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Sample records for cement production process

  1. [Release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Fei; Huang, Qi-Fei; Zhang, Xia; Yang, Yu; Wang, Qi

    2009-05-15

    Clinker was produced by Simulating cement calcination test, and concrete samples were also prepared according to national standard GB/T 17671-1999. Long-term cumulative release amount of heavy metals in cement product from co-processing waste in cement kiln was researched through leaching test which refers to EA NEN 7371 and EA NEN 7375, and one-dimensional diffusion model which is on the base of Fick diffusion law. The results show that availabilities of heavy metals are lower than the total amounts in concrete. The diffusion coefficients of heavy metals are different (Cr > As > Ni > Cd). During 30 years service, the cumulative release amounts of Cr, As, Ni and Cd are 4.43 mg/kg, 0.46 mg/kg, 1.50 mg/kg and 0.02 mg/kg, respectively, and the ratios of release which is the division of cumulative release amount and availability are 27.0%, 18.0%, 3.0% and 0.2%, respectively. The most important influence factor of cumulative release amount of heavy metal is the diffusion coefficient, and it is correlative to cumulative release amount. The diffusion coefficient of Cr and As should be controlled exactly in the processing of input the cement-kiln.

  2. Sulfur cement production using by products of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process and the FC4-1 cleaned soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bassam Masri, K.L.; Fullerton, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    An introductory set of experiments to show the feasibility of making sulfur cement were carried out at the University of Akron according to Parrett and Currett`s patent which requires the use of sulfur, a filler, a plasticizer, and a vulcanization accelerator. Small blocks of cement were made using byproducts of the perchloroethylene coal cleaning process. Extracted elemental and organic sulfur, ash and mineral matters from the float sink portion of the PCE process, and FC4-1 cleaned soil were used as substitutes for sulfur and filler needed for the production of sulfur cement. Leaching tests in different solutions and under different conditions were conducted on the sulfur blocks. Other tests such as strength, durability, resistance to high or low temperatures will be conducted in the future. Sulfur cement can be used as a sealing agent at a joint, roofing purposes, forming ornamental figures, and coating of exposed surfaces of iron or steel. When mixed with an aggregate, sulfur concrete is formed. This concrete can be used for structural members, curbings, guthers, slabs, and can be precast or cast at the job site. An advantage of sulfur cement over Portland cement is that it reaches its design strength in two to three hours after processing and it can be remelted and recast.

  3. Chromium behavior during cement-production processes: a clinkerization, hydration, and leaching study.

    PubMed

    Sinyoung, Suthatip; Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon; Asavapisit, Suwimol; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2011-07-15

    The behavior of chromium during the production of cement clinker, during the hydration of cement and during the leaching of cement mortars was investigated. The microstructures of clinker and mortar properties were investigated using free lime, XRD, SEM/EDS, and TG/DTA techniques. Chromium was found to be incorporated in the clinker phase. The formation of new chromium compounds such as Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15), Ca(5)Cr(3)O(12), Ca(5)Cr(2)SiO(12), and CaCr(2)O(7), with chromium oxidation states of +3, +4.6, +5, and +6, respectively, was detected. After the hydration process, additional chromium compounds were identified in the mortar matrix, including Ca(5)(CrO(4))(3)OH, CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), with chromium oxidation states of +4.6, +6, and +6, respectively. Additionally, some species of chromium, such as Cr(3+) from Ca(6)Al(4)Cr(2)O(15) and Cr(6+) from CaCr(2)O(7), CaCrO(4)·2H(2)O, and Al(2)(OH)(4)CrO(4), were leached during leaching tests, whereas other species remained in the mortar. The concentrations of chromium that leached from the mortar following U.S. EPA Method 1311 and EA NEN 7375:2004 leaching tests were higher than limits set by the U.S. EPA and the Environment Agency of England and Wales related to hazardous waste disposal in landfills. Thus, waste containing chromium should not be allowed to mix with raw materials in the cement manufacturing process.

  4. Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) Program: Improved Materials and Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements - Field Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    compositions of material- are currently used for scaling portland cement concrete (PCC) joints . These materials vary widely in chemi- cal complexity...PRODUCTIVITY ADVANCEMENT RESEARCH (CPAR) PROGRAM Improved Materials and Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements...Processes for Sealing and Resealing Joints in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements-Field Evaluation by Larry N. Lynch, Dewey W. White Accesion

  5. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted

  6. Identifying improvement potentials in cement production with life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Michael Elias; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2010-12-01

    Cement production is an environmentally relevant process responsible for 5% of total anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions and 7% of industrial fuel use. In this study, life cycle assessment is used to evaluate improvement potentials in the cement production process in Europe and the USA. With a current fuel substitution rate of 18% in Europe and 11% in the USA, both regions have a substantial potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save virgin resources by further increasing the coprocessing of waste fuels. Upgrading production technology would be particularly effective in the USA where many kiln systems with very low energy efficiency are still in operation. Using best available technology and a thermal substitution rate of 50% for fuels, greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced by 9% for Europe and 18% for the USA per tonne of cement. Since clinker production is the dominant pollution producing step in cement production, the substitution of clinker with mineral components such as ground granulated blast furnace slag or fly ash is an efficient measure to reduce the environmental impact. Blended cements exhibit substantially lower environmental footprints than Portland cement, even if the substitutes feature lower grindability and require additional drying and large transport distances. The highest savings in CO(2) emissions and resource consumption are achieved with a combination of measures in clinker production and cement blending.

  7. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, L. H.

    1985-12-03

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight monoor copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  8. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  9. Evaluation of a lime-mediated sewage sludge stabilisation process. Product characterisation and technological validation for its use in the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N Husillos; Granados, R J; Blanco-Varela, M T; Cortina, J L; Martínez-Ramírez, S; Marsal, M; Guillem, M; Puig, J; Fos, C; Larrotcha, E; Flores, J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes an industrial process for stabilising sewage sludge (SS) with lime and evaluates the viability of the stabilised product, denominated Neutral, as a raw material for the cement industry. Lime not only stabilised the sludge, raised the temperature of the mix to 80-100°C, furthering water evaporation, portlandite formation and the partial oxidation of the organic matter present in the sludge. Process mass and energy balances were determined. Neutral, a white powder consisting of portlandite (49.8%), calcite (16.6%), inorganic oxides (13.4%) and organic matter and moisture (20.2%), proved to be technologically apt for inclusion as a component in cement raw mixes. In this study, it was used instead of limestone in raw mixes clinkerised at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. These raw meals exhibited greater reactivity at high temperatures than the limestone product and their calcination at 1500°C yielded clinker containing over 75% calcium silicates, the key phases in Portland clinker. Finally, the two types of raw meal (Neutral and limestone) were observed to exhibit similar mineralogy and crystal size and distribution.

  10. Microscale Investigation of Arsenic Distribution and Species in Cement Product from Cement Kiln Coprocessing Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4. PMID:24223030

  11. Microscale investigation of arsenic distribution and species in cement product from cement kiln coprocessing wastes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Xue, Jingchuan; Huang, Qifei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the immobilization mechanism and the leaching risk of Arsenic (As) in the cement product from coprocessing wastes using cement kiln, distribution and species of As in cement product were determined by microscale investigation methods, including electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In this study, sodium arsenate crystals (Na3AsO412H2O) were mixed with cement production raw materials and calcined to produce cement clinker. Then, clinker was mixed water to prepare cement paste. EPMA results showed that As was generally distributed throughout the cement paste. As content in calcium silicate hydrates gel (C-S-H) was in low level, but higher than that in other cement mineral phases. This means that most of As is expected to form some compounds that disperse on the surfaces of cement mineral phases. Linear combination fitting (LCF) of the X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra revealed that As in the cement paste was predominantly As(V) and mainly existed as Mg3(AsO4)2, Ca3(AsO4)2, and Na2HAsO4.

  12. Utilization of red mud in cement production: a review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Na

    2011-10-01

    Red mud is a solid waste residue of the digestion of bauxite ores with caustic soda for alumina production. Its disposal remains a worldwide issue in terms of environmental concerns. During the past decades, extensive work has been done by a lot of researchers to develop various economic ways for the utilization of red mud. One of the economic ways is using red mud in cement production, which is also an efficient method for large-scale recycling of red mud. This paper provides a review on the utilization of red mud in cement production, and it clearly points out three directions for the use of red mud in cement production, namely the preparation of cement clinkers, production of composite cements as well as alkali-activated cements. In the present paper, the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of red mud are summarized, and the current progresses on these three directions are reviewed in detail.

  13. Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?

    SciTech Connect

    Buttress, Adam Jones, Aled; Kingman, Sam

    2015-02-15

    Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

  14. Control of structurization processes in wood-cement systems at fixed pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotina, Natalia; Gorlenko, Nikolay; Sarkisov, Yuriy; Naumova, Ludmila; Minakova, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a study of structurization processes in the wood-cement systemmixed with the buffer solutions and the improvement of service properties of products produced therefrom. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray phase analysis, and pH measurements show that structurization processes in wood-cement systems depend on the acidity of aqueous solution, the behavior of hydration, neutralization, and polycondensation reactions with the formation of polymer products including those with cement grout components and functional groups of wood. It is shown that phosphate buffer solutions used for mixing wood-cement compositions improve their strength properties and reduce water absorption. The optimum acidity of the buffered medium for service properties of the wood-cement systemis pH = 4.8.

  15. Sustainable cement production-present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Romer, M.; Tschudin, M.; Bolio, H.

    2011-07-15

    Cement will remain the key material to satisfy global housing and modern infrastructure needs. As a consequence, the cement industry worldwide is facing growing challenges in conserving material and energy resources, as well as reducing its CO{sub 2} emissions. According to the International Energy Agency, the main levers for cement producers are the increase in energy efficiency and the use of alternative materials, be it as fuel or raw materials. Accordingly, the use of alternative fuels has already increased significantly in recent years, but potential for further increases still exists. In cement, the reduction of the clinker factor remains a key priority: tremendous progress has already been made. Nevertheless, appropriate materials are limited in their regional availability. New materials might be able to play a role as cement constituents in the future. It remains to be seen to what extent they could substitute Portland cement clinker to a significant degree.

  16. Use of MRF residue as alternative fuel in cement production.

    PubMed

    Fyffe, John R; Breckel, Alex C; Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Single-stream recycling has helped divert millions of metric tons of waste from landfills in the U.S., where recycling rates for municipal solid waste are currently over 30%. However, material recovery facilities (MRFs) that sort the municipal recycled streams do not recover 100% of the incoming material. Consequently, they landfill between 5% and 15% of total processed material as residue. This residue is primarily composed of high-energy-content non-recycled plastics and fiber. One possible end-of-life solution for these energy-dense materials is to process the residue into Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) that can be used as an alternative energy resource capable of replacing or supplementing fuel resources such as coal, natural gas, petroleum coke, or biomass in many industrial and power production processes. This report addresses the energetic and environmental benefits and trade-offs of converting non-recycled post-consumer plastics and fiber derived from MRF residue streams into SRF for use in a cement kiln. An experimental test burn of 118 Mg of SRF in the precalciner portion of the cement kiln was conducted. The SRF was a blend of 60% MRF residue and 40% post-industrial waste products producing an estimated 60% plastic and 40% fibrous material mixture. The SRF was fed into the kiln at 0.9 Mg/h for 24h and then 1.8 Mg/h for the following 48 h. The emissions data recorded in the experimental test burn were used to perform the life-cycle analysis portion of this study. The analysis included the following steps: transportation, landfill, processing and fuel combustion at the cement kiln. The energy use and emissions at each step is tracked for the two cases: (1) The Reference Case, where MRF residue is disposed of in a landfill and the cement kiln uses coal as its fuel source, and (2) The SRF Case, in which MRF residue is processed into SRF and used to offset some portion of coal use at the cement kiln. The experimental test burn and accompanying analysis indicate

  17. Bone cement product and failure in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Øystein; Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif I; Furnes, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone cement market for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Norway has been dominated by a few products and distributors. Palacos with gentamicin had a market share exceeding 90% before 2005, but it was then withdrawn from the market and replaced by new slightly altered products. We have compared the survival of TKAs fixated with Palacos with gentamicin with the survival of TKAs fixated with the bone cements that took over the market. Patients and methods — Using data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register for the period 1997–2013, we included 26,147 primary TKAs in the study. The inclusion criteria were TKAs fixated with the 5 most used bone cements and the 5 most common total knee prostheses for that time period. 6-year Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were established for each cement product. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the association between bone cement product and revision risk. Separate analyses were performed with revision for any reason and revision due to deep infection within 1 year postoperatively as endpoints. Adjustments were made for age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis brand. Results — Survival was similar for the prostheses in the follow-up period, between the 5 bone cements included: Palacos with gentamicin, Refobacin Palacos R, Refobacin Bone Cement R (Refobacin BCR), Optipac Refobacin Bone Cement R (Optipac Refobacin BCR), and Palacos R + G. Interpretation — According to our findings, the use of the new bone cements led to a survival rate that was as good as with the old bone cement (Palacos with gentamicin). PMID:27841713

  18. [Atmospheric emission of PCDD/Fs from modern dry processing cement kilns with preheating in the southwest area, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Lu, Yi; Jian, Chuan; Guo, Zhi-Shun; Zhu, Ming-Ji; Deng, Li; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Six cement kilns were measured for emissions of PCDD/Fs in the Southwest Area, China. The results indicated that the emission levels of PCDD/Fs were 0.0029-0.0062 ng-m(-3) (Average, 0.0043 ng X m(-3)) from cement kilns which did not burn solid waste, and 0.028 ng X m(-3) from co-processing sewage sludge in cement kiln. The levels of PCDD/Fs emissions from cement manufacturing in the Southwest Area were significantly below the national emissions standard (0.1 ng x m(-3)). Emission factors of PCDD/Fs from the six cement kilns varied between 0.0089 and 0.084 microg x t(-1) cement, which were near or below the lowest emission factor reported by UNEP in 2005. Moreover, the emission factor of PCDD/Fs from co-processing sewage sludge in cement kiln was 7.6 times of the average factors from the other five cement kilns. Moreover,congener distribution of PCDD/F in stack gas from the two types of cement kilns was very different. The results showed that modern dry process cement kilns with preheating have lower emissions of PCDD/Fs. This suggested that the product of co-processing solid waste in cement kilns should be largely enhanced in China in future.

  19. Crack initiation processes in acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Sinnett-Jones, P E; Browne, M; Moffat, A J; Jeffers, J R T; Saffari, N; Buffière, J-Y; Sinclair, I

    2009-06-15

    A major constraint in improving the understanding of the micromechanics of the fatigue failure process and, hence, in optimizing bone cement performance is found in the uncertainties associated with monitoring the evolution of the internal defects that are believed to dominate in vivo failure. The present study aimed to synthesize high resolution imaging with complementary damage monitoring/detection techniques. As a result, evidence of the chronology of failure has been obtained. The earliest stages of crack initiation have been captured and it is proposed that, in the presence of a pore, crack initiation may occur away from the pore due to the combined influence of pore morphology and the presence of defects within regions of stress concentration. Furthermore, experimental evidence shows that large agglomerations of BaSO(4) are subject to microcracking during fatigue, although in the majority of cases, these are not the primary cause of failure. It is proposed that cracks may then remain contained within the agglomerations because of the clamping effect of the matrix during volumetric shrinkage upon curing.

  20. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials.

  1. Carbon dioxide capture from a cement manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Blount, Gerald C.; Falta, Ronald W.; Siddall, Alvin A.

    2011-07-12

    A process of manufacturing cement clinker is provided in which a clean supply of CO.sub.2 gas may be captured. The process also involves using an open loop conversion of CaO/MgO from a calciner to capture CO.sub.2 from combustion flue gases thereby forming CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2. The CaCO.sub.3/CaMg(CO.sub.3).sub.2 is then returned to the calciner where CO.sub.2 gas is evolved. The evolved CO.sub.2 gas, along with other evolved CO.sub.2 gases from the calciner are removed from the calciner. The reactants (CaO/MgO) are feed to a high temperature calciner for control of the clinker production composition.

  2. Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-26

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

  3. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  4. Aluminum dross oxide products for the portland cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zuck, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recovery of aluminum metal from drosses is a major factor in the recyclability success story enjoyed by the United States aluminum industry. Today`s modern dross processor uses the latest technology to maximize metal recovery at the lowest cost while complying with all environmental laws and regulations. Most dross processors, however, pay little attention to the resulting saltcake, the end residual of dross recycling, and rely on landfills for disposition of this material. The alternative is to recycle the saltcake, but the success of this technology is dependent on the development of reliable outlets for each of the saltcake constituents. This paper discusses the evolution of an aluminum dross oxide processing technology that produces an economically attractive source of alumina for the production of portland cement.

  5. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

  6. Hydraulic behavior of calcium sulfoaluminate-based cements derived from industrial process wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Beretka, J.; Sherman, N. . Div. of Building); Vito, B. de . Dipt. di Ingegneria dei Materiali e della Produzione); Santoro, L. . Dipt. di Chimica); Valenti, G.L. . Dipt. di Ingegneria e Fisica dell'Ambiente)

    1993-09-01

    The manufacture of cements based on calcium sulfoaluminate (C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]) [In this paper, the notation adopted in cement chemistry, vis. C=CO, A=Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], [bar S]=SO[sub 3], S=SiO[sub 2], and H=H[sub 2]O, has been used.] requires lower firing temperatures and lower grinding energy, as compared to ordinary Portland cements (OPC). Some of these low-energy cements can be formulated in order to develop high early strength and other performances similar to OPC. Further interest towards these types of cements relies on the possibility of using industrial process wastes as raw materials for their manufacture. It has been found that a number of industrial wastes and by-products such as phosphogypsum, bauxite fines, fly ash and blast furnace slag, can be employed without negatively affecting the hydraulic behavior of cements of planned C[sub 4]A[sub 3][bar S]:[beta]-C[sub 2]S:C[bar S] weight ratio 1.5:1:1. Blast furnace slag and fly ash can also be advantageously used as blending components of the fired products.

  7. Permeability Changes on Wellbore Cement Fractures Modified by Geochemical and Geomechanical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, K. A.; Um, W.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomography (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways and permeability, and cement fracture propagation with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Portland cement-basalt interface sample with artificial fractures was prepared to study the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects caused by subsurface activities. Cement-basalt interface sample was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the chemical reaction. CFD modeling was performed to simulate flow of supercritical CO2 within the fractures before and after the application of mechanical stress. The model results highlighted the complex flow characteristics within the fracture and also changes in flow patterns due to application of geomechanical stress. The CFD model predicted ~45% increase in permeability after the application of geomechanical force, which increases the fracture aperture. The same sample was reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater with impurity H2S (1 wt.%) at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Even after a 3.5-month reaction with CO2-H2S-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa, CaCO3 (s) precipitation occurred more extensively within the cement fracture rather than along the cement-basalt interfaces. Micro X-ray diffraction analysis also showed that major cement carbonation products of CO2-saturated groundwater reacting with impurity H2S were calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, consistent with cement carbonation by pure CO2-saturated groundwater, while pyrite was not identified due to low H2S content. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated

  8. Novorossiysk agglomeration landscapes and cement production: geochemical impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, A. V.; Pashkevich, M. A.

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with assessing the environmental impact of marl mining and cement production in Novorossiysk city (Krasnodar krai, Russia). The existing methods of studying the environmental effects caused by the cement industry have been reviewed. Soil and aquatic vegetation sampling has been carried out and the gross concentration of metals in the samples has been defined. The research has been conducted in the certified and accredited laboratory using emission spectral analysis. The external control has been carried out via X-ray fluorescence analysis. Based on the collected data, main chemical pollutants in soil cover and water area near the cement plant have been identified. The contaminants released by urban enterprises and motor vehicle emissions, as well as fugitive dust from dumps and the cement factory, lead to multi-element lithogeochemical anomaly at geochemical barriers in soils. Accumulation of pollutants in soil depends on the type of land use and the area relief. The most contaminated aquatic landscapes have been identified in the inner bay. According to this information, the technical proposals can be prepared for environmental safety management in strongly polluted city areas, as well as for the reclamation design in the areas currently experiencing the negative impact of cement production.

  9. India's cement industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1999-07-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's cement sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. Analysis shows that in the twenty year period, 1973 to 1993, productivity in the aluminum sector increased by 0.8% per annum. An econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's cement sector has been biased towards the use of energy and capital, while it has been material and labor saving. The increase in productivity was mainly driven by a period of progress between 1983 and 1991 following partial decontrol of the cement sector in 1982. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency in the sector. Their analysis shows that the Indian cement sector is moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use. However, substantial further energy savings and carbon reduction potentials still exist.

  10. Formulation of criteria for pollution control on cement products produced from solid wastes in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufei; Huang, Qifei; Yang, Yu; Huang, Zechun; Wang, Qi

    2011-08-01

    The process of producing cement products from solid waste can increase the level of pollutants in the cement products. Therefore, it is very important to establish a pollution control standard for cement products to protect the environment and human health. This paper presents acceptance limits for the availability of heavy metals in cement products which have been produced from solid wastes and explains how the limits have been calculated. The approach and method used to formulate these criteria were based on EN 12920. The typical exposure scenarios used in this paper involve concrete being used for drinking water supply pipelines and concrete pavements and are based on an analysis of typical applications of cement in China, and the potential for contact with water. The parameters of a tank test which was based on NEN 7375 were set in accordance with the environmental conditions of typical scenarios in China. Mechanisms controlling the release of heavy metals in concrete and a model for that release were obtained using the leaching test. Finally, based on acceptance criteria for drinking water and groundwater quality in China, limit values for the availability of heavy metals in concrete were calculated.

  11. Glass recycling in cement production--an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guohua; Lee, Harry; Young, King Lun; Yue, Po Lock; Wong, Adolf; Tao, Thomas; Choi, Ka Keung

    2002-01-01

    An innovative approach of using waste glass in cement production was proposed and tested in a laboratory and cement production plant. The laboratory characterization of 32 types of glass show that the chemical composition of glass does not vary significantly with its color or origin but depends on its application. The alkali content of glass, a major concern for cement production varies from 0 to 22%. For the glass bottles mainly found in Hong Kong waste glasses, the alkali content (Na2O) ranges from 10 to 19% with an average around 15%. There is no significant change of the SO2 content in the gas exhaust of the rotary kiln when about 1.8 t/h of glass bottles were loaded along with the 280-290 t/h raw materials. The content of NOx, mainly depends on the temperature of the kiln, does not show significant change either. The SO3 content of the clinker is comparable with that obtained without the loading of glass. The alkaline content shows a slight increase but still within three times the standard deviation obtained from the statistical data of the past year. The detailed analysis of the quality of the cement product shows that there is not any significant impact of glass for the feeding rate tested.

  12. Evaluation of cement production using a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    DeLallo, M.; Eshbach, R.

    1994-01-01

    There are several primary conclusions which can be reached and used to define research required in establishing the feasibility of using PFBC-derived materials as cement feedstock. 1. With appropriate blending almost any material containing the required cement-making materials can be utilized to manufacture cement. However, extensive blending with multiple materials or the use of ash in relatively small quantities would compromise the worth of this concept. 2. The composition of a potential feedstock must be considered not only with respect to the presence of required materials, but just as significantly, with respect to the presence and concentration of known deleterious materials. 3. The processing costs for rendering the feedstock into an acceptable composition and the energy costs associated with both processing and burning must be considered. It should be noted that the cost of energy to produce cement, expressed as a percentage of the price of the product is higher than for any other major industrial product. Energy consumption is, therefore, a major issue. 4. The need for conformance to environmental regulations has a profound effect on the cement industry since waste materials can neither be discharged to the atmosphere or be shipped to a landfill. 5. Fifth, the need for achieving uniformity in the composition of the cement is critical to controlling its quality. Unfortunately, certain materials in very small concentrations have the capability to affect the rate and extent to which the cementitious compound in portland cement are able to form. Particularly critical are variations in the ash, the sulfur content of the coal or the amount and composition of the stack dust returned to the kiln.

  13. Influence of the processed sunflower oil on the cement properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleysher, A. U.; Tokarchuk, V. V.; Sviderskiy, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Used oils (vegetable oil, animal oil, engine oil, etc.), which are essentially industrial wastes, have found application as secondary raw materials in some braches of industry. In particular, the only well-known and commonly-used way of utilizing wastes of vegetable oils is to apply them as raw materials in the production of biodiesel. The goal of the present study is to develop a conceptually new way of vegetable oil wastes utilization in the building industry. The test admixture D-148 was obtained from the processing of wastes of sunflower oil and it mainly consists of fatty acid diethanolamide. The test admixture was added to the cement system for the purpose of studying its influence on water demand, flowability, setting times, compressive strength and moisture adsorption. The test admixture D-148 at the optimal content 0. 2 weight % causes 10% decrease in water demand, 1.7 time increase in flowability (namely spread diameter), 23% increase in grade strength and 34% decrease in moisture adsorption. The results of the present investigation make it possible to consider the final product of the waste sunflower oil processing as multifunctional plasticizing-waterproofing admixture.

  14. [Comparison of fixation effects of heavy metals between cement rotary kiln co-processing and cement solidification/stabilization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-li; Liu, Jian-guo; Li, Cheng; Jin, Yi-ying; Nie, Yong-feng

    2008-04-01

    Both cement rotary kiln co-processing hazardous wastes and cement solidification/stabilization could dispose heavy metals by fixation. Different fixation mechanisms lead to different fixation effects. The same amount of heavy metal compounds containing As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn were treated by the two kinds of fixation technologies. GB leaching test, TCLP tests and sequential extraction procedures were employed to compare the fixation effects of two fixation technologies. The leached concentration and chemical species distribution of heavy metals in two grounded mortar samples were analyzed and the fixation effects of two kinds of technologies to different heavy metals were compared. The results show the fixation effect of cement rotary kiln co-processing technology is better than cement solidification/stabilization technology to As, Pb, Zn. Calcinations in cement rotary kiln and then hydration help As, Pb, Zn contained in hazardous wastes transform to more steady chemical species and effectively dispose these heavy metals compounds. Cr3+ is liable to be converted to much more toxic and more mobile Cr6+ state in cement rotary kiln. And so Cr wastes are more fit for treatment by cement solidification/stabilization technology. The work could provide a basis when choosing disposal technologies for different heavy metals and be helpful to improve the application and development of cement rotary kiln co-processing hazardous wastes.

  15. Processing and Properties of Chemically Derived Calcium Silicate Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    1991 Air Force Grant No. AFOSR-88-0184 Prepared for AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ELECTRONIC AND MATERIAL SCIENCES DIRECTORATE Principal...Heiland, Processing and Properties of Chemically Derived Calcium Silicate Cement. Master of Science , Solid State Science , The Pennsylvania State...University, May 1990. Appendix IV Kelly Markowski, A Fundamental Study of the Surface Chemistry of Calcium Silicate Hydrate, Bachelor of Science Thesis

  16. Potential use of pyrite cinders as raw material in cement production: results of industrial scale trial operations.

    PubMed

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Yazici, E Y; Türk, T; Süngün, Y H

    2009-07-15

    Pyrite cinders, which are the waste products of sulphuric acid manufacturing plants, contain hazardous heavy metals with potential environmental risks for disposal. In this study, the potential use of pyrite cinders (PyCs) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker was demonstrated at the industrial scale. The chemical and mineralogical analyses of the PyC sample used in this study have revealed that it is essentially a suitable raw material for use as iron source since it contains >87% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The samples of the clinkers produced from PyC in the industrial scale trial operation of 6 months were tested for the conformity of their chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products. The data were compared with the clinker products of the iron ore, which is used as the raw material for the production Portland cement clinker in the plant. The chemical compositions of all the clinker products of PyC appeared to conform to those of the iron ore clinker, and hence, a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the mortars prepared from the PyC clinker was found to be consistent with those of the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. It can be inferred from the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) that PyC could be a potential source of heavy metal pollution while the mortar samples obtained from the PyC clinkers present no environmental problems. These findings suggest that the waste pyrite cinders can be readily used as iron source for the production of Portland cement. The availability of PyC in large quantities at low cost provides further significant benefits for the management/environmental practices of these wastes and for the reduction of mining and processing costs of cement raw materials.

  17. Expansive Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-01

    either burned simultaneously with a portland ce4nt or !r;terground with portland cement clinker ; Type M - a mixture of portland cement, calcium-aluminate... clinker that is interground with portland clinker or blended with portland cement or, alternately, it may be formed simul- taneously vrith the portland ... clinker compounds during the burning process. 3. Expansive cement, Type M is either a mixture of portland cement, calcium aluminate cement, and calcium

  18. Emerging Energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} Emission-reduction Technologies for Cement and Concrete Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn; Lin, Elina

    2012-04-06

    Globally, the cement industry accounts for approximately 5 percent of current anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. World cement demand and production are increasing significantly, leading to an increase in this industry's absolute energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Development of new energy-efficiency and CO{sub 2} emission-reduction technologies and their deployment in the market will be key for the cement industry's mid- and long-term climate change mitigation strategies. This report is an initial effort to compile available information on process description, energy savings, environmental and other benefits, costs, commercialization status, and references for emerging technologies to reduce the cement industry's energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions. Although studies from around the world identify a variety of sector-specific and cross-cutting energy-efficiency technologies for the cement industry that have already been commercialized, information is scarce and/or scattered regarding emerging or advanced energy-efficiency and low-carbon technologies that are not yet commercialized. This report consolidates available information on nineteen emerging technologies for the cement industry, with the goal of providing engineers, researchers, investors, cement companies, policy makers, and other interested parties with easy access to a well-structured database of information on these technologies.

  19. Feasibility of using reject fly ash in cement-based stabilization/solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, C.S.; Qiao, X.C.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Lin, Z.S.

    2006-01-15

    Stabilization/solidification (s/s) has been routinely used for the final treatment of hazardous wastes prior to land disposal. These processes involve adding one or more solidifying reagents into the waste to transform it into a monolithic solid with improved structural integrity. Cement-based systems with partial replacement by pulverized fuel ash (PFA) have been widely used to minimize leaching of contaminants from hazardous wastes. The finer fraction of PFA ({lt}45 {mu} m, fine fly ash, MA), produced by passing the raw ash through a classifying process is commonly used in s/s processes. Low-grade fly ash is rejected (rFA) from the ash classifying process, and is largely unused due to high carbon content and large particle size but represents a significant proportion of PFA. This paper presents experimental results of a study that has assessed the feasibility of using rFA in the cement-based s/s of a synthetic heavy metal waste. Results were compared to mixes containing fFA. The strength results show that cement-based waste forms with rFA replacement are suitable for disposal at landfill and that the addition of heavy metal sludge can increase the degree of hydration of fly ash and decrease the porosity of samples. Adding Ca(OH){sub 2} and flue gas desulphurization sludge reduces the retarding effect of heavy metals on strength development. The results of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and Dynamic Leach Test show that rFA can be used in cement-based s/s wastes without compromising performance of the product.

  20. Review on Sintering Process of WC-Co Cemented Carbide in Metal Injection Molding Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathabrao, M.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview on sintering process of WC-Co cemented carbides in metal injection molding technology. Metal injection molding is an advanced and promising technology in producing cemented nanostructured carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal is known for its high hardness and wear resistance in various applications. Moreover, areas include fine grained materials, alternative binders, and alternative sintering techniques has been discussed in this paper.

  1. Effects of co-processing sewage sludge in cement kiln on NOx, NH3 and PAHs emissions.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dong; Zhu, Tianle; Liu, Runwei; Lv, Qingzhi; Sun, Ye; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fan

    2016-09-01

    The effects of co-processing sewage sludge in cement kiln on NOx, NH3 and PAHs emissions were systematically investigated in a cement production line in Beijing. The results show that co-processing the sewage sludge was helpful to reduce NOx emission, which primarily depends on the NH3 amount released from the sewage sludge. Meanwhile, NOx and NH3 concentrations in the flue gas have a negative correlation, and the contribution of feeding the sewage sludge to NOx removal decreased with the increase of injection amount of ammonia water in the SNCR system. Therefore, it is suggested that the injection amount of ammonia water in SNCR system may reduce to cut down the operating costs during co-processing the sewage sludge in cement kiln. In addition, the emission of total PAHs seems to increase with the increased amount of the sewage sludge feeding to the cement kiln. However, the distributions of PAHs were barely changed, and lower molecular weight PAHs were mainly distributed in gaseous phase, accounted for the major portion of PAHs when co-processing sewage sludge in cement kiln.

  2. [Hygienic characteristics of work conditions for main occupations in asbestos cement production of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Kundiev, Iu I; Cherniuk, V I; Karakashian, A N; Kucheruk, T K; Martynovskaia, T Iu; Demetskaia, A V; Sal'nikova, N A; Chuĭ, T S; Piatnitsa-Gorpinchenko, N K

    2008-01-01

    Studies covered of work conditions for main occupations in asbestos cement production of Ukraine. Studies covered work conditions and occupational features of workers engaged into main occupations in asbestos cement enterprises of Ukraine. Parameters presented characterize ambient air state, microclimate conditions, levels of noise and vibration, work intensity and hardness.

  3. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing Processes Based on Emergy and Ecological Footprint Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housin...

  4. Distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing municipal waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zhao, Yuyang; Li, Li; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Fu, Jianjie; Li, Chunping; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-07-01

    Co-processing municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash in cement kilns is challenging because the unintentional production of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during the process is not well understood. The distributions, profiles and formation mechanisms of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) as new POPs covered under Stockholm Convention in two cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash were studied. The average concentrations of PCNs in stack gas samples were 710 ng m(-3). The PCN concentration in particle samples collected from different process stages in the cement kilns ranged from 1.1 to 84.7 ng g(-1). Three process sites including suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and the kiln back-end bag filter were identified to be the major formation sites of PCNs in cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash. The PCN distribution patterns were similar to that of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/Fs), which indicates the possibility for simultaneous control of PCNs and PCDD/Fs in cement kilns co-processing fly ash. Chlorination was suggested to be an important formation mechanism of PCNs, and chlorination pathways of PCN congeners are proposed based on the congener profiles. Thermodynamic calculations, including relative thermal energies (ΔE) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG), and the charge densities of the carbon atoms in PCN supported the proposed chlorination mechanisms for PCN formation. The results presented in this study might provide helpful information for developing techniques and strategies to control PCN emissions during cement kilns co-processing MSWI fly ash.

  5. Wide-scale utilization of MSWI fly ashes in cement production and its impact on average heavy metal contents in cements: The case of Austria.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Jakob; Trinkel, Verena; Fellner, Johann

    2017-02-01

    A number of studies present the utilization of fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) in cement production as a recycling alternative to landfilling. While there is a lot of research on the impact of MSWI fly ashes utilization in cement production on the quality of concrete or the leaching of heavy metals, only a few studies have determined the resulting heavy metal content in cements caused by this MSWI fly ashes utilization. Making use of the case of Austria, this study (1) determines the total content of selected heavy metals in cements currently produced in the country, (2) designs a scenario and calculates the resulting heavy metal contents in cements assuming that all MSWI fly ashes from Austrian grate incinerators were used as secondary raw materials for Portland cement clinker production and (3) evaluates the legal recyclability of demolished concretes produced from MSWI fly ash amended cements based on their total heavy metal contents. To do so, data from literature and statistics are combined in a material flow analysis model to calculate the average total contents of heavy metals in cements and in the resulting concretes according to the above scenario. The resulting heavy metal contents are then compared (i) to their respective limit values for cements as defined in a new technical guideline in Austria (BMLFUW, 2016), and (ii) to their respective limit values for recycling materials from demolished concrete. Results show that MSWI fly ashes utilization increases the raw material input in cement production by only +0.9%, but the total contents of Cd by +310%, and Hg, Pb, and Zn by +70% to +170%. However these and other heavy metal contents are still below their respective limit values for Austrian cements. The same legal conformity counts for recycling material derived from concretes produced from the MSWI fly ash cements. However, if the MSWI fly ash ratio in all raw materials used for cement production were increased from 0.9% to 22

  6. Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

  7. Profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in cement kilns co-processing solid waste.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Zhan, Jiayu; Liu, Guorui; Zhao, Yuyang; Zheng, Minghui; Yang, Lili; Wang, Mei

    2017-05-01

    Co-incineration of sewage sludge in cement kilns can be used for its disposal. In the present study, samples were collected from three cement production runs where sewage sludge and other wastes (e.g. municipal solid waste, waste acid and wet sewage sludge) were co-processed. The samples were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The dioxin-like (dl)-PCB concentrations in the stack gases from run 1, 2, and 3 were 344.6, 548.7, and 104.3 pg m(-3), respectively. The toxic equivalency (TEQs) values for runs 1, 2, and 3 were 5.6, 8.9, and 0.7 pg TEQ Nm(-3), respectively. Calculation of net emissions for the three runs indicated that the co-incineration of other waste in addition to sewage sludge in cement kilns would not increase emission of the dl-PCBs. PCB concentrations in samples from the suspension boiler and humidifier tower, kiln-end bag filter, and cyclone preheater were much higher than those in samples from the kiln head area, indicating that these stages will be important for controlling PCB formation. Chlorinated biphenyl (CB)-77, CB-105 and CB-118 were the major dl-PCB congeners, CB-52, CB-101 were the major indicator PCB congeners, and tetra-CB to hexa-CB were the major homologues for the total input or output materials.

  8. Ultrasonic Characterization of the Curing Process of Polymethylmethacrylate-based Bone Cement Modified with Hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viano, Ann; Auwarter, Julie; Hoffmeister, Brent; Rho, Jae-Young

    2000-03-01

    The use of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based bone cement for implantation of metallic prostheses is becoming increasingly common. Failure of a cemented prosthesis often occurs when there is weak bonding at the bone/cement or cement/metal interface. The addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles, a synthetically produced version of the natural mineral in bone, may improve the adhesion by promoting bone growth into the cement itself. The curing time of PMMA bone cement determines the speed of implant insertion, which can affect the mechanical strength of the cement. Pure PMMA has a well-characterized curing time of 9-12 minutes, depending on environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. By measuring the propagation of ultrasonic pulses through a sample of bone cement, the curing process can be monitored. As the material hardens, the velocity of an ultrasonic pulse increases, and the attenuation decreases. These parameters were measured as a function of time for PMMA mixed with 0, 10 and 30investigation of the curing process as a function of hydroxyapatite concentration.

  9. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    process. It was observed in the laboratory simulated production of fluoride cement, that the clinkering temperature is much lower (around 1 170 °C) compared to that for the production of ordinary Portland cement. The other observed differences were attributed to the different mineralogical composition as a result of fluoride incorporation into the cement. While fluorine content is very minimal in fluoride cement, not more than 2 %, the resulting cementitious products are altered significantly as was observed from the study. Part of the experimental results has been used as reference material in the preparation of a draft Malawi Standard on fluoride cement. This draft standard will be submitted to the Malawi Bureau of Standards for further processing before it can be officially endorsed as a Malawi Standard.

  10. 76 FR 34252 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; Portland Cement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Cement Association Notice is hereby given that, on May 12, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Portland Cement... specified circumstances. Specifically, Drake Cement, LLC, Scottsdale, AZ; Argos USA Corporation, Houston,...

  11. Utilization of municipal sewage sludge as additives for the production of eco-cement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yiming; Zhou, Shaoqi; Li, Fuzhen; Lin, Yixiao

    2012-04-30

    The effects of using dried sewage sludge as additive on cement property in the process of clinker burning were investigated in this paper. The eco-cement samples were prepared by adding 0.50-15.0% of dried sewage sludge to unit raw meal, and then the mixtures were burned at 1450 °C for 2 h. The results indicated that the major components in the eco-cement clinkers were similar to those in ordinary Portland cement. Although the C(2)S phase formation increased with the increase of sewage sludge content, it was also found that the microstructure of the mixture containing 15.0% sewage sludge in raw meal was significantly different and that a larger amount of pores were distributed in the clinker. Moreover, all the eco-cement pastes had a longer initial setting time and final setting time than those of plain cement paste, which increased as the sewage sludge content in the raw meal increased. All the eco-cement pastes had lower early flexural strengths, which increased as the sewage sludge content increased, while the compressive strengths decreased slightly. However, this had no significant effect on all the strengths at later stages. Furthermore, the leaching concentrations of all the types of eco-cement clinkers met the standard of Chinese current regulatory thresholds.

  12. Sustainability of cement kiln co-processing of wastes in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Baidya, Rahul; Ghosh, Sadhan Kumar; Parlikar, Ulhas V

    2017-02-28

    Co-processing in cement kiln achieves effective utilization of the material and energy value present in the wastes, thereby conserving the natural resources by reducing the use of virgin material. In India, a number of multifolded initiatives have been taken that take into account the potential and volume of waste generation. This paper studies the factors which might influence the sustainability of co-processing of waste in cement kilns as a business model, considering the issues and challenges in the supply chain framework in India in view of the four canonical pillars of sustainability. A pilot study on co-processing was carried out in one of the cement plant in India to evaluate the environmental performance, economical performance, operational performance and social performance. The findings will help India and other developing countries to introduce effective supply chain management for co-processing while addressing the issues and challenges during co-processing of different waste streams in the cement kilns.

  13. Examination of the jarosite-alunite precipitate addition in the raw meal for the production of sulfoaluminate cement clinker.

    PubMed

    Katsioti, M; Tsakiridis, P E; Leonardou-Agatzini, S; Oustadakis, P

    2006-04-17

    The aim of the present research work was to investigate the possibility of adding a jarosite-alunite chemical precipitate, a waste product of a new hydrometallurgical process developed to treat economically low-grade nickel oxides ores, in the raw meal for the production of sulfoaluminate cement clinker. For that reason, two samples of raw meals were prepared, one contained 20% gypsum, as a reference sample ((SAC)Ref) and another with 11.31% jarosite-alunite precipitate ((SAC)J/A). Both raw meals were sintered at 1300 degrees C. The results of chemical and mineralogical analyses as well as the microscopic examination showed that the use of the jarosite-alunite precipitate did not affect the mineralogical characteristics of the so produced sulfoaluminate cement clinker and there was confirmed the formation of the sulfoaluminate phase (C4A3S), the most typical phase of this cement type. Furthermore, both clinkers were tested by determining the grindability, setting time, compressive strength and expansibility. The hydration products were examined by XRD analysis at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. The results of the physico-mechanical tests showed that the addition of jarosite-alunite precipitate did not negatively affect the quality of the produced cement.

  14. Barnacle Balanus amphitrite adheres by a stepwise cementing process.

    PubMed

    Burden, Daniel K; Barlow, Daniel E; Spillmann, Christopher M; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Daniel; Everett, R K; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2012-09-18

    Barnacles adhere permanently to surfaces by secreting and curing a thin interfacial adhesive underwater. Here, we show that the acorn barnacle Balanus amphitrite adheres by a two-step fluid secretion process, both contributing to adhesion. We found that, as barnacles grow, the first barnacle cement secretion (BCS1) is released at the periphery of the expanding base plate. Subsequently, a second, autofluorescent fluid (BCS2) is released. We show that secretion of BCS2 into the interface results, on average, in a 2-fold increase in adhesive strength over adhesion by BCS1 alone. The two secretions are distinguishable both spatially and temporally, and differ in morphology, protein conformation, and chemical functionality. The short time window for BCS2 secretion relative to the overall area increase demonstrates that it has a disproportionate, surprisingly powerful, impact on adhesion. The dramatic change in adhesion occurs without measurable changes in interface thickness and total protein content. A fracture mechanics analysis suggests the interfacial material's modulus or work of adhesion, or both, were substantially increased after BCS2 secretion. Addition of BCS2 into the interface generates highly networked amyloid-like fibrils and enhanced phenolic content. Both intertwined fibers and phenolic chemistries may contribute to mechanical stability of the interface through physically or chemically anchoring interface proteins to the substrate and intermolecular interactions. Our experiments point to the need to reexamine the role of phenolic components in barnacle adhesion, long discounted despite their prevalence in structural membranes of arthropods and crustaceans, as they may contribute to chemical processes that strengthen adhesion through intermolecular cross-linking.

  15. PIXE characterization of by-products resulting from the zinc recycling of industrial cemented carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemantle, C. S.; Sacks, N.; Topic, M.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    By-product materials of the widely used zinc recycling process of cemented carbides have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-PIXE techniques have identified elemental concentrations, distributions and purity of by-product materials from an industrial zinc recycling plant. Cobalt surface enrichment, lamellar microstructures of varying composition, including alternating tungsten carbide (WC) grains and globular cobalt, and regions of excess zinc contamination were found in materials with incomplete zinc penetration. Liquid Co-Zn formation occurred above 72 wt.% Zn at the furnace temperature of 930 °C, and was extracted towards the surface of poorly zinc infiltrated material, primarily by the vacuum used for zinc distillation. Surface enrichment was not observed in material that was zinc infiltrated to the sample center, which was more friable and exhibited more homogeneous porosity and elemental concentrations. The result of incomplete zinc infiltration was an enriched surface zone of up to 60 wt.% Co, compared to an original sample composition of ∼10-15 wt.% Co. The impact on resulting powders could be higher or inhomogeneous cobalt content, as well as unacceptably high zinc concentrations. PIXE has proven it can be a powerful technique for solving industrial problems in the cemented carbide cutting tool industry, by identifying trace elements and their locations (such as Zn to 0.1 wt.% accuracy), as well as the distribution of major elements within WC-Co materials.

  16. In situ monitoring of the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement with ESEM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Wei; Zhang Yunsheng; Lin Wei; Liu Zhiyong

    2004-06-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) was used to in situ quantitatively study the hydration process of K-PS geopolymer cement under an 80% RH environment. An energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDXA) was also employed to distinguish the chemical composition of hydration product. The ESEM micrographs showed that metakaolin particles pack loosely at 10 min after mixing, resulting in the existence of many large voids. As hydration proceeds, a lot of gels were seen and gradually precipitated on the surfaces of these particles. At later stage, these particles were wrapped by thick gel layers and their interspaces were almost completely filled. The corresponding EDXA results illustrated that the molar ratios of K/Al increase while Si/Al decrease with the development of hydration. As a result, the molar ratios of K/Al and Si/Al of hydration products at an age of 4 h amounted to 0.99 and 1.49, respectively, which were close to the theoretical values (K/Al=1.0, Si/Al=1.0 for K-PS geopolymer cement paste). In addition, well-developed crystals could not been found at any ages; instead, spongelike amorphous gels were always been observed.

  17. Construction Productivity Advancement Research (CPAR) Program. Performance of Concretes Proportioned with Pyrament Blended Cement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    and summarized in this report was part of a joint research program which was cost-shared by the USACE CPAR program and Pyrament/Lone Star Industries...multiyear joint research project on high- performance blended hydraulic cement products. This agreement was enacted within the Corps. Because of the...and admixtures to control setting and reduce the water requirement. The cement composition includes a number of features that depart significantly

  18. Comparison of the fixation effects of heavy metals by cement rotary kiln co-processing and cement based solidification/stabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Cheng; Jin, Yiying; Nie, Yongfeng; Li, Jinhui

    2009-06-15

    Cement rotary kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes and cement based solidification/stabilization could both immobilize heavy metals. The different retention mechanisms of the two technologies lead to different fixation effects of heavy metals. The same amount of heavy metal compounds were treated by the two types of fixation technologies. Long-term leaching test (160 days), the maximum availability leaching test (NEN 7341) and a modified three-step sequential extraction procedure, proposed by the Commission of the European Communities Bureau of Reference (BCR) were employed to compare the fixation effects of the two fixation technologies. The leaching concentrations in NEN 7341 and long-term leaching tests were compared with identification standard for hazardous wastes (GB5085.3-1996) and drinking water standard (GB5749-2005). The results indicate that the leaching concentrations of the long-term leaching test and NEN 7341 test were lower than the regulatory limits and the leached ratios were small. Both cement based solidification/stabilization and cement rotary kiln co-processing could effectively fix heavy metals. Calcination in a cement rotary kiln and the following hydration that follows during cement application could fix As, Cd, Pb and Zn more effectively and decrease the release to the environment. Cement solidification/stabilization technology has better effect in immobilizing Cr and Ni. Cr wastes are more fitful to be treated by cement solidification/stabilization.

  19. Effect of carbon dioxide injection on production of wood cement composites from waste medium density fiberboard (MDF).

    PubMed

    Qi, H; Cooper, P A; Wan, H

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of recycling waste medium density fiberboard (MDF) into wood-cement composites was evaluated. Both new fibers and recycled steam exploded MDF fibers had poor compatibility with cement if no treatment was applied, due to interference of the hydration process by the water soluble components of the fiber. However, this issue was resolved when a rapid hardening process with carbon dioxide injection was adopted. It appears that the rapid carbonation allowed the board to develop considerable strength before the adverse effects of the wood extractives could take effect. After 3-5 min of carbon dioxide injection, the composites reached 22-27% of total carbonation and developed 50-70% of their final (28-day) strength. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers had slightly lower splitting tensile strength and lower tensile toughness properties than those containing new fibers especially at a high fiber/cement ratio. Composites containing recycled MDF fibers also showed lower values of water absorption. Unlike composites cured conventionally, composites cured under CO(2) injection developed higher strength and toughness with increased fiber content. Incorporation of recycled MDF fibers into wood cement composites with CO(2) injection during the production stage presents a viable option for recycling of this difficult to manage waste material.

  20. Development of cement solidification process for sodium borate waste generated from PWR plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hirofumi Okabe; Tatsuaki Sato; Yuichi Shoji; Yoshiko Haruguchi; Masaaki Kaneko; Michitaka Saso; Masumitsu Toyohara

    2013-07-01

    A cement solidification process for treating sodium borate waste produced in pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants was studied. To obtain high volume reduction and high mechanical strength of the waste, simulated concentrated borate liquid waste with a sodium / boron (Na/B) mole ratio of 0.27 was dehydrated and powdered by using a wiped film evaporator. To investigate the effect of the Na/B mole ratio on the solidification process, a sodium tetraborate decahydrate reagent with a Na/B mole ratio of 0.5 was also used. Ordinary portland cement (OPC) and some additives were used for the solidification. Solidified cement prepared from powdered waste with a Na/B mole ratio 0.24 and having a high silica sand content (silica sand/cement>2) showed to improved uniaxial compressive strength. (authors)

  1. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  2. CSER 96-013: Cementation Process, glovebox HA-20MB at PFP

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, A.L.

    1996-09-01

    This evaluation provides criticality safety controls for the cementation processing in Glovebox HA-2OMB at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Slag and crucible residues from Pu button making will be blended with Portland cement in 5k-in. diam. x 7-in. tall cans, for eventual disposition in special DOT 17C drums. A maximum of 180 g Pu is allowed per liquid-bearing container (mixing bowl, filter funnel, or cement can). In this SD revision, three separate areas with 500 g Pu limits each are established; the airlock cell for input S&C cans, the reaction- and mixing-process area, and a cemented-can storage area. Number and spacing of containers within an area is not restricted, for areas spaced 6 inches apart. Acid addition in the reaction stage is allowed to the extent that plutonium dissolution will not occur.

  3. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  4. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  5. Variations and factors that influence the formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes in cement kilns co-processing solid waste.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Zhan, Jiayu; Liu, Guorui; Zhao, Yuyang; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-09-05

    Pilot studies of unintentionally produced pollutants should be performed before waste being co-processed in cement kilns. Polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) formation and emission from cement kilns co-processing sorted municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and waste acid, however, have not previously been studied. Here, PCNs were analyzed in stack gas samples and solid samples from different stages of three cement production runs. PCN destruction efficiencies were higher when waste was co-processed (93.1% and 88.7% in two tests) than when waste was not co-processed (39.1%), so co-processing waste would not increase PCN outputs. The PCN concentrations were higher in particle samples from the C1 preheater and stages at back end of kiln than in particle samples from other stages, suggesting that cyclone preheater and back end of kiln should be focused for controlling PCN emissions. Besides that, based on the variation of PCN concentrations and corresponding operating conditions in different stages, the temperature, feeding materials, and chlorine content were suggested as the main factors influencing PCN formation. The PCN homologue and congener profiles suggested chlorination and dechlorination were the main PCN formation and decomposition pathways, and congeners CN-23, CN-46, and CN-59 appear to be appropriate indicators of PCNs emitted from coal-burning sources.

  6. Dolomite magnesium oxychloride cement properties control method during its production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, T. N.; Nosov, A. V.; Kramar, L. Ya

    2015-01-01

    The work considers the possibility of reducing the decomposition temperature of MgCO3 in dolomite rock, provides the results of studies of the effect of various additives and enhancers on the decomposition of magnesium and calcium components of dolomite. Chlorides additives are the most promising for dolomite rocks roast intensification. They allow shifting the MgCO3 decomposition to lower temperatures, without exerting a significant influence on the decomposition of CaCO3. Introduction of additives-enhancers is found to be an effective method of controlling the properties of dolomite MOC during roasting, producing high-strength dolomite magnesium oxychloride cements with change in volume during solidification.

  7. 75 FR 453 - FLSMidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...., Cement Division, Product Engineering, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Aerotek Contract Engineering..., applicable to workers of FLSmidth, Inc., Cement Division, Product Engineering, including on-site leased...-site leased workers from Clarke Consulting, Inc. were also employed on-site at FLSmidth, Inc.,...

  8. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    supply side to mirror such attributes can be deal-breakers in a transaction. For qualitative interpretation of the findings in this report, the value chain was used to conceptualize the relation between supply and demand. Although quantitative data on the Afghan construction materials sector have been hard to come by, the premise herein was that qualitative aspects of supply and demand are revealed by following the flow of funding through projects of varying sizes. It was found that the spectrum of attributes on the demand side of large multimillion dollar reconstruction projects is generally high dimensional, distributed over a broad line of construction materials at diverse locations, and in varying quantities. As interpreted herein, project funds dispensed at the higher hierarchical levels of a project are often concentrated on procurement of construction materials and services at the upper end of the value chain. In contrast, project funds dispensed at the lower hierarchical levels are disseminated across a multiplicity of subprojects, thus restricting project acquisitions to the lower end of the value chain. Evidence suggests that under the current conditions in Afghanistan producers of construction materials at the lower end of the value chain (adobe brick, aggregate, low-end marble products) can successfully compete in local markets and turn a profit. In contrast, producers of energy-intensive products such as cement will continue to face intense competition from imports, at least in the near-term. In the long-term, as infrastructure issues are resolved, and as business conditions in Afghanistan improve, domestic producers will have a locational advantage in establishing a solid niche in their respective home markets. In the process of tendering properties for cement production, the pivotal issues of abundant, reliable, and cost-effective thermal and electrical energy sources for cement production have become prominent. Over the past 50 years, powdered coal and

  9. Portland cement for bone tissue engineering: Effects of processing and metakaolin blends.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Quiroz, Felipe García; Posada, Olga M; López, Luis E; Litsky, Alan S; Hansford, Derek J

    2011-08-01

    The need for a suitable scaffolding material for load bearing bone tissue engineering still has yet to be met satisfactorily. In this study, Portland cement and Portland cement/metakaolin (MK) blends were processed to render them biologically and mechanically suitable for such application. Portland cement was mixed with MK at different ratios. The slurries were hydrated under atmospheric (noncarbonated samples) and high-CO₂ conditions (carbonated samples). The mechanical properties were characterized via compressive tests. The bioactivity was analyzed in a simulated body fluid solution. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate sample morphology and chemistry. The cytocompatibility (direct contact assay, MTT test, and alkaline phosphatase activity) was tested using human osteoblast-like cells. Cell responses were observed via conventional and electron microscopy. The results showed that the implementation of MK did not significantly influence the mechanical properties. All the samples evidenced bioactive behavior. Cell experiments confirmed a highly cytotoxic response to the noncarbonated specimens. The introduction of MK as well as the CO₂ pretreatment significantly improved the cytocompatibility of the specimens. These results show that properly processed Portland cement and Portland cement/MK blends could present suitable properties for the development of load-bearing scaffolding structures in bone tissue-engineering applications.

  10. Towards optimization of the silanization process of hydroxyapatite for its use in bone cement formulations.

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G; Herrera Kao, Wilberth; Loría-Bastarrachea, María I; Veranes-Pantoja, Yaymarilis; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V; Cervantes-Uc, José M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to provide some fundamental information for optimization of silanization of hydroxyapatite intended for bone cement formulations. The effect of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS) concentration and solvent system (acetone/water or methanol/water mixtures) during HA silanization was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis. The effect of silanized HA on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements is also reported. It was found that the silanization process rendered hydroxyapatite with lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. Through EDX, it was observed that the silicon concentration in the HA particles was higher for acetone-water than that obtained for methanol-water system, although the mechanical performance of cements prepared with these particles exhibited the opposite behavior. Taking all these results together, it is concluded that methanol-water system containing MPS at 3wt.% provides the better results during silanization process of HA.

  11. Biphasic products of dicalcium phosphate-rich cement with injectability and nondispersibility.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chen, Jian-Chih; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Tien, Yin-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a calcium phosphate cement was developed using tetracalcium phosphate and surface-modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA). This developed injectable bone graft substitute can be molded to the shape of the bone cavity and set in situ through the piping system that has an adequate mechanical strength, non-dispersibility, and biocompatibility. The materials were based on the modified DCPA compositions of calcium phosphate cement (CPC), where the phase ratio of the surface-modified DCPA is higher than that of the conventional CPC for forming dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich cement. The composition and morphology of several calcium phosphate cement specimens during setting were analyzed via X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectroscopy system. The compressive strength of DCP-rich CPCs was greater than 30MPa after 24h of immersion in vitro. The reaction of the CPCs produced steady final biphasic products of DCPs with apatite. The composites of calcium phosphate cements derived from tetracalcium phosphate mixed with surface-modified DCPA exhibited excellent mechanical properties, injectability, and interlocking forces between particles, and they also featured nondispersive behavior when immersed in a physiological solution.

  12. Use of Ceramic Material (cement Clinker) for the Production of Biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sunny; Agarwal, Madhu

    Biodiesel is a renewable liquid fuel made from natural, renewable biological sources such as edible and non edible oils. Over the last years, biodiesel has gained more market due to its benefits and because it appears as the natural substitute for diesel. Reasons for growing interest in biodiesel include its potential for reducing noxious emissions, potential contributions to rural economic development, as an additional demand center for agricultural commodities, and as a way to reduce reliance on foreign oil. Biodiesel was prepared from soybean oil by transesterification with methanol in the presence of cement clinker. Cement clinker was examined as a catalyst for a conversion of soybean oil to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). It can be a promising heterogeneous catalyst for the production of biodiesel fuels from soybean oil because of high activity in the conversion and no leaching in the transesterification reaction. The reaction conditions were optimized. A study for optimizing the reaction parameters such as the reaction temperature, and reaction time, was carried out. The catalyst cement clinker composition was characterized by XRF. The results demonstrate that the cement clinker shows high catalytic performance & it was found that the yield of biodiesel can reach as high as 84.52% after 1 h reaction at 65°C, with a 6:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil, 21 wt% KOH/cement clinker as catalyst.

  13. Clean burning process which converts pollutants into value added product

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Xuefang

    1999-07-01

    By adding a multiple composite admixture in coal-fired boilers, the new technology turns ash and the sulfur in coal into cement clinker materials, deepens and stabilizes combustion process, decreases mechanical and chemical instabilities during combustion, and eliminates the production of NO{sub x}. While generating heat and power, the technology produces cement clinkers, and gets rid of the soot type of air pollution caused by cement kilns, thus effects a radical cure for the two pollution sources in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. The new technology makes use of coal ashes as renewable resources, saves energy resources and the land needed to discard the ashes. Therefore, it benefits for ecological balance and economics.

  14. Research Of The Influence Of Reftinskii SDPP’S Ash On The Processes Of Cement Stone’S Structure Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakova, G. A.; Solonina, V. A.; Zelig, M. P.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the experimental research of cement stone. Cement stone forming involves highly dispersive mineral additive - ground ash. It is stated that the substitution of some part of cement with activated ash leaves cement strength high. This is possible due to the activity of ash in structure forming processes. Activation of ash provides the increase in its puzzolanic activity, complete hydration processes. it is stated that ash grinding leads to a selective crystallization hydrated neoformations. Their morthology is different on outer and inner surfaces of ash spheres. The usage of ash can provide cement economy on condition that rheological characteristics of concrete stay constant. Besides, the usage of ash will improve physical and mechanic characteristics of cement stone and concrete.

  15. [Revision process and thinking of emission standard of air pollutants for cement industry].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ji, Liang; Zou, Lan; Wei, Yu-Xia; Zhao, Guo-Hua; Che, Fei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Guo-Ning

    2014-12-01

    The new National Emission Standard of Air Pollutants for Cement Industry (GB 4915-2013) was released recently, which is the third revision since the first release in 1985. This paper reviewed the revision process for the emission standard of air pollutants in cement industry, analyzed the impact of environmental protection situation and management policies changes on the content and form of the standard. The standard formulating principles and several key issues together constitute the base of emission standard, which are not only important to complete the theories and methods of emission standard development, but also important to improve the environmental management and pollution control level.

  16. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1,000 metric tons/year capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished. Major activities in the chemical engineering analyses included base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provided detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process.

  17. Process, Product, and Playmaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maisha T.; Purcell, Susie Spear; May, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This article examines relationships among process, product, and playmaking in a southeastern playwriting and performance program for teen girls, Playmaking for Girls (PFG). The authors have chosen to focus on tensions between process and product. Such tensions are present in the challenges teachers experience when privileging student-centered…

  18. Influence of mixture ratio and pH to solidification/stabilization process of hospital solid waste incineration ash in Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Sobiecka, Elzbieta; Obraniak, Andrzej; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2014-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization (S/S) is an established utilization technology to treat hazardous wastes. This research explored the influence of pH (3-12) on the immobilization of heavy metals present in five mixtures of hospital solid waste incinerator ash and Portland cement, following two different processes of waste solidification/stabilization (cement hydration and granulation). In general, cement hydration process resulted in more stable products than granulation process. A high ash content in the mixture with Portland cement (60wt%) resulted in the highest immobilization of Pb(2+) and Cu(2+), while a low ash content in the mixture (10wt%) resulted in the lowest leachability of Zn(2+). When ash and Portland cement was mixed in equal proportions (50wt%) the highest encapsulation was observed for Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(3+). Neutral and weak alkaline pH values within the range pH=7-8 resulted in the lowest leachability of the monitored heavy metals.

  19. Production of Fused Portland Cement and Sulphur Gas from Sulphatic Phosphorus-Containing Raw Materials with Added Fluorine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    was conducted to use this system to produce Portland cement clinker without having to employ huge rotary kilns. Studies were made of the process of...dissociation of CaSO4 in a molten Portland cement raw materials mix in oxidising and in slightly reducing media.

  20. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F.; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele; Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena; Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano

    2011-01-15

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  1. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Lusvardi, Gigliola; Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano

    2011-01-01

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 °C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY·AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY·AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca(3)Cr(2)(SiO(4))(3)] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO(5)]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY·AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  2. Substantial global carbon uptake by cement carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Fengming; Davis, Steven J.; Ciais, Philippe; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Guan, Dabo; Pade, Claus; Shi, Tiemao; Syddall, Mark; Lv, Jie; Ji, Lanzhu; Bing, Longfei; Wang, Jiaoyue; Wei, Wei; Yang, Keun-Hyeok; Lagerblad, Björn; Galan, Isabel; Andrade, Carmen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Calcination of carbonate rocks during the manufacture of cement produced 5% of global CO2 emissions from all industrial process and fossil-fuel combustion in 2013. Considerable attention has been paid to quantifying these industrial process emissions from cement production, but the natural reversal of the process--carbonation--has received little attention in carbon cycle studies. Here, we use new and existing data on cement materials during cement service life, demolition, and secondary use of concrete waste to estimate regional and global CO2 uptake between 1930 and 2013 using an analytical model describing carbonation chemistry. We find that carbonation of cement materials over their life cycle represents a large and growing net sink of CO2, increasing from 0.10 GtC yr-1 in 1998 to 0.25 GtC yr-1 in 2013. In total, we estimate that a cumulative amount of 4.5 GtC has been sequestered in carbonating cement materials from 1930 to 2013, offsetting 43% of the CO2 emissions from production of cement over the same period, not including emissions associated with fossil use during cement production. We conclude that carbonation of cement products represents a substantial carbon sink that is not currently considered in emissions inventories.

  3. Concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls at different process stages of cement kilns co-processing waste incinerator fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Yang, Lili; Zhan, Jiayu; Zheng, Minghui; Li, Li; Jin, Rong; Zhao, Yuyang; Wang, Mei

    2016-12-01

    Cement kilns can be used to co-process fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators. However, this might increase emission of organic pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Knowledge of PCB concentrations and homolog and congener patterns at different stages in this process could be used to assess the possibility of simultaneously controlling emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and "dioxin-like" compounds. To date, emissions from cement kilns co-processing fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators have not been analyzed for PCBs. In this study, stack gas and particulate samples from two cement kilns co-processing waste incinerator fly ash were analyzed for PCBs. The average total tri- to deca-chlorinated biphenyl (∑3-10PCB) concentration in the stack gas samples was 10.15ngm(-3). The ∑3-10PCB concentration ranges in particulate samples from different stages were 0.83-41.79ngg(-1) for cement kiln 1and0.13-1.69ngg(-1) for cement kiln 2. The ∑3-10PCB concentrations were much higher in particulate samples from the suspension pre-heater boiler, humidifier tower, and kiln back-end bag filters than in particulate samples from other stages. For these three stages, PCBs contributed to 15-18% of the total PCB, PCDD/F, and polychlorinated naphthalene toxic equivalents in stack gases and particulate matter. The PCB distributions were similar to those found in other studies for PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated naphthalenes, which suggest that it may be possible to simultaneously control emissions of multiple organic pollutants from cement kilns. Homolog patterns in the particulate samples were dominated by the pentachlorobiphenyls. CB-105, CB-118, and CB-123 were the dominant dioxin-like PCB congeners that formed at the back-end of the cement kiln. A mass balance of PCBs in the cement kilns indicated that the total mass of PCBs in the stack gases and clinker was about half the mass of PCBs in the raw materials.

  4. The Impact of Thermocycling Process on the Dislodgement Force of Different Endodontic Cements

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of thermocycling (500 cycles, 5°C/55°C) on the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements including WMTA, Nano-WMTA, and Bioaggregate to root dentin. Forty-eight dentin slices were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16) and filled with Angelus WMTA, Nano-WMTA, or Bioaggregate. After incubation, half of the samples were thermocycled while the other half remained untreated. Push-out bond strength was calculated, and the modes of the bond failures were determined by SEM. The highest bond strength was seen in nonthermocycled Nano-WMTA samples and the lowest in thermocycled Bioaggregate samples. The significant differences between nonthermocycled and thermocycled samples were only noticed in WMTA and Nano-WMTA groups (P < 0.001). The mode of failure for thermocycled samples of all three cements was mostly cohesive. Thermocycling process can drastically affect the push-out bond strength of calcium silicate based cements. The intrastructural damages occurred due to the thermal stresses, causing cohesive failures in set materials. Sealing property of endodontic cements which have experienced the thermal stresses can be jeopardized due to occlusal forces happening in furcation cites. PMID:24063004

  5. Release of asbestos fibers from weathered and corroded asbestos cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Spurny, K.R.

    1989-02-01

    The controversy on whether weathered and corroded asbestos cement products are emitting biologically significant asbestos fiber concentrations in ambient air has not been resolved. Nor is it known if the weathered and corroded asbestos cement products release asbestos fibers which have the same carcinogenic potency as standard chrysotile. The purpose of this research project was to develop a method for sampling and measuring asbestos fiber emissions from solid planar surfaces (i.e., roofs and facades) consisting of asbestos cement products and to develop methods for studying the physical and chemical changes and the carcinogenic potency of the emitted fibers. Using this method asbestos fiber emissions in ambient air have been measured in the FRG during 1984/1986. The emissions of asbestos fibers longer than 5 microns were in the range 10(6) to 10(8) fibers/m2.hr. The ambient air concentrations of these asbestos fibers were for the most part less than 10(3) fibers/m3. It was shown that the emitted asbestos fibers were chemically changed and it was shown with animal experiments that their carcinogenic potency did not differ from the carcinogenicity of standard chrysotile fibers.

  6. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production: A modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Teklay, Abraham; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse; Bøjer, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO{sub 2} intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model is developed, which fully addresses the conversion process of raw kaolinite particles suspended in hot gas. Particles are discretized into a number of spherical cells, on each of which mass, momentum, energy and species conservation equations are numerically solved by using the finite volume method. Reactions considered in the model include dehydration, dehydroxylation and various phase transformations. Thermogravimetric analysis is used to determine reaction kinetic data required as inputs in the model and to validate the model. Finally, model-based sensitivity analysis is performed, from which quantitative guidelines for calcination condition optimization are derived. - Highlights: • A general 1D mathematical model for single clay particle calcination is developed. • The model fully addresses momentum, heat and mass transfer and all the reactions. • Experiments are performed to determine kinetic data of the key reactions. • The model is verified by different means, including experimental results. • Sensitivity study is done to address key assumptions and derive useful guidelines.

  7. Fjords: Processes and products

    SciTech Connect

    Syvitski, J.P.M.; Burrell, D.C.; Skei, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Fjords are a major feature of coasts and provide geologists and oceanographers with an excellent environment for studying and modeling coastal processes and products. This book brings together and integrates an enormous amount of information on fjords and provides the reader with a thorough, interdisciplinary account of current research with emphasis on sedimentary processes. The processes demonstrated in fjords are often relevant to the estuarine or open ocean environment.

  8. Environmental behavior of cement-based stabilized foundry sludge products incorporating additives.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Irabien, A

    2004-06-18

    A series of experiments were conducted to stabilize the inorganic and organic pollutants in a foundry sludge from a cast iron activity using Portland cement as binder and three different types of additives, organophilic bentonite, lime and coal fly ash. Ecotoxicological and chemical behavior of stabilized mixes of foundry sludge were analyzed to assess the feasibility to immobilize both types of contaminants, all determined on the basis of compliance leaching tests. The incorporation of lime reduces the ecotoxicity of stabilized mixes and enhances stabilization of organic pollutants obtaining better results when a 50% of cement is replaced by lime. However, the alkalinity of lime increases slightly the leached zinc up to concentrations above the limit set under neutral conditions by the European regulations. The addition of organophilic bentonite and coal fly ash can immobilize the phenolic compounds but are inefficient to reduce the ecotoxicity and mobility of zinc of final products.

  9. Energy Efficient Microwave Hybrid Processing of Lime for Cement, Steel, and Glass Industries

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, Morgana L; Yakovlev, Vadim; Sahi, Catherine; Baranova, Inessa; Bowers, Johnney G; Esquenazi , Gibran L

    2012-02-10

    In this study, the microwave materials interactions were studied through dielectric property measurements, process modeling, and lab scale microwave hybrid calcination tests. Characterization and analysis were performed to evaluate material reactions and energy usage. Processing parameters for laboratory scale and larger scale calcining experiments were developed for MAT limestone calcination. Early stage equipment design concepts were developed, with a focus on microwave post heating treatment. The retrofitting of existing rotary calcine equipment in the lime industry was assessed and found to be feasible. Ceralink sought to address some of the major barriers to the uptake of MAT identified as the need for (1) team approach with end users, technology partners, and equipment manufacturers, (2) modeling that incorporates kiln materials and variations to the design of industrial microwave equipment. This project has furthered the commercialization effort of MAT by working closely with an industrial lime manufacturer to educate them regarding MAT, identifying equipment manufacturer to supply microwave equipment, and developing a sophisticated MAT modeling with WPI, the university partner. MAT was shown to enhance calcining through lower energy consumption and faster reaction rates compared to conventional processing. Laboratory testing concluded that a 23% reduction in energy was possible for calcining small batches (5kg). Scale-up testing indicated that the energy savings increased as a function of load size and 36% energy savings was demonstrated (22 kg). A sophisticated model was developed which combines simultaneous microwave and conventional heating. Continued development of this modeling software could be used for larger scale calcining simulations, which would be a beneficial low-cost tool for exploring equipment design prior to actual building. Based on these findings, estimates for production scale MAT calcining benefits were calculated, assuming uptake of

  10. Observer, Process, and Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Noa

    1996-01-01

    The structure of art as a symbol system is composed of three dimensions: observer, process, and product. Each dimension is described, discussed, and its application to art therapy illustrated through the case study of a 12-year-old boy suffering from a progressive neurological disorder. (LSR)

  11. Research on a Defects Detection Method in the Ferrite Phase Shifter Cementing Process Based on a Multi-Sensor Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) System

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Bo; Fu, Guicui; Li, Yanruoyue; Zhao, Youhu

    2016-01-01

    The cementing manufacturing process of ferrite phase shifters has the defect that cementing strength is insufficient and fractures always appear. A detection method of these defects was studied utilizing the multi-sensors Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) theory. Aiming at these process defects, the reasons that lead to defects are analyzed in this paper. In the meanwhile, the key process parameters were determined and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests during the cure process of resin cementing were carried out. At the same time, in order to get data on changing cementing strength, multiple-group cementing process tests of different key process parameters were designed and conducted. A relational model of cementing strength and cure temperature, time and pressure was established, by combining data of DSC and process tests as well as based on the Avrami formula. Through sensitivity analysis for three process parameters, the on-line detection decision criterion and the process parameters which have obvious impact on cementing strength were determined. A PHM system with multiple temperature and pressure sensors was established on this basis, and then, on-line detection, diagnosis and control for ferrite phase shifter cementing process defects were realized. It was verified by subsequent process that the on-line detection system improved the reliability of the ferrite phase shifter cementing process and reduced the incidence of insufficient cementing strength defects. PMID:27517935

  12. Research on a Defects Detection Method in the Ferrite Phase Shifter Cementing Process Based on a Multi-Sensor Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) System.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bo; Fu, Guicui; Li, Yanruoyue; Zhao, Youhu

    2016-08-10

    The cementing manufacturing process of ferrite phase shifters has the defect that cementing strength is insufficient and fractures always appear. A detection method of these defects was studied utilizing the multi-sensors Prognostic and Health Management (PHM) theory. Aiming at these process defects, the reasons that lead to defects are analyzed in this paper. In the meanwhile, the key process parameters were determined and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) tests during the cure process of resin cementing were carried out. At the same time, in order to get data on changing cementing strength, multiple-group cementing process tests of different key process parameters were designed and conducted. A relational model of cementing strength and cure temperature, time and pressure was established, by combining data of DSC and process tests as well as based on the Avrami formula. Through sensitivity analysis for three process parameters, the on-line detection decision criterion and the process parameters which have obvious impact on cementing strength were determined. A PHM system with multiple temperature and pressure sensors was established on this basis, and then, on-line detection, diagnosis and control for ferrite phase shifter cementing process defects were realized. It was verified by subsequent process that the on-line detection system improved the reliability of the ferrite phase shifter cementing process and reduced the incidence of insufficient cementing strength defects.

  13. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Guan, Dabo; Wei, Wei; Davis, Steven J; Ciais, Philippe; Bai, Jin; Peng, Shushi; Zhang, Qiang; Hubacek, Klaus; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert J; Crawford-Brown, Douglas; Lin, Jintai; Zhao, Hongyan; Hong, Chaopeng; Boden, Thomas A; Feng, Kuishuang; Peters, Glen P; Xi, Fengming; Liu, Junguo; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Zeng, Ning; He, Kebin

    2015-08-20

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China's total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China's carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000-2012 than the value reported by China's national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China's cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China's CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China's cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000-2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990-2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China's land carbon sink in 2000-2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  14. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.; Davis, S.; Ciais, P.; Bai, J; Peng, S.; Zhang, Q.; Hubacek, K.; Marland, Gregg; Andres, Robert Joseph; Crawford-Brown, D.; Lin, J.; Zhao, H.; Hong, C.; Boden, Thomas A.; Feng, K.; Peters, Glen P.; Xi, F.; Liu, J.; Li, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zeng, Ning; He, K.

    2015-08-19

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption and clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).

  15. Reduced carbon emission estimates from fossil fuel combustion and cement production in China

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Z.; Guan, D.; Wei, W.; ...

    2015-08-19

    Nearly three-quarters of the growth in global carbon emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and cement production between 2010 and 2012 occurred in China. Yet estimates of Chinese emissions remain subject to large uncertainty; inventories of China’s total fossil fuel carbon emissions in 2008 differ by 0.3 gigatonnes of carbon, or 15 per cent. The primary sources of this uncertainty are conflicting estimates of energy consumption and emission factors, the latter being uncertain because of very few actual measurements representative of the mix of Chinese fuels. Here we re-evaluate China’s carbon emissions using updated and harmonized energy consumption andmore » clinker production data and two new and comprehensive sets of measured emission factors for Chinese coal. We find that total energy consumption in China was 10 per cent higher in 2000–2012 than the value reported by China’s national statistics, that emission factors for Chinese coal are on average 40 per cent lower than the default values recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and that emissions from China’s cement production are 45 per cent less than recent estimates. Altogether, our revised estimate of China’s CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production is 2.49 gigatonnes of carbon (2 standard deviations = ±7.3 per cent) in 2013, which is 14 per cent lower than the emissions reported by other prominent inventories. Over the full period 2000 to 2013, our revised estimates are 2.9 gigatonnes of carbon less than previous estimates of China’s cumulative carbon emissions. Our findings suggest that overestimation of China’s emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China’s estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 (2.66 gigatonnes of carbon) or China’s land carbon sink in 2000–2009 (2.6 gigatonnes of carbon).« less

  16. Phase development in the hardening process of two calcium phosphate bone cements: an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Generosi, A.; Smirnov, V.V.; Rau, J.V.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Ferro, D.; Barinov, S.M.

    2008-03-04

    This work was aimed at the application of an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique to study the kinetics of phase development during the setting and hardening reactions in two calcium phosphate bone cements. The cements under study are based on either tricalcium phosphate or tetracalcium phosphate initial solid phase, and a magnesium carbonate-phosphoric acid liquid phase as the hardening liquid. The application of the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method allowed to collect the diffraction patterns from the cement pastes in situ starting from 1 min of the setting and hardening process. The only crystallized phase in both cements was apatite-like phase, the primary crystallization process proceeds during a few seconds of the setting reaction. Both the compressive strength and the pH value changes during the hardening period can be attributed to the transformations occurring in the intergranular X-ray amorphous phase.

  17. An inventory of primary air pollutants and CO 2 emissions from cement production in China, 1990-2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Zhang, Qiang; Nielsen, Chris; He, Kebin

    2011-01-01

    Direct emissions of air pollutants from the cement industry in China were estimated by developing a technology-based methodology using information on the proportion of cement produced from different types of kilns and the emission standards for the Chinese cement industry. Historical emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2), nitrogen oxides (NO X), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM) and carbon dioxide (CO 2) were estimated for the years 1990-2008, and future emissions were projected up to 2020 based on current energy-related and emission control policies. Compared with the historical high (4.36 Tg of PM 2.5, 7.16 Tg of PM 10 and 10.44 Tg of TSP in 1997), PM emissions are predicted to drop substantially by 2020, despite the expected tripling of cement production. Certain other air pollutant emissions, such as CO and SO 2, are also predicted to decrease with the progressive closure of shaft kilns. NO X emissions, however, could increase because of the promotion of precalciner kilns and the rapid increase of cement production. CO 2 emissions from the cement industry account for approximately one eighth of China's national CO 2 emissions. Our analysis indicates that it is possible to reduce CO 2 emissions from this industry by approximately 12.8% if advanced energy-related technologies are implemented. These technologies will bring co-benefits in reducing other air pollutants as well.

  18. Cementation of indirect restorations: an overview of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Simon, James F

    2013-01-01

    The process of ensuring proper retention, marginal seal, and durability of indirect restorations depends heavily on effective cementation. Careful consideration must be made when selecting an adhesive cement for a given application. This article provides information on resin cements that can guide clinicians in determining which type of cement is best suited to their clinical needs regarding cementation of indirect restorations. Emphasis is placed on successful cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  19. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  20. Butadiene production process overview.

    PubMed

    White, Wm Claude

    2007-03-20

    Over 95% of butadiene is produced as a by-product of ethylene production from steam crackers. The crude C4 stream isolated from the steam cracking process is fed to butadiene extraction units, where butadiene is separated from the other C4s by extractive distillation. The amount of crude C4s produced in steam cracking is dependent on the composition of the feed to the cracking unit. Heavier feeds, such as naphtha, yield higher amounts of C4s and butadiene than do lighter feeds. Crackers using light feeds typically produce low quantities of C4s and do not have butadiene extraction units. Overall butadiene capacity is determined by ethylene cracker operating rates, the type of feed being cracked, and availability of butadiene extraction capacity. Global butadiene capacity is approximately 10.5 million metric tons, and global production is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Crude C4s are traded globally, with the United States being the only significant net importer. Finished butadiene is also traded globally, with the largest exporters being Canada, Western Europe, Saudi Arabia and Korea. The largest net importers are Mexico, the United States and China. The global demand for butadiene is approximately 9 million metric tons [Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005 World Butadiene Analysis, Chemical Marketing Associates, Inc. (CMAI), 2005]. Production of styrene-butadiene rubber and polybutadiene rubber accounts for about 54% of global butadiene demand, with tire production being the single most important end use of butadiene synthetic rubbers. Other major butadiene derivatives are acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and styrene butadiene latex (about 24% of demand combined).

  1. Environmental Assessment of Different Cement Manufacturing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to its high environmental impact and energy intensive production, the cement industry needs to adopt more energy efficient technologies to reduce its demand for fossil fuels and impact on the environment. Bearing in mind that cement is the most widely used material for housing and modern infrastructure, the aim of this paper is to analyse the Emergy and Ecological Footprint of different cement manufacturing processes for a particular cement plant. There are several mitigation measures that can be incorporated in the cement manufacturing process to reduce the demand for fossil fuels and consequently reduce the CO2 emissions. The mitigation measures considered in this paper were the use of alternative fuels and a more energy efficient kiln process. In order to estimate the sustainability effect of the aforementioned measures, Emergy and Ecological Footprint were calculated for four different scenarios. The results show that Emergy, due to the high input mass of raw material needed for clinker production, stays at about the same level. However, for the Ecological Footprint, the results show that by combining the use of alternative fuels together with a more energy efficient kiln process, the environmental impact of the cement manufacturing process can be lowered. The research paper presents an analysis of the sustainability of cement production , a major contributor to carbon emissions, with respect to using alternative fuels and a more efficient kiln. It show

  2. In vitro biodurability of the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Viani, Alberto; Sgarbi, Giulia; Lusvardi, Gigliola

    2012-02-29

    To safely recycle the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos as secondary raw material, its toxicity potential should be assessed by in vitro biodurability tests. In this work, the acellular in vitro biodurability of the products of transformation of cement-asbestos at 1200 °C (named KRY·AS) was tested using both inorganic and organic simulated lung fluids at pH 4.5. The dissolution kinetics were followed using chemical, mineralogical and microstructural analyses. The total dissolution time estimated from the experiments with inorganic HCl diluted solution is one order of magnitude higher than that determined from the experiments with buffered Gamble solution (253 days vs. 20 days). The key parameter determining the difference in dissolution rate turns out to be the solidus/liquidus ratio which prompts a fast saturation of the solution with monosilicic acid. The calculated dissolution rate constants showed that the biodurability in vitro of KRY·AS is much lower with respect to that of standard chrysotile asbestos (total estimated dissolution time of 20 days vs. 298 days, respectively). This proves a low potential toxicity of this secondary raw material.

  3. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers

    PubMed Central

    Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers. Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7–4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m−3, using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group. Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest. Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  4. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, L J

    2003-06-12

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R&D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities.

  5. Cement As a Waste Form for Nuclear Fission Products: The Case of (90)Sr and Its Daughters.

    PubMed

    Dezerald, Lucile; Kohanoff, Jorge J; Correa, Alfredo A; Caro, Alfredo; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Ulm, Franz J; Saúl, Andrés

    2015-11-17

    One of the main challenges faced by the nuclear industry is the long-term confinement of nuclear waste. Because it is inexpensive and easy to manufacture, cement is the material of choice to store large volumes of radioactive materials, in particular the low-level medium-lived fission products. It is therefore of utmost importance to assess the chemical and structural stability of cement containing radioactive species. Here, we use ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) to study the effects of (90)Sr insertion and decay in C-S-H (calcium-silicate-hydrate) in order to test the ability of cement to trap and hold this radioactive fission product and to investigate the consequences of its β-decay on the cement paste structure. We show that (90)Sr is stable when it substitutes the Ca(2+) ions in C-S-H, and so is its daughter nucleus (90)Y after β-decay. Interestingly, (90)Zr, daughter of (90)Y and final product in the decay sequence, is found to be unstable compared to the bulk phase of the element at zero K but stable when compared to the solvated ion in water. Therefore, cement appears as a suitable waste form for (90)Sr storage.

  6. Reducing the cycle time of cementing processes for high quality doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, C.; Hahne, F.; Langehanenberg, P.; Heinisch, J.

    2015-09-01

    For the manufacturing of high performance optical systems, centered alignment of the optical surfaces within the assembly is becoming increasingly important. In this contribution, we will present a system for the automated alignment of optical surfaces for the high-throughput manufacturing of cemented doublets (and triplets) with optimized imaging performance. First of all, different concepts for the alignment of doublets etc. are discussed. Standard methods for cementing evaluate mechanical features, such as the outer barrel of one element as reference axis. Using this procedure the optical performance of the assembly that can be achieved is limited by imperfections in the collinearity of the element's barrel axis and its optical axis. Instead, using the optical axis of the bottom element as target axis opens up perspectives for the production of multiplets with perfect symmetric imaging performance. For this concept, all three center of curvature positions of the optical surfaces are measured. Then, the top surface is aligned to the bottom element's optical axis using high-precision actuators. In order to increase the throughput of this procedure, the system is equipped with a novel measurement head that acquires autocollimation images of all three surfaces of a doublet at the same time. Thus, the positions of all surfaces are measured simultaneously during just a single rotation, avoiding both additional rotations and focus movements. Using this approach, cycle times can significantly be reduced from an average of 1 min to less than 10 seconds (w/o curing time). The system is reconfigurable in order to support a wide range of sample designs and enables cementing of high quality optics with centering errors below 2 μm.

  7. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  8. Environmental assessment of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production--a case study in China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinglan; Li, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production. To confirm and add credibility to the study, uncertainty analysis was conducted. Results showed the impact generated from respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, global warming, and non-renewable energy categories had an important contribution to overall environmental impact, due to energy, clinker, and limestone production stages. Also, uncertainty analysis results showed the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production had little or no effect on changing the overall environmental potential impact generated from general cement production. Accordingly, using the technology of sewage sludge as secondary raw material in cement production is a good choice for reducing the pressure on the environment from dramatically increased sludge disposal. In addition, increasing electricity recovery rate, choosing natural gas fired electricity generation technology, and optimizing the raw material consumption in clinker production are highly recommended to reduce the adverse effects on the environment.

  9. Production of a calcium silicate cement material from alginate impression material.

    PubMed

    Washizawa, Norimasa; Narusawa, Hideaki; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biomaterials from daily dental waste. Since alginate impression material contains silica and calcium salts, we aimed to synthesize calcium silicate cement from alginate impression material. Gypsum-based investment material was also investigated as control. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that although firing the set gypsum-based and modified investment materials at 1,200°C produced calcium silicates, firing the set alginate impression material did not. However, we succeeded when firing the set blend of pre-fired set alginate impression material and gypsum at 1,200°C. SEM observations of the powder revealed that the featured porous structures of diatomite as an alginate impression material component appeared useful for synthesizing calcium silicates. Experimentally fabricated calcium silicate powder was successfully mixed with phosphoric acid solution and set by depositing the brushite. Therefore, we conclude that the production of calcium silicate cement material is possible from waste alginate impression material.

  10. Microstructural and bulk property changes in hardened cement paste during the first drying process

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Ippei; Nishioka, Yukiko; Igarashi, Go; Matsui, Kunio

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports the microstructural changes and resultant bulk physical property changes in hardened cement paste (hcp) during the first desorption process. The microstructural changes and solid-phase changes were evaluated by water vapor sorption, nitrogen sorption, ultrasonic velocity, and {sup 29}Si and {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance. Strength, Young's modulus, and drying shrinkage were also examined. The first drying process increased the volume of macropores and decreased the volume of mesopores and interlayer spaces. Furthermore, in the first drying process globule clusters were interconnected. During the first desorption, the strength increased for samples cured at 100% to 90% RH, decreased for 90% to 40% RH, and increased again for 40% to 11% RH. This behavior is explained by both microstructural changes in hcp and C–S–H globule densification. The drying shrinkage strains during rapid drying and slow drying were compared and the effects of the microstructural changes and evaporation were separated.

  11. The transformation sequence of cement-asbestos slates up to 1200 degrees C and safe recycling of the reaction product in stoneware tile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, A F; Cavenati, C; Zanatto, I; Meloni, M; Elmi, G; Gualtieri, M Lassinantti

    2008-04-01

    Cement-asbestos is the main asbestos containing material still found in most of the European countries such as Italy. Man- and weathering-induced degradation of the cement-asbestos slates makes them a source of dispersion of asbestos fibres and represents a priority cause of concern. This concern is the main prompt for the actual policy of abatement and disposal of asbestos containing materials in controlled wastes. An alternative solution to the disposal in dumping sites is the direct temperature-induced transformation of the cement-asbestos slates into non-hazardous mineral phases. This patented process avoids the stage of mechanical milling of the material before the treatment, which improves the reactivity of the materials but may be critical for the dispersion of asbestos fibres in working and life environment. For the first time, this paper reports the description of the reaction path taking place during the firing of cement-asbestos slates up to the complete transformation temperature, 1200 degrees C. The reaction sequence was investigated using different experimental techniques such as optical and electron microscopy, in situ and ex situ quali-quantitative X-ray powder diffraction. The understanding of the complex reaction path is of basic importance for the optimization of industrial heating processes leading to a safe recycling of the transformed product. For the recycling of asbestos containing materials, the Italian laws require that the product of the crystal chemical transformation of asbestos containing materials must be entirely asbestos-free, and should not contain more than 0.1 wt% fraction of the carcinogenic substances such as cristobalite. Moreover, if fibrous phases other than asbestos (with length to diameter ratio >3) are found, they must have a geometrical diameter larger than 3 microm. We have demonstrated that using an interplay of different experimental techniques, it is possible to safely verify the complete transformation of asbestos

  12. Utilization of lime-sinter process residue for the manufacture of a low-alumina portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Chesley, J.A.; Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1984-01-01

    The lime-sinter process for recovery of alumina from coal conversion solid wastes produces a residue that is largely dicalcium silicate (C/sub 2/S) and that contains only 3 to 5% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Use of this residue will eliminate the need for its disposal and will make the lime-sinter process more attractive financially. The unique composition of the residue makes it an attractive raw material for the manufacture of ASTM Type V (sulfate resistant) portland cement. There is a substantial demand for this type of cement in the western states. The feasibility of thus using the residue is examined and a cost analysis for a combined alumina-portland cement plant capable of using the fly ash from a 1000 MWe coal-fired power station is presented. 12 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  13. Recycling red mud from the production of aluminium as a red cement-based mortar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Jianfeng; Li, Haoxin; Zhao, Piqi; Chen, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Current management for red mud is insufficient and a new method is needed. A series of experiments have been carried out to develop a new approach for effective management of red mud. Mortars without or with 3%, 6% and 9% red mud were prepared and their fresh and hardened properties were measured to access the possibility of recycling the red mud in the production of red cement-based mortar. The mechanisms corresponding to their mechanical performance variations were explored by X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the fresh mortars with red mud present an increase of viscosity as compared with the control. However, little difference is found when the content of red mud is altered. It also can be seen that red mud increases flow time and reduces the slump flow of the mortar. Meanwhile, it is found that mortar with red mud is provided with higher air content. Red mud is eligible to adjust the decorative mortar colour. Compressive strength of mortar is improved when less than 6% red mud is added. However, overall it has a slightly negative effect on tensile bond strength. It decreases the Ca(OH)2 content and densifies the microstructure of hardened paste. The heavy metal concentrations in leachates of mortars with red mud are much lower than the values required in the standard, and it will not do harm to people's health and the environment. These results are important to recycle and effectively manage red mud via the production of red cement-based mortar.

  14. New manufacturing method for Fe-Si magnetic powders using modified pack-cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Ji Young; Kim, Jang Won; Han, Jeong Whan; Jang, Pyungwoo

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a new method for making Fe-Si magnetic powders using a pack-cementation process. It was found that Fe-Si alloy powders were formed by a reaction of the pack mixture of Fe, Si, NaF, and Al2O3 powders at 900 °C for 24 h under a hydrogen atmosphere. Separation of the Fe-Si alloy powders was dependent on the particle size of the Fe powders in the pack. For small Fe powders, magnetic separation in a medium of strong alkali solution was recommended. But, for relatively larger Fe powders, the Fe-Si alloy powders were easily separated from Al2O3 powders using a magnet in air atmosphere. The Si content in the Fe-Si magnetic powders were easily controlled by changing the weight ratio of Si to (Si+Fe) in the pack.

  15. Experimental and thermodynamic considerations of Mg2Si coatings deposited by pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathokostopoulos, D.; Tsipas, S. A.; Chaliampalias, D.; Pavlidou, E.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Vourlias, G.

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium disilicide is a narrow gap semiconductor which can be used in several applications such as thermoelectric materials, optoelectronic devices and batteries. It has attracted special attraction because of its low cost and non-toxicity. In the herein examination the formation of this compound is investigated by a simple, one-stage process which is pack cementation. Particularly, the effect of deposition time, activator and donor material concentration was examined. Mg2Si was formed in every case without the presence of other compounds as referred to be present when formed with other coating procedures which have higher cost and are very sophisticated. The examined parameters were found to have effect only on the coating thickness up to a certain value. Moreover, the experimental results confirmed the theoretical thermodynamic calculations performed for this case.

  16. Process to Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Gary, Ed.; Mirkes, Donna Z., Ed.

    Intended for educators who direct federally funded model projects, the booklet provides a framework for special education product development. In "Making Media Decisions," G. Richman explores procedures for selecting the most appropriate medium to carry the message of a given product. The fundamental questions are addressed: what is the goal; who…

  17. Acrylamide in processed potato products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trace amounts of acrylamide are found in many foods cooked at high temperatures. Acrylamide in processed potato products is formed from reducing sugars and asparagine and is a product of the Maillard reaction. Processed potato products including fries and chips are relatively high in acrylamide comp...

  18. Recycling the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos for the preparation of calcium sulfoaluminate clinker.

    PubMed

    Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2013-09-15

    According to recent resolutions of the European Parliament (2012/2065(INI)), the need for environmentally friendly alternative solutions to landfill disposal of hazardous wastes, such as asbestos-containing materials, prompts their recycling as secondary raw materials (end of waste concept). In this respect, for the first time, we report the recycling of the high temperature product of cement-asbestos, in the formulation of calcium sulfoaluminate cement clinkers (novel cementitious binders designed to reduce CO₂ emissions), as a continuation of a previous work on their systematic characterization. Up to 29 wt% of the secondary raw material was successfully introduced into the raw mix. Different clinker samples were obtained at 1250 °C and 1300 °C, reproducing the phase composition of industrial analogues. As an alternative source of Ca and Si, this secondary raw material allows for a reduction of the CO₂ emissions in cement production, mitigating the ecological impact of cement manufacturing, and reducing the need for natural resources.

  19. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The chemical engineering analysis of the preliminary process design of a process for producing solar cell grade silicon from dichlorosilane is presented. A plant to produce 1,000 MT/yr of silicon is analyzed. Progress and status for the plant design are reported for the primary activities of base case conditions (60 percent), reaction chemistry (50 percent), process flow diagram (35 percent), energy balance (10 percent), property data (10 percent) and equipment design (5 percent).

  20. Biodeterioration of the Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luptáková, Alena; Eštoková, Adriana; Mačingová, Eva; Kovalčíková, Martina; Jenčárová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The destruction of natural and synthetic materials is the spontaneous and irreversible process of the elements cycling in nature. It can by accelerated or decelerated by physical, chemical and biological influences. Biological influences are represented by the influence of the vegetation and microorganisms (MO). The destruction of cement composites by different MO through the diverse mechanisms is entitled as the concrete biodeterioration. Several sulphur compounds and species of MO are involved in this complex process. Heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic bacteria together with fungi have all been found in samples of corroding cement composites. The MO involved in the process metabolise the presented sulphur compounds (hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulphur etc.) to sulphuric acid reacting with concrete. When sulphuric acid reacts with a concrete matrix, the first step involves a reaction between the acid and the calcium hydroxide forming calcium sulphate. This is subsequently hydrated to form gypsum, the appearance of which on the surface of concrete pipes takes the form of a white, mushy substance which has no cohesive properties. In the continuing attack, the gypsum would react with the calcium aluminate hydrate to form ettringite, an expansive product. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to biodeterioration. The aim of this work was the study of the cement composites biodeterioration by the bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Experimental works were focused on the comparison of special cement composites and its resistance affected by the activities of used sulphur-oxidising

  1. Assessment of ferrous chloride and Portland cement for the remediation of chromite ore processing residue.

    PubMed

    Jagupilla, Santhi C; Wazne, Mahmoud; Moon, Deok Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) is an industrial waste containing up to 7% chromium (Cr) including up to 5% hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)]. The remediation of COPR has been challenging due to the slow release of Cr(VI) from a clinker like material and thereby the incomplete detoxification of Cr(VI) by chemical reagents. The use of sulfur based reagents such as ferrous sulfate and calcium polysulfide to detoxify Cr(VI) has exasperated the swell potential of COPR upon treatment. This study investigated the use of ferrous chloride alone and in combination with Portland cement to address the detoxification of Cr(VI) in COPR and the potential swell of COPR. Chromium regulatory tests, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were used to assess the treatment results. The treatment results indicated that Cr(VI) concentrations for the acid pretreated micronized COPR as measured by XANES analyses were below the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) standard of 20 mg kg(-1). The Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) Cr concentrations for all acid pretreated samples also were reduced below the TCLP regulatory limit of 5 mg L(-1). Moreover, the TCLP Cr concentration for the acid pretreated COPR with particle size ⩽0.010 mm were less than the universal treatment standard (UTS) of 0.6 mg L(-1). The treatment appears to have destabilized all COPR potential swell causing minerals. The unconfined compressive strength (UCS) for the treated samples increased significantly upon treatment with Portland cement.

  2. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) for producing silicon from dichlorosilane in a 1,000 MT/yr plant was continued. Progress and status for the chemical engineering analysis of the HSC process are reported for the primary process design engineering activities: base case conditions (85%), reaction chemistry (85%), process flow diagram (60%), material balance (60%), energy balance (30%), property data (30%), equipment design (20%) and major equipment list (10%). Engineering design of the initial distillation column (D-01, stripper column) in the process was initiated. The function of the distillation column is to remove volatile gases (such as hydrogen and nitrogen) which are dissolved in liquid chlorosilanes. Initial specifications and results for the distillation column design are reported including the variation of tray requirements (equilibrium stages) with reflux ratio for the distillation.

  3. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for sulfoaluminate cement clinker production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Shi, Huisheng; Guo, Xiaolu

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of partially substituting raw materials with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in sulfoaluminate cement (SAC) clinker production was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), compressive strength and free expansion ratio testing. Three different leaching tests were used to assess the environmental impact of the produced material. Experimental results show that the replacement of MSWI fly ash could be taken up to 30% in the raw mixes. The good quality SAC clinkers are obtained by controlling the compositional parameters at alkalinity modulus (C(m)) around 1.05, alumina-sulfur ratio (P) around 2.5, alumina-silica ratio (N) around 2.0~3.0 and firing the raw mixes at 1250 °C for 2h. The compressive strengths of SAC are high in early age while that develop slowly in later age. Results also show that the expansive properties of SAC are strongly depended on the gypsum content. Leaching studies of toxic elements in the hydrated SAC-based system reveal that all the investigated elements are well bounded in the clinker minerals or immobilized by the hydration products. Although some limited positive results indicate that the SAC prepared from MSWI fly ash would present no immediate thread to the environment, the long-term toxicity leaching behavior needs to be further studied.

  4. Performance of lime-soda sinter process residue in the manufacture of sulfate-resistant portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Chesley, J.A.; Burnet, G.

    1986-04-25

    The residue from the Ames Lime-Soda Sinter Process for recovering alumina from power plant fly ash consists largely of dicalcium silicate and shows promise as a raw material for the manufacture of a low-alumina, sulfate-resistant portland cement. A laboratory burnability study has been conducted to determine the best way to utilize this raw material from both clinker quality and economic perspectives. These tests are essential when a new material, such as the lime-sinter process residue, it to be considered as a possible cement raw material. The amount of unreacted lime can be used as a measure of the reactivity of a raw mix by indicating the extent to which the cement reactions have progressed. Conditions of residence time and temperature used for the burnability tests were chosen to simulate actual kiln operation. A factorial experimental design made of the parameters of burning temperature, lime content, and lumina (flux) content. Preliminary results from this study indicate that a raw mix made from the sinter residue yields a satisfactory cement.

  5. [The work process and occupational health risks in a cement factory].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fátima Sueli Neto; Oliveira, Simone; Reis, Marcelo Moreno dos; Silva, Célia Regina Sousa da; Menezes, Marco Antônio Carneiro; Dias, Ana Elisa Xavier de Oliveira e; Moreira, Josino Costa; Kuryiama, Gisele Sayuri

    2002-01-01

    The authors evaluate the work process and its effect on workers' health in a cement factory in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The interactive methodology consisted of different approaches to assessing the workplace through the incorporation of various institutions working in the field of Workers' Health, professionals from different backgrounds, and the trade union, valorizing the workers' experience and actively contributing to the surveillance process under the Unified National Health System (SUS). Levels of particulate matter and noise were measured. The mean level of free crystalline silica in the particulate matter was 2%, resulting in a tolerance limit as specified under Brazilian legislation (NR-15), or 2.0mg/m3. The concentration of particles both in samples collected in the workers' respiratory zone and in area samples varied from 3.59 to 52.44mg/m3. Noise varied from 83dB to 110dB. The majority of the values were higher than the maximum limits set by Brazilian legislation. These results, together with the opinions expressed by the workers themselves, showed an unhealthy workplace and work process, placing the workers' health at risk.

  6. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Chemical engineering analysis was continued for the HSC process (Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation) in which solar cell silicon is produced in a 1,000 MT/yr plant. Progress and status are reported for the primary engineering activities involved in the preliminary process engineering design of the plant base case conditions (96%), reaction chemistry (96%), process flow diagram (85%), material balance (85%), energy balance (60%), property data (60%), equipment design (40%), major equipment list (30%) and labor requirements (10%). Engineering design of the second distillation column (D-02, TCS column) in the process was completed. The design is based on a 97% recovery of the light key (TCS, trichlorosilane) in the distillate and a 97% recovery of the heavy key (TET, silicon tetrachloride) in the bottoms. At a reflux ratio of 2, the specified recovery of TCS and TET is achieved with 20 trays (equilibrium stages, N=20). Respective feed tray locations are 9, 12 and 15 (NF sub 1 = 9, NF sub 2 = 12,, and NF sub 3 = 15). A total condenser is used for the distillation which is conducted at a pressure of 90 psia.

  7. Leaching of metals from cement under simulated environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huixia; Wei, Fang; Tang, Jingchun; Giesy, John P

    2016-03-15

    Leaching of metals from cement under various environmental conditions was measured to evaluate their environmental safety. A cement product containing clinker, which was produced from cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, was solidified and leaching of metals was characterized using the 8-period test. Concentrations and speciation of metals in cements were determined. Effects of ambient environment and particle size on leachability of metals and mineralogical phases of cement mortars were evaluated by use of XRD and SEM. Results indicated that metals in cements were leachable in various media in descending order of: sea water, groundwater and acid rain. Cr, Ni, As, Co and V were leached by simulated sea water, while Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn, Sb and Tl were not leached in simulated sea water, groundwater or acid rain. When exposed to simulated acid rain or groundwater, amounts of Cr, Ni, As and V leached was inversely proportional to particle size of cement mortar. According to the one-dimensional diffusion equation, Cr was most leachable and the cumulative leached mass was predicted to be 9.6 mg kg(-1) after 20 years. Results of this study are useful in predicting releases of metals from cement products containing ash and clinkers cement kiln co-processing of hazardous wastes, so that they can be safely applied in the environment.

  8. NASA Product Peer Review Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's product peer review process. The contents include: 1) Inspection/Peer Review at NASA; 2) Reasons for product peer reviews; 3) Different types of peer reviews; and 4) NASA requirements for peer reviews. This presentation also includes a demonstration of an actual product peer review.

  9. Fan System Optimization Improves Production and Saves Energy at Ash Grove Cement Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-01

    This case study describes an optimization project implemented on a fan system at Ash Grove Cement Company, which led to annual energy and maintenance savings of $16,000 and 175,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh).

  10. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hongyou; Masanet, Eric; Price, Lynn

    2009-05-29

    The use of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to understand the embodied energy, environmental impacts, and potential energy-savings of manufactured products has become more widespread among researchers in recent years. This paper reviews recent LCA studies in the cement industry in China and in other countries and provides an assessment of the methodology used by the researchers compared to ISO LCA standards (ISO 14040:2006, ISO 14044:2006, and ISO/TR 14048:2002). We evaluate whether the authors provide information on the intended application, targeted audience, functional unit, system boundary, data sources, data quality assessment, data disaggregation and other elements, and draw conclusions regarding the level of adherence to ISO standards for the papers reviewed. We found that China researchers have gained much experience during last decade, but still have room for improvement in establishing boundaries, assessing data quality, identifying data sources, and explaining limitations. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future LCA research in China.

  12. Pore-filling cements in turbidites; Southern California: Products of early diagenesis and dewatering of shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krystinik, L. F.

    Cementation of deep sea fan deposits which begins at the sediment water interface and continues progressively to the maximum depths was studied. The type and intensity of cementation is determined, in part, by the labile components within the system. Authigenic iron-rich smectite (AIRS) is the earliest cement in deep sea sediment. Formation of AIRS begins with the dissolution of biogenic silica. The Stevens sand provides insight into the early stages of graywacke formation. A significant volume of nondetrital, nonpseudomatrix clay is generated by precipitation of dissolved species carried into a sandstone body by waters expelled from adjacent shale. The Stevens also provides insight into turbidite sedimentation within a restricted basin supplied by several sediment sources. Most Cenozoic turbidities from southern California contain either calcite cement which occludes porosity and preserves the initial character of the sediment, or a silica clay cement which reduces porosity slightly, but occludes permeability. Cementation of sandstones by clays precipitated from pore fluids generated in adjacent shales may be a first step toward the genesis of graywacke.

  13. Processing and in vivo evaluation of multiphasic calcium phosphate cements with dual tricalcium phosphate phases.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Heredia, Marco A; Bongio, Matilde; Bohner, Marc; Cuijpers, Vincent; Winnubst, Louis A J A; van Dijk, Natasja; Wolke, Joop G C; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P; Jansen, John A

    2012-09-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) use the simultaneous presence of several calcium phosphates phases. This is done to generate specific bulk and in vivo properties. This work has processed and evaluated novel multiphasic CPCs containing dual tricalcium phosphate (TCPs) phases. Dual TCPs containing α- and β-TCP phases were obtained by thermal treatment. Standard CPC (S-CPC) was composed of α-TCP, anhydrous dicalcium phosphate and precipitated hydroxyapatite, while modified CPC (DT-CPC) included both α- and β-TCP. Physicochemical characterization of these CPCs was based on scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area (SSA) and particle size (PS) analysis and mechanical properties. This characterization allowed the selection of one DT-CPC for setting time, cohesion and biological assessment compared with S-CPC. Biological assessment was carried out using a tibial intramedullary cavity model and subcutaneous pouches in guinea pigs. Differences in the surface morphology and crystalline phases of the treated TCPs were detected, although PS analysis of the milled CPC powders produced similar results. SSA analysis was significantly higher for DT-CPC with α-TCP treated at 1100°C for 5h. Poorer mechanical properties were found for DT-CPC with α-TCP treated at 1000°C. Setting time and cohesion, as well as the in vivo performance, were similar in the selected DT-CPC and the S-CPC. Both CPCs created the desired host reactions in vivo.

  14. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash for sulfoaluminate cement clinker production

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Kai; Shi Huisheng; Guo Xiaolu

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > The replacement can be taken up to 30% of MSWI fly ash in the raw mix. > The novelty compositional parameters were defined, their optimum values were determined. > Expansive property of SAC is strongly depended on gypsum content. > Three leaching test methods are used to assess the environmental impact. - Abstract: The feasibility of partially substituting raw materials with municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in sulfoaluminate cement (SAC) clinker production was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), compressive strength and free expansion ratio testing. Three different leaching tests were used to assess the environmental impact of the produced material. Experimental results show that the replacement of MSWI fly ash could be taken up to 30% in the raw mixes. The good quality SAC clinkers are obtained by controlling the compositional parameters at alkalinity modulus (C{sub m}) around 1.05, alumina-sulfur ratio (P) around 2.5, alumina-silica ratio (N) around 2.0{approx}3.0 and firing the raw mixes at 1250 deg. C for 2 h. The compressive strengths of SAC are high in early age while that develop slowly in later age. Results also show that the expansive properties of SAC are strongly depended on the gypsum content. Leaching studies of toxic elements in the hydrated SAC-based system reveal that all the investigated elements are well bounded in the clinker minerals or immobilized by the hydration products. Although some limited positive results indicate that the SAC prepared from MSWI fly ash would present no immediate thread to the environment, the long-term toxicity leaching behavior needs to be further studied.

  15. Effect of mixing process on microleakage of glass ionomer cements used in atraumatic restorative treatment on primary molars.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; do Vale, Miriam Pimenta Parreira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida

    2007-01-01

    Aiming to assess the effect of mixing process on microleakage, 40 primary molars were filled with encapsulated glass ionomer cements (GICs) (Vidrion, RCaps and Fuji, IXGPFAST) or with GICs stored in bottles (Vidrion, R and Fuji, IX). Dye penetration was assessed using scores. Encapsulation and mechanical mixing have reduced significantly marginal microleakage levels in class II restorations performed with conventional GICs if compared to the values obtained by their bottled correspondents (p=0.000).

  16. The use of electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring the hydration products of Portland cement mortars with high percentage of pozzolans

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, J.M.; Fita, I.C.; Soriano, L.; Payá, J.; Borrachero, M.V.

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, mortars and pastes containing large replacement of pozzolan were studied by mechanical strength, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of metakaolin (35%) and fly ash (60%) was evaluated and compared with an inert mineral addition (andalusite). The portlandite content was measured, finding that the pozzolanic reaction produced cementing systems with all portlandite fixed. The EIS measurements were analyzed by the equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) method. An EEC with three branches in parallel was applied. The dc resistance was related to the degree of hydration and allowed us to characterize plain and blended mortars. A constant phase element (CPE) quantified the electrical properties of the hydration products located in the solid–solution interface and was useful to distinguish the role of inert and pozzolanic admixtures present in the cement matrix.

  17. High Fragmentation Steel Production Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    phase of the project entailed the purchase and metallurgical characterization of two heats of HF-1 steel from different vendors. Performed by...At>-A 13^ nzt AD AD-E401 117 CONTRACTOR REPORT ARLCD-CR-83049 HIGH FRAGMENTATION STEEL PRODUCTION PROCESS ^"fP-PTTMirj A 1 James F. Kane...Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER High Fragmentation Steel Production Process 7. AUTHORfs; James F. Kane, Ronald L. Kivak, Colin C. MacCrindle

  18. Characterization of U(VI)-phases in corroded cement products by micro(μ)-spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Brendebach, B.; Bube, C.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Prüßmann, T.; Rickers-Appel, K.; Schild, D.; Soballa, E.; Vitova, T.

    2013-04-01

    Cementation is an industrial scale conditioning method applied to fix and solidify liquid low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LLW/ILW) prior to underground disposal in geological formations.To assist prognosis of the long-term safety of cemented waste, alteration of uranium doped cement productswas studied in chloride-rich solutions relevant for final LLW/ILW disposal in rock salt. After long-time exposure of the full-scale LLW/ILW simulates to concentrated NaCl and MgCl2 brines, solid samples were retrieved for chemical and mineralogical analysis with an emphasis on uranium speciation in the corroded cement matrix.Bulk and recent spatially resolved micro(μ) U L3-XAFS measurements point to the occurrence of a diuranate type U(VI) phase forming throughout the corroded cement monoliths. U-enriched hot spots with dimensions up to several tens of μm turn out to be generally X-ray amorphous.

  19. 76 FR 12370 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Portland Cement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Cement Association Notice is hereby given that, on February 02, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the... Cement Association (``PCA'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and..., PA; Lehigh Cement Company LLC, Allentown, PA; Lehigh Northwest Cement Company, Seattle, WA;...

  20. 77 FR 5573 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Portland Cement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Cement Association Notice is hereby given that, on January 6, 2012, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the... Cement Association (``PCA'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and... this venture. Also, Texas-Lehigh Cement Company, Buda, TX; Arizona Cement Association, Phoenix,...

  1. Comparison of modified sulfur cement and hydraulic cement for encapsulation of radioactive and mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01

    The majority of solidification/stabilization systems for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed waste, both in the commercial sector and at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, utilize hydraulic cement (such as portland cement) to encapsulate waste materials and yield a monolithic solid waste form for disposal. A new and innovative process utilizing modified sulfur cement developed by the US Bureau of Mines has been applied at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the encapsulation of many of these problem'' wastes. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material, and as such, it can be heated above it's melting point (120{degree}C), combined with dry waste products to form a homogeneous mixture, and cooled to form a monolithic solid product. Under sponsorship of the DOE, research and development efforts at BNL have successfully applied the modified sulfur cement process for treatment of a range of LLWs including sodium sulfate salts, boric acid salts, and incinerator bottom ash and for mixed waste contaminated incinerator fly ash. Process development studies were conducted to determine optimal waste loadings for each waste type. Property evaluation studies were conducted to test waste form behavior under disposal conditions by applying relevant performance testing criteria established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (for LLW) and the Environmental Protection Agency (for hazardous wastes). Based on both processing and performance considerations, significantly greater waste loadings were achieved using modified sulfur cement when compared with hydraulic cement. Technology demonstration of the modified sulfur cement encapsulation system using production-scale equipment is scheduled for FY 1991. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Effects of the granularity of raw materials on the hydration and hardening process of calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changsheng; Shao, Huifang; Chen, Feiyue; Zheng, Haiyan

    2003-10-01

    Effects of the granularity of the raw materials on the hydration and hardening process of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) composed of equimolar tetracalcium phosphate (TECP) and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) were investigated systematically. The variation of pH value in CPC slurry indicated that the control step of CPC hydration was the dissolution of DCPA under these experimental conditions. Reducing the particle size of DCPA could accelerate the hydration rate, and decreasing the particle size of TECP would expedite the dissolution of DCPA, which would obviously result in a faster hydration rate. The results of isothermal conduction calorimetry showed that reducing the particle size of TECP could increase the conversion ratio of starting materials to hydration products, which would lead to an increase in the compressive strength of the hardened body of CPC. The sample composed of the smallest particle size of DCPA and TECP obtained the compressive strength of 41 MPa, which would not attain the highest compressive strength, 49 MPa. The smaller the particle size of either DCPA or TECP, the shorter the setting time was. During the setting process of CPC, the microstructure progresses from a gel structure to an agglomeration-crystallization structure. The calculated values of setting time from the rheological model coincided with the experimental data very well. The parameters of AC impedance spectroscopy were closely correlated with the mean pore diameter and porosity of the CPC hardened body. The results of AC impedance spectroscopy further verified that a small particle size of raw materials could result in high hydration rate and the compressive strength of 49.1 MPa.

  3. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  4. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  5. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  6. Mineralogical composition and phase-to-phase relationships in natural hydraulic lime and/or natural cement - raw materials and burnt products revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Racek, Martin; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to modern process of production of cement clinker, traditional burning of natural hydraulic lime below sintering temperature relied on the formation of new phases from ion migration between neighbouring mineral grains composing raw material. The importance of the mineralogical composition and spatial distribution of rock-forming minerals in impure limestones used as a raw material for natural hydraulic lime presents not well explored issue in the scientific literature. To fill this gap, the recent study focuses in detailed analysis of experimentally burnt impure limestones (mostly from Barrandian area, Bohemian Massif). The phase changes were documented by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) coupled with x-ray elemental mapping. The latest allowed for visualization of distribution of elements within raw materials and burnt products. SEM/EDS study brought valuable data on the presence of transitional and/or minor phases, which were poorly detectable by other methods.

  7. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  8. Recovery Act Production of Algal BioCrude Oil from Cement Plant Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Weber; Norman Whitton

    2010-09-30

    The consortium, led by Sunrise Ridge Algae Inc, completed financial, legal, siting, engineering and environmental permitting preparations for a proposed demonstration project that would capture stack gas from an operating cement plant and convert the carbon dioxide to beneficial use as a liquid crude petroleum substitute and a coal substitute, using algae grown in a closed system, then harvested and converted using catalyzed pyrolysis.

  9. Copper-promoted cementation of antimony in hydrochloric acid system: A green protocol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Kui; Li, Ying-Ying; Cao, Hua-Zhen; Zheng, Guo-Qu

    2015-12-15

    A new method of recovering antimony in hydrochloric acid system by cementation with copper powder was proposed and carried out at laboratory scale. Thermodynamic analysis and cyclic voltammetry test were conducted to study the cementation process. This is a novel antimony removal technology and quite meets the requirements of green chemistry. The main cement product Cu2Sb is a promising anodic material for lithium and sodium ion battery. And nearly all consumed copper powder are transformed into CuCl which is an important industrial material. The effect of reaction temperature, stoichiometric ratio of Cu to Sb(III), stirring rate and concentration of HCl on the cementation efficiency of antimony were investigated in detail. Optimized cementation condition is obtained at 60 °C for 120 min and stirring rate of 600 rpm with Cu/Sb(III) stoichiometric ratio of 6 in 3 mol L(-1) HCl. At this time, nearly all antimony can be removed by copper powder and the cementation efficiency is over 99%. The structure and morphologies of the cement products were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Results show that the reaction temperature has little influence on the morphology of the cement products which consist of particles with various sizes. The activation energy of the cementation antimony on copper is 37.75 kJ mol(-1), indicating a chemically controlled step. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry results show that no stibine generates during the cementation process.

  10. Interfacial ultramorphology evaluation of resin luting cements to dentin: a correlative scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; André, Carolina Bosso; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the dentin-resin cements interfacial ultramorphologies using two different methods: scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four commercial products were evaluated: two conventional cementing system (RelyX ARC/Adper™ Scotchbond™ Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE and Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond, Kuraray) and two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray). Prepolymerized resin disks (Sinfony, 3M ESPE) were cemented on oclusal dentin surfaces of 24 third human molars, simulating the indirect restorations. After 24 h, teeth were sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs and processed for microscopy analyses (SEM or TEM/ n = 3). Qualitative characterization of dentin-resin cement interface was performed. Hybrid layer formation with long and dense resin tags was observed only for RelyX ARC cementing system. Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond system revealed few and short resin tags formation, whereas no hybridization and resin tags were detected for self-adhesive resin cements. Some interfacial regions exhibited that the self-adhesive resin cements were not bonded to dentin, presenting bubbles or voids at the interfaces. In conclusion, TEM and SEM bonding interface analyses showed ultramorphological variations among resin cements, which are directly related to dental bonding strategies used for each resin cement tested.

  11. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  12. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lu, Hongyou; Williams, Christopher; Price, Lynn

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe international best practices for pre-processing and coprocessing of MSW and sewage sludge in cement plants, for the benefit of countries that wish to develop co-processing capacity. The report is divided into three main sections. Section 2 describes the fundamentals of co-processing, Section 3 describes exemplary international regulatory and institutional frameworks for co-processing, and Section 4 describes international best practices related to the technological aspects of co-processing.

  13. Discovery Reconceived: Product before Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Dor

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the question, "What exactly about a mathematical concept should students discover, when they study it via discovery learning?", I present and demonstrate an interpretation of discovery pedagogy that attempts to address its criticism. My approach hinges on decoupling the solution process from its resultant product. Whereas theories of…

  14. Biological Processes for Hydrogen Production.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J

    Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed.

  15. An extrapolation method for compressive strength prediction of hydraulic cement products

    SciTech Connect

    Siqueira Tango, C.E. de

    1998-07-01

    The basis for the AMEBA Method is presented. A strength-time function is used to extrapolate the predicted cementitious material strength for a late (ALTA) age, based on two earlier age strengths--medium (MEDIA) and low (BAIXA) ages. The experimental basis for the method is data from the IPT-Brazil laboratory and the field, including a long-term study on concrete, research on limestone, slag, and fly-ash additions, and quality control data from a cement factory, a shotcrete tunnel lining, and a grout for structural repair. The method applicability was also verified for high-performance concrete with silica fume. The formula for predicting late age (e.g., 28 days) strength, for a given set of involved ages (e.g., 28,7, and 2 days) is normally a function only of the two earlier ages` (e.g., 7 and 2 days) strengths. This equation has been shown to be independent on materials variations, including cement brand, and is easy to use also graphically. Using the AMEBA method, and only needing to know the type of cement used, it has been possible to predict strengths satisfactorily, even without the preliminary tests which are required in other methods.

  16. Magnetic properties and element concentrations in lichens exposed to airborne pollutants released during cement production.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Luca; Winkler, Aldo; Guttová, Anna; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Loppi, Stefano

    2016-02-15

    The content of selected elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Ti, V and Zn) was measured in samples of the lichen Evernia prunastri exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, limestone and basalt quarries and urban and agricultural areas in SW Slovakia. Lichens transplanted around the investigated quarries and the cement mill rapidly (30 days) reflected the deposition of dust-associated elements, namely Ca (at the cement mill and the limestone quarry) and Fe, Ti and V (around the cement mill and the basalt quarry), and their content remained significantly higher throughout the whole period (30-180 days) with respect to the surrounding environment. Airborne pollutants (such as S) progressively increased in the study area from 30 to 180 days. The magnetic properties of lichen transplants exposed for 180 days have been characterized and compared with those of native lichens (Xanthoria parietina) and neighbouring bark, soil and rock samples, in order to test the suitability of native and transplanted samples as air pollution magnetic biomonitors. The magnetic mineralogy was homogeneous in all samples, with the exception of the samples from the basalt quarry. The transplants showed excellent correlations between the saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs) and the content of Fe. Native samples had a similar magnetic signature, but the values of the concentration-dependent magnetic parameters were up to two orders of magnitude higher, reflecting higher concentrations of magnetic particles. The concentrations of As, Ca and Cr in lichens correlated with Mrs values after neglecting the samples from the basalt quarry, which showed distinct magnetic properties, suggesting the cement mill as a likely source. Conversely, Ti and Mn were mostly (but not exclusively) associated with dust from the basalt quarry. It is suggested that the natural geological characteristics of the substrate may strongly affect the magnetic properties of lichen thalli

  17. Influence of cement kiln dust substitution on the mechanical properties of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaib, M.M.; Balaha, M.M.; Abdel-Rahman, A.G.

    2000-03-01

    Large quantities of cement kiln dust (CKD) are produced during the manufacture of cement clinker by the dry process. The technical and economical problems that arise for the semi-manufacture of raw materials used, energy and transportation of dust from the plant to outside, as well as the severe pollution to the surrounding atmosphere show the necessity of utilizing cement dust as one of the main objectives of the investigation. The cement dust contains a mixture of raw feed as well as calcined materials with some volatile salts. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of cement dust substitution instead of ordinary Portland cement (OPC), blast furnace slag cement (BFSC), and sulfate resistance cement (SRC) on the mechanical properties of some concrete mixes containing them, and also, to determine the optimum quantity of CKD which could be recycled in the manufacture of these types of cements. Useful conclusions and recommendations concerning the use of different amounts of CKD in the production of some blended cements as a partial substitution from different types of cements were obtained.

  18. Synthesis: Intertwining product and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis is a proposed systematic process for rapidly creating different members of a program family. Family members are described by variations in their requirements. Requirements variations are mapped to variations on a standard design to generate production quality code and documentation. The approach is made feasible by using principles underlying design for change. Synthesis incorporates ideas from rapid prototyping, application generators, and domain analysis. The goals of Synthesis and the Synthesis process are discussed. The technology needed and the feasibility of the approach are also briefly discussed. The status of current efforts to implement Synthesis methodologies is presented.

  19. Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

    2010-12-22

    This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

  20. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  1. 75 FR 4423 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Portland Cement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Cement Association Notice is hereby given that, on December 14, 2009, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the... Cement Association (``PCA'') has filed written notifications simultaneously with the Attorney General and... damages under specified circumstances. Specifically, Continental Cement, Hannibal, MO has been added as...

  2. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fakhim, Babak; Hassani, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghodousi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3 wt%) of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise. PMID:24489487

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

    2008-01-31

    This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this

  4. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, J.W.C.

    1959-09-29

    A process is described for the production of uranium by the autothermic reduction of an anhydrous uranium halide with an alkaline earth metal, preferably magnesium One feature is the initial reduction step which is brought about by locally bringing to reaction temperature a portion of a mixture of the reactants in an open reaction vessel having in contact with the mixture a lining of substantial thickness composed of calcium fluoride. The lining is prepared by coating the interior surface with a plastic mixture of calcium fluoride and water and subsequently heating the coating in situ until at last the exposed surface is substantially anhydrous.

  5. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  6. Utilization of industrial waste products as pozzolanic material in cemented paste backfill of high sulphide mill tailings.

    PubMed

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Cihangir, Ferdi; Kesimal, Ayhan; Deveci, Haci; Alp, Ibrahim

    2009-09-15

    In this study, the potential use of the industrial waste products including waste glass (WG), fly ash (FA), granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS) and silica fume (SF) as pozzolanic additive for the partial replacement of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in cemented paste backfill (CPB) of sulphide-rich mill tailings was investigated. The influence of these industrial waste products on the short- and long-term mechanical performance of CPB was demonstrated. The rate of development of strength of CPB samples tended to slow down when the pozzolanic wastes were incorporated or increased in dosage in the binder phase. Severe losses (by 26%) in the strength of CPB samples produced from exclusively OPC occurred after an initial curing period of 56 days. The addition of WG (10-30 wt%) as a partial replacement of OPC was observed to aggravate further the strength losses of CPB samples. GBFS, FA and SF appeared to improve the long-term performance of CPB samples; albeit, only GBFS and SF could be incorporated into the binder phase only at certain levels i.e. up to 20 wt% GBFS and 15wt% SF in order to maintain a threshold strength level of 0.7MPa over 360 days. SEM studies have provided further insight into the microstucture of CPB and confirmed the formation of deleterious gypsum as the expansive phase. These findings have demonstrated that the industrial waste products including GBFS and SF can be suitably used as mineral additives to improve the long-term mechanical performance of CPB produced from sulphide-rich tailings as well as to reduce the binder costs in a CPB plant.

  7. Process optimization for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Singh, Veena; Solanki, Kusum; Gupta, Munishwar N

    2008-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alkyl ester of long chain fatty acids and is considered to leave smaller footprint on the environment. It is produced by transesterification of a fat/oil with a short chain primary alcohol like methanol or ethanol. The three routes to its preparation are: alkali catalyzed, acid catalyzed and lipase-catalyzed transesterification. This review summarizes the key patents filed over the last few decades. The chemistry used in these patents is one of the three routes mentioned above. In few patents, heterogeneous catalysts have been used for catalyzing the transesterification process. The innovations mostly concern fine-tuning of the reaction conditions, plant design to improve logistics and use of glycerol produced as a by-product during biodiesel production. There is a concern that biofuels like biodiesel cut into resources like land meant for food crop production. Life cycle studies also create doubt about there being energy efficient fuels. Judicious choices that would differ with different regions are recommended. For the next few decades till better alternatives like hydrogen become viable, biodiesel would continue to be an important "alternative fuel".

  8. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  9. Design, Explanation, and Evaluation of Training Model Structures Based on Learning Organization--In the Cement Industry with a Nominal Production Capacity of Ten Thousand Tons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahimian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mojtaba; Abbspour, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effectiveness of training based on learning organization in the staff of cement industry with production capacity over ten thousand tons. The purpose of this study is to propose a training model based on learning organization. For this purpose, the factors of organizational learning were introduced by…

  10. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of chrysotile and crocidolite fibers with IR-spectroscopy: application to asbestos-cement products.

    PubMed

    Balducci, D; Valerio, F

    1986-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectrophotometry allows simple and quick qualitative and quantitative evaluations of different kinds of asbestos, as well as of other inorganic particles. In particular, chrysotile and crocidolite have characteristic IR spectra and optical density measures of 2,710 nm band for chrysotile, of 12,820 nm band for crocidolite permit quantitative evaluation of each fiber alone or in mixture. IR spectra also give informations about changes of fiber structure and of chemical composition due, for example, to thermal treatment or acid leaching. The analytical method we developed can detect levels as low as 0.1 mg of fiber in a 300 mg disk of KBr using a low cost IR spectrophotometer. The use of a Fourier Transform IR spectrophotometer (FTIR) improves dramatically the sensitivity and selectivity. Computer assisted analysis of spectra offers the possibility to reduce matrix interferences and to compare different spectra. Examples of IR technique applied to asbestos-cement products and insulating materials are presented.

  11. Effect of processing conditions of dicalcium phosphate cements on graft resorption and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Zhang, Yu Ling; Tamimi, Faleh; Barralet, Jake

    2017-02-15

    Dicalcium phosphate cements (brushite and monetite) are resorbable biomaterials with osteoconductive potential for bone repair and regeneration that have yet to gain widespread commercial use. Brushite can be converted to monetite by heat treatments additionally resulting in various changes in the physico-chemical properties. However, since conversion is most commonly performed using autoclave sterilisation (wet heating), it is uncertain whether the properties observed for monetite as a result of heating brushite under dry conditions affect resorption and bone formation favourably. This study was designed to produce monetite grafts of differing physical form by autoclaving and dry heating (under vacuum) to be compared with brushite biomaterials in an orthotopic pre-clinical implantation model in rabbit for 12weeks. It was observed that monetite grafts had higher porosity and specific surface area than their brushite precursors. The autoclaved monetite grafts had compressive strength reduced by 50% when compared with their brushite precursors. However, the dry heat converted monetite grafts had compressive strength comparable with brushite. Results from in vivo experiments revealed that both types of monetite graft materials resorbed faster than brushite and more bone formation was achieved. There was no significant difference in the amount of bone formed between the two types of monetite grafts. The implanted brushite grafts underwent phase transformation to form hydroxyapatite, which ultimately limited bioresorption. However, this was not observed in both types of monetite grafts. In summary, both autoclaving and dry heating the preset brushite cement grafts resulted in monetite biomaterials which were more resorbable with potential to be investigated and optimized for orthopaedic and maxillofacial bone repair and regeneration applications.

  12. Cancer mortality in towns in the vicinity of installations for the production of cement, lime, plaster, and magnesium oxide.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Castelló, Adela; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether there might be excess cancer mortality in the vicinity of Spanish installations for the production of cement, lime, plaster, and magnesium oxide, according to different categories of industrial activity. An ecologic study was designed to examine municipal mortality due to 33 types of cancer (period 1997-2006) in Spain. Population exposure to pollution was estimated on the basis of distance from town to industrial facility. Using spatial Besag-York-Mollié regression models with integrated nested Laplace approximations for Bayesian inference, we assessed the relative risk of dying from cancer in a 5-km zone around installations, analyzed the effect of category of industrial activity according to the manufactured product, and conducted individual analyses within a 50-km radius of each installation. Excess all cancer mortality (relative risk, 95% credible interval) was detected in the vicinity of these installations as a whole (1.04, 1.01-1.07 in men; 1.03, 1.00-1.06 in women), and, principally, in the vicinity of cement installations (1.05, 1.01-1.09 in men). Special mention should be made of the results for tumors of colon-rectum in both sexes (1.07, 1.01-1.14 in men; 1.10, 1.03-1.16 in women), and pleura (1.71, 1.24-2.28), peritoneum (1.62, 1.15-2.20), gallbladder (1.21, 1.02-1.42), bladder (1.11, 1.03-1.20) and stomach (1.09, 1.00-1.18) in men in the vicinity of all such installations. Our results suggest an excess risk of dying from cancer, especially in colon-rectum, in towns near these industries.

  13. Chemical production processes and systems

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; White, James F.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2014-06-17

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  14. Chemical production processes and systems

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E; Muzatko, Danielle S; White, James F; Zacher, Alan H

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogenolysis systems are provided that can include a reactor housing an Ru-comprising hydrogenolysis catalyst and wherein the contents of the reactor is maintained at a neutral or acidic pH. Reactant reservoirs within the system can include a polyhydric alcohol compound and a base, wherein a weight ratio of the base to the compound is less than 0.05. Systems also include the product reservoir comprising a hydrogenolyzed polyhydric alcohol compound and salts of organic acids, and wherein the moles of base are substantially equivalent to the moles of salts or organic acids. Processes are provided that can include an Ru-comprising catalyst within a mixture having a neutral or acidic pH. A weight ratio of the base to the compound can be between 0.01 and 0.05 during exposing.

  15. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  16. Cement evaluation tool: a new approach to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, B.; Dumont, A.; Pittman, D.; Seeman, B.

    1982-08-01

    Cement bond logging achieves its greatest utility when it provides the production engineer with precise indications of cement strength and distribution around the casing. Zone isolation is of critical importance in production. Previous logging systems have yielded measures of cement bond that were circumferential averages of cement quality. These were difficult to interpret. Additionally, they were sensitive to the degree of shear coupling between pipe, cement, and formation and thus were affected by microannulus. The cement evaluation tool (CET) described here overcomes these difficulties. It provides a measurement of cement presence and strength, which is largely insensitive to microannulus. Its log output is interpreted easily. Tool design allows examination of the casing circumferentially at each depth. Impedance behind casing is measured. Laboratory calibration measurements allow this to be presented in terms of cement compressive strength. Cement channels are distinguished easily, and a zone isolation indicator can be presented. Additionally, casing internal diameter and distortion are displayed. European and North American field tests have been completed, and performance for a variety of well conditions is discussed. The ability of the tool to identify channels is confirmed. Sequential runs with and without excess pressure demonstrate immunity to microannulus in cases where CBL is affected but where microannulus is small enough to prohibit hydraulic communication. Geometrical measurements have been good indicators of casing deformation and have identified casing corrosion and wear.

  17. Usage of internal magnetic fields to study the early hydration process of cement paste by MGSE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepišnik, Janez; Ardelean, Ioan

    2016-11-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients, arising within the porous media due to susceptibility differences at the interfaces of solid and liquid as well as due to the contained magnetic impurities, can be employed by the method of modulated gradient spin echo to get insight into the velocity autocorrelation spectrum of liquid confined in the porous structure. New theoretical treatment of spin interaction with the radio-frequency field and the simultaneously applied static non-uniform magnetic field provides the formula that match well with the measurement of restricted diffusion of water in pores of cement paste. Its fitting to the experimental data gives the changes in the mean size of capillary pores, the spin relaxation and the magnitude of mean internal magnetic field gradients during the induction period and early acceleration stage of hydration processes at different temperatures.

  18. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  19. Climate change: The impact of the third conference of the parties at Kyoto on the U.S. Portland cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, D.; Nisbet, M.; O`Hare, A.

    1998-12-31

    The paper provides, as background, a brief review of the structure of the US cement industry. It outlines the growth trends of the industry over the last 20 years. It describes the sources and significance of cement imports in the US market, and the importance of exports to Canadian cement producers. The sources of CO{sub 2}, the primary greenhouse gas emitted in the cement manufacturing process, are explained and the impact of improved energy efficiency and fuel switching on CO{sub 2} emissions per ton of product are discussed. The aspects of the Kyoto Protocol relevant to the US cement industry are analyzed as are the types of impacts they can be expected to have on: cement trade, domestic cement production, long term growth of the US cement industry, and US cement industry CO{sub 2} emissions. The paper projects the US cement industry CO{sub 2} emissions to 2010, taking into account anticipated improvements in energy efficiency. It discusses manufacturing process and changes that could be made to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The paper also covers the types of product modifications that might be made to reduce the embodied CO{sub 2} content. Where possible the potential reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions from process and product changes are quantified.

  20. Acid attack on hydrated cement — Effect of mineral acids on the degradation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gutberlet, T.; Hilbig, H.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2015-08-15

    During acid attack on concrete structural components, a degraded layer develops whose properties as a protective barrier are decisive for durability. {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy and {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy were used with XRD to investigate the degraded layer on hardened cement paste exposed to HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The layer comprises an amorphous silica gel with framework silicates, geminate and single silanol groups in which Si is substituted by Al. Amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} and Fe(OH){sub 3} are present. The gel forms by polycondensation and cross-linking of C-A-S-H chains at AlO{sub 4} bridging tetrahedra. In the transition zone between the degraded layer and the undamaged material, portlandite dissolves and Ca is removed from the C-A-S-H phases maintaining their polymer structure at first. With HCl, monosulphate in the transition zone is converted into Friedel's salt and ettringite. With H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, gypsum precipitates near the degradation front reducing the thickness of the transition zone and the rate of degradation.

  1. Wood Technology: Techniques, Processes, and Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Olan

    1975-01-01

    Seven areas of wood technology illustrates applicable techniques, processes, and products for an industrial arts woodworking curriculum. They are: wood lamination; PEG (polyethylene glycol) diffusion processes; wood flour and/or particle molding; production product of industry; WPC (wood-plastic-composition) process; residential construction; and…

  2. Field pilot study on emissions, formations and distributions of PCDD/Fs from cement kiln co-processing fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guorui; Zhan, Jiayu; Zheng, Minghui; Li, Li; Li, Chunping; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Yuyang; Jin, Rong

    2015-12-15

    A pilot study was performed to evaluate formation, distribution and emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from cement kilns that co-process fly ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). Stack gas and particulate samples from multiple stages in the process were collected and analyzed for PCDD/Fs. Stack emissions of PCDD/Fs were below the European Union limit for cement kilns (0.1 ng TEQ m(-3)). PCDD/F concentrations in particulates from the cyclone preheater outlet, suspension preheater boiler, humidifier tower, and back-end bag filter were much higher than in other samples, which suggests that these areas are the major sites of PCDD/F formation. Comparison of PCDD/F homolog and congener profiles from different stages suggested that tetra- and penta-chlorinated furans were mainly formed during cement kiln co-processing of MSWI fly ash. Three lower chlorinated furan congeners, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, were identified as dominant contributors to the toxic equivalents (TEQ) of the PCDD/Fs. The concentration of PCDD/Fs in particulates was correlated with chloride content, which is consistent with its positive effect on PCDD/F formation. This could be mitigated by pretreating the feedstock to remove chloride and metals. Mass balance indicated that cement kilns eliminated about 94% of the PCDD/F TEQ input from the feedstock.

  3. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2012-01-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  4. XML-based product information processing method for product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen Yu

    2011-12-01

    Design knowledge of modern mechatronics product is based on information processing as the center of the knowledge-intensive engineering, thus product design innovation is essentially the knowledge and information processing innovation. Analysis of the role of mechatronics product design knowledge and information management features, a unified model of XML-based product information processing method is proposed. Information processing model of product design includes functional knowledge, structural knowledge and their relationships. For the expression of product function element, product structure element, product mapping relationship between function and structure based on the XML model are proposed. The information processing of a parallel friction roller is given as an example, which demonstrates that this method is obviously helpful for knowledge-based design system and product innovation.

  5. Development of nanosilica bonded monetite cement from egg shells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2015-05-01

    This work represents further effort from our group in developing monetite based calcium phosphate cements (CPC). These cements start with a calcium phosphate powder (MW-CPC) that is manufactured using microwave irradiation. Due to the robustness of the cement production process, we report that the starting materials can be derived from egg shells, a waste product from the poultry industry. The CPC were prepared with MW-CPC and aqueous setting solution. Results showed that the CPC hardened after mixing powdered cement with water for about 12.5±1 min. The compressive strength after 24h of incubation was approximately 8.45±1.29 MPa. In addition, adding colloidal nanosilica to CPC can accelerate the cement hardening (10±1 min) process by about 2.5 min and improve compressive strength (20.16±4.39 MPa), which is more than double the original strength. The interaction between nanosilica and CPC was monitored using an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). While hardening, nanosilica can bond to the CPC crystal network for stabilization. The physical and biological studies performed on both cements suggest that they can potentially be used in orthopedics.

  6. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  7. Squeeze cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Kundert, D.P.; Dahl, J.A.; Dalrymple, E.D.; Gerke, R.R.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a method for terminating the flow of fluid from a portion of a subterranean formation into a wellbore. It comprises: placing within the wellbore adjacent the portion a volume of a slurry of hydraulic cement, permitting the volume to penetrate into the portion; and maintaining the slurry in the portion for a time sufficient to enable the slurry to form a rigid mass of cement in the portion.

  8. Characterization of spatial impact of particles emitted from a cement material production facility on outdoor particle deposition in the surrounding community.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Fan, Zhihua; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Stern, Alan H; Lioy, Paul J

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution of a facility that processes steel production slag into raw material for cement production to local outdoor particle deposition in Camden, NJ. A dry deposition sampler that can house four 37-mm quartz fiber filters was developed and used for the collection of atmospheric particle deposits. Two rounds of particle collection (3-4 weeks each) were conducted in 8-11 locations 200-800 m downwind of the facility. Background samples were concurrently collected in a remote area located -2 km upwind from the facility. In addition, duplicate surface wipe samples were collected side-by-side from each of the 13 locations within the same sampling area during the first deposition sampling period. One composite source material sample was also collected from a pile stored in the facility. Both the bulk of the source material and the < 38 microm fraction subsample were analyzed to obtain the elemental source profile. The particle deposition flux in the study area was higher (24-83 mg/m2 x day) than at the background sites (13-17 mg/m2day). The concentration of Ca, a major element in the cement source production material, was found to exponentially decrease with increasing downwind distance from the facility (P < 0.05). The ratio of Ca/Al, an indicator of Ca enrichment due to anthropogenic sources in a given sample, showed a similar trend. These observations suggest a significant contribution of the facility to the local particle deposition. The contribution of the facility to outdoor deposited particle mass was further estimated by three independent models using the measurements obtained from this study. The estimated contributions to particle deposition in the study area were 1.8-7.4% from the regression analysis of the Ca concentration in particle deposition samples against the distance from the facility, 0-11% from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source-receptor model, and 7

  9. Synthesis of aluminum-rich coatings on new high-temperature cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus by a pack cementation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex Keith

    2011-12-01

    In this research, a pack cementation process is developed for coating the newly developed cast austenitic steel CF8C-Plus. The developed coating process is capable of producing pack particle free coatings on large fatigue test specimens in a horizontal laboratory tube furnace as well as smaller oxidation and creep test samples. Several methods for the production of the pack powder free Al-rich coating are presented and evaluated for samples of both sizes. The developed coating is intended to compete with coatings of a similar quality produced with chemical vapor deposition and slurry coating methods. Additionally, because CF8C-Plus has only recently become available there is currently no available data on the effect of the fabrication of an Al-rich coating on the substrates properties. This research used advanced characterization methods to evaluate the coating surface and cross-sectional features. These methods include scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. This is the first time that this information has been made available to the scientific community. Also, the oxidation performance of the coating will be tested and compared to other coatings developed with CVD and slurry coating methods and the preliminary results of the effect of the coating on the alloys fatigue performance will be presented.

  10. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning

  11. Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil of a Natural Reserve (Isola delle Femmine) (Italy) located in front of a plant for the production of cement.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino

    2010-01-15

    Isola delle Femmine Natural Reserve is a very little isle about 15 km from the centre of Palermo, in front of a plant for the production of cement and about 600 m from coast. In the present research, profiles soil PAHs were obtained for 16 sites within the reserve and for 8 stations on the rural soil taken as reference. summation Sigma PAHs, in the soil of investigated area, ranged from 35 to 545 microg/kg. With the aim to find the origin of PAHs in the soil of Isola delle Femmine, we compare the distribution of single analytes in the investigated area with those of the reference rural area (Monte Raffo Rosso), with those of atmospheric urban particulate collected at Palermo along with reported of emissions of some cement plants. The island's investigated area showed a high amount of 4- and 5-rings PAHs, whereas 3-ring PAHs are present mainly in the emission of cement plants (from literature). The percentage of 3-, 4-, 5- and 6-rings PAHs determined in samples of Isola delle Femmine are similar to those of the reference rural soils and to those of urban atmospheric particulate. Cement plant activity has a negligible weight on the presence of PAHs in the soil of Isola delle Femmine.

  12. A comparative study of ordinary and mineralised Portland cement clinker from two different production units Part I: Composition and hydration of the clinkers

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuelson, Anna; Hansen, Staffan; Viggh, Erik

    2003-10-01

    Portland cement clinkers from two production units were investigated; Plant 1: ordinary clinker (P1) and clinker mineralised with CaF{sub 2}+CaSO{sub 4} (P1m); Plant 2: ordinary clinker (P2) and two clinkers mineralised with CaF{sub 2}+CaSO{sub 4} (P2m, low SO{sub 3} and P2m', high SO{sub 3}). The chemical composition of the clinkers was determined by X-ray fluorescence, ICP analysis, titration (free lime) and ion selective electrode measurements (F). Observed clinker parameters (LSF, SR, AR, R, wt.% MgO, F, SO{sub 3}, free lime): P1 (0.96, 2.72, 1.27, 1.04, 0.78, 0.06, 0.64, 0.71); P1m (1.03, 2.21, 1.58, 2.18, 0.87, 0.23, 1.95, 0.69); P2 (1.00, 2.66, 1.72, 0.75, 4.06, 0.20, 1.38, 1.51); P2m (1.01, 2.91, 1.96, 0.90, 3.21, 0.39, 1.72, 2.06); P2m' (0.97, 2.70, 1.84, 1.15, 3.86, 0.42, 2.48, 0.89). The qualitative and quantitative phase compositions were characterised using X-ray powder diffraction, backscattered electron imaging, X-ray microanalysis and elemental mapping, plus optical reflection microscopy. Phases observed in all clinkers were: alite, {beta}-belite, cubic aluminate, ferrite and free lime. Additional phases observed were: aphthitalite (P1, P2, P2m, P2m'), calcium langbeinite (P1m) and periclase (P2, P2m, P2m'). The clinker composition and texture differ more between the two plants, than between ordinary and mineralised clinker from the same production unit. Laboratory cements were prepared by mixing ground clinker with CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O. The cements were hydrated in an isothermal calorimeter at 20 deg. C (water/cement weight ratio=0.5) during 33 h. After 12 h, the laboratory cement based on P1m reached a higher level of reaction than the one based on P1. The P2m and P2m' laboratory cements had a slower reaction than the P2 cement.

  13. Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} at the Dragon Products, Inc. Cement Plant located in Thomaston, Maine. 1990 Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The background and process of the Passamaquoddy Technology Recovery Scrubber{trademark} are described. The Scrubber was developed for Dragon Cement Plant in Thomaston, Maine and facilitates a number of process improvements. The exhaust gas is scrubbed of SO{sub 2} with better than 90% efficiency. The kiln dust is cleaned of alkalines and so can be returned to kiln feed instead of dumped to landfill. Potassium sulfate in commercial quantity and purity can be recovered. Distilled water is recovered which also has commercial potential. Thus, various benefits are accrued and no waste streams remain for disposal. The process is applicable to both wet and dry process cement kilns and appears to have potential in any industry which generates acidic gaseous exhausts and/or basic solid or liquid wastes.

  14. Cellular automata modelling of the cementation process of the Turin (Italy) subsoil conglomerate (``ceppo''),based on a three-dimensional geological model of the city subsoil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, S.; de Rienzo, F.; Nardi, G.

    2003-04-01

    The Turin (Italy) subsoil is mainly made up by alluvial gravels and sands (Pleistocene), characterised by high cementation degree variability, covered by a thin thickness of loess. These alluvial sediments, of about 40 m deep, overlay lacustrine clays (Villafranchiano), locally heteropic with marine sandstones (Pliocene). The reconstruction of the areal distribution of cementation phenomena of the Turin urban subsoil is of fundamental importance within the context of planning and carrying out works in the city subsoil, as well as for preliminary evaluating the stability of such underground works. Moreover, analyses of spatial distribution of soil cementation could be usefully applied for estimating the propagation of waste-polluted fluids, and for reducing either the natural or human-induced risk, related to the overworking of urban area subsoils. The development of mathematical models commonly needs to deal with several interacting physical and chemical phenomena. A deterministic Cellular Automata (CA) model for the evaluation of cementation processes in the conglomerates of the Turin urban subsoil has recently been developed, by using a three-dimensional geological model of the city subsoil based on boreholes data. The model is able to simulate the spatial distribution of the cementation process in the studied area: it has been derived from two pre-existing CA models, i.e. SCAVATU and CABOTO. Geological, mineralogical-petrographic and sedimentological studies of the soil cementation, and a chemical-physical study of the carbonatic equilibria, have first been carried out. These studies pointed out the presence of meniscus cements (which suggest a meteoric diagenesis) and gave fundamental cues for the development of base hypothesis on the genesis of cementation in the considered area. A macroscopic Cellular Automata model has accordingly been developed, in order to simulate the principal phenomena which take place during the cementation process. The model has a

  15. Utilization of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash in blended cement Part 1: Processing and characterization of MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Aubert, J E; Husson, B; Sarramone, N

    2006-08-25

    This paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the processes applied to MSWI fly ash with a view to reusing it safely in cement-based materials. Part 1 presents two stabilization processes and Part 2 deals with the use of the two treated fly ashes (TFA) in mortars. Two types of binder were used: an Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) containing more than 95% clinker (CEM I 52.5R) and a binary blend cement composed of 70% ground granulated blast furnace slag and 30% clinker (CEM III-B 42.5N). In this first part, two stabilization processes are presented: the conventional process, called "A", based on the washing, phosphation and calcination of the ash, and a modified process, called "B", intended to eliminate metallic aluminum and sulfate contained in the ash. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the two TFA were comparable. The main differences observed were those expected, i.e. TFA-B was free of metallic aluminum and sulfate. The mineralogical characterization of the two TFAs highlighted the presence of large amounts of a calcium aluminosilicate phase taking two forms, a crystalline form (gehlenite) and an amorphous form. Hydration studies on pastes containing mixed TFA and calcium hydroxide showed that this phase reacted with calcium hydroxide to form calcium aluminate hydrates. This formation of hydrates was accompanied by a hardening of the pastes. These results are very encouraging for the reuse of such TFA in cement-based materials because they can be considered as pozzolanic additions and could advantageously replace a part of the cement in cement-based materials. Finally, leaching tests were carried out to evaluate the environmental impact of the two TFAs. The elements which were less efficiently stabilized by process A were zinc, cadmium and antimony but, when the results of the leaching tests were compared with the thresholds of the European landfill directive, TFA-A could nevertheless be accepted at landfills for non

  16. Process for capturing CO2 arising from the calcination of the CaCO3 used in cement manufacture.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N; Alonso, M; Grasa, G; Abanades, J Carlos

    2008-09-15

    This paper outlines a new CaCO3 calcination method for producing a stream of CO2 (suitable for permanent geological storage after purification and compression). The process is based on the use of very hot CaO particles (T >1000 degrees C) to transfer heat from a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) to a calciner (fluidized with CO2 and/or steam). Since the fluidized bed combustor and calciner have separate atmospheres, the CO2 resulting from the decomposition of CaCO3 can be captured, while the CO2 generated in the combustion of the fuel in air is emitted to the atmosphere. We demonstrate that with this system it is possible to reduce the CO2 emissions of a cement plant by around 60%. Furthermore, since the key pieces of equipment are similar to the commercial CFBCs used in power generation plants, it is possible to establish the additional investment required for the system and to estimate the cost per ton of CO2 avoided for this process to be about 19 $/tCO2 avoided.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of chrysotile and crocidolite fibres with infrared spectrophotometry: application to asbestos-cement products.

    PubMed

    Valerio, F; Balducci, D

    1989-01-01

    Infrared (IR) spectrophotometry allows simple and rapid qualitative and quantitative evaluations of different types of asbestos, as well as of other inorganic particles. In particular, chrysotile and crocidolite have characteristic IR spectra, and optical density measurements in the 2710 nm band for chrysotile and the 12820 nm band for crocidolite permit the quantitative evaluation of each fibre either alone or in mixtures. IR spectra also provide information on changes in fibre structure and in chemical composition as the result, for example, of thermal treatment or acid leaching. The analytical method that we have developed can detect amounts as small as 0.1 mg of fibre in a 300-mg disk of potassium bromide using a low-cost IR spectrophotometer. The use of a Fourier transform IR spectrophotometer dramatically improves the sensitivity and selectivity. Computer-assisted analysis of spectra offers the possibility of reducing matrix interference and of comparing different spectra. The application of the IR technique to asbestos-cement products and insulating materials is described.

  18. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  19. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  20. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  1. Sulfoaluminate-belite cement from low-calcium fly ash and sulfur-rich and other industrial by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Arjunan, P.; Silsbee, M.R.; Roy, D.M.

    1999-08-01

    The study describes the preparation and characterization of an environmentally friendly cement with performance characteristics similar to those of Portland cement, from a lime kiln bag house dust, a low-calcium fly ash, and a scrubber sludge. Promising preliminary results show the formation of relatively low-temperature phases calcium sulfoaluminate (4CaO{center{underscore}dot}3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center{underscore}dot}SO{sub 3}) and dicalcium silicate (2CaO{center{underscore}dot}SiO{sub 2}) at {approximately} 1,250 C if nodulized raw means used for clinker preparation and at 1,175 C if powdered raw meal is used as compared to the {approximately} 1,500 C sintering temperature required for Portland cement. Phases of the developed cements were predicted using modified Bogue calculations. Isothermal calorimetric measurements indicate the hydration properties of the cements are comparable to ordinary Portland cement. Mechanical properties and microstructural evaluations also were carried out.

  2. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  3. Nanostructured TaxC interlayer synthesized via double glow plasma surface alloying process for diamond deposition on cemented carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Wolong; Hei, Hongjun; Zhong, Qiang; Shen, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Bing; He, Zhiyong; Yu, Shengwang

    2015-12-01

    The aim in this work was to improve the adhesion of diamond coating with pre-deposition of a TaxC interlayer on cemented carbide (WC-Co) substrate by double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The following deposition of diamond coating on the interlayer was performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. TaxC interlayer with an inner diffusion layer and an outer deposition layer was composed of Ta2C and TaC nanocrystalline, and it exhibited a special compact surface morphology formed of flower-shaped pits. As the gradual element distributions existed in the diffusion layer, the interlayer displayed a superior adherence to the substrate with significantly enhanced surface microhardness to the original substrate. After CVD process, the preferred orientation of TaC changed from (2 2 2) to (2 0 0) plane, and a uniform and tense diamond coating with adhesion referred to class HF 2 at least (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure 3198 norm) was obtained on the interlayered substrate. It indicated that the diffusion of Co was effectively inhibited by the formation of TaxC diffusion-deposition interlayer. The TaxC interlayer is most likely to improve the performance of diamond coatings used in cutting tools.

  4. Rigless multizone recompletion using a cement packer placed with coiled tubing: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, T.W.; Patout, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    Cement packers have been used for some time when reserve estimates have not justified the cost of major rig remedial work. They typically provide a means of zonal isolation of the last reserves in an existing wellbore. The success of these operations has historically been low. This is predominantly because of poor cement bonding in the annulus between the tubing and production casing. Because of the minimal amount of equipment on location and lack of upfront design work involved, most cement packers are doomed to failure before they are even placed. Cement packers have been placed using a large number of methods. In the Ship Shoal 181 field, Well B-4 would not economically justify a major rig workover, even though there were several uphole gas sands capable of producing in this well. With proper upfront planning and design, it would be economical; however, all these reserves could be produced in a through-tubing process using a cement packer. This case history presents a refined look at existing technology involving placement of a cement packer and reviews problems common to cement-packer completions, including a case history. Solutions are also discussed for successfully completing and recovering reserves from not one but several remaining gas intervals. This paper reviews the design considerations and precautions, along with the production results and economics, for placing what is believed to be the largest cement packer placed through coiled tubing.

  5. A Thermoelectric Waste-Heat-Recovery System for Portland Cement Rotary Kilns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Li, Peng; Cai, Lanlan; Zhou, Pingwang; Tang, Di; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-06-01

    Portland cement is produced by one of the most energy-intensive industrial processes. Energy consumption in the manufacture of Portland cement is approximately 110-120 kWh ton-1. The cement rotary kiln is the crucial equipment used for cement production. Approximately 10-15% of the energy consumed in production of the cement clinker is directly dissipated into the atmosphere through the external surface of the rotary kiln. Innovative technology for energy conservation is urgently needed by the cement industry. In this paper we propose a novel thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system to reduce heat losses from cement rotary kilns. This system is configured as an array of thermoelectric generation units arranged longitudinally on a secondary shell coaxial with the rotary kiln. A mathematical model was developed for estimation of the performance of waste heat recovery. Discussions mainly focus on electricity generation and energy saving, taking a Φ4.8 × 72 m cement rotary kiln as an example. Results show that the Bi2Te3-PbTe hybrid thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system can generate approximately 211 kW electrical power while saving 3283 kW energy. Compared with the kiln without the thermoelectric recovery system, the kiln with the system can recover more than 32.85% of the energy that used to be lost as waste heat through the kiln surface.

  6. Biotechnology in Food Production and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Dietrich; Sinskey, Anthony J.

    1985-09-01

    The food processing industry is the oldest and largest industry using biotechnological processes. Further development of food products and processes based on biotechnology depends upon the improvement of existing processes, such as fermentation, immobilized biocatalyst technology, and production of additives and processing aids, as well as the development of new opportunities for food biotechnology. Improvements are needed in the characterization, safety, and quality control of food materials, in processing methods, in waste conversion and utilization processes, and in currently used food microorganism and tissue culture systems. Also needed are fundamental studies of the structure-function relationship of food materials and of the cell physiology and biochemistry of raw materials.

  7. Some factors affecting an increase in magnetic susceptibility of cement dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuchowska, Beata J.

    2001-09-01

    The aim of the research was to explain reasons of fluctuation in magnetic susceptibility of cement dusts and the consequences for the environment. The research comprised measurements of magnetic susceptibility and Fe content in dusts, and also in raw materials, additives, fuels, mixtures and clinkers used for cement production. The samples were taken in four cement plants located in Opole Province (southern Poland). In addition to this, the influence of two production methods (dry and wet) on magnetic susceptibility of dusts and some aspects of ferrimagnetic minerals formation in the process of clinker burning were considered. It was proven that magnetic susceptibility of dusts depends on raw materials and fuels but especially on additives used for cement production, method of production and the carbon monoxide content in gases from clinker rotary kilns. Statistically important linear correlations between magnetic susceptibility and Fe suggest that during clinker burning, ferrimagnetic minerals may be formed.

  8. Influence of Thermal Treatment Conditions on the Properties of Dental Silicate Cements.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Georgeta; Popa, Alexandru Mihai; Badanoiu, Alina Ioana; Iordache, Florin

    2016-02-18

    In this study the sol-gel process was used to synthesize a precursor mixture for the preparation of silicate cement, also called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement. This mixture was thermally treated under two different conditions (1400 °C/2 h and 1450 °C/3 h) followed by rapid cooling in air. The resulted material (clinker) was ground for one hour in a laboratory planetary mill (v = 150 rot/min), in order to obtain the MTA cements. The setting time and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) and cytocompatibility of the MTA cements were assessed in this study. The hardening processes, nature of the reaction products and the microstructural characteristics were also investigated. The anhydrous and hydrated cements were characterized by different techniques e.g., X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermal analysis (DTA-DTG-TG). The setting time of the MTA cement obtained by thermal treatment at 1400 °C/2 h (MTA1) was 55 min and 15 min for the MTA cement obtained at 1450 °C/3 h (MTA2). The compressive strength values were 18.5 MPa (MTA1) and 22.9 MPa (MTA2). Both MTA cements showed good bioactivity (assessed by an in vitro test), good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of cells.

  9. Effect of sepiolite on the flocculation of suspensions of fibre-reinforced cement

    SciTech Connect

    Jarabo, Rocio; Fuente, Elena; Moral, Ana; Blanco, Angeles; Negro, Carlos

    2010-10-15

    Sepiolite is used to increase thixotropy of cement slurries for easier processing, to prevent sagging and to provide a better final quality in the manufacture of fibre-reinforced cement products. However, the effect of sepiolite on flocculation and its interactions with the components of fibre cement are yet unknown. The aim of this research is to study the effects of sepiolite on the flocculation of different fibre-reinforced cement slurries induced by anionic polyacrylamides (A-PAMs). Flocculation and floc properties were studied by monitoring the chord size distribution in real time employing a focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) probe. The results show that sepiolite increases floc size and floc stability in fibre-cement suspensions. Sepiolite competes with fibres and clay for A-PAMs adsorption and its interaction with A-PAM improves flocculation of mineral particles.

  10. Business Communication: Its Process and Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Joel P.; Branchaw, Bernadine P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the essential difference between the writing process and its product; namely, that the former is a private and unique activity, whereas the latter is an observable artifact that can be publicly evaluated. Argues that even proponents of the process approach to writing cannot escape basing their discussions on products. (JD)

  11. The pulsar planet production process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, E. S.; Hansen, B. M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Most plausible scenarios for the formation of planets around pulsars end with a disk of gas around the pulsar. The supplicant author then points to the solar system to bolster faith in the miraculous transfiguration of gas into planets. We here investigate this process of transfiguration. We derive analytic sequences of quasi-static disks which give good approximations to exact solutions of the disk diffusion equation with realistic opacity tables. These allow quick and efficient surveys of parameter space. We discuss the outward transfer of mass in accretion disks and the resulting timescale constraints, the effects of illumination by the central source on the disk and dust within it, and the effects of the widely different elemental compositions of the disks in the various scenarios, and their extensions to globular clusters. We point out where significant uncertainties exist in the appropriate grain opacities, and in the effect of illumination and winds from the neutron star.

  12. Partitioning in parallel processing of production systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oflazer, K.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis presents research on certain issues related to parallel processing of production systems. It first presents a parallel production system interpreter that has been implemented on a four-processor multiprocessor. This parallel interpreter is based on Forgy's OPS5 interpreter and exploits production-level parallelism in production systems. Runs on the multiprocessor system indicate that it is possible to obtain speed-up of around 1.7 in the match computation for certain production systems when productions are split into three sets that are processed in parallel. The next issue addressed is that of partitioning a set of rules to processors in a parallel interpreter with production-level parallelism, and the extent of additional improvement in performance. The partitioning problem is formulated and an algorithm for approximate solutions is presented. The thesis next presents a parallel processing scheme for OPS5 production systems that allows some redundancy in the match computation. This redundancy enables the processing of a production to be divided into units of medium granularity each of which can be processed in parallel. Subsequently, a parallel processor architecture for implementing the parallel processing algorithm is presented.

  13. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, A.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1988-05-04

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  14. Process for impregnating a concrete or cement body with a polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.; Spence, Roger D.

    1989-01-01

    A process for impregnating cementitious solids with polymeric materials by blending polymeric materials in a grout, allowing the grout to cure, and contacting the resulting solidified grout containing the polymeric materials with an organic mixture containing a monomer, a cross-linking agent and a catalyst. The mixture dissolves the polymerized particles and forms a channel for distributing the monomer throughout the network formed by the polymeric particles. The organic components are then cured to form a substantially water-impermeable mass.

  15. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Gazula, Gopala K. M.; Hasham, Ali

    1996-01-01

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements.

  16. Process for improving metal production in steelmaking processes

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Gazula, G.K.M.; Hasham, A.

    1996-06-18

    A process and apparatus for improving metal production in ironmaking and steelmaking processes is disclosed. The use of an inert metallic conductor in the slag containing crucible and the addition of a transition metal oxide to the slag are the disclosed process improvements. 6 figs.

  17. Cement manufacture and the environment - Part I: Chemistry and technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oss, H. G.; Padovani, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Hydraulic (chiefly portland) cement is the binding agent in concrete and mortar and thus a key component of a country's construction sector. Concrete is arguably the most abundant of all manufactured solid materials. Portland cement is made primarily from finely ground clinker, which itself is composed dominantly of hydraulically active calcium silicate minerals formed through high-temperature burning of limestone and other materials in a kiln. This process requires approximately 1.7 tons of raw materials perton of clinker produced and yields about 1 ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, of which calcination of limestone and the combustion of fuels each contribute about half. The overall level of CO2 output makes the cement industry one of the top two manufacturing industry sources of greenhouse gases; however, in many countries, the cement industry's contribution is a small fraction of that from fossil fuel combustion by power plants and motor vehicles. The nature of clinker and the enormous heat requirements of its manufacture allow the cement industry to consume a wide variety of waste raw materials and fuels, thus providing the opportunity to apply key concepts of industrial ecology, most notably the closing of loops through the use of by-products of other industries (industrial symbiosis). In this article, the chemistry and technology of cement manufacture are summarized. In a forthcoming companion article (part II), some of the environmental challenges and opportunities facing the cement industry are described. Because of the size and scope of the U.S. cement industry, the analysis relies primarily on data and practices from the United States.

  18. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be

  19. Shotcrete -- Understanding of the hydration process of mixes containing CAC and Portland cement and proposal for a simple rheological characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bayoux, J.P.; Testud, M.; Guinot, D.; Willocq, J.; Capmas, A.

    1995-12-31

    In order to better understand the performances of CAC-slag cement and CAC--PC cement the hydration study of these mixes was undertaken. The hydrates which are responsible for the early stiffening/strengthening are identical in both mixes; it is only the time of appearance and amount which varies. Ettringite always forms first followed by the precipitation of C{sub 4}AH{sub 13}. They will both form faster then the temperature rises. As a complement, a simple laboratory equipment is proposed to characterize the stiffening behavior of the mixes straight after gauging.

  20. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    .17, H/S ratio of 2.5 and N/S ratio of 0.18. In the second phase of this research, theoretical models are built using a modified version of an existing cement hydration modelling code, "CEMHYD3D", to simulate the chemical reaction of the activated glass powder hydration and glass powder in cement. The modified model, which is referred to as the "MOD-model" is further used to predict the types, compositions and quantities of reaction products. Furthermore, the glass powder hydration data, which is obtained experimentally, is incorporated into the MOD-model to determine the effect of adding glass powder to the paste on the process of cement hydration and resulting paste properties. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results are made to evaluate the developed models. The MOD-model predictions have been validated using the experimental results, and were further used to investigate various properties of the hydrated glass powder cement paste. These properties include, for example, CH content of the paste, porosity, hydration degree of the glass powder and conventional C-S-H and GP CS-H contents. The results show that the MOD-model is capable of accurately simulating the hydration process of glass powder-blended cement paste and can be used to predict various properties of the hydrating paste.

  1. Case study of an MBT plant producing SRF for cement kiln co-combustion, coupled with a bioreactor landfill for process residues.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Mario; Dellavedova, Stefano; Rigamonti, Lucia; Scotti, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the performances of the energy recovery pathway from the residual waste based on the production of a Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) to be exploited via co-combustion in a cement kiln. The SRF is produced in a single stream Mechanical-Biological Treatment plant, where bio-drying of the waste is followed by mechanical refining in order to fulfil the quality requirements by the cement kilns. Peculiar of this MBT is the fact that sorting residues are disposed in a nearby landfill, managed according to a bioreactor approach, where landfill gas is collected for electric energy recovery. A detailed mass and energy balance of the system is presented based on one year operational data, followed by its Life Cycle Assessment. Results show that the system is energetically and environmentally effective, with most of the impacts being more than compensated by the savings of materials and energy. Major role in determining such outcome is the displacement of petcoke in the cement kiln, both in terms of its fossil CO2 emissions and of its life cycle impacts, including the trans-oceanic transport. To check the robustness of the results, two sensitivity analyses are performed on the landfill gas collection efficiency and on the avoided electric energy mix.

  2. The 3Rs and cement kiln dust: Opportunities for reduction, reuse and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.

    1997-12-31

    Cement kiln dust (CKD) is a by-product of the cement manufacturing process. This material which is captured in cement kiln dust control equipment consists primarily of raw and partly calcined kiln feed. Factors which contribute to the generation of CKD are described. Cases of successful reduction of CKD generation are presented. Technologies for treating CKD so that it can be reused as a raw material for cement production are discussed. Applications where CKD can be used alone or with other by-products are also presented. Opportunities for developing new uses for CKD are identified and discussed in terms of the drivers behind such applications as well as the economic, technical and regulatory barriers to their development.

  3. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Robl; John Groppo

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida

  4. Process engineering economics of bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Galbe, Mats; Sassner, Per; Wingren, Anders; Zacchi, Guido

    2007-01-01

    This work presents a review of studies on the process economics of ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials published since 1996. Our objective was to identify the most costly process steps and the impact of various parameters on the final production cost, e.g. plant capacity, raw material cost, and overall product yield, as well as process configuration. The variation in estimated ethanol production cost is considerable, ranging from about 0.13 to 0.81 US$ per liter ethanol. This can be explained to a large extent by actual process differences and variations in the assumptions underlying the techno-economic evaluations. The most important parameters for the economic outcome are the feedstock cost, which varied between 30 and 90 US$ per metric ton in the papers studied, and the plant capacity, which influences the capital cost. To reduce the ethanol production cost it is necessary to reach high ethanol yields, as well as a high ethanol concentration during fermentation, to be able to decrease the energy required for distillation and other downstream process steps. Improved pretreatment methods, enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis with cheaper and more effective enzymes, as well as improved fermentation systems present major research challenges if we are to make lignocellulose-based ethanol production competitive with sugar- and starch-based ethanol. Process integration, either internally or externally with other types of plants, e.g. heat and power plants, also offers a way of reducing the final ethanol production cost.

  5. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    SciTech Connect

    Varas, M.J. . E-mail: mjvaras@geo.ucm.es; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-11-15

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements.

  6. Sustainable development of the cement industry and blended cements to meet ecological challenges.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Konstantin

    2003-05-05

    The world production of cement has greatly increased in the past 10 years. This trend is the most significant factor affecting technological development and the updating of manufacturing facilities in the cement industry. Existing technology for the production of cement clinker is ecologically damaging; it consumes much energy and natural resources and also emits pollutants. A new approach to the production of blended or high-volume mineral additive (HVMA) cement helps to improve its ecological compatibility. HVMA cement technology is based on the intergrinding of portland cement clinker, gypsum, mineral additives, and a special complex admixture. This new method increases the compressive strength of ordinary cement, improves durability of the cement-based materials, and--at the same time--uses inexpensive natural mineral additives or industrial by-products. This improvement leads to a reduction of energy consumption per unit of the cement produced. Higher strength, better durability, reduction of pollution at the clinker production stage, and decrease of landfill area occupied by industrial by-products, all provide ecological advantages for HVMA cement.

  7. Mariner 9-Image processing and products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levinthal, E.C.; Green, W.B.; Cutts, J.A.; Jahelka, E.D.; Johansen, R.A.; Sander, M.J.; Seidman, J.B.; Young, A.T.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the system for the display, processing, and production of image-data products created to support the Mariner 9 Television Experiment. Of necessity, the system was large in order to respond to the needs of a large team of scientists with a broad scope of experimental objectives. The desire to generate processed data products as rapidly as possible to take advantage of adaptive planning during the mission, coupled with the complexities introduced by the nature of the vidicon camera, greatly increased the scale of the ground-image processing effort. This paper describes the systems that carried out the processes and delivered the products necessary for real-time and near-real-time analyses. References are made to the computer algorithms used for the, different levels of decalibration and analysis. ?? 1973.

  8. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  9. Benchmarking Peer Production Mechanisms, Processes & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Thomas; Kretschmer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable identifies key approaches for quality management in peer production by benchmarking peer production practices and processes in other areas. (Contains 29 footnotes, 13 figures and 2 tables.)[This report has been authored with contributions of: Kaisa Honkonen-Ratinen, Matti Auvinen, David Riley, Jose Pinzon, Thomas Fischer, Thomas…

  10. Production Process for Strong, Light Ceramic Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, G. R.; Cordia, E. R.; Tomer, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Proportions of ingredients and sintering time/temperature schedule changed. Production process for lightweight, high-strength ceramic insulating tiles for Space Shuttle more than just scaled-up version of laboratory process for making small tiles. Boron in aluminum borosilicate fibers allows fusion at points where fibers contact each other during sintering, thereby greatly strengthening tiles structure.

  11. Micro Mechanics and Microstructures of Major Subsurface Hydraulic Barriers: Shale Caprock vs Wellbore Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radonjic, M.; Du, H.

    2015-12-01

    Shale caprocks and wellbore cements are two of the most common subsurface impermeable barriers in the oil and gas industry. More than 60% of effective seals for geologic hydrocarbon bearing formations as natural hydraulic barriers constitute of shale rocks. Wellbore cements provide zonal isolation as an engineered hydraulic barrier to ensure controlled fluid flow from the reservoir to the production facilities. Shale caprocks were deposited and formed by squeezing excess formation water and mineralogical transformations at different temperatures and pressures. In a similar process, wellbore cements are subjected to compression during expandable tubular operations, which lead to a rapid pore water propagation and secondary mineral precipitation within the cement. The focus of this research was to investigate the effect of wellbore cement compression on its microstructure and mechanical properties, as well as a preliminary comparison of shale caprocks and hydrated cement. The purpose of comparative evaluation of engineered vs natural hydraulic barrier materials is to further improve wellbore cement durability when in contact with geofluids. The micro-indentation was utilized to evaluate the change in cement mechanical properties caused by compression. Indentation experiments showed an overall increase in hardness and Young's modulus of compressed cement. Furthermore, SEM imaging and Electron Probe Microanalysis showed mineralogical alterations and decrease in porosity. These can be correlated with the cement rehydration caused by microstructure changes as a result of compression. The mechanical properties were also quantitatively compared to shale caprock samples in order to investigate the similarities of hydraulic barrier features that could help to improve the subsurface application of cement in zonal isolation. The comparison results showed that the poro-mechanical characteristics of wellbore cement appear to be improved when inherent pore sizes are shifted to

  12. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    The Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool (BEST) Cement is a process-based tool based on commercially available efficiency technologies used anywhere in the world applicable to the cement industry. This version has been designed for use in China. No actual cement facility with every single efficiency measure included in the benchmark will likely exist; however, the benchmark sets a reasonable standard by which to compare for plants striving to be the best. The energy consumption of the benchmark facility differs due to differences in processing at a given cement facility. The tool accounts for most of these variables and allows the user to adapt the model to operational variables specific for his/her cement facility. Figure 1 shows the boundaries included in a plant modeled by BEST Cement. In order to model the benchmark, i.e., the most energy efficient cement facility, so that it represents a facility similar to the user's cement facility, the user is first required to input production variables in the input sheet (see Section 6 for more information on how to input variables). These variables allow the tool to estimate a benchmark facility that is similar to the user's cement plant, giving a better picture of the potential for that particular facility, rather than benchmarking against a generic one. The input variables required include the following: (1) the amount of raw materials used in tonnes per year (limestone, gypsum, clay minerals, iron ore, blast furnace slag, fly ash, slag from other industries, natural pozzolans, limestone powder (used post-clinker stage), municipal wastes and others); the amount of raw materials that are preblended (prehomogenized and proportioned) and crushed (in tonnes per year); (2) the amount of additives that are dried and ground (in tonnes per year); (3) the production of clinker (in tonnes per year) from each kiln by kiln type; (4) the amount of raw materials, coal and clinker that is ground by mill type (in tonnes per year); (5

  13. NISAR ISRO science data processing and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Krishna Murari; Mehra, Raghav; Ryali, Usha Sundari

    2016-05-01

    NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) is a Dual Frequency (L & S band) mission which will be operating in SweepSAR mode. As compared to traditional SAR imaging modes in which Swath and resolution are at trade-off, SweepSAR imaging concept can acquire data over large swath (240 Km) without compromising azimuth resolution (6m approximately). NISAR L-band & S-band sensors will be developed by JPL-NASA and ISRO respectively. NISAR science data will be downloaded at both NASA and ISRO ground stations. SAC-ISRO will develop the SAR processor for both L & S band data to generate products in compliance with science requirements. Moreover, JPL will develop L-band SAR processor and all data products will be available to users. Distributed data processing architecture will be used for handling large volume of data resulting from moderate resolution and larger swath in SweepSAR mode. Data products will be available in multiple processing levels like raw signal products, signal processed single-look and multi-look products, ground range products and Geo-Referenced products in HDF5 & GeoTiff formats. Derived Geo-Referenced Polarimetric and Interferometric data products will also be available for dissemination to the users. A rigorous calibration exercise will be performed by acquiring data over reference targets like Amazon rain-forest & corner reflectors sites for the generation of calibrated data products. Furthermore, various science data products (for science applications) will also be derived from basic data products for operational dissemination.

  14. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment Product Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process environmental data products beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Within the overall NPOESS processing environment, the IDPS must process a data volume nearly 1000 times the size of current systems -- in one-quarter of the time. Further, it must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. This paper will describe the architecture approach that is necessary to meet these challenging, and seemingly exclusive, NPOESS IDPS design requirements, with a focus on the processing relationships required to generate the NPP products.

  15. Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-11-30

    The Cement Kiln Flue Gas Recovery Scrubber Project was a technical success and demonstrated the following: CKD can be used successfully as the sole reagent for removing SO2 from cement kiln flue gas, with removal efficiencies of 90 percent or greater; Removal efficiencies for HCl and VOCs were approximately 98 percent and 70 percent, respectively; Particulate emissions were low, in the range of 0.005 to 0.007 grains/standard cubic foot; The treated CKD sorbent can be recycled to the kiln after its potassium content has been reduced in the scrubber, thereby avoiding the need for landfilling; The process can yield fertilizer-grade K2SO4, a saleable by-product; and Waste heat in the flue gas can provide the energy required for evaporation and crystallization in the by-product recovery operation. The demonstration program established the feasibility of using the Recovery Scrubber{trademark} for desulfurization of flue gas from cement kilns, with generally favorable economics, assuming tipping fees are available for disposal of ash from biomass combustion. The process appears to be suitable for commercial use on any type of cement kiln. EPA has ruled that CKD is a nonhazardous waste, provided the facility meets Performance Standards for the Management of CKD (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1999d). Therefore, regulatory drivers for the technology focus more on reduction of air pollutants and pollution prevention, rather than on treating CKD as a hazardous waste. Application of the Recovery Scrubbe{trademark} concept to other waste-disposal operations, where pollution and waste reductions are needed, appears promising.

  16. Carbon nanotube mass production: principles and processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Qian, Wei-Zhong; Wei, Fei

    2011-07-18

    Our society requires new materials for a sustainable future, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are among the most important advanced materials. This Review describes the state-of-the-art of CNT synthesis, with a focus on their mass-production in industry. At the nanoscale, the production of CNTs involves the self-assembly of carbon atoms into a one-dimensional tubular structure. We describe how this synthesis can be achieved on the macroscopic scale in processes akin to the continuous tonne-scale mass production of chemical products in the modern chemical industry. Our overview includes discussions on processing methods for high-purity CNTs, and the handling of heat and mass transfer problems. Manufacturing strategies for agglomerated and aligned single-/multiwalled CNTs are used as examples of the engineering science of CNT production, which includes an understanding of their growth mechanism, agglomeration mechanism, reactor design, and process intensification. We aim to provide guidelines for the production and commercialization of CNTs. Although CNTs can now be produced on the tonne scale, knowledge of the growth mechanism at the atomic scale, the relationship between CNT structure and application, and scale-up of the production of CNTs with specific chirality are still inadequate. A multidisciplinary approach is a prerequisite for the sustainable development of the CNT industry.

  17. Cementing multilateral wells with latex cement

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A multilateral well is a well with one or more branches or lateral sections extending from its main wellbore. The laterals can be openhole or cased hole. When laterals are cased hole, the cement integrity for casing support and zonal isolation is very important. When cementing the lateral sections of multilateral wells, it is important to use a cement with high strength and durability to support the liner throughout the life of the well and to support the lateral section. The cement column is subjected to various stresses when the cemented inner stub is cut. High tensile strength, flexural strength, and crack resistance are required. These properties are necessary to make a clean cut through the cement sheath that does not induce cracks in the cement column. Latex cement is commonly used for its gas-migration-control property.

  18. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this mission-oriented research program is the production of renewable hydrogen for fossil fuel processing. This program will build upon promising results that have been obtained in the Chemical Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the utilization of intact microalgae for photosynthetic water splitting. In this process, specially adapted algae are used to perform the light-activated cleavage of water into its elemental constituents, molecular hydrogen and oxygen. The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of their hydrogen-producing capability. These are: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the original development of an evacuated photobiological reactor for real-world engineering applications; (6) the potential for using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. The significance of each of these points in the context of a practical system for hydrogen production is discussed. This program will be enhanced by collaborative research between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and senior faculty members at Duke University, the University of Chicago, and Iowa State University. The special contribution that these organizations and faculty members will make is access to strains and mutants of unicellular algae that will potentially have useful properties for hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting.

  19. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  1. Operationalizing Space Weather Products - Process and Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scro, K. D.; Quigley, S.

    2006-12-01

    Developing and transitioning operational products for any customer base is a complicated process. This is the case for operational space weather products and services for the USAF. This presentation will provide information on the current state of affairs regarding the process required to take an idea from the research field to the real-time application of 24-hour space weather operations support. General principles and specific issues are discussed and will include: customer requirements, organizations in-play, funding, product types, acquisition of engineering and validation data, security classification, version control, and various important changes that occur during the process. The author's viewpoint is as an individual developing space environmental system-impact products for the US Air Force: 1) as a member of its primary research organization (Air Force Research Laboratory), 2) working with its primary space environment technology transition organization (Technology Application Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center, SMC/WXT), and 3) delivering to the primary sponsor/customer of such system-impact products (Air Force Space Command). The experience and focus is obviously on specific military operationalization process and issues, but most of the paradigm may apply to other (commercial) enterprises as well.

  2. The effect of lime-dried sewage sludge on the heat-resistance of eco-cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Quan; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hai-Hua; Xu, Jing-Cheng; Liu, Jia; Li, Guang-Ming; Huang, Juwen

    2016-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of sewage sludge is a growing problem for sewage treatment plants. One method of disposal is to use sewage sludge as partial replacement for raw material in cement manufacture. Although this process has been well researched, little attention has been given to the thermal properties of cement that has had sewage sludge incorporated in the manufacturing process. This study investigated the fire endurance of eco-cement to which lime-dried sludge (LDS) had been added. LDS was added in proportions of 0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12% (by weight) to the raw material. The eco-cement was exposed to 200, 400, or 600 °C for 3 h. The residual strength and the microstructural properties of eco-cement were then studied. Results showed that the eco-cement samples suffered less damage than conventional cement at 600 °C. The microstructural studies showed that LDS incorporation could reduce Ca(OH)(2) content. It was concluded that LDS has the potential to improve the heat resistance of eco-cement products.

  3. Well cementing in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

  4. Sustainability Analysis for Products and Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability Analysis for Products and Processes Subhas K. Sikdar National Risk Management Research Laboratory United States Environmental protection Agency 26 W. M.L. King Dr. Cincinnati, OH 45237 Sikdar.subhas@epa.gov ABSTRACT Claims of both sustainable and unsu...

  5. Syllables as Processing Units in Handwriting Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Sonia; Alvarez, Carlos J.; Vallee, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    This research focused on the syllable as a processing unit in handwriting. Participants wrote, in uppercase letters, words that had been visually presented. The interletter intervals provide information on the timing of motor production. In Experiment 1, French participants wrote words that shared the initial letters but had different syllable…

  6. Critical elements in implementations of just-in-time management: empirical study of cement industry in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Mehwish; Bhatti, Mansoor Nazir; Shams, Tauqeer; Zaman, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, inventory management is continuous challenge for all organizations not only due to heavy cost associated with inventory holding, but also it has a great deal to do with the organizations production process. Cement industry is a growing sector of Pakistan's economy which is now facing problems in capacity utilization of their plants. This study attempts to identify the key strategies for successful implementation of just-in-time (JIT) management philosophy on the cement industry of Pakistan. The study uses survey responses from four hundred operations' managers of cement industry in order to know about the advantages and benefits that cement industry have experienced by Just in time (JIT) adoption. The results show that implementing the quality, product design, inventory management, supply chain and production plans embodied through the JIT philosophy which infect enhances cement industry competitiveness in Pakistan. JIT implementation increases performance by lower level of inventory, reduced operations & inventory costs was reduced eliminates wastage from the processes and reduced unnecessary production which is a big challenge for the manufacturer who are trying to maintain the continuous flow processes. JIT implementation is a vital manufacturing strategy that reaches capacity utilization and minimizes the rate of defect in continuous flow processes. The study emphasize the need for top management commitment in order to incorporate the necessary changes that need to take place in cement industry so that JIT implementation can take place in an effective manner.

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  8. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  9. Optimization process of tribenzoine production as a glycerol derived product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widayat, Abdurrakhman, Rifianto, Y.; Abdullah, Hadiyanto, Samsudin, Asep M.; Annisa, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Tribenzoin is a derived product from glycerol that can produce from glycerol conversion via esterification process. The product can be used in the food industry, cosmetics industry, polymer industry and also can be used to improve the properties of adhesive materials and water resistance in the ink printer.In the other hand, it advantages is environmentally friendly andrenewable because it is not derived from petroleum. This paper discusses the effect of temperature and catalyst concentration for tribenzoin production. For the responses, yield and product composition were observed. Results showed that the highest yield achieved at optimal variable data processed using Central Composite Design (CCD) which is 63.64 temperature (°C), mole ratio of benzoic acidto glycerol is 3.644:1, and catalyst concentration 6.25% (wt% glycerol). Yield products produced 58.71%. FTIR analysis results showed that the samples contained the results of IR spectra wavelength 1761 cm-1 in the fingerprint region and 3165 cm-1 frequency region group. The existence of these two adjustments that fixed in the area is strong evidence that the compound is tribenzoin.

  10. Development of strength in cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovic, B.

    1981-04-01

    The production of doped belite (dicalcium silicate) clinkers as a prospective means for saving energy in Portland cement production is described. This is accomplished by small additions of either barium sulfate (BaSO4), calcium tribasic phosphate (Ca5(PO4)3OH), or vanadium oxide (V2O5) to belite (Ca2SiO4) clinker. In addition to conserving energy, doping the belite with barium sulfate imparts greater strength to the resulting modified belite. Reactants, additives, and factors contributing to the fabrication of Sorel cement are described.

  11. Application of the sonic volumetric scan log to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Broding, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The imaging process of a volumetric scan presentation produces a sonic image that gives a pictorial display of the cement in place. The cemented zone can be further evaluated from transmittance and velocity scans. The image can be selected to include the casing to cement bond, the full cemented zone or the cement to formation bond. Sectoring, tilting and rotation of the image allows one to quickly make a first interpretation for any suspect areas. A more detailed study from transmittance and velocity data permits a reliable qualification of the physical properties of the cement in place.

  12. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Graphene Nanoplatelet-Cement Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baomin; Jiang, Ruishuang; Wu, Zhenlin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were dispersed uniformly in aqueous solution using methylcellulose (MC) as a dispersing agent via ultrasonic processing. Homogenous GNP suspensions were incorporated into the cement matrix to investigate the effect of GNPs on the mechanical behavior of cement paste. The optimum concentration ratio of GNPs to MC was confirmed as 1:7 by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), and the optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images displayed remarkable dispersing performance. The GNP–cement composite exhibited better mechanical properties with the help of surface-modified GNPs. The flexural strength of cement paste increased up to 15%–24% with 0.05 wt % GNPs (by weight of cement). Meanwhile, the compressive strength of the GNP–cement composite increased up to 3%–8%. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal analysis (TG/DTG) demonstrated that the GNPs could accelerate the degree of hydration and increase the amount of hydration products, especially at an early age. Meanwhile, the lower porosity and finer pore size distribution of GNP–cement composite were detected by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). In addition, scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed the introduction of GNPs could impede the development of cracks and preserve the completeness of the matrix through the plicate morphology and tortuous behavior of GNPs. PMID:28335328

  13. Tires fuel oil field cement manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Caveny, B.; Ashford, D.; Garcia, J.G.; Hammack, R.

    1998-08-31

    In a new process, waste automobile tires added to the fuel mix of gas, coal, and coke help fire kilns to produce API-quality oil field cement. Capital Cement uses this process in its cement-manufacturing plant in San Antonio, in which it also produces construction cement. The tires provide a lower-cost fuel and boost the temperature at a critical stage in the kiln burn process. Also, steel-belted tires add iron content to the mix. According to lab results, tire-burned cement slurries will perform the same as conventionally burned cement slurries. Actual field applications have proven that cement produced by burning tires performs no different than conventionally produced slurries. Capital`s plant uses both dry and wet processes, with separate kilns running both processes at the same time. Cement clinker is partially fired by waste tires in both kiln processes. The tires represent 12% of the fuel consumed by the plant, a number that is expected to increase. Capital burns about 200 tires/hr, or about 1.6 million tires/year.

  14. Healing process of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp covering with mineral trioxide aggregate or Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Holland, R; de Souza, V; Murata, S S; Nery, M J; Bernabé, P F; Otoboni Filho, J A; Dezan Júnior, E

    2001-01-01

    Considering several reports about the similarity between the chemical compositions of the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement (PC), the subject of this investigation was to analyze the behavior of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and direct pulp protection with these materials. After pulpotomy, the pulp stumps of 26 roots of dog teeth were protected with MTA or PC. Sixty days after treatment, the animal was sacrificed and the specimens removed and prepared for histomorphological analysis. There was a complete tubular hard tissue bridge in almost all specimens. In conclusion, MTA and PC show similar comparative results when used in direct pulp protection after pulpotomy.

  15. Porosity reduction in bone cement at the cement-stem interface.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Ferguson, S; Tepic, S

    1996-05-01

    The fatigue failure of bone cement, leading to loosening of the stem, is likely to be one mode of failure of cemented total hip replacements. There is strong evidence that cracks in the cement are initiated at voids which act as stress risers, particularly at the cement-stem interface. The preferential formation of voids at this site results from shrinkage during polymerisation and the initiation of this process at the warmer cement-bone interface, which causes bone cement to shrink away from the stem. A reversal of the direction of polymerisation would shrink the cement on to the stem and reduce or eliminate the formation of voids at this interface. We have investigated this by implanting hip prostheses, at room temperature or preheated to 44 degrees C, into human cadaver femora kept at 37 degrees C. Two types of bone cement were either hand-mixed or vacuum-mixed before implantation. We found that the area of porosity at the cement-stem interface was dramatically reduced by preheating the stem and that the preheating temperature of 44 degrees C determined by computer analysis of transient heat transfer was the minimum required to induce initial polymerisation at the cement-stem interface. Temperature measurements taken during these experiments in vitro showed that preheating of the stem caused a negligible increase in the temperature of the bone. Reduction of porosity at the cement-stem interface could significantly increase the life of hip arthroplasties.

  16. Mass balance of dioxins over a cement kiln in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeqing; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Jiang; Meng, Weijie; Yan, Mi; Wang, Huanzhong; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-02-01

    The cement production process may be a potential source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs, "dioxins"), due to the widespread distribution of dioxins and potential precursors in raw materials and to conditions favorable to de novo formation in the heat exchangers. The emission, gas/particle distribution, and mass balance of PCDD/Fs were investigated at a typical state-of-the-art Chinese cement kiln. Input and output inventories were established for three campaigns, including two in normal operation and one while co-processing refuse derived fuel (RDF). Sample analysis from stack gas, cement kiln dust, raw meal, fly dust and clinker for the analysis of PCDD/Fs were reported in this study. Dioxins were also analyzed at various positions in the pre-heater, presenting an adsorption-desorption circulation process of PCDD/Fs. The over-all dioxin mass balance was negative, indicating that this cement kiln is not a source but a sink process of dioxins.

  17. Early age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in natural zeolite blended cements: Reaction kinetics and products by in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, R.; Mertens, G.; Cizer, O.; Elsen, J.

    2010-12-15

    The in situ early-age hydration and pozzolanic reaction in cements blended with natural zeolites were investigated by time-resolved synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with Rietveld quantitative phase analysis. Chabazite and Na-, K-, and Ca-exchanged clinoptilolite materials were mixed with Portland cement in a 3:7 weight ratio and hydrated in situ at 40 {sup o}C. The evolution of phase contents showed that the addition of natural zeolites accelerates the onset of C{sub 3}S hydration and precipitation of CH and AFt. Kinetic analysis of the consumption of C{sub 3}S indicates that the enveloping C-S-H layer is thinner and/or less dense in the presence of alkali-exchanged clinoptilolite pozzolans. The zeolite pozzolanic activity is interpreted to depend on the zeolite exchangeable cation content and on the crystallinity. The addition of natural zeolites alters the structural evolution of the C-S-H product. Longer silicate chains and a lower C/S ratio are deduced from the evolution of the C-S-H b-cell parameter.

  18. Multiphase Processing of Isoprene Oxidation Products - Kinetic and Product Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Schoene, L.; Schindelka, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene represents a significant fraction of NMHC in the troposphere with recently estimated emission rates of 500-750 TgC yr-1 (1). Due to its enormous source strength, the fate of isoprene and its degradation products is important in atmospheric processes. Possible ascendancies of such oxidation processes are the regional ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Some aspects of SOA formation from isoprene and its degradation products have already been studied by chamber studies (2,3). Aqueous phase oxidation processes which may occur after phase transfer of ‘early’ oxidation products are often neglected. But these processes provide a potentially important source for organic particle mass constituents such as carboxylic acids. The majority of existing aqueous phase modelling studies focus only on ‘later’ products such as methylglyoxal and oxalic acid. Yet, a recent field study reports much higher aqueous phase concentrations of some ‘earlier’ isoprene oxidation products including methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) than expected (4). This indicates a possibly underestimated importance of multiphase chemical processes in the course of the isoprene oxidation as a source for the production of organic particle mass together with known ‘heterogeneous processes’ such as the direct condensation of low-volatility products from gas phase processes onto existing particle surfaces. In order to implement the isoprene multiphase chemistry in atmospheric models detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies are needed. Hence, the temperature dependence of MACR, MVK, methacrylic acid and acrylic acid exposed to NO3, SO4- and OH radicals in the aqueous phase was investigated. The measurements were performed using a laser-photolysis laser long path absorption technique. The analysis confirmed in all cases the much higher reactivity of the OH radical in comparison to SO4- and NO3 radicals. The temperature dependence is most distinct for NO3

  19. Hydrogen production and catalyst demetallization process

    SciTech Connect

    Elvin, F.J.

    1989-05-09

    A process is described for the production of molecular hydrogen and demetallization of solid particles comprising: (a) contacting hydrogen sulfide with solid particles at conditions effective to convert the hydrogen sulfide into molecular hydrogen, the solid particles comprising at least one metallic component effective to promote the hydrogen sulfide conversion; (b) separating the molecular hydrogen from elemental sulfur formed in step (a) and unconverted hydrogen sulfide and recovering a product enriched in molecular hydrogen; and (c) demetallizing at least a portion of the solid particles from step (a) to produce demetallized solid particles having a reduced content of the metallic component.

  20. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  1. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  2. Dentin bonding agents and resin cements--current status.

    PubMed

    Woolsey, G; O'Mahony, A; Hansen, P A

    2000-01-01

    Contemporary restorative dentistry is a rapidly evolving science which challenges the progressive clinician with a plethora of "new and improved" products. Sound product choices should be couched in the prudent consideration of well conducted in vitro and in vivo product research. This review shall list the most recent product developments in dentin bonding agents (fifth generation agents), resin-containing dental cements and the newest generation of dental cements i.e., resin-ionomer dental cements.

  3. Poly(vinyl chloride) processes and products.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, R N

    1981-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) resins are produced by four basic processes: suspension, emulsion, bulk and solution polymerization. PVC suspensions resins are usually relatively dust-free and granular with varying degrees of particle porosity. PVC emulsion resins are small particle powders containing very little free monomer. Bulk PVC resins are similar to suspension PVC resins, though the particles tend to be more porous. Solution PVC resins are smaller in particle size than suspension PVC with high porosity particles containing essentially no free monomer. The variety of PVC resin products does not lend itself to broad generalizations concerning health hazards. In studying occupational hazards the particular PVC process and the product must be considered and identified in the study. PMID:7333230

  4. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant

  5. CITRIC ACID AS A SET RETARDER FOR CALCIUM ALUMINATE PHOSPHATE CEMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.; BROTHERS, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Citric acid added as set retarder significantly contributed to enhancing the setting temperature and to extending the thickening time of a calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) geothermal cement slurry consisting of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) as the base reactant and sodium polyphosphate (NaP) solution as the acid reactant. The set-retarding activity of citric acid was due to the uptake of Ca{sup 2+} ions from the CAC by carboxylic acid groups within the citric acid. This uptake led to the precipitation of a Ca-complexed carboxylate compound as a set-retarding barrier layer on the CAC grains' surfaces. However, this barrier layer was vulnerable to disintegration by the attack of free Ca{sup 2+} ions from CAC, and also to degradation at elevated temperature, thereby promoting the generation of exothermic energy from acid-base reactions between the CAC and NaP after the barrier was broken. The exothermic reaction energy that was promoted in this way minimized the loss in strength of the citric acid-retarded cement. The phase composition assembled in both retarded and non-retarded cements after autoclaving at 180 C encompassed three reaction products, hydroxyapatite (HOAp), hydrogrossular and boehmite, which are responsible for strengthening the autoclaved cement. The first two reaction products were susceptible to reactions with sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate to form crystalline bassanite scale as the corrosion product. The boehmite phase possessed a great resistance to acid and sulfate. Although the bassanite scales clinging to the cement's surfaces were the major factor governing the loss in weight, they served in protecting the cement from further acid- and sulfate-corrosion until their spallation eventually occurred. Nevertheless, the repetitive processes of HOAp and hydrogrossular {yields} bassanite {yields} spallation played an important role in extending the useful lifetime of CaP cement in a low pH environment at 180 C.

  6. The effects of the mechanical–chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Milling extracted MSWI fly ash. ► Increasing specific surface area, destruction of the crystalline texture, and increasing the amount of amorphous materials. ► Increasing heavy metal stability. ► Inducing pozzolanic reactions and increasing the early and later strength of the cement paste. - Abstract: A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96 h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50 times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH){sub 2} and led to the generation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  7. The effects of the mechanical-chemical stabilization process for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash on the chemical reactions in cement paste.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Gang; Sun, Chang-Jung; Gau, Sue-Huai; Wu, Ching-Wei; Chen, Yu-Lun

    2013-04-01

    A water extraction process can remove the soluble salts present in municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash, which will help to increase the stability of the synthetic materials produced from the MSWI fly ash. A milling process can be used to stabilize the heavy metals found in the extracted MSWI fly ash (EA) leading to the formation of a non-hazardous material. This milled extracted MSWI fly ash (MEA) was added to an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) paste to induce pozzolanic reactions. The experimental parameters included the milling time (96h), water to binder ratios (0.38, 0.45, and 0.55), and curing time (1, 3, 7 and 28 days). The analysis procedures included inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES), BET, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. The results of the analyses indicate that the milling process helped to stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA, with an increase in the specific surface area of about 50times over that of OPC. The addition of the MEA to the OPC paste decreased the amount of Ca(OH)2 and led to the generation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) which in turned increased the amount of gel pores and middle sized pores in the cement. Furthermore, a comparison shows an increase in the early and later strength over that of OPC paste without the addition of the milled extracted ash. In other words, the milling process could stabilize the heavy metals in the MEA and had an activating effect on the MEA, allowing it to partly substitute OPC in OPC paste.

  8. Experimental determination of carbonation rate in Portland cement at 25°C and relatively high CO2 partial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Montegrossi, Giordano; Huet, Bruno; Virgili, Giorgio; Orlando, Andrea; Vaselli, Orlando; Marini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to study the alteration of Portland class G Cement at ambient temperature under a relatively high CO2 partial pressure through suitably designed laboratory experiments, in which cement hydration and carbonation are taken into account separately. First, the hydration process was carried out for 28 days to identify and quantify the hydrated solid phases formed. After the completion of hydration, accompanied by partial carbonation under atmospheric conditions, the carbonation process was investigated in a stirred micro-reactor (Parr instrument) with crushed cement samples under 10 bar or more of pure CO2(g) and MilliQ water adopting different reaction times. The reaction time was varied to constrain the reaction kinetics of the carbonation process and to investigate the evolution of secondary solid phases. Chemical and mineralogical analyses (calcimetry, chemical composition, SEM and X-ray Powder Diffraction) were carried out to characterize the secondary minerals formed during cement hydration and carbonation. Water analyses were also performed at the end of each experimental run to measure the concentrations of relevant solutes. The specific surface area of hydrated cement was measured by means of the BET method to obtain the rates of cement carbonation. Experimental outcomes were simulated by means of the PhreeqC software package. The obtained results are of interest to understand the comparatively fast cement alteration in CO2 production wells with damaged casing.

  9. Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, T.A.; Marland, G.; Andres, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

  10. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  11. Barnacle cement: An etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  12. Barnacle cement: an etchant for stainless steel 316L?

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, R; Kumar, R; Doble, M; Venkatesan, R

    2010-09-01

    Localized corrosion of stainless steel beneath the barnacle-base is an unsolved issue for the marine industry. In this work, we clearly bring out for the first time the role of the barnacle cement in acting as an etchant, preferentially etching the grain boundaries, and initiating the corrosion process in stainless steel 316L. The investigations include structural characterization of the cement and corroded region, and also chemical characterization of the corrosion products generated beneath the barnacle-base. Structural characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the morphological changes in the cement structure across the interface of the base-plate and the substrate, modification of the steel surface by the cement and the corrosion pattern beneath the barnacle-base. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of the corrosion products show that they are composed of mainly oxides of iron thereby implying that the corrosion is aerobic in nature. A model for the etching and corrosion mechanism is proposed based on our observations.

  13. In situ vitrification: Process and products

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.; Koegler, S.

    1991-06-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is an electrically powered thermal treatment process that converts soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. It is similar in concept to bringing a simplified glass manufacturing process to a site and operating it in the ground, using the soil as a glass feed stock. Gaseous emissions are contained, scrubbed, and filtered. When the process is completed, the molten volume cools producing a block of glass and crystalline material that resembles natural obsidian commingled with crystalline phases. The product passes US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) leach resistance tests, and it can be classified as nonhazardous from a chemical hazard perspective. ISV was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for application to contaminated soils. It is also being adapted for applications to buried waste, underground tanks, and liquid seepage sites. ISV's then-year development period has included tests on many different site conditions. As of January 1991 there have been 74 tests using PNL's ISV equipment; these tests have ranged from technology development tests using nonhazardous conditions to hazardous and radioactive tests. 2 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Power Ultrasound to Process Dairy Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V.

    Conventional methods of pasteurizing milk involve the use of heat regardless of treatment (batch, high temperature short time - HTST or ultra high temperature - UHT sterilization), and the quality of the milk is affected because of the use of high temperatures. Consequences of thermal treatment are a decrease in nutritional properties through the destruction of vitamins or denaturation of proteins, and sometimes the flavor of milk is undesirably changed. These changes are produced at the same time that the goal of the pasteurization process is achieved, which is to have a microbiological safe product, free of pathogenic bacteria, and to reduce the load of deteriorative microorganisms and enzymes, resulting in a product with a longer storage life.

  15. β-Dicalcium silicate-based cement: synthesis, characterization and in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies.

    PubMed

    Correa, Daniel; Almirall, Amisel; García-Carrodeguas, Raúl; dos Santos, Luis Alberto; De Aza, Antonio H; Parra, Juan; Delgado, José Ángel

    2014-10-01

    β-dicalcium silicate (β-Ca₂ SiO₄, β-C₂ S) is one of the main constituents in Portland cement clinker and many refractory materials, itself is a hydraulic cement that reacts with water or aqueous solution at room/body temperature to form a hydrated phase (C-S-H), which provides mechanical strength to the end product. In the present investigation, β-C₂ S was synthesized by sol-gel process and it was used as powder to cement preparation, named CSiC. In vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies were assessed by soaking the cement samples in simulated body fluid solutions and human osteoblast cell cultures for various time periods, respectively. The results showed that the sol-gel process is an available synthesis method in order to obtain a pure powder of β-C₂ S at relatively low temperatures without chemical stabilizers. A bone-like apatite layer covered the material surface after soaking in SBF and its compressive strength (CSiC cement) was comparable with that of the human trabecular bone. The extracts of this cement were not cytotoxic and the cell growth and relative cell viability were comparable to negative control.

  16. Formation, release and control of dioxins in cement kilns.

    PubMed

    Karstensen, Kåre Helge

    2008-01-01

    Co-processing of hazardous wastes in cement kilns have for decades been thought to cause increased emissions of PCDD/PCDFs--a perception that has been evaluated in this study. Hundreds of PCDD/PCDF measurements conducted by the cement industry and others in the last few years, on emissions and solid materials, as well as recent test burns with hazardous wastes in developing countries do not support this perception. Newer data has been compared with older literature data and shows in particular that many emission factors have to be reconsidered. Early emission factors for cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste, which are still used in inventories, are shown to be too high compared with actual measurements. Less than 10 years ago it was believed that the cement industry was the main contributor of PCDD/PCDFs to air; data collected in this study indicates however that the industry contributes with less than 1% of total emissions to air. The Stockholm Convention on POPs presently ratified by 144 parties, classifies cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste as a source category having the potential for comparatively high formation and release of PCDD/PCDFs. This classification is based on early investigations from the 1980s and 1990s where kilns co-processing hazardous waste had higher emissions compared to those that did not burn hazardous waste. However, the testing of these kilns was often done under worst case scenario conditions known to favour PCDD/PCDF formation. More than 2000 PCDD/PCDF cement kiln measurements have been evaluated in this study, representing most production technologies and waste feeding scenarios. They generally indicate that most modern cement kilns co-processing waste today can meet an emission level of 0.1ngI-TEQ/m(3), when well managed and operated. In these cases, proper and responsible use of waste including organic hazardous waste to replace parts of the fossil fuel does not seem to increase formation of PCDD/PCDFs. Modern preheater

  17. (Fission product transport processes in reactor accidents)

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, S.A.; Beahm, E.C.; Kress, T.S.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1989-06-14

    The purpose of this trip was to participate in and to hold informal discussions with other participants in the International Centre for Heat and Mass Transfer (ICHMT) International Seminar on Fission Product Transport Processes held at Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia, during the week of May 22--26, 1989. There were 129 participants from 20 countries at the Seminar. The travelers delivered two invited lectures and presented four invited papers based upon NRC-sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One of the travelers also served as Chairman of the Session entitled Transport Phenomena in the Reactor Coolant System'' and appeared as a Panelist in the Closing Session of the Seminar.

  18. Asphalt cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  20. Process for production of a metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  1. Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John Groppo; Thomas Robl; Robert Rathbone

    2006-06-01

    an affinity for air entraining admixture (AEA), a consideration that is a significant benefit. In concrete, substitution of 20% showed that the UFA product outperformed a typical ash by achieving 105 to 107% of control strength after 28 days and 109.5 to 112% after 56 days. Higher substitution levels were shown to delay early strength development, but surpass control strength after 28 days while lower substitution levels provide both early and longer term strength. One of the most significant benefits provided by using UFA in concrete mix designs is the improved resistance to chloride permeability while some improvements is flexural strength were realized and tensile strength was essentially unchanged. Potentially significant benefits may also be offered by using UFA as a process addition in the manufacture of cement clinker.

  2. Sequential processing during noun phrase production.

    PubMed

    Bürki, Audrey; Sadat, Jasmin; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alario, F-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether the brain operations involved during the processing of successive words in multi word noun phrase production take place sequentially or simultaneously. German speakers named pictures while ignoring a written distractor superimposed on the picture (picture-word interference paradigm) using the definite determiner and corresponding German noun. The gender congruency and the phonological congruency (i.e., overlap in first phonemes) between target and distractor were manipulated. Naming responses and EEG were recorded. The behavioural performance replicated both the phonology and the gender congruency effects (i.e., shorter naming latencies for gender congruent than incongruent and for phonologically congruent than incongruent trials). The phonological and gender manipulations also influenced the EEG data. Crucially, the two effects occurred in different time windows and over different sets of electrodes. The phonological effect was observed substantially earlier than the gender congruency effect. This finding suggests that the processing of determiners and nouns during determiner noun phrase production occurs at least partly sequentially.

  3. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Natalia A; Valdez, Alejandra L; Fariña, Julia I

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined.

  4. Microbial production of scleroglucan and downstream processing

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Natalia A.; Valdez, Alejandra L.; Fariña, Julia I.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic petroleum-based polymers and natural plant polymers have the disadvantage of restricted sources, in addition to the non-biodegradability of the former ones. In contrast, eco-sustainable microbial polysaccharides, of low-cost and standardized production, represent an alternative to address this situation. With a strong global market, they attracted worldwide attention because of their novel and unique physico-chemical properties as well as varied industrial applications, and many of them are promptly becoming economically competitive. Scleroglucan, a β-1,3-β-1,6-glucan secreted by Sclerotium fungi, exhibits high potential for commercialization and may show different branching frequency, side-chain length, and/or molecular weight depending on the producing strain or culture conditions. Water-solubility, viscosifying ability and wide stability over temperature, pH and salinity make scleroglucan useful for different biotechnological (enhanced oil recovery, food additives, drug delivery, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, biocompatible materials, etc.), and biomedical (immunoceutical, antitumor, etc.) applications. It can be copiously produced at bioreactor scale under standardized conditions, where a high exopolysaccharide concentration normally governs the process optimization. Operative and nutritional conditions, as well as the incidence of scleroglucan downstream processing will be discussed in this chapter. The relevance of using standardized inocula from selected strains and experiences concerning the intricate scleroglucan scaling-up will be also herein outlined. PMID:26528259

  5. Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

  6. China: Emissions pattern of the world leader in CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Jay S.; Andres, Robert J.; Marland, Gregg

    2008-04-01

    Release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. Our best estimate is that China became the largest national source of CO2 emissions during 2006. Previously, the United States (US) had occupied that position. However, the annual emission rate in the US has remained relatively stable between 2001-2006 while the emission rate in China has more than doubled, apparently eclipsing that of the US in late 2006. Here we present the seasonal and spatial pattern of CO2 emissions in China, as well as the sectoral breakdown of emissions. Though our best point estimate places China in the lead position in terms of CO2 emissions, we qualify this statement in a discussion of the uncertainty in the underlying data (3-5% for the US; 15-20% for China). Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of China's new position with respect to international agreements to mitigate climate change.

  7. Cascaded processing in written compound word production

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Raymond; Tønnessen, Finn Egil; Strömqvist, Sven; Hyönä, Jukka; Niemi, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the intricate interplay between central linguistic processing and peripheral motor processes during typewriting. Participants had to typewrite two-constituent (noun-noun) Finnish compounds in response to picture presentation while their typing behavior was registered. As dependent measures we used writing onset time to assess what processes were completed before writing and inter-key intervals to assess what processes were going on during writing. It was found that writing onset time was determined by whole word frequency rather than constituent frequencies, indicating that compound words are retrieved as whole orthographic units before writing is initiated. In addition, we found that the length of the first syllable also affects writing onset time, indicating that the first syllable is fully prepared before writing commences. The inter-key interval results showed that linguistic planning is not fully ready before writing, but cascades into the motor execution phase. More specifically, inter-key intervals were largest at syllable and morpheme boundaries, supporting the view that additional linguistic planning takes place at these boundaries. Bigram and trigram frequency also affected inter-key intervals with shorter intervals corresponding to higher frequencies. This can be explained by stronger memory traces for frequently co-occurring letter sequences in the motor memory for typewriting. These frequency effects were even larger in the second than in the first constituent, indicating that low-level motor memory starts to become more important during the course of writing compound words. We discuss our results in the light of current models of morphological processing and written word production. PMID:25954182

  8. Current Status of Geothermal Well Cement Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study made in 1976 indicated that the cements used for well completion deteriorate in the geothermal environments and that the life expectancy of a well, and therefore the economics of geothermal processes, could be improved significantly if better materials were developed. On the basis of this assessment, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) helped the Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy to organize a program to develop materials that meet the estimated design criteria for geothermal well cements. The BNL work involves research on polymer cements and full management of an integrated program involving contract research and industrial participation. The program consists of the following phases: (1) problem definition, (2) cement research and development, (3) property verification, (4) downhole testing, and (5) cementing of demonstration wells.

  9. 40 CFR 161.162 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of production process. 161... § 161.162 Description of production process. If the product is produced by an integrated system, the applicant must submit information on the production (reaction) processes used to produce the...

  10. Literature survey on cements for remediation of deformed casing in geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.; Philippacopoulos, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was requested to conduct a literature survey for the best available cement to use in the proposed casing patch as part of the Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO) project on remediation of deformed casings. A total of 50 wells have been identified with deformed production casing in Unocal`s portion of The Geysers geothermal field. A procedure to address the casing deformation and avoid abandonment of these wells has been developed as described in the Geysers Deformed Casing Remediation Proposal. The proposed remediation procedure involves isolation of the zone of interest with an inflatable packer, milling the deformed casing and cementing a 7 inch diameter liner to extend approximately 100 ft above and 100 ft below the milled zone. During the milling operation it is possible that the original cement and surrounding formation may slough away. In order to specify a suitable cement formulation for the casing patch it is first necessary to identify and understand the deformation mechanism/s operating in The Geysers field. Subsequently, the required cement mechanical properties to withstand further deformation of the repaired system must be defined. From this information it can be determined whether available cement formulations meet these requirements. In addition to The Geysers, other geothermal fields are at possible risk of casing deformation due to subsidence, seismic activity, lateral and vertical formation movement or other processes. Therefore, the proposed remediation procedure may have applications in other fields.

  11. The suitability of a supersulfated cement for nuclear waste immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, N. C.; Milestone, N. B.; Gordon, L. E.; Ko, S.-C.

    2014-09-01

    Composite cements based on ordinary Portland cement are used in the UK as immobilisation matrices for low and intermediate level nuclear wastes. However, the high pore solution pH causes corrosion of some metallic wastes and undesirable expansive reactions, which has led to alternative cementing systems being examined. We have investigated the physical, chemical and microstructural properties of a supersulfated cement in order to determine its applicability for use in nuclear waste encapsulation. The hardened supersulfated cement paste appeared to have properties desirable for use in producing encapsulation matrices, but the high powder specific surface resulted in a matrix with high porosity. Ettringite and calcium silicate hydrate were the main phases formed in the hardened cement paste and anhydrite was present in excess. The maximum rate of heat output during hydration of the supersulfated cement paste was slightly higher than that of a 9:1 blastfurnace slag:ordinary Portland cement paste commonly used by the UK nuclear waste processing industry, although the total heat output of the supersulfated cement paste was lower. The pH was also significantly lower in the supersulfated cement paste. Aluminium hydroxide was formed on the surface of aluminium metal encapsulated in the cement paste and ettringite was detected between the aluminium hydroxide and the hardened cement paste.

  12. Process, optimized acidizing reduce production facility upsets

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.A.; Hill, D.G.; McConnell, S.B.; Johnson, M.R.

    1997-02-10

    The filtration/absorption process, coupled with optimum treatments, prevent facility upsets that increase the time and resources required for bringing a well back on-line following an acid stimulation. Surface active agents, required in acidizing to improve well productivity, can form oil/water emulsions and cause unacceptable oil and grease levels during acid flowback. But recent offshore experiences after acidizing show that operators can achieve oil and grease discharge limits without facility upsets. To minimize oil and grease, the additives need to be optimized by adding a mutual breakout solvent (MBS). MBS has the dual function of being a mutual solvent and a sludge and emulsion control additive. The paper discusses acidizing problems, acid additives, handling options, and a case history of the Main Pass A field.

  13. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Gibson, Tracy; Captain, James; Athman, Robert; Nugent, Matthew; Parks, Steven; Devor, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx.8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H2O/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H2 for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASA's new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  14. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony; Gibson, Tracy; Captain, James; Athman, Robert; Nugent, Matthew; Parks, Steven; Devor, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methane/oxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO2 is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a HiCO2 recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO2/hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO2 freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH4/hr and 71.3 g H20/hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH4/O2 propellant per 14 hr day (including O2 from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H2 for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASA's new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  15. Flavor violating processes with sgoldstino pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Gorbunov, D. S.

    2012-04-01

    In supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics (SM), goldstino superpartners—scalar and pseudoscalar sgoldstinos—can be light enough for emerging in decays of SM particles. Sgoldstino interaction with SM fields is suppressed by the scale of supersymmetry breaking in the whole theory. Hence, searches for sgoldstinos give an opportunity to probe the underlying mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to SM fields are proportional to the supersymmetry breaking parameters—MSSM soft terms—and therefore can lead to flavor violating processes in quark and lepton sectors. We consider flavor violating processes involving sgoldstino pair production which are driven by sgoldstino couplings proportional to squark and slepton soft mass terms, m˜LL2 and m˜RR2. We find that present limits on off-diagonal entries in squark and slepton squared mass matrices allow t-, b-, c-quark and τ-lepton decays at levels available for study with existing data (BaBar, Belle, CLEOc) and in ongoing experiments (LHCb, CMS, ATLAS). In particular, we obtain the following branching ratios Br(t→cSP)≲10-7, Br(τ→μSP)≲10-7, Br(Bs→SP)≲10-4, Br(B→K(*)SP)≲10-4, Br(D→SP)≲10-7 with sgoldstino subsequent decays into kinematically allowed pairs of SM particles γγ, e+e-, μ+μ-, etc. Remarkably, the prominent signature of sgoldstino pair production is two muon pairs with pair momenta peaked at sgoldstino masses.

  16. Comparative assessment of TRU waste forms and processes. Volume I. Waste form and process evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Lokken, R.O.; May, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Timmerman, C.L.; Treat, R.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    This study provides an assesses seven waste forms and eight processes for immobilizing transuranic (TRU) wastes. The waste forms considered are cast cement, cold-pressed cement, FUETAP (formed under elevated temperature and pressure) cement, borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass, basalt glass-ceramic, and cold-pressed and sintered silicate ceramic. The waste-immobilization processes considered are in-can glass melting, joule-heated glass melting, glass marble forming, cement casting, cement cold-pressing, FUETAP cement processing, ceramic cold-pressing and sintering, basalt glass-ceramic processing. Properties considered included gas generation, chemical durability, mechanical strength, thermal stability, and radiation stability. The ceramic products demonstrated the best properties, except for plutonium release during leaching. The glass and ceramic products had similar properties. The cement products generally had poorer properties than the other forms, except for plutonium release during leaching. Calculations of the Pu release indicated that the waste forms met the proposed NRC release rate limit of 1 part in 10/sup 5/ per year in most test conditions. The cast-cement process had the lowest processing cost, followed closely by the cold-pressed and FUETAP cement processes. Joule-heated glass melting had the lower cost of the glass processes. In-can melting in a high-quality canister had the highest cost, and cold-pressed and sintered ceramic the second highest. Labor and canister costs for in-can melting were identified. The major contributor to costs of disposing of TRU wastes in a defense waste repository is waste processing costs. Repository costs could become the dominant cost for disposing of TRU wastes in a commercial repository. It is recommended that cast and FUETAP cement and borosilicate glass waste-form systems be considered. 13 figures, 16 tables.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  20. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  1. Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, John E.

    1989-03-21

    It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums

  2. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.

    1993-09-21

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

  3. Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate.

  4. Process for production of a borohydride compound

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-19

    A process for production of a borohydride compound M(BH.sub.4).sub.y. The process has three steps. The first step combines a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.yM with aluminum, hydrogen and a metallic catalyst containing at least one metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group; M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two; wherein the catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum. The second step combines the compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y with a borate, boroxine or borazine compound to produce M(BH.sub.4).sub.y and a byproduct mixture containing alkali metal and aluminum aryloxides. The third step separates M(BH.sub.4).sub.y from the byproduct mixture.

  5. [Optimization of the pertussis vaccine production process].

    PubMed

    Germán Santiago, J; Zamora, N; de la Rosa, E; Alba Carrión, C; Padrón, P; Hernández, M; Betancourt, M; Moretti, N

    1995-01-01

    The production of Pertussis Vaccine was reevaluated at the Instituto Nacional de Higiene "Rafael Rangel" in order to optimise it in terms of vaccine yield, potency, specific toxicity and efficiency (cost per doses). Four different processes, using two culture media (Cohen-Wheeler and Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1) and two types of bioreactors (25 L Fermentador Caracas and a 450 L industrial fermentor) were compared. Runs were started from freeze-dried strains (134 or 509) and continued until the obtention of the maximal yield. It was found that the combination Fermentación Glutamato Prolina-1/industrial fermentor, shortened the process to 40 hours while consistently yielding a vaccine of higher potency (7.91 +/- 2.56 IU/human dose) and lower specific toxicity in a mice bioassay. In addition, the physical aspect of the preparation was rather homogeneous and free of dark aggregates. Most importantly, the biomass yield more than doubled those of the Fermentador Caracas using the two different media and that in the industrial fermentor with the Cohen-Wheeler medium. Therefore, the cost per doses was substantially decreased.

  6. The limited benefit of "product-by-process" claim.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bao-Chi; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2016-10-02

    A product-by-process claim was initially developed when the invention could not otherwise be adequately defined. In the US, a patent applicant can use a product-by-process claim for a new product, no matter whether the product can also be defined by using structure features. However, the applicant mainly bears the burden to establish the novelty between the claimed product and the prior art product. Moreover, in terms of infringement, the very recent CAFC cases indicate that the product must be made by a process recited in the claim to infringe a product-by-process claim. Thus, an assignee almost can not take advantage from product-by-process claims during the patent enforcement by comparing with process claims. From the points of the burden during patent prosecution and confined scope in determining infringement, the benefit of using a product-by-process claim would be very limited.

  7. Optical evaluation on the setting of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De León Martínez, H. A.; Bernal, J. J. Soto; González Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2015-01-01

    In the construction area, one of the most widely used cement is the CPC 30R, it is a hydraulic binder consisting of CaO, SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3, when mixed with water forms cement pastes and its four crystallographic phases start to hydrate. The diffuse reflection on cement paste can give an indication of the behaviour on optical properties on the hydration of the cement and early formation products. In this study, Portland cement (CPC) pastes were prepared with 0.45 a water to cement ratio (w/c). This work is aimed to evaluate the optical properties of cement pastes on the hydration reaction during the first 24 hours by measuring the intensity of diffuse reflection changes.

  8. Process performance and product quality in an integrated continuous antibody production process.

    PubMed

    Karst, Daniel J; Steinebach, Fabian; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    Continuous manufacturing is currently being seriously considered in the biopharmaceutical industry as the possible new paradigm for producing therapeutic proteins, due to production cost and product quality related benefits. In this study, a monoclonal antibody producing CHO cell line was cultured in perfusion mode and connected to a continuous affinity capture step. The reliable and stable integration of the two systems was enabled by suitable control loops, regulating the continuous volumetric flow and adapting the operating conditions of the capture process. For the latter, an at-line HPLC measurement of the harvest concentration subsequent to the bioreactor was combined with a mechanistic model of the capture chromatographic unit. Thereby, optimal buffer consumption and productivity throughout the process was realized while always maintaining a yield above the target value of 99%. Stable operation was achieved at three consecutive viable cell density set points (20, 60, and 40 × 10(6) cells/mL), together with consistent product quality in terms of aggregates, fragments, charge isoforms, and N-linked glycosylation. In addition, different values for these product quality attributes such as N-linked glycosylation, charge variants, and aggregate content were measured at the different steady states. As expected, the amount of released DNA and HCP was significantly reduced by the capture step for all considered upstream operating conditions. This study is exemplary for the potential of enhancing product quality control and modulation by integrated continuous manufacturing. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 298-307. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section 590.680 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION...

  10. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section 590.680 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION...

  11. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section 590.680 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION...

  12. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section 590.680 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION...

  13. 9 CFR 590.680 - Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Approval of labeling for egg products processed in exempted egg products processing plants. 590.680 Section 590.680 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION...

  14. Development of an Improved Cement for Geothermal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Trabits, George

    2015-04-20

    After an oil, gas, or geothermal production well has been drilled, the well must be stabilized with a casing (sections of steel pipe that are joined together) in order to prevent the walls of the well from collapsing. The gap between the casing and the walls of the well is filled with cement, which locks the casing into place. The casing and cementing of geothermal wells is complicated by the harsh conditions of high temperature, high pressure, and a chemical environment (brines with high concentrations of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid) that degrades conventional Portland cement. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provided support for the development of fly-ash-modified calcium aluminate phosphate (CaP) cement, which offers improved resistance to degradation compared with conventional cement. However, the use of CaP cements involves some operational constraints that can increase the cost and complexity of well cementing. In some cases, CaP cements are incompatible with chemical additives that are commonly used to adjust cement setting time. Care must also be taken to ensure that CaP cements do not become contaminated with leftover conventional cement in pumping equipment used in conventional well cementing. With assistance from GTO, Trabits Group, LLC has developed a zeolite-containing cement that performs well in harsh geothermal conditions (thermal stability at temperatures of up to 300°C and resistance to carbonation) and is easy to use (can be easily adjusted with additives and eliminates the need to “sterilize” pumping equipment as with CaP cements). This combination of properties reduces the complexity/cost of well cementing, which will help enable the widespread development of geothermal energy in the United States.

  15. Effect of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Disodium Hydrogen Phosphate on BMP-2 Production

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Solaimanirad, Jafar; Shahi, Shahriar; Shafaie, Hajar; Salem Milani, Amin; Shakuie, Sahar; Zand, Vahid; Abdolrahimi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the hypotheses regarding the calcification induction by mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is the involvement of transforming growth factor-Beta (TGF-β) super family. Calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement is one of the endodontic biomaterials with clinical applications similar to MTA. The aim of the present in vitro study was to compare the induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) by a combination of disodium hydrogen phosphate (DSHP) and tooth colored ProRoot MTA (WMTA), to that of CEM cement and WMTA. Methods and Materials: Human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) were obtained from the attached gingiva of human premolars. HGFs were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s medium, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin, and streptomycin. Cells in groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to WMTA, CEM and WMTA+DSHP discs, respectively. The fourth group served as the control. After 72 h of exposure, HGF viability was determined by Mosmann’s tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay. BMP-2 levels in cell-free culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA, followed by the post hoc Games-Howell test for BMP-2 and post hoc Tukey’s test for the results of MTT assay. Results: Cellular viability was significantly higher in group 3 compared to the other groups (P<0.05); however, CEM and WMTA did not exhibit significant differences (P=0.08). The control group exhibited significantly higher cellular viability in comparison to the other groups of the study (P<0.05). The highest and lowest protein production rates were observed in the WMTA (3167±274.46 pg/mL) and WMTA+DSHP (1796±839.49 pg/mL) groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between the control, WMTA and CEM groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: WMTA and CEM did not exhibit any significant differences in terms of inducing BMP-2 production; however, incorporation of DSHP into WMTA resulted in a

  16. The contemporary cement cycle of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapur, A.; Van Oss, H. G.; Keoleian, G.; Kesler, S.E.; Kendall, A.

    2009-01-01

    A country-level stock and flow model for cement, an important construction material, was developed based on a material flow analysis framework. Using this model, the contemporary cement cycle of the United States was constructed by analyzing production, import, and export data for different stages of the cement cycle. The United States currently supplies approximately 80% of its cement consumption through domestic production and the rest is imported. The average annual net addition of in-use new cement stock over the period 2000-2004 was approximately 83 million metric tons and amounts to 2.3 tons per capita of concrete. Nonfuel carbon dioxide emissions (42 million metric tons per year) from the calcination phase of cement manufacture account for 62% of the total 68 million tons per year of cement production residues. The end-of-life cement discards are estimated to be 33 million metric tons per year, of which between 30% and 80% is recycled. A significant portion of the infrastructure in the United States is reaching the end of its useful life and will need to be replaced or rehabilitated; this could require far more cement than might be expected from economic forecasts of demand for cement. ?? 2009 Springer Japan.

  17. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-12-12

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feed-stocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others.

  18. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllectorPrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  19. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muscatello, A.; Devor, R.; Captain, J.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx. 8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  20. Fuel ethanol production: process design trends and integration opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carlos A; Sánchez, Oscar J

    2007-09-01

    Current fuel ethanol research and development deals with process engineering trends for improving biotechnological production of ethanol. In this work, the key role that process design plays during the development of cost-effective technologies is recognized through the analysis of major trends in process synthesis, modeling, simulation and optimization related to ethanol production. Main directions in techno-economical evaluation of fuel ethanol processes are described as well as some prospecting configurations. The most promising alternatives for compensating ethanol production costs by the generation of valuable co-products are analyzed. Opportunities for integration of fuel ethanol production processes and their implications are underlined. Main ways of process intensification through reaction-reaction, reaction-separation and separation-separation processes are analyzed in the case of bioethanol production. Some examples of energy integration during ethanol production are also highlighted. Finally, some concluding considerations on current and future research tendencies in fuel ethanol production regarding process design and integration are presented.

  1. 40 CFR 158.330 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Product Chemistry § 158.330 Description of production process. If... chemical equations of each intended reaction occurring at each step of the process, and of the duration...

  2. Microwave radiometry for cement kiln temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Karl D; Wang, Lingyun; Ryza, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The maximum temperature inside a cement kiln is a critical operating parameter, but is often difficult or impossible to measure. We present here the first data that show a correlation between cement kiln temperature measured using a microwave radiometer and product chemistry over an eight-hour period. The microwave radiometer senses radiation in the 12-13 GHz range and has been described previously [Stephan and Pearce (2002), JMPEE 37: 112-124].

  3. Power plant fly ash as a resource for alumina and cement

    SciTech Connect

    Murtha, M.J.; Burnet, G.

    1980-01-01

    A sinter process has been developed to form soluble aluminate compounds from mixtures of fly ash, limestone, and soda ash. The aluminates are extracted, treated to remove silicates, and precipitated; the precipitate is calcined to metallurgical grade alumina. The extract residue shows promise as a raw material for the production of Portland cement. Process economics are presented, and the effects of alumina and silica contents of the fly ash, sintering temperatures and time, and sales credits for by-products are discussed.

  4. Writing in dyslexia: product and process.

    PubMed

    Morken, Frøydis; Helland, Turid

    2013-08-01

    Research on dyslexia has largely centred on reading. The aim of this study was to assess the writing of 13 children with and 28 without dyslexia at age 11 years. A programme for keystroke logging was used to allow recording of typing activity as the children performed a sentence dictation task. Five sentences were read aloud twice each. The task was to type the sentence as correctly as possible, with no time constraints. The data were analysed from a product (spelling, grammar and semantics) and process (transcription fluency and revisions) perspective, using repeated measures ANOVA and t-tests to investigate group differences. Furthermore, the data were correlated with measures of rapid automatic naming and working memory. Results showed that the group with dyslexia revised their texts as much as the typical group, but they used more time, and the result was poorer. Moreover, rapid automatic naming correlated with transcription fluency, and working memory correlated with the number of semantic errors. This shows that dyslexia is generally not an issue of effort and that cognitive skills that are known to be important for reading also affect writing.

  5. Process for capturing CO{sub 2} arising from the calcination of the CaCO{sub 3} used in cement manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    N. Rodriguez; M. Alonso; G. Grasa; J. Carlos Abanades

    2008-09-15

    This paper outlines a new CaCO{sub 3} calcination method for producing a stream of CO{sub 2} (suitable for permanent geological storage after purification and compression). The process is based on the use of very hot CaO particles (T {gt} 1000{sup o}C) to transfer heat from a circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) to a calciner (fluidized with CO{sub 2} and/or steam). Since the fluidized bed combustor and calciner have separate atmospheres, the CO{sub 2} resulting from the decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} can be captured, while the CO{sub 2} generated in the combustion of the fuel in air is emitted to the atmosphere. We demonstrate that with this system it is possible to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions of a cement plant by around 60%. Furthermore, since the key pieces of equipment are similar to the commercial CFBCs used in power generation plants, it is possible to establish the additional investment required for the system and to estimate the cost per ton of CO{sub 2} avoided for this process to be about 19 $/tCO{sub 2} avoided. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Improvement of casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Part 2: Oilfield cements and cement additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, K. H.; Akstinat, M.

    1982-07-01

    Oilfield cements and cement additives were investigated in order to improve the casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Characterization and evaluation of the main oil field cements commercially available were studied. The testing was carried out according to American Petroleum Institute API standards and nonstandardized test methods (dynamic modulus of elasticity, expansion/shrinkage), especially the rheology, thickening time and the influence of pressure, temperature and water-cement ratio, were considered. The main emphasis in the field of cement additives was on the evaluation of cement retarders for high temperatures, accelerators, and additives for cement expansion. Furthermore oil field cements were tested, and their properties are described.

  7. Integrated Product and Process Data for B2B Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad; Jones, Albert; Wysk, Richard A.

    2003-09-01

    Collaborative development of engineered products in a business-to-business (B2B) environment will require more than just the selection of components from an on-line catalogue. It will involve the electronic exchange of product, process, and production engineering information during both design and manufacturing. While the state-of-the-practice does include a variety of ways to exchange product data electronically, it does not extend to the exchange of manufacturing process data. The reason is simple; process data is usually tied to specific manufacturing resources. These resources are not known typically at product development time. This paper proposes an approach, called an Integrated Product and Process Data (IPPD), where manufacturing process data is considered during product development. This approach replaces traditional process plans, which are resource specific, with a resource-independent process representation. Such a representation will allow a much wider collaboration among business partners and provide the necessary base for collaborative product development.

  8. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  9. Bioreactor and process design for biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Show, Kuan-Yeow; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is regarded as an attractive future clean energy carrier due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. It has the potential for renewable biofuel to replace current hydrogen production which rely heavily on fossil fuels. While biohydrogen production is still in the early stage of development, there have been a variety of laboratory- and pilot-scale systems developed with promising potential. This work presents a review of advances in bioreactor and bioprocess design for biohydrogen production. The state-of-the art of biohydrogen production is discussed emphasizing on production pathways, factors affecting biohydrogen production, as well as bioreactor configuration and operation. Challenges and prospects of biohydrogen production are also outlined.

  10. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  11. Reducing CO2-Emission by using Eco-Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, K.; Bergmeister, K.; Janotka, I.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 concentration in the air is rising constantly. Globally, cement companies are emitting nearly two billion tonnes/year of CO2 (or around 6 to 7 % of the planet's total CO2 emissions) by producing portland cement clinker. At this pace, by 2025 the cement industry will be emitting CO2 at a rate of 3.5 billion tones/year causing enormous environmental damage (Shi et al., 2011; Janotka et al., 2012). At the dawn of the industrial revolution in the mid-eighteenth century the concentration of CO2 was at a level of ca. 280 ppm. 200 years later at the time of World War II the CO2 level had risen to 310 ppm what results in a rate of increase of 0,15 ppm per year for that period (Shi et al., 2011). In November 2011 the CO2 concentration reached a value of 391 ppm (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 2011), a rise of ca. 81 ppm in 66 years and an increased rate of around 1,2 ppm/year respectively. In the same period cement production in tons of cement has multiplied by a factor of ca. 62 (Kelly & Oss, US Geological Survey, 2010). Thus new CO2-saving eco-cement types are gaining in importance. In these cement types the energy-consuming portland cement clinker is partially replaced by latent hydraulic additives such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or zeolite. These hydraulic additives do not need to be fired in the rotary furnace. They ony need to be pulverized to the required grain size and added to the ground portland cement clinker. Hence energy is saved by skipping the engery-consuming firing process, in addition there is no CO2-degassing as there is in the case of lime burning. Therefore a research project between Austria and Slovakia, funded by the EU (Project ENVIZEO), was initiated in 2010. The main goal of this project is to develop new CEM V eco-types of cements and certificate them for common usage. CEM V is a portland clinker saving cement kind that allows the reduction of clinker to a proportion of 40-64% for CEM V/A and 20-39% for CEM V/B respectively by the

  12. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, III, William R.; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Xu, Tengfang

    2012-12-03

    India’s cement industry is the second largest in the world behind China with annual cement production of 168 Mt in 2010 which accounted for slightly greater than six percent of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. To produce that amount of cement, the industry consumed roughly 700 PJ of fuel and 14.7 TWh of electricity. We identified and analyzed 22 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the Indian cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model and compared to an electricity price forecast the cumulative cost-effective plant-level electricity savings potential for the Indian cement industry for 2010- 2030 is estimated to be 83 TWh, and the cumulative plant-level technical electricity saving potential is 89 TWh during the same period. The grid-level CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 82 Mt CO2 and the electric grid-level CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 88 Mt CO2. Compared to a fuel price forecast, an estimated cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 1,029 PJ with associated CO2 emission reduction of 97 Mt CO2 during 2010-2030 is possible. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Indian cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost over the next twenty years.

  13. Processing of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in a Rotary Calciner - 12212

    SciTech Connect

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Musatov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Processing Russian nuclear ion exchange resin KU-2 using a 'Rotary' calciner was conducted. The resulting product is a dry free flowing powder (moisture content 3 wt.%, Angle of repose of ≅ 20 deg.). Compared with the original exchange resin the volume of the final product is about 3 times less.. Rotary calciner product can be stored in metal drums or in special reinforced concrete cubicles. After thermal treatment in a rotary calciner, the spent resin product can be solidified in cement yielding the following attributes: - The cemented waste is only a 35% increase over the volume of powder product; - The volume of cement calciner product is almost 9 times less (8.7) than the volume of cement solidified resin; - The mechanical strength of cemented calciner product meets the radioactive waste regulations in Russia. (authors)

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  15. Accelerated biodegradation of cement by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as a bioassay for evaluating immobilization of low-level radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Aviam, Orli; Bar-Nes, Gabi; Zeiri, Yehuda; Sivan, Alex

    2004-10-01

    Disposal of low-level radioactive waste by immobilization in cement is being evaluated worldwide. The stability of cement in the environment may be impaired by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that corrode the cement by producing sulfuric acid. Since this process is so slow that it is not possible to perform studies of the degradation kinetics and to test cement mixtures with increased durability, procedures that accelerate the biodegradation are required. Semicontinuous cultures of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiomonas intermedia containing thiosulfate as the sole energy source were employed to accelerate the biodegradation of cement samples. This resulted in a weight loss of up to 16% after 39 days, compared with a weight loss of 0.8% in noninoculated controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the degraded cement samples revealed deep cracks, which could be associated with the formation of low-density corrosion products in the interior of the cement. Accelerated biodegradation was also evident from the leaching rates of Ca(2+) and Si(2+), the major constituents of the cement matrix, and Ca exhibited the highest rate (up to 20 times greater than the control rate) due to the reaction between free lime and the biogenic sulfuric acid. Leaching of Sr(2+) and Cs(+), which were added to the cement to simulate immobilization of the corresponding radioisotopes, was also monitored. In contrast to the linear leaching kinetics of calcium, silicon, and strontium, the leaching pattern of cesium produced a saturation curve similar to the control curve. Presumably, the leaching of cesium is governed by the diffusion process, whereas the leaching kinetics of the other three ions seems to governed by dissolution of the cement.

  16. Accelerated Biodegradation of Cement by Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria as a Bioassay for Evaluating Immobilization of Low-Level Radioactive Waste

    PubMed Central

    Aviam, Orli; Bar-Nes, Gabi; Zeiri, Yehuda; Sivan, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Disposal of low-level radioactive waste by immobilization in cement is being evaluated worldwide. The stability of cement in the environment may be impaired by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that corrode the cement by producing sulfuric acid. Since this process is so slow that it is not possible to perform studies of the degradation kinetics and to test cement mixtures with increased durability, procedures that accelerate the biodegradation are required. Semicontinuous cultures of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiomonas intermedia containing thiosulfate as the sole energy source were employed to accelerate the biodegradation of cement samples. This resulted in a weight loss of up to 16% after 39 days, compared with a weight loss of 0.8% in noninoculated controls. Scanning electron microscopy of the degraded cement samples revealed deep cracks, which could be associated with the formation of low-density corrosion products in the interior of the cement. Accelerated biodegradation was also evident from the leaching rates of Ca2+ and Si2+, the major constituents of the cement matrix, and Ca exhibited the highest rate (up to 20 times greater than the control rate) due to the reaction between free lime and the biogenic sulfuric acid. Leaching of Sr2+ and Cs+, which were added to the cement to simulate immobilization of the corresponding radioisotopes, was also monitored. In contrast to the linear leaching kinetics of calcium, silicon, and strontium, the leaching pattern of cesium produced a saturation curve similar to the control curve. Presumably, the leaching of cesium is governed by the diffusion process, whereas the leaching kinetics of the other three ions seems to governed by dissolution of the cement. PMID:15466547

  17. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  18. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-02-23

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others. Key milestones included producing hydrogenated coal in the Hydrotreating Facility for the first time. The facility is now operational, although digital controls have not yet been completely wired. In addition, ultrasound is being used to investigate enhanced dissolution of coal. Experiments have been carried out.

  19. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  20. Hydration reactions of cement combinations containing vitrified incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Thomas D.; Dhir, Ravindra K

    2004-05-01

    One treatment option for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash (IFA) is vitrification. The process yields a material containing reduced levels of trace metals relative to the original ash. The material is glassy and potentially suitable as a cement component in concrete. This paper examines the vitrification of an IFA and studies the hydration reactions of combinations of this vitrified material and Portland cement (PC). Isothermal conduction calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the hydration reactions. As the levels of vitrified ash increase, the quantities of AFt phase produced decrease, whilst quantities of AFm phase increase, due to the reduced levels of sulfate in the vitrified ash. The levels of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel (inferred from estimates of quantities of gel-bound water) remain constant at 28 days regardless of vitrified ash content, indicating that the material is contributing toward the formation of this product.

  1. Architectures, Representations and Processes of Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alario, F.-Xavier; Costa, Albert; Ferreira, Victor S.; Pickering, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors present an overview of recent research conducted in the field of language production based on papers presented at the first edition of the International Workshop on Language Production (Marseille, France, September 2004). This article comprises two main parts. In the first part, consisting of three sections, the authors review the…

  2. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Spedding, F.H.; Butler, T.A.; Johns, I.B.

    1959-03-10

    The removal of fission products such as strontium, barium, cesium, rubidium, or iodine from neutronirradiated uranium is described. Uranium halide or elemental halogen is added to melted irradiated uranium to convert the fission products to either more volatile compositions which vaporize from the melt or to higher melting point compositions which separate as solids.

  3. Porous Portland Cement Concrete; The State of the Art.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This study investigates the current state of the art relating to the production and use of those porous portland cement concretes that may be...suitable for the construction of porous portland cement friction courses. Porous concretes produced by gap grading or elimination of the fine aggregate...applications discussed include: a no-fines pavement layer, porous portland cement concrete pavements, and porous pavement edge drains or porous hard shoulders

  4. Recycling of porcelain tile polishing residue in portland cement: hydration efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pelisser, Fernando; Steiner, Luiz Renato; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-02-21

    Ceramic tiles are widely used by the construction industry, and the manufacturing process of ceramic tiles generates as a major residue mud derived from the polishing step. This residue is too impure to be reused in the ceramic process and is usually discarded as waste in landfills. But the analysis of the particle size and concentration of silica of this residue shows a potential use in the manufacture of building materials based on portland cement. Tests were conducted on cement pastes and mortars using the addition of 10% and 20% (mass) of the residue. The results of compressive strength in mortars made up to 56 days showed a significant increase in compressive strength greater than 50%. The result of thermogravimetry shows that portlandite is consumed by the cement formed by the silica present in the residue in order to form calcium silicate hydrate and featuring a pozzolanic reaction. This effect improves the performance of cement, contributes to research and application of supplementary cementitious materials, and optimizes the use of portland cement, reducing the environmental impacts of carbon dioxide emissions from its production.

  5. Low fluid leakoff cementing compositions and filtration control additive for cement

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, G.T.

    1993-07-20

    A cementing composition is described, for cementing oil or gas wells penetrating subterranean formations, capable of forming a fluid slurry when mixed with water comprising: dry hydraulic cement; and a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh. In a process for cementing a casing in an oil or gas well penetrating a subterranean formation wherein a cement slurry, formed by mixing water and hydraulic cement, is pumped down the well to flow upwardly between the casing and the subterranean formation, the improvement is described comprising: utilizing as a filtration control additive of from about 0.2 to 5.0 percent by weight, based upon dry hydraulic cement, of finely ground peanut hulls, and utilizing finely ground peanut hulls wherein 10 percent or more of the finely ground peanut hulls is in the particle size range of less than 20 standard sieve mesh and greater than 500 standard sieve mesh.

  6. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  7. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  8. Hydrogen in the Methanol Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kralj, Anita Kovac; Glavic, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very important industrial gas in chemical processes. It is very volatile; therefore, it can escape from the process units and its mass balance is not always correct. In many industrial processes where hydrogen is reacted, kinetics are often related to hydrogen pressure. The right thermodynamic properties of hydrogen can be found for…

  9. Process for the Production of Radioactive Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico; Amaldi, Edoardo; Pontecorvo, Bruno; Rasetti, Franco; Segré, Emilio

    neutroni (Method for increasing the efficiency of the processes for the production of artificial radioactivities by neutron bombardment), was submitted in Italy just after the achievement (on October 22, 1934) of the first experimental results, and later extended to U.S.A. and other countries. The intriguing story about this Patent (seemingly without reference to its content), which resulted to be of fundamental relevance for the subsequent development of the atomic energy, is well described in the literature.2 The reference article3 for the material here contained is of February 15, 1935, to which we refer the reader for further details. However, at least in part, specific results discussed here are somewhat different from those in the article mentioned.

  10. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide among cement factory workers: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tungu, Alexander Mtemi; Bråtveit, Magne; Mamuya, Simon D; Moen, Bente E

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that dust exposure causes airway inflammation among cement factory workers. However, there is limited information on the mechanisms of this effect. We explored any associations between total dust exposure and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) as a marker of airway eosinophilic inflammation among cement production workers in Tanzania. We also examined possible differences in FENO concentration between workers in different parts of the production line. Methodology We examined 127 cement workers and 28 controls from a mineral water factory. An electrochemistry-based NIOX MINO device was used to examine FENO concentration. Personal total dust was collected from the breathing zone of the study participants using 37 mm cellulose acetate filters placed in three-piece plastic cassettes. Interviews on workers’ background information were conducted in the Swahili language. Results We found equal concentrations of FENO among exposed workers and controls (geometric mean (GM)=16 ppb). The GM for total dust among the exposed workers and controls was 5.0 and 0.6 mg/m3, respectively. The FENO concentrations did not differ between the exposed workers with high (GM≥5 mg/m3) and low (GM<5 mg/m3) total dust exposure. There was no significant difference in FENO concentration between workers in the two main stages of the cement production process. Conclusions We did not find any difference in FENO concentration between dust-exposed cement workers and controls, and there were similar FENO concentrations among workers in the two main stages of cement production. PMID:23243102

  11. Biotechnological Processes in Microbial Amylase Production

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, M. K. Md; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Hashim, Uda; Chinni, Suresh V.

    2017-01-01

    Amylase is an important and indispensable enzyme that plays a pivotal role in the field of biotechnology. It is produced mainly from microbial sources and is used in many industries. Industrial sectors with top-down and bottom-up approaches are currently focusing on improving microbial amylase production levels by implementing bioengineering technologies. The further support of energy consumption studies, such as those on thermodynamics, pinch technology, and environment-friendly technologies, has hastened the large-scale production of the enzyme. Herein, the importance of microbial (bacteria and fungi) amylase is discussed along with its production methods from the laboratory to industrial scales. PMID:28280725

  12. Process simulation and economical evaluation of enzymatic biodiesel production plant.

    PubMed

    Sotoft, Lene Fjerbaek; Rong, Ben-Guang; Christensen, Knud V; Norddahl, Birgir

    2010-07-01

    Process simulation and economical evaluation of an enzymatic biodiesel production plant has been carried out. Enzymatic biodiesel production from high quality rapeseed oil and methanol has been investigated for solvent free and cosolvent production processes. Several scenarios have been investigated with different production scales (8 and 200 mio. kg biodiesel/year) and enzyme price. The cosolvent production process is found to be most expensive and is not a viable choice, while the solvent free process is viable for the larger scale production of 200 mio. kg biodiesel/year with the current enzyme price. With the suggested enzyme price of the future, both the small and large scale solvent free production proved viable. The product price was estimated to be 0.73-1.49 euro/kg biodiesel with the current enzyme price and 0.05-0.75 euro/kg with the enzyme price of the future for solvent free process.

  13. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  14. A Prevalidation of the Product-Process Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashenbaum, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for instructors of supply chain and operations management (SCOM) courses is to help students who have never seen a production floor visualize concepts, such as the product-process matrix from standard introductory SCOM texts. This article presents a classroom exercise, which "prevalidates" the product-process matrix.…

  15. Manufacturing Processes for Various Shaped Consumable Ordnance Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Spacers Spiral wrapping Felting...manufacture of a variety of different shaped combustible ordnance products. Matched metal molding and spiral wrapping processes were utilized...higher product off-press weight and slick feeling of the product’s outer surface. The process of spiral wrapping with nitro- cellulose paper was

  16. 40 CFR 158.330 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of production process. 158.330 Section 158.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Product Chemistry § 158.330 Description of production process....

  17. 40 CFR 158.330 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Description of production process. 158.330 Section 158.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Product Chemistry § 158.330 Description of production process....

  18. 40 CFR 158.330 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of production process. 158.330 Section 158.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Product Chemistry § 158.330 Description of production process....

  19. 40 CFR 158.330 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of production process. 158.330 Section 158.330 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Product Chemistry § 158.330 Description of production process....

  20. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production and process controls. 820.70 Section 820.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Production and Process Controls § 820.70 Production and...

  1. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Production and Process Controls § 820.70 Production and process... product quality, the manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures to adequately control these... quality. (f) Buildings. Buildings shall be of suitable design and contain sufficient space to...

  2. 21 CFR 820.70 - Production and process controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Production and Process Controls § 820.70 Production and process... product quality, the manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures to adequately control these... quality. (f) Buildings. Buildings shall be of suitable design and contain sufficient space to...

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  5. Losing the Product in the Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Lawrence; Baines, Coleen; Kunkel, Anthony; Stanley, Gregory Kent

    1999-01-01

    Describes three basic variations on the process approach to teaching writing witnessed while observing over 300 secondary English teachers: the "classic" process approach, the "antigrammarian" approach, and the "five paragraph" approach. Argues that the idea of error must be allowed back into the classroom, and that lockstep allegiance to a set of…

  6. Technical Writing: Process and Product. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerson, Sharon J.; Gerson, Steven M.

    This book guides students through the entire writing process--prewriting, writing, and rewriting--developing an easy-to-use, step-by-step technique for writing the types of documents they will encounter on the job. It engages students in the writing process and encourages hands-on application as well as discussions about ethics, audience…

  7. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or...

  8. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or...

  9. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or...

  10. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or...

  11. 7 CFR 926.11 - Processed cranberries or cranberry products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processed cranberries or cranberry products. 926.11... COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.11 Processed cranberries or cranberry products. Processed cranberries or...

  12. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  13. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  14. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  15. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frozen processed food... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the...

  16. 48 CFR 870.111-5 - Frozen processed food products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS SPECIAL PROCUREMENT CONTROLS Controls 870.111-5 Frozen processed food products. (a) The following frozen processed food products must have a label complying with the Federal... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frozen processed...

  17. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, R.D.

    1958-11-01

    A process is described for the manufacture of uranium bexafluoride which consists in contacting an oxide of uranium simultaneously with elemental carbon and elemental fluorine at an elevated temperature, using a proportion of the carbon to the oxide about 50% in excess of that theoretically required to combine with f the oxygen as C0/.sub 2/. The process has the advantage that the uranium oxide is reduced by tbe carbon aad converted to the hexafluoride in a single operation.

  18. Effect of Fly Ash and Silica Fume on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-10

    underlying cement hydration, the use of new technology is needed to enhance the prediction of properties. The nanoscience field of 10 study...hydration. Modern cement technology requires further development of the Portland cement properties due to increased building demands. The rapidly expanding...movement to minimize the physical footprint of the magnitude of cement production leads to technological advancement at the nano-scale. Cement

  19. Cemented Volcanic Soils, Martian Spectra and Implications for the Martian Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Schiffman, P.; Drief, A.; Southard, R. J.

    2004-03-01

    Cemented volcanic crusts are studied to learn about their composition, formation processes, and implications for climate interactions with the surface on Mars. Such carbonate, sulfate and opal crusts may be present in cemented soil units on Mars.

  20. Developmental study of a low-pH magnesium phosphate cement for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, S R; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a laboratory investigation into the development of a low-pH magnesium phosphate-based cement for use in in-situ stabilisation/solidification systems, as a more effective alternative to Portland cement. The idea is to develop a cement-based binder with a low enough pH to facilitate biodegradation in combination with stabilisation/solidification processes. Potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate was selected as the phosphate source, dead-burned magnesia as the magnesium source and boric acid as the retarder. The range of mixes were tested primarily on their pH development which was found to be in the range of 6-9.5 for a magnesia to phosphate ratio range of 1:1 to 1:5. The testing revealed a dense microstructure, high early-age strength development and low volume expansion of the developed cement. Observed fracturing of some of the cured cement samples has been related to the curing conditions and the impurities present in the magnesia. On the basis of microstructural examination, observed white crystalline deposits on cured samples are likely to be a reaction product of magnesia and potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  1. A literature review of mixed waste components: Sensitivities and effects upon solidification/stabilization in cement-based matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, C.H.; Gilliam, T.M.

    1994-03-01

    The US DOE Oak Ridge Field Office has signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) regarding Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) mixed wastes subject to the land disposal restriction (LDR) provisions of the Resource conservation and Recovery Act. The LDR FFCA establishes an aggressive schedule for conducting treatability studies and developing treatment methods for those ORR mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes listed in Appendix B to the Agreement. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program has been initiated to provide those efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all of the wastes that meet Appendix B criteria. The program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs in a variety of areas, including that of final waste forms (i.e., stabilization/solidification processes). A literature research has been performed, with the objective of determining waste characterization needs to support cement-based waste-form development. The goal was to determine which waste species are problematic in terms of consistent production of an acceptable cement-based waste form and at what concentrations these species become intolerable. The report discusses the following: hydration mechanisms of Portland cement; mechanisms of retardation and acceleration of cement set-factors affecting the durability of waste forms; regulatory limits as they apply to mixed wastes; review of inorganic species that interfere with the development of cement-based waste forms; review of radioactive species that can be immobilized in cement-based waste forms; and review of organic species that may interfere with various waste-form properties.

  2. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.H.; Bauer, H.F.; Grimes, R.W.

    1993-03-30

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen and carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  3. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  4. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  5. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis.

  6. From Process to Product: Your Risk Process at Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Fogarty, Jenifer; Charles, John; Buquo, Lynn; Sibonga, Jean; Alexander, David; Horn, Wayne G.; Edwards, J. Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) and Human Research Program (HRP) at the NASA/Johnson Space Center work together to address and manage the human health and performance risks associated with human space flight. This includes all human system requirements before, during, and after space flight, providing for research, and managing the risk of adverse long-term health outcomes for the crew. We previously described the framework and processes developed for identifying and managing these human system risks. The focus of this panel is to demonstrate how the implementation of the framework and associated processes has provided guidance in the management and communication of human system risks. The risks of early onset osteoporosis, CO2 exposure, and intracranial hypertension in particular have all benefitted from the processes developed for human system risk management. Moreover, we are continuing to develop capabilities, particularly in the area of information architecture, which will also be described. We are working to create a system whereby all risks and associated actions can be tracked and related to one another electronically. Such a system will enhance the management and communication capabilities for the human system risks, thereby increasing the benefit to researchers and flight surgeons.

  7. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  9. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, Rathin; Randhava, Sarabjit S.; Tsai, Shih-Perng

    1997-01-01

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H.sub.2 O.sub.2 laden permeate.

  10. Separation processes during binary monotectic alloy production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1984-01-01

    Observation of microgravity solidification processes indicates that outside of sedimentation, at least two other important effects can separate the phases: critical-point wetting and spreading; and thermal migration of second-phase droplets due to interfacial tension gradients. It is difficult to study these surface tension effects while in a unit gravity field. In order to investigate the processes occurring over a temperature range, i.e., between a consolute point and the monotectic temperature, it is necessary to use a low-gravity environment. The MSFC drop tube (and tower), the ballistic trajectory KC-135 airplane, and the Space Shuttle are ideal facilities to aid formation and testing of hypotheses. Much of the early work in this area focuses on transparent materials so that process dynamics may be studied by optical techniques such as photography for viewing macro-processes; holography for studying diffusional growth; spinodal decomposition and coalescence; ellipsometry for surface wetting and spreading effects; and interferometry and spectroscopy for small-scale spatial resolution of concentration profiles.

  11. Process for the production of liquid hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Bhatt, Bharat Lajjaram; Engel, Dirk Coenraad; Heydorn, Edward Clyde; Senden, Matthijis Maria Gerardus

    2006-06-27

    The present invention concerns a process for the preparation of liquid hydrocarbons which process comprises contacting synthesis gas with a slurry of solid catalyst particles and a liquid in a reactor vessel by introducing the synthesis gas at a low level into the slurry at conditions suitable for conversion of the synthesis gas into liquid hydrocarbons, the solid catalyst particles comprising a catalytic active metal selected from cobalt or iron on a porous refractory oxide carrier, preferably selected from silica, alumina, titania, zirconia or mixtures thereof, the catalyst being present in an amount between 10 and 40 vol. percent based on total slurry volume liquids and solids, and separating liquid material from the solid catalyst particles by using a filtration system comprising an asymmetric filtration medium (the selective side at the slurry side), in which filtration system the average pressure differential over the filtration medium is at least 0.1 bar, in which process the particle size distribution is such that at least a certain amount of the catalyst particles is smaller than the average pore size of the selective layer of the filtration medium. The invention also comprises an apparatus to carry out the process described above.

  12. Sweet sorghum processing for alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Schmulevich, I.; Coble, C.G.; Egg, R.P.

    1983-12-01

    Several processing techniques for producing ethanol from sweet sorghum were investigated. Fermentating chopped stalks yielded more ethanol than shredded sorghum or juice. Leaf removal prior to fermentation resulted in higher yields per unit feedstock. Removal of solids after fermentation yielded slightly more ethanol than solids removal before fermentation.

  13. Content, Process, and Product: Modeling Differentiated Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Barbara Kline

    2015-01-01

    Modeling differentiated instruction is one way to demonstrate how educators can incorporate instructional strategies to address students' needs, interests, and learning styles. This article discusses how secondary teacher candidates learn to focus on content--the "what" of instruction; process--the "how" of instruction;…

  14. Process for the production of hydrogen peroxide

    DOEpatents

    Datta, R.; Randhava, S.S.; Tsai, S.P.

    1997-09-02

    An integrated membrane-based process method for producing hydrogen peroxide is provided comprising oxidizing hydrogenated anthraquinones with air bubbles which were created with a porous membrane, and then contacting the oxidized solution with a hydrophilic membrane to produce an organics free, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} laden permeate. 1 fig.

  15. Processing maize flour and corn meal food products

    PubMed Central

    Gwirtz, Jeffrey A; Garcia-Casal, Maria Nieves

    2014-01-01

    Corn is the cereal with the highest production worldwide and is used for human consumption, livestock feed, and fuel. Various food technologies are currently used for processing industrially produced maize flours and corn meals in different parts of the world to obtain precooked refined maize flour, dehydrated nixtamalized flour, fermented maize flours, and other maize products. These products have different intrinsic vitamin and mineral contents, and their processing follows different pathways from raw grain to the consumer final product, which entail changes in nutrient composition. Dry maize mechanical processing creates whole or fractionated products, separated by anatomical features such as bran, germ, and endosperm. Wet maize processing separates by chemical compound classification such as starch and protein. Various industrial processes, including whole grain, dry milling fractionation, and nixtamalization, are described. Vitamin and mineral losses during processing are identified and the nutritional impacts outlined. Also discussed are the vitamin and mineral contents of corn. PMID:24329576

  16. Acid-soluble magnesia cement; New applications in completion and workover operations

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatman, R.E.; Scoggins, W.C. )

    1990-11-01

    Acid-soluble magnesia cement (MC) was used in production zones to plug perforations temporarily to reduce brine losses during completion and workover operations. This has resulted in substantial savings for operators. The cement has also been used to reduce potential formation damage. This paper describes some of the characteristics of the cement, field applications, and results.

  17. BD monomer and elastomer production processes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J

    2001-06-01

    The monomer 1,3 butadiene (BD) is a product of the petrochemical industry. It is used to make several elastomers including the very high volume styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) that comprises the bulk of automobile tires. It is also used to make polybutadiene rubber that is used in parts of tires, coatings, composites and other products. The monomer can be converted to chlorobutadiene (chloroprene) and used to make polychloroprene (neoprene). BD is one of the several olefins created by cracking hydrocarbons in the presence of steam. A mixed C4 stream from the steam cracker is then sent to a BD monomer extraction unit. Modern units typically use dimethyl formamide as the extraction solvent. SBR is commonly made by the copolymerization of BD and styrene, along with various additives to control the reaction, in a water emulsion. The reaction proceeds in a continuous chain of reactors until it is 'shortstopped' by a strong reducing agent. After removing unreacted monomers from the stabilized latex, it is blended, coagulated and dewatered. The resulting dry rubber crumb is bailed, film wrapped and stored in crates. The polymerization of BD to make polybutadiene rubber can be conducted as a water suspension type polymerization similar to SBR or in a solvent system followed by solvent recovery and transfer into water suspension.

  18. How To Make Mulligan Stew: Process and Product Again.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorrell, Robert M.

    The complexity of the writing process makes it more useful to isolate a variety of processes or parts of processes that can be taught and learned. A narrow view of writing as product leads to a misinterpretation of the process as a definite sequence--prewriting, writing, rewriting--when in fact it is much more recursive. Proper analysis of product…

  19. Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmings, Raymond T.

    2005-12-31

    Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland ce¬ment-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is

  20. The effect of white or grey PVC pipe and its joint solvents (primer and cement) on odour problems in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wiesenthal, K E; Suffet, I H

    2007-01-01

    A study of the production of odour-causing compounds was conducted from the leaching of polyvinylchloride (PVC) pipe and its joints, primer and cement, into drinking water distribution systems. Flavour Profile Analysis (FPA), closed-loop stripping analysis--gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (CLSA-GC/MS) and sensory-GC analysis of white or grey PVC alone found no odour-causing compounds produced during the leaching experiments. FPA analysis of the PVC's primer and cement leached alone and/or when applied to grey or white PVC pipes produced a glue/varnish odour. A sweet/phenolic odour replaced the glue/varnish odour after the leached media were diluted with Milli-Q water to threshold odour intensity. Three compounds were responsible for the sweet/phenolic odour and were observed by sensoryGC analysis. The leaching study of the PVC pipe with its joint solvents (primer and cement) concluded that the original solvent compounds, and their reaction products that formed during the bonding process on the PVC pipe, were a primary source of the glue/varnish odour. The original compounds of the PVC primer and cement were not detected by CLSA-GC/MS, due to their high volatility during the CLSA extraction method and/or these compounds appeared in a solvent peak of the GC/MS analysis. However, the original primer and cement chemicals (acetone, tetrahydrofuran, methyl ethyl ketone, and cyclohexanone) had a glue/varnish odour. A total of nine odorous GC peaks were produced as reaction products from leaching of primer in water and white or grey PVC pipe with primer and cement, and white or grey PVC with primer only. None of these compounds were among the chemical ingredients in the original primer or cement. Four GC peaks with a sweet/phenolic odour were present due to the reaction products of the cement leached with white or grey PVC. None of these compounds were positively identified.

  1. Analysis of process water use in poultry meat production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry processing facilities use large quantities of water for chiller unit operations. The chiller is critical for temperature reduction to inhibit microbial growth and preserve product quality and safety. Process water quality can also influence product safety when bacteria present on poultry sk...

  2. "Key Moments" as Pedagogical Windows into the Video Production Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Erica; Gibbons, Damiana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we trace learning across the digital video production process through case studies with four youth media arts organizations (YMAOs) across the United States. We hypothesize that what these organizations share is a series of key moments throughout the production process in which youth must articulate the relationship between the…

  3. The Interaction between Central and Peripheral Processes in Handwriting Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roux, Sebastien; McKeeff, Thomas J.; Grosjacques, Geraldine; Afonso, Olivia; Kandel, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Written production studies investigating central processing have ignored research on the peripheral components of movement execution, and vice versa. This study attempts to integrate both approaches and provide evidence that central and peripheral processes interact during word production. French participants wrote regular words (e.g. FORME),…

  4. Product-Process Distinctions in ELT Curriculum Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wette, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    ELT theory classifies curricula as belonging to one of two contrasting approaches: either process or product. While foundation-level teacher education literature offers strongly product-oriented advice, research- and theory-oriented texts stress the need to negotiate with learners, and to take language-learning processes into account. This article…

  5. Nonperturbative multiphoton processes and electron-positron pair production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Müller, C.; Keitel, C. H.

    2006-04-01

    Various regimes of pair production in laser fields are analyzed. Particularly, the question of the observability of pair production in a nonperturbative multiphoton regime is discussed. A simple heuristic method is employed which gives order-of-magnitude estimates for probabilities of multiphoton processes and allows to describe its main features. The method is initially probed upon the known process of pair production in a Coulomb and a strong laser field. Then it is applied to the nonperturbative multiphoton regime of the pair production process in a standing laser wave.

  6. Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V.

    1995-06-01

    In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

  7. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  8. Continuous downstream processing for high value biological products: A Review.

    PubMed

    Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the possibility of developing truly continuous processes for the large-scale production of high value biological products. Continuous processing has the potential to provide significant reductions in cost and facility size while improving product quality and facilitating the design of flexible multi-product manufacturing facilities. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in separations technology suitable for continuous downstream bioprocessing, focusing on unit operations that would be most appropriate for the production of secreted proteins like monoclonal antibodies. This includes cell separation/recycle from the perfusion bioreactor, initial product recovery (capture), product purification (polishing), and formulation. Of particular importance are the available options, and alternatives, for continuous chromatographic separations. Although there are still significant challenges in developing integrated continuous bioprocesses, recent technological advances have provided process developers with a number of attractive options for development of truly continuous bioprocessing operations.

  9. Feasibility of disposing waste glyphosate neutralization liquor with cement rotary kiln.

    PubMed

    Bai, Y; Bao, Y B; Cai, X L; Chen, C H; Ye, X C

    2014-08-15

    The waste neutralization liquor generated during the glyphosate production using glycine-dimethylphosphit process is a severe pollution problem due to its high salinity and organic components. The cement rotary kiln was proposed as a zero discharge strategy of disposal. In this work, the waste liquor was calcinated and the mineralogical phases of residue were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mineralogical phases and the strength of cement clinker were characterized to evaluate the influence to the products. The burnability of cement raw meal added with waste liquor and the calorific value of waste liquor were tested to evaluate the influence to the thermal state of the kiln system. The results showed that after the addition of this liquor, the differences of the main phases and the strength of cement clinker were negligible, the burnability of raw meal was improved; and the calorific value of this liquor was 6140 J/g, which made it could be considered as an alternative fuel during the actual production.

  10. Lai Products and Validation For Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baret, Frédéric; Combal, Bruno; Moulin, Sophie; Bacour, Cédric; Weiss, Marie; Garrigues, Sébastien

    Leaf area index (LAI) is a very important variable required in many hydrological processes. It controls evapotranspiration in several ways, rain interception and run- off. However, because LAI may change rapidly with space and time, estimates derived from remote sensing data could be used as input to spatially distributed hydrological models running at a range of scales. The derivation of LAI from remote sensing data is not straightforward since several factors may confound LAI effect on reflectance. We propose to use radiative transfer model inversion to estimate LAI from top of canopy reflectance measurements. Several inversion approaches are compared, with emphasis put on the regularisation of the inverse process by introducing prior information on the variables. Applications of this approach is made over several agricultural data sets at high spatial resolution (few 10th meters) thanks to hyperspectral (CASI, HYMAP) and BRDF (POLDER) airborne sensors. It includes the ReSeDA experiment on the Alpilles site in 1997 based on POLDER sensor, the Blue Earth experiment based on CASI in 1997, the DAISEX experiment in 1999 with POLDER and HYMAP and the Laon experiment based on CASI data in 2000 and 2001. The limitations of these approaches are discussed, with due attention on the way to derive prior information, inverse techniques, uncertainties on measurements and models, and scaling effects.

  11. Active PZT fibers: a commercial production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strock, Harold B.; Pascucci, Marina R.; Parish, Mark V.; Bent, Aaron A.; Shrout, Thomas R.

    1999-07-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) active fibers, from 80 to 250 micrometers in diameter, are produced for the AFOSR/DARPA funded Active Fiber Composites Consortium (AFCC) Program and commercial customers. CeraNova has developed a proprietary ceramics-based technology to produce PZT mono-filaments of the required purity, composition, straightness, and piezoelectric properties for use in active fiber composite structures. CeraNova's process begins with the extrusion of continuous lengths of mono-filament precursor fiber from a plasticized mix of PZT-5A powder. The care that must be taken to avoid mix contamination is described using illustrations form problems experiences with extruder wear and metallic contamination. Corrective actions are described and example microstructures are shown. The consequences of inadequate lead control are also shown. Sintered mono- filament mechanical strength and piezoelectric properties data approach bulk values but the validity of such a benchmark is questioned based on variable correlation with composite performance measures. Comb-like ceramic preform structures are shown that are being developed to minimize process and handling costs while maintaining the required mono-filament straightness necessary for composite fabrication. Lastly, actuation performance data are presented for composite structures fabricated and tested by Continuum Control Corporation. Free strain actuation in excess of 2000 microstrain are observed.

  12. Use of iodized salt in processed Philippine food products.

    PubMed

    Azanza, P; Cariaso, K; Dela Cerna, M C; de Ocampo, C; Galvez, F; Moises, M; Pujanes, K

    1998-06-01

    The effects of iodized salt use on the quality of processed Philippine food products were evaluated. Samples for the study included dried-salted and smoked fish products, nitrite-cured pork, and fermented plain and flavored shrimp pastes. Generally, no significant differences were detected between the physicochemical, microbiological and sensory characteristics of the test products prepared with iodized and unfortified NaCl salts. The salting process in each food operation significantly increased the iodine content of the test products. However, subsequent losses in the absorbed iodine were recorded due to the boiling, smoking, drying, fermenting and heating processes in the different operations. It was recommended that studies be undertaken on the addition of iodine to semi-processed or completely processed food products to lessen iodine losses.

  13. Product Binding Varies Dramatically between Processive and Nonprocessive Cellulase Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Nimlos, M. R.; Shirts, M. R.; Stahlberg, J.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-07-13

    Cellulases hydrolyze {beta}-1,4 glycosidic linkages in cellulose, which are among the most prevalent and stable bonds in Nature. Cellulases comprise many glycoside hydrolase families and exist as processive or nonprocessive enzymes. Product inhibition negatively impacts cellulase action, but experimental measurements of product-binding constants vary significantly, and there is little consensus on the importance of this phenomenon. To provide molecular level insights into cellulase product inhibition, we examine the impact of product binding on processive and nonprocessive cellulases by calculating the binding free energy of cellobiose to the product sites of catalytic domains of processive and nonprocessive enzymes from glycoside hydrolase families 6 and 7. The results suggest that cellobiose binds to processive cellulases much more strongly than nonprocessive cellulases. We also predict that the presence of a cellodextrin bound in the reactant site of the catalytic domain, which is present during enzymatic catalysis, has no effect on product binding in nonprocessive cellulases, whereas it significantly increases product binding to processive cellulases. This difference in product binding correlates with hydrogen bonding between the substrate-side ligand and the cellobiose product in processive cellulase tunnels and the additional stabilization from the longer tunnel-forming loops. The hydrogen bonds between the substrate- and product-side ligands are disrupted by water in nonprocessive cellulase clefts, and the lack of long tunnel-forming loops results in lower affinity of the product ligand. These findings provide new insights into the large discrepancies reported for binding constants for cellulases and suggest that product inhibition will vary significantly based on the amount of productive binding for processive cellulases on cellulose.

  14. Production process for advanced space satellite system cables/interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, Luis A.

    2007-12-01

    This production process was generated for the satellite system program cables/interconnects group, which in essences had no well defined production process. The driver for the development of a formalized process was based on the set backs, problem areas, challenges, and need improvements faced from within the program at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition, the formal production process was developed from the Master's program of Engineering Management for New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro New Mexico and submitted as a thesis to meet the institute's graduating requirements.

  15. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic processes in the riser chamber of installation for clinker production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsuk, Grzegorz; Dobrowolski, Bolesław; Nowosielski, Grzegorz; Wydrych, Jacek; Duda, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    Clinker burning process has a decisive influence on energy consumption and the cost of cement production. A new problem is to use the process of decarbonization of alternative fuels from waste. These issues are particularly important in the introduction of a two-stage combustion of fuel in a rotary kiln without the typical reactor-decarbonizator. This work presents results of numerical studies on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the riser chamber, which will be designed to burn fuel in the system where combustion air is supplied separately from the clinker cooler. The mathematical model is based on a combination of two methods of motion description: Euler description for the gas phase and Lagrange description for particles. Heat transfer between particles of raw material and gas was added to the numerical calculations. The main aim of the research was finding the correct fractional distribution of particles. For assumed particle distribution on the first stage of work, authors noted that all particles were carried away by the upper outlet to the preheater tower, what is not corresponding to the results of experimental studies. The obtained results of calculations can be the basis for further optimization of the design and operating conditions in the riser chamber with the implementation of the system.

  16. Process for production desulfurized of synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Wolfenbarger, James K.; Najjar, Mitri S.

    1993-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1900.degree.-2600.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises a calcium-containing compound portion, a sodium-containing compound portion, and a fluoride-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (1) a sulfur-containing sodium-calcium-fluoride silicate phase; and (2) a sodium-calcium sulfide phase.

  17. Recent trends in bioethanol production from food processing byproducts.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen; Stark, Benjamin C

    2016-11-01

    The widespread use of corn starch and sugarcane as sources of sugar for the production of ethanol via fermentation may negatively impact the use of farmland for production of food. Thus, alternative sources of fermentable sugars, particularly from lignocellulosic sources, have been extensively investigated. Another source of fermentable sugars with substantial potential for ethanol production is the waste from the food growing and processing industry. Reviewed here is the use of waste from potato processing, molasses from processing of sugar beets into sugar, whey from cheese production, byproducts of rice and coffee bean processing, and other food processing wastes as sugar sources for fermentation to ethanol. Specific topics discussed include the organisms used for fermentation, strategies, such as co-culturing and cell immobilization, used to improve the fermentation process, and the use of genetic engineering to improve the performance of ethanol producing fermenters.

  18. Guidance for Selecting Legitimate Recycling Products and Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-23

    information you have provided on the GIL glassification process for electric arc furnace ( EAF ) dust or K061 when the EAF dust is a hazardous waste. Based on the...regarding the regulatory status of the GIL process and glass frit product has been whether EAF dust incorporated into GIL glass frit meets the definition...emission control dust from a primary copper smelter could be returned to any part of the process associated with copper production. The material also cannot

  19. Monitoring the ettringite formation in cement paste using low field T2-NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Alexandra; Badea, Codruta; Ardelean, Ioan

    2013-11-01

    In the present work, we study the transverse relaxation time evolution of water molecules confined inside cement paste during the hydration process. The cement paste under study was manufactured with different water-to-cement ratios and using two types of cement: gray cement (CEM I 52.5 R) having a high content of magnetic impurities and white cement (CEM I 52.5 N) with lower amount of magnetic impurities. The two cement types were chosen in order to better distinguish the surface contribution to the relaxation process. On this basis a relationship between porosity evolution, ettringite formation and the transverse relaxation time evolution was established. It was also observed that the increase in the water-to-cement ratio better reveals the ettringite formation.

  20. Importance of granulometry on phase evolution and phase-to-phase relationships of experimentally burned impure limestones intended for production of hydraulic lime and/or natural cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to modern ordinary Portland cement production from finely ground raw material blends, ancient burning of hydraulic lime was conducted by burning larger pieces of natural raw material. Due to natural variability of raw material composition, exploitation of different beds from even one formation can result the product with significantly different composition and/or properties. Prague basin (Neoproterozoic to pre-Variscan Palaeozoic of the central part of the Bohemian Massif - the so-called Barrandian area, Czech Republic) represents a classical example of the limestone-rich region with long-term history of limestone burning for quick lime and/or various types of hydraulic binders. Due to the fact that burning of natural hydraulic lime has been abandoned in this region at the turn of 19th/20th c., significant gap in knowledge on the behavior of various limestone types and on the influence of minor variance in composition on the quality of burned product is encountered. Moreover, the importance of employment of larger pieces of raw material for burning for the development of proper phase-to-phase relationships (i.e. development of hydraulic phases below sintering temperature at mutual contacts of minerals) has not been examined before. To fill this gap, a representative specimens of major limestone types from the Prague basin have been selected for experimental study: Upper Silurian limestone types (Přídolí and Kopanina Lms.), and Lower Devonian limestones (Radotín, Kotýs, Řeporyje, Dvorce-Prokop, and Zlíchov Lms.). Petrographic character of the experimental material was examined by polarizing microscopy, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of insoluble residue. Based on the data from wet silicate analyses, modal composition of studied impure limestones was computed. Experimental raw material was burned in laboratory electric furnace at 1000 and 1200°C for 3

  1. Hydrogen production via the KBW gasification process

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, H.J.; Cannon, J.F.; Probert, P.B.

    1982-03-01

    In October, 1981, Koppers Company, Inc. and the Babcock and Wilcox Company (an operating unit of McDermott, Inc.) formed a joint venture, KBW Gasification Systems, Inc. to serve the expanding synthetic fuels market. KBW is offering commercially an atmospheric pressure, oxygen blown, slagging type entrained flow gasification system. The KBW coal gasification system was designed to offer the synthetic fuels industry an efficient, reliable and advanced system that uses proven modern technology. It can gasify any rank of coal. This includes both Eastern and Western U.S. Coals. Caking properties of the coal do not affect the gasification process. The KBW gasifier can handle wide variations in ash quantity, ash fusion temperature, and sulfur content. It can gasify 100 percent of the mine output. It has major environmental advantages. Tar, phenols, and heavy hydrocarbons are not produced in the KBW gasifier because of the high gasification temperature. It does not produce methane. This eliminates the need for costly and energy intensive steam reforming. It is based on design data, knowledge, and experience possessed by Koppers and Babcock and Wilcox in the areas of coal preparation and handling, mass transfer, heat transfer equipment fabrication, and plant construction. The KBW gasifier has a larger internal volume than existing entrained flow gasifiers. This results in high throughput rates. Both the KBW gasifier and heat recovery boiler use components that have been proven through years of fabrication and service. Membrane walls constructed of vertical, water cooled tubes (which have been widely used in boilers) are used in the KBW gasifier and heat recovery boiler. This feature enables the gasifier to produce high pressure saturated steam that is subsequently superheated in the heat recovery boiler. The water cooled tubes can withstand much higher heat fluxes than jacket type cooling systems while assuring nucleate boiling.

  2. Study on Product Innovative Design Process Driven by Ideal Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuying; Lu, Ximei; Wang, Ping; Liu, Hui

    Product innovative design in companies today relies heavily on individual members’ experience and creative ideation as well as their skills of integrating creativity and innovation tools with design methods agilely. Creative ideation and inventive ideas generation are two crucial stages in product innovative design process. Ideal solution is the desire final ideas for given problem, and the striving reaching target for product design. In this paper, a product innovative design process driven by ideal solution is proposed. This design process encourages designers to overcome their psychological inertia, to foster creativity in a systematic way for acquiring breakthrough creative and innovative solutions in a reducing sphere of solution-seeking, and results in effective product innovative design rapidly. A case study example is also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design process.

  3. Process development and intensification for enhanced production of Bacillus lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Vivek; Clarke, Kim G

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in Bacillus lipopeptides for high-value applications has driven process design, development and optimization for enhanced lipopeptide production. Traditional optimization approaches have been directed towards improving the overall titres by modification of media components and environmental parameters, almost exclusively in submerged cultures. Carbon and nitrogen sources, trace elements and oxygen availability have all been demonstrated to exhibit significant influences on lipopeptide yield, productivity and selectivity. This insight into process-linked kinetics, especially selectivity, has led to the introduction of novel process intensification and integration strategies which further promote process efficiency, and which include foam fractionation, inverse fluidization, rotating disc contacting and microfiltration with recycle. These strategies have not only transformed the production capabilities, but have also successfully integrated upstream production with downstream purification through cell retention and in situ product removal. This review analyses and critically discusses the impact of process conditions and process optimization strategies for improving lipopeptide production kinetics, specifically highlighting the emerging trend of process intensification and integration strategies and further, proposes a heuristic route to enhance lipopeptide production.

  4. From Rocks to Cement. What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Science Education Center.

    This module deals with the materials used in making concrete hollow blocks. Topics discussed include: (1) igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks; (2) weathering (the process of breaking down rocks) and its effects on rocks; (3) cement; (4) stages in the manufacturing of Portland cement; and (5) the transformation of cement into concrete…

  5. Next generation enhancement of cements by the addition of industrial wastes and subsequent treatment with supercritical CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.M.V.; Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J.W.; Jones, R.; Baglin, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    The natural curing reactions which occur in a standard portland cement involve the formation of portlandite, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and calcium silicate hydrates, CSH. Over time, the cured cement abstracts carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2}, from the air, converting the portlandite and CSH to calcium carbonate, CaCO{sub 3}. It turns out, however, that this secondary conversion results in the blockage and/or closure of pores, drastically slowing the reaction rate with time. By exposing a portland cement to supercritical CO{sub 2} (SCCO{sub 2}), it is found that the carbonation reaction can be greatly accelerated. This acceleration is due to (1) the ability of the supercritical fluid to penetrate into the pores of the cement, providing continuous availability of fresh reactant, in hyper-stoichiometric concentrations; and (2) the solubility of the reaction product in the supercritical fluid, facilitating its removal. By accelerating the natural aging reactions, a chemically stable product is formed having reduced porosity, permeability and pH, while at the same time significantly enhancing the mechanical strength. The supercritical CO{sub 2} treatment process also removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement, and sequesters large amounts of carbon dioxide, permanently removing it from the environment. The authors describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of cements containing industrial waste. Some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed. Finally, some initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid CO{sub 2} treatment will be presented.

  6. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent. PMID:27035456

  7. MEMS product engineering using fabrication process development tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K.; Schmidt, T.; Ortloff, D.; Popp, J.; Wagener, A.; Brück, R.

    2008-12-01

    The development of MEMS devices differs substantially from product engineering methods used in more traditional industries. The approach is characterized by a close customer involvement and product specific fabrication processes. A large number interdependencies between device design on the one hand and manufacturing process development on the other hand make product engineering in the MEMS area a rather tedious and complicated task. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive customer-oriented MEMS product engineering methodology. Both MEMS design and fabrication process development are analyzed with regard to procedures and interfaces used in order to develop an appropriate CAD support either in terms of existing tools or by specifying individual tools to be implemented. The manufacturing process development is part of this holistic approach and is supported by a CAD environment for the management and the design of thin-film MEMS fabrication processes. This environment has been developed by the authors and became recently commercially available.

  8. Sources of Information as Determinants of Product and Process Innovation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Jaime; Salazar, Idana; Vargas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use a panel of manufacturing firms in Spain to examine the extent to which they use internal and external sources of information (customers, suppliers, competitors, consultants and universities) to generate product and process innovation. Our results show that, although internal sources are influential, external sources of information are key to achieve innovation performance. These results are in line with the open innovation literature because they show that firms that are opening up their innovation process and that use different information sources have a greater capacity to generate innovations. We also find that the importance of external sources of information varies depending on the type of innovation (product or process) considered. To generate process innovation, firms mainly rely on suppliers while, to generate product innovation, the main contribution is from customers. The potential simultaneity between product and process innovation is also taken into consideration. We find that the generation of both types of innovation is not independent.

  9. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  10. Technology for the product and process data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The computerized product and process data base is increasingly recognized to be the cornerstone component of an overall system aimed at the integrated automation of the industrial processes of a given company or enterprise. The technology needed to support these more effective computer integrated design and manufacturing methods, especially the concept of 3-D computer-sensible product definitions rather than engineering drawings, is not fully available and rationalized. Progress is being made, however, in bridging this technology gap with concentration on the modeling of sophisticated information and data structures, high-performance interactive user interfaces and comprehensive tools for managing the resulting computerized product definition and process data base.

  11. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  12. Acoustic response of cemented granular sedimentary rocks: molecular dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    García, Xavier; Medina, Ernesto

    2007-06-01

    The effect of cementation processes on the acoustical properties of sands is studied via molecular dynamics simulation methods. We propose numerical methods where the initial uncemented sand is built by simulating the settling process of sediments. Uncemented samples of different porosity are considered by emulating natural mechanical compaction of sediments due to overburden. Cementation is considered through a particle-based model that captures the underlying physics behind the process. In our simulations, we consider samples with different degrees of compaction and cementing materials with distinct elastic properties. The microstructure of cemented sands is taken into account while adding cement at specific locations within the pores, such as grain-to-grain contacts. Results show that the acoustical properties of cemented sands are strongly dependent on the amount of cement, its stiffness relative to the hosting medium, and its location within the pores. Simulation results are in good correspondence with available experimental data and compare favorably with some theoretical predictions for the sound velocity within a range of cement saturation, porosity, and confining pressure.

  13. Optimisation of a two-liquid component pre-filled acrylic bone cement system: a design of experiments approach to optimise cement final properties.

    PubMed

    Clements, James; Walker, Gavin; Pentlavalli, Sreekanth; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    The initial composition of acrylic bone cement along with the mixing and delivery technique used can influence its final properties and therefore its clinical success in vivo. The polymerisation of acrylic bone cement is complex with a number of processes happening simultaneously. Acrylic bone cement mixing and delivery systems have undergone several design changes in their advancement, although the cement constituents themselves have remained unchanged since they were first used. This study was conducted to determine the factors that had the greatest effect on the final properties of acrylic bone cement using a pre-filled bone cement mixing and delivery system. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to determine the impact of the factors associated with this mixing and delivery method on the final properties of the cement produced. The DoE illustrated that all factors present within this study had a significant impact on the final properties of the cement. An optimum cement composition was hypothesised and tested. This optimum recipe produced cement with final mechanical and thermal properties within the clinical guidelines and stated by ISO 5833 (International Standard Organisation (ISO), International standard 5833: implants for surgery-acrylic resin cements, 2002), however the low setting times observed would not be clinically viable and could result in complications during the surgical technique. As a result further development would be required to improve the setting time of the cement in order for it to be deemed suitable for use in total joint replacement surgery.

  14. Upstream processes in antibody production: evaluation of critical parameters.

    PubMed

    Jain, Era; Kumar, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    The demand for monoclonal antibody for therapeutic and diagnostic applications is rising constantly which puts up a need to bring down the cost of its production. In this context it becomes a prerequisite to improve the efficiency of the existing processes used for monoclonal antibody production. This review describes various upstream processes used for monoclonal antibody production and evaluates critical parameters and efforts which are being made to enhance the efficiency of the process. The upstream technology has tremendously been upgraded from host cells used for manufacturing to bioreactors type and capacity. The host cells used range from microbial, mammalian to plant cells with mammalian cells dominating the scenario. Disposable bioreactors are being promoted for small scale production due to easy adaptation to process validation and flexibility, though they are limited by the scale of production. In this respect Wave bioreactors for suspension culture have been introduced recently. A novel bioreactor for immobilized cells is described which permits an economical and easy alternative to hollow fiber bioreactor at lab scale production. Modification of the cellular machinery to alter their metabolic characteristics has further added to robustness of cells and perks up cell specific productivity. The process parameters including feeding strategies and environmental parameters are being improved and efforts to validate them to get reproducible results are becoming a trend. Online monitoring of the process and product characterization is increasingly gaining importance. In total the advancement of upstream processes have led to the increase in volumetric productivity by 100-fold over last decade and make the monoclonal antibody production more economical and realistic option for therapeutic applications.

  15. New Vistas in Chemical Product and Process Design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Babi, Deenesh K; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-06-07

    Design of chemicals-based products is broadly classified into those that are process centered and those that are product centered. In this article, the designs of both classes of products are reviewed from a process systems point of view; developments related to the design of the chemical product, its corresponding process, and its integration are highlighted. Although significant advances have been made in the development of systematic model-based techniques for process design (also for optimization, operation, and control), much work is needed to reach the same level for product design. Timeline diagrams illustrating key contributions in product design, process design, and integrated product-process design are presented. The search for novel, innovative, and sustainable solutions must be matched by consideration of issues related to the multidisciplinary nature of problems, the lack of data needed for model development, solution strategies that incorporate multiscale options, and reliability versus predictive power. The need for an integrated model-experiment-based design approach is discussed together with benefits of employing a systematic computer-aided framework with built-in design templates.

  16. Polymer additives improve cementing in salt formations

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, P. )

    1988-12-05

    Recently, new anionic aromatic polymers (AAP's) have been identified that simultaneously impart to salt-rich cement slurries improved fluid-loss control and exceptional rheological properties. At the same time, these materials do not significantly extend the slurry-thickening time or impair the compressive strength development of the cement. Thus, the casing strings are protected in plastic zones very soon after completing the cement job. The cementing of wells penetrating massive salt formations has posed a number of problems over the years. Contributing to the problem was the fact that some cements displayed poor characteristics in saline environments, and that conventional additives were of limited use in these systems. Other additives, designed for salt water, were found to provide characteristics far from the optimum, while at the same time causing detrimental effects on other slurry properties, notably rheology, thickening time, and early compressive strength. In several areas, the presence of salt domes and massive evaporite sequences cause problems in the drilling, completion, and long-term production of oil and gas wells that penetrate these zones.

  17. MCFC integrated system in a biodiesel production process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, F.; Freni, S.; Galvagno, A.; Chiodo, V.

    2011-03-01

    The continuous increasing in biodiesel production by transesterification process is leading to an excess of glycerol production as a byproduct. The utilization of this huge amount of glycerol appears as a not easy solvable problem and thus several authors have proposed alternative ways. The integration of the main production process with a glycerol feed molten carbonate fuel cells bottoming cycle, to satisfy plant energy requirements, seems to be one of the most promising one. The proposed paper reports the main results obtained by authors in the framework of an investigation on a possible use of glycerol as energy sources for a real pilot plant for biodiesel production. An overall evaluation of worldwide biodiesel production plants was made and especially about the production capacity in European Union in the last decade. To make a more detailed study, authors were taken into account a real production plant. After a preliminary step, purported to plant mass and energy flows determination, authors considered the integration of a bottoming cycle based on: (i) steam reforming of glycerol for syn-gas production; (ii) molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) system supplied by syn-gas for heat and electricity production. A mathematical model, based on experimental data, has been developed to calculate mass and energy balances for the proposed plant lay-out as well as plant energy efficiency enhancement has been determined. Results have evidenced the feasibility of this process and demonstrated that plant integrated with bottoming cycle can reach a very high level of energy self-production.

  18. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  19. Assessment of biological Hydrogen production processes: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafpour, G. D.; Shahavi, M. H.; Neshat, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Energy crisis created a special attention on renewable energy sources. Among these sources; hydrogen through biological processes is well-known as the most suitable and renewable energy sources. In terms of process yield, hydrogen production from various sources was evaluated. A summary of microorganisms as potential hydrogen producers discussed along with advantages and disadvantages of several bioprocesses. The pathway of photo-synthetic and dark fermentative organisms was discussed. In fact, the active enzymes involved in performance of biological processes for hydrogen generation were identified and their special functionalities were discussed. The influential factors affecting on hydrogen production were known as enzymes assisting liberation specific enzymes such as nitrogenase, hydrogenase and uptake hydrogenase. These enzymes were quite effective in reduction of proton and form active molecular hydrogen. Several types of photosynthetic systems were evaluated with intension of maximum hydrogen productivities. In addition dark fermentative and light intensities on hydrogen productions were evaluated. The hydrogen productivities of efficient hydrogen producing strains were evaluated.

  20. Automation and control of off-planet oxygen production processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J.; Suitor, J. W.; Schooley, L. S.; Cellier, F. E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the automation and control of off-planet production processes. First, a general approach to process automation and control is discussed from the viewpoint of translating human process control procedures into automated procedures. Second, the control issues for the automation and control of off-planet oxygen processes are discussed. Sensors, instruments, and components are defined and discussed in the context of off-planet applications, and the need for 'smart' components is clearly established.

  1. Novel particulate production processes to create unique security materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampden-Smith, Mark; Kodas, Toivo; Haubrich, Scott; Oljaca, Miki; Einhorn, Rich; Williams, Darryl

    2006-02-01

    Particles are frequently used to impart security features to high value items. These particles are typically produced by traditional methods, and therefore the security must be derived from the chemical composition of the particles rather than the particle production process. Here, we present new and difficult-to-reproduce particle production processes based on spray pyrolysis that can produce unique particles and features that are dependent on the use of these new-to-the-world processes and process trade secrets. Specifically two examples of functional materials are described, luminescent materials and electrocatalytic materials.

  2. Performance in Reading Comprehension--Product or Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Samuel S.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of reading performance is influenced by perceptions of what constitutes reading. Both product (testing of discrete thinking skills) and process (metacomprehension) information is needed to understand and improve reading comprehension. (SK)

  3. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Product Denitrator Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1982-05-01

    The upgrade and redesign of a fluidized-bed denitrator for production of uranium trioxide from uranyl nitrate solution is discussed. The success of the project in improving process efficiency and personnel safety is also addressed based on subsequent operation.

  4. Optimizing product life cycle processes in design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faneye, Ola. B.; Anderl, Reiner

    2002-02-01

    Life cycle concepts do not only serve as basis in assisting product developers understand the dependencies between products and their life cycles, they also help in identifying potential opportunities for improvement in products. Common traditional concepts focus mainly on energy and material flow across life phases, necessitating the availability of metrics derived from a reference product. Knowledge of life cycle processes won from an existing product is directly reused in its redesign. Depending on sales volume nevertheless, the environmental impact before product optimization can be substantial. With modern information technologies today, computer-aided life cycle methodologies can be applied well before product use. On the basis of a virtual prototype, life cycle processes are analyzed and optimized, using simulation techniques. This preventive approach does not only help in minimizing (or even eliminating) environmental burdens caused by product, costs incurred due to changes in real product can also be avoided. The paper highlights the relationship between product and life cycle and presents a computer-based methodology for optimizing the product life cycle during design, as presented by SFB 392: Design for Environment - Methods and Tools at Technical University, Darmstadt.

  5. Radon emanation from concrete and the influence of using flyash in cement.

    PubMed

    van der Lugt, G; Scholten, L C

    1985-10-01

    In the Netherlands both Portland cement and blast furnace cement (slags from blast furnaces with about 30% Portland cement) are used for concrete. Radon exhalation measurements were carried out on concrete blocks made with these two types of cement and blocks with 15, 25 and 35% of the cement substituted by three different types of flyash. The results show that substituting part of the cement by flyash has no drastic effect on the exhalation rate. For concrete with Portland cement the exhalation rate decreases using flyash with an average radium content. With blast furnace cement a slight increase may be expected. The exhalation of concrete is greater than the sum of the exhalation values of the constituting components. The water in the pores of the concrete plays an essential role in the emanation process.

  6. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  7. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  8. PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT CHANGES FOR CLEANER PRODUCTION IN FEDERAL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses process and equipment changes for cleaner production in federal facilities. During the 1990s, DoD and EPA conducted joint research and development, aimed at reducing the discharge of hazardous and toxic pollutants from military production and maintenance faci...

  9. NIR spectroscopy for determining soy contents in processed meat products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy products such as soy concentrate, soy protein and soy grits are used as a meat extender in processed meat products to improve meat texture. However, soy allergies are one of the common food allergies, especially in infants and young children, and can be mild to life-threatening. The United State...

  10. 40 CFR 161.162 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Description of production process. 161.162 Section 161.162 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...

  11. Natural fiber production, harvesting, and preliminary processing: options and opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of natural fibers and plant oils in bio-products introduces numerous logistical challenges not typically encountered with non-agricultural resources. Once it has been determined that a plant material is suitable for commercial development, the production, harvesting, and processing s...

  12. 40 CFR 161.162 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Description of production process. 161.162 Section 161.162 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...

  13. 40 CFR 161.162 - Description of production process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Description of production process. 161.162 Section 161.162 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...

  14. Exploring Group Communication and Productivity Improvement: Using an Experiential Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Mary Y.; Mandeville, David E.

    Engineering students at Oklahoma State University used an experiential process (the ACME Basket Exercise) to develop an understanding of how quality and productivity can be improved. The exercise simulates a traditional production organization in the classroom and mirrors the efforts, the successes, and the frustrations of individuals and work…

  15. Design of Fit-for-Purpose Cement to Restore Cement-Caprock Seal Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, R.

    2015-12-01

    This project aims to study critical research needs in the area of rock-cement interfaces, with a special focus on crosscutting applications in the Wellbore Integrity Pillar of the SubTER initiative. This study will focus on design and test fit-for-purpose cement formulations. The goals of this project are as follows: 1) perform preliminary study of dispersing nanomaterial admixtures in Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) mixes, 2) characterize the cement-rock interface, and 3) identify potential high-performance cement additives that can improve sorption behavior, chemical durability, bond strength, and interfacial fracture toughness, as appropriate to specific subsurface operational needs. The work presented here focuses on a study of cement-shale interfaces to better understand failure mechanisms, with particular attention to measuring bond strength at the cement-shale interface. Both experimental testing and computational modeling were conducted to determine the mechanical behavior at the interface representing the interaction of cement and shale of a typical wellbore environment. Cohesive zone elements are used in the finite element method to computationally simulate the interface of the cement and rock materials with varying properties. Understanding the bond strength and mechanical performance of the cement-formation interface is critical to wellbore applications such as sequestration, oil and gas production and exploration and nuclear waste disposal. Improved shear bond strength is an indication of the capability of the interface to ensure zonal isolation and prevent zonal communication, two crucial goals in preserving wellbore integrity. Understanding shear bond strength development and interface mechanics will provide an idea as to how the cement-formation interface can be altered under environmental changes (temperature, pressure, chemical degradation, etc.) so that the previously described objectives can be achieved. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  18. Hydration of alumina cement containing ferrotitanium slag with polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE) additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechkalov, Denis; Chernogorlov, Sergey; Abyzov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The paper is discussing results of study of alumina binder containing aluminous cement and ferrotitanium slag from aluminothermic process by Kliuchevskoi Ferroalloys corp. with various additives containing polycarboxylate-ethers (PCE). Selecting ferrotitanium slag as additive is based on the fact that its content of alumina and phase composition is closest to the alumina cement. The composition of the ferrotitanium slag is displayed. In order to compensate the decrease in strength caused by addition of ferrotitanium slag having low activity, PCE additives were added. As PCE additives were used Melflux 1641F, Melflux 2651F and Melflux PP200F by BASF. The effect of additives on the hydration of the binder, depending on the amount and time of additives hardening is shown. The composition of the hydration products in the cement was studied by physico-chemical analysis: derivatography and X-ray analysis. It is found that in the early stages of hardening PCE additives have inhibitory effect on hydration processes and promote new phase amorphization. The optimal content of additives was investigated. The basic properties of the binders have been tested. It was observed that the modified binders meet the requirements of Russian National State Standard GOST 969 to the alumina cement.

  19. Increase in the strength characteristics of Portland cement due to introduction of the compound mineral supplements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, Liliia; Gichko, Nikolai; Mukhina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    At the initial phase of hardening it is the limestone component that plays a major role in the hardening process, which acts as the substrate for the crystallization of hydrate tumors due to its chemical affinity with the products of Portland cement hydration. After 7 days, the diopside supplement influences the processes more significantly. Diopside has a high modulus of elasticity compared to the cement paste. As a result, stresses are redistributed within the cement paste and the whole composition is hardened. An increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement to more than 66.7% does not provide a substantial increase in the strength of the cement paste. As the hardness of diopside is higher than the hardness of limestone, much more energy is required to grind it down to a usable component. Therefore, a further increase in the quantity of diopside in the compound supplement is not economically feasible. An evaluation of the optimum quantity of input compound mineral supplements can be made based on the ideas of close packing of spherical particles and the Pauling rules. The optimum content of the supplement is 8-8.5% provided that its dispersion and density are close to the dispersion and density of the binder. An increase in the dispersion of the supplement reduces its optimal quantity.

  20. Mechanization and automation of production processes in turbine building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodyanyuk, V. P.

    1984-02-01

    Specialists at the All-Union Institute of Planning and Technology of Energy Machine Building are working on the problem of mechanization and automation of production processes. One of the major technological processes being worked on is the production of welded units. At the present time the Institute has designed a centralized cutting and manufacturing shop in use at several metallurgical plants, clamping devices for materials hoists based on permanent magnets, a program controlled installation for driving shaped apertures in welded diaphragm rims and an automated system for planning technological processes involved in manufacturing operations. Even in the manufacture of such individualized devices as turbines, mechanization and automation of production processes are economically justified. During the 11th Five Year Plan, the Institute will continue to develop progressive technological processes and equipment for precise shaping of turbine blade blanks, mechanical working of parts of steam, gas and hydraulic turbines, as well as nuclear powerplant turbines.

  1. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  2. The fluid-compensated cement bond log

    SciTech Connect

    Nayfeh, T.H.; Leslie, H.D.; Wheelis, W.B.

    1984-09-01

    An experimental and numerical wave mechanics study of cement bond logs demonstrated that wellsite computer processing can now segregate wellbore fluid effects from the sonic signal response to changing cement strength. Traditionally, cement logs have been interpreted as if water were in the wellbore, without consideration of wellbore fluid effects. These effects were assumed to be negligible. However, with the increasing number of logs being run in completion fluids such as CaCl/sub 2/, ZnBr/sub 2/, and CaBr/sub 2/, large variations in cement bond logs became apparent. A Schlumberger internal paper showing that bond log amplitude is related to the acoustic impedance of the fluid in which the tool is run led to a comprehensive study of wellbore fluid effects. Numerical and experimental models were developed simulating wellbore geometry. Measurements were conducted in 5-, 7-, and 95/8-in. casings by varying the wellbore fluid densities, viscosities, and fluid types (acoustic impedance). Parallel numerical modeling was undertaken using similar parameters. The results showed that the bond log amplitude varied dramatically with the wellbore fluid's acoustic impedance; for example, there was a 70 percent increase in the signal amplitude for 11.5-lb/ gal CaCl/sub 2/ over the signal amplitude in water. This led to the development of a Fluid-Compensated Bond log that corrects the amplitude for acoustic impedance of varying wellbore fluids, thereby making the measurements more directly related to the cement quality.

  3. Integrating artificial and human intelligence into tablet production process.

    PubMed

    Gams, Matjaž; Horvat, Matej; Ožek, Matej; Luštrek, Mitja; Gradišek, Anton

    2014-12-01

    We developed a new machine learning-based method in order to facilitate the manufacturing processes of pharmaceutical products, such as tablets, in accordance with the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) and Quality by Design (QbD) initiatives. Our approach combines the data, available from prior production runs, with machine learning algorithms that are assisted by a human operator with expert knowledge of the production process. The process parameters encompass those that relate to the attributes of the precursor raw materials and those that relate to the manufacturing process itself. During manufacturing, our method allows production operator to inspect the impacts of various settings of process parameters within their proven acceptable range with the purpose of choosing the most promising values in advance of the actual batch manufacture. The interaction between the human operator and the artificial intelligence system provides improved performance and quality. We successfully implemented the method on data provided by a pharmaceutical company for a particular product, a tablet, under development. We tested the accuracy of the method in comparison with some other machine learning approaches. The method is especially suitable for analyzing manufacturing processes characterized by a limited amount of data.

  4. Pulsed electric field processing of egg products: a review.

    PubMed

    Yogesh, K

    2016-02-01

    Thermal processing ensures safety and enhances the shelf-life of most of the food products. It alters the structural-chemical composition, modifies heat labile components, as well as affects the functional properties of food products. This has driven the development of non-thermal food processing techniques, primarily for extending the shelf-life of different food products. These techniques are currently also being evaluated for their effects on product processing, quality and other safety parameters. Pulsed electric field (PEF) is an example of non-thermal technique which can be applied for a variety of purpose in the food processing industry. PEF can be used for antimicrobial treatment of various food products to improve the storability or food safety, for extraction and recovery of some high-value compounds from a food matrix or for stabilization of various food products through inactivation of some enzymes or catalysts. Research on the application of PEF to control spoilage or pathogenic microorganisms in different egg products is being currently focused. It has been reported that PEF effectively reduces the activity of various microorganisms in a variety of egg products. However, the PEF treatment also alters the structural and functional properties to some extent and there is a high degree of variability between different studies. In addition to integrating findings, the present review also provides several explanations for the inconsistency in findings between different studies related to PEF processing of egg products. Several specific recommendations for future research directions on PEF processing are well discussed in this review.

  5. Hydrothermal cement/metal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Baldwin, S.

    1996-01-01

    The authors investigated the adherence of two cementitious materials, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and silica flour-filled class G cement (CGC), to metal substrates, such as cold-rolled steel (CRS), stainless steel (SS), electroplated zinc-coated steel (EZS), and zinc phosphate-coated steel (ZPS) after autoclaving at 200 C. In CPC/metal joints, the {gamma}-AlOOH phase, which segregated from the hydroxyapatite phase of the CPC matrix, was preferentially precipitated on the CRS and SS surfaces and also mixed with the reaction products formed at the interfaces between CPC and EZS or ZPS. Precipitation of {gamma}-AlOOH caused the formation of a weak boundary layer at the interfacial transition zones, thereby resulting in a low shear-bond strength. Although CGC accelerated the rate of corrosion of CRS and SS surfaces, the growth of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters, formed as the corrosion products of metals at interfaces, aided the anchoring effect of xonotlite crystals as the major phase of CGC matrix, thereby conferring a high shear-bond strength. The EZS and ZPS surfaces were susceptible to alkali dissolution caused by the attack of the high-pH interstitial fluid of CGC pastes to the Zn and zinc phosphate coatings. Thus, the bond strengths of the CGC/EZS and /ZPS joints were lower than those of the joints made with CRS and SS.

  6. Top-quark processes at NLO in production and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R.Keith

    2012-04-01

    We describe the implementation of top production and decay processes in the parton-level Monte Carlo program MCFM. By treating the top quark as being on-shell, we can factorize the amplitudes for top-pair production, s-channel single-top production, and t-channel single-top production into the product of an amplitude for production and an amplitude for decay. In this way we can retain all spin correlations. Both the production and the decay amplitudes are calculated consistently at next-to-leading order in alpha_s. The full dependence on the b-quark mass is also kept. Phenomenological results are presented for various kinematic distributions at the LHC and for the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron.

  7. Cogeneration process for production of energy and iron materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, J.M.

    1991-10-08

    This paper reports a process for the production of electricity. It comprises: providing a low grade coal fuel' performing a pyrolysis procedure on the coal fuel at a temperature of about 600{degrees} C. to remove oil and volatiles therefrom, and to generate a resultant coal char product; pelletizing the coal char product to form coal char product pellets, the step of pelletizing comprising pelletizing at least a portion of the coal char product in combination with reducible solid iron material to form coal char pellets containing reducible solid iron material; charging a cupola with the coal char product and the reducible solid iron material, the step of charging a cupola being characterized by charging substantially all the coal char product in the form of coal char product pellets and substantially all the reducible solid iron material in the form of pellets containing the coal char product in combination with the reducible solid iron material; reducing and melting all the reducible solid iron material in the coal char pellets by heating the pellets in the cupola at a suitable temperature under a pressure of at least about 100 psi in the presence of a sufficient upward flow of process gases, with the resultant formation of hot product gases.

  8. Hydrodynamic pressure processing: Impact on the quality attributes of fresh and further-processed meat products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) as an innovative, postharvest technology for enhancing the quality attributes of fresh and further-processed meat products. A variety of meat products have been tested for their response to the high pressure shockwaves of HDP. The st...

  9. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  10. Solid recovered fuels in the cement industry with special respect to hazardous waste.

    PubMed

    Thomanetz, Erwin

    2012-04-01

    Cements with good technical properties have been produced in Europe since the nineteenth century and are now worldwide standardized high-quality mass products with enormous production numbers. The basic component for cement is the so-called clinker which is produced mainly from raw meal (limestone plus clay plus sands) in a rotary kiln with preheater and progressively with integrated calciner, at temperatures up to 1450 °C. This process requires large amounts of fossil fuels and is CO₂-intensive. But most CO₂ is released by lime decomposition during the burning process. In the 1980s the use of alternative fuels began--firstly in the form of used oil and waste tyres and then increasingly by pre-conditioned materials from commercial waste and from high calorific industrial waste (i.e. solid recovered fuel (SRF))--as well as organic hazardous waste materials such as solvents, pre-conditioned with sawdust. Therefore the cement industry is more and more a competitor in the waste-to-energy market--be it for municipal waste or for hazardous waste, especially concerning waste incineration, but also for other co-incineration plants. There are still no binding EU rules identifying which types of SRF or hazardous waste could be incinerated in cement kilns, but there are some well-made country-specific 'positive lists', for example in Switzerland and Austria. Thus, for proper planning in the cement industry as well as in the waste management field, waste disposal routes should be considered properly, in order to avoid surplus capacities on one side and shortage on the other.

  11. Recycling of ladle slag in cement composites: Environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Serjun, Vesna Zalar; Mladenovič, Ana; Mirtič, Breda; Meden, Anton; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    In the present work compact and ground cement composites in which 30% of cement by mass was replaced by ladle slag were investigated for their chemical and physico-mechanical properties. To evaluate long-term environmental impacts, leachability test based on diffusion, which combined both, diffusion and dissolution of contaminants, was performed in water and saline water. Total element concentrations and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 180days. At the end of the experiment, the mineralogical composition and the physico-mechanical stability of cement composites was also assessed. The results revealed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were immobilized by the hydration products formed in the cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Cr(VI) content originating from the cement was also appreciably reduced by Fe(II) from minerals present in the added ladle slag, which thus had significant positive environmental effects. Among metals, only Mo and Ba were leached in elevated concentrations, but solely in ground cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Lower V concentrations were observed in leachates of ground than compact composite. It was demonstrated that the presence of ladle slag in cement composites can even contribute to improved mortar resistance. The investigated ladle slag can be successfully implemented in cement composites as supplementary cementitious material.

  12. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-03-01

    The Cement Bond Log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal in order to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than twenty years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation, ostensibly, with Cement Bond Logs. Cement Bond Logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed upon the log measurements is needed in order to properly evaluate the log. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of Cement Bond Logs which fall into this category are presented.

  13. A practical approach to the interpretation of cement bond logs

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.L.

    1985-07-01

    The cement bond log has been controversial since its inception. Despite its potential, it is possibly the most maligned logging service available to the industry. Effective zone isolation between permeable intervals in a well requires a cement sheath over an appreciable vertical interval. It is necessary for the annular cement sheath to provide an effective hydraulic seal to withstand subsequent completion and production operations. The oil industry has used wireline well logs to detect the presence or absence of cement behind pipe for more than 20 years. Users have attempted, not always successfully, to evaluate the effectiveness of cement bond to both pipe and formation with cement bond logs. Cement bond logs do not mislead. Poor interpretation habits mislead. Knowledge of the well completion and the inherent physical restraints placed on the log measurements is needed to evaluate the log properly. The purpose here is to dispel some of the myths created by misguided interpretation practices. Examples of cement bond logs that fall into this category are be presented.

  14. Near infrared and Raman spectroscopy for the in-process monitoring of pharmaceutical production processes.

    PubMed

    De Beer, T; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Saerens, L; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2011-09-30

    Within the Process Analytical Technology (PAT) framework, it is of utmost importance to obtain critical process and formulation information during pharmaceutical processing. Process analyzers are the essential PAT tools for real-time process monitoring and control as they supply the data from which relevant process and product information and conclusions are to be extracted. Since the last decade, near infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy have been increasingly used for real-time measurements of critical process and product attributes, as these techniques allow rapid and nondestructive measurements without sample preparations. Furthermore, both techniques provide chemical and physical information leading to increased process understanding. Probes coupled to the spectrometers by fiber optic cables can be implemented directly into the process streams allowing continuous in-process measurements. This paper aims at reviewing the use of Raman and NIR spectroscopy in the PAT setting, i.e., during processing, with special emphasis in pharmaceutics and dosage forms.

  15. Geothermal Cementing - The State of the Art

    SciTech Connect

    Shryock, S. H.; Smith, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Much emphasis today is being placed on the drilling and completion of steam wells. Success or failure depends greatly on the cementing process, which requires not only the selection of competent and durable materials but also the complete understanding of placement techniques. Immobile muds, crooked holes, lost circulation, poor centralization, and the inability to move pipe are some of the major areas which contribute to good or bad results. This presentation covers a ''state of the art'' of the various techniques, materials, and equipment being used in cementing steam wells in the US and Mexico.

  16. Curing time effect on the fraction of {sup 137}Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay composition

    SciTech Connect

    Plecas, Ilija; Dimovic, Slavko

    2007-07-01

    To assess the safety of disposal of radioactive waste material in cement, curing conditions and time of leaching radionuclides {sup 137}Cs have been studied. Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. Curing conditions and curing time prior to commencing the leaching test are critically important in leach studies since the extent of hydration of the cement materials determines how much hydration product develops and whether it is available to block the pore network, thereby reducing leaching. Incremental leaching rates R{sub n}(cm/d) of {sup 137}Cs from cement ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix after 180 days were measured. The results presented in this paper are examples of results obtained in a 20-year concrete testing project which will influence the design of the engineer trenches system for future central Serbian radioactive waste storing center. (authors)

  17. Development of fluidized bed cement sintering technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Katsuji

    1994-12-31

    In the new system presented in this paper, the cement clinker is sintered, not in a rotary kiln, but in two different furnaces: a spouted bed kiln and a fluidized bed kiln. The heat generated in the process of cooling the cement clinker is recovered by a fluidized bed cooler and a packed bed cooler, which are more efficient than the conventional coolers. Compared with the rotary kiln system, the new technology significantly reduces NO{sub x} emissions, appreciably cuts energy consumption, and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions as well. Thus, the new system is an efficient cement sintering system that is friendly to the global environment. In this paper, we describe this new technology as one of the applied technologies at an industrial level that is being developed in the Clean Coal Technology Project, and we present the results from test operations at our pilot plant.

  18. Injectable polydimethylsiloxane-hydroxyapatite composite cement.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Nenad; Jovanović, Jelena; Suljovrujić, Edin; Uskoković, Dragan

    2003-01-01

    An injectable polydimethylsiloxane/hydroxyapatite (PDMS/HAp) composite cement was synthesised using linear PDMS and HAp (particles of about 100 nm in size) of different mass fractions. The effect of HAp mass fraction (5-60 mass%) on the hardness of PDMS/HAp composite cement was investigated. The hardness achieved is 25-49 degrees ShA. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the cross-linking process and the influence of HAp on the temperature and duration of PDMS/HAp cross-linking. The microstructure of composite cement surfaces after 10 days in vivo tests was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The presence of well-adhered macrophages, fibroblasts and monocytes was found on the implant surface upon its extraction from the organism.

  19. Comparison of electrolytic, thermochemical, and other hydrogen-production processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, R.; Whaley, T.

    1981-01-01

    An overview is presented of the following six hydrogen production process categories: catalytic steam reforming of light hydrocarbons; partial oxidation of less-reactive feedstocks such as coal and heavy oil; reaction of active metals or metal hydrides with water or acids; electrolysis of water; thermochemical hydrogen cycles; and photolysis of water. These processes are compared technically, and to the extent possible, economically.

  20. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section 113.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION THERMALLY PROCESSED LOW-ACID FOODS PACKAGED IN HERMETICALLY...

  1. 21 CFR 113.100 - Processing and production records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Processing and production records. 113.100 Section 113.100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION THERMALLY PROCESSED LOW-ACID FOODS PACKAGED IN HERMETICALLY...

  2. Image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, E. K.; Hammill, H. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new technique for image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation was developed. It was entirely objective, quantitative, and general, and should prove useful in system design and quality control. The technique and its application to determination of quality control procedures for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite NASA Data Processing Facility are described.

  3. Process-Product Research: A Cornerstone in Educational Effectiveness Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This article links the contribution of process-product studies in developing the theoretical framework of educational effectiveness by pointing out the importance of teacher behavior in the classroom. The role that Jere Brophy played in this evolving research is described within the various phases of teacher effectiveness research. Process-product…

  4. Ionic liquid-based green processes for energy production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suojiang; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Xiaochun; Xin, Jiayu; Miao, Qingqing; Wang, Jianji

    2014-11-21

    To mitigate the growing pressure on resource depletion and environment degradation, the development of green processes for the production of renewable energy is highly required. As a class of novel and promising media, ionic liquids (ILs) have shown infusive potential applications in energy production. Aiming to offer a critical overview regarding the new challenges and opportunities of ILs for developing green processes of renewable energy, this article emphasises the role of ILs as catalysts, solvents, or electrolytes in three broadly interesting energy production processes from renewable resources, such as CO2 conversion to fuels and fuel additives, biomass pretreatment and conversion to biofuels, as well as solar energy and energy storage. It is expected that this article will stimulate a generation of new ideas and new technologies in IL-based renewable energy production.

  5. Hydration Characteristics of Metakaolin Admixtured Cement using DTA, XRD and SEM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, D.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2008-04-01

    The paper aims to investigate hydration and pozzolanic reaction in Portland cement paste with different replacement percentages (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%) of metakaolin. The compressive strength of the metakaolin admixtured cement was measured at 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks. The compressive strength developments of the metakaolin admixtured cement are compared with Portland cement. It is found that metakaolin contributes significantly to strength development as an accelerating admixture for Portland cement. The pozzolanic reactions and the reaction products were determined by DTA, XRD and SEM.

  6. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  7. Fish Processed Production Planning Using Integer Stochastic Programming Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah, Mawengkang, Herman

    2011-06-01

    Fish and its processed products are the most affordable source of animal protein in the diet of most people in Indonesia. The goal in production planning is to meet customer demand over a fixed time horizon divided into planning periods by optimizing the trade-off between economic objectives such as production cost and customer satisfaction level. The major decisions are production and inventory levels for each product and the number of workforce in each planning period. In this paper we consider the management of small scale traditional business at North Sumatera Province which performs processing fish into several local seafood products. The inherent uncertainty of data (e.g. demand, fish availability), together with the sequential evolution of data over time leads the production planning problem to a nonlinear mixed-integer stochastic programming model. We use scenario generation based approach and feasible neighborhood search for solving the model. The results which show the amount of each fish processed product and the number of workforce needed in each horizon planning are presented.

  8. Substitution of saturated fat in processed meat products: a review.

    PubMed

    Ospina-E, J C; Sierra-C, A; Ochoa, O; Pérez-Álvarez, J A; Fernández-López, J

    2012-01-01

    The food industry is increasingly directing its efforts to produce and commercialize functional foods where the reduction or even elimination of saturated fat is an important goal. This situation arises from the concern of many institutions and individuals worldwide on the growth of non-transmissible diseases, particularly cardiovascular ones. This article presents a revision of the most important research carried out on processed meat products production and looks at the topic from two principal points of view: the nutritional and technological function of fat and the way in which it is gradually being replaced in the above-mentioned products. Many ingredients have been used to substitute fat but while the results concerning the nutritional composition of the final products are generally acceptable, the sensory aspects are not completely solved. This review emphasizes the use of plastic fats because they allow the highest fat substitution levels during its process and consumption without affecting the product behavior.

  9. Improving preanalytic processes using the principles of lean production (Toyota Production System).

    PubMed

    Persoon, Thomas J; Zaleski, Sue; Frerichs, Janice

    2006-01-01

    The basic technologies used in preanalytic processes for chemistry tests have been mature for a long time, and improvements in preanalytic processes have lagged behind improvements in analytic and postanalytic processes. We describe our successful efforts to improve chemistry test turnaround time from a central laboratory by improving preanalytic processes, using existing resources and the principles of lean production. Our goal is to report 80% of chemistry tests in less than 1 hour and to no longer recognize a distinction between expedited and routine testing. We used principles of lean production (the Toyota Production System) to redesign preanalytic processes. The redesigned preanalytic process has fewer steps and uses 1-piece flow to move blood samples through the accessioning, centrifugation, and aliquoting processes. Median preanalytic processing time was reduced from 29 to 19 minutes, and the laboratory met the goal of reporting 80% of chemistry results in less than 1 hour for 11 consecutive months.

  10. Image processing and products for the Magellan mission to Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Jerry; Alexander, Doug; Andres, Paul; Lewicki, Scott; Mcauley, Myche

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan mission to Venus is providing planetary scientists with massive amounts of new data about the surface geology of Venus. Digital image processing is an integral part of the ground data system that provides data products to the investigators. The mosaicking of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image data from the spacecraft is being performed at JPL's Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). MIPL hosts and supports the Image Data Processing Subsystem (IDPS), which was developed in a VAXcluster environment of hardware and software that includes optical disk jukeboxes and the TAE-VICAR (Transportable Applications Executive-Video Image Communication and Retrieval) system. The IDPS is being used by processing analysts of the Image Data Processing Team to produce the Magellan image data products. Various aspects of the image processing procedure are discussed.

  11. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  12. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  13. Scale-down of the inactivated polio vaccine production process.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van 't Oever, Aart G; Vinke, Marian; Spiekstra, Arjen; Wijffels, René H; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-05-01

    The anticipated increase in the demand for inactivated polio vaccines resulting from the success in the polio eradication program requires an increase in production capacity and cost price reduction of the current inactivated polio vaccine production processes. Improvement of existing production processes is necessary as the initial process development has been done decades ago. An up-to-date lab-scale version encompassing the legacy inactivated polio vaccine production process was set-up. This lab-scale version should be representative of the large scale, meaning a scale-down model, to allow experiments for process optimization that can be readily applied. Initially the separate unit operations were scaled-down at setpoint. Subsequently, the unit operations were applied successively in a comparative manner to large-scale manufacturing. This allows the assessment of the effects of changes in one unit operation to the consecutive units at small-scale. Challenges in translating large-scale operations to lab-scale are discussed, and the concessions that needed to be made are described. The current scale-down model for cell and virus culture (2.3-L) presents a feasible model with its production scale counterpart (750-L) when operated at setpoint. Also, the current scale-down models for the DSP unit operations clarification, concentration, size exclusion chromatography, ion exchange chromatography, and inactivation are in agreement with the manufacturing scale. The small-scale units can be used separately, as well as sequentially, to study variations and critical product quality attributes in the production process. Finally, it is shown that the scale-down unit operations can be used consecutively to prepare trivalent vaccine at lab-scale with comparable characteristics to the product produced at manufacturing scale.

  14. Hydrogen production: two stage processes for waste degradation.

    PubMed

    Gómez, X; Fernández, C; Fierro, J; Sánchez, M E; Escapa, A; Morán, A

    2011-09-01

    The dark fermentation process generates hydrogen by biological means. It presents two main advantages: fulfilling requirements for mild operational conditions and gaining benefit from the residual biomass. The process itself may be seen as a pre-treatment step in a complete stabilisation chain, with the aim of attaining the valorisation of residual biomass. However, increasing the yield of H2 production is an imperative task. In this manuscript, a review of recent work in the field of fermentative hydrogen production is presented. As dark fermentation has a maximum yield of 33% (on sugars), a description is also presented of possible second stage processes for the degradation of dark fermentation effluents. Alternatives considered were photofermentation and bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as processes capable of converting fermentation sub-products into H2. Anaerobic digestion as a final stabilisation stage was also considered owing to the wide application of this technology in the treatment of bio-wastes.

  15. Virtual Collaborative Simulation Environment for Integrated Product and Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulli, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Deneb Robotics is a leader in the development of commercially available, leading edge three- dimensional simulation software tools for virtual prototyping,, simulation-based design, manufacturing process simulation, and factory floor simulation and training applications. Deneb has developed and commercially released a preliminary Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) capability for Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). This capability allows distributed, real-time visualization and evaluation of design concepts, manufacturing processes, and total factory and enterprises in one seamless simulation environment.

  16. The JSC Engineering Directorate Product Peer Review Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Kenneth C.

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Engineering Directorate has developed a Product Peer Review process in support of NASA policies for project management and systems engineering. The process complies with the requirements of NPR 7120.5, NPR 7123.1 and NPR 7150.2 and follows the guidance in NASA/SP-2007-6105. This presentation will give an overview of the process followed by a brief demonstration of an actual peer review, with audience participation.

  17. Recent advances in lactic acid production by microbial fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed Ali; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-11-01

    Fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has roused interest among researchers in recent years due to its high potential for applications in a wide range of fields. More specifically, the sharp increase in manufacturing of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA) materials, green alternatives to petroleum-derived plastics, has significantly increased the global interest in lactic acid production. However, higher production costs have hindered the large-scale application of PLA because of the high price of lactic acid. Therefore, reduction of lactic acid production cost through utilization of inexpensive substrates and improvement of lactic acid production and productivity has become an important goal. Various methods have been employed for enhanced lactic acid production, including several bioprocess techniques facilitated by wild-type and/or engineered microbes. In this review, we will discuss lactic acid producers with relation to their fermentation characteristics and metabolism. Inexpensive fermentative substrates, such as dairy products, food and agro-industrial wastes, glycerol, and algal biomass alternatives to costly pure sugars and food crops are introduced. The operational modes and fermentation methods that have been recently reported to improve lactic acid production in terms of concentrations, yields, and productivities are summarized and compared. High cell density fermentation through immobilization and cell-recycling techniques are also addressed. Finally, advances in recovery processes and concluding remarks on the future outlook of lactic acid production are presented.

  18. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono-and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  19. Magnesium phosphate glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.

    1984-03-13

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate exhibiting rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.

  20. Magnesium-phosphate-glass cements with ceramic-type properties

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1982-09-23

    Rapid setting magnesium phosphate (Mg glass) cementitious materials consisting of magnesium phosphate cement paste, polyborax and water-saturated aggregate, exhibits rapid setting and high early strength characteristics. The magnesium glass cement is prepared from a cation-leachable powder and a bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid such as an aqueous solution of diammonium phosphate and ammonium polyphosphate. The cation-leachable powder includes a mixture of two different magnesium oxide powders processed and sized differently which when mixed with the bivalent metallic ion-accepting liquid provides the magnesium glass cement consisting primarily of magnesium ortho phosphate tetrahydrate, with magnesium hydroxide and magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate also present. The polyborax serves as a set-retarder. The resulting magnesium mono- and polyphosphate cements are particularly suitable for use as a cementing matrix in rapid repair systems for deteriorated concrete structures as well as construction materials and surface coatings for fireproof structures.