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Sample records for cemented acetabular replacements

  1. Fatigue failure in the cement mantle of a simplified acetabular replacement model

    PubMed Central

    Zant, Nikolaus P.; Wong, Charles K.Y.; Tong, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Although the role of fatigue failure in aseptic loosening of cemented total hip replacements has been extensively studied in femoral components, studies of fatigue failure in cement mantle of acetabular replacements have yet to be reported, despite that the long-term failure rate in the latter is about three times that of femoral components. Part of the reason may be that a complex pelvic bone structure does not land itself readily for a 2D representation as that of a femur. In this work, a simple multilayer model has been developed to reproduce the stress distributions in the cement mantle of an acetabular replacement from a plane strain finite element pelvic bone model. The experimental multilayer model was subjected to cyclic loading up to peak hip contact force during normal walking. Radial fatigue cracks were observed in the vicinity of the maximum tangential and compressive stresses, as predicted by the FE models. Typical fatigue striations were also observed on the fracture surfaces post cyclic testing. The results were examined in the context of retrieval studies, 3D FE analysis and in vitro experimental results using full-sized hemi-pelvic bone models. PMID:19330048

  2. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  3. Cementation of a polyethylene liner into a metal acetabular shell: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Aaron A; Prince, Edward J; Drake, F Thurston; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2009-08-01

    Cementation of a liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell is common in revision hip arthroplasty. We compare the biomechanical strengths of cemented liners with standard locked liners. Fifty polyethylene liners were inserted into acetabular shells using the standard locking mechanism or 1 of 2 cement types then loaded to failure by torsion or lever-out testing. Lever-out testing showed that all cemented liners failed at similar loads to standard locked liners. With torsion testing, cemented liners failed at significantly higher loads than standard locked liners; roughening the liner increased load to failure. Cementation of an acetabular liner into a metal shell is safe and strong and a good alternative to metal shell replacement. Saw roughening of the polyethylene liner strengthens the poly-cement interface.

  4. Damage evolution in acetabular replacements under long-term physiological loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Heaton-Adegbile, P; New, A; Hussell, J G; Tong, J

    2009-05-29

    Damage development in cemented acetabular replacements has been studied in bovine pelvic bones under long-term physiological loading conditions, including normal walking, stair climbing and a combined block loading with representative routine activities. The physiological loading conditions were achieved using a specially designed hip simulator for fixation endurance testing. Damage was detected and monitored using micro-CT scanning at regular intervals of the experiments, and verified by microscopic studies post testing. The results show that debonding at the bone-cement interface defined the failure of cement fixation in all cases, and debondings initiated near the dome of the acetabulum in the superior-posterior quadrant, consistent with the high-stress region identified from the finite element analysis of implanted acetabular models Zant, N.P., Heaton-Adegbile, P., Hussell, J.G., Tong, J., 2008b. In-vitro fatigue failure of cemented acetabular replacements-a hip simulator study. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Transactions of the ASME, 130, 021019-1-9]; [Tong, J., Zant, N.P., Wang, J-Y., Heaton-Adegbile, P., Hussell, J.G., 2008. Fatigue in cemented acetabulum. International Journal of Fatigue, 30(8), 1366-1375].

  5. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  9. Clinical and radiological outcome of the cemented Contemporary acetabular component in patients < 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, M W J L; Timmer, C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Schreurs, B W

    2013-12-01

    Despite the worldwide usage of the cemented Contemporary acetabular component (Stryker), no published data are available regarding its use in patients aged < 50 years. We undertook a mid- to long-term follow-up study, including all consecutive patients aged < 50 years who underwent a primary total hip replacement using the Contemporary acetabular component with the Exeter cemented stem between January 1999 and January 2006. There were 152 hips in 126 patients, 61 men and 65 women, mean age at surgery 37.6 years (16 to 49 yrs). One patient was lost to follow-up. Mean clinical follow-up of all implants was 7.6 years (0.9 to 12.0). All clinical questionnaire scores, including Harris hip score, Oxford hip score and several visual analogue scales, were found to have improved. The eight year survivorship of all acetabular components for the endpoints revision for any reason or revision for aseptic loosening was 94.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 89.2 to 97.2) and 96.4% (95% CI 91.6 to 98.5), respectively. Radiological follow-up was complete for 146 implants. The eight year survival for the endpoint radiological loosening was 93.1% (95% CI 86.2 to 96.6). Three surviving implants were considered radiologically loose but were asymptomatic. The presence of acetabular osteolysis (n = 17, 11.8%) and radiolucent lines (n = 20, 13.9%) in the 144 surviving cups indicates a need for continued observation in the second decade of follow-up in order to observe their influence on long-term survival. The clinical and radiological data resulting in a ten-year survival rate > 90% in young patients support the use of the Contemporary acetabular component in this specific patient group.

  10. Cementation of an acetabular liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Springer, Bryan D; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2003-10-01

    Cementing a polyethylene liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell during revision hip arthroplasty may be appropriate in select patients. The purpose of this study was to review our early results with this technique. Sixteen patients with >2-year follow-up or who had any complications at <2 years from surgery were identified. Indications for this technique included: failure of the previous locking mechanism, significant polyethylene wear, malposition of the well-fixed metal shell, and previous removal of the liner with a retained acetabular shell. One acetabular shell has been revised at 13 months for multiple dislocations. Hip scores improved an average of 24.2 points. Radiographs revealed no polyethylene dissociation or acetabular loosening. Complications occurred in 7 patients. Initial results appear successful at providing secure fixation, while preventing the bone loss that might occur with removal of a well-fixed component.

  11. Long Term Results of Liner Polyethylene Cementation Technique in Revision for Peri-acetabular Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Gurion; Kandel, Leonid; Qutteineh, Bilal; Liebergall, Meir; Mattan, Yoav

    2015-06-01

    Patients with peri-acetabular osteolysis around a well fixed cementless acetabular component may be treated with liner exchange. When the locking mechanism is unreliable or unavailable, cementing the liner into the fixed acetabular component is a feasible option. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic long term results of this technique. Forty hip revisions with liner cementation in 37 patients were performed. The minimum follow up was 10 years. Modified Harris Hip Score and recent x rays were reviewed. Four hips were re-revised. Two patients were diagnosed with exacerbation of osteolysis but refused revision. Dislocation rate was relatively high (16%). Liner cementation technique in revision hip surgery is useful in patients with a well fixed metal backed acetabular component.

  12. Fix and replace; an emerging paradigm for treating acetabular fractures

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Colin G.; Carrothers, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although technically challenging even for the experienced surgeon, simultaneous open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of acetabular fracture and total hip replacement (THR) have some potential advantages over the more traditional treatment options in specific patient subgroups; theoretically allowing immediate weight bearing and faster rehabilitation, reducing the cost of inpatient stay, and reducing the risks of early and late local complications associated with standard treatment for this type of injury. We review the evolution of the indications and techniques, outline the surgical challenges, and discuss implant options and outcomes for this treatment paradigm. PMID:28228787

  13. A technique to remove a stable all-polyethylene cemented acetabular liner in revision hip arthroplasty: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Judas, Fernando M.; Lucas, Francisco M.; Fonseca, Ruben L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The removal of a well-fixed acetabular component in a total hip arthroplasty can cause bone fractures, excessive bleeding, as well as extended bone loss. The reimplantation of a new acetabular component may be compromised. Presentation of case We report a technique using 2 cork-screws for removal a stable cemented acetabular component for the treatment of a recurrent dislocation of a cemented total hip arthroplasty, due to acetabular malposition. Discussion A diversity of approaches and tools has been used for extraction of the acetabular prosthesis. Using 2 cork-screws it is possible to create fissures and fractures into the cement mantle, and greater manual control is obtained facilitating the manipulation of the acetabular component in different directions. The cup-cemented bond can be disrupted, the host bone is preserved and the risks of complications are minimized. Conclusion This technique is simple, available in any environment, reproducible, non-costly, non-timing consuming and safe. PMID:25725330

  14. Assessment of failure of cemented polyethylene acetabular component due to bone remodeling: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine failure of the cemented polyethylene acetabular component, which might occur due to excessive bone resorption, cement-bone interface debonding and fatigue failure of the cement mantle. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvic bone were developed and bone remodeling algorithm was implemented for present analysis. Soderberg fatigue failure diagram was used for fatigue assessment of the cement mantle. Hoffman failure criterion was considered for prediction of cement-bone interface debonding. Results indicate fatigue failure of the cement mantle and implant-bone interface debonding might not occur due to bone remodeling.

  15. The effect of geometry and abduction angle on the stresses in cemented UHMWPE acetabular cups – finite element simulations and experimental tests

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Rami K; Koistinen, Arto; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Santavirta, Seppo S; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2005-01-01

    Background Contact pressure of UHMWPE acetabular cup has been shown to correlate with wear in total hip replacement (THR). The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that the cup geometry, abduction angle, thickness and clearance can modify the stresses in cemented polyethylene cups. Methods Acetabular cups with different geometries (Link®: IP and Lubinus eccentric) were tested cyclically in a simulator at 45° and 60° abduction angles. Finite element (FE) meshes were generated and two additional designs were reconstructed to test the effects of the cup clearance and thickness. Contact pressures at cup-head and cup-cement interfaces were calculated as a function of loading force at 45°, 60° and 80° abduction angles. Results At the cup-head interface, IP experienced lower contact pressures than the Lubinus eccentric at low loading forces. However, at higher loading forces, much higher contact pressures were produced on the surface of IP cup. An increase in the abduction angle increased contact pressure in the IP model, but this did not occur to any major extent with the Lubinus eccentric model. At the cup-cement interface, IP experienced lower contact pressures. Increased clearance between cup and head increased contact pressure both at cup-head and cup-cement interfaces, whereas a decreased thickness of polyethylene layer increased contact pressure only at the cup-cement interface. FE results were consistent with experimental tests and acetabular cup deformations. Conclusion FE analyses showed that geometrical design, thickness and abduction angle of the acetabular cup, as well as the clearance between the cup and head do change significantly the mechanical stresses experienced by a cemented UHMWPE acetabular cup. These factors should be taken into account in future development of THR prostheses. FE technique is a useful tool with which to address these issues. PMID:15904521

  16. Revisions of Extensive Acetabular Defects with Impaction Grafting and a Cement Cup

    PubMed Central

    van Egmond, Nienke; De Kam, Daniel C. J.; Gardeniers, Jean W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Loosening of acetabular components often leads to bony defects. Management of extensive acetabular bone loss in hip revision arthroplasty can be a tremendous challenge. Questions/purposes We asked whether a reconstruction with impacted bone grafts will provide a durable and pain-free function in extensive acetabular defects. We specifically determined the (1) survival rates with the end point of revision for any reason, aseptic revision, and radiographic loosening; (2) visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, Harris hip score (HHS), and the Oxford Hip Questionnaire score (OHQS); (3) number of repeat revisions; (4) complications; and (5) radiographic loosening, wear, and radiolucencies. Patients and Methods We retrospectively followed 25 patients (27 hips) with extensive acetabular defects. No patient was lost to followup. Two patients died during followup. Minimum followup was 3 years (mean, 8.8 years; range, 3–14.1 years). Results Three patients (three hips) underwent repeat revision surgery and another two patients (two hips) had radiographically loose hips. The 10-year survival rate was 88% (95% confidence interval, 74.2%–100%) with the end point acetabular revision for any reason and 95% (95% confidence interval, 86.0%–100%) with the end point acetabular revision for aseptic loosening. The mean HHSs were 55 points before surgery and 72 points postoperatively. Conclusions Acetabular reconstruction with impaction bone grafting and a cemented cup is a reliable technique with a 10-year survival rate of 88% in patients with extensive acetabular deficiencies. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:20931308

  17. Management of neglected acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Veerappa, L A; Tripathy, S K; Sen, R K

    2015-08-01

    Management of neglected acetabular fractures is a difficult task. Osteosynthesis in such cases may not be an ideal solution because of the femoral head damage due to pressure by the fractured acetabular edge, avascular necrosis, difficulty in mobilizing the fragments due to callus formation, difficulty in indirect reduction of the fracture fragments and macerated acetabular fragments all contributing to inadequate fracture reduction. Majority of such fractures are now treated with total hip replacement. While treating such fractures with THR, problems associated with neglected acetabular fractures such as fracture non-union, hip dislocation, protrusio, cavitary bone defect or peripheral bone defect must be considered. 3D computed tomography scan provides a clear view about the acetabular and periacetabular bony anatomy. Impaction grafting and antiprotrusio cage or ring with a cemented acetabular cup can address most of the hip protrusio and cavitary bone defects. Segmental bone defect needs cortical strut-bone graft fixation and subsequent implantation of a cemented or uncemented acetabular cup implantation. Fracture non-union needs approximate reduction and fixation with plates followed by bone grafting and implantation of an acetabular cup. Despite these efforts, the outcome of THR in neglected acetabular fracture is considerable worse than after conventional hip replacement.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3320 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a... Devices § 888.3320 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with a cemented...

  3. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01).

  4. Corrosion on the acetabular liner taper from retrieved modular metal-on-metal total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Dyrkacz, Richard M; Turgeon, Thomas R; Burnell, Colin D; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-10-01

    Eight retrieved metal-on-metal total hip replacements displayed corrosion damage along the cobalt-chromium alloy liner taper junction with the Ti alloy acetabular shell. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the primary mechanism of corrosion to be grain boundary and associated crevice corrosion, which was likely accelerated through mechanical micromotion and galvanic corrosion resulting from dissimilar alloys. Coordinate measurements revealed up to 4.3mm(3) of the cobalt-chromium alloy taper surface was removed due to corrosion, which is comparable to previous reports of corrosion damage on head-neck tapers. The acetabular liner-shell taper appears to be an additional source of metal corrosion products in modular total hip replacements. Patients with these prostheses should be closely monitored for signs of adverse reaction towards corrosion by-products.

  5. The use of a "rim cutter" device and a flanged cup for improving the mantle of the acetabular component of a cemented Exeter total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Valencia, Jenaro Ángel; Gallart, Xavier; Bori, Guillem; Rodríguez-Roiz, Juan Miguel; Combalia, Andreu

    2016-12-01

    A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the cement mantle in two groups of patients treated with the acetabular components of cemented Exeter total hip arthroplasties (THAs). Two groups of 20 patients were compared: Group 1 received non-flanged acetabular cemented cups (Contemporary, Stryker) and Group 2 received flanged acetabular cemented cups (X3 Rim Fit, Stryker). Cups in Group 2 were implanted after using a rim cutter device. Group 2 showed better penetration of cement in zone 1 (10.76 mm compared with 2.93 mm; p = 0.008) and a thicker cement mantle in zone 1 (3.57 mm compared with 2.89 mm; p = 0.04). More cups in Group 2 had a cement mantle thickness less than 3 mm (30 % in Group 1 compared with 70 % in Group 2; p = 0.0039). No other radiological differences were observed. These results favor the use of a rim cutter device and flanged cup to improve the cement mantle for the acetabular components of cemented Exeter THAs. However, the improvements were less than expected. In view of the results of previous studies, further research is therefore needed to assess the value of this approach in improving the acetabular cement mantle.

  6. The effect of the Rim Cutter on cement pressurization and penetration on cemented acetabular fixation in total hip arthroplasty: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, B N; Lee, A J C; Timperley, A J; Whitehouse, S L; Crawford, R W

    2010-01-01

    The Rim Cutter (Stryker Orthopedics, Mahwah, New Jersey) is a tool designed to cut a ledge inside the rim of the acetabulum, onto which a precisely trimmed, cemented, flanged cup can be fitted. The aim was to investigate the effect of the Rim Cutter on the intra-acetabular cement mantle pressure and the depth of cement penetration during cup insertion. The study had two parts. In the first part, hemi-pelvis models were fitted with pressure sensors. Pressure in the acetabulum was measured on insertion of a conventional cemented flanged cup with and without the use of a Rim Cutter to prepare the rim of the acetabulum. The second part assessed cement penetration when the same cups were inserted into a foam shell model. The shell was mounted in a jig and had holes drilled in it; the distance that cement penetrated into the holes was measured. A significant increase in cement pressure at the apex (p = 0.04) and the rim (p = 0.004) is seen when the Rim Cutter is used. Cement penetration in the Rim Cutter group was significantly increased at the rim of the acetabulum (p = 0.003). Insertion of a flanged cup after the acetabulum is prepared with the Rim Cutter leads to a significant increase in cement pressure and penetration during cup insertion in vitro when compared with conventional flanged cups.

  7. Outcomes of polyethylene liner cementation into a fixed metal acetabular shell with minimum follow-up of 7 years.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung-Sik; Yoon, Sun-Jung; Lee, Ju Rang

    2015-01-01

    Cementation of a polyethylene liner into the well-fixed shell is a convenient option for revision total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed 45 patients who had liner cementation to investigate the risk factors which gave rise to major complications and reoperation. Patients were observed for a minimum of 7 years (range 7.8-14 years). Relevant risk factors (age, BMI, surgical approach, previous cup size and position, types of coated surface) were assessed with Cox regression analysis. The mean Harris Hip Score was improved from 62.5 (range 57-68) preoperatively to 87.1 (range 70-97). A total of 7 hips (15.5%) had acetabular component loosening that was treated with reoperation. Prevalence of acetabular component loosening was statistically significantly higher in hydroxyapatite-coated group (5 of 13) than in the Ti-coated group (2 of 32, p = 0.015). All recurrent dislocations occurred in patients treated with a posterior approach. Diameter of the previous metal shell of below 54 mm showed a lower 10-year survival rate than those greater than 54 mm in diameter. PE liner cementation in stable metal cup is a useful alternative option for carefully selected patients. Pre-existing HA-coated cups as well as small sized cups were indicative of poor outcomes.

  8. Fix and replace: An emerging paradigm for treating acetabular fractures in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Tissingh, Elizabeth K; Johnson, Abigail; Queally, Joseph M; Carrothers, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Acetabular fractures in older patients are challenging to manage. The “fix and replace” construct may present a new paradigm for the management of these injuries. We present the current challenge of acetabular fractures in older patients. We present this in the context of the current literature. This invited editorial presents early results from our centre and the ongoing challenges are discussed. PMID:28361014

  9. Medium-term results of cementation of a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner into a well-fixed acetabular shell in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Jae; Lee, Keun-Ho; Park, Shin-Hyung; Park, Youn-Soo

    2014-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to document outcomes of cementation of a highly cross-linked polyethylene (PE) liner into a well-fixed acetabular metal shell in 36 hips. All operations were performed by a single surgeon using only one type of liner. Patients were followed for a mean of 6.1 years (range, 3-8 years). Mean Harris hip score improved from 58 points preoperatively to 91 points postoperatively. There were no cases of PE liner dislodgement or progressive osteolysis. 1 hip (2.8%) required revision surgery for acetabular cup loosening with greater trochanteric fracture. Complications included 1 peroneal nerve palsy and 1 dislocation. The results of this study and previous reports demonstrated that cementation of highly cross-linked PE liner into well-fixed metal shell could provide good midterm durability.

  10. The use of a constrained cementless acetabular component for instability in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Rady, Ahmad Emad; Asal, Mohammed Kamal; Bassiony, Ayman Abdelaziz

    2010-01-01

    Recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is a disabling complication that can be difficult to treat. We evaluated the early clinical and radiographic outcome associated with the use of a constrained acetabular component for instability in total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent either primary or revision total hip arthroplasty with a cementless constrained acetabular component for different indications. The mean patient age at surgery was 57.4 years and the mean clinical and radiological follow-up period was 26.4 months. Clinical assessment was performed by the Harris hip score and at the latest follow up patients reported outcome using the Oxford hip score questionnaire. All radiographs were evaluated for evidence of loosening. Only one patient experienced redislocation with the constrained prosthesis. The average Harris hip score increased from a preoperative mean of 22 (range, 16 - 36) to a postoperative mean of 85 (range, 66-94). Preoperatively, the mean Oxford Hip Score was 48.6, which decreased to 20.5 at the final examination. All but one of the 15 hips had a well-fixed, stable cup. Femoral component stability with bone ingrowth was achieved in 10 cases. A constrained acetabular component is an effective option for the treatment of hip instability in primary and revision arthroplasty in those at high risk of dislocation. The potential for aseptic loosening requires evaluation by long term studies.

  11. Acetabular revision with impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component: comparison of the Kaplan-Meier analysis to the competing risk analysis in 62 revisions with 25 to 30 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Te Stroet, M A J; Keurentjes, J C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Verdonschot, N; Slooff, T J J H; Schreurs, B W

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of 62 consecutive acetabular revisions using impaction bone grafting and a cemented polyethylene acetabular component in 58 patients (13 men and 45 women) after a mean follow-up of 27 years (25 to 30). All patients were prospectively followed. The mean age at revision was 59.2 years (23 to 82). We performed Kaplan-Meier (KM) analysis and also a Competing Risk (CR) analysis because with long-term follow-up, the presence of a competing event (i.e. death) prevents the occurrence of the endpoint of re-revision. A total of 48 patients (52 hips) had died or had been re-revised at final review in March 2011. None of the deaths were related to the surgery. The mean Harris hip score of the ten surviving hips in ten patients was 76 points (45 to 99). The KM survivorship at 25 years for the endpoint 're-revision for any reason' was 58.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38 to 73) and for 're-revision for aseptic loosening' 72.1% (95% CI 51 to 85). With the CR analysis we calculated the KM analysis overestimates the failure rate with respectively 74% and 93% for these endpoints. The current study shows that acetabular impaction bone grafting revisions provide good clinical results at over 25 years.

  12. Properties of Cement Mortar Containing Rubber Ash as Sand Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Syazani Leman, Alif; Izzati Raihan Ramzi Hannan, Nurul

    2016-11-01

    Discarded scrap tyres have become one of the major environmental problems nowadays. There has been increasing public worry about the mining of natural resources in recent years. In order to minimize the consumption of natural resources, rubber ash has been postulated as a potential material for partial replacement of sand in concrete materials especially for applications which are subjected to impact and vibration such as road and bridge construction. Thus, it contributes to the development of the construction industry in a sustainable way. This paper mainly emphasizes on the use of rubber ash from waste tyres in cement mortar. 100mm cubic specimens were produced by adding rubber ash volume ratios of 0%, 3%, 5% and 7% as sand replacement in M30 quality cement mortar. A compressive stress test and a density test were conducted at the end of 7, 14, and 28 days. The result shows that 5% is the optimum value for sand replacement in the cement mortar. Therefore, rubber ash is acceptable to be used as sand replacement.

  13. Porous titanium particles for acetabular reconstruction in total hip replacement show extensive bony armoring after 15 weeks

    PubMed Central

    Walschot, Lucas H B; Aquarius, René; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone impaction grafting technique restores bone defects in total hip replacement. Porous titanium particles (TiPs) are deformable, like bone particles, and offer better primary stability. We addressed the following questions in this animal study: are impacted TiPs osteoconductive under loaded conditions; do released micro-particles accelerate wear; and are systemic titanium blood levels elevated after implantation of TiPs? Animals and methods — An AAOS type-III defect was created in the right acetabulum of 10 goats weighing 63 (SD 6) kg, and reconstructed with calcium phosphate-coated TiPs and a cemented polyethylene cup. A stem with a cobalt chrome head was cemented in the femur. The goats were killed after 15 weeks. Blood samples were taken pre- and postoperatively. Results — The TiP-graft layer measured 5.6 (SD 0.8) mm with a mean bone ingrowth distance of 2.8 (SD 0.8) mm. Cement penetrated 0.9 (0.3–1.9) mm into the TiPs. 1 reconstruction showed minimal cement penetration (0.3 mm) and failed at the cement-TiP interface. There were no signs of accelerated wear, metallic particle debris, or osteolysis. Median systemic titanium concentrations increased on a log-linear scale from 0.5 (0.3–1.1) parts per billion (ppb) to 0.9 (0.5–2.8) ppb (p = 0.01). Interpretation — Adequate cement pressurization is advocated for impaction grafting with TiPs. After implantation, calcium phosphate-coated TiPs were osteoconductive under loaded conditions and caused an increase in systemic titanium concentrations. However, absolute levels remained low. There were no signs of accelerated wear. A clinical pilot study should be performed to prove that application in humans is safe in the long term. PMID:25238431

  14. Fly ash as replacement for cement in extruded fiber-reinforced cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peled, A.; Akkaya, Y.; Shah, S.P.

    1999-11-01

    The objective of this work was to develop extrudable compositions of fiber-reinforced cement composites that contain high content of fly ash. For that purpose specimens containing different ratio of fly ash as replacement for cement were extruded, with different fiber types: acrylic, PVA, glass and cellulose. Composites produced with the conventional cast process were also examined for comparison. It was found that fly ash improves the flexural strength and ductility of the extruded composite compared to composites without fly ash, for all fiber types. In the cast composites fly ash improved the composite ductility but reduced the flexural strength of the composite. Differences in matrix properties and fiber-matrix interface between the cast and extrusion composites can explain the differences in the flexural performances.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hazardous Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  16. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement Kilns... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement Kilns... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  18. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hazardous Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  19. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement Kilns... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  20. Acetabular distraction: an alternative approach to pelvic discontinuity in failed total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Brown, N M; Hellman, M; Haughom, B H; Shah, R P; Sporer, S M; Paprosky, W G

    2014-11-01

    A pelvic discontinuity occurs when the superior and inferior parts of the hemi-pelvis are no longer connected, which is difficult to manage when associated with a failed total hip replacement. Chronic pelvic discontinuity is found in 0.9% to 2.1% of hip revision cases with risk factors including severe pelvic bone loss, female gender, prior pelvic radiation and rheumatoid arthritis. Common treatment options include: pelvic plating with allograft, cage reconstruction, custom triflange implants, and porous tantalum implants with modular augments. The optimal technique is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable healing between the two segments. A method of treating pelvic discontinuity using porous tantalum components with a distraction technique that achieves both initial stability and subsequent long-term biological fixation is described.

  1. A randomised controlled trial comparing highly cross-linked and contemporary annealed polyethylene after a minimal eight-year follow-up in total hip arthroplasty using cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Langlois, J; Atlan, F; Scemama, C; Courpied, J P; Hamadouche, M

    2015-11-01

    Most published randomised controlled trials which compare the rates of wear of conventional and cross-linked (XL) polyethylene (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have described their use with a cementless acetabular component. We conducted a prospective randomised study to assess the rates of penetration of two distinct types of PE in otherwise identical cemented all-PE acetabular components. A total of 100 consecutive patients for THA were randomised to receive an acetabular component which had been either highly XL then remelted or moderately XL then annealed. After a minimum of eight years follow-up, 38 hips in the XL group and 30 hips in the annealed group had complete data (mean follow-up of 9.1 years (7.6 to 10.7) and 8.7 years (7.2 to 10.2), respectively). In the XL group, the steady state rate of penetration from one year onwards was -0.0002 mm/year (sd 0.108): in the annealed group it was 0.1382 mm/year (sd 0.129) (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001). No complication specific to either material was recorded. These results show that the yearly linear rate of femoral head penetration can be significantly reduced by using a highly XLPE cemented acetabular component.

  2. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  3. Highly Cross-linked Polyethylene Liner Dissociation from a Cement-less Modular Acetabular Shell: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shunsuke; Sonohata, Motoki; Kitajima, Masaru; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Liner dissociation of polyethylene from a cementless acetabular socket following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a rare complication. Cross-linked polyethylene liner dissociation from AMS-HA shell (KYOCERA Med, Osaka, Japan) occurred in 2 out of the 4153 (0.04%) cases approximately 10 years after undergoing surgery at our institute. First case was an 80-year-old female who underwent right THA along with subtrochanteric femoral shortening osteotomy due to complete dislocation hip, and second case was a 72-year-old male, who underwent right THA due to coxarthrosis. A 26 mm femoral head and CPE liner were used in both cases and the inclination degree of the acetabular socket was within 50°.There was no implant loosening in both cases. There was partial damage in the elevated rim on the alternative side and scratches on the back side in the both extracted CPE liner. It was surmised that liner dissociation was caused due to a problem in the liner fixing format of the push in type of the present model. PMID:28217197

  4. Characterization and utilization of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) as partial replacements of Portland cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Om Shervan

    The characteristics of cement kiln dusts (CKDs) and their effects as partial replacement of Portland Cement (PC) were studied in this research program. The cement industry is currently under pressure to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and solid by-products in the form of CKDs. The use of CKDs in concrete has the potential to substantially reduce the environmental impact of their disposal and create significant cost and energy savings to the cement industry. Studies have shown that CKDs can be used as a partial substitute of PC in a range of 5--15%, by mass. Although the use of CKDs is promising, there is very little understanding of their effects in CKD-PC blends. Previous studies provide variable and often conflicting results. The reasons for the inconsistent results are not obvious due to a lack of material characterization data. The characteristics of a CKD must be well-defined in order to understand its potential impact in concrete. The materials used in this study were two different types of PC (normal and moderate sulfate resistant) and seven CKDs. The CKDs used in this study were selected to provide a representation of those available in North America from the three major types of cement manufacturing processes: wet, long-dry, and preheater/precalciner. The CKDs have a wide range of chemical and physical composition based on different raw material sources and technologies. Two fillers (limestone powder and quartz powder) were also used to compare their effects to that of CKDs at an equivalent replacement of PC. The first objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive composition analysis of CKDs and compare their characteristics to PC. CKDs are unique materials that must be analyzed differently from PC for accurate chemical and physical analysis. The present study identifies the chemical and physical analytical methods that should be used for CKDs. The study also introduced a method to quantify the relative abundance of the different

  5. [Analysis of migration of screwed acetabular components following revision arthroplasty of the hip joint. Results of single-image roentgen analysis].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, S W; Ochsner, P E; Pfister, A; Mayrhofer, P

    1994-01-01

    Out of 57 revised acetabular components, which were regularly checked, 47 had been replaced by a cemented Müller's acetabular reinforcement ring resp. a cementless Müller's Sl-shell with flange. Both types of cups are anchored in the acetabular roof with cancellous bone screws (tab. 1). 42 cases with radiograph series permitted a detailed analysis with the EBRA-method, a computer aided method for the evaluation of acetabular spatial migration based on standard radiographs of the pelvis. The clinical results were very satisfying (tab. 6). The screwed acetabular components migrated little, although, some essential displacements of the center of rotation (in relation to the anatomical position) had to be accepted. As was recognizable with today's inaccurate methods of measuring the center of the head, the displacement too far towards cranial influenced the migration tendency less than an excessive lateralisation. Especially satisfying is the fact, that no increased migration was observed after reconstruction bone grafting of severe acetabular defects, provided that at least a partly direct contact between the acetabular component and the original bone stock was obtained. For the first time EBRA shall be introduced here as a method which shows the migration and the spatial inclination of the acetabular cup in a vector chart.

  6. Palacos compared to Palamed bone cement in total hip replacement: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Meinardi, Joris E; Valstar, Edward R; Van Der Voort, Paul; Kaptein, Bart L; Fiocco, Marta; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Stability and survival of cemented total hip prostheses is dependent on a multitude of factors, including the type of cement that is used. Bone cements vary in viscosity, from low to medium and high. There have been few clinical RSA studies comparing the performance of low- and high-viscosity bone cements. We compared the migration behavior of the Stanmore hip stem cemented using novel low-viscosity Palamed bone cement with that of the same stem cemented with conventional high-viscosity Palacos bone cement. Patients and methods We performed a randomized controlled study involving 39 patients (40 hips) undergoing primary total hip replacement for primary or secondary osteoarthritis. 22 patients (22 hips) were randomized to Palacos and 17 patients (18 hips) were randomized to Palamed. Migration was determined by RSA. Results None of these 40 hips had been revised at the 10-year follow-up mark. To our knowledge, the patients who died before they reached the 10-year endpoint still had the implant in situ. No statistically significant or clinically significant differences were found between the 2 groups for mean translations, rotations, and maximum total-point motion (MTPM). Interpretation We found similar migration of the Stanmore stem in the high-viscosity Palacos cement group and the low-viscosity Palamed cement group. We therefore expect that the risk of aseptic loosening with the new Palamed cement would be comparable to that with the conventional Palacos cement. The choice of which type of bone cement to use is therefore up to the surgeon’s preference. PMID:27329869

  7. Cemented Müller straight stem total hip replacement: 18 year survival, clinical and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaou, Vasileios S; Korres, Demetrios; Lallos, Stergios; Mavrogenis, Andreas; Lazarettos, Ioannis; Sourlas, Ioannis; Efstathopoulos, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To present the 18 year survival and the clinical and radiological outcomes of the Müller straight stem, cemented, total hip arthroplasty (THA). METHODS: Between 1989 and 2007, 176 primary total hip arthroplasties in 164 consecutive patients were performed in our institution by the senior author. All patients received a Müller cemented straight stem and a cemented polyethylene liner. The mean age of the patients was 62 years (45-78). The diagnosis was primary osteoarthritis in 151 hips, dysplasia of the hip in 12 and subcapital fracture of the femur in 13. Following discharge, serial follow-up consisted of clinical evaluation based on the Harris Hip Score and radiological assessment. The survival of the prosthesis using revision for any reason as an end-point was calculated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-four (15%) patients died during the follow-up study, 6 (4%) patients were lost, while the remaining 134 patients (141 hips) were followed-up for a mean of 10 years (3-18 years). HSS score at the latest follow-up revealed that 84 hips (59.5%) had excellent results, 30 (22.2%) good, 11 (7.8%) fair and 9 (6.3%) poor. There were 3 acetabular revisions due to aseptic loosening. Six (4.2%) stems were diagnosed as having radiographic definitive loosening; however, only 1 was revised. 30% of the surviving stems showed no radiological changes of radiolucency, while 70% showed some changes. Survival of the prosthesis for any reason was 96% at 10 years and 81% at 18 years. CONCLUSION: The 18 year survival of the Müller straight stem, cemented THA is comparable to those of other successful cemented systems. PMID:24147267

  8. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar.

    PubMed

    Naceri, Abdelghani; Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  9. Use of waste brick as a partial replacement of cement in mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Naceri, Abdelghani Hamina, Makhloufi Chikouche

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste brick as a partial replacement for cement in the production of cement mortar. Clinker was replaced by waste brick in different proportions (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) by weight for cement. The physico-chemical properties of cement at anhydrous state and the hydrated state, thus the mechanical strengths (flexural and compressive strengths after 7, 28 and 90 days) for the mortar were studied. The microstructure of the mortar was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the mineralogical composition (mineral phases) of the artificial pozzolan was investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size distributions was obtained from laser granulometry (LG) of cements powders used in this study. The results obtained show that the addition of artificial pozzolan improves the grinding time and setting times of the cement, thus the mechanical characteristics of mortar. A substitution of cement by 10% of waste brick increased mechanical strengths of mortar. The results of the investigation confirmed the potential use of this waste material to produce pozzolanic cement.

  10. Radiostereometric Analysis Study of Tantalum Compared with Titanium Acetabular Cups and Highly Cross-Linked Compared with Conventional Liners in Young Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, David C.; Greene, Meridith; Snyder, Benjamin; Aubin, Michelle; Drew, Jacob; Bragdon, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiostereometric analysis provides highly precise measurements of component micromotion relative to the bone that is otherwise undetectable by routine radiographs. This study compared, at a minimum of five years following surgery, the micromotion of tantalum and titanium acetabular cups and femoral head penetration in highly cross-linked polyethylene liners and conventional (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) liners in active patients who had undergone total hip replacement. Methods: This institutional review board-approved prospective, randomized, blinded study involved forty-six patients. Patients were randomized into one of four cohorts according to both acetabular cup and polyethylene liner. Patients received either a cementless cup with a titanium mesh surface or a tantalum trabecular surface and either a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner or an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. Radiostereometric analysis examinations and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) activity, and Harris hip scores were obtained preoperatively, postoperatively, at six months, and annually thereafter. Results: All patients had significant improvement (p < 0.05) in Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, WOMAC, UCLA activity, and Harris hip scores postoperatively. On radiostereometric analysis examination, highly cross-linked polyethylene liners showed significantly less median femoral head penetration at five years (p < 0.05). Steady-state wear rates from one year to five years were 0.04 mm per year for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liners and 0.004 mm per year for highly cross-linked polyethylene liners. At the five-year follow-up, the median migration (and standard error) was 0.05 ± 0.20 mm proximally for titanium cups and 0.21 ± 0.05 mm for tantalum cups. Conclusions: In this young population who had undergone

  11. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  12. Dual mobility total hip replacement in a high risk population

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Jatinder Singh; Al Riyami, Amur; Allami, Mohamad Kasim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate results of dual mobility total replacement in a high risk population who take hip into hyperflexed position while sitting and praying on the floor. Method: The study included 65 (35 primary total replacement and 30 complex total hip replacement) cases of total hip replacement using avantage privilege dual mobility cup system from biomet. A cemented acetabular component and on femoral side a bimetric stem, either cemented or uncemented used depending on the canal type. Ten cases were examined fluoroscopically in follow up. Result: There was dislocation in one patient undergoing complex hip replacement. Fluoroscopy study showed no impingement between the neck of prosthesis and acetabular shell at extremes of all movements. Conclusion: The prevalence of dislocation is low in our high risk population and we consider it preferred concept for patients undergoing complex total hip replacement. PMID:27924742

  13. The economics of using prophylactic antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, C J; Zmistowski, B M; Clyde, C T; Parvizi, J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of peri-prosthetic infection following total joint replacement continues to rise, and attempts to curb this trend have included the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement at the time of primary surgery. We have investigated the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the use of antibiotic-loaded cement for primary total knee replacement (TKR) by comparing the rate of infection in 3048 TKRs performed without loaded cement over a three-year period versus the incidence of infection after 4830 TKRs performed with tobramycin-loaded cement over a later period of time of a similar duration. In order to adjust for confounding factors, the rate of infection in 3347 and 4702 uncemented total hip replacements (THR) performed during the same time periods, respectively, was also examined. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients in the different cohorts. The absolute rate of infection increased when antibiotic-loaded cement was used in TKR. However, this rate of increase was less than the rate of increase in infection following uncemented THR during the same period. If the rise in the rate of infection observed in THR were extrapolated to the TKR cohort, 18 additional cases of infection would have been expected to occur in the cohort receiving antibiotic-loaded cement, compared with the number observed. Depending on the type of antibiotic-loaded cement that is used, its cost in all primary TKRs ranges between USD $2112.72 and USD $112 606.67 per case of infection that is prevented.

  14. Cementless acetabular fixation in patients 50 years and younger at 10 to 18 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Teusink, Matthew J; Callaghan, John J; Warth, Lucian C; Goetz, Devon D; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the 10- to 18-year follow-up of cementless acetabular fixation in patients 50 years and younger. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive group of 118 patients (144 hips) in whom primary total hip arthroplasty had been performed by 2 surgeons using a cementless acetabular component. Two (1.4%) cementless acetabular components were revised because of aseptic loosening. Twenty-four hips (16.7%) were revised for any mechanical failure of the acetabular component mostly related to acetabular liner wear and osteolysis. The average linear wear rate was 0.19 mm per year, which was higher than our previous reports with cemented acetabular fixation. The fiber mesh ingrowth surface of the cementless acetabular component in this study was superior to cemented acetabular components in terms of fixation. However, the high rates of wear and osteolysis have led to poor overall acetabular component construct survivorship.

  15. Acetabular blood flow during total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    ElMaraghy, Amr W.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the immediate effect of reaming and insertion of the acetabular component with and without cement on periacetabular blood flow during primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Design A clinical experimental study. Setting A tertiary referral and teaching hospital in Toronto. Patients Sixteen patients (9 men, 7 women) ranging in age from 30 to 78 years and suffering from arthritis. Intervention Elective primary THA with a cemented (8 patients) and noncemented (8 patients) acetabular component. All procedures were done by a single surgeon who used a posterior approach. Main outcome measure Acetabular bone blood-flow measurements made with a laser Doppler flowmeter before reaming, after reaming and after insertion of the acetabular prosthesis. Results Acetabular blood flow after prosthesis insertion was decreased by 52% in the noncemented group (p < 0.001) and 59% in the cemented group (p < 0.001) compared with baseline (prereaming) values. Conclusion The significance of these changes in periacetabular bone blood flow during THA may relate to the extent of bony ingrowth, periprosthetic remodelling and ultimately the incidence of implant failure because of aseptic loosening. PMID:10851413

  16. Modelling the fibrous tissue layer in cemented hip replacements: experimental and finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Waide, V; Cristofolini, L; Stolk, J; Verdonschot, N; Boogaard, G J; Toni, A

    2004-01-01

    The long-term fixation of cemented femoral components may be jeopardised by the presence of a fibrous tissue layer at the bone-cement interface. This study used both experimental and finite element (FE) methods to investigate the load transfer characteristics of two types of cemented hip replacements (Lubinus SPII and Müller-Curved) with a fibrous tissue layer. The experimental part investigated six stems of each type, where these were implanted in composite femurs with a specially selected silicone elastomer modelling the soft interfacial layer. Two fibrous tissue conditions were examined: a layer covering the full cement mantle, representing a revision condition; and a layer covering the proximal portion of the cement mantle, representing a non-revised implant with partial debonding and fibrous tissue formation. The FE method was used to model the full fibrous tissue layer condition, for both implants. The layer was modelled as a homogeneous, linearly isotropic material. A cross-comparison was performed of the experimental and FE findings. Agreement between experimental and FE models was verified to be within 15%. Varying the stiffness parameter of the FE soft tissue layer had little influence on the cortical bone strains, though had considerable effect on the cement strains. Stress shielding occurred for both stems under both fibrous tissue conditions, with the greatest reduction around the calcar. However, the cortical bone strains were generally larger than those for the equivalent well-fixed stems. The fibrous tissue layer was not found to increase the general strain pattern of the cement mantle, though localised regions of high stress were detected.

  17. Distal femoral physeal growth arrest secondary to a cemented proximal femoral endoprosthetic replacement.

    PubMed

    Gaston, C L; Tillman, R M; Grimer, R J

    2011-05-01

    We report a case of spontaneous physeal growth arrest of the distal femur in a nine-year-old child with Ewing's sarcoma of the proximal femur treated with chemotherapy and endoprosthetic replacement. Owing to the extent of disuse osteoporosis at the time of surgery, the entire intramedullary canal up to the distal femoral physis was filled with cement. Three years later, the femur remained at its pre-operative length of 19 cm. Pre-operative calculations of further growth failed to account for the growth arrest, and the initial expandable growing prosthesis inserted has been revised to a longer one in order to address the leg-length discrepancy. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of distal femoral physeal growth arrest following cemented endoprosthetic replacement of the proximal femur.

  18. Effects on cement after partial replacement with burned joss paper ash.

    PubMed

    Lin, D F; Huang, L S; Luo, H L; Weng, R S

    2012-12-01

    In the last ten years, as international environmental protection consciousness has increased, the study and applications of green building, green construction materials and energy savings as well as reduction of carbon dioxide have become urgent issues for governments. In Taiwan, joss papers are burned in more than 11,731 registered shrines or temples in traditional Chinese deity or ancestor worship ceremonies during special holidays or occasions. Instead of placing this large amount of burned joss paper ash (BJPA) in landfills, this study proposes recycling BJPA by replacing some cement with calcined BJPA (CBJPA) in mortar specimens. After BJPA samples were calcined at a high kiln temperature, mortar samples were created using CBJPA to replace cement at seven different levels: 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30%. Tests like setting time and compressive strength were performed for macro-analyses; scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis were carried out for the microstructure and chemical composition analyses. The test results showed that the compressive strengths of specimens with different levels of CBJPA replacement were apparently less than those of the control group (0% CBJPA) at all curing times. The compressive strength and setting time both decreased as the fraction of CBJPA in the mortar increased. Furthermore, because the hydration product did not cement and the mortar specimen structure was loose, the expected strength improvement from the pozzolanic reaction provided by the CBJPA was not clearly observed.

  19. Study on concrete with partial replacement of cement by rice husk ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaarthik Krishna, N.; Sandeep, S.; Mini, K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Increase in the demand of conventional construction materials and the need for providing a sustainable growth in the construction field has prompted the designers and developers to opt for ‘alternative materials’ feasible for use in construction. For this objective, the use of industrial waste products and agricultural byproducts are very constructive. These industrial wastes and agricultural by products such as Fly Ash, Rice Husk Ash, Silica Fume, and Slag can be replaced instead of cement because of their pozzolanic behavior, which otherwise requires large tract of lands for dumping. In the present investigation, Rice Husk Ash has been used as an admixture to cement in concrete and its properties has been studied. An attempt was also done to examine the strength and workability parameters of concrete. For normal concrete, mix design is done based on Indian Standard (IS) method and taking this as reference, mix design has been made for replacement of Rice Husk Ash. Four different replacement levels namely 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% are selected and studied with respect to the replacement method.

  20. The importance of acetabular component position in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daines, Brian K; Dennis, Douglas A

    2012-11-01

    Correct acetabular cup position is critical to successful total hip replacement. Unfortunately, malposition of acetabular cups is common and leads to increased rates of dislocation, wear, and ion toxicity. Despite the popularity of Lewinnek's safe zone, the exact target of acetabular abduction and version remains elusive. Differences in functional pelvic position, surgical approach, and femoral anteversion affect the optimal cup position for individual patients. Surgeons need to be aware of pelvic position changes from the supine to lateral decubitus position.

  1. Total hip replacement: A meta-analysis to evaluate survival of cemented, cementless and hybrid implants

    PubMed Central

    Phedy, Phedy; Ismail, H Dilogo; Hoo, Charles; Djaja, Yoshi P

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether cemented, cementless, or hybrid implant was superior to the other in terms of survival rate. METHODS Systematic searches across MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane that compared cemented, cementless and hybrid total hip replacement (THR) were performed. Two independent reviewers evaluated the risk ratios of revision due to any cause, aseptic loosening, infection, and dislocation rate of each implants with a pre-determined form. The risk ratios were pooled separately for clinical trials, cohorts and registers before pooled altogether using fixed-effect model. Meta-regressions were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. Funnel plots were analyzed. RESULTS Twenty-seven studies comprising 5 clinical trials, 9 cohorts, and 13 registers fulfilled the research criteria and analyzed. Compared to cementless THR, cemented THR have pooled RR of 0.47 (95%CI: 0.45-0.48), 0.9 (0.84-0.95), 1.29 (1.06-1.57) and 0.69 (0.6-0.79) for revision due to any reason, revision due to aseptic loosening, revision due to infection, and dislocation respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, the pooled RRs of cemented THR were 0.82 (0.76-0.89), 2.65 (1.14-6.17), 0.98 (0.7-1.38), and 0.67 (0.57-0.79) respectively. Compared to hybrid THR, cementless THR had RRs of 0.7 (0.65-0.75), 0.85 (0.49-1.5), 1.47 (0.93-2.34) and 1.13 (0.98-1.3). CONCLUSION Despite the limitations in this study, there was some tendency that cemented fixation was still superior than other types of fixation in terms of implant survival. PMID:28251071

  2. Effects of cement creep on stem subsidence and stresses in the cement mantle of a total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; McKellop, H

    1997-02-01

    In cemented total hip prostheses, the role of creep of the acrylic cement (polymethyl methacrylate, [PMMA]) in increasing or decreasing the chance of failure of the cement mantle is a subject of ongoing controversy. In the present study we used a three-dimensional finite-element model of a cemented stem to assess the influence of cement creep on subsidence of the stem, and on the stress and strain in the cement under cyclic load, both in the short and long term. The cement layer was assigned the shear and bulk creep moduli of Zimmer regular PMMA cement, which were obtained experimentally. The stem-cement interface was modeled either as (1) completely bonded, (2) completely debonded with friction, or (3) completely debonded and frictionless. Under the cyclic load some cement creep occurred with all three bonding conditions, allowing additional subsidence of the stem and a decrease in the stress components within the cement. During the unloaded period the full recovery of the preload conditions could be reached with the completely bonded and with the frictionless interfaces. With the frictional interface there was residual cement creep, residual stresses within the cement, and residual subsidence of the stem during the unloaded period; however, the reduction of the stress was at most 13% and the subsidence was about 0.46 mm. The much larger subsidence of debonded stems that is often observed clinically might be attributed to the factors which were not included in the present model, such as circumferential bone remodeling.

  3. Comparison of flanged and unflanged acetabular cup design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Adequate depth of cement penetration and cement mantle thickness is important for the durability of cemented cups. A flanged cup, as opposed to unflanged, has been suggested to give a more uniform cement mantle and superior cement pressurization, thus improving the depth of cement penetration. This hypothesis was tested experimentally. Materials and methods The same cup design with and without flange (both without cement spacers) was investigated regarding intraacetabular pressure, cement mantle thickness, and depth of cement penetration. With machine control, the cups were inserted into open-pore ceramic acetabular models (10 flanged, 10 unflanged) and into paired cadaver acetabuli (10 flanged, 10 unflanged) with prior pressurization of the cement. Results No differences in intraacetabular pressures during cup insertion were found, but unflanged cups tended to migrate more towards the acetabular pole. Flanged cups resulted in thicker cement mantles because of less bottoming out, whereas no differences in cement penetration into the bone were observed. Interpretation Flanged cups do not generate higher cementation pressure or better cement penetration than unflanged cups. A possible advantage of the flange, however, may be to protect the cup from bottoming out, and there is possibly better closure of the periphery around the cup, sealing off the cement-bone interface. PMID:20860522

  4. Pulmonary cement embolism in a child following total elbow replacement for primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Subramaniam; Vora, Tushar; Gulia, Ashish; Mahajan, Abhishek; Desai, Subhash

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary bone cement embolism (PCE) is an uncommon event occurring after implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in orthopaedic surgeries involving adult patients, more so in the elderly. Its incidence in the paediatric population is extremely rare. We herein describe a case of PCE in a 15-year-old girl, 9 days after she underwent total elbow replacement with PMMA placement for a primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) of the distal humerus. This report describes the occurrence of a common post-operative complication of bone cement embolism in an uncommon scenario of total elbow replacement for a bone tumour in a child, which masqueraded initially as acute pneumonitis.

  5. Backside nonconformity and locking restraints affect liner/shell load transfer mechanisms and relative motion in modular acetabular components for total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, S M; Ochoa, J A; White, C V; Srivastav, S; Cournoyer, J

    1998-05-01

    Nonconformity between the polyethylene liner and the metal shell may exist in modular acetabular components by design, due to manufacturing tolerances, or from locking mechanisms that attach the polyethylene liner to the metal shell. Relative motion at the liner/shell interface has been associated with backside wear, which may contribute to osteolysis which has been clinically observed near screw holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nonconformity and locking restraints on the liner/shell relative motion and load transfer mechanisms in a commercially available, metal-backed acetabular component with a polar fenestration. The finite element method was used to explore the hypothesis that backside nonconformity and locking restraints play important roles in long-term surface damage mechanisms that are unique to modular components, such as backside wear and liner extrusion through screw holes. The three-body quasi-static contact problem was solved using a commercially available explicit finite element code, which modeled contact between the femoral head, polyethylene liner, and the metal shell. Four sets of liner boundary conditions were investigated: no restraints, rim restraints, equatorial restraints, and both rim and equatorial restraints. The finite element model with a conforming shell predicted between 8.5 and 12.8 microm of incremental extrusion of the polyethylene through the polar fenestration, consistent with in vitro experiments of the same design under identical loading conditions. Furthermore, idealized rim and/or equatorial liner restraints were found to share up to 71% of the load across the liner/shell interface. Consequently, the results of this study demonstrate that backside nonconformity and locking restraints substantially influence backside relative motion as well as load transfer at the liner/shell interface.

  6. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  7. Studies on Punching Shear Resistance of Two Way Slab Specimens with Partial Replacement of Cement by GGBS with Different Edge Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemani, Ravi Dakshina Murthy; Rao, M. V. S.; Grandhe, Veera Venkata Satya Naranyana

    2016-09-01

    The present work is an effort to quantify the punching shear load resistance effect on two way simply supported slab specimens with replacement of cement by Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag (GGBS) with different edge conditions at various replacement levels and evaluate its efficiency. GGBS replacement has emerged as a major alternative to conventional concrete and has rapidly drawn the concrete industry attention due to its cement savings, cost savings, environmental and socio-economic benefits. The two way slab specimens were subjected to punching shear load by in house fabricated apparatus. The slab specimens were cast using M30 grade concrete with HYSD bars. The cement was partially replaced with GGBS at different percentages i.e., 0 to 30 % at regular intervals of 10 %. The test results indicate that the two way slab specimens with partial replacement of cement by GGBS exhibit high resistance against punching shear when compared with conventional concretes slab specimens.

  8. Functional interface micromechanics of 11 en-bloc retrieved cemented femoral hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark A; Verdonschot, Nico; Izant, Timothy H; Race, Amos

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Despite the longstanding use of micromotion as a measure of implant stability, direct measurement of the micromechanics of implant/bone interfaces from en bloc human retrievals has not been performed. The purpose of this study was to determine the stem-cement and cement-bone micromechanics of functionally loaded, en-bloc retrieved, cemented femoral hip components. Methods 11 fresh frozen proximal femurs with cemented implants were retrieved at autopsy. Specimens were sectioned transversely into 10-mm slabs and fixed to a loading device where functional torsional loads were applied to the stem. A digital image correlation technique was used to document micromotions at stem-cement and cement-bone interfaces during loading. Results There was a wide range of responses with stem-cement micromotions ranging from 0.0006 mm to 0.83 mm (mean 0.17 mm, SD 0.29) and cement-bone micromotions ranging from 0.0022 mm to 0.73 mm (mean 0.092 mm, SD 0.22). There was a strong (linear-log) inverse correlation between apposition fraction and micromotion at the stem-cement interface (r2 = 0.71, p < 0.001). There was a strong inverse log-log correlation between apposition fraction at the cement-bone interface and micromotion (r2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Components that were radiographically well-fixed had a relatively narrow range of micromotions at the stem-cement (0.0006–0.057 mm) and cement-bone (0.0022–0.029 mm) interfaces. Interpretatation Minimizing gaps at the stem-cement interface and encouraging bony apposition at the cement-bone interface would be clinically desirable. The cement-bone interface does not act as a bonded interface in actual use, even in radiographically well-fixed components. Rather, the interface is quite compliant, with sliding and opening motions between the cement and bone surfaces. PMID:20367421

  9. A tribological study of UHMWPE acetabular cups and polyurethane compliant layer acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Ash, H E; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    , was found with cement fixation (0.30 mm penetration with cement fixation, 0.44 mm with polyethylene holder mounting, and 0.52 mm with metal shell mounting). A 4. 25-million-cycle wear test was then conducted on a further five ABG flared form, polyurethane acetabular cups with cement fixation. Five ABG standard form, UHMWPE acetabular cups were also wear-tested to 5. 0-million cycles. The mean and standard error of the wear rate for the polyurethane cups were 14.1 +/- 4.3 mg/10(6) (12.0 +/- 3.6 mm(3)/10(6)), cycles compared with 44.8 +/- 3.4 mg/10(6) (48.2 +/- 3. 7 mm(3)/10(6)), cycles for the UHMWPE cups. This study showed that the novel polyurethane-compliant layer acetabular cup with cement fixation was tribologically superior to the ABG standard form UHMWPE design currently being used clinically.

  10. Investigation of Cement-Replacement Materials. Report 15. Temperature Rise of Mass Concrete Mixtures,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    mixtures containing large amounts of pozzolan and small amounts of portland cement were reported and discussed in Report 13 of this series. The effects of... portland cement were also investigated and the results are presented in the present report. Temperature rise was not significantly affected by the use

  11. Experimental Evaluation of Cement Replacement Fillers on the Performance of Slurry Seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Mansour; Alrezaei, Hossein Ali; Naji Almasi, Soroush

    2016-10-01

    Reducing the level of roads service is a process that starts from the first day of the operation of road and the slope of deterioration curve of road sustainability becomes faster with the passage of time. After building the road, adopting an economic approach in order to maintain the road is very important. Slurry seal as one type of protective asphalts that works by sealing inactive cracks of the road and increasing skid resistance is the most effective types of restoration with environmentally friendly behaviour. Fillers are responsible for adjusting set time in slurry seal. Cement is the most common filler used in slurry seal. Cements having suitable properties as a filler, has a very energy demanding manufacturing process and a notable amount of energy is used for manufacturing cement in the country annually. On the other hand, manufacturing process and application of cement have increased levels of pollutant gases, followed by significant environmental pollution. So in this study other options as a filler such as hydrated lime, stone powder and the slag from iron melting furnace were compared with two common types of cement (Portland and type-v cement) in the mixtures of slurry seal by wet abrasion and cohesion tests. Results indicated that, in both tests, lime and slag fillers had behaviours close to the cement filler.

  12. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    Periprosthetic bone remodeling is frequently observed after total hip replacement. Reduced bone density increases the implant and bone fracture risk, and a gross loss of bone density challenges fixation in subsequent revision surgery. Computational approaches allow bone remodeling to be predicted in agreement with the general clinical observations of proximal resorption and distal hypertrophy. However, these models do not reproduce other clinically observed bone density trends, including faster stabilizing mid-stem density losses, and loss-recovery trends around the distal stem. These may resemble trends in postoperative joint loading and activity, during recovery and rehabilitation, but the established remodeling prediction approach is often used with identical pre- and postoperative load and activity assumptions. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of pre- to postoperative changes in activity and loading upon the predicted progression of remodeling. A strain-adaptive finite element model of a femur implanted with a cemented Charnley stem was generated, to predict 60 months of periprosthetic remodeling. A control set of model input data assumed identical pre- and postoperative loading and activity, and was compared to the results obtained from another set of inputs with three varying activity and load profiles. These represented activity changes during rehabilitation for weak, intermediate and strong recoveries, and pre- to postoperative joint force changes due to hip center translation and the use of walking aids. Predicted temporal bone density change trends were analyzed, and absolute bone density changes and the time to homeostasis were inspected, alongside virtual X-rays. The predicted periprosthetic bone density changes obtained using modified loading inputs demonstrated closer agreement with clinical measurements than the control. The modified inputs also predicted the clinically observed temporal density change trends, but still under

  13. Outcome of total knee replacement following explantation and cemented spacer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Zajonz, Dirk; Bollmann, Juliane; Geissler, Vanessa; Prietzel, Torsten; Moche, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Heyde, Christoph-E.; Josten, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infection after total knee replacement (TKR) is one of the serious complications which must be pursued with a very effective therapeutic concept. In most cases this means revision arthroplasty, in which one-setting and two-setting procedures are distinguished. Healing of infection is the conditio sine qua non for re-implantation. This retrospective work presents an assessment of the success rate after a two-setting revision arthroplasty of the knee following periprosthetic infection. It further considers drawing conclusions concerning the optimal timing of re-implantation. Patients and methods: A total of 34 patients have been enclosed in this study from September 2005 to December 2013. 35 re-implantations were carried out following explantation of total knee and implantation of cemented spacer. The patient’s group comprised of 53% (18) males and 47% (16) females. The average age at re-implantation time was 72.2 years (ranging from 54 to 85 years). We particularly evaluated the microbial spectrum, the interval between explantation and re-implantation, the number of surgeries that were necessary prior to re-implantation as well as the postoperative course. Results: We reported 31.4% (11) reinfections following re-implantation surgeries. The number of the reinfections declined with increasing time interval between explantation and re-implantation. Patients who developed reinfections were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 4.47 months. Those patients with uncomplicated course were operated on (re-implantation) after an average of 6.79 months. Nevertheless, we noticed no essential differences in outcome with regard to the number of surgeries carried out prior to re-implantation. Mobile spacers proved better outcome than temporary arthrodesis with intramedullary fixation. Conclusion: No uniform strategy of treatment exists after peri-prosthetic infections. In particular, no optimal timing can be stated concerning re-implantation. Our data

  14. Effect of Copolymer Latexes on Physicomechanical Properties of Mortar Containing High Volume Fly Ash as a Replacement Material of Cement

    PubMed Central

    Kozhamzharova, Latipa; Gulzhakhan, Yeligbayeva; Bekbayeva, Lyazzat; Williams, Craig

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the physicomechanical properties of mortar containing high volume of fly ash (FA) as partial replacement of cement in presence of copolymer latexes. Portland cement (PC) was partially replaced with 0, 10, 20, 30 50, and 60% FA. Copolymer latexes were used based on 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (2-HEA) and 2-hydroxymethylacrylate (2-HEMA). Testing included workability, setting time, absorption, chemically combined water content, compressive strength, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The addition of FA to mortar as replacement of PC affected the physicomechanical properties of mortar. As the content of FA in the concrete increased, the setting times (initial and final) were elongated. The results obtained at 28 days of curing indicate that the maximum properties of mortar occur at around 30% FA. Beyond 30% FA the properties of mortar reduce and at 60% FA the properties of mortar are lower than those of the reference mortar without FA. However, the addition of polymer latexes into mortar containing FA improved most of the physicomechanical properties of mortar at all curing times. Compressive strength, combined water, and workability of mortar containing FA premixed with latexes are higher than those of mortar containing FA without latexes. PMID:25254256

  15. Cemented total hip prosthesis: Radiographic and scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aliabadi, P.; Tumeh, S.S.; Weissman, B.N.; McNeil, B.J. )

    1989-10-01

    Conventional radiographs, technetium-99m bone scans, and gallium-67 scans were reviewed in 44 patients who had undergone cemented total hip joint replacement and were imaged because of suspicion of prosthesis loosening or infection. A complete radiolucent line of 2 mm or wider along the bone-cement interface or metal-cement lucency on conventional radiographs was used as the criterion for prosthetic loosening with or without infection and proved to be 54% sensitive and 96% specific. Scintigraphic criteria for prosthetic loosening were increased focal uptake of the radiopharmaceutical for the femoral component and increased focal or diffuse uptake for the acetabular component. For bone scintigraphy, sensitivity was 73% and specificity was 96%. Combining the results of conventional radiographs and bone scans increased sensitivity to 84% and decreased specificity to 92% for the diagnosis of loosening, infection, or both. The study also showed that Ga-67 scintigraphy has a low sensitivity for the detection of infection.

  16. Cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rina; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Waddell, James P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of clinical factors on outcome after acetabular revision with a cementless beaded cup. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Tertiary care referral centre. Patients Forty-one patients who underwent acetabular revision with a cementless cup were followed up for a mean of 3.4 years. Interventions Acetabular revision with a beaded cementless cup in all patients. A morcellized allograft was used in 10 patients. Outcome measures A modified Harris hip score (range of motion measurement omitted), the SF-36 health survey, and the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis index. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effects of age, gender, morcellized allografting, time to revision from the previous operation, acetabular screw fixation and concurrent femoral revision on outcome. Results Gender accounted for a significant portion of the variation seen in the SF-36 physical component scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.02), with women tending to have worse results. Increasing age was associated with lower WOMAC index function scores (r = 0.36, p = 0.03), whereas concurrent femoral revision tended to have a positive effect on WOMAC index function (r = 0.39, p = 0.01). None of the potential clinical predictors had any significant effect on the SF-36 mental component scores, or WOMAC index pain and stiffness scores. Conclusions In cementless acetabular revision arthroplasty, physical function, as measured by generic and limb-specific scales, may be affected by gender, age and the presence of a concurrent femoral revision. Time to revision from the previous operation, morcellized allografting and screw fixation of the acetabulum did not affect outcomes. This information may provide some prognostic value for patients’ expectations. PMID:10948687

  17. More complications with uncemented than cemented femoral stems in total hip replacement for displaced femoral neck fractures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chammout, Ghazi; Muren, Olle; Laurencikas, Evaldas; Bodén, Henrik; Kelly-Pettersson, Paula; Sjöö, Helene; Stark, André; Sköldenberg, Olof

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Total hip replacement (THR) is the preferred method for the active and lucid elderly patient with a displaced femoral neck fracture (FNF). Controversy still exists regarding the use of cemented or uncemented stems in these patients. We compared the effectiveness and safety between a modern cemented, and a modern uncemented hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stem in patients 65–79 years of age who were treated with THR for displaced FNF. Patients and methods In a single-center, single-blinded randomized controlled trial, we included 69 patients, mean age 75 (65–79) and with a displaced FNF (Garden III–IV). 35 patients were randomized to a cemented THR and 34 to a reverse-hybrid THR with an uncemented stem. Primary endpoints were: prevalence of all hip-related complications and health-related quality of life, evaluated with EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) index up to 2 years after surgery. Secondary outcomes included: overall mortality, general medical complications, and hip function. The patients were followed up at 3, 12, and 24 months. Results According to the calculation of sample size, 140 patients would be required for the primary endpoints, but the study was stopped when only half of the sample size was included (n = 69). An interim analysis at that time showed that the total number of early hip-related complications was substantially higher in the uncemented group, 9 (among them, 3 dislocations and 4 periprosthetic fractures) as compared to 1 in the cemented group. The mortality and functional outcome scores were similar in the 2 groups. Interpretation We do not recommend uncemented femoral stems for the treatment of elderly patients with displaced FNFs. PMID:27967333

  18. Postoperative Development of Bone Mineral Density and Muscle Strength in the Lower Limb After Cemented and Uncemented Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Tobias; Krüger, Christine; Kasch, Cornelius; Finze, Susanne; Steens, Wolfram; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Skripitz, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background : Numerous studies have shown reduction of periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) after hip replacement. The effect on the whole limb, however, is still unexplored. This study’s objective was to analyse the postoperative development of BMD and muscle strength of the limb after total hip replacement (THR) and to determine links between these parameters. Methods : 55 patients, who underwent THR, were included. Depending on therapeutic indication, either an uncemented stem (Group A, n=30) or a cemented stem (Group B, n=25) has been implanted. In the limbs, the measurement of BMD using DEXA and the maximum isometric muscle strength, detected by a leg press, were undertaken preoperatively and after 3, 6 and 12 months. Results : A total of 12 patients (Group A: n = 6, Group B: n = 6) were excluded due to reasons which were not relevant to the study. So, the results refer to the data of 43 patients. In Group A (uncemented, n = 24), a significant decrease of BMD on the operated extremity was seen after 3, 6 and 12 months compared with preoperative values. Isometric muscle strength on the affected extremity increased significantly after 6 and 12 months. In Group B (cemented, n = 19), with a lower baseline compared to group A, an increase in BMD of the affected limb was seen postoperatively. This rise was significant after 12 months. With regard to the isometric muscle strength, a significant increase could be observed in this group after 6 and 12 months. Conclusion : Analogous to postoperative reduction of periprosthetic bone density, a decrease of the entire limb BMD on the operated leg occurred after implantation of uncemented hip stems. In contrast, an increase in BMD was recorded for cemented stems. Regardless of the type of anchoring, a substantial increase in muscular strength could be observed postoperatively in both groups. PMID:25246993

  19. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  20. Strong and tough magnesium wire reinforced phosphate cement composites for load-bearing bone replacement.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Reinhard; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Ewald, Andrea; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Groll, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are brittle biomaterials of low bending strength. One promising approach to improve their mechanical properties is reinforcement with fibers. State of the art degradable reinforced composites contain fibers made of polymers, resorbable glass or whiskers of calcium minerals. We introduce a new class of composite that is reinforced with degradable magnesium alloy wires. Bending strength and ductility of the composites increased with aspect ratio and volume content of the reinforcements up to a maximal bending strength of 139±41MPa. Hybrid reinforcement with metal and polymer fibers (PLA) further improved the qualitative fracture behavior and gave indication of enhanced strength and ductility. Immersion tests of composites in SBF for seven weeks showed high corrosion stability of ZEK100 wires and slow degradation of the magnesium calcium phosphate cement by struvite dissolution. Finally, in vitro tests with the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 demonstrate cytocompatibility of the composite materials.

  1. Calcium looping spent sorbent as a limestone replacement in the manufacture of portland and calcium sulfoaluminate cements.

    PubMed

    Telesca, Antonio; Marroccoli, Milena; Tomasulo, Michele; Valenti, Gian Lorenzo; Dieter, Heiko; Montagnaro, Fabio

    2015-06-02

    The calcium looping (CaL) spent sorbent (i) can be a suitable limestone replacement in the production of both ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement, and (ii) promotes environmental benefits in terms of reduced CO2 emission, increased energy saving and larger utilization of industrial byproducts. A sample of CaL spent sorbent, purged from a 200 kWth pilot facility, was tested as a raw material for the synthesis of two series of OPC and CSA clinkers, obtained from mixes heated in a laboratory electric oven within temperature ranges 1350°-1500 °C and 1200°-1350 °C, respectively. As OPC clinker-generating mixtures, six clay-containing binary blends were investigated, three with limestone (reference mixes) and three with the CaL spent sorbent. All of them showed similar burnability indexes. Moreover, three CSA clinker-generating blends (termed RM, MA and MB) were explored. They included, in the order: (I) limestone, bauxite and gypsum (reference mix); (II) CaL spent sorbent, bauxite and gypsum; (III) CaL spent sorbent plus anodization mud and a mixture of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly and bottom ashes. The maximum conversion toward 4CaO·3Al2O3·SO3, the chief CSA clinker component, was the largest for MB and almost the same for RM and MA.

  2. A novel method to assess primary stability of press-fit acetabular cups.

    PubMed

    Crosnier, Emilie A; Keogh, Patrick S; Miles, Anthony W

    2014-11-01

    Initial stability is an essential prerequisite to achieve osseointegration of press-fit acetabular cups in total hip replacements. Most in vitro methods that assess cup stability do not reproduce physiological loading conditions and use simplified acetabular models with a spherical cavity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bone density and acetabular geometry on cup stability using a novel method for measuring acetabular cup micromotion. A press-fit cup was inserted into Sawbones(®) foam blocks having different densities to simulate normal and osteoporotic bone variations and different acetabular geometries. The stability of the cup was assessed in two ways: (a) measurement of micromotion of the cup in 6 degrees of freedom under physiological loading and (b) uniaxial push-out tests. The results indicate that changes in bone substrate density and acetabular geometry affect the stability of press-fit acetabular cups. They also suggest that cups implanted into weaker, for example, osteoporotic, bone are subjected to higher levels of micromotion and are therefore more prone to loosening. The decrease in stability of the cup in the physiological model suggests that using simplified spherical cavities to model the acetabulum over-estimates the initial stability of press-fit cups. This novel testing method should provide the basis for a more representative protocol for future pre-clinical evaluation of new acetabular cup designs.

  3. Bonded Fly Ash: A Low-Energy Replacement for Portland Cement Concrete to Improve Resistance to Chem-Bio Intrusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    The paper discusses the background of cementitious materials, and generally compares natural (Pozzolanic) cement to manufactured ( Portland ) cement . Fly...ash is discussed as a common Pozzolan, and in particular, the low-energy requirement for fly ash as compared to Portland cement . Also...photomicrographs of fly ash particles and of chemically bonded fly ash are compared to a photomicrograph of Portland cement particles and a photograph of Portland

  4. Partial replacement of fossil fuel in a cement plant: risk assessment for the population living in the neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Joaquim; Mari, Montse; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2010-10-15

    In cement plants, the substitution of traditional fossil fuels not only allows a reduction of CO(2), but it also means to check-out residual materials, such as sewage sludge or municipal solid wastes (MSW), which should otherwise be disposed somehow/somewhere. In recent months, a cement plant placed in Alcanar (Catalonia, Spain) has been conducting tests to replace fossil fuel by refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW. In July 2009, an operational test was progressively initiated by reaching a maximum of partial substitution of 20% of the required energy. In order to study the influence of the new process, environmental monitoring surveys were performed before and after the RDF implementation. Metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were analyzed in soil, herbage, and air samples collected around the facility. In soils, significant decreases of PCDD/F levels, as well as in some metal concentrations were found, while no significant increases in the concentrations of these pollutants were observed. In turn, PM(10) levels remained constant, with a value of 16μgm(-3). In both surveys, the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks derived from exposure to metals and PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of the facility were within the ranges considered as acceptable according to national and international standards. This means that RDF may be a successful choice in front of classical fossil fuels, being in accordance with the new EU environmental policies, which entail the reduction of CO(2) emissions and the energetic valorization of MSW. However, further long-term environmental studies are necessary to corroborate the harmlessness of RDF, in terms of human health risks.

  5. Symposium on Surface Replacement Arthroplasty of the Hip. Biomechanics: mutifactorial design choices--an essential compromise?

    PubMed

    Clarke, I C

    1982-10-01

    The main flaws to be overcome in realizing the potential success of the double-cup arthroplasty procedure are failures due to femoral cup loosening, acetabular cup loosening, and femoral-neck fractures. The clinical uncertainties include the selection of a suitable patient with adequate bone stock and the technical difficulties associated with (I) reaming the acetabulum adequately, (2) reaming down onto the neck without violating it, and (3) anchoring the components securely by interdigitation of acrylic cement. The higher frictional torques of the double-cup arthroplasty designs are not a clinical loosening issue--the resulting acetabular cement-bone shear stresses are very low. Computer models of both the femoral and acetabular components predict significant stress shielding of the cancellous bone under metal femoral shells. At the rim of the femoral cup, the stresses are increased by a factor of 3 owing to the stress concentration effect and can rise to a factor of 10 if cystic or osteoporotic changes are present. This finding if confirmed in the three-dimensional models may explain some of the femoral neck fractures. The thin polyethylene acetabular cups may also cause a stress concentration effect on the underlying cement and bone. This may explain the higher incidence of radiographic loosening around the acetabulum in double-cup arthroplasty designs compared with total hip replacements. Metal-backed sockets may reduce cancellous bone stresses and appear advantageous. There is no clinical evidence of unusual wear or wear-related problems. However, new material formulations are now either in use or being planned for the double-cup arthroplasty designs. As yet, there have been no published data on hip simulator wear for the efficacy of any of the current or proposed changes. Biologic fixation appears to be the theme for the 1980s. However, the combination of technology, design instrumentation, and patient selection will be critical in achieving success with this

  6. Current attitudes to total hip replacement in the younger patient: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Tennent, T D; Goddard, N J

    2000-01-01

    A postal questionnaire was sent to all practicing consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK seeking information regarding their usual total hip replacement practice, the age at which they would define a patient as falling into the 'young hip group' and whether this might modify their practice. In particular, in the 'younger' age group, we were interested in the frequency of usage of uncemented implants, the choice of implant and the bearing surfaces. Of 1242 surgeons surveyed, we had a response from 935 who currently undertake total hip arthroplasty. Their responses confirm that approximately 60,645 total hip replacements are performed annually in the UK of which 9,376 are performed in the younger age group (mean age 57.5 years). As with our previous survey, the most popular prosthesis in the 'older' age group overall was the Charnley (51%) followed by the Exeter (15%). These implants also proved to be the most popular in the 'younger' age group (40% Charnley, 18% Exeter), with 75% of surgeons choosing a cemented stem, and 65% also opting to cement the socket. 23% of surgeons used hydroxy-apatite coated implants on both the femoral and acetabular sides of the joint. Stainless steel remained the most popular choice of femoral head bearing surface (42%) followed by chrome-cobalt (33%) and ceramic (25%). On the acetabular side, high density polyethylene predominated--accounting for 95%, with only 3% using chrome cobalt and 2% ceramic. There would appear to be a remarkably conservative attitude among British surgeons, the majority of whom prefer to stick with tried and tested cemented femoral implants when dealing with the younger patient. There are a small number of uncemented acetabulae and the hybrid configuration. Hydroxy-apatite coatings seem to be the most popular choice for the non-cemented prostheses. Ceramic femoral heads are used more frequently than the ceramic acetabular bearing, and equally metal/metal bearings remain infrequently used.

  7. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening - technical note.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation.

  8. Evolution and future of surface replacement of the hip.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, H C; Grigoris, P; Dorey, F J

    1998-01-01

    Surface replacement is a bone-conserving alternative to total hip arthroplasty and is a significant development in the evolution of hip arthroplasty. Surface replacement with polyethylene bearings was largely abandoned, primarily because of component aseptic loosening caused by tissue reaction to high-volumetric polyethylene wear. For patients with osteonecrosis and collapse of the femoral head but with preservation of some acetabular articular cartilage, precision fit, hemisurface replacement of the femoral head only has emerged as the treatment of choice. The survivorship of our series of patients, performed in the 1981-84 era (average age, 32 years), has been 85% at 5 years, 67% at 10 years, and 42% at 16 years. In the absence of polyethylene, there has been no loosening. Revisions were for cartilage wear. The procedure is now much improved with instrumentation for non-trochanteric osteotomy approaches and off-the-shelf components in 1-mm increments. For arthritic hips, a new era of surface replacement has emerged. With metal-on-metal bearings, the volumetric wear has been reduced 20-100 times from those with polyethylene, and there is no penalty for the large ball size. The devices are now conservative on the acetabular as well as femoral side. Hybrid or all-cementless fixation is superior to earlier all-cemented devices. In those patients, the results with up to 4 years have been complication-free, with an absence of pain and a return to high functional levels, including participation in sports. Forty patients have received a Conserve Plus with interference fitting of the acetabular component with sintered beads to obtain fixation. Although the follow-up is short, surface replacement with the large ball size is extremely stable, and dislocation is rare.

  9. Determination of interfacial fracture toughness of bone–cement interface using sandwich Brazilian disks

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J.; Wong, K.Y.; Lupton, C.

    2007-01-01

    The long-term stability of cemented total hip replacements critically depends on the lasting integrity of the bond between bone and bone cement. Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone–cement is obtained by mechanical tests that tend to produce a large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone–cement interface has been studied using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out using polyurethane foams as substrates and a common bone cement as an interlayer. Selected loading angles from 0° to 25° were used to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Finite element analyses were carried out to obtain the solutions for strain energy release rates at given phase angles associated with the experimental models. The effects of crack length on the measured interfacial fracture toughness were examined. Microscopic studies were also carried out to obtain the morphology of the fractured interfaces at selected loading angles. The implication of the results on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements is discussed in the light of preliminary work on bovine cancellous bone–cement interface. PMID:19330043

  10. Investigation of Cement-Replacement Materials. Report 10. Use of Large Amounts of Possolans in Lean Mass Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    proportioned with crushed limestone aggregate graded up to 6 in. Five mixtures contained no pozzolan and from 189 to 312 lb of portland cement per cubic...yard. Thirty-three mixtures contained one bag (94 lb) of portland cement per cubic yard with various amounts of one of four pozzolanic materials. A...greater weight of pozzolan than of portland cement was used in 24 of the 33 mixtures. Many of the mixtures appeared to develop ample strength and

  11. Stresses in cement mantles of hip replacements: effect of femoral implant sizes, body mass index and bone quality.

    PubMed

    Lamvohee, J-M S; Mootanah, R; Ingle, P; Cheah, K; Dowell, J K

    2009-10-01

    The effects of femoral prosthetic heads of diameters 22 and 28 mm were investigated on the stability of reconstructed hemi-pelves with cement mantles of thicknesses 1-4 mm and different bone qualities. Materialise medical imaging package and I-Deas finite element (FE) software were used to create accurate geometry of a hemi-pelvis from CT-scan images. Our FE results show an increase in cement mantle stresses associated with the larger femoral head. When a 22 mm femoral head is used on acetabulae of diameters 56 mm and above, the probability of survivorship can be increased by creating a cement mantle of at least 1 mm thick. However, when a 28 mm femoral head is used, a cement mantle thickness of at least 4 mm is needed. Poor bone quality resulted in an average 45% increase in the tensile stresses of the cement mantles, indicating resulting poor survivorship rate.

  12. Cavitary acetabular defects treated with morselized cancellous bone graft and cementless cups

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, G. C.T.; Kubiak, E. N.; Levine, B.; Chen, F. S.

    2006-01-01

    The use of impacted morselized cancellous bone grafts in conjunction with cementless hemispherical acetabular cups for treatment of AAOS type II acetabular cavitary deficiencies was evaluated in a retrospective study of 23 primary and 24 revision total hip arthroplasties, at a mean follow-up of 7.9 and 8.1 years, respectively. All primary hips received autografts, while all revision hips received allografts. Modified Harris Hip Scores for primary and revision hip replacements increased from a pre-operative mean of 37 and 47 to a postoperative mean of 90 and 86, respectively. All 23 autografts and 23 out of 24 cancellous allografts were radiographically incorporated without evidence of resorption. There were no instances of infection, component migration, or cases requiring subsequent acetabular revision. We conclude that impacted morselized cancellous bone-graft augmentation of cementless cups is a viable surgical option for AAOS type II cavitary acetabular defects. PMID:16988799

  13. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... cemented and uncemented prostheses are comparable. However, more long-term data are available in the United States for hip replacements with cemented prostheses, because doctors have been using them ... period. Because it takes a long time for the natural bone to grow and ...

  14. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Ae; Abo-Mosallam, Hany; Lee, Hye-Young; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved.Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements.Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitrorat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC.Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs.Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials.

  15. Biological and mechanical properties of an experimental glass-ionomer cement modified by partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO

    PubMed Central

    Dong-Ae, KIM; Hany, ABO-MOSALLAM; Hye-Young, LEE; Jung-Hwan, LEE; Hae-Won, KIM; Hae-Hyoung, LEE

    2015-01-01

    Some weaknesses of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) as dental materials, for instance the lack of bioactive potential and poor mechanical properties, remain unsolved. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the partial replacement of CaO with MgO or ZnO on the mechanical and biological properties of the experimental glass ionomer cements. Material and Methods Calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass was prepared for an experimental glass ionomer cement by melt quenching technique. The glass composition was modified by partial replacement (10 mol%) of CaO with MgO or ZnO. Net setting time, compressive and flexural properties, and in vitro rat dental pulp stem cells (rDPSCs) viability were examined for the prepared GICs and compared to a commercial GIC. Results The experimental GICs set more slowly than the commercial product, but their extended setting times are still within the maximum limit (8 min) specified in ISO 9917-1. Compressive strength of the experimental GIC was not increased by the partial substitution of CaO with either MgO or ZnO, but was comparable to the commercial control. For flexural properties, although there was no significance between the base and the modified glass, all prepared GICs marked a statistically higher flexural strength (p<0.05) and comparable modulus to control. The modified cements showed increased cell viability for rDPSCs. Conclusions The experimental GICs modified with MgO or ZnO can be considered bioactive dental materials. PMID:26398508

  16. [Intrafemoral pressure measurement in different cement removal procedures during hip prosthesis replacement operations--experimental study with cadaver femora].

    PubMed

    Porsch, M; Schmidt, J; Brimmers, P; Menne, A; Merkle, W

    1998-03-01

    During primary hip arthroplasty an increase in intramedullary pressure (IMP) of up to 1000 mm Hg can be observed. As a result of this increased intrafemoral pressure, intramedullary constituents can pass into the venous circulation creating a risk of fat embolism syndrome (FES). In the present experimental study on 9 femora obtained from human corpses, we investigated the question as to whether various methods of cement removal during total hip revision arthroplasty are also associated with increased intramedullary pressure and a risk of FES. The IMP was recorded with a standardized experimental set-up during removal of cement from the proximal and distal regions, including removal of the cement "tip" and the intramedullary plug. The methods employed for this purpose included the osteotome and mallet, a compressed air powered chisel, and a modified intracorporal lithotripter. All the methods induced fluctuations in the IMP the highest values being recorded for the conventional method using the osteotome and mallet (45 mm Hg) and the lowest values for the intracorporeal lithotripter (7.5 mm Hg). Working on the distal cement caused higher fluctuations in comparison with the proximal region. The study failed to reveal any increase in mean IMP, and all measured values were in the low pressure range (considerably below 150 mm Hg). While there seems to be no apparent risk of an FES developing during removal of cement, careless manipulation of the distal cement plug may result in higher intrafemoral pressures--above 150 mm Hg--thus increasing the risk of a fat embolism syndrome.

  17. Total arthroplasty in displaced dysplastic hips with acetabular reconstruction and femoral shortening – technical note☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paulo; de Oliveira, Leandro Alves; Coelho, Danilo Lopes; do Amaral, Rogério Andrade; Rebello, Percival Rosa; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new procedure of total hip replacement in patient with severe developmental dysplasia of the left hip, using technique of acetabular reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts and subtrochanteric shortening femoral osteotomy. Total hip replacement done in January of 2003. The Eftekhar's classification was used and included type D, neglected dislocations. Bone graft incorporated in acetabular shelf and femoral osteotomy. Our contribution is the use of an Allis plate to better fix acetabular grafts, avoiding loosening, and cerclage around bone graft in femoral osteotomy site, which diminish pseudoarthrosis risk. This technique shows efficiency, allowing immediately resolution for this case with pain and range of motion of hip improvement. It also allows the acetabular dysplasia reconstruction, equalization of the limb length (without elevated risk of neurovascular lesion) and repairs the normal hip biomechanics due to the correction of the hip's center of rotation. PMID:26229775

  18. A biocompatible and bioactive replacement for dentine: is this a reality? The properties and uses of a novel calcium-based cement.

    PubMed

    Bachoo, I K; Seymour, D; Brunton, P

    2013-01-01

    As part of the continuing evolution towards conservative dentistry there has been a drive to push further and investigate the possibility of inducing the repair and regeneration of lost dental hard tissue. Until recently, the prospect of repair and regeneration had been confined to laboratory studies and hypothesised scientific models. In 2009, a new product was launched claiming to be a revolutionary material capable of offering a bioactive and biocompatible replacement for dentine. The calcium-based cement is reported to preserve pulp vitality, promote pulp healing and provide a natural substitute for dentine through bioactive stimulation of the dentino-pulpal complex. Its clinical indications are extensive, described as a restorative material suitable for use wherever dentine replacement is required. In this article the physical, mechanical, chemical and biological properties of this novel material are presented, together with the results of experimental laboratory-based investigations and on-going clinical in vivo investigations.

  19. [Aseptic, simultaneous and bilateral mobilisation due to an acetabular shell fracture in a 43 year-old patient].

    PubMed

    Ceretti, M; Fanelli, M; Pappalardo, S

    2014-01-01

    The acetabular shell mobilization is the main long-term complication in total hip replacement. Metal-back fracture has also to be considered among the possible causes of shell mobilization. A case is presented of bilateral acetabular shell mobilization due to the trabecular covering de-soldering from the metal-back in a 43 year-old patient, 13-14 years after the first surgery.

  20. Improving the accuracy of acetabular cup implantation using a bulls-eye spirit level.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Duncan; Gupta, Sanjay; Ohly, Nicholas E; Patil, Sanjeev; Meek, R; Mohammed, Aslam

    2011-01-01

    Acetabular introducers have a built-in inclination of 45 degrees to the handle shaft. With patients in the lateral position, surgeons aim to align the introducer shaft vertical to the floor to implant the acetabulum at 45 degrees. We aimed to determine if a bulls-eye spirit level attached to an introducer improved the accuracy of implantation. A small circular bulls-eye spirit level was attached to the handle of an acetabular introducer. A saw bone hemipelvis was fixed to a horizontal, flat surface. A cement substitute was placed in the acetabulum and subjects were asked to implant a polyethylene cup, aiming to obtain an angle of inclination of 45 degrees. Two attempts were made with the spirit level masked and two with it unmasked. The distance of the air bubble from the spirit level's center was recorded by a single assessor. The angle of inclination of the acetabular component was then calculated. Subjects included both orthopedic consultants and trainees. Twenty-five subjects completed the study. Accuracy of acetabular implantation when using the unmasked spirit level improved significantly in all grades of surgeon. With the spirit level masked, 12 out of 50 attempts were accurate at 45 degrees inclination; 11 out of 50 attempts were "open," with greater than 45 degrees of inclination, and 27 were "closed," with less than 45 degrees. With the spirit level visible, all subjects achieved an inclination angle of exactly 45 degrees. A simple device attached to the handle of an acetabular introducer can significantly improve the accuracy of implantation of a cemented cup into a saw bone pelvis in the lateral position.

  1. Fly and bottom ashes from biomass combustion as cement replacing components in mortars production: rheological behaviour of the pastes and materials compression strength.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Stefano; Tonello, Gabriele; Piani, Luciano; Furlani, Erika

    2011-10-01

    In the present research mortar pastes obtained by replacing a commercial cement with the equivalent mass of 5, 10, 20 and 30 wt.% of fly ash or bottom ash from fir chips combustion, were prepared and rheologically characterized. It was observed that the presence of ash modifies their rheological behaviour with respect to the reference blend due to the presence, in the ashes, of KCl and K2SO4 which cause precipitation of gypsum and portlandite during the first hydration stages of the pastes. Hydrated materials containing 5 wt.% of ash display compression strength and absorption at 28 d of same magnitude as the reference composition; conversely, progressive increase of ash cause a continuous decline of materials performances. Conversely, samples tested after 180 d display a marked decline of compression strength, as a consequence of potassium elution and consequent alkali-silica reaction against materials under curing.

  2. Quantification of clearance and creep in acetabular wear measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Thomas; Vandenbussche, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to measure femoral head penetration before occurrence of real wear, and to quantify the portions attributable respectively to clearance and plastic deformations in various acetabular designs. Methods We analyzed CT scans from 15 patients at ‘day five’ after total hip arthroplasty (THA). All patients received Exafit® femoral stems and 28 mm heads: 5 patients had cemented Durasul® all-PE cups, 5 patients had un-cemented Allofit® metal-backed cups, and 5 patients had un-cemented Stafit® dual-mobility cups. We also analyzed CT scans of samples of the three head-cup combinations to compare in vivo and in vitro measurements. Results The mean femoral head penetration measured on ‘day five’ was lower for all-PE cups (0.196 mm) than for metal-backed cups (0.551 mm) and dual-mobility cups (0.634 mm). Conclusions The present study indicates that isolated measurements of femoral head penetration include 0.15–0.46 mm of radial clearance and 0.05–0.27 mm of creep, and confirms that the majority of so-called bedding-in observed in the first post-operative months is not entirely due to wear. PMID:27162781

  3. Optimization of acetabular component orientation using DOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krepelka, Mircea; Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela

    2012-09-01

    Stress shielding is increasingly recognized as an important cause of acetabular component failure. Several studies have been focused on improving the acetabular component placement to reduce the risk of dislocation, impingement and range of motion but little is known of its influence on implant-bone interface pressures. This study employs experimental design, 3D reconstruction and FE simulation to identify the most significant factors for acetabular component behavior and predict the best configuration of acetabular spatial orientation angles within the constraints of the Lewinnek's safe zone in order to minimize peak contact pressures. Data analysis by response surface method revealed that the magnitude of periacetabular pressures was significantly reduced by the anteversion angle at its lowest value as well as the abduction angle located at the central point value, which corresponded to a 40° abduction and 5° anteversion of cup orientation.

  4. [Cemented total knee replacement: comparative study between the use or not of tourniquet on the inmediate results].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, J A; Sierra-Pérez, M; García-Velazco, R A; Salas-Mora, C A; Cisneros-González, V M

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of immediate postoperative results of patients undergoing cemented total knee arthroplasty with and without ischemia. Observational, cross-sectional, retrospective, analytical, single-center study that included 180 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty from 2011 to 2014: 120 without ischemia, 60 with ischemia. Mean age was 70 years with SD ± 7. Criteria to assess the immediate postoperative results include intraoperative bleeding, hemoglobin differential and pain. Exclusion criteria comprised patients being treated at a pain clinic, those on anticoagulants, with a history of bleeding disorders, psychiatric conditions, kidney failure or those intolerant to NSAIDs. In total knee arthroplasty without ischemia there is better pain control (p = 0.026). The hemoglobin differential and intraoperative bleeding were less with ischemia (p = 0.008). 32.8% of patients required blood transfusion, but no statistically significant relationship was established with the use or non-use of ischemia (p = 0.301). The most commonly reported pain was within a VAS of 0-3; 62.2% of cases reported mild pain. Mean hemoglobin differential was 3.7 with SD ± 1.3 with a range from 0 to 7.4. Patients in whom no ischemia was used during the surgical procedure experienced less pain. There was less bleeding and hemoglobin differential with the use of ischemia. However, this did not result in a statistically significant difference in the need for blood transfusion. The use of ischemia with caution and according to the surgeons preference is recommended.

  5. Importance of maintaining the basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome during acetabular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Pei, Fuxing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Li, Zongming

    2016-01-01

    The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome is important for the maintenance of implant stability in press-fit acetabular reconstruction of total hip arthroplasty. However, information on the basic stress pathway and its impact factors remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the orientations and positions of the acetabular component on the basic stress pathway. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was defined as two parts: 3D basic trabecular bone stress distribution and quantified basic cortical bone stress level, using two subject-specific finite element normal hip models. The effects were then analysed by generating 32 reconstructed acetabular cases with different cup abduction and anteversion angles within a range of 35-50° and 10-25°, respectively, and 12 cases with different hip centre heights within a range of 0-15 mm above the acetabular dome. The 3D trabecular stress distribution decreased remarkably in all cases, while the 80% of the basic cortical bone stress level was maintained in cases when the acetabular component was positioned at 10° or 15° anteversion and 40° or 45° abduction angles. The basic stress pathway above the acetabular dome was disturbed when the superior displacement of the hip centre exceeded 5 mm above the anatomical hip centre. Positioning the acetabular component correctly contributes to maintain the stress balance between the acetabular cup and the bone during acetabular reconstruction, thus helping restore the normal hip biomechanics and preserve the stability of the implants.

  6. Outcome of porous tantalum acetabular components for Paprosky type 3 and 4 acetabular defects.

    PubMed

    Batuyong, Eldridge D; Brock, Hugh S; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Maloney, William J; Goodman, Stuart B; Huddleston, James I

    2014-06-01

    Porous tantalum acetabular implants provide a potential solution for dealing with significant acetabular bone loss. This study reviews 24 acetabular revisions using tantalum implants for Paprosky type 3 and 4 defects. The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 35 ± 19 (range, 4-71) to 88 ± 14 (range, 41-100), p < 0.0001. Postoperative radiographs showed radiolucent lines in 14 hips with a mean width of 1.3 ± 1.0 mm (range, 0.27-4.37 mm). No gaps enlarged and 71% of them disappeared at a mean of 13 ± 10 months (range, 3-29 months). At a mean follow-up of 37 ± 14 months (range, 24-66 months), 22 reconstructions showed radiograpic evidence of osseointegration (92%). The two failures were secondary to septic loosening. When dealing with severe acetabular bone loss, porous tantalum acetabular components show promising short-term results.

  7. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  8. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J

    2008-01-01

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula. PMID:19325935

  9. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Tong, J

    2006-06-15

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress intensity factors as well as strain energy release rates were obtained for a sandwich disk with a finite interlayer using the finite element method. Phase angles were obtained at a fixed distance to the crack tip. The fracture loads were obtained from the load displacement curves and the values of interfacial fracture toughness were calculated from the fracture loads and the finite element J-integral solutions. The implication of this information on the assessment of fixation in acetabular replacements was discussed in the light of in-vitro fatigue testing of implanted acetabula.

  10. Long-term Radiographic Assessment of Cemented Polyethylene Acetabular Cups

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Graham; Porter, Neil; Fisher, John; Older, John

    2008-01-01

    In vitro studies demonstrating excessive wear in polyethylene cups sterilized using gamma irradiation and stored in air led to the abandonment of this sterilization technique. We evaluated the clinical wear performance of a metal femoral component on a polyethylene cup in a hip prosthesis from a selected subset of implants in a group of patients followed for at least 20 years and assessed the time dependency of variation in penetration rates. We measured penetration in 33 polyethylene cups in 25 patients who had a Charnley low-friction arthroplasty between 1982 and 1984. All patients had Charnley Ogee® cups implanted for more than 20 years and sterilized using the gamma irradiation in air technique. If degradation occurred over time in vivo, it was not reflected by an increased penetration rate with increasing time in vivo; even after 20 years of implantation, the degree of wear remained low. This suggests gamma irradiation affects wear on ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene by reducing wear secondary to the crosslinking, by increasing wear as shown through in vitro studies of heavily oxidized samples, or by oxidation resulting from prolonged shelf life. The effect of progressive oxidation in vivo does not appear to affect wear in vivo. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196419

  11. Metal-backed acetabular components with conventional polyethylene: a review of 9113 primary components with a follow-up of 20 years.

    PubMed

    Hallan, G; Dybvik, E; Furnes, O; Havelin, L I

    2010-02-01

    The Norwegian Arthroplasty Register has shown that several designs of uncemented femoral stems give good or excellent survivorship. The overall findings for uncemented total hip replacement however, have been disappointing because of poor results with the use of metal-backed acetabular components. In this study, we exclusively investigated the medium-to long-term performance of primary uncemented metal-backed acetabular components. A total of 9113 primary uncemented acetabular components were implanted in 7937 patients between 1987 and 2007. These were included in a prospective, population-based observational study. All the implants were modular and metal-backed with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene liners. The femoral heads were made of stainless steel, cobalt-chrome (CoCr) alloy or alumina ceramic. In all, seven different designs of acetabular component were evaluated by the Kaplan-Meier survivorship method and Cox regression analysis. Most acetabular components performed well up to seven years. When the endpoint was revision of the acetabular component because of aseptic loosening, the survival ranged between 87% and 100% at ten years. However, when the endpoint was revision for any reason, the survival estimates were 81% to 92% for the same implants at ten years. Aseptic loosening, wear, osteolysis and dislocation were the main reasons for the relatively poor overall performance of the acetabular components. Prostheses with alumina heads performed slightly better than those with stainless steel or CoCr alloy in subgroups. Whereas most acetabular components performed well at seven years, the survivorship declined with longer follow-up. Fixation was generally good. None of the metal-backed uncemented acetabular components with ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene liners in our study had satisfactory long-term results because of high rates of wear, osteolysis, aseptic loosening and dislocation.

  12. Acetabular pneumatocyst containing air-fluid level.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Narváez, J; Rodríguez-Mijarro, M; Quintero, J C

    1999-01-01

    The presence of intraosseous gas most commonly occurs in osteomyelitis, vacuum phenomenon, and postsurgery or posttraumatic states. Several cases of subchondral gas-filled lesions, called pneumatocysts, have also been described in the sacroiliac joint and clavicle, none of them with intralesional air-fluid level. These pneumatocysts are innocuous lesions of uncertain origin. We describe one case of acetabular pneumatocyst containing air-fluid level in a 62-year-old man with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis involving hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a pneumatocyst in an acetabular location containing air-fluid level.

  13. The acetabular point: a morphological and ontogenetic study

    PubMed Central

    RISSECH, C.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; MALGOSA, A.

    2001-01-01

    The acetabular point was analysed by studying human pelvic bones from 326 individuals ranging from newborns to age 97 y. The bones were categorised into 3 groups according to the degree of fusion for the 3 elements of the pelvis: nonfused (59), semifused (5) and fused (262). The acetabular point in immature pelvic bones is clearly represented by the point of the fusion lines for each bony element at the level of the acetabular fossa. In adult pelvic bones the acetabular fossa has an irregular clover-leaf shape, the superior lobe being smaller than the anterior and posterior lobes. Cross-sectional analysis of acetabular morphology suggested that the acetabular point in adult pelvic bones is always represented by the indentation between the superior and the anterior lobes of the acetabular fossa. PMID:11465866

  14. Clinical and Radiological Results over the Medium Term of Isolated Acetabular Revision

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Lorenzo; Bonicoli, Enrico; Niccolai, Francesco; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Acetabular cup loosening is associated with pain, reduced function, and instability of the implant. If such event happens while the femoral implant is in a satisfactory position and is well fixed to the bone, isolated acetabular revision surgery is indicated. The aim of this single-center retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results over the medium term (12-month follow-up mean 36, max 60) of isolated acetabular revisions surgery using a porous hemispheric revision shell matched with a cemented all-poly cup and large diameter femoral head (>32). 33 patients were enrolled. We collect any relevant data from the clinical board. Routine clinical and radiographic examinations were performed preoperatively; the postoperative follow-up was made at 1, 3, and 6 months and yearly thereafter. At the last available follow-up, we report satisfactory improvement of functional scores in all the patients; 2 patients (6.1%) showed thigh pain and only 4 hips (12.11%) presented mild groin pain; all the femoral components are well fixed and there were no potential or pending rerevisions. With bias due to the follow-up and to the retrospective design of the study, we report clinical, functional, and radiological satisfactory results. PMID:25610894

  15. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  16. Fatigue fracture of a forged cobalt-chromium-molybdenum femoral component inserted with cement. A report of ten cases.

    PubMed

    Woolson, S T; Milbauer, J P; Bobyn, J D; Yue, S; Maloney, W J

    1997-12-01

    Ten patients who had had a total hip replacement with a forged cobalt-chromium-molybdenum femoral prosthesis (Precoat or Precoat Plus) inserted with cement were seen with a fatigue fracture of the stem an average of fifty months (range, nineteen to seventy-four months) postoperatively. The average age of the patients was sixty-one years (range, forty-three to seventy-three years), and the average weight was ninety-six kilograms (range, seventy to 130 kilograms). Eight patients had had a primary total hip replacement, and two had had a revision; all of the acetabular components had been inserted without cement. Radiographs that had been made before the fracture were available for four of the eight hips that had had a primary replacement; all four had radiographic evidence of debonding of the cement mantle from the proximal end of the stem. This probably caused exaggerated cantilever bending stresses on the proximal aspect of the stem as the distal end of the stem was well fixed. The radiographs of both hips that had had a revision demonstrated a non-union of the greater trochanter, which had resulted in separation at the cement-bone interface at the proximal portion of the femur before the fracture. Scanning electron micrographs of five of the ten fractured prostheses demonstrated a fatigue fracture that began near the anterolateral corner of the prosthesis, through characters that had been etched on the implant with a laser. Metallurgical analysis indicated subsurface voids or inclusions, or both, immediately under the region that had been etched. This finding is consistent with thermal changes to the microstructure of the alloy that probably caused a focal reduction in the material strength. A high proportion (seven) of the ten stems had a poor cement mantle. Also, of the seven small stems that were used, six had been implanted in patients who weighed more than eighty kilograms, so there was relative undersizing of the prostheses. Early debonding of the proximal

  17. Acetabular augmentation induced by extracorporeal shock waves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Saisu, Takashi; Kamegaya, Makoto; Wada, Yuichi; Takahashi, Kenji; Mitsuhashi, Shigeru; Moriya, Hideshige; Maier, Markus

    2005-05-01

    We conducted this animal study to demonstrate whether exposing the acetabulum in immature rabbits to extracorporeal shock waves induces bone formation in the acetabulum. Five thousand shock waves of 100 MPa each were directed, from outside, at the acetabular roof of eight immature rabbits. At each of two time points (4 and 8 weeks) after treatment, the pelvises of four rabbits were removed and evaluated morphologically. Woven bone formation was observed on the lateral margin of the acetabular roof at 4 weeks after treatment, and the breadth of the acetabular roof in the coronal plane was significantly increased. Eight weeks after treatment, the woven bone disappeared; the breadth of the acetabular roof, however, was significantly increased. These findings demonstrated that extracorporeal shock waves induced acetabular augmentation in rabbits. We conclude that extracorporeal shock waves, perhaps, could be applied clinically for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia.

  18. Meralgia Paresthetica and Femoral Acetabular Impingement: A Possible Association

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aiesha

    2010-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica consists of pain and dysesthesia in the anterolateral thigh. Etiology is divided into spontaneous and iatrogenic causes. To my knowledge this has never been attributed to femoral acetabular impingement. This case highlights the presence of lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy in the setting of femoral acetabular impingement syndrome thus raising the possibility of an association. Keywords Femoral acetabular impingement; Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve; Dysesthesia; Nerve conduction studies PMID:22043261

  19. Wear of a sequentially annealed polyethylene acetabular liner

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Trevor C; Petrak, Martin J; Turgeon, Thomas R; Bohm, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose We previously reported on a randomized controlled trial (RCT) that examined the effect of adding tobramycin to bone cement after femoral stem migration. The present study examined femoral head penetration into both conventional and highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular liners in the same group of RCT patients, with a minimum of 5 years of postoperative follow-up. Patients and methods Linear penetration of the femoral head into an X3 (Stryker) crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) liner was measured in 18 patients (19 hips) using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Femoral head penetration was also measured in 6 patients (6 hips) with a conventional polyethylene liner (CPE), which served as a control group. Results The median proximal femoral head penetration in the XLPE group after 5.5 years was 0.025 mm with a steady-state penetration rate of 0.001 mm/year between year 1 and year 5. The CPE liner showed a median proximal head penetration of 0.274 mm after 7.2 years, at a rate of 0.037 mm/year. Interpretation The Trident X3 sequentially annealed XLPE liner shows excellent in vivo wear resistance compared to non-crosslinked CPE liners at medium-term implantation. The rate of linear head penetration in the XLPE liners after > 5 years of follow-up was 0.001 mm/year, which is in close agreement with the results of previous studies. PMID:25140986

  20. Micro-observations of different types of nano-Al₂O₃on the hydration of cement paste with sludge ash replacement.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Deng-Fong; Shieh, Show-Ing; You, Yan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants have become important in developing countries. Consequently, the amount of sewage sludge produced by these countries has been gradually increasing, and determining how to properly recycle this sludge is becoming an important topic for researchers. In this study, to expand the recyclability of sewage sludge ash (SSA) in engineering applications, two types of nano-aluminium oxides (Al₂O₃), MC2A and MC2R, were added to SSA/cement paste and mortar specimens. The MC2R type (γ phase) had a smaller particle size and larger specific surface area than the MC2A type (α phase). The results indicate that the addition of nano-Al₂O₃to SSA/cement paste can effectively improve the hydration products of the paste. Moreover, the amount of hydration products increased as the amount of nano-Al₂O₃added to the SSA/cement paste increased. The test results indicate that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃can more uniformly distribute in the paste body and improve the hydration of cement than MC2R nano-Al₂O₃. Thus, more calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) gel and calcium aluminate hydrate (C-A-H) salts were produced, and the strength of the specimens was improved. This study suggests that MC2A nano-Al₂O₃is preferable to MC2R nano- Al₂O₃for SSA/cement specimen applications.

  1. Expansive Cements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-10-01

    either burned simultaneously with a portland ce4nt or !r;terground with portland cement clinker ; Type M - a mixture of portland cement, calcium-aluminate... clinker that is interground with portland clinker or blended with portland cement or, alternately, it may be formed simul- taneously vrith the portland ... clinker compounds during the burning process. 3. Expansive cement, Type M is either a mixture of portland cement, calcium aluminate cement, and calcium

  2. Syndrome of symptomatic adult acetabular dysplasia (SAAD syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, F; Silman, A; Croft, P; Cooper, C; Hosie, G; Macfarlane, G

    2003-01-01

    Design: Cross sectional analysis of a prospective cohort. Setting: 35 general practices across the UK. Subjects: 195 patients (63 male, 132 female) aged 40 years and over presenting with a new episode of hip pain Results: The prevalence of acetabular dysplasia in this study of new presenters with hip pain was high (32%). There was no significant relationship between acetabular dysplasia and radiographic OA overall. Conclusions: The high prevalence of acetabular dysplasia across all grades of OA severity suggests that dysplasia itself may be an important cause of hip pain ("symptomatic adult acetabular dysplasia"). PMID:12634238

  3. Navigated Acetabular Cup Fixation for Acetabular Deformity or Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Yu, Jung Jin; Seo, Hyo-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the usefulness of navigated acetabular cup fixation for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty. Materials and Methods This study enrolled 28 patients with at least 12 months' follow-up. The safe zone of the acetabular cup was defined as 40°±10°in inclination and 15°±10°in anteversion. The authors used the navigation and radiographic data to determine whether the acetabular cup was located within the safe zone or not. To evaluate the clinical outcomes, preoperative and last follow-up Harris hip scores were checked, and the occurrence of complications was evaluated. Results According to the navigation data, the mean inclination and anteversion were 38.5°±4.7°(range, 32°-50°) and 16.6°±4.0°(range, 8°-23°), respectively. According to the radiographic data the mean inclination and anteversion were 40.5°±4.6°(range, 32°-50°) and 19.4°±4.2°(range, 8°-25°), respectively. In both cases, all values were within the safe zone. Harris hip score was improved in all patients from preoperative 52.3±14.4 points (range, 29-87 points) to 88.0±9.0 points (range, 65-99 points) at the last follow-up. There was no dislocation or loosening of both cases. Conclusion Navigated acetabular cup fixation is a useful technique for total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular deformity or revision total hip arthroplasty because it prevents the malposition and related complications. PMID:27536573

  4. The effect of stem material and surface treatment on the torsional stability at the metal-cement interface of upper limb joint replacement systems.

    PubMed

    Hosein, Yara K; King, Graham J W; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2014-08-01

    Stem surface treatment and material are two design factors that may affect the onset of implant loosening. For upper limb applications, no known in vitro studies have addressed the role of these two factors on cemented implant stability. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the torsional stability of cemented titanium and cobalt chrome stems with varying surface treatments in vitro. Thirty implant stems of circular cross-section (Ø = 8mm) were machined from cobalt chrome (n = 15) and titanium (n = 15). For each type, stems were subdivided into three groups for application of clinically relevant surface treatments: smooth, sintered beads, or plasma spray. Stems were potted in bone cement, allowed 24 h to cure, and placed in a materials testing machine. Stems were tested under cyclic torsion (1-30 Nm), using a staircase loading protocol. Failure was defined as either the first rapid increase in stem rotation without resistance, or attaining a maximum torque of 30 Nm. Implant stems with non-smooth surfaces offered greater resistance to torsion (p < 0.05), with the plasma spray treatment outlasting the beaded and smooth stems (p < 0.05). Titanium offered superior interface strength (p < 0.05) but reduced resistance to motion (p < 0.05) when compared to cobalt chrome. Therefore, these design features should be considered during upper limb implant design.

  5. Controversies in Treatment of Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Krupic, Ferid; Biscevic, Mirza; Grubor, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acetabular fractures treatment represents a great controversy, challenge and dilemma for an orthopedic surgeon. Aim: The aim of the paper was to present the results of treatment of 96 acetabular fractures in the Clinic of Traumatology Banja Luka, in the period from 2003 to 2013, as well as to raise awareness regarding the controversy in the methods of choice in treating acetabulum fractures. Material and methods: The series consists of 96 patients, 82 males and 14 females, average age 40.5 years. Traffic trauma was the cause of fractures in 79 patients (85%), and in 17 patients (15%) fractures occurred due to falls from height. Polytrauma was present in 31 patients (32%). According to the classification of Judet and Letournel, representation of acetabular fractures was as follows: posterior wall in 32 patients, posterior column in 28, anterior wall in 4, anterior column in 2, transverse fractures in 8, posterior wall and posterior column in 10, anterior and posterior wall in 6, both- column in 4 and transversal fracture and posterior wall in 2 patients. 14 patients were treated with traction, that is, 6 patients with femoral traction and 8 patients with both lateral and femoral traction. 82 patients (86.4%) were surgically treated. Kocher-Langenbeck approach was applied in the treatment of 78 patients. In two patients from the Kocher-Langenbeck’s approach, the Ollier’s approach had to be applied as well. Two acetabular were primarily treated with Ollier’s approach. Extended Smith- Peterson’s approach was applied 4 times, and Emile Letournel’s (ilioinguinal) approach 14 times. Results: Functional outcome (after follow-up of 18 months), according to the Harris hip score of surgical treatment in 82 patients, was as follows: good 46 (56%), satisfactory 32 (39%) and poor 4 (5%). Results of acetabulum fractures treated with traction were: good 8 (57%), satisfactory 4 (28%) and poor 2 (15%). According to the Brook’s classification of heterotopic

  6. Pelvic position and movement during hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Grammatopoulos, G; Pandit, H G; da Assunção, R; Taylor, A; McLardy-Smith, P; De Smet, K A; Murray, D W; Gill, H S

    2014-07-01

    The orientation of the acetabular component is influenced not only by the orientation at which the surgeon implants the component, but also the orientation of the pelvis at the time of implantation. Hence, the orientation of the pelvis at set-up and its movement during the operation, are important. During 67 hip replacements, using a validated photogrammetric technique, we measured how three surgeons orientated the patient's pelvis, how much the pelvis moved during surgery, and what effect these had on the final orientation of the acetabular component. Pelvic orientation at set-up, varied widely (mean (± 2, standard deviation (sd))): tilt 8° (2sd ± 32), obliquity -4° (2sd ± 12), rotation -8° (2sd ± 14). Significant differences in pelvic positioning were detected between surgeons (p < 0.001). The mean angular movement of the pelvis between set-up and component implantation was 9° (sd 6). Factors influencing pelvic movement included surgeon, approach (posterior > lateral), procedure (hip resurfacing > total hip replacement) and type of support (p < 0.001). Although, on average, surgeons achieved their desired acetabular component orientation, there was considerable variability (2sd ± 16) in component orientation. We conclude that inconsistency in positioning the patient at set-up and movement of the pelvis during the operation account for much of the variation in acetabular component orientation. Improved methods of positioning and holding the pelvis are required.

  7. Canted seating of the Stryker Modular Dual Mobility liner within a Trident hemispherical acetabular shell.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Scott M; Olsson, Erik C; Del Gaizo, Daniel J

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old woman who suffered a left femoral neck fracture underwent a left total hip arthroplasty using a Stryker Trident (Kalamazoo, MI) hemispherical acetabular shell and Modular Dual Mobility (MDM) metal liner. Post-operative radiographs demonstrated canted seating of the liner. The patient was taken immediately back to the operating room where the acetabular liner appeared well seated superiorly but was in a canted position inferiorly. Removal and replacement was performed and post-operative radiographs demonstrated complete seating. Subsequent follow up at 6 months demonstrated good clinical function with no adverse radiographic findings. Canted seating is a potential complication of the MDM metal liner. Providers should be aware of potential incomplete seating inferiorly despite the superior portion of the liner being well seated.

  8. Acetabular Fractures in the Elderly: Treatment Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Pagenkopf, Eric; Grose, Andrew; Partal, George

    2006-01-01

    Acetabular fractures in the elderly population are marked by a high degree of variability in terms of patient and fracture characteristics. Successful outcomes depend on application of highly individualized management principles by experienced teams. Reviewed are indications and outcomes associated with various management options, including closed treatment, open reduction internal fixation, and acute or staged total hip arthroplasty. Proper initial management choices are critical, as early failures and subsequent salvage surgery can be accompanied by significant morbidity. Clinical results after ORIF closely follow the quality of articular reduction and the ability to maintain a congruent reduction of the hip joint. Fracture characteristics predictive of anatomic articular reduction should be treated with ORIF. Fracture characteristics predictive of early post-traumatic arthritis should be treated with simultaneous ORIF and THA. Presented is one referral institution’s treatment algorithm and management approach. PMID:18751831

  9. Wear of highly crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components

    PubMed Central

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Munn, Zachary; Howie, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Wear rates of highly crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) acetabular components have varied considerably between different published studies. This variation is in part due to the different techniques used to measure wear and to the errors inherent in measuring the relatively low amounts of wear in XLPE bearings. We undertook a scoping review of studies that have examined the in vivo wear of XLPE acetabular components using the most sensitive method available, radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Methods A systematic search of the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases was performed to identify published studies in which RSA was used to measure wear of XLPE components in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). Results 18 publications examined 12 primary THA cohorts, comprising only 260 THAs at 2–10 years of follow-up. The mean or median proximal wear rate reported ranged from 0.00 to 0.06 mm/year. However, differences in the manner in which wear was determined made it difficult to compare some studies. Furthermore, differences in RSA methodology between studies, such as the use of supine or standing radiographs and the use of beaded or unbeaded reference segments, may limit future meta-analyses examining the effect of patient and implant variables on wear rates. Interpretation This scoping review confirmed the low wear rates of XLPE in THA, as measured by RSA. We make recommendations to enhance the standardization of reporting of RSA wear results, which will facilitate early identification of poorly performing implants and enable a better understanding of the effects of surgical and patient factors on wear. PMID:25301435

  10. Prevalence of periprosthetic osteolysis after total hip replacement in patients with rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perez Alamino, Rodolfo; Casellini, Carolina; Baňos, Andrea; Schneeberger, Emilce Edith; Gagliardi, Susana Alicia; Maldonado Cocco, José Antonio; Citera, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis (PO) is a frequent complication in patients with joint implants. There are no data regarding the prevalence of PO in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and osteoarthritis (OA). Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of PO in patients with RA, JCA, AS, and OA, who have undergone total hip replacement (THR), and to identify factors associated with its development. Methods The study included patients diagnosed with RA (ACR 1987), AS (modified New York criteria), JCA (European 1977 criteria), and osteoarthritis (OA) (ACR 1990 criteria) with unilateral or bilateral THR. Demographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were collected. Panoramic pelvic plain radiographs were performed, to determine the presence of PO at acetabular and femoral levels. Images were read by two independent observers. Results One hundred twenty-two hip prostheses were analyzed (74 cemented, 30 cementless, and 18 hybrids). The average time from prosthesis implantation to pelvic radiograph was comparable among groups. PO was observed in 72 hips (59%). In 55% of cases, PO was detected on the femoral component, with a lower prevalence in RA (53%) vs AS (64.7%) and JCA (76.5%). Acetabular PO was more frequent in JCA patients (58.8%), compared with RA (11.6%) and OA (28.5%) patients (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.06, respectively). There was no significant association between the presence of PO and clinical, functional, or therapeutic features. Conclusion The prevalence of PO was 59%, being more frequent at the femoral level. Larger studies must be carried out to determine the clinical significance of radiologic PO. PMID:27790012

  11. The influence of acetabular cup material on pelvis cortex surface strains, measured using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, A S; Taylor, A C; Browne, M

    2012-02-23

    Acetabular cup loosening is a late failure mode of total hip replacements, and peri-prosthetic bone deterioration may promote earlier failure. Preservation of supporting bone quality is a goal for implant design and materials selection, to avoid stress shielding and bone resorption. Advanced polymer composite materials have closer stiffness to bone than metals, ceramics or polymers, and have been hypothesised to promote less adverse bone adaptation. Computer simulations have supported this hypothesis, and the present study aimed to verify this experimentally. A composite hemi-pelvis was implanted with Cobalt Chromium (CoCr), polyethylene (UHMWPE) and MOTIS(®)carbon-fibre-reinforced polyether etherketone (CFR-PEEK) acetabular cups. In each case, load was applied to the implanted pelvis and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was used for surface strain measurement. The test was repeated for an intact hemi-pelvis. Trends in implanted vs. intact bone principal strains were inspected to assess the average principal strain magnitude change, allowing comparison of the potential bone responses to implantation with the three cups. The CFR-PEEK cup was observed to produce the closest bone strain to the intact hip in the main load path, the superior peri-acetabular cortex (+12% on average, R(2)=0.84), in comparison to CoCr (+40%, R(2)=0.91) and UHWMPE cups (-26%, R(2)=0.94). Clinical observations have indicated that increased periacetabular cortex loading may result in reduced polar cancellous bone loading, leading to longer term losses in periprosthetic bone mineral density. This study provides experimental evidence to verify previous computational studies, indicating that cups produced using materials with stiffness closer to cortical bone recreate physiological cortical bone strains more closely and could, therefore, potentially promote less adverse bone adaptation than stiffer press-fitted implants in current use.

  12. Preliminary Biomechanical Study of Different Acetabular Reinforcement Devices for Acetabular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Lee, Po-Yi; Hsieh, Pang-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Background Acetabular reinforcement devices (ARDs) are frequently used as load-sharing devices to allow allograft incorporation in revision hip arthroplasty with massive acetabular bone loss. The key to a successful reconstruction is robust fixation of the device to the host acetabulum. Interlocking fixation is expected to improve the initial stability of the postoperative construct. However, all commercially available ARDs are designed with non-locking fixation. This study investigates the efficacy of standard ARDs modified with locking screw mechanisms for improving stability in acetabular reconstruction. Methods Three types of ARDs were examined to evaluate the postoperative compression and angular stability: i) standard commercial ARDs, ii) standard ARDs modified with monoaxial and iii) standard ARDs modified with polyaxial locking screw mechanisms. All ARDs were implanted into osteomized synthetic pelvis with pelvic discontinuity. Axial compression and torsion tests were then performed using a servohydraulic material testing machine that measured load (angle) versus displacement (torque). Initial stability was compared among the groups. Results Equipping ARDs with interlocking mechanisms effectively improved the initial stability at the device/bone interface compared to standard non-locked ARDs. In both compression and torsion experiments, the monoaxial interlocking construct demonstrated the highest construct stiffness (672.6 ± 84.1 N/mm in compression and 13.3 ± 1.0 N·m/degree in torsion), whereas the non-locked construct had the lowest construct stiffness (381.4 ± 117.2 N/mm in compression and 6.9 ± 2.1 N·m/degree in torsion) (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential benefit of adding a locking mechanism to an ARD. Polyaxial ARDs provide the surgeon with more flexibility in placing the screws at the cost of reduced mechanical performance. This in vitro study provides a preliminary evaluation of biomechanical performance for ARDs

  13. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  14. Long-Term Outcome of Acetabular Reconstruction Using a Kerboull-Type Acetabular Reinforcement Device with Hydroxyapetite Granule and Structural Autograft for AAOS type II and III Acetabular Defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoo; Tanaka, Chiaki; Kanoe, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the clinical results of the reconstruction of acetabular bone deficiency using hydroxyapatite (HA) granules and structural autografts supported by a Kerboull-type acetabular reinforcement device at a minimum of 10 years follow-up. Between 1993 and 2003, 40 consecutive THA revisions were performed in 37 patients with a mean age of 66.4 years. The mean follow-up period was 12.8 years. Radiologically, 5 hips failed, of which 2 were revised. The survival rate of the acetabular component at 10 years was 100% in type II defects and 94.9% in the type III defects, using acetabular revision for loosening as the end point. Acetabular reconstruction with HA granules, structural autografts and a Kerboull-type acetabular reinforcement device provided satisfactory clinical and radiological results at 12.8 years postoperatively.

  15. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Trabecular Metal Acetabular Components for Failed Treatment of Acetabular Fractures: A Mid-term Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhou, Yi-Xin; Zhang, Chun-Yu; Xu, Hui; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Porous-coated cups have been widely used in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures, and good results have been reported with the use of these cups; however, the durability and functionality of modular trabecular metal (TM) acetabular components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures remain unclear. This study aimed to examine the radiographic and clinical outcomes associated with the use of modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures to assess the durability and functionality of these components in acetabular reconstruction after failed treatment of acetabular fractures. Methods: A total of 41 patients (41 hips) underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) using modular TM acetabular components for failed treatment of acetabular fractures at our hospital between January 2007 and December 2012. Among these patients, two were lost to follow-up. Therefore, 39 patients (39 hips) were finally included in this study. The Harris hip score before and after the surgery, satisfaction level of the patients, and radiographic results were assessed. Results: The mean Harris hip score increased from 34 (range, 8–52) before surgery to 91 (range, 22–100) at the latest follow-up examination (P < 0.001). The results were excellent for 28 hips, good for six, fair for three, and poor for two. Among the 39 patients, 25 (64%) and 10 (26%) were very satisfied and somewhat satisfied, respectively. All cups were found to be fully incorporated, and no evidence of cup migration or periacetabular osteolysis was noted. Conclusions: Despite the technically demanding nature of the procedure, THA using modular TM acetabular components showed good durability and functionality and may be an effective reconstruction option for failed treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27064033

  16. A Novel Approach for Treatment of Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Qin, Hui; Ding, Haoliang; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no single approach that provides adequate exposure for treatment of all types of acetabular fractures. We describe our experience with an easier, relatively less invasive pubic symphysis approach (PSA) for the treatment of acetabular fractures. Material/Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, fifteen patients with acetabular fracture underwent surgery using the PSA technique. Fracture reduction and treatment outcomes were assessed by clinical and radiological examination. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications were documented. Results Mean operative time was 222±78 minutes. Average blood loss was 993±361 mL. Anatomical reduction was achieved in all patients. Minimum follow-up period was 31 months. Postoperative hypoesthesia in the area of innervation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was reported in one patient, with spontaneous recovery at one month after surgery. No complications were reported during the follow-up period. At the most recent follow up, clinical outcomes were graded as “excellent” in six patients, “good” in eight patients and “fair” in one patient based on the modified Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score. Conclusions PSA appears to be a timesaving and safe approach for treatment of acetabular fractures that affords good visual access and allows for excellent fracture reduction. Our preliminary results revealed a much lower incidence of complications than traditional approaches, suggesting PSA is an alternative for treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27734825

  17. Natural cement as the precursor of Portland cement: Methodology for its identification

    SciTech Connect

    Varas, M.J. . E-mail: mjvaras@geo.ucm.es; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2005-11-15

    When cements appeared in the 19th century, they took the place of traditional binding materials (lime, gypsum, and hydraulic lime) which had been used until that time. Early cements can be divided into two groups, natural and artificial (Portland) cements. Natural cements were introduced first, but their widespread usage was short-lived as they were quickly replaced by artificial cements (Portland), still the most important and predominant today. The main differences between natural and artificial cements arise during the manufacturing process. The final properties of the cements are greatly influenced by differences in the raw materials and burning temperatures employed. The aim of this paper is to assess the efficiency of traditional analytical techniques (petrographic microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) used to differentiate natural and artificial cements.

  18. Volumetric computerized tomography as a measurement of periprosthetic acetabular osteolysis and its correlation with wear

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R John; Boyd, Allen; Totterman, Saara; Seo, Gwy-Suk; Tamez-Pena, Jose; Campbell, Debbie; Novotny, Leonore; Olcott, Christopher; Martell, John; Hayes, F Ann; O'Keefe, Regis J; Schwarz, Edward M

    2002-01-01

    Osteolysis, which is considered to be a major source of morbidity following total hip joint replacement, has been notoriously difficult to measure accurately, particularly in the acetabular area. In order to study periacetabular osteolysis, specialized software for computerized tomography (CT) scan image analysis has been developed. This software (3D-CT) eliminates metal artifacts, allows three-dimensional segmentation of the CT image, and reconstructs the segmented image to provide an accurate representation and measurement of volume for osteolytic lesions. In the present study, 20 patients underwent periacetabular osteolytic volume determination using 3D-CT, functional assessment (using the Harris Hip Scale, the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index, and the short form 36 questionnaire), and two-dimensional analysis of volumetic polyethylene wear using digitalized plain films. Periacetabular osteolysis correlated directly with the polyethylene wear rate (relative risk [RR] = 0.494, P = 0.027). If one patient with an acetabular revision, one patient with recurrent dislocation, and one patient with a Biomet prosthesis are excluded, then the correlation between wear and osteolysis is improved (RR = 0.685, P = 0.002). In summary, the current study demonstrates both the feasibility of CT imaging of periacetabular osteolysis and the correlation between polyethylene wear and osteolytic volume, providing a potential outcome measure for clinical trials that are designed to examine interventions in this complex disease process. PMID:11879538

  19. Effects of screw eccentricity on the initial stability of the acetabular cup in artificial foam bone of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui-Ting; Lin, Dan-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular cup loosening is one of the major failure models of total hip replacement (THR), which is mostly due to insufficient initial stability of the cup. Previous studies have demonstrated that cup stability is affected by the quality of the host bone and the surgical skill when inserting screws. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on the initial stability of the acetabular cup of eccentric screws in bone of different qualities. In this study, hemispherical cups were fixed into bone specimens constructed from artificial foam with three elastic moduli using one to three screws. The effects of two types of screw eccentricity (offset and angular) on the stability of the acetabular cup were also evaluated. The experimental results indicate that in the presence of ideal screwing, the cup was stable in bone specimens constructed from foam with the highest elastic modulus. In addition, increasing the number of ideal screws enhanced the cup stability, especially in bone specimens constructed from soft foam. Moreover, the cup stability was most affected by offset eccentric screw(s) in the hard-foam bone specimens and by angular eccentric screw(s) in the soft-foam bone specimens. The reported results indicate that the presence of screw eccentricity affects the initial stability of the acetabular cup. Surgeons should keep this in mind when performing screw insertions in THR. However, care is necessary when translating these results to the intraoperative situation due to the experiments being conducted under laboratory conditions, and hence, future studies should attempt to replicate the results reported here in vivo.

  20. Tension band stabilisation of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens.

    PubMed

    Langley-Hobbs, S J; Sissener, T R; Shales, C J

    2007-06-01

    The surgical repair of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens using a screw and tension band technique is reported. This was an appropriate method for restoring articular congruency and improving pelvic alignment. All cases had an excellent outcome and full limb use following fracture repair. In kittens younger than 12 weeks, there is a possibility of premature fusion of the acetabular bone resulting in development of a deformed, shallow acetabulum and hip subluxation. However, surgery is still justified when there is pelvic canal narrowing to decrease the risk of future defecatory problems. Early implant removal in such young kittens may decrease the severity of deformity caused by premature physeal closure. In kittens of 16 weeks or older, the prognosis is good for normal acetabular development and implant removal is not necessary.

  1. Femoral cement within cement technique in carefully selected aseptic revision arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Lucas; Buttaro, Martin; Comba, Fernando; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results in a group of patients who underwent aseptic revision hip arthroplasty using the cement within cement (CWC) technique. Between 1999 and 2005, 37 aseptic revision hip operations were performed. There were 30 women and five men, with an average age of 68 years. The reasons for revision were femoral stem fracture, cup failure, acetabular protrusion after hemi-arthroplasty and recurrent dislocation. At an average follow-up of 46 months, none of the patients required further femoral revision. The average post-operative Merle D'Aubigne score was 16.6 points (p<0.05). No evidence of radiological stem failure was observed and no femoral component was considered to be at risk for loosening. In this series of patients, the CWC technique provided consistent with high functional outcomes. This valid and effective alternative should be considered in carefully selected aseptic cases.

  2. Development of site-specific locking plates for acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Zhang, Li-Hai; Zhang, Ying-Ze; He, Chun-Qing; Zhang, Li-Cheng; Wang, Yan; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2013-05-01

    Site-specific locking plates have gained popularity for the treatment of fractures. However, the clinical use of a site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures remains untested due to production limits. To design a universal site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures, the 3-dimensional (3D) photographic records of 171 pelvises were retrospectively studied to generate a universal posterior innominate bone surface. Using 3D photographical processing software, the 3D coordinate system was reset according to bony landmarks and was scaled based on the acetabular diameter to allow a direct comparison between surfaces. The measured surface was separated into measurement units. At each measurement unit, the authors calculated the average z-axis values in all samples and obtained the 3D coordinate values of the point cloud that could be reconstructed into the universal surface. A plate was subsequently designed in 3D photographical processing software, and the orientation and distribution of locking screws was included. To manufacture a plate, the data were entered into Unigraphics NX version 6.0 software (Siemens PLM Software, Co, Ltd, Plano, Texas) and a CNC digital milling machine (FANUC Co, Ltd, Yamanashi, Japan). The resulting locking plate fit excellently with the reduced bone surface intraoperatively. Plate contouring was avoided intraoperatively. Universal 3.5-mm locking screws locked successfully into the plate, and their orientations were consistent with the design. No screw yielded to acetabular penetration. This method of designing a site-specific acetabular locking plate is practical, and the plates are suitable for clinical use. These site-specific locking plates may be an option for the treatment of acetabular fractures, particularly in elderly patients.

  3. Femoral impaction bone allografting with an Exeter cemented collarless, polished, tapered stem in revision hip replacement: a mean follow-up of 10.5 years.

    PubMed

    Wraighte, P J; Howard, P W

    2008-08-01

    Femoral impaction bone allografting has been developed as a means of restoring bone stock in revision total hip replacement. We report the results of 75 consecutive patients (75 hips) with a mean age of 68 years (35 to 87) who underwent impaction grafting using the Exeter collarless, polished, tapered femoral stem between 1992 and 1998. The mean follow-up period was 10.5 years (6.3 to 14.1). The median pre-operative bone defect score was 3 (interquartile range (IQR) 2 to 3) using the Endo-Klinik classification. The median subsidence at one year post-operatively was 2 mm (IQR 1 to 3). At the final review the median Harris hip score was 80.6 (IQR 67.6 to 88.9) and the median subsidence 2 mm (IQR 1 to 4). Incorporation of the allograft into trabecular bone and secondary remodelling were noted radiologically at the final follow-up in 87% (393 of 452 zones) and 40% (181 of 452 zones), respectively. Subsidence of the Exeter stem correlated with the pre-operative Endo-Klinik bone loss score (p = 0.037). The degree of subsidence at one year had a strong association with long-term subsidence (p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between previous revision surgery and a poor Harris Hip score (p = 0.028), and those who had undergone previous revision surgery for infection had a higher risk of complications (p = 0.048). Survivorship at 10.5 years with any further femoral operation as the end-point was 92% (95% confidence interval 82 to 97).

  4. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Jamshid, T.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  5. Radiological evaluation of painful total hip replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Schneider, R.; Freiberger, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-four cases of clinically failed, cemented, total hip prostheses requiring surgery were reviewed to determine the accuracy of preoperative plain radiography, culture of aspirated fluid, arthrography, and bone scanning. When radiopaque cement had been used to embed the prosthesis, plain radiography was highly accurate in detecting a loose femoral component, less so in detecting a loose acetabular component. Culture of aspirated fluid was accurate in diagnosing infection. A positive arthrogram identified loosening with good accuracy; however, a negative arthrogram did not reliably exclude loosening. /sup 99/mTc bone scans frequently differentiated loosening from loosening with infection. The suggested sequence of diagnostic tests is plain radiography followed by bone scanning. If the bone scan shows diffuse augmented uptake, culture of aspirated fluid followed by arthrography is indicated.

  6. Analysis of version in the acetabular cup.

    PubMed

    Seradge, H; Nagle, K R; Miller, R J

    1982-06-01

    To determine the amount of anteversion or retroversion of the acetabular component of the implanted total hip prosthesis, two anteroposterior radiographs of the hip are obtained, with the contralateral hip flexed to compensate for the possible existing flexion contracture. The X-ray beam is centered on the implanted total hip in one radiograph, and moved away from it toward the contralateral hip in the second radiograph. If the cup is anteverted, the opening will seem wider in the second radiograph. To calculate the angle, the location of the center of the X-ray beam on the X-ray plate must be know. The center of the X-ray beam can be marked on the radiograph by putting a metalic cross on the patient, over the centering cross of the X-ray light source. If the distance of the signature of the X-ray's center beam is less than 8 mm for the center of the cup on the X-ray film, the cup version can be calculated from the arcsin of the shortest to the largest diameter of the cup. If the central ray's signature is farther away, correction is necessary for this calculation. Also, the variable parameters, e.g., cup size, and magnification rate, should be considered in the calculations. The anteroposterior radiographs of the implanted total hip, obtained with the central beam being marked on the X-ray plate, not only are useful for evaluation of the implant but also can be used to calculate the version angle with an accuracy of +/-2 degrees. The necessary calculation is tabulated for cups with an outside diameter of 44-56 mm.

  7. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  8. Squeeze cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Kundert, D.P.; Dahl, J.A.; Dalrymple, E.D.; Gerke, R.R.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a method for terminating the flow of fluid from a portion of a subterranean formation into a wellbore. It comprises: placing within the wellbore adjacent the portion a volume of a slurry of hydraulic cement, permitting the volume to penetrate into the portion; and maintaining the slurry in the portion for a time sufficient to enable the slurry to form a rigid mass of cement in the portion.

  9. Porous Tantalum Buttress Augments for Severe Acetabular Posterior Column Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Hull, Jason R; Russo, Glenn S; Lieberman, Jay R; Jiranek, William A

    2015-11-01

    In revision total hip arthroplasty (THA), consensus is lacking regarding the optimal method for reconstruction of the most severe acetabular defects. Porous tantalum (TM) buttress augments were designed for the most severe postero-superior defects. The purpose of this study was to report the results of a consecutive series of acetabular reconstructions utilizing TM buttress augments. Eight complex acetabular reconstructions utilizing a TM buttress augment were performed at two centers. All were Paprosky 3A or Paprosky 3B bone loss classification, with severe superior and posterior column deficiency where wedge augments were insufficient for mechanical support. The acetabular cup sizes ranged from 64-78, and a buttress shim was used in 7 of 8 cases. Clinical and radiographic follow-up averaged 16.5 months (range, 10-28) and no cases were lost to follow-up. There were no cases of clinical or radiographic loosening, and no case had required reoperation or revision. All patients except one were ambulating with either no assist device or a single cane at final follow-up. There was one complication of an iliac wing fracture noted incidentally on postoperative x-rays in the lone patient in whom a buttress shim was not used. At short-term follow-up, TM acetabular buttress augments appear to effectively substitute for the use of structural allografts or cages, which would otherwise be used in this challenging setting. The potential for biologic fixation is promising for the durability of these reconstructions; however, longer-term follow-up is required for full evaluation.

  10. Cement Burns

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Munir; Moynagh, M.; Lawlor, C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Cement burns account for relatively few admissions to a burn unit; however, these burns deserve separate consideration because of special features of diagnosis and management. Cement burns, even though potentially disabling, have rarely been reported in literature. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all patients admitted with cement burns injuries to the national burns unit at the St James's Hospital in Dublin, Ireland, over a 10-year period for the years 1996–2005. Results: A total of 46 patients with cement burns were admitted. The majority of patients were aged 16–74 years (mean age = 32 years). Eighty-seven percent of injuries occurred in an industrial and 13% in a domestic setting. The upper and lower extremities were involved in all the patients, and the mean total body surface area affected was 6.5%. The mean length of hospital stay was 21 days with a range of 1–40 days. Thirty-eight (82%) were surgically managed involving debridement and split-thickness skin graft (SSG) and four (9%) were conservatively managed. A further four did not have data available. Conclusion: Widespread inexperience in dealing with this group of cement burns patients and delays in referral to burns unit highlights the potential for greater levels of general awareness and knowledge in both prevention and treatment of these burns. As well, early debridement and split-thickness skin grafting at diagnosis constitutes the best means of reducing the high socioeconomic costs and allows for early return to work. PMID:18091981

  11. Initial Results of an Acetabular Center Axis Registration Technique in Navigated Hip Arthroplasty with Deformed Acetabular Rims

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Mishima, Hajime; Yoshizawa, Tomohiro; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Background In cementless total hip arthroplasty, imageless computer-assisted navigation is usually used to register the anterior pelvic plane (APP). The accuracy of this method is influenced by the subcutaneous tissues overlying the registration landmarks. On the other hand, the acetabular center axis (ACA) is determined from the acetabular rim. Precise registration of the ACA is possible because of direct palpation using a pointer. Imageless navigation using the ACA usually targets patients with normal acetabular morphology. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of imageless navigation using the ACA instead of the APP in patients with normal or deformed acetabular rims. Methods The intraoperative cup position was compared with that obtained from the postoperative computed tomography (CT) images in 18 cases. Results The inclination angle derived from the navigation system was 3.4 ± 5.3 degrees smaller and the anteversion angle was 1.4 ± 3.1 degrees larger than those derived from the CT images. Conclusion The inclination cup angle of the navigation system was significantly inferior to the true value, particularly in cases with large anterior osteophytes. PMID:27073586

  12. Lateral acetabular labral length is inversely related to acetabular coverage as measured by lateral center edge angle of Wiberg

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Brian D.; Wolf, Bryan; Lambert, Jeffrey R.; Clayton, Carolyn W.; Glueck, Deborah H.; Jesse, Mary Kristen; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip often have compensatory labral hypertrophy, which presumably lends stability to an unstable joint. Conversely, patients with acetabular overcoverage may have small or ossified labra. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction of labral length with the degree of acetabular hip coverage. A retrospective cohort of patients with hip pain presenting to a hip preservation center, who had undergone hip magnetic resonance imaging and AP pelvis radiographs were studied. General linear multivariate models were used to assess the association between three measures of labral length (lateral, anterior and anterior inferior locations along the acetabular rim) and the X-ray derived lateral center edge angle (LCEA) of Wiberg. Of the three acetabular labral locations measured, only the lateral labrum was associated with LCEA Wiberg (P = 0.0008). Lateral labral length increases as LCEA of Wiberg decreases. The anterior and anterior inferior labral locations did not show a predictable increase in labral length as LCEA Wiberg decreased. PMID:27583157

  13. [Vascular injuries in joint replacement surgery].

    PubMed

    Novotný, K; Pádr, R; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2011-01-01

    Iatrogenic injuries to blood vessels in joint replacement surgery are rare events that occur as few per thousand. However, their sequelae are serious. The patient may either bleed to death, because vascular injury is not obvious and therefore difficult to diagnose, or lose the limb due to ischaemia. The highest risk of vascular injury is associated with repeat surgery and loosening of the acetabular component. We distinguish sharp and blunt force injuries. The former are caused by implants, sharp instruments, bone fragments or bone cement debris. The latter arise from stretching over a part of implanted material. Bleeding can be inapparent or apparent. Inapparent bleeding is difficult to diagnose and is recognized from the dynamics of blood losses. Haemodynamic instability or, in a worse case, even hypovolaemic shock may be the only signs of bleeding. Occlusion of an artery is manifested by limb ischaemia. The seriousness and progression of ischaemia depends on the rate of arterial occlusion, potential pathways for collateral circulation and the degree of atherosclerotic vascular disease. The patient with conduction anaesthesia does not feel pain and therefore the diagnosis must primarily be based on arterial pulsation in the limb and its skin colour. A pseudoaneurysm can develop due to a partially weakened vascular wall and its rupture is a life-threatening complication. Its presence is recognized as a pulsating mass in the groin. An arterio- venous fistula which arises from traumatic communication between the two vessels may lead to cardiac failure. The diagnosis is based on examination by sonography and digital subtraction angiography. The results of CT angiography and MR angiography are difficult to evaluate because of the presence of metal implants. In apparent bleeding it is sometimes difficult to locate the source. It is recommended to perform digital compression and gain access to the vessels from the extraperitoneal approach. When an expanding haematoma or

  14. Porosity reduction in bone cement at the cement-stem interface.

    PubMed

    Bishop, N E; Ferguson, S; Tepic, S

    1996-05-01

    The fatigue failure of bone cement, leading to loosening of the stem, is likely to be one mode of failure of cemented total hip replacements. There is strong evidence that cracks in the cement are initiated at voids which act as stress risers, particularly at the cement-stem interface. The preferential formation of voids at this site results from shrinkage during polymerisation and the initiation of this process at the warmer cement-bone interface, which causes bone cement to shrink away from the stem. A reversal of the direction of polymerisation would shrink the cement on to the stem and reduce or eliminate the formation of voids at this interface. We have investigated this by implanting hip prostheses, at room temperature or preheated to 44 degrees C, into human cadaver femora kept at 37 degrees C. Two types of bone cement were either hand-mixed or vacuum-mixed before implantation. We found that the area of porosity at the cement-stem interface was dramatically reduced by preheating the stem and that the preheating temperature of 44 degrees C determined by computer analysis of transient heat transfer was the minimum required to induce initial polymerisation at the cement-stem interface. Temperature measurements taken during these experiments in vitro showed that preheating of the stem caused a negligible increase in the temperature of the bone. Reduction of porosity at the cement-stem interface could significantly increase the life of hip arthroplasties.

  15. Cemented versus uncemented fixation of the femoral component of the NexGen CR total knee replacement in patients younger than 60 years: a prospective randomised controlled RSA study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Henricson, Anders; Nilsson, Kjell G

    2009-06-01

    The optimal mode of femoral fixation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) remains controversial, especially for the young patient. In a prospective randomised study we compared the magnitude and pattern of the fixation of cemented versus uncemented femoral components during 2 years in patients younger than 60 years. Forty-one knees in 41 patients were randomised to receive a NexGen (Zimmer, Warsaw, USA) cruciate-retaining TKA with either a cemented or an uncemented non HA-coated femoral component. The patients were examined by radiostereometric analysis (RSA), as well as clinical and radiological evaluation. The magnitude and pattern of migration as measured by RSA did not differ significantly between the cemented and uncemented fixation during the 2-year follow-up, nor were there any differences between the groups in clinical parameters. These findings suggest that an uncemented and non HA-coated femoral component may behave equally as well as a cemented one in the long-term.

  16. Multiobjective optimization of an electrostimulative acetabular revision system.

    PubMed

    Potratz, Carsten; Kluess, Daniel; Ewald, Hartmut; van Rienen, Ursula

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new approach for the enhancement of the bone proliferation rate by electrostimulation in the acetabular region. Based on the complex tissue structure in this area, the electric field distributions were computed by numerical means using a model based on high-resolution computed tomography scans of the acetabular area. This results in a complex, nonlinear, and discrete optimization problem. Therefore, an adapted algorithm was developed to reduce the computational effort in the order of several magnitudes. We divided the procedure into two stages: data extraction and a subsequent optimization process. The used optimization algorithm utilizes an evolutionary concept and a multidimensional definition of optimality for different, partly contradictive objective functions. Finally, we present first optimization results for different stimulation situations.

  17. Acetabular component deformation with press-fit fixation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Matthew; Griffin, William L; Mason, J Bohannon; Peindl, Richard D; Odum, Susan

    2006-09-01

    Acetabular component deformation secondary to forces encountered during insertion is a potential consequence of the press-fit technique. This study characterized the stiffness of Pinnacle 100 cups (DePuy, Warsaw, Ind) via mechanical testing and used this information with intraoperative measurements of cup deformation to calculate the in vivo forces acting on cups inserted during hip arthroplasty in 21 patients. We found that 90.5% of cups had measurable compression deformity, averaging 0.16 +/- 0.16 mm. The corresponding forces acting on these cups averaged 414 +/- 421 N. For hard-on-hard bearing surfaces, such in vivo deformation of acetabular shells may result in negative clinical consequences such as equatorial loading with increased wear and potential seizing of components, chipping of ceramic inserts, or locking mechanism damage.

  18. Para-acetabular periarthritis calcarea: its radiographic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, A; Murayama, S; Ohuchida, T; Russell, W J

    1988-01-01

    On retrospective reviews of radiographs, periarthritis calcarea was distinguished from os acetabula by interval radiographic progression and regression. Among 59 men and 51 women, there were 137 instances of para-acetabular calcifications and ossifications, which were morphologically classified as 58 discrete, 58 amorphous, and 21 segmented types. Correlations with other radiographic abnormalities, symptoms, signs, and laboratory abnormalities were sought, but not established. Out of 93 serially imaged opacities, 90 changed, including 37 of the 40 instances (92.5%) of the discrete type and 53 instances (100%) of the amorphous and segmented types--due to periarthritis calcarea. At least 43 of 90 densities were newly developed. Mean age at first detection was 47.7 years. Three of the discrete densities were unchanged and represented os acetabula. Thus, recognition of para-acetabular periarthritis calcarea is not only of academic importance; it can facilitate proper treatment as well.

  19. Late sciatic nerve axonotmesis following acetabular reconstruction plate.

    PubMed

    Moreta, J; Foruria, X; Labayru, F

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries associated with acetabular fractures can be post-traumatic, perioperative or postoperative. Late postoperative injury is very uncommon and can be due to heterotopic ossifications, muscular scarring, or implant migration. A case is presented of a patient with a previous transverse acetabular fracture treated with a reconstruction plate for the posterior column. After 17 years, she presented with progressive pain and motor deficit in the sciatic territory. Radiological and neurophysiological assessments were performed and the patient underwent surgical decompression of the sciatic nerve. A transection of the nerve was observed that was due to extended compression of one of the screws. At 4 years postoperatively, her pain had substantially diminished and the paresthesias in her leg had resolved. However, her motor symptoms did not improve. This case report could be relevant due to this uncommon delayed sciatic nerve injury due to prolonged hardware impingement.

  20. Acetabular augmentation for the treatment of unstable total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J. E.; Koka, S. R.; Bintcliffe, I. W.; Addison, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight unstable total hip arthroplasties were treated with an acetabular augmentation wedge. Of the hips, 23 have had no further dislocations at a mean follow-up of 26 months. Five patients continued to dislocate and have needed further surgery. To our knowledge this is the largest reported series of acetabular augmentation with as good results as those of the most successful reported series of this technique, and a success rate comparable to other methods of treating recurrent dislocation. Careful patient selection, and using a thin augmentation wedge to avoid impingement, are important to the success of a technique which is a useful option in the management of recurrent dislocation. Images Figure 1 PMID:10364973

  1. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  2. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  3. Polyethylene liner cementation technique in asymptomatic versus symptomatic osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Leonid; Rivkin, Gurion; Friedman, Adi; Segal, David; Liebergall, Meir; Mattan, Yoav

    2009-08-01

    Osteolysis around a cementless acetabular component can lead to severe bone loss. This study examined whether osteolysis should be treated while still asymptomatic. Thirty-seven liner cementation revisions were performed in 34 patients. Mean patient age was 61 years, and mean time elapsed after index surgery was 85 months (range, 36-168 months). Patients were evaluated by Harris Hip Score (HHS), and mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 43-82 months). Average HHS was 87 with a pain component of 39. In asymptomatic patients, both the HHS and the pain score were significantly higher: 95 and 43, respectively (P<.01). One patient with extensive bone loss had a fracture of the acetabulum and underwent revision at another institution. Revision of the polyethylene liner and cementation of a new one is a useful technique in patients with a stable acetabular shell. This is especially true for asymptomatic patients with osteolysis and thus should be performed early; however, high dislocation rate is still a concern.

  4. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  5. Cemented and cementless fixation: results and techniques.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Craig D

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple reports of successful cemented and cementless total knee arthroplasty in the current literature. Although technically more demanding to implant, selected cementless designs, with nearly 20 years of follow-up, demonstrate near-equal success compared with cemented implants, the gold standard. Far more important than the decision to use a cemented or cementless implant is the use of precise technique, adequate balancing of the soft tissues, and proper overall alignment. Failure to achieve these basic principles can lead to early failure in any total knee replacement system.

  6. [Protrusio acetabuli. An update on the primary and secondary acetabular protrusion].

    PubMed

    Kindynis, P; Garcia, J

    1990-01-01

    Acetabular protrusion refers to intrapelvic displacement of the medial wall of the acetabulum and is defined as inward movement of the acetabular line so that the distance between this line and the laterally located ilioischial line is 3 mm or more in adult men and 6 mm or more in adult women. As discussed in this article, acetabular protrusion may be found in many bone disorders such as degenerative joint disease, Paget's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, osteomalacia, Marfan's disease and as an effect of irradiation. Protrusio acetabuli appearing in absence of any recognizable cause is termed primary acetabular protrusion or Otto pelvis. Primary acetabular protrusion usually affects both hips in young to middle aged women with a history of diminished abduction, rotation and hip pain since puberty. Radiographically one notes a bilateral axial migration of the femoral head without joint space loss and with moderate degenerative changes.

  7. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction as a reason for the development of acetabular retroversion: a new theory.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Acetabular retroversion has been recently implicated as an important factor in the development of femoral acetabular impingement and hip osteoarthritis. The proper function of the hip joint requires that the anatomic features of the acetabulum and femoral head complement one another. In acetabular retroversion, the alignment of the acetabulum is altered where it opens in a posterolaterally instead of anterior direction. Changes in acetabular orientation can occur with alterations in pelvic tilt (anterior/posterior), and pelvic rotation (left/right). An overlooked problem that alters pelvic tilt and rotation, often seen by physical therapists, is sacroiliac joint dysfunction. A unique feature that develops in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) is asymmetry between the left and right innominate bones that can alter pelvic tilt and rotation. This article puts forth a theory suggesting that acetabular retroversion may be produced by sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

  8. Improving acetabular cup orientation in total hip arthroplasty by using smartphone technology.

    PubMed

    Peters, Frank M; Greeff, Richard; Goldstein, Neal; Frey, Chris T

    2012-08-01

    Acetabular cup placement in total hip arthroplasty is often difficult to assess, especially in the lateral position and using the posterior approach. Conventional techniques and computer-assisted surgery are the 2 most popular methods for proper placement of the acetabular cup in Lewinnek's safe zone of orientation (anteversion 15° ± 10° and lateral inclination 40° ± 10°). We developed a system that uses the accelerometer and camera function of the iPhone. A level indicator application and protractor application were downloaded to the iPhone and used to improve acetabular cup placement. This system has proven to be accurate and quick. Our series of 50 prospective cases showed good results with all our acetabular cups being placed within a narrow range in the safe zone and with less than 5% difference between the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative acetabular inclinations.

  9. Cementing multilateral wells with latex cement

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A multilateral well is a well with one or more branches or lateral sections extending from its main wellbore. The laterals can be openhole or cased hole. When laterals are cased hole, the cement integrity for casing support and zonal isolation is very important. When cementing the lateral sections of multilateral wells, it is important to use a cement with high strength and durability to support the liner throughout the life of the well and to support the lateral section. The cement column is subjected to various stresses when the cemented inner stub is cut. High tensile strength, flexural strength, and crack resistance are required. These properties are necessary to make a clean cut through the cement sheath that does not induce cracks in the cement column. Latex cement is commonly used for its gas-migration-control property.

  10. Three-dimensional acetabular orientation measurement in a reliable coordinate system among one hundred Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Henghui; Wang, Yiping; Ai, Songtao; Chen, Xiaojun; Wang, Liao; Dai, Kerong

    2017-01-01

    Determining three-dimensional (3D) acetabular orientation is important for several orthopaedic scenarios, but the complex geometries of both pelvis and acetabulum make measurements of orientation unreliable. Acetabular orientation may also differ between the sexes or racial groups. We aimed to (1) establish and evaluate a novel method for measuring 3D acetabular orientation, (2) apply this new method to a large population of Chinese subjects, and (3) report relevant characteristics of native acetabular orientation in this population. We obtained computed tomography scans taken for non-orthopaedic indications in 100 Chinese subjects (50 male, 50 female). A novel algorithm tailored to segmentation of the hip joint was used to construct 3D pelvic models from these scans. We developed a surface-based method to establish a reliable 3D pelvic coordinate system and software to semi-automatically measure 3D acetabular orientation. Differences in various acetabular orientations were compared within and between subjects, between male and female subjects, and between our subjects and subjects previously reported by another group. The reported method was reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.999). Acetabular orientations were symmetrical within subjects, but ranged widely between subjects. The sexes differed significantly in acetabular anteversion (average difference, 3.0°; p < 0.001) and inclination (1.5°; p < 0.03). Acetabular anteversion and inclination were substantially smaller among our Chinese subjects than previously reported for American subjects. Thus, our method was reliable and sensitive, and we detected sex differences in 3D acetabular orientation. Awareness of differences between the sexes and races is the first step towards better reconstruction of the hip joint for all individuals and could also be applied to other orthopaedic scenarios. PMID:28207829

  11. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  12. Cement design based on cement mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Thiercelin, M.J.; Dargaud, B.; Baret, J.F.; Rodriquez, W.J.

    1998-12-01

    The disappearance of cement bond log response as a result of variations of downhole conditions has been observed in numerous wells. This observation has led to concern about the loss of proper zonal isolation. Stresses induced in the cement, through deformation of the cemented casing resulting from the variation of downhole conditions, are the cause of this damage. The authors present an analysis of the mechanical response of set cement in a cased wellbore to quantify this damage and determine the key controlling parameters. The results show that the thermo-elastic properties of the casing, cement, and formation play a significant role. The type of failure, either cement debonding or cement cracking, is a function of the nature of the downhole condition variations. This analysis allows one to propose appropriate cement mechanical properties to avoid cement failure and debonding. The authors show that the use of high compressive strength cement is not always the best solution and, in some cases, flexible cements are preferred.

  13. [Application of three-dimensional printing personalized acetabular wing-plate in treatment of complex acetabular fractures via lateral-rectus approach].

    PubMed

    Mai, J G; Gu, C; Lin, X Z; Li, T; Huang, W Q; Wang, H; Tan, X Y; Lin, H; Wang, Y M; Yang, Y Q; Jin, D D; Fan, S C

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To investigate reduction and fixation of complex acetabular fractures using three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and personalized acetabular wing-plate via lateral-rectus approach. Methods: From March to July 2016, 8 patients with complex acetabular fractures were surgically managed through 3D printing personalized acetabular wing-plate via lateral-rectus approach at Department of Orthopedics, the Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University. There were 4 male patients and 4 female patients, with an average age of 57 years (ranging from 31 to 76 years). According to Letournel-Judet classification, there were 2 anterior+ posterior hemitransverse fractures and 6 both-column fractures, without posterior wall fracture or contralateral pelvic fracture. The CT data files of acetabular fracture were imported into the computer and 3D printing technique was used to print the fractures models after reduction by digital orthopedic technique. The acetabular wing-plate was designed and printed with titanium. All fractures were treated via the lateral-rectus approach in a horizontal position after general anesthesia. The anterior column and the quadrilateral surface fractures were fixed by 3D printing personalized acetabular wing-plate, and the posterior column fractures were reduction and fixed by antegrade lag screws under direct vision. Results: All the 8 cases underwent the operation successfully. Postoperative X-ray and CT examination showed excellent or good reduction of anterior and posterior column, without any operation complications. Only 1 case with 75 years old was found screw loosening in the pubic bone with osteoporosis after 1 month's follow-up, who didn't accept any treatment because the patient didn't feel discomfort. According to the Matta radiological evaluation, the reduction of the acetabular fracture was rated as excellent in 3 cases, good in 4 cases and fair in 1 case. All patients were followed up for 3 to 6 months and all

  14. [Association between allergy to benzoyl peroxide, vitiligo and implantation of a cemented total knee joint prosthesis: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Gothner, M; Ozokyay, L; Godau, P; Kälicke, T; Muhr, G; Schildhauer, T A; Dudda, M

    2011-09-01

    Allergies against bone cement or bone cement components have been well-described. We report on a 63-year-old patient who presented with progressive vitiligo all over the body after implantation of a cemented total knee replacement. A dermatological examination was performed and an allergy to benzoyl peroxide was found. A low-grade infection was diagnosed 5 months after implantation of the total knee replacement and the prosthesis was replaced with a cement spacer. After treating the infection of the knee replacement non-cemented arthrodesis of the knee was performed. In cases of new, unknown skin efflorescence, urticaria and periprosthetic loosening of cemented joint replacement, the differential diagnosis should include not only infections but also possible allergies against bone-cement and components such as benzoyl peroxide or metal components.

  15. Decreased Lumbar Lordosis and Deficient Acetabular Coverage Are Risk Factors for Subchondral Insufficiency Fracture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head occurs in the elderly and recipients of organ transplantation. Osteoporosis and deficient lateral coverage of the acetabulum are known risk factors for SIF. There has been no study about relation between spinopelvic alignment and anterior acetabular coverage with SIF. We therefore asked whether a decrease of lumbar lordosis and a deficiency in the anterior acetabular coverage are risk factors. We investigated 37 patients with SIF. There were 33 women and 4 men, and their mean age was 71.5 years (59-85 years). These 37 patients were matched with 37 controls for gender, age, height, weight, body mass index and bone mineral density. We compared the lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, acetabular index, acetabular roof angle, acetabular head index, anterior center-edge angle and lateral center-edge angle. Lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, lateral center edge angle, anterior center edge angle, acetabular index and acetabular head index were significantly different between SIF group and control group. Lumbar lordosis (OR = 1.11), lateral center edge angle (OR = 1.30) and anterior center edge angle (OR = 1.27) had significant associations in multivariate analysis. Decreased lumbar lordosis and deficient anterior coverage of the acetabulum are risk factors for SIF as well as decreased lateral coverage of the acetabulum. PMID:27550496

  16. Automated measurement of anterior and posterior acetabular sector angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a segmentation algorithm by which anatomical landmarks on the pelvis are extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. The landmarks are used to automatically define the anterior (AASA) and posterior acetabular sector angles (PASA) describing the degree of hip misalignment. The center of each femoral head is obtained by searching for the point at which most intensity gradient vectors defined at edge points intersect. The radius of each femoral head is computed by finding the sphere, positioned at the center of the femoral head, for which the normalized sum of gradient vector magnitudes on the sphere surface is maximal. The anterior and posterior corners of each acetabulum are searched for on a curve representing the acetabulum and defined by dynamic programming. The femoral head centers and anterior and posterior corners are used to calculate the AASA and PASA. The algorithm was applied to CT images of 120 normal subjects and the results were compared to ground truth values obtained by manual segmentation. The mean absolute difference (+/- standard deviation) between the obtained and ground truth values was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mm for the femoral head centers and 2.1 +/- 1.3 degrees for the acetabular angles.

  17. Atypical periprosthetic acetabular fracture in long-term alendronate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Giuseppe; Capone, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bisphosphonates have been commonly used in the treatment of osteoporosis, demonstrating its efficacy in fracture risk reduction. However, even if are generally safe and well tolerated, concerns have emerged about atypical fractures related to its prolonged use. Although atypical femoral fracture are more common, case reports demonstrated that even other skeletal areas can be involved by unusual pattern of fracture. We report a atypical acetabular periprosthetic fracture in a 83-year-old female patient after prolonged alendronate treatment for osteoporosis and isolated acetabular revision surgery. The patient underwent to clinical, bioumoral and radiological evaluation and all the history cases were fully reported. We believe this periprosthetic fracture, according to the available data, may have similar underlying pathology to atypical femoral fractures. Awareness of symptoms, in addition to a regular radiographic survey may facilitate early diagnosis and possible prevention of spontaneous periprosthetic fractures, in patients receiving bisphosphonate therapy beyond 5 years. The treatment of this atypical periprosthetic fracture should include both surgical than pharmacological therapy to obtained bone healing. PMID:28228784

  18. Explicit finite element modelling of the impaction of metal press-fit acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Hothi, H S; Busfield, J J C; Shelton, J C

    2011-03-01

    Metal press-fit cups and shells are widely used in hip resurfacing and total hip replacement procedures. These acetabular components are inserted into a reamed acetabula cavity by either impacting their inner polar surface (shells) or outer rim (cups). Two-dimensional explicit dynamics axisymmetric finite element models were developed to simulate these impaction methods. Greater impact velocities were needed to insert the components when the interference fit was increased; a minimum velocity of 2 m/s was required to fully seat a component with a 2 mm interference between the bone and outer diameter. Changing the component material from cobalt-chromium to titanium alloy resulted in a reduction in the number of impacts on the pole to seat it from 14 to nine. Of greatest significance, it was found that locking a rigid cap to the cup or shell rim resulted in up to nine fewer impactions being necessary to seat it than impacting directly on the polar surface or using a cap free from the rim of the component, as is the case with many commercial resurfacing cup impaction devices currently used. This is important to impactor design and could make insertion easier and also reduce acetabula bone damage.

  19. Acetabular revision with freeze-dried irradiated and chemically treated allograft: a minimum 5-year follow-up of 17 cases

    PubMed Central

    Caton, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 17 consecutive revision total hip arthroplasties performed with the use of freeze-dried irradiated bone allograft in 15 patients. These allografts were used in conjunction with five Kerboull rings, two steel meshes and ten cemented isolated cups. All the patients have had a follow-up of at least 5 years. The patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically. No revisions were necessary and X-rays confirmed partial or total ingrowth of the allografts. In acetabular revision surgery, hip reconstruction can be successfully treated by freeze-dried irradiated and chemically treated allografts. Additional studies with longer term follow-up are necessary to confirm this outcome. PMID:17828537

  20. Ankle replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... is surgery to replace the damaged bone and cartilage in the ankle joint. Artificial joint parts (prosthetics) ... Your surgeon will remove the damaged bone and cartilage. Your surgeon will replace the damaged part of: ...

  1. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. (Watch the video to learn about what goes ...

  2. Vacuum-mixing cement does not decrease overall porosity in cemented femoral stems: AN IN VITRO LABORATORY INVESTIGATION

    PubMed Central

    Messick, K. J.; Miller, M. A.; Damron, L. A.; Race, A.; Clarke, M. T.; Mann, K. A.

    2008-01-01

    The role of vacuum mixing on the reduction of porosity and on the clinical performance of cemented total hip replacements remains uncertain. We have used paired femoral constructs prepared with either hand-mixed or vacuum-mixed cement in a cadaver model which simulated intra-operative conditions during cementing of the femoral component. After the cement had cured, the distribution of its porosity was determined, as was the strength of the cement-stem and cement-bone interfaces. The overall fraction of the pore area was similar for both hand-mixed and vacuum-mixed cement (hand 6%; vacuum 5.7%; paired t-test, p = 0.187). The linear pore fractions at the interfaces were also similar for the two techniques. The pore number-density was much higher for the hand-mixed cement (paired t-test, p = 0.0013). The strength of the cement-stem interface was greater with the hand-mixed cement (paired t-test, p = 0.0005), while the strength of the cement-bone interface was not affected by the conditions of mixing (paired t-test, p = 0.275). The reduction in porosity with vacuum mixing did not affect the porosity of the mantle, but the distribution of the porosity can be affected by the technique of mixing used. PMID:17785755

  3. A biomechanical study of periacetabular defects and cement filling.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoping; Butala, Neha B; Etheridge, Brandon S; Siegel, Herrick J; Lemons, Jack E; Eberhardt, Alan W

    2007-04-01

    Periacetabular bone metastases cause severe pain and functional disability in cancer patients. Percutaneous acetabuloplasty (PCA) is a minimally invasive, image-guided procedure whereby cement is injected into lesion sites. Pain relief and functional restoration have been observed clinically; however, neither the biomechanical consequences of the lesions nor the effectiveness of the PCA technique are well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate how periacetabular lesion size, cortex involvement, and cement modulus affect pelvic bone stresses and strains under single-legged stance loading. Experiments were performed on a male cadaver pelvis under conditions of intact, periacetabular defect, and cement-filling with surface strains recorded at three strain gage locations. The experimental data were then employed to validate three-dimensional finite element models of the same pelvis, developed using computed tomography data. The models demonstrated that increases in cortical stresses were highest along the posterior column of the acetabulum, adjacent to the defect. Cortical stresses were more profoundly affected in the presence of transcortical defects, as compared to those involving only trabecular bone. Cement filling with a modulus of 2.2 GPa was shown to restore cortical stresses to near intact values, while a decrease in cement modulus due to inclusion of BaSO(4) reduced the restorative effect. Peak acetabular contact pressures increased less than 15% for all simulated defect conditions; however, the contact stresses were reduced to levels below intact in the presence of either cement filling. These results suggest that periacetabular defects may increase the vulnerability of the pelvis to fracture depending on size and cortical involvement and that PCA filling may lower the risk of periacetabular fractures.

  4. Strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bioactive bone cement in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Chiu, K Y; Lu, W W; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y G; Hao, L B; Li, Z Y; Lam, W M; Lu, S B; Luk, K D K

    2006-08-01

    Clinical outcome of cemented implants to revision total hip replacement (THR) is not as satisfactory as primary THR, due to the loss of bone stock and normal trabecular pattern. This study evaluated a bioactive bone cement, strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bone cement, in a goat revision hip hemi-arthroplasty model, and compared outcomes with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months after operation, significantly higher bonding strength was found in the Sr-HA group (3.36+/-1.84 MPa) than in the PMMA bone cement group (1.23+/-0.73 MPa). After detached from the femoral component, the surface of PMMA bone cement mantle was shown relatively smooth, whereas the surface of the Sr-HA bioactive bone cement mantle was uneven, by SEM observation. EDX analysis detected little calcium and no phosphorus on the surface of PMMA bone cement mantle, while high content of calcium (14.03%) and phosphorus (10.37%) was found on the surface of the Sr-HA bone cement mantle. Even higher content of calcium (17.37%) and phosphorus (10.84%) were detected in the concave area. Intimate contact between Sr-HA bioactive bone cement and bone was demonstrated by histological and SEM observation. New bone bonded to the surface of Sr-HA cement and grew along its surface. However, fibrous tissue was observed between PMMA bone cement and bone. The results showed good bioactivity of Sr-HA bioactive bone cement in this revision hip replacement model using goats. This in vivo study also suggested that Sr-HA bioactive bone cement was superior to PMMA bone cement in terms of bone-bonding strength. Use of bioactive bone cement may be a possible solution overcoming problems associated with the use of PMMA bone cement in revision hip replacement.

  5. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  6. [Use of the anatomical cemented femoral stem SAS I: mid-term results].

    PubMed

    Mikláš, M; Pink, M; Valoušek, T

    2015-01-01

    is an implant made to fit the proximal femur anatomy. Its highly polished surface allows for optimal fitting with the supporting bone and for even distribution of weight bearing. This results in a low rate of THA failure. In accordance with the relevant literature, the acetabular components is considered to be the weakest element in total hip replacement in terms of aseptic loosening and implant failure. At present, the SAS I stem has no Morse Eurocone taper and this is the chief obstacle hindering its more frequent use in endoprosthetics. CONCLUSIONS The results of our study are in agreement with those of other successfully implanted polished cemented femoral components. Key words: anatomical cemented femoral component, surface adjustment of the femoral stem, complications.

  7. A simplified method to determine acetabular cup anteversion from plain radiographs.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Karl-Heinz

    2004-04-01

    Plain radiographs are the most important diagnostic means for determining the indication and following up on total hip arthroplasty. The acetabular cup position can be easily determined by applying trigonometric functions. This report presents an even simpler method. The short axis of the projected ellipse is measured and related to the total cross-section of the projected cup along the short axis. This relationship correlates with acetabular cup anteversion angles and represents an inverse sinus function. A close linear correlation is seen within the most common interval from 10 degrees to 30 degrees. Anteversion is between 23 degrees to 24 degrees when the ellipse bisects the total acetabular cross-section. This means that simply measuring the length of the short ellipse axis and the total length of the projected cross-section along the short axis provides the radiographic acetabular anteversion. Nonorthogonal projected radiographs should be corrected first.

  8. Fixed-angle screws vs standard screws in acetabular prosthesis fixation: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hugate, Ronald R; Dickey, Ian D; Chen, Qingshan; Wood, Christina M; Sim, Franklin H; Rock, Michael G

    2009-08-01

    Secure fixation of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty can be challenging. The purpose of this study was to perform biomechanical analysis of cup fixation strength using fixed-angle vs standard screw fixation. Multihole, porous-backed acetabular prostheses were implanted in both acetabuli of 8 cadaveric pelves using standard press-fit techniques. Fixed-angle screws were used on the left side, and standard cancellous screws were used in the right. The use of fixed-angle screws enhanced acetabular fixation substantially under subfailure cyclic loading conditions and load-to-failure. The triradiate screw configuration increases the bending moment required to fail the specimens as well. Fixed-angle screws may be useful for achieving rigid fixation of acetabular prostheses in challenging clinical scenarios.

  9. Asphalt cement poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  11. Retained Sponge: A Rare Complication in Acetabular Osteosinthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Mañanes, Rubén Pérez; Rojo-Manaute, José; Moran-Blanco, Luz María; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Retained sponges after a surgical treatment of polytrauma may cause a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and present a difficult diagnostic problem. We report a case of retained surgical sponge in a 35-year-old man transferred from another hospital, that sustained a open acetabular fracture. The fracture was reduced through a limited ilio-inguinal approach. After 4 days, he presented massive wound dehiscence of the surgical approach. An abdominal CT scan showed, lying adjacent to the outer aspect of the left iliac crest, a mass of 10 cm, identified as probable foreign body. The possibility of this rare complication should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass. PMID:26312116

  12. Acetabular cartilage defects cause altered hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait

    PubMed Central

    Samaan, Michael A.; Teng, Hsiang-Ling; Kumar, Deepak; Lee, Sonia; Link, Thomas; Majumdar, Sharmila; Souza, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with acetabular cartilage defects reported increased pain and disability compared to those without acetabular cartilage defects. The specific effects of acetabular cartilage defects on lower extremity coordination patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage defects. Methods A combined approach, consisting of a semi-quantitative MRI-based quantification method and vector coding, was used to assess hip and knee joint coordination variability during gait in those with and without acetabular cartilage lesions. Findings The coordination variability of the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation, hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation and hip rotation/knee rotation joint couplings were reduced in the acetabular lesion group compared to the control group during loading response of the gait cycle. The lesion group demonstrated increased variability in the hip flexion-extension/knee rotation and hip abduction-adduction/knee rotation joint couplings, compared to the control group, during the terminal stance/pre-swing phase of gait. Interpretation Reduced variability during loading response in the lesion group may suggest reduced movement strategies and a possible compensation mechanism for lower extremity instability during this phase of the gait cycle. During terminal stance/pre-swing, a larger variability in the lesion group may suggest increased movement strategies and represent a compensation or pain avoidance mechanism caused by the load applied to the hip joint. PMID:26298706

  13. Value of 3-D CT in classifying acetabular fractures during orthopedic residency training.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jeffrey; Halvorson, Jason; Carroll, Eben; Webb, Lawrence X

    2012-05-01

    The complex anatomy of the pelvis and acetabulum have historically made classification and interpretation of acetabular fractures difficult for orthopedic trainees. The addition of 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) scan has gained popularity in preoperative planning, identification, and education of acetabular fractures given their complexity. Therefore, the authors examined the value of 3-D CT compared with conventional radiography in classifying acetabular fractures at different levels of orthopedic training. Their hypothesis was that 3-D CT would improve correct identification of acetabular fractures compared with conventional radiography.The classic Letournel fracture pattern classification system was presented in quiz format to 57 orthopedic residents and 20 fellowship-trained orthopedic traumatologists. A case consisted of (1) plain radiographs and 2-dimensional axial CT scans or (2) 3-D CT scans. All levels of training showed significant improvement in classifying acetabular fractures with 3-D vs 2-D CT, with the greatest benefit from 3-D CT found in junior residents (postgraduate years 1-3).Three-dimensional CT scans can be an effective educational tool for understanding the complex spatial anatomy of the pelvis, learning acetabular fracture patterns, and correctly applying a widely accepted fracture classification system.

  14. The contemporary cement cycle of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kapur, A.; Van Oss, H. G.; Keoleian, G.; Kesler, S.E.; Kendall, A.

    2009-01-01

    A country-level stock and flow model for cement, an important construction material, was developed based on a material flow analysis framework. Using this model, the contemporary cement cycle of the United States was constructed by analyzing production, import, and export data for different stages of the cement cycle. The United States currently supplies approximately 80% of its cement consumption through domestic production and the rest is imported. The average annual net addition of in-use new cement stock over the period 2000-2004 was approximately 83 million metric tons and amounts to 2.3 tons per capita of concrete. Nonfuel carbon dioxide emissions (42 million metric tons per year) from the calcination phase of cement manufacture account for 62% of the total 68 million tons per year of cement production residues. The end-of-life cement discards are estimated to be 33 million metric tons per year, of which between 30% and 80% is recycled. A significant portion of the infrastructure in the United States is reaching the end of its useful life and will need to be replaced or rehabilitated; this could require far more cement than might be expected from economic forecasts of demand for cement. ?? 2009 Springer Japan.

  15. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  16. The impact of surgeon handedness in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, A; Stewart, T; Stone, M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Total hip replacement (THR) is successful and performed commonly. Component placement is a determinant of outcome. Influence of surgeon handedness on component placement has not been considered previously. This study was a radiographic assessment of component positioning with respect to handedness. Early data from 160 patients are reported. Methods Overall, 160 primary THRs for osteoarthritis were included. Equal numbers of left and right THRs were performed by four surgeons, two right-handed and two left-handed. Postoperative radiography was assessed for THR component position by measurement of leg length inequality, acetabular inclination and centre of rotation. Surgeons’ handedness was assessed using the Edinburgh inventory. Results For leg length inequality, no significant interaction was seen between hip side and surgeon handedness. Acetabular inclination angles showed a statistically significant difference, however, depending on hand dominance, with higher inclination angles recorded when operating on the dominant side. There was a trend towards greater medialisation of the centre of rotation on the non-dominant side although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Surgeon handedness appears to influence acetabular component position during THR but it is one factor of many that interact to achieve a successful outcome. PMID:25198975

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of bone cement and bone cement/metal interface failure.

    PubMed

    Browne, M; Jeffers, J R T; Saffari, N

    2010-02-01

    To quantify the failure mechanisms related to the loosening of cemented hip joint replacements, novel techniques, capable of monitoring, nondestructively, the initiation and progression of failure during in vitro fatigue tests, were employed. Fatigue testing of model cement and cement-stem test pieces was monitored using acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Once damage was detected, an ultrasonic imaging system was used to obtain an image of the damage site and to measure the stiffness of the affected region. This method of examination provided a detailed insight into the internal crack propagation and delamination patterns. Initial work was conducted on bulk cement specimens subjected to bending and tension. The second stage of the work examined a model stem-cement interface under tensile opening loading conditions. A novel ultrasonic technique was used to measure the bond quality at the cement-metal interface. Progressive delamination was identified over time, and the AE technique was able to identify critical areas of delamination before they could be identified conclusively by ultrasonic imaging. The work has demonstrated the potential of the AE technique as a tool for the preclinical assessment of total hip replacements.

  18. Quantitative Computerized Assessment of the Degree of Acetabular Bone Deficiency: Total radial Acetabular Bone Loss (TrABL)

    PubMed Central

    Gelaude, Frederik; Clijmans, Tim; Delport, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    A novel quantitative, computerized, and, therefore, highly objective method is presented to assess the degree of total radical acetabular bone loss. The method, which is abbreviated to “TrABL”, makes use of advanced 3D CT-based image processing and effective 3D anatomical reconstruction methodology. The output data consist of a ratio and a graph, which can both be used for direct comparison between specimens. A first dataset of twelve highly deficient hemipelves, mainly Paprosky types IIIB, is used as illustration. Although generalization of the findings will require further investigation on a larger population, it can be assumed that the presented method has the potential to facilitate the preoperative use of existing classifications and related decision schemes for treatment selection in complex revision cases. PMID:22013539

  19. Magnesia-Based Cements: A Journey of 150 Years, and Cements for the Future?

    PubMed

    Walling, Sam A; Provis, John L

    2016-04-13

    This review examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 150 years of work worldwide on magnesium-based inorganic cements, with a focus on both scientific and patent literature. Magnesium carbonate, phosphate, silicate-hydrate, and oxysalt (both chloride and sulfate) cements are all assessed. Many such cements are ideally suited to specialist applications in precast construction, road repair, and other fields including nuclear waste immobilization. The majority of MgO-based cements are more costly to produce than Portland cement because of the relatively high cost of reactive sources of MgO and do not have a sufficiently high internal pH to passivate mild steel reinforcing bars. This precludes MgO-based cements from providing a large-scale replacement for Portland cement in the production of steel-reinforced concretes for civil engineering applications, despite the potential for CO2 emissions reductions offered by some such systems. Nonetheless, in uses that do not require steel reinforcement, and in locations where the MgO can be sourced at a competitive price, a detailed understanding of these systems enables their specification, design, and selection as advanced engineering materials with a strongly defined chemical basis.

  20. A novel liposomal drug delivery system for PMMA bone cements

    PubMed Central

    Birchall, James C.; Evans, Samuel L.; Denyer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The population in developed countries is ageing and the number of people experiencing joint‐related conditions, such as osteoarthritis, is expected to increase. Joint replacements are currently the most effective treatment for severe joint conditions and although many of these procedures are successful, infection developing after the procedure is still an issue, requiring complex and expensive revisions. Whilst incorporating a powdered antibiotic within the bone cement can reduce infection rates, the powder frequently agglomerates, resulting in poor antibiotic release characteristics and compromised mechanical performance of the cement. To overcome these issues, a novel delivery system consisting of antibiotic‐loaded nano‐sized liposomes was developed for inclusion into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. This system was tested in a commercial cement (Palacos R) and consistently delivered a higher percentage (22%) of the incorporated antibiotic when compared to the powdered antibiotic cement (9%), meaning less antibiotic needs to be incorporated than with conventional cement. The novel system resulted in a controlled and gradual release of antibiotic over a longer, 30‐day period and enhanced the toughness, bending strength and Vickers hardness of the cement, without altering its polymerization or molecular structure. This new material has the potential to significantly reduce infections in cemented joint replacements leading to enhanced patient quality of life and reduced healthcare costs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1510–1524, 2016. PMID:26256271

  1. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  4. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  5. Effect of Metakaolin on Strength and Efflorescence Quantity of Cement-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tsai-Lung; Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the basic mechanical and microscopic properties of cement produced with metakaolin and quantified the production of residual white efflorescence. Cement mortar was produced at various replacement ratios of metakaolin (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25% by weight of cement) and exposed to various environments. Compressive strength and efflorescence quantify (using Matrix Laboratory image analysis and the curettage method), scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were reported in this study. Specimens with metakaolin as a replacement for Portland cement present higher compressive strength and greater resistance to efflorescence; however, the addition of more than 20% metakaolin has a detrimental effect on strength and efflorescence. This may be explained by the microstructure and hydration products. The quantity of efflorescence determined using MATLAB image analysis is close to the result obtained using the curettage method. The results demonstrate the best effectiveness of replacing Portland cement with metakaolin at a 15% replacement ratio by weight. PMID:23737719

  6. Shoulder replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... the opening at the end of the shoulder blade, called the socket. This type of joint allows ... head. The socket part (glenoid) of your shoulder blade will be replaced with a smooth plastic shell ( ...

  7. Hydration Characteristics of Metakaolin Admixtured Cement using DTA, XRD and SEM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, D.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2008-04-01

    The paper aims to investigate hydration and pozzolanic reaction in Portland cement paste with different replacement percentages (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%) of metakaolin. The compressive strength of the metakaolin admixtured cement was measured at 1 day, 1 week and 4 weeks. The compressive strength developments of the metakaolin admixtured cement are compared with Portland cement. It is found that metakaolin contributes significantly to strength development as an accelerating admixture for Portland cement. The pozzolanic reactions and the reaction products were determined by DTA, XRD and SEM.

  8. Femoral Version, Neck-Shaft Angle, and Acetabular Anteversion in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Peng, Lin; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Xie, Guo-Ping; Yang, Qin-Meng; Chai, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Yu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anatomic data regarding femoral version, neck-shaft angle, and acetabular anteversion are still limited in Chinese Han adult population. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of age, sex, and body laterality on the 3 important anatomic indicators in Chinese Han healthy adults. Measurements were performed independently by 3 experienced observers using the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) in healthy adults who had received imaging tests of the femur and acetabulum between January 2009 and October 2014. Relevant data were measured and analyzed. A total of 466 adults (353 males and 113 females) were included. The mean femoral version, neck-shaft angle, and acetabular anteversion for all were 10.62, 133.02, and18.79, respectively. Age-based analysis showed that adults younger than 60 years had a significantly higher neck-shaft angle (P < 0.001) but a significantly lower acetabular anteversion (P < 0.001) than those older than 60 years. Sex-based analysis revealed that females had significantly higher values of femoral version (P < 0.001) and acetabular anteversion (P < 0.001) than males. Laterality-based analysis found the left side had a significantly lower acetabular anteversion (P < 0.001) than the right side. Outcomes of multiple linear regression analysis indicated that femoral version may be associated with sex (P < 0.001) but not age (P = 0.076) or laterality (P = 0.430), neck-shaft angle may be associated with age (P < 0.001) but not sex (P = 0.378) or laterality (P = 0.233), and acetabular anteversion may be associated with age (P < 0.001) and sex (P < 0.001) but not laterality (P = 0.060). In this representative Chinese cohort, neck-shaft angle may decrease, whereas acetabular anteversion may increase with age, females may have higher values of femoral version and acetabular anteversion than males, and the right body side may have a higher value of acetabular

  9. Predictors of poor outcome after both column acetabular fractures: a 30-year retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acetabular fractures are often combined with associated injuries to the hip joint. Some of these associated injuries seem to be responsible for poor long-term results and these injuries seem to affect the outcome independent of the quality of the acetabular reduction. The aim of our study was to analyze the outcome of both column acetabular fractures and the influence of osseous cofactors such as initial fracture displacement, hip dislocation, femoral head lesions and injuries of the acetabular joint surface. Methods A retrospective cohort study in patients with both column acetabular fractures treated over a 30 year period was performed. Patients with a follow-up of more than two years were invited for a clinical and radiological examination. Displacement was analyzed on initial and postoperative radiographs. Contusion and impaction of the femoral head was grouped. Injuries of the acetabular joint surface consisting of impaction, contusion and comminution were recorded. The Merle d’Aubigné Score was documented and radiographs were analysed for arthritis (Helfet classification), femoral head avascular necrosis (Ficat/Arlet classification) and heterotopic ossifications (Brooker classification). Results 115 patients were included in the follow up examination. Anatomic reduction (malreduction ≤ 1mm) was associated with a significantly better clinical outcome than nonanatomical reduction (p = 0.001). Initial displacement of more than 10mm (p = 0.031) and initial intraarticular fragments (p = 0.041) were associated with worse outcome. Other associated injuries, such as the presence of a femoral head dislocation, femoral head injuries and injuries to the acetabular joint surface showed no significant difference in outcome individually, but in fractures with more than two associated local injuries the risk for joint degeneration was significant higher (p < 0.001) than in cases with less than two of them. In the subgroup of

  10. Optimisation of a two-liquid component pre-filled acrylic bone cement system: a design of experiments approach to optimise cement final properties.

    PubMed

    Clements, James; Walker, Gavin; Pentlavalli, Sreekanth; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    The initial composition of acrylic bone cement along with the mixing and delivery technique used can influence its final properties and therefore its clinical success in vivo. The polymerisation of acrylic bone cement is complex with a number of processes happening simultaneously. Acrylic bone cement mixing and delivery systems have undergone several design changes in their advancement, although the cement constituents themselves have remained unchanged since they were first used. This study was conducted to determine the factors that had the greatest effect on the final properties of acrylic bone cement using a pre-filled bone cement mixing and delivery system. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to determine the impact of the factors associated with this mixing and delivery method on the final properties of the cement produced. The DoE illustrated that all factors present within this study had a significant impact on the final properties of the cement. An optimum cement composition was hypothesised and tested. This optimum recipe produced cement with final mechanical and thermal properties within the clinical guidelines and stated by ISO 5833 (International Standard Organisation (ISO), International standard 5833: implants for surgery-acrylic resin cements, 2002), however the low setting times observed would not be clinically viable and could result in complications during the surgical technique. As a result further development would be required to improve the setting time of the cement in order for it to be deemed suitable for use in total joint replacement surgery.

  11. Pelvic Incidence: A Predictive Factor for Three-Dimensional Acetabular Orientation—A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bollini, Gérard; Legaye, Jean; Tardieu, Christine; Prat-Pradal, Dominique; Chabrol, Brigitte; Jouve, Jean-Luc; Duval-Beaupère, Ginette; Pélissier, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Acetabular cup orientation (inclination and anteversion) is a fundamental topic in orthopaedics and depends on pelvis tilt (positional parameter) emphasising the notion of a safe range of pelvis tilt. The hypothesis was that pelvic incidence (morphologic parameter) could yield a more accurate and reliable assessment than pelvis tilt. The aim was to find out a predictive equation of acetabular 3D orientation parameters which were determined by pelvic incidence to include in the model. The second aim was to consider the asymmetry between the right and left acetabulae. Twelve pelvic anatomic specimens were measured with an electromagnetic Fastrak system (Polhemus Society) providing 3D position of anatomical landmarks to allow measurement of acetabular and pelvic parameters. Acetabulum and pelvis data were correlated by a Spearman matrix. A robust linear regression analysis provided prediction of acetabulum axes. The orientation of each acetabulum could be predicted by the incidence. The incidence is correlated with the morphology of acetabula. The asymmetry of the acetabular roof was correlated with pelvic incidence. This study allowed analysis of relationships of acetabular orientation and pelvic incidence. Pelvic incidence (morphologic parameter) could determine the safe range of pelvis tilt (positional parameter) for an individual and not a group. PMID:25006461

  12. Management of an Open Acetabular Fracture in a Skeletally Immature Patient

    PubMed Central

    Clutter, Sarah Y; Morgan, Steven J; Erickson, Mark; Smith, Wade R; Stahel, Philip F

    2007-01-01

    Background: Open acetabular fractures in children are rare, but potentially devastating injuries. Secondary to the low incidence, there is an apparent lack of reports on appropriate management strategies for open pediatric acetabular fractures in the literature. Methods: Description of a case study. Results: A 3 years and ten months-old girl was ejected as a passenger from an all terrain vehicle. She sustained a displaced, grade IIIA open left anterior column acetabular fracture. The injury was treated by extending the open wound to a formal first window of the ilioinguinal approach. After surgical debridement, the anterior column was reduced anatomically and fixed by two lag screws which avoided the tri-radiate cartilage. A vaginal laceration was debrided and repaired. The patient was treated in a spica cast without weight bearing on the left lower extremity for 8 weeks. No perioperative complications occurred. The acetabular fracture healed in an anatomic position within 8 weeks. To avoid premature closure of the tri-radiate cartilage, the patient underwent a physeal bar resection at one year after injury. At two-year follow up, she was walking and running without pain and had a free range of motion of her left hip. Conclusions: Operative management should represent the therapy of choice for open, displaced pediatric acetabular fractures. After fracture healing, a scheduled physeal bar resection may be required for injuries which involve the tri-radiate cartilage. PMID:19461903

  13. Gelatin powders accelerate the resorption of calcium phosphate cement and improve healing in the alveolar ridge.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Goichi; Sugita, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Katsutoshi; Yoshida, Waka; Ikada, Yoshito; Sobajima, Satoshi; Neo, Masashi; Maeda, Hatsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yukihiko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of combining calcium phosphate cement and gelatin powders to promote bone regeneration in the canine mandible. We mixed gelatin powders with calcium phosphate cement to create a macroporous composite. In four beagle dogs, two saddle-type bone defects were created on each side of the mandible, and calcium phosphate cement alone or calcium phosphate cement containing composite gelatin powders was implanted in each of the defects. After a healing period of six months, mandibles were removed for µCT and histological analyses. The µCT and histological analyses showed that at experimental sites at which calcium phosphate cement alone had been placed new bone had formed only around the periphery of the residual calcium phosphate cement and that there had been little or no ingrowth into the calcium phosphate cement. On the other hand, at experimental sites at which calcium phosphate cement containing composite gelatin powders had been placed, we observed regenerated new bone in the interior of the residual calcium phosphate cement as well as around its periphery. The amount of resorption of calcium phosphate cement and bone regeneration depended on the mixing ratio of gelatin powders to calcium phosphate cement. New bone replacement was significantly better in the sites treated with calcium phosphate cement containing composite gelatin powders than in those treated with calcium phosphate cement alone.

  14. Improvement of casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Part 2: Oilfield cements and cement additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, K. H.; Akstinat, M.

    1982-07-01

    Oilfield cements and cement additives were investigated in order to improve the casing cementation of deep and ultradeep wells. Characterization and evaluation of the main oil field cements commercially available were studied. The testing was carried out according to American Petroleum Institute API standards and nonstandardized test methods (dynamic modulus of elasticity, expansion/shrinkage), especially the rheology, thickening time and the influence of pressure, temperature and water-cement ratio, were considered. The main emphasis in the field of cement additives was on the evaluation of cement retarders for high temperatures, accelerators, and additives for cement expansion. Furthermore oil field cements were tested, and their properties are described.

  15. Abyssal seep site cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A.C.; Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.; Commeau, J.

    1988-01-01

    The deepest submarine cements known so far occur along the 3,300-m deep base of the Florida escarpment and are associated with methane-bearing brine seeps, which emanate there. These deep Holocene carbonates, which occur as surficial and buried crusts, burrow fillings, and friable horizons, were sampled via ALVIN. The carbonates form irregular halos extending up to 20 m from seeps colonized by chemosynthetic fauna. Mussels, gastropods, and clams, the carbonate components of the community, produce a shell hash that is locally cemented by coarsely crystalline low-Mg calcite. Halos of palisade calcite are reminiscent of ancient examples of marine cements. Also present are carbonate hemipelagics cemented by micrite into crusts and burrow fillings. The degree of cementation varies from pervasive to light. Slabs of cemented crust up to 30 cm thick contrast with typical shallow crusts and exhibit irregular tops and smooth bottoms indicating different chemical gradients and pathways.

  16. Cementation of indirect restorations: an overview of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stamatacos, Catherine; Simon, James F

    2013-01-01

    The process of ensuring proper retention, marginal seal, and durability of indirect restorations depends heavily on effective cementation. Careful consideration must be made when selecting an adhesive cement for a given application. This article provides information on resin cements that can guide clinicians in determining which type of cement is best suited to their clinical needs regarding cementation of indirect restorations. Emphasis is placed on successful cementation of all-ceramic restorations.

  17. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  18. The effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of revision hip arthroplasty: a finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, A T M; Pankaj; Usmani, A S; Howie, C R

    2004-01-01

    The study uses idealized two-dimensional finite element models to examine the behaviour of the acetabular construct following revision hip arthroplasty, carried out using the Slooff-Ling impaction grafting technique. The behaviour of bone graft was considered in detail, with non-linear elasticity and non-associated plasticity being adopted. Load was applied to the acetabular construct through a femoral head using smooth sliding surfaces. In particular, four models were subjected to two idealized cyclic load cases to investigate the effect of acetabular cup size on the short-term stability of the acetabular construct. The study suggests that benefits may be gained by using the largest practical size of acetabular cup.

  19. A new predictive indicator by arthrography for future acetabular growth following conservative treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Satsuma, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kinugasa, Maki; Takeoka, Yoshiki; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find a new predictive indicator for acetabular growth of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Seventy-three hips that were diagnosed with developmental dysplasia of the hip and treated by conservative reduction were included in our study. In 30 hips with center-edge angle ≤ 10° at age 4, the center-edge of the acetabular limbus angle (CEALA) in the arthrogram was measured. On the basis of the results, CEALA was significantly smaller in the secondary acetabular dysplasia group than in the normal group at maturity. In conclusion, CEALA is a more reliable and accurate predictive indicator for acetabular development than center-edge angle or acetabular index.

  20. Shape variability of the adult human acetabulum and acetabular fossa related to sex and age by geometric morphometrics. Implications for adult age estimation.

    PubMed

    San-Millán, Marta; Rissech, Carme; Turbón, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to explore shape variability of the acetabulum during the human adult life span, in relation to sex and age. The human acetabular shape was analysed in 682 os coxae from three different documented skeletal collections from the Iberian Peninsula. Two landmarks and thirty-two sliding semi-landmarks were used for the geometric morphometric procedures and a clock-wise standard was used for orientation. The 180° meridian (6:00) line was positioned over the midpoint of the acetabular notch and 36 reference points in 10° increments along the rim were marked. Data showed that size, sex and age significantly influence acetabular shape variation. Sex differences were significant in individuals younger than 65 years old and were characterised by males exhibiting relatively extended acetabular rim profiles from 10:00 to 1:00, narrower acetabular notches, and reduced acetabular fossae. In addition, three main age-related changes occurred to the acetabular shape in both sexes: outer acetabular profile modification, with extension from 10:00 to 1:00 and reduction from 7:00 to 9:00, acetabular notch narrowing, and acetabular fossa reduction. The age-related changes that were observed are shared by both sexes and seem to be related to bone production associated with age. Specifically, age appears to affect the entire border of the lunate surface: the acetabular rim, both acetabular horns, and the outer edge of the acetabular fossa. Furthermore, shape data confirmed the clover-leaf shape of the acetabular fossa in both males and females. These results improve our understanding of acetabular shape, and assist in refining age-estimation methods and enhancing hip surgery and rehabilitation.

  1. Preparation of special cements from red mud

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M.; Upadhayay, S.N.; Prasad, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    Red mud from HINDALCO (Hindustan Aluminium Corporation) Industries Limited, Renukoot, India, contains significant quantities of alumina, iron oxide and silica. Presence of the said constituents makes it a suitable ingredient for the preparation of special cements. Preparation of three varieties of cements was investigated, namely: (a) aluminoferrite (C{sub 4}AF)-belite ({beta}-C{sub 2}S) using lime + red mud + fly ash; (b) aluminoferrite-ferrite (C{sub 2}F)-aluminates (C{sub 3}A and C{sub 12}A{sub 7}) utilizing lime + red mud + bauxite; and (c) sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}{bar S})-aluminoferrite-ferrite using lime + red mud + bauxite + gypsum. The effects of composition (proportions of lime, red mud, fly ash, bauxite and gypsum), firing temperature and duration on the properties of cements produced were studied in detail. Cements made from lime + red mud + bauxite or lime + red mud + bauxite + gypsum exhibit strengths comparable or superior to ordinary Portland cement (OPC). On the other hand, those prepared using lime + red mud + fly ash did not have sufficient strength. Moreover, it was not possible to replace bauxite by fly ash (as a source of alumina) in any significant quantity.

  2. Use of porous tantalum for acetabular reconstruction in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Issack, Paul S

    2013-11-06

    ➤ Over the past decade, porous tantalum has emerged as a powerful tool for reconstruction of the failed acetabular component.➤ The increased porosity, high coefficient of friction, and favorable elastic modulus of porous tantalum compared with traditional titanium mesh or cobalt chromium acetabular components allow for greater bone ingrowth potential, implant stability, and host bone preservation, respectively, in porous tantalum shells.➤ Several studies have confirmed the excellent early and midterm results of porous tantalum reconstruction for revision hip arthroplasty.➤ Depending on the degree of bone loss, excellent results have been achieved with modular or revision porous tantalum shells, tantalum shells with tantalum augments, and cup-cage constructs.➤ These implants and techniques are greatly changing the approach to acetabular revision surgery and are providing constructs with greater stability and more physiologic biomechanical properties than those achieved through the use of traditional reconstructive methods.

  3. Biomechanical Analysis of the Fixation System for T-Shaped Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yanping; Lei, Jianyin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weiyi; Liu, Ximing

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical mechanism of fixation systems in the most frequent T-shaped acetabular fracture using finite element method. The treatment of acetabular fractures was based on extensive clinical experience. Three commonly accepted rigid fixation methods (double column reconstruction plates (P × 2), anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (P + PS), and anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (P + QS)) were chosen for evaluation. On the basis of the finite element model, the biomechanics of these fixation systems were assessed through effective stiffness levels, stress distributions, force transfers, and displacements along the fracture lines. All three fixation systems can be used to obtain effective functional outcomes. The third fixation system (P + QS) was the optimal method for T-shaped acetabular fracture. This fixation system may reduce many of the risks and limitations associated with other fixation systems. PMID:26495030

  4. Central acetabular fracture with dislocation treated by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Central acetabular fractures with dislocation are usually the result of high-energy trauma, resulting in joint incongruity, and are frequently associated with other injuries. Open reduction and internal fixation has been the standard treatment for acetabular fractures, but it is associated with extensive surgical trauma, and complications such as haematoma formation, iatrogenic nerve injury, and heterotopic ossification. We present the case of a 63-year-old female who sustained a central acetabular fracture of the hip with dislocation as a result of an automobile collision. Closed reduction of the dislocation was performed, and the fracture was managed by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using a specially prepared plate. At 01 year postoperatively, radiographs showed the fracture to have been well-healed with good congruity of the joint. However, heterotopic ossification of the joint was noted. The technique allowed reduction of the fracture with minimal surgical trauma.

  5. Oxidation and other property changes of retrieved sequentially annealed UHMWPE acetabular and tibial bearings.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Steven D; Currier, Barbara H; Van Citters, Douglas W; Levine, Rayna A; Collier, John P

    2015-04-01

    This investigation analyzed retrieved sequentially crosslinked and annealed (SXL) ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings to determine whether the material is chemically stable in vivo. A series of retrieved tibial and acetabular components were analyzed for changes in ketone oxidation, crosslink density, and free radical concentration. Oxidation was observed to increase with in vivo duration, and the rate of oxidation in tibial inserts was significantly greater than in acetabular liners. SXL acetabular bearings oxidized at a rate comparable to gamma-sterilized liners, while SXL tibial inserts oxidized at a significantly faster rate than their gamma-sterilized counterparts. A significant decrease in crosslink density with increased mean ketone oxidation index was observed, suggesting that in vivo oxidation may be causing material degradation. Furthermore, a subsurface whitened damage region was also found in a subset of the bearings, indicating the possibility of a clinically relevant decrease in mechanical properties of these components.

  6. Acetabular Fractures in the Elderly: Midterm Outcomes of Column Stabilisation and Primary Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Briones, A.; Smith, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Interest in arthroplasty techniques for periarticular or intra-articular fractures in the elderly/osteoporotic patient continues to rise, including for geriatric acetabular fractures. In line with this, many acetabular fracture surgeons are now undertaking acute total hip arthroplasty in elderly/osteoporotic patients. Little is known however of the outcomes of this procedure, beyond the first year after surgery. Questions/Purposes. We determined the clinical outcomes of a series of elderly osteoporotic patients (mean age at surgery 77.4 years) treated for acetabular fractures with column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty, at a mean of 49 months after surgery. Methods. 24 patients (25 hips) were reviewed at a mean of 49 months after surgery. The surgical technique employed has previously been described. Radiographs were obtained, and clinical outcomes were assessed using Harris Hip Scores and the Merle d'Aubigné score. Results. 14 hips were available for assessment (9 deceased, 2 lost to follow-up). No patient suffered any complications beyond the perioperative period, no acetabular components were loose clinically or on latest radiographs, and the mean Harris Hip Score was 92. All but one patient scored good or excellent on the Merle d'Aubigné score. Conclusions. Column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty are a viable option for complex geriatric acetabular fractures, with encouraging midterm results. We conclude that THR is a viable long-term solution in this situation provided that the acetabular columns are stabilised prior to implantation, but more research is needed to aid in overall management decision making. PMID:28194414

  7. Reduction of soil pollution by usingwaste of the limestone in the cement industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, M. Cecilia Soto; Robles Castillo, Marcelo; Blanco Fernandez, David; Diaz Gonzalez, Marcos; Naranjo Lamilla, Pedro; Moore Undurraga, Fernando; Pardo Fabregat, Francisco; Vidal, Manuel Miguel Jordan; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Nuria

    2016-04-01

    In the cement manufacturing process (wet) a residue is generated in the flotation process. This builds up causing contamination of soil, groundwater and agricultural land unusable type. In this study to reduce soil and water pollution 10% of the dose of cement was replaced by waste of origin limestone. Concretes were produced with 3 doses of cement and mechanical strengths of each type of concrete to 7, 28 and 90 days were determined. the results indicate that the characteristics of calcareous residue can replace up to 10% of the dose of cement without significant decreases in strength occurs. It is noted that use of the residue reduces the initial resistance, so that the dose of cement should not be less than 200 kg of cement per m3. The results allow recommends the use of limestone waste since it has been observed decrease in soil and water contamination without prejudice construction material Keywords: Soil contamination; Limestone residue; Adding concrete

  8. Mechanical and physical properties of cement blended with sewage sludge ash.

    PubMed

    Garcés, P; Pérez Carrión, M; García-Alcocel, E; Payá, J; Monzó, J; Borrachero, M V

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the compatibility of sewage sludge ash (SSA) with various types of commercially available cements (CEM I and CEM II types, cements with several proportions of clinker). The behaviour of mortars fabricated with various percentages (10-30% by weight) of the cement replaced by SSA has been analyzed in terms of workability, mechanical strength, porosity and shrinkage/expansion. SSA exhibits moderate pozzolanic activity; the highest compressive strengths were obtained with 10% of the cement replaced by SSA. The CEM II/B-M (V-LL) 42.5R cement is considered ideal for preparing mortars containing SSA. Shrinkage data demonstrate that sulphates present in SSA are not reactive towards cement.

  9. A growing problem: acetabular fractures in the elderly and the combined hip procedure.

    PubMed

    Buller, Leonard T; Lawrie, Charles M; Vilella, Fernando E

    2015-04-01

    Acetabular fractures in the elderly are most frequently the result of low-energy trauma and present unique management challenges to orthopedic surgeons. Evaluation and treatment should be performed in a multidisciplinary fashion with early involvement of internal medicine subspecialists and geriatricians. Distinct fracture patterns and pre-existing osteoarthritis and osteoporosis necessitate careful preoperative planning. The role of total hip arthroplasty should also be considered when surgical treatment is indicated. The outcomes of acetabular fractures in the elderly have improved, but complications remain higher and results less satisfactory than in younger individuals. The lack of randomized controlled trials has limited the ability to establish an evidence-based treatment algorithm.

  10. Acetabular roof stress fracture: a rare cause of hip pain in children

    PubMed Central

    Jlalia, Zied; Bellil, Mehdi; Ghachem, Maher Ben

    2016-01-01

    Stress fracture of acetabular roof is an unusual cause of hip pain. It is considered as an underdiagnosed entity. People who are more susceptible to experience this fracture are athletes, soldiers and dancers. We present the case of an 11 year old girl with a roof acetabular stress fracture for which the diagnosis and follow-ups were possible by the means of MRI. The treatment was keeping the child at a complete rest. Failure to abide with this treatment can cause the stress fracture to evaluate into a complete fracture. PMID:28154643

  11. Recycling of ladle slag in cement composites: Environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Serjun, Vesna Zalar; Mladenovič, Ana; Mirtič, Breda; Meden, Anton; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    In the present work compact and ground cement composites in which 30% of cement by mass was replaced by ladle slag were investigated for their chemical and physico-mechanical properties. To evaluate long-term environmental impacts, leachability test based on diffusion, which combined both, diffusion and dissolution of contaminants, was performed in water and saline water. Total element concentrations and Cr(VI) were determined in leachates over a time period of 180days. At the end of the experiment, the mineralogical composition and the physico-mechanical stability of cement composites was also assessed. The results revealed that Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were immobilized by the hydration products formed in the cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Cr(VI) content originating from the cement was also appreciably reduced by Fe(II) from minerals present in the added ladle slag, which thus had significant positive environmental effects. Among metals, only Mo and Ba were leached in elevated concentrations, but solely in ground cement composites with the addition of ladle slag. Lower V concentrations were observed in leachates of ground than compact composite. It was demonstrated that the presence of ladle slag in cement composites can even contribute to improved mortar resistance. The investigated ladle slag can be successfully implemented in cement composites as supplementary cementitious material.

  12. Computational modelling of bone cement polymerization: temperature and residual stresses.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M A; Nuño, N; Madrala, A; García-Aznar, J M; Doblaré, M

    2009-09-01

    The two major concerns associated with the use of bone cement are the generation of residual stresses and possible thermal necrosis of surrounding bone. An accurate modelling of these two factors could be a helpful tool to improve cemented hip designs. Therefore, a computational methodology based on previous published works is presented in this paper combining a kinetic and an energy balance equation. New assumptions are that both the elasticity modulus and the thermal expansion coefficient depend on the bone cement polymerization fraction. This model allows to estimate the thermal distribution in the cement which is later used to predict the stress-locking effect, and to also estimate the cement residual stresses. In order to validate the model, computational results are compared with experiments performed on an idealized cemented femoral implant. It will be shown that the use of the standard finite element approach cannot predict the exact temporal evolution of the temperature nor the residual stresses, underestimating and overestimating their value, respectively. However, this standard approach can estimate the peak and long-term values of temperature and residual stresses within acceptable limits of measured values. Therefore, this approach is adequate to evaluate residual stresses for the mechanical design of cemented implants. In conclusion, new numerical techniques should be proposed in order to achieve accurate simulations of the problem involved in cemented hip replacements.

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  14. Chromium stabilization chemistry of paint removal wastes in Portland cement and blast furnace slag

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    The use of cement based systems for solidification and stabilization of hazardous wastes has been proposed. The stabilization of Cr contaminated paint removal wastes in ordinary Portland cement and in a Portland cement and blast furnace slag matrix was investigated. A loading by volume of 75% waste and 25% cement (or cement + slag) was used. The expression of pore solution was utilized to determine the chemical environment encountered by the waste species in the cement matrix. The highly alkaline conditions of ordinary Portland cement determined the stability of the metal species, with Cr being highly soluble. The replacement of 25% of the Portland cement by blast furnace slag was found to decrease the [OH-] of the pore solution resulting in a decrease of the Cr concentration. For cement wastes forms hydrated for 28 days, the Cr concentration decreased in the expressed pore solution. During the TCLP tests the cement waste form and extraction solution were found to react, changing the chemistry of the extraction solution. The expression of pore solution was found to give a direct measure of the chemistry of the waste species in the cement matrix. This avoids the reaction of the TCLP extraction solution with the cement matrix which changes the solubility of the hazardous metals. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  16. Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Anton K; Duke, Steve R; Burch, Thomas E; Davis, Edward W; Zee, Ralph H; Bransby, David I; Hopkins, Carla; Thompson, Rutherford L; Duan, Jingran; Venkatasubramanian, Vignesh; Stephen, Giles

    2012-06-30

    at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facility's production process.

  17. Evaluation of the wear performance of a polycarbonate-urethane acetabular component in a hip joint simulator and comparison with UHMWPE and cross-linked UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    St John, Kenneth; Gupta, Minakshi

    2012-07-01

    Acetabular hip joint components manufactured from gamma-sterilized ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), gamma cross-linked UHMWPE, or polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) polymers were evaluated in a hip joint simulator, using cobalt alloy femoral components, for at least 5 million cycles. The volume of material losses due to wear was calculated for each type of sample, based upon mass loss measurements, every 500,000 cycles. The loss of material for the conventional UHMWPE was much higher than for the cross-linked UHMWPE, showing about a 70% reduction in wear due to cross-linking. The material loss for the PCU samples appears to have been at least 24% lower than for the cross-linked UHMWPE. Based upon these results, the PCU material seems to have potential for use as an alternative bearing material to UHMWPE for total hip replacement surgeries.

  18. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3650 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3650 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3650 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3650 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3800 - Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a wrist...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3110 - Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3510 - Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained... Knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A knee joint femorotibial metal/polymer constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3650 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer non-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3660 - Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3100 - Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ankle joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace...

  13. Primary total hip replacement: a comparison of a nationally agreed guide to best practice and current surgical technique as determined by the North West Regional Arthroplasty Register.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, M. H. A.; Gambhir, A. K.; Bale, L.; Pradhan, N.; Porter, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 1999, a statement of best practice in primary total hip replacement was approved by the Council of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and by the British Hip Society (BHS) to provide a basis for regional and national auditable standards. We have compared practice in the North West Region of England to this document to ascertain adherence to this guide to best practice. METHODS: A total of 86 surgeons from 26 hospitals were included in a questionnaire study. RESULTS: A mean of 93.3% of operations were performed in the surgeon's usual theatre. All of these theatres had vertical laminar air flow systems. Of respondents, 42.2% routinely used exhaust suits, 68.1% routinely used impermeable disposable gowns, and 26.1% used impermeable re-usable gowns. The Charnley femoral and acetabular prostheses were the most commonly used prostheses. All surgeons used some form of anti-thromboembolic prophylaxis: 66.2% use a combination of both mechanical and chemical means. All surgeons used antibiotic prophylaxis. The most popular choice of antibiotic was a cephalosporin--70.7% used a 3-dose regimen over 24 h, 2.6% of surgeons continued antibiotic prophylaxis for 48 h after surgery, and 93.7% of surgeons routinely use antibiotic-loaded cement. All surgeons routinely cleaned, irrigated and dried the acetabulum and femur before cement insertion. Only one surgeon did not use any form of femoral canal occlusion. 69.4% used an intramedullary bone block. Retrograde filling of the femoral shaft by means of a cement gun was practised by 65.1%. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated considerable variation of practice in total hip arthroplasty across the North West Region and significant divergence from the statement of best practice approved by the BOA and BHS. The introduction of a properly funded national hip register will surely help to clarify the effect of such diverse practice on patient outcome. We would recommend that all trusts locally audit their practices

  14. Effectiveness of an Acetabular Positioning Device in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Stephen L.; Mologne, Timothy S.; Peterson, Drew A.; Holley, Keith A.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available acetabular positioning device, we performed a prospective evaluation of 40 consecutive patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty. All surgery was performed by the same surgeon, in the same operating room, and on the same operating table. The acetabular positioning device was designed to place the component in 45° of abduction. At 6 weeks, all radiographs were evaluated by 3 investigators not involved with the surgery. Each radiograph was evaluated by each reviewer on 3 separate occasions, blinded to the findings of the other reviewer to assess interobserver and intraobserver variability. The mean cup abduction angle was 42.1°, with a range from 23° to 57° (SD 8.3°). Intraobserver and interobserver variability were 0.2 and 0.3°, respectively. The findings of this study demonstrate a wide variability in acetabular cup placement in primary total hip arthroplasty. We believe this is due to movement of the pelvis, which may occur during preparation, draping, and retracting during surgery. We feel surgeons should not rely solely on positioning devices when implanting the acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty. Identification of bone landmarks and determination of superolateral implant coverage noted on preoperative templating is advocated to improve the precision of component position. PMID:18751812

  15. Autologous Membrane Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) for the treatment of acetabular chondral defect

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acetabular chondral defect are very frequently associated to FAI. Treatment options are still questionable. Methods Between 2008 and 2014, 201 patients over 583 have been arthroscopically treated with the AMIC procedure for grade III and/or IV acetabular chondral lesions. Patients age was between 18 and 50 years; acetabular chondral lesion size was between 2 and 4 cm2; radiological Tönnis degree of osteoarthritis was ≤ 2. Results The mean follow up of the entire group of 201 patients was 5 years (from 8 to 2). Significant improvement, as measured by the mHHS, was observed at 6 months in comparison to preoperative levels (80.3 ± 8.3) (p<0.001). Continuous improvement with respect to each previous evaluation time point was seen, reaching the highest improvement level at the three year follow-up (85.5 ± 7.2). The mean mHHS improvement recorded at the five year follow-up compared with preoperative scores was 39.1 ± 5.9. Conclusions AMIC is a valid procedure to repair medium-sized chondral defects on the acetabular side of the hip found during treatment of FAI and lead to long-term favourable outcomes. Level of evidence IV. PMID:28066742

  16. Double-crush syndrome after acetabular fractures. A sign of poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Giannoudis, P V; Da Costa, A A; Raman, R; Mohamed, A K; Smith, R M

    2005-03-01

    Injury to the sciatic nerve is one of the more serious complications of acetabular fracture and traumatic dislocation of the hip, both in the short and long term. We have reviewed prospectively patients, treated in our unit, for acetabular fractures who had concomitant injury to the sciatic nerve, with the aim of predicting the functional outcome after these injuries. Of 136 patients who underwent stabilisation of acetabular fractures, there were 27 (19.9%) with neurological injury. At initial presentation, 13 patients had a complete foot-drop, ten had weakness of the foot and four had burning pain and altered sensation over the dorsum of the foot. Serial electromyography (EMG) studies were performed and the degree of functional recovery was monitored using the grading system of the Medical Research Council. In nine patients with a foot-drop, there was evidence of a proximal acetabular (sciatic) and a distal knee (neck of fibula) nerve lesion, the double-crush syndrome. At the final follow-up, clinical examination and EMG studies showed full recovery in five of the ten patients with initial muscle weakness, and complete resolution in all four patients with sensory symptoms (burning pain and hyperaesthesia). There was improvement of functional capacity (motor and sensory) in two patients who presented initially with complete foot-drop. In the remaining 11 with foot-drop at presentation, including all nine with the double-crush lesion, there was no improvement in function at a mean follow-up of 4.3 years.

  17. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  18. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  19. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  20. Porous Surface Modified Bioactive Bone Cement for Enhanced Bone Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li; Dong, Jingjing; Guo, Dagang; Mao, Mengmeng; Kong, Liang; Li, Yang; Wu, Zixiang; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Our findings suggested a new bioactive bone cement for prosthetic fixation in total joint replacement. PMID:22905143

  1. Bone cement product and failure in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Birkeland, Øystein; Espehaug, Birgitte; Havelin, Leif I; Furnes, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — The bone cement market for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in Norway has been dominated by a few products and distributors. Palacos with gentamicin had a market share exceeding 90% before 2005, but it was then withdrawn from the market and replaced by new slightly altered products. We have compared the survival of TKAs fixated with Palacos with gentamicin with the survival of TKAs fixated with the bone cements that took over the market. Patients and methods — Using data from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register for the period 1997–2013, we included 26,147 primary TKAs in the study. The inclusion criteria were TKAs fixated with the 5 most used bone cements and the 5 most common total knee prostheses for that time period. 6-year Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were established for each cement product. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the association between bone cement product and revision risk. Separate analyses were performed with revision for any reason and revision due to deep infection within 1 year postoperatively as endpoints. Adjustments were made for age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis brand. Results — Survival was similar for the prostheses in the follow-up period, between the 5 bone cements included: Palacos with gentamicin, Refobacin Palacos R, Refobacin Bone Cement R (Refobacin BCR), Optipac Refobacin Bone Cement R (Optipac Refobacin BCR), and Palacos R + G. Interpretation — According to our findings, the use of the new bone cements led to a survival rate that was as good as with the old bone cement (Palacos with gentamicin). PMID:27841713

  2. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  3. Hinge total knee replacement revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.; Hu, Cungen; Vyamont, Didier

    1997-01-01

    Objective To determine if aseptic loosening is a major problem in hinge total knee replacement. Design A cohort study. Setting A university-affiliated institute, specializing in elective orthopedic surgery. Patients Fifty-eight patients, mainly those requiring revision, in whom the conditions were such that it was felt only a totally constrained implant was appropriate. In 7 patients the implant was press-fitted; in the remainder it was cemented. Five patients required fusion or revision, and 8 died less than 2 years after implantation, leaving 45 for review. Follow-up was 2 to 13 years. Intervention Total knee replacement with a Guepar II prosthesis. Main outcome measures Radiolucency determined by the Cameron system and clinical scoring using the Hospital for Special Surgery system. Results Of the cemented components, 91% of femoral stems were type IA (no lucency), 9% were type IB (partial lucency), with no type II or III lucency. Tibial lucency was 87% type IA and 13% type IB, with no type II or III lucency. Of the noncemented components, 58% of femoral components were type IA and 42% type IB. Tibial lucency was 71% type IA and 29% type IB. Lucency was mainly present in zones 1 and 2 adjacent to the knee. Clinical rating was 18% excellent, 20% good, 20% fair and 42% poor. Postoperative complications included infection (13%), aseptic loosening (7%), quadriceps lag (16%) and extensor mechanism problems (16%). Conclusions Aseptic loosening is an uncommon problem in hinge total knee replacement. The complication rate in cases of sufficient severity as to require a hinge replacement remains high. Current indications for a hinge prosthesis are anteroposterior instability with a very large flexion gap, complete absence of the collateral ligaments and complete absence of a functioning extensor mechanism. PMID:9267296

  4. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  5. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  6. Trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for congenital hip disease.

    PubMed

    Hartofilakidis, G; Babis, G C; Georgiades, G; Kourlaba, G

    2011-05-01

    We studied the effect of trochanteric osteotomy in 192 total hip replacements in 140 patients with congenital hip disease. There was bony union in 158 hips (82%), fibrous union in 29 (15%) and nonunion in five (3%). The rate of union had a statistically significant relationship with the position of reattachment of the trochanter, which depended greatly on the pre-operative diagnosis. The pre-operative Trendelenburg gait substantially improved in all three disease types (dysplasia, low and high dislocation) and all four categories of reattachment position. A persistent Trendelenburg gait post-operatively was noticed mostly in patients with defective union (fibrous or nonunion). Acetabular and femoral loosening had a statistically significant relationship with defective union and the position of reattachment of the trochanter. These results suggest that the complications of trochanteric osteotomy in total hip replacement for patients with congenital hip disease are less important than the benefits of this surgical approach.

  7. Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Benjamin J.

    Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness

  8. Tantalum acetabular augments in one-stage exchange of infected total hip arthroplasty: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Till Orla; Kendoff, Daniel; Sabihi, Reza; Kamath, Atul F; Rueger, Johannes M; Gehrke, Thorsten

    2014-07-01

    During the one-stage exchange procedure for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total hip arthroplasty (THA), acetabular defects challenge reconstructive options. Porous tantalum augments are an established tool for addressing acetabular destruction in aseptic cases, but their utility in septic exchange is unknown. This retrospective case-control study presents the initial results of tantalum augmentation during one-stage exchange for PJI. Primary endpoints were rates of re-infection and short-term complications associated with this technique. Study patients had no higher risk of re-infection with equivalent durability at early follow-up with a re-infection rate in both groups of 4%. In conclusion, tantalum augments are a viable option for addressing acetabular defects in one-stage exchange for septic THA. Further study is necessary to assess long-term durability when compared to traditional techniques for acetabular reconstruction.

  9. The Harris-Galante cementless acetabular component: results in 190 cases with at least 3 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Claus, B; Van Innis, B; De Witte, E; Van Overschelde, J; Magotteaux, B; Fatemi, F; Vandepaer, F

    1993-01-01

    The results of 190 primary total hip arthroplasties with a Harris-Galante cementless acetabular cup were reviewed. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 3 years (range, 3 to 5.5 years, mean 46 months). Clinical and radiographical analysis was performed. Inguinal pain was recorded in five cases. We noted a fracture of a screw in four cases without further implications. There was no evidence of acetabular loosening. There was no migration of the acetabular cup. No acetabular component showed measurable wear of the polyethylene liner. Non-progressive radiolucent lines were recorded in 14% of the patients: among these patients, radiolucent lines were noted in zone 1 in 46%, in zone 2 in 4% and in zone 3 in 86%. Two socket revisions became necessary. One patient suffered a deep-seated infection. Another revision was necessary because of recurrent dislocation.

  10. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  11. Utilization of ground waste seashells in cement mortars for masonry and plastering.

    PubMed

    Lertwattanaruk, Pusit; Makul, Natt; Siripattarapravat, Chalothorn

    2012-11-30

    In this research, four types of waste seashells, including short-necked clam, green mussel, oyster, and cockle, were investigated experimentally to develop a cement product for masonry and plastering. The parameters studied included water demand, setting time, compressive strength, drying shrinkage and thermal conductivity of the mortars. These properties were compared with those of a control mortar that was made of a conventional Portland cement. The main parameter of this study was the proportion of ground seashells used as cement replacement (5%, 10%, 15%, or 20% by weight). Incorporation of ground seashells resulted in reduced water demand and extended setting times of the mortars, which are advantages for rendering and plastering in hot climates. All mortars containing ground seashells yielded adequate strength, less shrinkage with drying and lower thermal conductivity compared to the conventional cement. The results indicate that ground seashells can be applied as a cement replacement in mortar mixes and may improve the workability of rendering and plastering mortar.

  12. Glass ionomer restorative cement systems: an update.

    PubMed

    Berg, Joel H; Croll, Theodore P

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for more than two decades. Their usefulness in clinical dentistry is preferential to other materials because of fluoride release from the glass component, biocompatibility, chemical adhesion to dentin and enamel, coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, and versatility. The purpose of this paper was to review the uses of glass ionomer materials in pediatric dentistry, specifically as pit and fissure sealants, dentin and enamel replacement repair materials, and luting cements, and for use in glass ionomer/resin-based composite stratification tooth restoration (the sandwich technique). This article can also be used as a guide to research and clinical references regarding specific aspects of the glass ionomer systems and how they are used for young patients.

  13. Comparison of two digital radiostereometric analysis methods in the determination of femoral head penetration in a total hip replacement phantom.

    PubMed

    Bragdon, Charles R; Estok, Daniel M; Malchau, Henrik; Kärrholm, Johan; Yuan, Xunhua; Bourne, Robert; Veldhoven, Jean; Harris, William H

    2004-05-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has been used extensively to evaluate the magnitude and direction of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular component of a total hip replacement as a result of polyethylene wear and creep. The accuracy and precision of an RSA study depends on several factors, including the radiographic technique, the analytical software, and the positioning of the tantalum markers. This study had three sequential purposes. First, an in vitro phantom model was used to quantify the accuracy and precision of digital images versus conventional radiography in RSA measurements of penetration of the femoral head into the acetabular shell in a total hip replacement. The Umeå RSA software package was used for analysis of both the conventional films, which were digitized at a resolution of 300 DPI, and digital radiographs, which were converted from a DICOM format at a resolution of 218 DPI. Digital radiography was found to be superior. Next, two methods of RSA analysis currently in use for determining femoral head penetration into polyethylene of total joint replacements were compared. Using the phantom model, we compared the Umeå RSA system (Biomedical Innovations AB) to the RSA-CMS (RSA Clinical Measurement Solution) and in both cases used the digital radiographs. The Umeå RSA system was found to be superior. Finally, two methods of marking the position of the acetabular component with tantalum beads were compared: one in which beads were inserted into previously described towers protruding from the back of the acetabular shell and another in which beads were placed into the peripheral flange of the polyethylene liner using the Umeå RSA analysis system of the digital radiographs. The results using the two marker configurations were similar.

  14. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  16. New polyethylenes in total hip replacement: A ten- to 12-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    García-Rey, E; García-Cimbrelo, E; Cruz-Pardos, A

    2013-03-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, 90 patients underwent total hip replacement using the same uncemented acetabular and femoral components with a 28 mm metallic femoral head but with prospective randomisation of the acetabular liner to either Durasul highly cross-linked polyethylene or nitrogen-sterilised Sulene polyethylene. We assessed 83 patients at a minimum follow-up of ten years. Linear penetration of the femoral head was estimated at six weeks, six and 12 months and annually thereafter, using the Dorr method, given the non-spherical shape of the acetabular component. There was no loosening of any component; only one hip in the Sulene group showed proximal femoral osteolysis. The mean penetration of the femoral head at six weeks was 0.08 mm (0.02 to 0.15) for the Durasul group and 0.16 mm (0.05 to 0.28) for the Sulene group (p = 0.001). The mean yearly linear penetration was 64.8% lower for the Durasul group at 0.05 mm/year (sd 0.035) for the Sulene group and 0.02 mm/year (sd 0.016) for the Durasul (p < 0.001). Mean linear femoral head penetration at ten years was 61% less in the Durasul than Sulene group. Highly cross-linked polyethylene gives excellent results at ten years.

  17. Pelvic, acetabular and hip fractures: What the surgeon should expect from the radiologist.

    PubMed

    Molière, S; Dosch, J-C; Bierry, G

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic ring fractures when caused by trauma, either violent or in demineralized bone, generally consist of injuries in both the anterior (pubic symphysis and rami) and posterior (iliac wing, sacrum, sacroiliac joint) portions. Injury classifications are based on injury mechanism and pelvic stability, and are used to determine treatment. Acetabular fractures, associated or not to pelvic ring disruption, are classified on the basis of fracture line, into elementary fractures of the acetabular walls, columns and roof, and into complex fractures. Fractures of the proximal end of the femur occur often on demineralized bone following low-energy trauma. The fractures are categorized by anatomic location (neck, trochanter and subtrochanteric region) and degree of displacement. These variables determine the risk of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, which is the main complication of such fractures.

  18. Sex assessment from the acetabular rim by means of image analysis.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, S; Maestri, C; Parisini, S; Vecchi, F; Gruppioni, G

    2008-08-25

    Determining sex from skeletal remains is one of the most important steps in archaeological and forensic anthropology. The present study considers the diagnostic value of the acetabulum based on its planar image and related metric data. For this purpose, 83 adult os coxae of known age were examined. Digital photos of the acetabular area were taken, with each bone in a standardized orientation. Technical drawing software was used to trace the acetabular rim and to measure the related dimensions (area, perimeter, longitudinal and transverse maximum width). The measurements were subjected to SPSS discriminant and classification function analysis. There were significant differences (p

  19. Arthroscopic excision of acetabular osteoid osteoma in a 7-year-old patient.

    PubMed

    Aşık, Mehmet; Erşen, Ali; Polat, Gökhan; Bilgili, Fuat; Tunalı, Onur

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to present the case report of a 7-year-old patient who was treated with hip arthroscopy for an acetabular osteoid osteoma. A 7-year-old patient was referred to our clinic with hip pain. In the assessment of the patient, an acetabular osteoid osteoma was detected in his right hip; it was adjacent to his triradiate cartilage. An arthroscopic surgery was planned as an alternative to open safe hip dislocation. The osteoid osteoma was completely removed with hip arthroscopy. Postoperative CT scanning and histopathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis. Exposure of the acetabulum can be problematic in paediatric patients due to the potential risks of open safe dislocation. Hip arthroscopy can safely be used for benign hip lesions in paediatric patients. Level of evidence Case report, Level V.

  20. Revision of complex acetabular defects using cages with the aid of rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiwu; Wang, Liao; Mao, Yuanqing; Wang, You; Dai, Kerong; Zhu, Zhenan

    2013-12-01

    This study details a method using rapid prototyping (RP) technique to assist in acetabular revision with complex bone defects. Hemi-pelvic RP models were built among 25 patients with complex acetabular bone defects. Each patient was scheduled to undergo revision using either commercially available or customized cages based on individualized RP models. Average follow-up was 4.4 years (range, 1 to 9 years). The average Harris hip score was 36.1 (range, 20 to 58) preoperatively and reached an average of 82.6 (range, 60-96) at the last follow-up. No mechanical failure or loosening was observed. One patient experienced hip dislocation 4 days postoperatively. The resultant findings of this study merit consideration of RP as a helpful clinical complement for dealing with some complex bone defect of acetabulum.

  1. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  2. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  3. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  4. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  5. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  6. Postural correction reduces hip pain in adult with acetabular dysplasia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Khuu, Anne; Marinko, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip is often diagnosed in infancy, but less severe cases of acetabular dysplasia are being detected in young active adults. The purpose of this case report is to present a non-surgical intervention for a 31-year-old female with mild acetabular dysplasia and an anterior acetabular labral tear. The patient presented with right anterior hip and groin pain, and she stood with the trunk swayed posterior to the pelvis (swayback posture). The hip pain was reproduced with the anterior impingement test. During gait, the patient maintained the swayback posture and reported 6/10 hip pain. Following correction of the patient’s posture, the patient’s pain rating was reduced to a 2/10 while walking. The patient was instructed to maintain the improved posture. At the 1 year follow-up, she demonstrated significantly improved posture in standing and walking. She had returned to recreational running and was generally pain-free. The patient demonstrated improvement on self-reported questionnaires for pain, function and activity. These findings suggest that alteration of posture can have an immediate and lasting effect on hip pain in persons with structural abnormality and labral pathology. PMID:25731688

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE SEGMENTAL IMPACTION OF FEMORAL HEAD FOLLOWING AN ACETABULAR FRACTURE SURGICALLY MANAGED

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Carina; Daniachi, Daniel; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Honda, Emerson Kiyoshi; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Riccioli, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Correlate the postoperative radiographic evaluation with variables accompanying acetabular fractures in order to determine the predictive factors for segmental impaction of femoral head. Methods: Retrospective analysis of medial files of patients submitted to open reduction surgery with internal acetabular fixation. Within approximately 35 years, 596 patients were treated for acetabular fractures; 267 were followed up for at least two years. The others were excluded either because their follow up was shorter than the minimum time, or as a result of the lack of sufficient data reported on files, or because they had been submitted to non-surgical treatment. The patients were followed up by one of three surgeons of the group using the Merle d'Aubigné and Postel clinical scales as well as radiological studies. Results: Only tow studied variables-age and amount of postoperative reductionshowed statistically significant correlation with femoral head impaction. Conclusions: The quality of reduction-anatomical or with up to 2mm residual deviation-presents a good radiographic evolution, reducing the potential for segmental impaction of the femoral head, a statistically significant finding. PMID:27004191

  8. Articular cartilage friction increases in hip joints after the removal of acetabular labrum.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongnam; Ito, Hiroshi; Kourtis, Lampros; Safran, Marc R; Carter, Dennis R; Giori, Nicholas J

    2012-02-02

    The acetabular labrum is believed to have a sealing function. However, a torn labrum may not effectively prevent joint fluid from escaping a compressed joint, resulting in impaired lubrication. We aimed to understand the role of the acetabular labrum in maintaining a low friction environment in the hip joint. We did this by measuring the resistance to rotation (RTR) of the hip, which reflects the friction of the articular cartilage surface, following focal and complete labrectomy. Five cadaveric hips without evidence of osteoarthritis and impingement were tested. We measured resistance to rotation of the hip joint during 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 times body weight (BW) cyclic loading in the intact hip, and after focal and complete labrectomy. Resistance to rotation, which reflects articular cartilage friction in an intact hip was significantly increased following focal labrectomy at 1-3 BW loading, and following complete labrectomy at all load levels. The acetabular labrum appears to maintain a low friction environment, possibly by sealing the joint from fluid exudation. Even focal labrectomy may result in increased joint friction, a condition that may be detrimental to articular cartilage and lead to osteoarthritis.

  9. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  10. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  11. Clinical fracture of cross-linked UHMWPE acetabular liners.

    PubMed

    Furmanski, Jevan; Anderson, Martin; Bal, Sonny; Greenwald, A Seth; Halley, David; Penenberg, Brad; Ries, Michael; Pruitt, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is increasingly used as a bearing material in total hip replacements. Cross-linking of UHMWPE has been shown to increase wear resistance but decrease its fracture resistance. We analyzed the clinical fracture failure of four cross-linked UHMWPE total hip replacement components of four different designs via microscopic observation of the fracture surfaces, and found that in all cases fractures initiated at stress concentrations in an unsupported region of the component (termed the elevated rim). Finite element analyses (FEA) of each individual implant design were then conducted. Results from this analysis demonstrated that the predicted magnitude and orientation of maximum principal stress due to mechanical loading of the elevated rim was sufficient to propagate initiated fatigue cracks in each case. FEA also predicted that cracks may arrest after some amount of growth due to a steep stress gradient near the initiation site. Further, while anatomical positioning of the implant and material properties affect the risk of fracture, we examined whether these failures are strongly related to the notched elevated rim design feature that is common to the four failed cases presented here. We believe that cross-linked UHMWPE remains an excellent bearing material for total hip replacements but that designs employing this material should mitigate stress concentrations or other design features that increase the risk of fracture.

  12. In vivo performance of a reduced-modulus bone cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forehand, Brett Ramsey

    Total joint replacement has become one of the most common procedures in the area of orthopedics and is often the solution in patients with diseased or injured hip joints. Component loosening is a significant problem and is primarily caused by bone resorption at the bone-cement interface in cemented implants. It is our hypothesis that localized shear stresses are responsible for the resorption. It was previously shown analytically that local stresses at the interface could be reduced by using a cement of lower modulus. A new reduced modulus cement, polybutyl methylmethacrylate (PBMMA), was developed to test the hypothesis. PBMMA was formulated to exist as polybutyl methacrylate filler in a polymethyl methacrylate matrix. The success of PBMMA cement is based largely on the fact that the polybutyl component of the cement will be in the rubbery state at body temperature. In vitro characterization of the cement was undertaken previously and demonstrated a modulus of approximately one-eighth that of conventional bone cement, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and increased fracture toughness. The purpose of this experiment was to perform an in vivo comparison of the two cements. A sheep model was selected. Total hip arthroplasty was performed on 50 ewes using either PBMMA or PMMA. Radiographs were taken at 6 month intervals. At one year, the contralateral femur of each sheep was implanted so that each animal served as its own control, and the animals were sacrificed. The stiffness of the bone-cement interface of the femoral component within the femur was assessed by applying a torque to the femoral component and demonstrated a significant difference in loosening between the cements when the specimens were tested in external rotation (p < 0.007). Evaluation of the mechanical data also suggests that the PBMMA sheep had a greater amount of loosening for each subject, 59% versus 4% for standard PMMA. A radiographic analysis demonstrated more signs of loosening in the PMMA series

  13. Should the patella be replaced in total knee replacement?

    PubMed

    Badhe, N; Dewnany, G; Livesley, P J

    2001-01-01

    In 170 total knee arthroplasties for osteoarthritis 71 did not receive a patellar replacement (group A), while 99 knees had a cemented polyethylene patella (group B). The mean follow-up time was 36 months (30-50 months). In group A 10 patients underwent second-stage patellar resurfacing and in group B 2 knees underwent revision of the patellar component. Radiologically the average patellar congruency was similar. In both groups there were 21 non-congruent knees. In group A 8 were symptomatic and had low scores compared to 2 in group B (P<0.05). The mean HSS score and patellar score were higher in group B than in group A (P<0.05).

  14. Characterization of Human Anterosuperior Acetabular Depression in Correlation With Labral Tears

    PubMed Central

    Kopydlowski, Nathan J.; Tannenbaum, Eric P.; Smith, Matthew V.; Sekiya, Jon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Labral tears often occur in the same quadrant of the acetabulum at a small depression previously referred to as the psoas valley. Understanding the anatomic variations of this depression could help us understand the etiology of labral tears. Purpose: To describe the location and dimensions of the depression located in the anterosuperior acetabular rim. The hypothesis was that the location of this depression would be consistent with the common location of acetabular labral tears described in the literature. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 240 pelvic specimens were divided into 2 groups (n = 120 for each) according to age (younger age group: 21.36 ± 3.12 years [range, 14-24 years]; older age group: 42.30 ± 10.27 years, [range, 25-60 years]).Specimens were also categorized based on sex (mean age: 31.93 ± 12.31 years [male]; 32.08 ± 13.66 years [female]) and race (mean age: 31.45 ± 13.16 years [black]; 32.57 ± 12.82 years [white]). The depth and width of the acetabular depression were measured using a digital caliper, and the location was measured using a goniometer. Results: The psoas valley was observed in every specimen and was located in the anterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum. Its depth was significantly greater (P < .001) in males (5.35 ± 1.60 mm) than in females (3.95 ± 1.31 mm). The width of the psoas valley was also greater (P < .001) in males (29.39 ± 3.98 mm) than in females (24.49 ± 4.80 mm). There were no differences in size or location of the depression between races or age groups. The psoas valley was located between 3.92 ± 0.42 o’clock anteriorly and 2.12 ± 0.77 o’clock posteriorly. Conclusion: The differences observed in the study data are believed to be a result of the different anatomic morphologies of the pelvis in males and females. This loss of bony support, caused by the depression, could be the underlying cause of weakening of the acetabular labrum as people age. Clinical Relevance

  15. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  16. New cement formulation helps solve deep cementing problems

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; DeBlanc, F.X.

    1989-06-01

    Invert-emulsion muds are used in most deep, hot wells. The internal aqueous phase of these muds frequently contains high concentrations of salts. It is desirable to complete these wells with a cement slurry containing salt concentrations up to and including saturation to minimize compatibility problems between cement slurry and mud. Above their effective temperature range, however, saturated salt cements - though still considered desirable for their other properties - pose design difficulties regarding thickening time, fluid loss, and rheology. High salt concentrations tend to decrease the effectiveness of most common cement additives - e.g., retarders, fluid-loss additives, and dispersants. At high temperatures, concentrations of these additives can become unacceptably large, while the additives themselves are not as effective under these conditions. Development of and field experience with a new cementing formulation for deep, high-temperature, saturated-salt applications have helped resolve the cement design problems encountered in south Texas and southern and offshore Louisiana. A single synthetic-polymer additive provides cement retardation, fluid-loss control, and dispersant properties with normal design considerations as opposed to the lengthy design requirements of other cement systems. A particular benefit derived from use of the new cement system involves cementing of long liners. Such liners frequently require squeeze cementing at the liner top because the cement is designed for conditions at the bottom of the liner and is thus frequently over-retarded for the cooler temperatures encountered at the top of the liner. This over-retardation tendency is alleviated greatly by use of the new saturated-salt cement additive.

  17. An unusual cause of locking after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, J; Doorgakant, A; Shand, J E G; Orr, M M

    2007-09-01

    Locking after total knee replacement is uncommon and is generally caused by the formation of fibrous tissue around the patella. We report an unusual cause of locking resulting from intermittent occlusion of the popliteal artery, which was tethered to cement at the posterior aspect of the tibial component.

  18. Current topics in the radiology of joint replacement surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, B.N. )

    1990-09-01

    Several methods of total hip joint replacement are currently used. Radiographic appearances after cemented, bone ingrowth, press-fit, and bipolar hip prostheses are reviewed. The roles of nuclear medicine and arthrographic procedures for identifying complications are discussed. Total knee prostheses and, in particular, complications related to the patellar component are described.115 references.

  19. Chemical vs. Physical Acceleration of Cement Hydration

    PubMed Central

    Bentz, Dale P.; Zunino, Franco; Lootens, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Cold weather concreting often requires the use of chemical accelerators to speed up the hydration reactions of the cement, so that setting and early-age strength development will occur in a timely manner. While calcium chloride (dihydrate – CaCl2·2H2O) is the most commonly used chemical accelerator, recent research using fine limestone powders has indicated their high proficiency for physically accelerating early-age hydration and reducing setting times. This paper presents a comparative study of the efficiency of these two approaches in accelerating hydration (as assessed via isothermal calorimetry), reducing setting times (Vicat needle), and increasing early-age mortar cube strength (1 d and 7 d). Both the CaCl2 and the fine limestone powder are used to replace a portion of the finest sand in the mortar mixtures, while keeping both the water-to-cement ratio and volume fractions of water and cement constant. Studies are conducted at 73.4 °F (23°C) and 50 °F (10 °C), so that activation energies can be estimated for the hydration and setting processes. Because the mechanisms of acceleration of the CaCl2 and limestone powder are different, a hybrid mixture with 1 % CaCl2 and 20 % limestone powder (by mass of cement) is also investigated. Both technologies are found to be viable options for reducing setting times and increasing early-age strengths, and it is hoped that concrete producers and contractors will consider the addition of fine limestone powder to their toolbox of techniques for assuring performance in cold weather and other concreting conditions where acceleration may be needed. PMID:28077884

  20. Development of the Use of Alternative Cements for the Treatment of Intermediate Level Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.; Godfrey, I.H.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes initial development studies undertaken to investigate the potential use of alternative, non ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based encapsulation matrices to treat historic legacy wastes within the UK's Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) inventory. Currently these wastes are encapsulated in composite OPC cement systems based on high replacement with blast furnace slag of pulverised fuel ash. However, the high alkalinity of these cements can lead to high corrosion rates with reactive metals found in some wastes releasing hydrogen and forming expansive corrosion products. This paper therefore details preliminary results from studies on two commercial products, calcium sulfo-aluminate (CSA) and magnesium phosphate (MP) cement which react with a different hydration chemistry, and which may allow wastes containing these metals to be encapsulated with lower reactivity. The results indicate that grouts can be formulated from both cements over a range of water contents and reactant ratios that have significantly improved fluidity in comparison to typical OPC cements. All designed mixes set in 24 hours with zero bleed and the pH values in the plastic state were in the range 10-11 for CSA and 5-7 for MP cements. In addition, a marked reduction in aluminium corrosion rate has been observed in both types of cements compared to a composite OPC system. These results therefore provide encouragement that both cement types can provide a possible alternative to OPC in the immobilisation of reactive wastes, however further investigation is needed. (authors)

  1. Mechanical, material, and antimicrobial properties of acrylic bone cement impregnated with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Slane, Josh; Vivanco, Juan; Rose, Warren; Ploeg, Heidi-Lynn; Squire, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Prosthetic joint infection is one of the most serious complications that can lead to failure of a total joint replacement. Recently, the rise of multidrug resistant bacteria has substantially reduced the efficacy of antibiotics that are typically incorporated into acrylic bone cement. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an attractive alternative to traditional antibiotics resulting from their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and low bacterial resistance. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to incorporate metallic silver nanoparticles into acrylic bone cement and quantify the effects on the cement's mechanical, material and antimicrobial properties. AgNPs at three loading ratios (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0% wt/wt) were incorporated into a commercial bone cement using a probe sonication technique. The resulting cements demonstrated mechanical and material properties that were not substantially different from the standard cement. Testing against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using Kirby-Bauer and time-kill assays demonstrated no antimicrobial activity against planktonic bacteria. In contrast, cements modified with AgNPs significantly reduced biofilm formation on the surface of the cement. These results indicate that AgNP-loaded cement is of high potential for use in primary arthroplasty where prevention of bacterial surface colonization is vital.

  2. Dynamic virtual simulation of the occurrence and severity of edge loading in hip replacements associated with variation in the rotational and translational surgical position.

    PubMed

    Leng, Joanna; Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Wilcox, Ruth; Jones, Alison; Barton, David; Fisher, John

    2017-04-01

    Variation in the surgical positioning of total hip replacement can result in edge loading of the femoral head on the rim of the acetabular cup. Previous work has reported the effect of edge loading on the wear of hip replacement bearings with a fixed level of dynamic biomechanical hip separation. Variations in both rotational and translational surgical positioning of the hip joint replacement combine to influence both the biomechanics and the tribology including the severity of edge loading, the amount of dynamic separation, the force acting on the rim of the cup and the resultant wear and torque acting on the cup. In this study, a virtual model of a hip joint simulator has been developed to predict the effect of variations in some surgical positioning (inclination and medial-lateral offset) on the level of dynamic separation and the contact force of the head acting on the rim as a measure of severity of edge loading. The level of dynamic separation and force acting on the rim increased with increased translational mismatch between the centres of the femoral head and the acetabular cup from 0 to 4 mm and with increased cup inclination angle from 45° to 65°. The virtual model closely replicated the dynamics of the experimental hip simulator previously reported, which showed similar dynamic biomechanical trends, with the highest level of separation being found with a mismatch of 4 mm between the centres of the femoral head and acetabular cup and 65° cup inclination angle.

  3. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  4. Peri-implant stress correlates with bone and cement morphology: micro-FE modeling of implanted cadaveric glenoids

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Hwabok; Armstrong, April D.; Flint, Wesley W.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Lewis, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of cemented joint replacements is a complex biological and mechanical process, and remains a clinical concern especially in patients with poor bone quality. Utilizing high resolution finite element analysis of a series of implanted cadaver glenoids, the objective of this study was to quantify relationships between construct morphology and resulting mechanical stresses in cement and trabeculae. Eight glenoid cadavers were implanted with a cemented central peg implant. Specimens were imaged by micro-CT, and subject-specific finite element models were developed. Bone volume fraction, glenoid width, implant-cortex distance, cement volume, cement-cortex contact, and cement-bone interface area were measured. Axial loading was applied to the implant of each model and stress distributions were characterized. Correlation analysis was completed across all specimens for pairs of morphological and mechanical variables. The amount of trabecular bone with high stress was strongly negatively correlated with both cement volume and contact between the cement and cortex (r = −0.85 and −0.84, p < 0.05). Bone with high stress was also correlated with both glenoid width and implant-cortex distance. Contact between the cement and underlying cortex may dramatically reduce trabecular bone stresses surrounding the cement, and this contact depends on bone shape, cement amount, and implant positioning. PMID:25929691

  5. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  6. Foamed well cementing compositions and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bour, D.L.; Childs, J.D.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a method of cementing a well penetrating a salt containing subterranean formation. It comprises: forming a foamed cement composition; placing the foamed cement composition in contact with the salt containing formation; and permitting the foamed cement composition to set in contact with the salt containing formation to form a hardened mass of cement.

  7. What is the Fate of Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) Acetabular Component Orientation When Evaluated in the Standing Position?

    PubMed

    Tiberi, John V; Antoci, Valentin; Malchau, Henrik; Rubash, Harry E; Freiberg, Andrew A; Kwon, Young-Min

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective study measured the change of the acetabular component orientation between supine and standing radiographs in 113 THA patients and identified the associated anatomical parameters that may help direct pre-operative planning. The mean change of the acetabular component inclination and version from supine to standing was 4.6° and 5.9° respectively (P<0.0001), with 49 (43%) hips showing inclination change >5° and 69 (53%) hips showing version change >5°. Twelve (43%) of 28 'malpositioned' cups became 'well-positioned' and 26 (31%) of 85 'well-positioned' cups became 'malpositioned' upon standing. Changes in inclination were associated with leg length discrepancy and pelvic obliquity; and changes in version were associated with pelvic tilt and pelvic incidence. Standing position and patient factors should be considered when defining "optimal" acetabular orientation.

  8. Uncemented porous tantalum acetabular components: early follow-up and failures in 613 primary total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Noiseux, Nicolas O; Long, William J; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2014-03-01

    Uncemented tantalum acetabular components were introduced in 1997. The purpose was to determine the 2- to 10-year results with this implant material in primary total hip arthroplasty. Our registry identified all primary total hip cases with porous tantalum cups implanted from 1997 to 2004. Clinical outcomes and radiographs were studied. 613 cases were identified. Seventeen percent of patients were lost to follow-up. Twenty-five reoperations were performed (4.4%). Acetabular cup removal occurred in 6 cases (1.2%). No cups were revised for aseptic loosening. Incomplete radiolucent lines were found on 9.3% of initial postoperative radiographs. At 2 years, 67% had resolved. Zero new radiolucent lines were detected. Two- to 10-year results of porous tantalum acetabular components for primary total hip arthroplasty demonstrate high rates of initial stability and apparent ingrowth.

  9. Inversion of the acetabular labrum triggers rapidly destructive osteoarthritis of the hip: representative case report and proposed etiology.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiyokazu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Fukushima, Mana; Matsumoto, Tadami

    2014-12-01

    The pathophysiology of rapidly destructive osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is unknown. This study documented cases of inversion of the acetabular labrum, which has clinicoradiologic features similar to those of initial-stage rapidly destructive hip OA. Our study was based on a prospective review of data for 9 patients with rapidly destructive hip OA. Intraoperative findings showed that the anterosuperior portion of the acetabular labrum had inverted into the articular space, along with many fragments of articular cartilage, in all patients. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral heads were seen just under the inverted labra in 8 of the 9 patients. Inversion of the acetabular labrum may be involved in rapid joint-space narrowing and subchondral insufficiency fracture in rapidly destructive hip OA.

  10. MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

    2014-08-01

    Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients.

  11. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000178.htm Shoulder replacement - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder ...

  12. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002974.htm Knee joint replacement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Knee joint replacement is a surgery to replace a knee ...

  13. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to replace all or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint called a prosthesis. This ... You're in the Hospital You had a hip joint replacement surgery to replace all or part of ...

  14. Cement evaluation tool: a new approach to cement evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, B.; Dumont, A.; Pittman, D.; Seeman, B.

    1982-08-01

    Cement bond logging achieves its greatest utility when it provides the production engineer with precise indications of cement strength and distribution around the casing. Zone isolation is of critical importance in production. Previous logging systems have yielded measures of cement bond that were circumferential averages of cement quality. These were difficult to interpret. Additionally, they were sensitive to the degree of shear coupling between pipe, cement, and formation and thus were affected by microannulus. The cement evaluation tool (CET) described here overcomes these difficulties. It provides a measurement of cement presence and strength, which is largely insensitive to microannulus. Its log output is interpreted easily. Tool design allows examination of the casing circumferentially at each depth. Impedance behind casing is measured. Laboratory calibration measurements allow this to be presented in terms of cement compressive strength. Cement channels are distinguished easily, and a zone isolation indicator can be presented. Additionally, casing internal diameter and distortion are displayed. European and North American field tests have been completed, and performance for a variety of well conditions is discussed. The ability of the tool to identify channels is confirmed. Sequential runs with and without excess pressure demonstrate immunity to microannulus in cases where CBL is affected but where microannulus is small enough to prohibit hydraulic communication. Geometrical measurements have been good indicators of casing deformation and have identified casing corrosion and wear.

  15. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Cross-sectional Anatomy of Ilium for Guiding Acetabular Component Placement Using High Hip Center Technique in Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian-Lin; Zuo, Jian-Lin; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan-Guo; Li, Xue-Zhou; Liu, Tong; Gao, Zhong-Li

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many clinical studies have been published involving the use of a high hip center (HHC), achieved good follow-up. However, there is a little anatomic guidance in the literature regarding the amount of bone stock available for initial implant coverage in this area of the ilium. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thickness and width of the human ilium and related acetabular cup coverage for guiding acetabular component placement in HHC. Methods: A total of 120 normal hips in 60 cases of adult patients from lower extremities computer tomographic angiography Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data were chosen for the study. After importing the data to the mimics software, we chose the cross sections every 5-mm increments from the rotational center of the hip to the cephalic of the ilium according the body sagittal axis, then we measured the thickness and width of the ilium for each cross section in axial plane, calculated the cup coverage at each chosen section. Results: At the acetabular dome, the mean thickness and width of the ilium were 49.71 ± 4.88 mm and 38.92 ± 3.67 mm, respectively, whereas at 1 cm above the dome, decreased to 41.35 ± 5.13 and 31.13 ± 3.37 respectively, and 2 cm above the dome, decreased to 31.25 ± 4.04 and 26.65 ± 3.43, respectively. Acetabular cup averaged coverage for 40-, 50-, and 60-mm hemispheric shells, was 100%, 89%, and 44% at the acetabular dome, 100%, 43.7%, and 27.5% for 1 cm above the dome, and 37.5%, 21.9%, and 14.2% for 2 cm above the dome. Conclusions: HHC reconstructions within 1 cm above the acetabular dome will be an acceptable and smaller diameter prosthesis would be better. PMID:26063357

  17. Nano-scale hydrogen-bond network improves the durability of greener cements

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Johan; Rodrigues, Michelle Santos; Telling, Mark T. F.; Beraldo, Antonio Ludovico; Santos, Sérgio Francisco; Aldridge, Laurence P.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    More than ever before, the world's increasing need for new infrastructure demands the construction of efficient, sustainable and durable buildings, requiring minimal climate-changing gas-generation in their production. Maintenance-free “greener” building materials made from blended cements have advantages over ordinary Portland cements, as they are cheaper, generate less carbon dioxide and are more durable. The key for the improved performance of blends (which substitute fine amorphous silicates for cement) is related to their resistance to water penetration. The mechanism of this water resistance is of great environmental and economical impact but is not yet understood due to the complexity of the cement's hydration reactions. Using neutron spectroscopy, we studied a blend where cement was replaced by ash from sugar cane residuals originating from agricultural waste. Our findings demonstrate that the development of a distinctive hydrogen bond network at the nano-scale is the key to the performance of these greener materials. PMID:24036676

  18. Minimizing Stress Shielding and Cement Damage in Cemented Femoral Component of a Hip Prosthesis through Computational Design Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Justin; Yadav, Rohan

    2017-01-01

    The average life expectancy of many people undergoing total hip replacement (THR) exceeds twenty-five years and the demand for implants that increase the load-bearing capability of the bone without affecting the short- or long-term stability of the prosthesis is high. Mechanical failure owing to cement damage and stress shielding of the bone are the main factors affecting the long-term survival of cemented hip prostheses and implant design must realistically adjust to balance between these two conflicting effects. In the following analysis we introduce a novel methodology to achieve this objective, the numerical technique combines automatic and realistic modeling of the implant and embedding medium, and finite element analysis to assess the levels of stress shielding and cement damage and, finally, global optimization, using orthogonal arrays and probabilistic restarts, were used. Applications to implants, fabricated using a homogeneous material and a functionally graded material, were presented. PMID:28348892

  19. The influence of bone and bone cement debris on counterface roughness in sliding wear tests of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Caravia, L; Dowson, D; Fisher, J; Jobbins, B

    1990-01-01

    Studies of explanted hip prostheses have shown high wear rates of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular cups and roughening of the surface of the metallic femoral head. Bone and bone cement particles have also been found in the articulating surfaces of some joints. It has been proposed that bone or bone cement particles may cause scratching and deterioration in the surface finish of metallic femoral heads, thus producing increased wear rates and excessive amounts of wear debris. Sliding wear tests of UHMWPE pins on stainless steel have been performed with particles of different types of bone and bone cement added. Damage to the stainless steel counterface and the motion of particles through the interface have been studied. Particles of bone cement with zirconium and barium sulphate additives and particles of cortical bone scratched the stainless steel counterface. The cement particles with zirconium additive produced significantly greater surface damage. The number of particles entering the contact and embedding in the UHMWPE pin was dependent on particle size and geometry, surface roughness and contact stress. Particles are likely to cause surface roughening and increased wear rates in artificial joints.

  20. Well cementing in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

  1. Examination and treatment of a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear: A case report.

    PubMed

    Khoo-Summers, Lynnette; Bloom, Nancy J

    2015-08-01

    Dancers are at risk for developing groin pain that is due to acetabular labral tears. Although surgical management of labral tears has been reported extensively, conservative management has been poorly described. This case report describes the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of groin pain in a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear. Treatment focused on decreasing anterior hip joint stresses and improving the precision of hip motion through correction of alignment and movement impairments noted during functional activities and dance. Successful outcomes included a reduction in pain and return to professional ballet dancing.

  2. Fucntional and Radiological Outcome of Surgical Management of Acetabular Fractures in Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Taufiq, Intikhab; Najjad, Muhammad Kazim Raheem; Khan, Naveed; Zia, Osama Bin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by trauma and the incidence is rising in developing countries. Initially these fractures were managed conservatively, due to lack of specialized and dedicated acetabulum surgery centres. Our aim is to study the radiological and functional outcomes of surgical management of acetabular fractures in tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods Total 50 patients were enrolled. The patients with acetabular fractures were enrolled between the years 2012 to 2014. Patients were evaluated clinically with Harris hip score (HHS) and radiologically with Matta outcome grading. The factors examined include age, gender, fracture pattern, time between injury and surgery, initial displacement and quality of reduction on the final outcome. Results There were 34 males and 16 females. Mean age was 44.20±11.65 years while mean duration of stay was 9.28±2.36 days. Duration of follow-up was 24 months. Most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (n=37, 74.0%). Open reduction and internal fixation of fractures were performed using reconstruction plates. Mean HHS at 24 months was 82.36±8.55. The clinical outcome was acceptable (excellent or good) in 35 (70.0%) cases and not acceptable (fair or poor) in 15 (30.0%) cases. The radiological outcome was anatomical in 39 (78.0%) cases, congruent in 5 (10.0%) cases, incongruent in 6 (12.0%) cases. Conclusion Study results indicated that mechanism of injury, time between injury and surgery, initial degree of displacement and quality of reduction had significant effect on functional as well as radiological outcome. PMID:28097111

  3. Current concept in dysplastic hip arthroplasty: Techniques for acetabular and femoral reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bicanic, Goran; Barbaric, Katarina; Bohacek, Ivan; Aljinovic, Ana; Delimar, Domagoj

    2014-01-01

    Adult patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip develop secondary osteoarthritis and eventually end up with total hip arthroplasty (THA) at younger age. Because of altered anatomy of dysplastic hips, THA in these patients represents technically demanding procedure. Distorted anatomy of the acetabulum and proximal femur together with conjoined leg length discrepancy present major challenges during performing THA in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. In addition, most patients are at younger age, therefore, soft tissue balance is of great importance (especially the need to preserve the continuity of abductors) to maximise postoperative functional result. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for THA in dysplastic hips, their advantages and disadvantages. For acetabular reconstruction following techniques are described: Standard metal augments (prefabricated), Custom made acetabular augments (3D printing), Roof reconstruction with vascularized fibula, Roof reconstruction with pedicled iliac graft, Roof reconstruction with autologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with homologous bone graft, Roof reconstruction with auto/homologous spongious bone, Reinforcement ring with the hook in combination with autologous graft augmentation, Cranial positioning of the acetabulum, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with chisel, Medial protrusion technique (cotyloplasty) with reaming, Cotyloplasty without spongioplasty. For femoral reconstruction following techniques were described: Distraction with external fixator, Femoral shortening through a modified lateral approach, Transtrochanteric osteotomies, Paavilainen osteotomy, Lesser trochanter osteotomy, Double-chevron osteotomy, Subtrochanteric osteotomies, Diaphyseal osteotomies, Distal femoral osteotomies. At the end we present author’s treatment method of choice: for acetabulum we perform cotyloplasty leaving only paper-thin medial wall, which we break during

  4. Accuracy of methods to measure femoral head penetration within metal-backed acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Callary, Stuart A; Solomon, Lucian B; Holubowycz, Oksana T; Campbell, David G; Howie, Donald W

    2016-06-30

    A number of different software programs are used to investigate the in vivo wear of polyethylene bearings in total hip arthroplasty. With wear rates below 0.1 mm/year now commonly being reported for highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) components, it is important to identify the accuracy of the methods used to measure such small movements. The aims of this study were to compare the accuracy of current software programs used to measure two-dimensional (2D) femoral head penetration (FHP) and to determine whether the accuracy is influenced by larger femoral heads or by different methods of representing the acetabular component within radiostereometric analysis (RSA). A hip phantom was used to compare known movements of the femoral head within a metal-backed acetabular component to FHP measured radiographically using RSA, Hip Analysis Suite (HAS), PolyWare, Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse (EBRA), and Roentgen Monographic Analysis Tool (ROMAN). RSA was significantly more accurate than the HAS, PolyWare, and ROMAN methods when measuring 2D FHP with a 28 mm femoral head. Femoral head size influenced the accuracy of HAS and ROMAN 2D FHP measurements, EBRA proximal measurements, and RSA measurements in the proximal and anterior direction. The use of different acetabular reference segments did not influence accuracy of RSA measurements. The superior accuracy and reduced variability of RSA wear measurements allow much smaller cohorts to be used in RSA clinical wear studies than those utilizing other software programs. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  5. Mineral of the month: cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

  6. Improved coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques at Prudhoe Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbrook, P.R.; Mason, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents major changes in coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques used in the Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBUWOA). Changes include introduction of a polymer diluent to replace borax contamination, increased differential pressures placed on squeeze and coil, reduced cement volumes, and incorporation of an inflow test and resqueeze procedure. These changes resulted in increased squeeze effectiveness by reducing equipment and engineering time requirements and by shortening well shut-in time after the workover.

  7. The influence of surface topography on wear debris generation at the cement/bone interface under cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Kirk A; Yang, Dongliang T; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-05-01

    The long-term success of a total joint replacement can be undermined by loosening of the implant, generation of wear debris or a combination of both factors. In the present study the influence of the surface morphologies of the bone and cement mantle on loosening of cemented total joint replacements (THJRs) and development of wear debris were studied. Model cemented THJR specimens were prepared in which the femoral canal was textured using specific cutting tools. The specimens were subjected to cyclic loads inducing pure shear fatigue of the cement/bone interface. Changes in both the femoral canal and cement mantle resulting from fatigue were quantified in terms of the surface topography and the volume of wear debris. Loosening occurred with cyclic loading due to degradation of the cement and bone and resulted in the development of cement and bone particles. There was no correlation between the fatigue strength of the interfaces and the volume of wear debris. In general, the change in surface topography of the cement mantle with fatigue decreased with increasing volume of cement interdigitation. Femoral canal surfaces with symmetric profile height distribution (i.e., Gaussian surfaces) resulted in the lowest volume of generated debris.

  8. Inspection program improves bulk cement system delivery

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bannion, T. ); Guidroz, B.; Morris, G. )

    1993-12-20

    A recently implemented survey of pneumatically operated bulk cement-handling equipment offshore has improved bulk cement deliverability on several Gulf of Mexico rigs. The 30-point survey helps ensure an adequate rate of bulk cement delivery throughout the cement job. The inspection survey was developed because the source of many cement job failures was a lack of adequate, steady delivery of bulk cement to the cementing unit during the job. The job failures caused by flow interruptions, plugging of tools by chunks of set cement, and erratic flow resulted in poor primary cement jobs, many of which required remedial cementing jobs. A better-controlled flow of cement may help prevent these types of failure, thereby reducing the number of remedial cement operations. The paper describes the inspection procedures.

  9. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  10. Femoro-acetabular impingement clinical research: is a composite outcome the answer?

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Olufemi R; Sansone, Mikael; de Sa, Darren; Simunovic, Nicole; Bedi, Asheesh; Kelly, Bryan T; Farrokhyar, Forough; Karlsson, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) is increasingly recognized as an important cause of hip pain in the young adult. However, the methods of evaluating the efficacy of surgical intervention are often not validated and/or inconsistently reported. Important clinical, gait, radiographic and biomarker outcomes are discussed. This article (1) presents the rationale for considering a composite outcome for FAI patients; (2) examines a variety of important end points currently used to evaluate FAI surgery; (3) discusses a strategy to generate a composite outcome by combining these end points; and (4) highlights the challenges and current areas of controversy that such an approach to evaluating symptomatic FAI patients may present.

  11. Cementation and compaction history of synorogenic foreland basin sedimentary rocks from Huaco, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Damanti, J.F.; Jordan, T.E.

    1989-07-01

    The Sierra de Huaco exposes the western flank of the Bermejo foreland basin of central western Argentina. The exposed 5400-m section is well dated (14-2.3 Ma) and consists of synorogenic continental strata. Petrographic data combined with decompaction techniques provide first-order estimates of the absolute age of cementation of the sandstones. This information can be used to interpret petroleum migration paths and reservoir potential. Three diagenetic zones have been recognized, each characterized by a dominant cementing material within a distinct framework texture. These textures reflect varying degrees of compaction and framework-grain replacement prior to cementation. The diagenetic histories of the three zones were genetically linked to thrusting in the adjacent Precordillera, changes in depositional environment, and subsurface fluid flow. The depth at which cementation occurred in each zone is constrained by comparison of observed intergrain volume to predicted volumes (for uncemented sands) at any given burial depth. First-order estimates of the absolute age of cementation in each zone were made possible by comparing these relationships with a curve of accumulation history of the decompacted strata. The lowest zone compacted with little interstitial cement for as long as 11 m.y. after deposition. The middle zone was cemented within 3 m.y. after deposition. The upper zone experienced framework-grain replacement by calcite at very shallow depths within 2 m.y. and experienced little compaction. 14 figures, 1 table.

  12. Retention of alkali ions by hydrated low-pH cements: Mechanism and Na{sup +}/K{sup +} selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, T.T.H.; Chabas, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Frizon, F.

    2013-09-15

    Low-pH cements, also referred to as low-alkalinity cements, can be designed by replacing significant amounts of Portland cement by pozzolanic materials. Their pore solution is characterized by a pH near 11, and an alkali concentration much lower than that of Portland cement. This work investigates the retention of sodium and potassium by a hydrated low-pH cement comprising 60% Portland cement and 40% silica fume. It is shown that sorption of potassium is higher than that of sodium and mainly results from counterion charge balancing of the C-S-H negative surface charge. To explain the greater retention of potassium compared to sodium, it is postulated that potassium, unlike sodium, may enter the interlayer of C-S-H to compensate the negative charges in the interlayer, in addition to the external surfaces. This assumption is supported by structural characterization of C-S-H using X-ray diffraction.

  13. Phosphate based oil well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  14. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved

  15. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  16. Cement fabrics of the Bahamian platform and its margin near Lee Stocking Island

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, G.; Rouche, L.; Dill, R.F.; Kendall, C.G.S.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Consolidated to firable carbonate rock samples were collected on and around Lee Stocking Island to determine the distribution, fabric, and mineralogy of their cements. The rocks include: (1) beachrock rimming the islands, (2) shallow-water hardgrounds, (3) reef rock, (4) channel stromatolites, and (5) Pleistocene bedrock. Analyses by SEM, microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and petrographic microscope have revealed ten different cement fabrics. Five of these cements are varieties of fibers, all of which are aragonitic except the whisker' fibers that form coarse networks of intertwining high-Mg calcite in a Pleistocene cave sample. Acicular fan-druse and square-tipped coarse fibers cement the beachrock, while an isopachous, needle-fiber rim is found only in the hardgrounds. A radial fibrous cement occurs in several ooids and biogenic grains, representing a replacement fabric of aragonite that has inverted to high-Mg calcite. Two types of blades are present: a stubby variety with a length:width ratio of 2:1 and an elongated 5:1 variety, both of which are high-Mg calcite. While the 2:1 variety is rather common, the 5:1 variety only occurred in one sample. Aragonitic micrite envelopes often surround grains in beachrock and hardgrounds, but only in association with fibrous cement. An aragonitic lime mud matrix cements the crusted mud beds and low-Mg calcite equant spar cements the Pleistocene samples and occurs as void-fill in beachrock and hardgrounds. The most common marine cementation is associated with the aragonitic fibers found in the discontinuous hardgrounds and beachrocks. The more widespread cements are the low Mg-calcite spar associated with meteoric diagenesis and cementation of the Pleistocene surface.

  17. Magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler: preliminary experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Stephen A; Peauroi, John

    2009-03-01

    Bone cement has great potential in craniofacial surgery in the repair of osseous defects secondary to surgery or trauma. This includes the use of bone cement as a bone void filler for full-thickness cranial defects and as augmentation of deficient bones. Ideally, this material should be easily available, biocompatible, resorbable, bone inductive, and have adhesive qualities to bone. Calcium-based bone cements have some of these qualities but have a higher than desirable failure rate. OsteoCrete, a new magnesium-based bone cement and bone void filler, was compared to Norian in critical-sized skull defects and cementing bone flaps in rabbits. Both materials were successful; however, OsteoCrete had a faster resorption and replacement by bone rate than Norian. Bone flap position and apparent stability were also superior with OsteoCrete. There were no adverse reactions to either cement. A magnesium-based bone cement presents with advantages when compared with a comparator calcium-based cement in craniofacial surgery.

  18. Hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder as a function of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinherrová, Lenka; Trník, Anton; Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Rahhal, Viviana; Irassar, Edgardo F.; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The production of a cement binder generates a high amount of CO2 and has high energy consumption, resulting in a very adverse impact on the environment. Therefore, use of pozzolana active materials in the concrete production leads to a decrease of the consumption of cement binder and costs, especially when some type of industrial waste is used. In this paper, the hydration of blended cement pastes containing waste ceramic powder from the Czech Republic and Portland cement produced in Argentina is studied. A cement binder is partially replaced by 8 and 40 mass% of a ceramic powder. These materials are compared with an ordinary cement paste. All mixtures are prepared with a water/cement ratio of 0.5. Thermal characterization of the hydrated blended pastes is carried out in the time period from 2 to 360 days. Simultaneous DSC/TG analysis is performed in the temperature range from 25 °C to 1000 °C in an argon atmosphere. Using this thermal analysis, we identify the temperature, enthalpy and mass changes related to the liberation of physically bound water, calcium-silicate-hydrates gels dehydration, portlandite, vaterite and calcite decomposition and their changes during the curing time. Based on thermogravimetry results, we found out that the portlandite content slightly decreases with time for all blended cement pastes.

  19. Acetabular Reconstruction with Human and Bovine Freeze- Dried Bone Grafts and a Reinforcement Device

    PubMed Central

    Rosito, Ricardo; Galia, Carlos Roberto; Macedo, Carlos Alberto Souza; Moreira, Luis Fernando; Quaresma, Lourdes Maria Araújo C.; Palma, Humberto Moreira

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND This is a cohort trial (1997–2005) of 49 patients submitted to an acetabular component revision of a total hip arthroplasty, using impacted human and bovine freeze-dried cancellous bone grafts (H&FDBG) and a reinforcement device. OBJECTIVE To compare clinical/radiographic graft incorporation capability between cancellous bone grafts. PATIENTS/METHODS There were two groups: I (n=26) receiving human grafts and II (n=25) receiving bovine grafts. The average follow-up times were 55 and 49 months, respectively. Clinical analysis was based on the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel score, and the radiographic analysis involved an established score based on Conn’s et al. criteria for radiographic bone incorporation. RESULTS No clinical/radiographic differences were found between the groups and both showed an overall rate of 88.5% and 76% of graft incorporation (p=0.424). CONCLUSION The results presented here are comparable to those in the literature with the use of deep-FG. Therefore, cancellous bone grafts can be safely and adequately used in acetabular component revision in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:18719763

  20. Preliminary analysis on the MD-4® plasma-sprayed titanium acetabular component☆

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Loures, Elmano; Simoni, Leandro Furtado; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Loures, Daniel Naya; Loures, Clarice Naya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the short-term performance of a type of implant manufactured in Brazil. Methods This study analyzed a cohort of 60 patients who underwent implantation of MD-4® acetabular components during primary hip arthroplasty procedures performed between January 1, 2010, and August 1, 2012. The patients were studied retrospectively with regard to clinical behavior, stability and radiological osseointegration. The patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 42 months (mean: 27) and were evaluated by means of the Harris Hip Score, SF-36 questionnaire and serial conventional radiographs. Results All the components were radiologically stable, without evidence of migration or progressive radiolucency lines. On average, the Harris Hip Score evolved from 36.1 to 92.1 (p < 0.001) and the SF-36 showed significant increases in all its domains (p < 0.001). No differences were observed among patients with osteoarthrosis, osteonecrosis, hip dysplasia or other conditions. Conclusions The short-term results showed clinical and radiological signs of stability and osseointegration of the implants, which may represent a predictive factor regarding medium-term survival of this acetabular component. PMID:26229918

  1. 3D Printing Aids Acetabular Reconstruction in Complex Revision Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    DeBuitleir, Cathal; Soden, Philip; O'Donnchadha, Brian; Tansey, Anthony; Abdulkarim, Ali; McMahon, Colm; Hurson, Conor J.

    2017-01-01

    Revision hip arthroplasty requires comprehensive appreciation of abnormal bony anatomy. Advances in radiology and manufacturing technology have made three-dimensional (3D) representation of osseous anatomy obtainable, which provide visual and tactile feedback. Such life-size 3D models were manufactured from computed tomography scans of three hip joints in two patients. The first patient had undergone multiple previous hip arthroplasties for bilateral hip infections, resulting in right-sided pelvic discontinuity and a severe left-sided posterosuperior acetabular deficiency. The second patient had a first-stage revision for infection and recurrent dislocations. Specific metal reduction protocols were used to reduce artefact. The images were imported into Materialise MIMICS 14.12®. The models were manufactured using selective laser sintering. Accurate templating was performed preoperatively. Acetabular cup, augment, buttress, and cage sizes were trialled using the models, before being adjusted, and resterilised, enhancing the preoperative decision-making process. Screw trajectory simulation was carried out, reducing the risk of neurovascular injury. With 3D printing technology, complex pelvic deformities were better evaluated and treated with improved precision. Life-size models allowed accurate surgical simulation, thus improving anatomical appreciation and preoperative planning. The accuracy and cost-effectiveness of the technique should prove invaluable as a tool to aid clinical practice. PMID:28168060

  2. Towards the optimal design of an uncemented acetabular component using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Rajesh; Pratihar, Dilip Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic loosening of the acetabular component (hemispherical socket of the pelvic bone) has been mainly attributed to bone resorption and excessive generation of wear particle debris. The aim of this study was to determine optimal design parameters for the acetabular component that would minimize bone resorption and volumetric wear. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvises were developed using data from computed tomography scans. A multi-objective optimization problem was formulated and solved using a genetic algorithm. A combination of suitable implant material and corresponding set of optimal thicknesses of the component was obtained from the Pareto-optimal front of solutions. The ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component generated considerably greater volumetric wear but lower bone density loss compared to carbon-fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) and ceramic. CFR-PEEK was located in the range between ceramic and UHMWPE. Although ceramic appeared to be a viable alternative to cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, CFR-PEEK seems to be the most promising alternative material.

  3. Measuring acetabular component position on lateral radiographs - ischio-lateral method.

    PubMed

    Pulos, Nicholas; Tiberi Iii, John V; Schmalzried, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    The standard method for the evaluation of arthritis and postoperative assessment of arthroplasty treatment is observation and measurement from plain films, using the flm edge for orientation. A more recent employment of an anatomical landmark, the ischial tuberosity, has come into use as orientation for evaluation and is called the ischio-lateral method. In this study, the use of this method was evaluated as a first report to the literature on acetabular component measurement using a skeletal reference with lateral radiographs. Postoperative radiographs of 52 hips, with at least three true lateral radiographs taken at different time periods, were analyzed. Component position was measured with the historical method (using the flm edge for orientation) and with the new method using the ischio-lateral method. The mean standard deviation (SD) for the historical approach was 3.7° and for the ischio-lateral method, 2.2° (p < 0.001). With the historical method, 19 (36.5%) hips had a SD greater than ± 4°, compared to six hips (11.5%) with the ischio-lateral method. By using a skeletal reference, the ischio-lateral method provides a more consistent measurement of acetabular component position. The high intra-class correlation coefficients for both intra- and inter-observer reliability indicate that the angle measured with this simple method, which employs no further technology, increased time, or cost, is consistent and reproducible for multiple observers.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy study of the oxidation of Hylamer UHMWPE explanted acetabular cups sterilized differently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Matteo; Tinti, Anna; Visentin, Manuela; Stea, Susanna; Erani, Paolo; Fagnano, Concezio

    2007-05-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used for over 40 years for acetabular cups in total hip joint prosthesis. Hylamer is a hot isostatically pressed material with high crystallinity. Early loosening due to extensive oxidation and phase transformation has been observed for this material. To analyze the reasons for its high tendency to oxidize, we have examined by FT-IR spectroscopy explanted acetabular cups γ-sterilized in different ways. The oxidation and wear rate observed were: Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in air with a long shelf life > Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in air with short shelf life ⩾ Hylamer cups γ-sterilized in nitrogen. Our data indicate the important role of the shelf life on the oxidation of the cups: the samples γ-sterilized in air characterized by a shelf life greater than 3 years showed severe oxidation, a high wear rate, and marked debris production with delamination and the formation of a brittle zone in the more oxidated regions. In these regions we observed an increase in crystallinity, which was probably due to the decrease in the molecular weight of PE. The high oxidation was probably due to the modifications induced by the material treatment.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3330 - Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an... Devices § 888.3330 Hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented acetabular component, prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/metal semi-constrained, with an uncemented...

  10. Trabecular metal cup without augments for acetabular revision in case of extensive bone loss and low bone-prosthesis contact.

    PubMed

    Pierannunzii, L; Mambretti, A; D'Imporzano, M

    2011-01-01

    Current evidences in revision hip arthroplasty suggest to treat severe acetabular bone loss with dedicated implants, such as anti-protrusio cages, stemmed cups, modular systems supplied with iliac flanges and obturatory hook. However recent literature is reporting satisfactory outcomes with simple elliptical Trabecular Metal cups. Purpose of the study was to evaluate mid-term results of such a surgical procedure. All hip revisions performed from 2008 to 2009 with implantation of a TMT multi-hole acetabular cup without augmentations were retrospectively reviewed. The cases with low-degree acetabular bone loss (stage I and II according to GIR classification), with surgical report poorly describing the bone defect, with inadequate pre- and post-operative x-rays were ruled out. Twenty-five cases were identified, but four were lost to follow-up. The twenty-one patients were 71 year-old on average (from 60 to 82), with stage IV bone loss in 6 cases and stage III bone loss in 15 cases. Mean interval from surgery to evaluation was 20.9 months (from 13 to 30). The evaluation included bone-prosthesis contact estimation, component position, survivorship, complications, final Harris Hip Score, presence of periprosthetic radiolucencies. Host bone-prosthesis contact was estimated to be about 35%. Only three implant were subsequently reoperated (for infection, early migration, recurrent dislocation). The HHS among non-reoperated 18 patients was 81.96 on average (from 63.44 to 95.82). Six cases showed thin radiolucencies in one of the three Charnley zones, while three cases showed radiolucencies in two. None of these images was evolutive, thus they were not considered signs of loosening. The mid-term results of this series confirm the hypothesis that a porous tantalum acetabular cup is an effective option to deal with difficult acetabular revisions. Although no extra-acetabular fixation device is available, the very high surface friction guaranteed by the material and the

  11. Durability of Cement Composites Reinforced with Sisal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianqiang

    This dissertation focuses mainly on investigating the aging mechanisms and degradation kinetics of sisal fiber, as well as the approaches to mitigate its degradation in the matrix of cement composites. In contrast to previous works reported in the literature, a novel approach is proposed in this study to directly determine the fiber's degradation rate by separately studying the composition changes, mechanical and physical properties of the embedded sisal fibers. Cement hydration is presented to be a crucial factor in understanding fiber degradation behavior. The degradation mechanisms of natural fiber consist of mineralization of cell walls, alkali hydrolysis of lignin and hemicellulose, as well as the cellulose decomposition which includes stripping of cellulose microfibrils and alkaline hydrolysis of amorphous regions in cellulose chains. Two mineralization mechanisms, CH-mineralization and self-mineralization, are proposed. The degradation kinetics of sisal fiber in the cement matrix are also analyzed and a model to predict the degradation rate of cellulose for natural fiber embedded in cement is outlined. The results indicate that the time needed to completely degrade the cellulose in the matrix with cement replacement by 30wt.% metakaolin is 13 times longer than that in pure cement. A novel and scientific method is presented to determine accelerated aging conditions, and to evaluating sisal fiber's degradation rate and durability of natural fiber-reinforced cement composites. Among the static aggressive environments, the most effective approach for accelerating the degradation of natural fiber in cement composites is to soak the samples or change the humidity at 70 °C and higher temperature. However, the dynamic wetting and drying cycling treatment has a more accelerating effect on the alkali hydrolysis of fiber's amorphous components evidenced by the highest crystallinity indices, minimum content of holocellulose, and lowest tensile strength. Based on the

  12. Alumina Inlay Failure in Cemented Polyethylene-backed Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroyoshi; Minoda, Yukihide; Ohashi, Hirotsugu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Alumina-on-alumina bearings for THA have markedly improved in mechanical properties through advances in technology; however, alumina fracture is still a concern. We retrospectively reviewed 77 patients (82 hips) with cemented alumina-on-alumina THAs to identify factors relating to alumina failure. The mean age of the patients at surgery was 63 years. The prostheses had a cemented polyethylene-backed acetabular component with an alumina inlay and a 28-mm alumina head. Revision surgery was performed because of alumina inlay failure in four hips (three fractures and one dissociation; 5.6%), deep infection in two, and recurrent dislocation in one. The 8-year survival rate was 90.7% with revision for any reason and 94.4% with revision for alumina failure as the end point. There were no differences in age, body mass index, gender, mobility, function, abduction angle, or size of component among the four hips with alumina failure and the remaining 68 hips without it; however, radiolucent lines in the sockets were more apparent in four cases with alumina inlay failure. This alumina-on-alumina THA thus yielded unsatisfactory medium-term results because we observed a high rate of catastrophic alumina inlay failure. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18288546

  13. Stabilization of high and low solids Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) waste with super cement

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B.W.

    2000-01-11

    This report details solidification activities using selected Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies with the High and Low Solid waste streams. Ceramicrete and Super Cement technologies were chosen as the best possible replacement solidification candidates for the waste streams generated by the SRS incinerator from a list of several suggested Mixed Waste Focus Area technologies. These technologies were tested, evaluated, and compared to the current Portland cement technology being employed. Recommendation of a technology for replacement depends on waste form performance, process flexibility, process complexity, and cost of equipment and/or raw materials.

  14. Reusing fly ash in glass fibre reinforced cement: a new generation of high-quality GRC composites.

    PubMed

    Payá, J; Bonilla, M; Borrachero, M V; Monzó, J; Peris-Mora, E; Lalinde, L F

    2007-01-01

    New composite materials based on an alkali-resistant glass-fibre reinforced cement (AR-GRC) system are being developed by using fly ash (FA) produced at coal thermoelectric power plants, and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst residue (FC3R) from the petrol industry as cement replacement materials. These wastes are reactive from the pozzolanic viewpoint, and modify the nature and the microstructure of the cement matrix when a part of the Portland cement is replaced in the formulation of GRC. Several microstructural and mechanical aspects are being studied for AR-GRC systems. The behaviour of composites exposed to ageing shows that the pozzolanic activity of the ground FA added in high amounts and its mixture with the FC3R increase the flexural strength and no evidences of strength decay are observed. Additionally, the fibres due to the high alkalinity of the cementing matrix can be deteriorated. Fibres in the control (only Portland cement) and FC3R containing composites were attacked, whereas composites with FA and their mixture with FC3R show that the fibres have not been attacked, due to the pozzolanic activity of replacing materials that reduce the calcium hydroxide content in the cementing matrix.

  15. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  16. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  17. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  18. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  19. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  20. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  1. Diagenetic cements in transgressive and regressive limestone members on the Stanton Limestone (Upper Pennsylvanian), northern midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Bin; Heckel, P.H.; Gonzalez, L.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Detailed cathodoluminescent microscopy reveals various types and phases of cement growth preserved in the two limestone members of the Stanton Limestone, which represents a complete cycle of sea level rise and fall during deposition. In the transgressive Captain Creek Limestone Member, early cements are mainly isopachous rims within brachiopods. In the regressive Stoner Limestone Member, early cements are both intergranula rand intragranular isopachous rims in oolitic and skeletal grainstones and in wackestones, as well as non-luminescent syntaxial overgrowths around echinoderm grains. The second phase of cementation in both members consists of luminescence void-filling blocky calcite and syntaxial overgrowths. The latest phase of cementation in both members comprises non-luminescent void-filling and/or replacement ferroan dolomite formed during burial. The early cements are more enriched in Fe and more enriched in Mg than in Sr. However, there seems to be little difference in trace elemental compositions between the transgressive and regressive limestones in general, although certain types of cements confined to one member fall into a relatively small field. The blocky calcites exhibit much higher Fe and Mn content than the early cements. The ferroan dolomite exhibits higher Fe and Mn concentration in the transgressive than in the regressive limestone. The greater abundance of marine cements in the regressive limestone is attributed to greater residence time in high-energy warm marine environments. Differences in Fe and Mn concentration between transgressive and regressive limestone cements are attributed to differences in redox conditions of diagenetic fluids controlled by the offshore Eudora Shale separating these two limestones.

  2. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-08-01

    Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm-1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  3. The acetabular labrum: anatomic and functional characteristics and rationale for surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marc R

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen unprecedented growth in the number of hip arthroscopies. Acetabular labral tears are the leading indication for arthroscopy of this joint. However, labral anatomy and function, as well as the effects of labral tears and surgical outcomes, have only recently been studied. Labral tears may cause pain and microinstability of the hip joint. They also may increase friction within the joint, cartilage consolidation, and strain within the articular cartilage, thereby possibly resulting in accelerated degeneration of the joint. Partial labrectomy and labral repair are the current surgical options, and basic science data suggest that labral repairs can heal and subsequently restore function. However, a good, validated outcomes measure to adequately assess active patients with a painful nonarthritic hip is needed to determine the efficacy of such repair and aid in managing patient expectations.

  4. A feasibility study into the use of three-dimensional printer modelling in acetabular fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Yu, A W; Duncan, J M; Daurka, J S; Lewis, A; Cobb, J

    2015-01-01

    There are a number of challenges associated with the operative treatment of acetabular fractures. The approach used is often extensive, while operative time and perioperative blood loss can also be significant. With the proliferation of 3D printer technology, we present a fast and economical way to aid the operative planning of complex fractures. We used augmented stereoscopic 3D CT reconstructions to allow for an appreciation of the normal 3D anatomy of the pelvis on the fractured side and to use the models for subsequent intraoperative contouring of pelvic reconstruction plates. This leads to a reduction in the associated soft tissue trauma, reduced intraoperative time and blood loss, minimal handling of the plate, and reduced fluoroscopic screening times. We feel that the use of this technology to customize implants, plates, and the operative procedure to a patient's unique anatomy can only lead to improved outcomes.

  5. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  6. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  7. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, L. H.

    1985-12-03

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight monoor copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  8. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE FOR ANTARCTICA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    formulation of recommended procedures for batching, mixing, placing, and curing of portland cement concrete in Antarctica. The pertinent features of the mix and design and related procedures are given. (Author)

  9. Wear of gamma-crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cups against roughened femoral balls.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H; Shen, F W; DiMaio, W; Lancaster, J G

    1999-12-01

    Crosslinking of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene has been shown to markedly improve its wear resistance in clinical studies and laboratory tests using hip joint simulators. However, because most of the laboratory studies have been done under clean conditions using prosthesis-quality, highly polished counterfaces, there is concern regarding how well an intentionally crosslinked polyethylene acetabular cup will resist abrasion by a femoral ball that has been damaged by third-body abrasion in vivo. To investigate this, conventional and radiation crosslinked-remelted acetabular cups of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene were tested in a hip joint simulator bearing against smooth femoral balls and against balls with moderate and severe roughening. Cups were tested with and without aging to accelerate any oxidative degradation. The crosslinked cups were produced by exposing extruded GUR 4150 bar stock of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene to 5 Mrad gamma radiation under a partial vacuum and then the bars were remelted to extinguish residual free radicals. Artificial aging at 70 degrees C under 5 atm oxygen for 14 days induced negligible oxidation in the crosslinked and remelted material. Against smooth balls, the wear of the crosslinked cups, with or without aging, averaged approximately 15% of that of the conventional cups. Against the moderately rough balls, the wear rate of the conventional cups was unchanged, whereas the wear rate increased slightly for the nonaged and aged crosslinked cups, but was still only 26% and 20% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. Against extremely rough balls, the mean wear rates increased markedly for each material such that during the final 1 million cycle interval, the average wear rates of the nonaged and the aged crosslinked cups were 72% and 47% of that of the conventional cups, respectively. That is, the crosslinked polyethylene showed substantially better wear resistance than conventional polyethylene

  10. Prophylactic radiotherapy against heterotopic ossification following internal fixation of acetabular fractures: a comparative estimate of risk

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, P; Yip, G; Scaife, J E; House, T; Thomas, S J; Harris, F; Owen, P J; Hull, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy (RT) is effective in preventing heterotopic ossification (HO) around acetabular fractures requiring surgical reconstruction. We audited outcomes and estimated risks from RT prophylaxis, and alternatives of indometacin or no prophylaxis. Methods: 34 patients underwent reconstruction of acetabular fractures through a posterior approach, followed by a 8-Gy single fraction. The mean age was 44 years. The mean time from surgery to RT was 1.1 days. The major RT risk is radiation-induced fatal cancer. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) method was used to estimate risk, and compared with a method (Trott and Kemprad) specifically for estimating RT risk for benign disease. These were compared with risks associated with indometacin and no prophylaxis. Results: 28 patients (82%) developed no HO; 6 developed Brooker Class I; and none developed Class II–IV HO. The ICRP method suggests a risk of fatal cancer in the range of 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000; the Trott and Kemprad method suggests 1 in 3000. For younger patients, this may rise to 1 in 2000; and for elderly patients, it may fall to 1 in 6000. The risk of death from gastric bleeding or perforation from indometacin is 1 in 180 to 1 in 900 in older patients. Without prophylaxis risk of death from reoperation to remove HO is 1 in 4000 to 1 in 30,000. Conclusion: These results are encouraging, consistent with much larger series and endorse our multidisciplinary management. Risk estimates can be used in discussion with patients. Advances in knowledge: The risk from RT prophylaxis is small, it is safer than indometacin and substantially overlaps with the range for no prophylaxis. PMID:25089852

  11. Acetabular cup position and risk of dislocation in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seagrave, Kurt G; Troelsen, Anders; Malchau, Henrik; Husted, Henrik; Gromov, Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — Hip dislocation is one of the most common complications following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Several factors that affect dislocation have been identified, including acetabular cup positioning. Optimal values for cup inclination and anteversion are debatable. We performed a systematic review to describe the different methods for measuring cup placement, target zones for cup positioning, and the association between cup positioning and dislocation following primary THA. Methods — A systematic search of literature in the PubMed database was performed (January and February 2016) to identify articles that compared acetabular cup positioning and the risk of dislocation. Surgical approach and methods for measurement of cup angles were also considered. Results— 28 articles were determined to be relevant to our research question. Some articles demonstrated that cup positioning influenced postoperative dislocation whereas others did not. The majority of articles could not identify a statistically significant difference between dislocating and non-dislocating THA with regard to mean angles of cup anteversion and inclination. Most of the articles that assessed cup placement within the Lewinnek safe zone did not show a statistically significant reduction in dislocation rate. Alternative target ranges have been proposed by several authors. Interpretation— The Lewinnek safe zone could not be justified. It is difficult to draw broad conclusions regarding a definitive target zone for cup positioning in THA, due to variability between studies and the likely multifactorial nature of THA dislocation. Future studies comparing cup positioning and dislocation rate should investigate surgical approach separately. Standardized tools for measurement of cup positioning should be implemented to allow comparison between studies. PMID:27879150

  12. Formulation and characterization of antimicrobial quaternary ammonium dendrimer in poly(methyl methcarylate) bone cement.

    PubMed

    Abid, C K V Zainul; Jain, Swati; Jackeray, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Singh, Harpal

    2017-04-01

    The use of novel antimicrobial molecules in bone cement can improve efficiency of recuperation after arthroplasty or joint replacement surgeries, avoiding the risks associated with antibiotic resistant antimicrobial agents. Nanomaterials particularly dendrimers are particularly useful for making broad spectrum killing agents owing to their large surface areas and functionalities. Therefore, we have synthesized generation 1 quaternary ammonium dendrimer of tripropylene glycol diacrylate (TPGDA) using octyl iodide (OI) [TPGDA G1.0 (=) quaternary octyl iodide (QOI)] and capitalized on their capabilities of contact killing based mechanism. We formulated different TPGDA G1.0 (=) QOI antimicrobial agent loaded liquid component composed of methyl methacrylate monomer and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine coinitiator. Different polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based experimental bone cement formulations were made and dendrimer concentration was optimized. Mechanical strength and compressive modulus of modified bone cement decreased on increasing concentrations and 10% was optimized for further analysis. The mechanical strength of bone cement yield the similar trend in wet conditions bone cement immersed in artificially created stimulated body fluids. Ten percent TPGDA G1.0 (=) QOI in bone cement was sufficient to kill gram positive and negative bacteria and its property is retained even after a period of 30 days. Thus novel dendritic structures show promise for clinical antimicrobial activity while retaining mechanical properties of bone cements. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 521-530, 2017.

  13. [Ionomer cement as bone substitute in the middle ear of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Geyer, G

    1997-04-01

    Ionomer-based cements are obtained by the reaction of an aluminum-fluoro-silicate glass with a polyalcenoic acid. During setting and hardening the cement bonds closely with adjacent hard tissue. The previous implantation of this material in the baboon tibia has held great promise as a possible use in bone replacement. In the present study the cement was tested concerning its biocompatibility and biostability in the middle ears of 64 rabbits. Viscid cement paste was inserted into the epitympanic space of each animal. A preformed cement strut was then placed to serve as a columella between the eardrum and stapes footplate. During a subsequent interval of 28 days up to 2 years middle ear specimens were evaluated under a surgical microscope, following which histologic sections were studied under light microscopic conditions. Findings demonstrated that after insertion of freshly mixed cement a firm adhesion to bone developed that proved to be biocompatible and biostable over time. After 28 days the preformed and fully hardened implants were overgrown by a delicate mucosa normally present in the middle ear. No evidence for any rejection of the implants could be found. The experience available to date indicates that ionomer cement is biocompatible and biostable, easy to handle and workable without splintering. With appropriate use it represents a useful implant material in surgery of the head and neck.

  14. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  15. Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J.

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

  16. Influence of various amount of diatomaceous earth used as cement substitute on mechanical properties of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Medved, Igor; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Zahálková, Jana; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Active silica containing materials in the sub-micrometer size range are commonly used for modification of strength parameters and durability of cement based composites. In addition, these materials also assist to accelerate cement hydration. In this paper, two types of diatomaceous earths are used as partial cement replacement in composition of cement paste mixtures. For raw binders, basic physical and chemical properties are studied. The chemical composition of tested materials is determined using classical chemical analysis combined with XRD method that allowed assessment of SiO2 amorphous phase content. For all tested mixtures, initial and final setting times are measured. Basic physical and mechanical properties are measured on hardened paste samples cured 28 days in water. Here, bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive and flexural strength, are measured. Relationship between compressive strength and total open porosity is studied using several empirical models. The obtained results give evidence of high pozzolanic activity of tested diatomite earths. Their application leads to the increase of both initial and final setting times, decrease of compressive strength, and increase of flexural strength.

  17. Cement pulmonary embolism after vertebroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes Giraldo, Walter Alberto; Lamúa Riazuelo, José Ramón; Gallego Rivera, José Ignacio; Vázquez Díaz, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of vertebral cementing techniques for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty has spread for the treatment of pain associated with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. This is also associated with the increased incidence of complications related with these procedures, the most frequent being originated by leakage of cementation material. Cement can escape into the vertebral venous system and reach the pulmonary circulation through the azygous system and cava vein, producing a cement embolism. This is a frequent complication, occurring in up to 26% of patients undergoing vertebroplasty but, since most patients have no clinical or hemodynamical repercussion, this event usually goes unnoticed. However, some serious, and even fatal cases, have been reported. We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient who underwent vertebroplasty for persistent pain associated with osteoporotic L3 vertebral fracture and who developed a cement leak into the cava vein and right pulmonary artery during the procedure. Although he developed a pulmonary cement embolism, the patient remained asymptomatic and did not present complications during follow-up.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiee, S. M.; Moztarzadeh, F.; Solati-Hashjin, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study deals with synthesizing hydroxyapatite bone cement as a bone substitute for clinical applications. The powder part of the cement is using β-tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, dicalcium phosphate and the liquid part contains NaH 2PO 4·2H 2O solution with different concentrations. The effects of liquid concentration on the setting times of the cement have been investigated. XRD analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy were used to study the phase composition of calcium phosphate cement. Morphology and chemical analysis of the synthesized cement was performed using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyser. In addition, the effect of soaking time of synthesized bone cement in simulated body fluid (SBF) on the final phase and strength has been studied. Soaking prepared cement in SBF solution for appropriate time resulted in transformation of the composition of the cement into hydroxyapatite and hence the strength of the cement has been increased.

  19. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering

  20. Cement evaluation; Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkington, P.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Cement evaluation began with the calculation of cement tops. This calculation assumed gauge holes and no channeling of the cement through the mud. Calipers were not available at that time. In the mid-1930's, the use of temperature surveys to determine the top of cement (TOC) was documented in technical journals. Properly run temperature surveys can identify the TOC, but distribution of cement-e.g., vertical isolation through zones of interest-is difficult to ascertain. Radioactive tracer surveys were run in the late 1930's to determine cement tops. Carnotite was mixed in the lead slurry and cement tops were determined with a gamma ray log. Tracer surveys had the same limitations as temperature logs but were not time-sensitive. This paper reports on methods that have been and are currently being used for cement evaluation including temperature logs, radioactive traces, and cement bond tools.

  1. The Use of Natural Pozzolan in Concrete as an Additive or Substitute for Cement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    17 Figure 28. Materials used for concrete mix...activity index with different pozzaolanic materials . ................................................ 62 Table 31. ASTM C1260 Aggregate grading...is feasible that a significant portion of cement in a concrete mixture may be replaced by pozzolan. This study ex- plored the properties of concrete

  2. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.”...

  3. Surgical treatment of an acetabular fracture and labral tear with suture anchors in a 10-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Mormor, Meir; Matityahu, Amir

    2009-11-01

    This article presents a case of a 10-year-old boy with a right acetabular fracture secondary to a direct blow to the pelvis and back. He sustained a right hip dislocation and transverse with posterior wall acetabular fracture with a nonconcentric hip joint after reduction. The fracture was treated with right labral and articular segment absorbable suture tie-down and relocation of the right hip into an anatomical position. At 32-month follow-up, the patient had returned to activities of daily living, he had a normal and symmetric gait pattern, and no pain on hip adduction, flexion, or internal rotation. This technique reduced the fracture and labrum, relocated the hip joint, and obviated the need for hardware removal that is typically needed in the pediatric population. This case is distinctive due to the patient's young age and treatment method, which has not been described previously for the treatment of this rare pediatric fracture.

  4. Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystal/ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene composites as biomaterials for acetabular cup prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian C; Bloom, Paul D; Baikerikar, K G; Sheares, Valerie V; Mallapragada, Surya K

    2002-04-01

    Polymer composites of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystals and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were investigated for use in acetabular cup prosthetics. The wear properties of the Al-Cu-Fe/UHMWPE samples and a 440 steel ball counterface were measured. The mechanical strength of the Al-Cu-Fe/UHMWPE composites was compared to UHMWPE and alumina/UHMWPE. The biocompatibility of the composite material was tested using a direct contact cytotoxicity assay. Al-Cu-Fe/UHMWPE demonstrated lower volume loss after wear and higher mechanical strength than UHMWPE. This composite material also showed no increase in counterface wear or cytotoxicity relative to UHMWPE. These combined results demonstrate that Al-Cu-Fe/UHMWPE composites are promising candidate materials for acetabular cup prosthetics.

  5. Leaching of cement: Study of the surface layer

    SciTech Connect

    Faucon, P.; Le Bescop, P.; Adenot, F.; Bonville, P.; Jacquinot, J.F.; Pineau, F.; Felix, B.

    1996-11-01

    Short-lived, and possibly long-lived, radioactive waste is, or will be, stored in concrete containers (casks, disposal structures, etc.). To predict the safety of these containers, the composition and structure of the material when degraded must be known. Leaching of cement pastes shows that the properties of the surface layer are similar whether or not the cement paste contains slag. Substantial amounts of calcium, and smaller amounts of silicon, are leached out. Iron and magnesium are not released, but their content in the surface layer increases, with respect to an internal reference. Magnesium precipitates in the form of hydrotalcite, whereas the calcium of calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) is replaced by iron and dissolves out. Hydrogarnets undergo little, or no, leaching.

  6. Quantum Mechanical Metric for Internal Cohesion in Cement Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Dharmawardhana, C. C.; Misra, A.; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2014-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the main binding phase of Portland cement, the single most important structural material in use worldwide. Due to the complex structure and chemistry of CSH at various length scales, the focus has progressively turned towards its atomic level comprehension. We study electronic structure and bonding of a large subset of the known CSH minerals. Our results reveal a wide range of contributions from each type of bonding, especially hydrogen bonding, which should enable critical analysis of spectroscopic measurements and construction of realistic C-S-H models. We find the total bond order density (TBOD) as the ideal overall metric for assessing crystal cohesion of these complex materials and should replace conventional measures such as Ca:Si ratio. A rarely known orthorhombic phase Suolunite is found to have higher cohesion (TBOD) in comparison to Jennite and Tobermorite, which are considered the backbone of hydrated Portland cement. PMID:25476741

  7. Effect of acetabular cup abduction angle on wear of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene in hip simulator testing.

    PubMed

    Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Pivec, Robert; Lancin, Perry; Mont, Michael A; Wang, Aiguo; Delanois, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    The effect of acetabular component positioning on the wear rates of metal-on-polyethylene articulations has not been extensively studied. Placement of acetabular cups at abduction angles of more than 40° has been noted as a possible reason for early failure caused by increased wear. We conducted a study to evaluate the effects of different acetabular cup abduction angles on polyethylene wear rate, wear area, contact pressure, and contact area. Our in vitro study used a hip joint simulator and finite element analysis to assess the effects of cup orientation at 4 angles (0°, 40°, 50°, 70°) on wear and contact properties. Polyethylene bearings with 28-mm cobalt-chrome femoral heads were cycled in an environment mimicking in vivo joint fluid to determine the volumetric wear rate after 10 million cycles. Contact pressure and contact area for each cup abduction angle were assessed using finite element analysis. Results were correlated with cup abduction angles to determine if there were any differences among the 4 groups. The inverse relationship between volumetric wear rate and acetabular cup inclination angle demonstrated less wear with steeper cup angles. The largest abduction angle (70°) had the lowest contact area, largest contact pressure, and smallest head coverage. Conversely, the smallest abduction angle (0°) had the most wear and most head coverage. Polyethylene wear after total hip arthroplasty is a major cause of osteolysis and aseptic loosening, which may lead to premature implant failure. Several studies have found that high wear rates for cups oriented at steep angles contributed to their failure. Our data demonstrated that larger cup abduction angles were associated with lower, not higher, wear. However, this potentially "protective" effect is likely counteracted by other complications of steep cup angles, including impingement, instability, and edge loading. These factors may be more relevant in explaining why implants fail at a higher rate if

  8. An Effective and Feasible Method, “Hammering Technique,” for Percutaneous Fixation of Anterior Column Acetabular Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihai; Zhang, Wei; Li, Tongtong; Li, Jiantao; Chen, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and advantages of percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” Materials and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 16 patients with percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique.” There were 11 males and 5 females with an average age of 38.88 years (range: 24–54 years) in our study. Our study included 7 nondisplaced fractures, 6 mild displaced fractures (<2 mm), and 5 displaced fractures (>2 mm). The mean time from injury to surgery was 4.5 days (range: 2–7 days). Results. The average of operation time was 27.56 minutes (range: 15–45 minutes), and the mean blood loss was 55.28 mL (range: 15–100 mL). The mean fluoroscopic time was 54.78 seconds (range: 40–77 seconds). The first pass of the guide wire was acceptable without cortical perforation or intra-articular perforation in 88.89% (16/18) of the procedures, and the second attempt was in 11.11% (2/18). Conclusion. Our study suggested that percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture with “hammering technique” acquired satisfying surgical and clinical outcomes. It may be an alternative satisfying treatment for percutaneous fixation of anterior column acetabular fracture by 2D fluoroscopy using a C-arm with less fluoroscopic time. PMID:27493962

  9. Study of the three-dimensional orientation of the labrum: its relations with the osseous acetabular rim

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Noémie; Bouhallier, July; Baylac, Michel; Tardieu, Christine; Gagey, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional orientation of the coxo-femoral joint remains a challenge as an accurate three-dimensional orientation ensure an efficient bipedal gait and posture. The quantification of the orientation of the acetabulum can be performed using the three-dimensional axis perpendicular to the plane that passes along the edge of the acetabular rim. However, the acetabular rim is not regular as an important indentation in the anterior rim was observed. An innovative cadaver study of the labrum was developed to shed light on the proper quantification of the three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum. Dissections on 17 non-embalmed corpses were performed. Our results suggest that the acetabular rim is better represented by an anterior plane and a posterior plane rather than a single plane along the entire rim as it is currently assumed. The development of the socket from the Y-shaped cartilage was suggested to explain the different orientations in these anterior and posterior planes. The labrum forms a plane that takes an orientation in between the anterior and posterior parts of the acetabular rim, filling up inequalities of the bony rim. The vectors VL, VA2 and VP, representing the three-dimensional orientation of the labrum, the anterior rim and the posterior rim, are situated in a unique plane that appears biomechanically dependent. The three-dimensional orientation of the acetabulum is a fundamental parameter to understand the hip joint mechanism. Important applications for hip surgery and rehabilitation, as well as for physical anthropology, were discussed. PMID:22360458

  10. Calcium phosphate cement - gelatin powder composite testing in canine models: Clinical implications for treatment of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Yomoda, Mitsuhiro; Sobajima, Satoshi; Kasuya, Akihiro; Neo, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported the excellent biocompatibility of calcium phosphate cement. However, calcium phosphate cement needs further improvement in order for it to promote bone replacement and eventual bone substitution, as it exhibits slow biodegradability and thus remains in the body over an extended period of time. In this study, we mixed calcium phosphate cement with gelatin powder in order to create a composite containing macropores with interconnectivity, and we then implanted it into canine femurs from the diaphysis to the distal metaphysis. Eight dogs were divided into the sham group, the control (C0) group with 100 wt% calcium phosphate cement, the C10 group with 90 wt% calcium phosphate cement and 10 wt% gelatin powder, and the C15 group with 85 wt% calcium phosphate cement and 15 wt% gelatin powder. Bone replaceability in C10 and C15 at 3 and 6 months was evaluated by radiography, micro-CT, histomorphometry, and mineral apposition rate. New bone formation was seen in C10 and C15 although that was not seen in C0 at six months. The mineral apposition rate was significantly higher in C15 than in C10 in both the diaphysis and metaphysis, and the composite was found to have excellent biodegradability and bone replaceability in canine subjects. As the composite is easily and rapidly prepared, it is likely to become a new bone substitute for use in clinical settings.

  11. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  12. In vivo evaluation of bioactive PMMA-based bone cement with unchanged mechanical properties in a load-bearing model on rabbits.

    PubMed

    Fottner, Andreas; Nies, Berthold; Kitanovic, Denis; Steinbrück, Arnd; Hausdorf, Jörg; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Pohl, Ulrich; Jansson, Volkmar

    2015-07-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate-based bone cements are widely used for fixation of joint replacements. To improve the long-term outcome, bioactive bone cements are aspired to advance the bone-cement interface. This study evaluated the in vivo properties of a new polymethylmethacrylate-based bioactive bone cement with addition of amphiphilic phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate. Previous in vitro studies confirmed bioactive properties in cell culture, as well as unchanged mechanical properties are tests according to ISO 5833:2002.Three different variations of the cement (polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 and polymethylmethacrylate + phosphorylated 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate + CaCl2 + Na2CO3) were compared to conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement. To evaluate the properties under load-bearing conditions, a spacer prosthesis was implanted into the femoral diaphysis of 24 rabbits. Additionally, a cement plug was installed into the proximal tibia. After three months, polished sections with Giemsa surface staining were prepared. The bioactivity was determined using the bone affinity index.The sections showed a good osseointegration of the bioactive bone cement without cement cracks under load-bearing conditions. Regarding the bone affinity index, the bioactive bone cement revealed a significantly higher value in the proximal tibia (25.9-37.7%) and around the spacer prosthesis (36.8-58.9%) compared to the conventional polymethylmethacrylate cement (12.8-17.0%).The results confirm the in vivo bioactivity of this bone cement. The absence of cement cracks indicates a sufficient mechanical stability to fix prostheses with this bioactive cement, but for a final assessment long-term tests are necessary.

  13. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time.

  14. Biodeterioration of the Cement Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luptáková, Alena; Eštoková, Adriana; Mačingová, Eva; Kovalčíková, Martina; Jenčárová, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The destruction of natural and synthetic materials is the spontaneous and irreversible process of the elements cycling in nature. It can by accelerated or decelerated by physical, chemical and biological influences. Biological influences are represented by the influence of the vegetation and microorganisms (MO). The destruction of cement composites by different MO through the diverse mechanisms is entitled as the concrete biodeterioration. Several sulphur compounds and species of MO are involved in this complex process. Heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic bacteria together with fungi have all been found in samples of corroding cement composites. The MO involved in the process metabolise the presented sulphur compounds (hydrogen sulphide, elemental sulphur etc.) to sulphuric acid reacting with concrete. When sulphuric acid reacts with a concrete matrix, the first step involves a reaction between the acid and the calcium hydroxide forming calcium sulphate. This is subsequently hydrated to form gypsum, the appearance of which on the surface of concrete pipes takes the form of a white, mushy substance which has no cohesive properties. In the continuing attack, the gypsum would react with the calcium aluminate hydrate to form ettringite, an expansive product. The use supplementary cementing composite materials have been reported to improve the resistance of concrete to biodeterioration. The aim of this work was the study of the cement composites biodeterioration by the bacteria Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. Experimental works were focused on the comparison of special cement composites and its resistance affected by the activities of used sulphur-oxidising

  15. A preliminary study of CO2 sequestration of cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Lee, H.; Hwang, J.; Oh, J.; Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    CSH by replacement of Ca by Mg. Almost all portlandites change to calcites in the pulverized cement paste (<0.15mm) within one hour with direct aqueous carbonation method. The carbonation of CSH is slightly progressed. With the addition of NaCl and MgCl2, the carbonation efficiency of CSH is not increased. However, the leaching test result with MgCl2 solution indicates that MgCl2 can be an efficient additive in indirect aqueous carbonation method.

  16. Reducing CO2-Emission by using Eco-Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voit, K.; Bergmeister, K.; Janotka, I.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 concentration in the air is rising constantly. Globally, cement companies are emitting nearly two billion tonnes/year of CO2 (or around 6 to 7 % of the planet's total CO2 emissions) by producing portland cement clinker. At this pace, by 2025 the cement industry will be emitting CO2 at a rate of 3.5 billion tones/year causing enormous environmental damage (Shi et al., 2011; Janotka et al., 2012). At the dawn of the industrial revolution in the mid-eighteenth century the concentration of CO2 was at a level of ca. 280 ppm. 200 years later at the time of World War II the CO2 level had risen to 310 ppm what results in a rate of increase of 0,15 ppm per year for that period (Shi et al., 2011). In November 2011 the CO2 concentration reached a value of 391 ppm (NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, 2011), a rise of ca. 81 ppm in 66 years and an increased rate of around 1,2 ppm/year respectively. In the same period cement production in tons of cement has multiplied by a factor of ca. 62 (Kelly & Oss, US Geological Survey, 2010). Thus new CO2-saving eco-cement types are gaining in importance. In these cement types the energy-consuming portland cement clinker is partially replaced by latent hydraulic additives such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or zeolite. These hydraulic additives do not need to be fired in the rotary furnace. They ony need to be pulverized to the required grain size and added to the ground portland cement clinker. Hence energy is saved by skipping the engery-consuming firing process, in addition there is no CO2-degassing as there is in the case of lime burning. Therefore a research project between Austria and Slovakia, funded by the EU (Project ENVIZEO), was initiated in 2010. The main goal of this project is to develop new CEM V eco-types of cements and certificate them for common usage. CEM V is a portland clinker saving cement kind that allows the reduction of clinker to a proportion of 40-64% for CEM V/A and 20-39% for CEM V/B respectively by the

  17. Formation, release and control of dioxins in cement kilns.

    PubMed

    Karstensen, Kåre Helge

    2008-01-01

    Co-processing of hazardous wastes in cement kilns have for decades been thought to cause increased emissions of PCDD/PCDFs--a perception that has been evaluated in this study. Hundreds of PCDD/PCDF measurements conducted by the cement industry and others in the last few years, on emissions and solid materials, as well as recent test burns with hazardous wastes in developing countries do not support this perception. Newer data has been compared with older literature data and shows in particular that many emission factors have to be reconsidered. Early emission factors for cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste, which are still used in inventories, are shown to be too high compared with actual measurements. Less than 10 years ago it was believed that the cement industry was the main contributor of PCDD/PCDFs to air; data collected in this study indicates however that the industry contributes with less than 1% of total emissions to air. The Stockholm Convention on POPs presently ratified by 144 parties, classifies cement kilns co-processing hazardous waste as a source category having the potential for comparatively high formation and release of PCDD/PCDFs. This classification is based on early investigations from the 1980s and 1990s where kilns co-processing hazardous waste had higher emissions compared to those that did not burn hazardous waste. However, the testing of these kilns was often done under worst case scenario conditions known to favour PCDD/PCDF formation. More than 2000 PCDD/PCDF cement kiln measurements have been evaluated in this study, representing most production technologies and waste feeding scenarios. They generally indicate that most modern cement kilns co-processing waste today can meet an emission level of 0.1ngI-TEQ/m(3), when well managed and operated. In these cases, proper and responsible use of waste including organic hazardous waste to replace parts of the fossil fuel does not seem to increase formation of PCDD/PCDFs. Modern preheater

  18. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  19. 76 FR 76760 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on gray Portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4281 (December 2011), entitled Gray Portland...

  20. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  1. The effect of lime-dried sewage sludge on the heat-resistance of eco-cement.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Quan; Liu, Wei; Cao, Hai-Hua; Xu, Jing-Cheng; Liu, Jia; Li, Guang-Ming; Huang, Juwen

    2016-01-01

    The treatment and disposal of sewage sludge is a growing problem for sewage treatment plants. One method of disposal is to use sewage sludge as partial replacement for raw material in cement manufacture. Although this process has been well researched, little attention has been given to the thermal properties of cement that has had sewage sludge incorporated in the manufacturing process. This study investigated the fire endurance of eco-cement to which lime-dried sludge (LDS) had been added. LDS was added in proportions of 0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12% (by weight) to the raw material. The eco-cement was exposed to 200, 400, or 600 °C for 3 h. The residual strength and the microstructural properties of eco-cement were then studied. Results showed that the eco-cement samples suffered less damage than conventional cement at 600 °C. The microstructural studies showed that LDS incorporation could reduce Ca(OH)(2) content. It was concluded that LDS has the potential to improve the heat resistance of eco-cement products.

  2. 76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on gray portland cement and cement clinker...

  3. 76 FR 50252 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... COMMISSION Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United... cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  4. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  5. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  11. Development of strength in cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovic, B.

    1981-04-01

    The production of doped belite (dicalcium silicate) clinkers as a prospective means for saving energy in Portland cement production is described. This is accomplished by small additions of either barium sulfate (BaSO4), calcium tribasic phosphate (Ca5(PO4)3OH), or vanadium oxide (V2O5) to belite (Ca2SiO4) clinker. In addition to conserving energy, doping the belite with barium sulfate imparts greater strength to the resulting modified belite. Reactants, additives, and factors contributing to the fabrication of Sorel cement are described.

  12. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further

  13. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-01-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  14. Phase composition, mechanical performance and in vitro biocompatibility of hydraulic setting calcium magnesium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    Klammert, Uwe; Reuther, Tobias; Blank, Melanie; Reske, Isabelle; Barralet, Jake E; Grover, Liam M; Kübler, Alexander C; Gbureck, Uwe

    2010-04-01

    Brushite (CaHPO(4) x 2H(2)O)-forming calcium phosphate cements are of great interest as bone replacement materials because they are resorbable in physiological conditions. However, their short setting times and low mechanical strengths limit broad clinical application. In this study, we showed that a significant improvement of these properties of brushite cement could be achieved by the use of magnesium-substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate with the general formula Mg(x)Ca((3-x))((PO(4))(2) with 0 < x < 3 as cement reactants. The incorporation of magnesium ions increased the setting times of cements from 2 min for a magnesium-free matrix to 8-11 min for Mg(2.25)Ca(0.75)(PO(4))(2) as reactant. At the same time, the compressive strength of set cements was doubled from 19 MPa to more than 40 MPa after 24h wet storage. Magnesium ions were not only retarding the setting reaction to brushite but were also forming newberyite (MgHPO(4) x 3H(2)O) as a second setting product. The biocompatibility of the material was investigated in vitro using the osteoblast-like cell line MC3T3-E1. A considerable increase of cell proliferation and expression of alkaline phosphatase, indicating an osteoblastic differentiation, could be noticed. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed an obvious cell growth on the surface of the scaffolds. Analysis of the culture medium showed minor alterations of pH value within the physiological range. The concentrations of free calcium, magnesium and phosphate ions were altered markedly due to the chemical solubility of the scaffolds. We conclude that the calcium magnesium phosphate (newberyite) cements have a promising potential for their use as bone replacement material since they provide a suitable biocompatibility, an extended workability and improved mechanical performance compared with brushite cements.

  15. Dilemmas in imaging for peri-acetabular osteotomy: the influence of patient position and imaging technique on the radiological features of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kosuge, D; Cordier, T; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W

    2014-09-01

    Peri-acetabular osteotomy is an established surgical treatment for symptomatic acetabular dysplasia in young adults. An anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis is commonly used to assess the extent of dysplasia as well as to assess post-operative correction. Radiological prognostic factors include the lateral centre-edge angle, acetabular index, extrusion index and the acetabular version. Standing causes a change in the pelvis tilt which can alter certain radiological measurements relative to the supine position. This article discusses the radiological indices used to assess dysplasia and reviews the effects of patient positioning on these indices with a focus on assessment for a peri-acetabular osteotomy. Intra-operatively, fluoroscopy is commonly used and the implications of using fluoroscopy as a modality to assess the various radiological indices along with the effects of using an anteroposterior or posteroanterior fluoroscopic view are examined. Each of these techniques gives rise to a slightly different image of the pelvis as the final image is sensitive to the position of the pelvis and the projection of the x-ray beam.

  16. Application of a shape-memory alloy internal fixator for treatment of acetabular fractures with a follow-up of two to nine years in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinwei; Xu, Shuogui; Su, Jiacan; Yu, Baoqing

    2009-01-01

    Displaced acetabular fractures should be treated surgically. Over the past decade, surgical approaches to the acetabulum and the surgical technique for repair of common fracture patterns have advanced. Excellent outcomes after repair of these injuries can be achieved. The aim of this study was to assess the medium-term results of reconstruction of acetabular fractures by using shape-memory alloy designed by the authors. This is a retrospective review conducted at a level 1 trauma centre. From October 1999 to July 2009, 19 patients with acetabular fractures were treated with our patented Ni-Ti shape-memory alloy acetabular tridimensional memory alloy-fixation system (ATMFS). The ATMFS device was cooled with ice before implantation and then warmed to 40–50°C after implantation to produce balanced axial and compression forces that would stabilise the fracture three dimensionally. Our results are as follows; according to the D’Aubigne−Postel scoring system: Fifteen cases out of 19 (79%) achieved excellent or good clinical results. In two patients, late complications included avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) associated with posterior dislocation of the hip joint two years after the operation. We also observed two cases of grade II or III ectopic ossification, with good hip function, and one case of traumatic arthritis. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of the ATMFS device for the management of acetabular fracture. The device provides continuous compression of the fracture with minimal disruption to the local blood supply. PMID:20012433

  17. DSC and TG Analysis of a Blended Binder Based on Waste Ceramic Powder and Portland Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Kulovaná, Tereza; Scheinherrová, Lenka; Rahhal, Viviana; Irassar, Edgardo; Černý, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Cement industry belongs to the business sectors characteristic by high energy consumption and high {CO}2 generation. Therefore, any replacement of cement in concrete by waste materials can lead to immediate environmental benefits. In this paper, a possible use of waste ceramic powder in blended binders is studied. At first, the chemical composition of Portland cement and ceramic powder is analyzed using the X-ray fluorescence method. Then, thermal and mechanical characterization of hydrated blended binders containing up to 24 % ceramic is carried out within the time period of 2 days to 28 days. The differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry measurements are performed in the temperature range of 25°C to 1000°C in an argon atmosphere. The measurement of compressive strength is done according to the European standards for cement mortars. The thermal analysis results in the identification of temperature and quantification of enthalpy and mass changes related to the liberation of physically bound water, calcium-silicate-hydrates dehydration and portlandite, vaterite and calcite decomposition. The portlandite content is found to decrease with time for all blends which provides the evidence of the pozzolanic activity of ceramic powder even within the limited monitoring time of 28 days. Taking into account the favorable results obtained in the measurement of compressive strength, it can be concluded that the applied waste ceramic powder can be successfully used as a supplementary cementing material to Portland cement in an amount of up to 24 mass%.

  18. Effects of lithium nitrate admixture on early-age cement hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, M.J. Kurtis, K.E.

    2008-04-15

    Although the benefits of lithium admixtures for mitigation of alkali-silica reaction (ASR) have been well documented, the potential ancillary effects of lithium compounds on cement and concrete remain largely uncharacterized. To examine the effects of the most common lithium admixture - lithium nitrate - on early-age behavior, the admixture was introduced at dosages of 0% to 400% of the recommended dosage to six cements of varying composition and to a cement-fly ash blend. Behavior was examined by isothermal calorimetry and measurements of chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, and setting time. Results indicate that lithium nitrate accelerates the early hydration of most cements but may retard hydration after 24 h. In the lowest alkali cement tested, set times were shortened in the presence of lithium nitrate by 15-22%. Higher dosages appeared to increase autogenous shrinkage after 40 days. The replacement of cement by Class F fly ash at 20% by weight appeared to diminish the early acceleration effects, but later hydration retardation and autogenous shrinkage were still observed.

  19. Magnetic ranging tool accurately guides replacement well

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.B.; Wesson, J.P. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports on magnetic ranging surveys and directional drilling technology which accurately guided a replacement well bore to intersect a leaking gas storage well with casing damage. The second well bore was then used to pump cement into the original leaking casing shoe. The repair well bore kicked off from the surface hole, bypassed casing damage in the middle of the well, and intersected the damaged well near the casing shoe. The repair well was subsequently completed in the gas storage zone near the original well bore, salvaging the valuable bottom hole location in the reservoir. This method would prevent the loss of storage gas, and it would prevent a potential underground blowout that could permanently damage the integrity of the storage field.

  20. Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... ankle pump exercises, and early mobilization. Leg-length Inequality Sometimes after a hip replacement, one leg may ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 12 ) AAOS does ...

  1. Ankle replacement - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped damaged bones, and put in an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were shown how to treat swelling around your new ankle joint.

  2. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... This may be accomplished by adding plastic or porcelain filling material or a porcelain crown to reshape its appearance. What options are ... there is no danger of nerve involvement. A porcelain replacement tooth is held in place by metal ...

  3. Carbohydrates as Fat Replacers.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xingyun; Yao, Yuan

    2017-02-28

    The overconsumption of dietary fat contributes to various chronic diseases, which encourages attempts to develop and consume low-fat foods. Simple fat reduction causes quality losses that impede the acceptance of foods. Fat replacers are utilized to minimize the quality deterioration after fat reduction or removal to achieve low-calorie, low-fat claims. In this review, the forms of fats and their functions in contributing to food textural and sensory qualities are discussed in various food systems. The connections between fat reduction and quality loss are described in order to clarify the rationales of fat replacement. Carbohydrate fat replacers usually have low calorie density and provide gelling, thickening, stabilizing, and other texture-modifying properties. In this review, carbohydrates, including starches, maltodextrins, polydextrose, gums, and fibers, are discussed with regard to their interactions with other components in foods as well as their performances as fat replacers in various systems.

  4. Considerations for proper selection of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Simon, James F; Darnell, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Selecting the proper cement for sufficient bond strength has become progressively complicated as the number of different materials for indirect restorations has increased. The success of any restoration is highly dependent on the proper cement being chosen and used. The function of the cement is not only to seal the restoration on the tooth but also, in some cases, to support the retention of the restoration. This ability to strengthen retention varies by the cement chosen by the clinician; therefore, careful consideration must precede cement selection.

  5. Two-incision technique for rotational acetabular osteotomy: good outcome in 35 hips.

    PubMed

    Pajarinen, Jarkko; Hirvensalo, Eero

    2003-04-01

    We have developed a 2-incision technique for rotational acetabular osteotomy. This includes both an extraperitoneal and an anterolateral exposure of the pelvic bones allowing an unconstrained approach without dissection of the muscle insertion. 2 plates are used to stabilize the osteotomy and full range motion of the hip is permitted within 2 days of surgery, while weight bearing is restricted for 6 weeks after the operation. We reviewed the complications and technical results in 27 patients (28 hips) after a minimum follow-up of mean 3 (1-5) years. No major surgical complications occurred, but dysfunction of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred frequently (14 patients). The radiographical correction of the femoral head covering was similar to those in previous reports of rotational osteotomy. The range of hip motion was not affected by the operation. A significant increase in the mean Merle D'Aubigné and Harris Hip scores was observed in a subgroup of 20 patients with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. In conclusion, the method we have used is safe and the early results are satisfactory.

  6. Minimum Lateral Bone Coverage Required for Securing Fixation of Cementless Acetabular Components in Hip Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Yasuharu; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Ito, Yoshihiro; Hara, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the minimum lateral bone coverage required for securing stable fixation of the porous-coated acetabular components (cups) in hip dysplasia. Methods. In total, 215 primary total hip arthroplasties in 199 patients were reviewed. The average follow-up period was 49 months (range: 24–77 months). The lateral bone coverage of the cups was assessed by determining the cup center-edge (cup-CE) angle and the bone coverage index (BCI) from anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. Further, cup fixation was determined using the modified DeLee and Charnley classification system. Results. All cups were judged to show stable fixation by bone ingrowth. The cup-CE angle was less than 0° in 7 hips (3.3%) and the minimum cup-CE angle was −9.2° (BCI: 48.8%). Thin radiolucent lines were observed in 5 hips (2.3%), which were not associated with decreased lateral bone coverage. Loosening, osteolysis, dislocation, or revision was not observed in any of the cases during the follow-up period. Conclusion. A cup-CE angle greater than −10° (BCI > 50%) was acceptable for stable bony fixation of the cup. Considering possible errors in manual implantation, we recommend that the cup position be planned such that the cup-CE angle is greater than 0° (BCI > 60%). PMID:28299327

  7. Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene and polydimethylsiloxane blend as acetabular cup material.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, M T; Zaghiyan, M; Mirzadeh, H

    2005-03-25

    An acetabular cup shock absorber implant is formed from a composite of polymer materials. The cup consists of three zones such as the articulating surface of the implant is 100% ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) (zone 1) and shock absorber of the cup contains of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) (zone 3). Zone 2 which is designed for better adhesion between zone 1 and zone 2 consists of a blend of UHMWPE and PDMS is a cushion that from one side adheres to zone 1 and the other side to zone 2. PDMS and UHMWPE have been blended under conditions of shear and elevated temperature in order to form uniform, thermoplastic blends. When blends compared to pure UHMWPE, the blends show lowered tensile modulus and lowered mixing energies. The UHMWPE crystals are increased in quantity or else become more regular, even 50% blend shows no rubbery stage. The morphology and dynamic mechanical behavior of the blends were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dynamic mechanic thermal analysis (DMTA). In this study, the biocompatibility have evaluated in vitro the interaction of UHMWPE, silicone and PDMS/UHMWPE blends with L929 fibroblast cells.

  8. The capsular ligaments provide more hip rotational restraint than the acetabular labrum and the ligamentum teres

    PubMed Central

    van Arkel, R. J.; Amis, A. A.; Cobb, J. P.; Jeffers, J. R. T.

    2015-01-01

    In this in vitro study of the hip joint we examined which soft tissues act as primary and secondary passive rotational restraints when the hip joint is functionally loaded. A total of nine cadaveric left hips were mounted in a testing rig that allowed the application of forces, torques and rotations in all six degrees of freedom. The hip was rotated throughout a complete range of movement (ROM) and the contributions of the iliofemoral (medial and lateral arms), pubofemoral and ischiofemoral ligaments and the ligamentum teres to rotational restraint was determined by resecting a ligament and measuring the reduced torque required to achieve the same angular position as before resection. The contribution from the acetabular labrum was also measured. Each of the capsular ligaments acted as the primary hip rotation restraint somewhere within the complete ROM, and the ligamentum teres acted as a secondary restraint in high flexion, adduction and external rotation. The iliofemoral lateral arm and the ischiofemoral ligaments were primary restraints in two-thirds of the positions tested. Appreciation of the importance of these structures in preventing excessive hip rotation and subsequent impingement/instability may be relevant for surgeons undertaking both hip joint preserving surgery and hip arthroplasty. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:484–91. PMID:25820886

  9. Evaluation of sulfate resistance of cement mortars containing black rice husk ash.

    PubMed

    Chatveera, B; Lertwattanaruk, P

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, black rice husk ashes (BRHAs), which are agrowastes from an electricity generating power plant and a rice mill, were ground and used as a partial cement replacement. The durability of mortars under sulfate attack including expansion and compressive strength loss were investigated. For parametric study, BRHA were used as a Portland cement Type 1 replacement at the levels of 0%, 10%, 30%, and 50% by weight of binder. The water-to-binder ratios were 0.55 and 0.65. For the durability of mortar exposed to sulfate attack, 5% sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solutions were used. As a result, when increasing the percentage replacement of BRHA, the expansion and compressive strength loss of mortar decreased. At the replacement levels of 30% and 50% of BRHA, the expansion of the mortars was less than those mixed with sulfate-resistant cement. However, the expansion of the mortars exposed to Na2SO4 was more than those exposed to MgSO4. Increasing the replacement level of BRHA tends to reduce the compressive strength loss of mortars exposed to Na2SO4 attack. In contrary, under MgSO4 attack, when increasing the replacement level of BRHA, the compressive strength loss increases from 0% to 50% in comparison to Portland cement mortar. Results show that ground BRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material to concrete and also improve resistance to sodium sulfate attack, but it can impair resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  10. Androgen replacement for women.

    PubMed Central

    Basson, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a postmenopausal syndrome comprising specific changes in sexual desire and response associated with low free testosterone exists. To determine whether this syndrome is ameliorated by testosterone replacement. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Literature documenting that replacement of physiological levels of testosterone is beneficial and safe is scant. Only one randomized prospective blinded study examines sexual outcome in detail. MAIN MESSAGE: Testosterone is an important metabolic and sex hormone produced by the ovary throughout life. The variable reduction in ovarian testosterone production coincident with menopause is sometimes associated with a syndrome of specific changes in sexual desire and sexual response. Estrogen deficiency also impairs sexual response, but its replacement will not improve and might exacerbate sexual symptoms from androgen loss. Diagnosis of androgen deficiency is clinical, based on accurate assessment of a woman's sexual status before and after menopause and only confirmed (rather than diagnosed) by a low level of free testosterone. Partial androgen replacement restores much of the sexual response and facilitates sexual desire that is triggered by external cues. Avoiding supraphysiological levels of testosterone lessens risk of masculinization. Avoiding alkylated testosterone lessens hepatic or lipid impairment. CONCLUSION: Further prospective randomized studies of replacement of physiological levels of testosterone in women with androgen deficiency syndrome are needed, using formulations of testosterone available in Canada. The consistency of sexual changes, the associated personal and relationship distress, together with our clinical experience of the gratifying response to physiological replacement, make further studies urgently needed. PMID:10509222

  11. A review of binders used in cemented paste tailings for underground and surface disposal practices.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amjad; Yanful, Ernest K

    2013-12-15

    Increased public awareness of environmental issues coupled with increasingly stringent environmental regulations pertaining to the disposal of sulphidic mine waste necessitates the mining industry to adopt more competent and efficient approaches to manage acid rock drainage. Cemented paste tailings (CPT) is an innovative form of amalgamated material currently available to the mining industry in developed countries. It is made usually from mill tailings mingled with a small amount of binder (customarily Portland cement) and water. The high cost associated with production and haulage of ordinary Portland cement and its alleged average performance as a sole binder in the long term (due to vulnerability to internal sulphate attack) have prompted users to appraise less expensive and technically efficient substitutes for mine tailings paste formulations. Generally, these binders include but are not limited to sulphate resistant cements, and/or as a partial replacement for Portland cement by artificial pozzolans, natural pozzolans, calcium sulphate substances and sodium silicates. The approach to designing environmentally efficient CPT is to ensure long-term stability and effective control over environmental contaminants through the use of composite binder systems with enhanced engineering properties to cater for inherit deficiencies in the individual constituents. The alkaline pore solution created by high free calcium rich cement kiln dust (CKD) (byproduct of cement manufacturing) is capable of disintegrating the solid glassy network of artificial pozzolans to produce reactive silicate and aluminate species when attacked by (OH(-)) ions. The augmented pozzolanic reactivity of CKD-slag and CKD-fly ash systems may produce resilient CPT. Since cemented paste comprising mine tailings and binders is a relatively new technology, a review of the binding materials used in such formulations and their performance evaluation in mechanical fill behaviour was considered pertinent in

  12. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  13. Automation design of cemented doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Galina; Ivanova, Tatiana; Korotkova, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    Algorithm and software for cemented doublet synthesis by Slusarev's methodology are presented. Slusarev's methodology is based on lookup tables that allow calculating doublet radii by given value of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration by specific algorithm. This calculation is automated in this work. The input parameters for algorithm are desired values of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration of cemented doublet. The software looks up few pairs of optical glasses corresponding to specified value of chromatic aberration and then calculates radii of surfaces for each pair of glasses corresponding to specified third-order coma and spherical aberration. The resulted third-order aberrations and real aberrations on the edge of the pupil are calculated for obtained radiuses. Several doublets can be analyzed in result table and the chosen one can be imported into Zemax. The calculated cemented doublet parameters can be analyzed and optimized in optical system design software. The software allows to make the first step of optical system design fast and simple. It allows to design not only the system which is free of the third-order spherical aberration, coma and axial color, but obtain necessary value of aberration for compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system. Possibility to look up optical glasses automatically, what affects the chromatic aberration correction and aberration correction in general, is especially important. Examples of automatic calculation of cemented doublet and compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system are presented in the paper.

  14. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  15. Lightweight Cement Slurries based on vermiculite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minaev, K.; Gorbenko, V.; Ulyanova, O.

    2014-08-01

    The main purpose of the research is to study the lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite and its parameters in accordance with GOST 1581-96 requirements as well as improvement of its formulation by polymer additives. Analysis of vermiculite-containing mixture providing the lowest density while maintaining other required parameters was conducted. As a cement base, cement PTscT-I-G-CC-1, cement PTscT - 100 and vermiculite M200 and M150 were used. Vermiculite content varied from 10 to 15 %; and water-to-cement-ratio ranged from 0.65 to 0.8. To sum up, despite the fact that lightweight cement slurry based on vermiculite satisfies GOST 1581-96 requirements under laboratory conditions, field studies are necessary in order to make a conclusion about applicability of this slurry for well cementing.

  16. Pose measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane based on inertial measurement unit in total hip replacement surgeries.

    PubMed

    Zhe Cao; Shaojie Su; Hong Chen; Hao Tang; Yixin Zhou; Zhihua Wang

    2016-08-01

    In Total Hip Replacement (THR), inaccurate measurement of Anterior Pelvic Plane (APP), which is usually used as a reference plane, will lead to malposition of the acetabular prosthesis. As a result, the risk of impingement, dislocation and wear will increase and the safe range of motion will be limited. In order to acquire the accurate pose of APP, a measurement system is designed in this paper, which includes two parts: one is used to estimate the initial pose of APP and the other is used to trail dynamic motion of APP. Both parts are composed of an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and magnetometer sensors. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is adopted to fuse the data from IMU and the magnetometer sensors to estimate the orientation of the pelvis. The test results show that the error angle between calculated axis and true axis of the pelvis in geodetic coordinate frame is less than 1.2 degree, which meets the requirement of the surgery.

  17. Blasted copper slag as fine aggregate in Portland cement concrete.

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, M A G; Sales, A T C; Andrade, N

    2017-03-26

    The present work focuses on assessing the viability of applying blasted copper slag, produced during abrasive blasting, as fine aggregate for Portland cement concrete manufacturing, resulting in an alternative and safe disposal method. Leaching assays showed no toxicity for this material. Concrete mixtures were produced, with high aggregate replacement ratios, varying from 0% to 100%. Axial compressive strength, diametrical compressive strength, elastic modulus, physical indexes and durability were evaluated. Assays showed a significant improvement in workability, with the increase in substitution of fine aggregate. With 80% of replacement, the concrete presented lower levels of water absorption capacity. Axial compressive strength and diametrical compressive strength decreased, with the increase of residue replacement content. The greatest reductions of compressive strength were found when the replacement was over 40%. For tensile strength by diametrical compression, the greatest reduction occurred for the concrete with 80% of replacement. After the accelerated aging, results of mechanic properties showed a small reduction of the concrete with blasted copper slag performance, when compared with the reference mixture. Results indicated that the blasted copper slag is a technically viable material for application as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures.

  18. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  19. Study on the effects of white rice husk ash and fibrous materials additions on some properties of fiber-cement composites.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Yahya; Ziabari, Kamran Pourhooshyar; Torkaman, Javad; Ashori, Alireza; Jafari, Mohammad

    2013-03-15

    This work assesses the effects of white rice husk ash (WRHA) as pozzolanic material, virgin kraft pulp (VKP), old corrugated container (OCC) and fibers derived from fiberboard (FFB) as reinforcing agents on some properties of blended cement composites. In the sample preparation, composites were manufactured using fiber-to-cement ratio of 25:75 by weight and 5% CaCl(2) as accelerator. Type II Portland cement was replaced by WRHA at 0%, 25% and 50% by weight of binder. A water-to-binder ratio of 0.55 was used for all blended cement paste mixes. For parametric study, compressive strength, water absorption and density of the composite samples were evaluated. Results showed that WRHA can be applied as a pozzolanic material to cement and also improved resistance to water absorption. However, increasing the replacement level of WRHA tends to reduce the compressive strength due to the low binding ability. The optimum replacement level of WRHA in mortar was 25% by weight of binder; this replacement percentage resulted in better compressive strengths and water absorption. OCC fiber is shown to be superior to VKF and FFB fibers in increasing the compressive strength, due to its superior strength properties. As expected, the increase of the WRHA content induced the reduction of bulk density of the cement composites. Statistical analysis showed that the interaction of above-mentioned variable parameters was significant on the mechanical and physical properties at 1% confidence level.

  20. Tribological characteristics of a composite total-surface hip replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Roberts, J. C.; Ling, F. F.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous fiber, woven E glass composite femoral shells having the same elastic properties as bone were fabricated. The shells were then encrusted with filled epoxy wear resistant coatings and run dry against ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups in 42,000 and 250,000 cycle wear tests on a total hip simulator. The tribological characteristics of these continuous fiber particulate composite femoral shells articulating with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cups were comparable to those of a vitallium ball articulating with an ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene acetabular cup.

  1. Experimental studies on a new bioactive material: HAIonomer cements.

    PubMed

    Yap, A U J; Pek, Y S; Kumar, R A; Cheang, P; Khor, K A

    2002-02-01

    promising material, which possess good mechanical properties. Potential uses of this new material include bone cements and performed implants for hard tissue replacement in the field of otological, oral-maxillofacial and orthopedic surgery.

  2. Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Irvin Allen

    Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate

  3. An evaluation of commercial and experimental resin-modified glass-ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanchanavasita, Widchaya

    Glass-ionomer cement (GIG) has become widely accepted as a restorative material due to its bonding ability and sustained release of fluoride. The cement is, however, sensitive to moisture imbalance and lacks toughness. Recently, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGIC) have been introduced. These materials contain monomeric species, such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in addition to the components of the conventional glass-ionomer cements. Disadvantages of RMGICs include a relatively high contraction and exotherm on polymerisation. HEMA is known to be cytotoxic, leading to problems of biocompatibility, and polyHEMA swells on exposure to water, leading to dimensional instability of the cements. Addressing these problems is important in the development of the RMGICs. Using alternative monomers to replace or reduce the amount of HEMA used in the current RMGIC formulations would be appropriate. This study was divided into two parts. Initially certain properties such as water sorption, micro-hardness, flexural strength and polymerisation exotherm of commercially available RMGICs were evaluated. Long-term storage of RMGICs in aqueous solutions resulted in their high water uptakes and solubilities and large volumetric expansions. However, the surface hardness and strengths of the restorative grade RMGICs were not affected on storage in distilled water. When the materials were immersed in artificial saliva, significantly higher water uptake were obtained; the equilibrium water uptake were not reached after 20 months. As a consequence, plastic behaviour and reduced surface hardness were observed. The RMGICs also produced high exotherm during polymerisation. The second part of the study investigated the use of an experimental resin as an alternative to HEMA. The experimental resin has the advantage of low toxicity to the pulp and relatively low polymerisation shrinkage. This study compared the polymerisations of the resin and HEMA, and of mixtures of these two

  4. Analysis of Femoral Components of Cemented Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shantanu; Harsha, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There have been continuous on-going revisions in design of prosthesis in Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA) to improve the endurance of hip replacement. In the present work, Finite Element Analysis was performed on cemented THA with CoCrMo trapezoidal, CoCrMo circular, Ti6Al4V trapezoidal and Ti6Al4V circular stem. It was observed that cross section and material of femoral stem proved to be critical parameters for stress distribution in femoral components, distribution of interfacial stress and micro movements. In the first part of analysis, designs were investigated for micro movements and stress developed, for different stem materials. Later part of the analysis focused on investigations with respect to different stem cross sections. Femoral stem made of Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) resulted in larger debonding of stem at cement-stem interface and increased stress within the cement mantle in contrast to chromium alloy (CoCrMo) stem. Thus, CoCrMo proved to be a better choice for cemented THA. Comparison between CoCrMo femoral stem of trapezium and circular cross section showed that trapezoidal stem experiences lesser sliding and debonding at interfaces than circular cross section stem. Also, trapezium cross section generated lower peak stress in femoral stem and cortical femur. In present study, femur head with diameter of 36 mm was considered for the analysis in order to avoid dislocation of the stem. Also, metallic femur head was coupled with cross linked polyethylene liner as it experiences negligible wear compared to conventional polyethylene liner and unlike metallic liner it is non carcinogenic.

  5. What Is a Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Replacement PDF Version Size: 123 KB Audio Version Time: 10:01 Size: 9.4 MB November 2014 What Is a Hip Replacement? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Hip replacement surgery ...

  6. Alkali-silica reaction resistant concrete using pumice blended cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Uma

    Durability of structures is a major challenge for the building industry. One of the many types of concrete deterioration that can affect durability is alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR has been found in most types of concrete structures, including dams, bridges, pavements, and other structures that are 20 to 50 years old. The degradation mechanism of ASR produces a gel that significantly expands in the presence of water as supplied from the surrounding environment. This expansion gel product can create high stresses and cracking of the concrete, which can lead to other forms of degradation and expensive structural replacement costs. The four essential factors that produce an expansive ASR gel in concrete are the presence of alkalis, siliceous aggregate, moisture, and free calcium hydroxide (CH). If concrete is starved of any one of these essential components, the expansion can be prevented. Reducing CH through the use of a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) such as natural pozzolan pumice is the focus of this research. By using a pozzolan, the amount of CH is reduced with time based on the effectiveness of the pozzolan. Many pozzolans exist, but one such naturally occurring pozzolanic material is pumice. This research focuses on determining the effect of a finely ground pumice as a SCM in terms of its resistance to ASR expansion, as well as improving resistance to other potential concrete durability mechanisms. In spite of having high alkali contents in the pumice, mixtures containing the SCM pumice more effectively mitigated the ASR expansion reaction than other degradation mechanisms. Depending on the reactivity of the aggregates and fineness of the pumice, 10-15% replacement of cement with the pumice was found to reduce the ASR expansion to the acceptable limits. The amount of CH remaining in the concrete was compared to the ASR expansion in order to improve understanding of the role of CH in the ASR reaction. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X

  7. Excellent long-term results of the Müller acetabular reinforcement ring in primary total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sirka, Aurimas; Clauss, Martin; Tarasevicius, Sarunas; Wingstrand, Hans; Stucinskas, Justinas; Robertsson, Otto; Emil Ochsner, Peter; Ilchmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — The original Müller acetabular reinforcement ring (ARR) shows favorable medium-term results for acetabular reconstruction in total hip arthroplasty, where it is used when the acetabular bone stock is deficient. However, there are no data regarding long-term survival of the device. We therefore investigated long-term survival and analyzed radiological modes of failure. Patients and methods — Between 1984 and 2002, 321 consecutive primary arthroplasties using an ARR were performed in 291 patients. The mean follow-up time was 11 (0–25) years, and 24 hips were lost to follow-up. For survival analysis, we investigated 321 hips and the end of the follow-up was the date of revision, date of death, or the last patient contact date with implant still in situ. Radiological assessment was performed for 160 hips with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up and with radiographs of sufficient quality. It included evaluation of osteolysis, migration, and loosening. Results — 12 ARR THAs were revised: 1 isolated ARR revision for aseptic loosening, 4 revisions of the ARR and the stem for aseptic loosening, 6 for infection, and 1 for recurrent dislocation. The cumulative revision rate for all components, for any reason, at 20 years was 15% (95% CI: 10–22), while for the ARR only it was 7% (95% CI: 4–12) for any reason and 3.4% (95% CI: 1–9) for aseptic loosening. 21 (13%) of 160 ARR THAs examined had radiological changes: 7 had osteolysis but were not loose, and 14 were radiologically loose but were not painful and not revised. Interpretation — Our data suggest that the long-term survival of the ARR is excellent. PMID:26471881

  8. Post-deformation shape-recovery behavior of vitamin E-diffused, radiation crosslinked polyethylene acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Shishido, Takaaki; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2016-10-01

    The in-vivo progression of creep and wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) acetabular liners has been clinically evaluated by measuring radiographic penetration of femoral heads. In such clinical assessments, however, viscoelastic strain relaxation has been rarely considered after a removal of hip joint loading, potentially leading to an underestimation of the penetrated thickness. The objective of this study was to investigate shape-recovery behavior of pre-compressed, radiation crosslinked and antioxidant vitamin E-diffused UHMWPE acetabular liners, and also to characterize the effects of varying their internal diameter (ID) and wall thickness (WT). We applied uniaxial compression to the UHMWPE specimens of various ID (28, 32, 36mm) and WT (4.8, 6.8, 8.9mm) for 4320min under the constant load of 3000N, and subsequently monitored the strain-relaxation behavior as a function of time after unloading. It was observed that there was a considerable shape recovery of the components after removal of the external static load. Reducing ID and WT significantly accelerated the rate of creep strain recovery, and varying WT was more sensitive to the recovery behavior than ID. Creep deformation of the tested liners recovered mostly within the first 300min after unloading. Note that approximately half of the total recovery amount proceeded just within 5min after unloading. These results suggest a remarkably high capability of shape recovery of vitamin E-diffused highly crosslinked UHMWPE. In conclusion, the time-dependent shape recovering and the diameter-thickness effect on its behavior should be carefully considered when the postoperative penetration is quantified in highly crosslinked UHMWPE acetabular liners (especially on the non-weight bearing radiographs).

  9. Pullout strength of fixation screws from polymethylmethacrylate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Flahiff, C M; Gober, G A; Nicholas, R W

    1995-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement is often used to fill voids and increase the strength of osteoporotic and pathological bone. However, it is unclear as to which method of cement augmentation provides optimal screw fixation. This study was conducted to determine which of the current cement augmentation techniques provides the strongest construct when used in association with orthopaedic fixation screws. Pullout strength was determined for screws placed in sawbones with no cement, soft cement, doughy cement and hard cement after drilling and tapping. All cement-screw constructs were significantly stronger than the no cement group. Screws placed in doughy cement had a significantly higher pullout force than those placed in hard cement. Pullout strength of screws placed in soft cement was intermediate between the other cement techniques but not significantly different from either group.

  10. Strength development in concrete with wood ash blended cement and use of soft computing models to predict strength parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Maniar, A.; Suganya, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Wood Ash (WA) prepared from the uncontrolled burning of the saw dust is evaluated for its suitability as partial cement replacement in conventional concrete. The saw dust has been acquired from a wood polishing unit. The physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of WA is presented and analyzed. The strength parameters (compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength) of concrete with blended WA cement are evaluated and studied. Two different water-to-binder ratio (0.4 and 0.45) and five different replacement percentages of WA (5%, 10%, 15%, 18% and 20%) including control specimens for both water-to-cement ratio is considered. Results of compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength showed that the strength properties of concrete mixture decreased marginally with increase in wood ash contents, but strength increased with later age. The XRD test results and chemical analysis of WA showed that it contains amorphous silica and thus can be used as cement replacing material. Through the analysis of results obtained in this study, it was concluded that WA could be blended with cement without adversely affecting the strength properties of concrete. Also using a new statistical theory of the Support Vector Machine (SVM), strength parameters were predicted by developing a suitable model and as a result, the application of soft computing in structural engineering has been successfully presented in this research paper. PMID:26644928

  11. Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhu

    Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product

  12. Toxicology of chlorofluorocarbon replacements.

    PubMed

    Dekant, W

    1996-03-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are stable in the atmosphere and may reach the stratosphere. They are cleaved by UV-radiation in the stratosphere to yield chlorine radicals, which are thought to interfere with the catalytic cycle of ozone formation and destruction and deplete stratospheric ozone concentrations. Due to potential adverse health effects of ozone depletion, chlorofluorocarbon replacements with much lower or absent ozone depleting potential are developed. The toxicology of these compounds that represent chlorofluorohydrocarbons (HCFCs) or fluorohydrocarbons (HFCs) has been intensively studied. All compounds investigated (1, 1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane [HCFC-141b], 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane [HFC-134a], pentafluoroethane [HFC-125], 1-chloro- 1,2,2,2-tetrafluoroethane [HCFC-124], and 1,1-dichloro-2,2,2-trifluoroethane [HCFC-123]) show only a low potential for skin and eye irritation. Chronic adverse effects on the liver (HCFC-123) and the testes (HCFC-141b and HCFC-134a), including tumor formation, were observed in long-term inhalation studies in rodents using very high concentrations of these CFC replacements. All CFC replacements are, to varying extents, biotransformed in the organism, mainly by cytochrome P450-catalyzed oxidation of C-H bonds. The formed acyl halides are hydrolyzed to give excretable carboxylic acids; halogenated aldehydes that are formed may be further oxidized to halogenated carboxylic acids or reduced to halogenated alcohols, which are excretory metabolites in urine from rodents exposed experimentally to CFC replacements. The chronic toxicity of the CFC replacements studied is unlikely to be of relevance for humans exposed during production and application of CFC replacements.

  13. Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

  14. Comparing the use of sewage sludge ash and glass powder in cement mortars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Poon, Chi Sun

    2016-09-23

    This study explored the suitability of using sewage sludge ash (SSA) and mixed-colored glass powder (MGP) as construction materials in cement mortars. Positive findings from this study may help promote the recycling of waste SSA and MGP in construction works. The results indicated that the SSA decreased while MGP improved the mortar workability. The SSA exhibited very low pozzolanic activity, but the cement mortar prepared with 20% SSA yielded strength values slightly superior to those of the glass mortars due to its water absorption ability. MGP can serve as a pozzolan and when 20% of cement was replaced by MGP, apparent compressive strength gains were found at later curing ages. The SSA could be used to mitigate ASR expansion while the MGP was superior in resisting drying shrinkage.

  15. The incidence of stress fracture following peri-acetabular osteotomy: an under-reported complication.

    PubMed

    Malviya, A; Dandachli, W; Beech, Z; Bankes, M J; Witt, J D

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures occurring in the pubis and ischium after peri-acetabular osteotomy (PAO) are not well recognised, with a reported incidence of 2% to 3%. The purpose of this study was to analyse the incidence of stress fracture after Bernese PAO under the care of two high-volume surgeons. The study included 359 patients (48 men, 311 women) operated on at a mean age of 31.1 years (15 to 56), with a mean follow-up of 26 months (6 to 64). Complete follow-up radiographs were available for 348 patients, 64 of whom (18.4%) developed a stress fracture of the inferior pubic ramus, which was noted at a mean of 9.1 weeks (5 to 55) after surgery. Most (58; 91%) healed. In 40 of the patients with a stress fracture (62.5%), pubic nonunion also occurred. Those with a stress fracture were significantly older (mean 33.9 years (16 to 50) vs 30.5 years (15 to 56), p = 0.002) and had significantly more mean pre-operative deformity: mean centre-edge angle (9.8° (-9.5 to 35) vs 12.4° (-33 to 28), p = 0.04) and mean Tönnis angle (22.8° (0 to 45) vs 18.7° (-2 to 38), p < 0.001). The pubic nonunion rate was significantly higher in those with a stress fracture (62.5% vs 7%, p < 0.001), with regression analysis revealing that these patients had 11.8 times higher risk than those without nonunion.

  16. Assessing the Acetabular Cup Implant Primary Stability by Impact Analyses: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Adrien; Bosc, Romain; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Hernigou, Philippe; Haiat, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary stability of the acetabular cup (AC) implant is an important determinant for the long term success of cementless hip surgery. However, it remains difficult to assess the AC implant stability due to the complex nature of the bone-implant interface. A compromise should be found when inserting the AC implant in order to obtain a sufficient implant stability without risking bone fracture. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of impact signals analyses to assess the primary stability of AC implants inserted in cadaveric specimens. Methods AC implants with various sizes were inserted in 12 cadaveric hips following the same protocol as the one employed in the clinic, leading to 86 different configurations. A hammer instrumented with a piezoelectric force sensor was then used to measure the variation of the force as a function of time produced during the impact between the hammer and the ancillary. Then, an indicator I was determined for each impact based on the impact momentum. For each configuration, twelve impacts were realized with the hammer, the value of the maximum amplitude being comprised between 2500 and 4500 N, which allows to determine an averaged value IM of the indicator for each configuration. The pull-out force F was measured using a tangential pull-out biomechanical test. Results A significant correlation (R2 = 0.69) was found between IM and F when pooling all data, which indicates that information related to the AC implant biomechanical stability can be retrieved from the analysis of impact signals obtained in cadavers. Conclusion These results open new paths in the development of a medical device that could be used in the future in the operative room to help orthopedic surgeons adapt the surgical protocol in a patient specific manner. PMID:27893757

  17. The Use of Iliac Stem Prosthesis for Acetabular Defects following Resections for Periacetabular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    De Paolis, Massimiliano; Romagnoli, Carlo; Alì, Nikolin; Giannini, Sandro; Donati, Davide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The management of pelvic tumors is a challenge for orthopaedic oncologists due to the complex anatomy of the pelvis and the need to have extensive exposure. Various reconstructive techniques have been proposed with poor functional results and a high percentage of complications. Our purpose is to determine the functional results and the rate of complications of iliac stem prosthesis for acetabular defects following resections for periacetabular tumors. Materials and Methods. Between 1999 and 2012, 45 patients underwent pelvic resections for periacetabular bone tumors followed by reconstruction with stem cup prosthesis. The most common diagnosis was CS (chondrosarcoma, 29 cases), followed by OS (osteosarcoma, 9 cases) and metastasis (3 cases). In 33 cases, this implant was associated with massive bone allografts. Minimum follow-up required to evaluate functional outcome was 2 years. We classified pelvic resections according to Enneking and Dunham's classification and we used MSTS (musculoskeletal tumor system) score to evaluate functional outcomes. Results and Discussion. Sixteen patients died of their disease, three were lost to follow-up, four are alive with disease, and twenty-two are alive with no evidence of disease. Fifteen patients had local recurrence. Sixteen patients had bone or lung metastasis. We have had 6 infections, 2 aseptic loosening, and 2 cases of hip dislocation. Iliac sovracetabular osteotomy was fused in all cases at 10 months from surgery. Functional results were good or excellent in 25 of 31 patients with long-term follow-up (77%), with a percentage similar to that reported in the literature. Conclusion. The use of iliac stem prosthesis is a simple reconstructive technique that reduces operative times and risk of infection. It allows having good results and low rate of complications, but it should be performed in selected cases and centres of reference. PMID:24250275

  18. Lunar cement and lunar concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a study to investigate methods of producing cements from lunar materials are presented. A chemical process and a differential volatilization process to enrich lime content in selected lunar materials were identified. One new cement made from lime and anorthite developed compressive strengths of 39 Mpa (5500 psi) for 1 inch paste cubes. The second, a hypothetical composition based on differential volatilization of basalt, formed a mineral glass which was activated with an alkaline additive. The 1 inch paste cubes, cured at 100C and 100 percent humidity, developed compressive strengths in excess of 49 Mpa (7100 psi). Also discussed are tests made with Apollo 16 lunar soil and an ongoing investigation of a proposed dry mix/steam injection procedure for casting concrete on the Moon.

  19. A Twofold Comparison between Dual Cure Resin Modified Cement and Glass Ionomer Cement for Orthodontic Band Cementation

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Hanaa El; Elhiny, Omnia; Salem, Ghada; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Attia, Mazen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the solubility of dual cure resin modified resin cement in a food simulating solution and the shear bond strength compared to conventional Glass ionomer cement. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The materials tested were self-adhesive dual cure resin modified cement and Glass Ionomer (GIC). Twenty Teflon moulds were divided into two groups of tens. The first group was injected and packed with the modified resin cement, the second group was packed with GIC. To test the solubility, each mould was weighed before and after being placed in an analytical reagent for 30 days. The solubility was measured as the difference between the initial and final drying mass. To measure the Shear bond strength, 20 freshly extracted wisdom teeth were equally divided into two groups and embedded in self-cure acrylic resin. Four mm sections of stainless steel bands were cemented to the exposed buccal surfaces of teeth under a constant load of 500 g. Shear bond strength was measured using a computer controlled materials testing machine and the load required to deband the samples was recorded in Newtons. RESULTS: GIC showed significantly higher mean weight loss and an insignificant lower Shear bond strength, compared to dual cure resin Cement. CONCLUSION: It was found that dual cure resin modified cement was less soluble than glass ionomer cement and of comparable bond strength rendering it more useful clinically for orthodontic band cementation. PMID:28028417

  20. New radiopaque acrylic bone cement. II. Acrylic bone cement with bromine-containing monomer.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Ichim, I C; Popa, M; Rusu, M

    2008-07-01

    Bromine-containing methacrylate, 2-(2-bromopropionyloxy) ethyl methacrylate (BPEM), had been used in the formulation of acrylic radiopaque cements. The effect of this monomer incorporated into the liquid phase of acrylic bone cement, on the curing parameters, thermal properties, water absorption, density, compression tests and radiopacity was studied. A decrease of maximum temperature and an increase of the setting time were observed with the addition of the bromine-containing monomer in the radiolucent cement composition. Adding BPEM in radiolucent acrylic bone cements composition results in the decrease of glass transition temperature and increase of its thermal stability. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer are characterized by polymerization shrinkage lower than the radiolucent cement. Addition of bromine-containing comonomer in radiolucent acrylic bone cement composition determines the increase of compressive strength. Acrylic bone cements modified with bromine-containing comonomer proved to be radiopaque.

  1. Cement bond log evaluation of foam- and synthetic-cemented casings

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckdorfer, R.A.; Jacobs, W.R.; Masson, J.P.

    1984-11-01

    Cement bond log (CBL /SUP TM/ ) studies on foam- and synthetic-cemented wells were initiated to determine the feasibility of, as well as to develop technologies for, evaluating these novel cementing services. Early CBL's on these cementing systems showed little effect on the log amplitude curve. Hence, CBL evaluations were difficult to obtain and interpret. A special sonde with a 1.3-ft (0.4-m) transmitter-toreceiver spacing was developed for this study. Sonic signal amplitudes were determined by using cemented shortcasing test sections. Sonic attenuation rates were correlated to compressive strengths for a range of cement densities. Experimental details of the cementing operation and logging studies are discussed. Data relating attenuation rates to compressive strengths and cement densities also are presented. Field results are discussed.

  2. Expansive Cements and Their Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-10-01

    made available from the Office, Chief of Research and Development, Army, f- operation of the Concrete Technology Inxormation Aalysis Center (CTIAC...Ths is CTIAC Report No. 8. This report was prepared by Mr. George C. Hoff, Chief Materials Properties V Section of the Concrete iabcraLory, U. S. Army...compensating expansive cement concrete is to minimize cracking in concrete pavements and structures caused by drying shrinkage. The paper reviews the

  3. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-31

    pastes have shown that the matrix is microporous; mesopores are absent unless the material is allowed to dry out. This results in water adsorption at low...only to water. When subsequently dried a portion of3 the porosity is converted to larger mesopores . • Only about one third of the cement reacts in a...Frictional sliding, in this case was characterized by a decreasing slope in the loading curve followed by hysteresis in the unload/reloading curves

  4. Hexachloroethane Obscurant Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    suggest that neither the alkali metal hydroxides nor chlorides are extremely toxic (11). Oral rat LD50 values are indeed lower for hydroxide salts...analyze for toxicity of combustion gases and particulates. Compositions containing boron potassium nitrate igniter blended with halide salts...variants were identified which should have improved performance. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Non- toxic obscurant, hexachloroethane smoke replacement 16

  5. Python import replacement

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    SmartImport.py is a Python source-code file that implements a replacement for the standard Python module importer. The code is derived from knee.py, a file in the standard Python diestribution , and adds functionality to improve the performance of Python module imports in massively parallel contexts.

  6. Prioritizing equipment for replacement.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Mike

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that clinical engineers take the lead in formulating evaluation processes to recommend equipment replacement. Their skill, knowledge, and experience, combined with access to equipment databases, make them a logical choice. Based on ideas from Fennigkoh's scheme, elements such as age, vendor support, accumulated maintenance cost, and function/risk were used.6 Other more subjective criteria such as cost benefits and efficacy of newer technology were not used. The element of downtime was also omitted due to the data element not being available. The resulting Periop Master Equipment List and its rationale was presented to the Perioperative Services Program Council. They deemed the criteria to be robust and provided overwhelming acceptance of the list. It was quickly put to use to estimate required capital funding, justify items already thought to need replacement, and identify high-priority ranked items for replacement. Incorporating prioritization criteria into an existing equipment database would be ideal. Some commercially available systems do have the basic elements of this. Maintaining replacement data can be labor-intensive regardless of the method used. There is usually little time to perform the tasks necessary for prioritizing equipment. However, where appropriate, a clinical engineering department might be able to conduct such an exercise as shown in the following case study.

  7. Window Replacement Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Explores ways to replace facility windows more easily and efficiently by evaluating long-term needs and window options. Recommends obtaining references from window manufacturer and installer, scheduling the work during times the facility is unoccupied, and ensuring that historic and life-safety issues be considered. (GR)

  8. Sustainable cement production-present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.; Romer, M.; Tschudin, M.; Bolio, H.

    2011-07-15

    Cement will remain the key material to satisfy global housing and modern infrastructure needs. As a consequence, the cement industry worldwide is facing growing challenges in conserving material and energy resources, as well as reducing its CO{sub 2} emissions. According to the International Energy Agency, the main levers for cement producers are the increase in energy efficiency and the use of alternative materials, be it as fuel or raw materials. Accordingly, the use of alternative fuels has already increased significantly in recent years, but potential for further increases still exists. In cement, the reduction of the clinker factor remains a key priority: tremendous progress has already been made. Nevertheless, appropriate materials are limited in their regional availability. New materials might be able to play a role as cement constituents in the future. It remains to be seen to what extent they could substitute Portland cement clinker to a significant degree.

  9. Cements for use in esthetic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Thiago A; da Silva, Nelson R F A; Carvalho, Ricardo M

    2007-04-01

    Dental cements are designed to retain restorations, appliances, and post and cores in a stable and, presumably, long-lasting position in the oral environment. Conventional glass ionomer and zinc phosphate cements are among the most popular materials for luting metallic restorations and posts, whereas resin-based cements are preferred for esthetic applications. Successful cementation of esthetic restorations is largely dependent on the appropriate treatment and silane application to the internal surface of the restoration. Clinicians are frequently advised to use three-step total-etch or two-step self-etch adhesive for luting purposes to avoid problems of incompatibility between adhesives and chemical- or dual-cure cements. A reliable cementation procedure can only be achieved if the operator is aware of the mechanisms involved and the material limitations.

  10. How to obtain good primary cement jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Kundert, D.P. ); Vacca, H.L. ); Smink, D.E

    1990-04-01

    A review of 23 primary cementing jobs performed over an 11-year period in four states has shown improved success with attention having been directed to low- cost means of improving displacement of drilling muds by cement slurries. The most important factors appear to be placement of centralizers and scratchers, conditioning of the drilling mud and pipe movement (reciprocation) while conditioning mud and while placing cement. Confidence gained in the use of these methods has resulted in a job technique wherein the top cementing plug is pumped down with 10% acetic acid or other desired perforating fluid followed by 2% KCI water. This technique permits lower-cost completions. The theory and application of cement bond logging is reviewed with five example CBL-VDL logs presented and discussed. Several examples are shown under applied surface pressure conditions. An example of a CBL-VDL log for an offset well where the principles of primary cementing were not observed is shown for comparison.

  11. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, P.K.; Persoff, P.; Fox, J.P.

    1980-06-01

    Low cost material is needed for grouting abandoned retorts. Experimental work has shown that a hydraulic cement can be produced from Lurgi spent shale by mixing it in a 1:1 weight ratio with limestone and heating one hour at 1000°C. With 5% added gypsum, strengths up to 25.8 MPa are obtained. This cement could make an economical addition up to about 10% to spent shale grout mixes, or be used in ordinary cement applications.

  12. Zirconia: cementation of prosthetic restorations. Literature review

    PubMed Central

    GARGARI, M.; GLORIA, F.; NAPOLI, E.; PUJIA, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim of the work Aim of the work was to execute a review of the international literature about the cementation of zirconia restorations, analyzing the properties of the cements most commonly used in clinical activities. Materials and methods It was performed, through PubMed, a bibliographic search on the international literature of the last 10 years using the following limits: studies in English, in vitro studies, randomized clinical trial, reviews, meta-analysis, guide-lines. Were excluded from the search: descriptive studies, case reports, discussion articles, opinion’s leader. Results From studies results that common surface treatments (silanization, acid etching) are ineffective on zirconia because it has an inert surface without glassy component (on which this surface treatments act primarily), instead the sandblasting at 1atm with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) results significantly effective for the resulting roughening that increase the surface energy and the wettability of the material. Furthermore it has been shown that zinc phosphate-based cements, Bis-GMA-based and glass-ionomer cements can’t guarantee a stable long-term adhesion, instead resin cements containing phosphate monomer 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown higher adhesion and stability values than the other cements. In particular, it has seen that bond strength of zirconia copings on dentin, using MDP-based cement, is about 6,9MPa; this value is comparable to that obtained with gold copings cementation. Conclusions Analyzed studies have led to the following conclusions: sandblasting with aluminium oxide (Al2O3) is the best surface treatment to improve adhesion between resin cements and zirconia; resin cements containing phosphate ester monomers 10-methacryloyloxyidecyl-dihyidrogenphosphate (MDP) have shown in the studies an higher bond strength and stability after ageing treatment; the best procedure for cementing zirconia restorations results the combination of

  13. Treating cement burns in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Use of cement is widespread in the UK and warnings about burns caused by contact with the material are usually printed on bags and delivery dockets. Nevertheless, about 2 per cent of people admitted to burns units have injuries, many serious, caused by prolonged contact with wet cement. This article explores the pathophysiology of cement burns, and outlines the best forms of treatment and prevention.

  14. Water dynamics in glass ionomer cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, M. C.; Jacobsen, J.; Momsen, N. C. R.; Benetti, A. R.; Telling, M. T. F.; Seydel, T.; Bordallo, H. N.

    2016-07-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are an alternative for preventive dentistry. However, these dental cements are complex systems where important motions related to the different states of the hydrogen atoms evolve in a confined porous structure. In this paper, we studied the water dynamics of two different liquids used to prepare either conventional or resin-modified glass ionomer cement. By combining thermal analysis with neutron scattering data we were able to relate the water structure in the liquids to the materials properties.

  15. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-11-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  16. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  17. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation.

  18. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wen-Xing; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Che, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0' modes.

  19. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  20. Basic properties of calcium phosphate cement containing atelocollagen in its liquid or powder phases.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y; Ishikawa, K; Takechi, M; Toh, T; Yuasa, T; Nagayama, M; Suzuki, K

    1998-01-01

    The basic properties of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) containing atelocollagen, the main component of the organic substrate in bone, were studied in an initial evaluation for the fabrication of modified CPC. The setting time of conventional CPC (c-CPC) was prolonged to over 100 min when c-CPC contained 1% or more atelocollagen. The diametral tensile strength (DTS) of c-CPC decreased linearly with the collagen content, descending to below the detection limit when the c-CPC contained 3% or more atelocollagen. Therefore, use of c-CPC as the base cement seems inappropriate for the fabrication of atelocollagen-containing CPC. In contrast, the cement set at 9-34 min when fast-setting CPC (FSCPC) was used as the base cement and contained 1-5% atelocollagen, respectively. Although addition of atelocollagen resulted in the decrease of DTS of the set mass, the DTS was approximately the same, 6-8 MPa, at contents of atelocollagen between 1% and 5%. When atelocollagen was added to FSCPC, the handling property was improved significantly. The paste also became more adhesive with increase in atelocollagen content. These properties are desirable for its use in surgical procedures since, for example, bony defects can be filled easily and without a space interposed between the bone and cement paste. Although there are some disadvantages for the addition of atelocollagen to CPC, it can be accepted as long as FSCPC was used as the base cement. We conclude that further evaluations of the effects of atelocollagen, such as biocompatibility, bone synthesis, and bone replacement behaviour should be done, using FSCPC as the base cement.