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Sample records for cementless forged titanium

  1. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  2. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; deFromont, F.

    2007-03-01

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  3. Successful hip arthroplasty using cementless titanium implants in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Harald; Ramsauer, Thomas; Böhm, Gerhard; Hilzensauer, Gerhard; Dorn, Ulrich; Lintner, Felix

    2002-03-01

    Over a period of eight years, we implanted a total of 76 cementless hip prostheses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The clinical results of 47 patients (70 hips) increased from a mean Harris Hip Score of 33 to 85 after an average of 49 months (range 1-11 years). One threaded cup has had to be revised because of loosening, and one stem because of femoral fracture. At the latest follow-up, 88% of Hofer-Imhof threaded cups had complete bone ingrowth (Type 0); 10% had near-complete bone ingrowth with minimal radiolucency in one third of the bone contact area (Type 1), and 2% had radiolucency in two thirds of the bone contact area (Type 2). Hemispherical push-in cups showed significantly more radiolucency around the cup. For the stems (Uni, Zweymüller SL), 83% showed no radiolucency (Type 0); 17% had radiolucency only very proximally (Type 1). Minor remodelling (Type 1) occurred in 60% of the femoral shafts; 30% had moderate femoral density loss (Type 2), and 10% had severe bone loss and cortical thinning (Type 3). There was no correlation between marked shaft atrophy and clinical symptoms. With regard to radiolucency and remodelling, there was no significant difference between the two types of stem used. Cementless hip arthroplasty using titanium implants has an excellent outcome in the medium term. PMID:11880907

  4. Initial mechanical stability of cementless highly-porous titanium tibial components

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Timothy Brandon; Amer, Luke D; Warren, Christopher P; Cornwell, Phillip; Meneghini, R Michael

    2008-01-01

    Cementless fixation in total knee replacement has seen limited use since reports of early failure surfaced in the late 80s and early 90s. However the emergence of improved biomaterials, particularly porous titanium and tantalum, has led to a renewed interest in developing a cementless tibial component to enhance long-term survivorship of the implants. Cement is commonly employed to minimize micromotion in new implants but represents a weak interface between the implant and bone. The elimination of cement and application of these new biomaterials, which theoretically provide improved stability and ultimate osseointegration, would likely result in greater knee replacement success. Additionally, the removal of cement from the procedure would help minimize surgical durations and get rid of the time needed for curing, thereby the chance of infection. The purpose of this biomechanical study was twofold. The first goal was to assess whether vibration analysis techniques can be used to evaluate and characterize initial mechanical stability of cementless implants more accurately than the traditional method of micromotion determination, which employs linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs). Second, an evaluative study was performed to determine the comparative mechanical stability of five designs of cementless tibial components under mechanical loading designed to simulate in vivo forces. The test groups will include a cemented Triathlon Keeled baseplate control group, three different 2-peg cementless baseplates with smooth, mid, and high roughnesses and a 4-peg cement/ess baseplate with mid-roughness.

  5. Survival analysis of cementless grit-blasted titanium total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C; Kapandji, A I

    2001-04-01

    Although about 200000 cementless Zweymüller-Alloclassic total hip arthroplasties (THAs) were carried out worldwide in the last decade, the survival analysis of these prostheses was not available in the 2000 report of the Swedish national hip arthroplasty registry. We report a prospective survivorship analysis of 200 consecutive grit-blasted cementless Alloclassic primary THAs carried out since 1988. Using surgical, clinical and radiological endpoints for the stem and the threaded cup the ten-year survivorship was 91.5% for reoperation for any cause, 96.4% for hip pain (Merle d'Aubigné score < 5 points, clinical failure), 99.4% for definite aseptic loosening (radiological failure) and 99.3% for revision for aseptic loosening. Using the Swedish registry criteria of primary osteoarthritis and revision for aseptic loosening as the endpoint, the survival rate of 99.1% at ten years for the subgroup of 157 Alloclassic THAs in osteoarthritis compares favourably with that of the best modern cemented hip replacements reported in the Swedish arthroplasty registry. PMID:11341429

  6. Effect of Variants of Thermomechanical Working and Annealing Treatment on Titanium Alloy Ti6Al4V Closed Die Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Kumar, V. Anil; Kumar, P. Ram

    2016-06-01

    Performance of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V pressure vessels made of closed die forged domes of route `B' (multiple step forged and mill annealed) is reported to be better than route `A' (single/two step forged and mill annealed). Analysis revealed that forgings processed through route `B' have uniformity in microstructure and yield strength at various locations within the forging, as compared to that of route `A.' It is attributed to in-process recrystallization (dynamic as well as static) of route `B' forgings as compared to limited recrystallization of route `A' forgings. Further, post-forging recrystallization annealing (RA) effect is found to be more significant for route `A' forgings in achieving uniform microstructure and mechanical properties, since route `B' forgings have already undergone similar phenomenon during the thermomechanical working process itself. Considering prime importance of yield strength, statistical scatter in yield strength values within the forgings have been evaluated for forgings of both the routes. Standard deviation in the yield strength of route `B' forgings was lower (<10 MPa) as compared to route `A' (>15 MPa), which later became lower (~10 MPa) after RA with a minor decrease in yield strength. The present work discusses these variants of thermomechanical processing along with annealing to achieve better uniformity in properties and microstructure.

  7. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  8. Formation and Microstructure of Ultrafine-Grained Titanium Processed by Multi-Directional Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingfeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafine-grained titanium with uniform grain size for medical applications is obtained by multi-directional forging at 773 K in air. The microstructures and microtextures in the deformed titanium specimens are investigated by optical microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction technique, and transmission electron microscopy. Titanium specimen experience the recrystallization softening at cumulative strain about 1.2. After six passes with the cumulative strains of 2.4, the coarse grain sizes are gradually refined from about 25 μm to about 0.2 μm. New microtextures with recrystallized features generate in the specimens after multi-directional forgings. Grain boundaries in the specimens are geometrical necessary boundaries aiming to accommodate the imposed strain. It is suggested that the continuous dynamic recrystallization induced by deformation bands is responsible for the formation of ultrafine-grained titanium during multi-directional forging. Meanwhile the subdivision of grains by the mechanical twinning dramatically enhanced grain refinement to develop ultrafine-grained microstructure.

  9. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-17

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy ({alpha}+{beta}) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  10. POD of ultrasonic detection of synthetic hard alpha inclusions in titanium aircraft engine forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R. B.; Meeker, W. Q.; Brasche, L. J. H.

    2011-06-23

    The probability of detection (POD) of inspection techniques is a key input to estimating the lives of structural components such as aircraft engines. This paper describes work conducted as a part of the development of POD curves for the ultrasonic detection of synthetic hard alpha (SHA) inclusions in titanium aircraft engine forgings. The sample upon which the POD curves are to be based contains four types of right circular SHAs that have been embedded in a representative titanium forging, as well as a number of flat bottomed holes (FBHs). The SHAs were of two sizes, number 3 and number 5, with each size including seeds with nominal nitrogen concentrations of both 3 and 17 wt. %. The FBHs included sizes of number 1, number 3, and number 5. This discreteness of the data poses a number of challenges to standard processes for determining POD. For example, at each concentration of nitrogen, there are only two sizes, with 10 inspection opportunities each. Fully empirical, standard methodologies such as a circumflex versus a provide less than an ideal framework for such an analysis. For example, there is no way to describe the beam limiting effect whereby the signal no longer increases the flaw grows larger than the beam, one can only determine POD at the two concentration levels present in the block, and confidence bounds tend to be broad because of the limited data available for each case. In this paper, we will describe strategies involving the use of physics-based models to overcome these difficulties by allowing the data from all reflectors to be analyzed by a single statistical model. Included will be a discussion of the development of the physics-based model, its comparison to the experimental data (obtained at multiple sites with multiple operators) and its implications regarding the statistical analysis, whose details will be given in a separate article by Li et al. in this volume.

  11. Cementless Titanium Mesh Fixation of Osteoporotic Burst Fractures of the Lumbar Spine Leads to Bony Healing: Results of an Experimental Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Roepenack, Paula; Roesner, Jan; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Martin, Heiner; Reichel, Martin; Rotter, Robert; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Current treatment strategies for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) focus on cement-associated solutions. Complications associated with cement application are leakage, embolism, adjacent fractures, and compromise in bony healing. This study comprises a validated VCF model in osteoporotic sheep in order to (1) evaluate a new cementless fracture fixation technique using titanium mesh implants (TMIs) and (2) demonstrate the healing capabilities in osteoporotic VCFs. Methods. Twelve 5-year-old Merino sheep received ovariectomy, corticosteroid injections, and a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet for osteoporosis induction. Standardized VCFs (type AO A3.1) were created, reduced, and fixed using intravertebral TMIs. Randomly additional autologous spongiosa grafting (G1) or no augmentation was performed (G2, n = 6 each). Two months postoperatively, macroscopic, micro-CT and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation. Results. Fracture reduction succeeded in all cases without intraoperative complications. Bony consolidation was proven for all cases with increased amounts of callus development for G2 (58.3%). Micro-CT revealed cage integration. Neither group showed improved results with biomechanical testing. Conclusions. Fracture reduction/fixation using TMIs without cement in osteoporotic sheep lumbar VCF resulted in bony fracture healing. Intravertebral application of autologous spongiosa showed no beneficial effects. The technique is now available for clinical use; thus, it offers an opportunity to abandon cement-associated complications. PMID:27019848

  12. Effect of isothermal forging on the fracture properties of binary [gamma]-base titanium aluminides at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gnanamoorthy, R.; Mutoh, Y. ); Masahashi, N.; Mizuhara, Y. )

    1994-07-15

    Gamma base titanium aluminides are light in weight and possess excellent high temperature properties such as strength, stiffness and oxidation resistance. Mechanical properties of [gamma]-base titanium aluminides depend on the microstructure, alloying addition and processing route. Influences of microstructure and alloying addition on the fracture properties have been investigated. However, the influence of processing route on fracture properties is not clear at present. In the present study, the flexural strength, the flexural strength, fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth properties of (a) cast and heat treated and (b) cast, heat treated and subsequently isothermal forged binary Ti-50Al (compositions are mentioned in atomic percent) with equiaxed microstructures are investigated. Fracture surface and crack growth path investigations are performed.

  13. Effects of some technological aspects on the fatigue strength of a cementless hip stem.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, M; Toni, A; Giunti, A

    1995-07-01

    Four prototype cementless hip stems were tested following the ISO 7206 protocol for the assessment of the endurance properties and compared with a cast Cr-Co-Mo (ASTM F75) commercially available stem which was used as reference design. All the tested stems were similar in shape and size, but with some substantial differences. The first was made of forged Ti6A14V alloy (ASTM F136). The second, made of the same material, featured a central hole intended to reduce the bending stiffness of the stem itself. The third was identical to the second but for a small tooling notch in one of the fillets of the hole. The fourth was similar to the first but had a coating of sintered titanium beads in the proximal part. All of these modifications were made to evaluate the effect of fatigue strength of intentional or unintentional features commonly found in commercial stems. The forged Ti6A14V allow was found to be substantially stronger than the cast ASTM F75 Cr-Co-Mo alloy. However, tooling notches or sintered coatings were found to dramatically reduce this strength. Thus, the Ti6A14V alloy calls for an accurate design process, especially when complex shapes or sintered structures are required.

  14. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  15. Cementless total hip arthroplasty with the rectangular titanium Zweymuller stem. A concise follow-up, at a minimum of fifteen years, of a previous report.

    PubMed

    Grübl, Alexander; Chiari, Catharina; Giurea, Alexander; Gruber, Martin; Kaider, Alexandra; Marker, Martina; Zehetgruber, Harald; Gottsauner-Wolf, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Between October 1986 and November 1987, 208 total hip arthroplasties were performed with use of the cementless Zweymüller stem and a threaded cup in 200 consecutive patients. Of 102 patients (108 hips) who were available for follow-up at a minimum of 180 months postoperatively, eighty-three (eighty-nine hips) had the primary joint replacement still intact. No stem had been revised because of aseptic loosening, but we found various degrees of osteolysis around sixteen (18%) of the implants. The probability of survival of the stem at fifteen years was 0.98 (95% confidence interval, 0.96 to 1.00). The probability of survival of the cup was 0.85 (95% confidence interval, 0.79 to 0.91). PMID:17015598

  16. Effects of femoral component material properties on cementless fixation in total hip arthroplasty. A comparison study between carbon composite, titanium alloy, and stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Otani, T; Whiteside, L A; White, S E; McCarthy, D S

    1993-02-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced-carbon composite material is an attractive implant material because its modulus of elasticity can be made similar to that of cortical bone. This study investigated the effect of femoral prosthesis elastic modulus on cementless implant fixation. Distal, as well as proximal, relative micromovements between implant and bone were measured in two testing protocols (axial-load and torsional-load), comparing identically shaped carbon composite (modulus of elasticity = 18.6 GPa), Ti6Al4V (100 GPa), and 630 stainless steel (200 GPa) prostheses. In the axial-load test, proximal mediolateral micromotions were significantly larger in the flexible composite stem than in the two metals. In the torsional-load test, rotational micromotions and "slop" displacements in the flexible stem were significantly larger proximally and significantly smaller distally than in the two metals. While these results suggest that proximal stress transfer may be improved by a flexible stem, they raise the possibility of increased proximal micromotion, and suggest that improved proximal fixation may be necessary to achieve clinical success with flexible composite femoral components.

  17. Achieving Fine Beta Grain Structure in a Metastable Beta Titanium Alloy Through Multiple Forging-Annealing Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafari, Ahmad; Ding, Yunpeng; Cui, Jianzhong; Xia, Kenong

    2016-07-01

    A coarse-grained (order of 1 mm) Ti-5553 metastable beta alloy was subjected to multiple passes of low-temperature forging and multiple forging plus annealing cycles, respectively. In the forging only processing, strain was concentrated in the shear bands formed and accumulated with each forging pass, resulting in a heterogeneous microstructure and eventual cracking along the shear bands. In contrast, the introduction of a short beta annealing after each forging step led to fine recrystallized grains (50 to 100 µm) formed in the shear bands, and a uniformly refined beta grain structure after four cycles. This is attributed to the strengthening effect of the fine grains, causing redistribution of most severe strains to the coarse grain region in the subsequent forging, consistent with the simulated results by finite element analysis. The analyses of the microstructures and simulated strain distributions revealed that the critical strain for recrystallization is between 0.2 and 0.5 and the strain to fracture to be ~0.8 to 0.9. The fine-grained (50 to 100 µm) beta alloy, however, fractured at a much smaller strain of <0.4 during the next forging step, owing to the formation of stress-induced martensitic α″ which is more prevalent in fine grains than in coarse ones.

  18. Forging Advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry Barnett

    2003-03-01

    Many mechanical designs demand components produced to a near net shape condition to minimize subsequent process steps. Rough machining from slab or bar stock can quickly and economically produce simple prismatic or cylindrical shapes. More complex shapes can be produced by laser engineered net shaping (LENS), casting , or forging. But for components that require great strength in mission critical applications, forging may be the best or even the only option. However, designers of these parts may and often do lack the detailed forging process knowledge necessary to understand the impact of process details such as grain flow or parting line placement on both the forging process and the characteristics of the forged part. Economics and scheduling requirements must also be considered. Sometimes the only viable answer to a difficult problem is to re-design the assembly to reduce loading and enable use of other alternatives.

  19. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  20. Implant Design in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Taek

    2016-01-01

    When performing cementless hip arthroplasty, it is critical to achieve firm primary mechanical stability followed by biological fixation. In order to achieve this, it is essential to fully understand characteristics of implant design. In this review, the authors review fixation principles for a variety of implants used for cementless hip replacement and considerations for making an optimal selection. PMID:27536647

  1. Unicondylar knee arthroplasty: a cementless perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Michael E.; Englund, Roy E.; Leighton, Ross K.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the results of cementless unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA) with those already reported in a similar study on cemented UKA. Design A case-series cross-sectional study. Setting The Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax. Patients Fifty-one patients who underwent a total of 57 UKAs between May 1989 and May 1997. Inclusion criteria were osteoarthritis involving the predominantly the medial compartment of the knee, relative sparing of the other compartments, less than 15° of varus, minimal knee instability, and attendance at the postoperative clinical visit. Intervention Cementless UKA. Main outcome measures Clinical parameters that included pain, range of motion and the Knee Society Clinical Knee Score. Roentgenographic parameters that included α, β, γ and σ angles and the presence of periprosthetic radiolucency or loose beads. Results Age, weight, gender and follow-up interval did not significantly affect the clinical results in terms of pain, range of motion or knee score. Knees with more than 1 mm of radiolucency had significantly lower knee scores than those with no radiolucency. Knees that radiologically had loose beads also had significantly lower knee scores. The clinical outcomes of cementless UKA were comparable to those already reported on cemented UKA. Cementless femurs had less radiolucency than the cemented femurs, whereas cementless tibias had more radiolucency than their cemented counterparts. Conclusions Cementless UKA seems to be as efficacious as cemented UKA. However, there is some concern about the amount of radiolucency in the cementless tibial components. A randomized clinical trial comparing both cementless and cemented tibial components with a cementless femur (hybrid knee) is needed to further assess this controversial issue in UKA. PMID:11129829

  2. New Trends in Forging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Hagen, T.; Knigge, J.; Elgaly, I.; Hadifi, T.; Bouguecha, A.

    2011-05-01

    Limited natural resources increase the demand on highly efficient machinery and transportation means. New energy-saving mobility concepts call for design optimisation through downsizing of components and choice of corrosion resistant materials possessing high strength to density ratios. Component downsizing can be performed either by constructive structural optimisation or by substituting heavy materials with lighter high-strength ones. In this context, forging plays an important role in manufacturing load-optimised structural components. At the Institute of Metal Forming and Metal-Forming Machines (IFUM) various innovative forging technologies have been developed. With regard to structural optimisation, different strategies for localised reinforcement of components were investigated. Locally induced strain hardening by means of cold forging under a superimposed hydrostatic pressure could be realised. In addition, controlled martensitic zones could be created through forming induced phase conversion in metastable austenitic steels. Other research focused on the replacement of heavy steel parts with high-strength nonferrous alloys or hybrid material compounds. Several forging processes of magnesium, aluminium and titanium alloys for different aeronautical and automotive applications were developed. The whole process chain from material characterisation via simulation-based process design to the production of the parts has been considered. The feasibility of forging complex shaped geometries using these alloys was confirmed. In spite of the difficulties encountered due to machine noise and high temperature, acoustic emission (AE) technique has been successfully applied for online monitoring of forging defects. New AE analysis algorithm has been developed, so that different signal patterns due to various events such as product/die cracking or die wear could be detected and classified. Further, the feasibility of the mentioned forging technologies was proven by means

  3. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  4. Forging process design for risk reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yongning

    In this dissertation, forging process design has been investigated with the primary concern on risk reduction. Different forged components have been studied, especially those ones that could cause catastrophic loss if failure occurs. As an effective modeling methodology, finite element analysis is applied extensively in this work. Three examples, titanium compressor disk, superalloy turbine disk, and titanium hip prosthesis, have been discussed to demonstrate this approach. Discrete defects such as hard alpha anomalies are known to cause disastrous failure if they are present in those stress critical components. In this research, hard-alpha inclusion movement during forging of titanium compressor disk is studied by finite element analysis. By combining the results from Finite Element Method (FEM), regression modeling and Monte Carlo simulation, it is shown that changing the forging path is able to mitigate the failure risk of the components during the service. The second example goes with a turbine disk made of superalloy IN 718. The effect of forging on microstructure is the main consideration in this study. Microstructure defines the as-forged disk properties. Considering specific forging conditions, preform has its own effect on the microstructure. Through a sensitivity study it is found that forging temperature and speed have significant influence on the microstructure. In order to choose the processing parameters to optimize the microstructure, the dependence of microstructure on die speed and temperature is thoroughly studied using design of numerical experiments. For various desired goals, optimal solutions are determined. The narrow processing window of titanium alloy makes the isothermal forging a preferred way to produce forged parts without forging defects. However, the cost of isothermal forging (dies at the same temperature as the workpiece) limits its wide application. In this research, it has been demonstrated that with proper process design, the die

  5. Ten to twelve-year results with the Zweymüller cementless total hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Vervest, Ton M J S; Anderson, Patricia G; Van Hout, Freek; Wapstra, Frits-Hein; Louwerse, Robert T; Koetsier, Juriaan W A

    2005-04-01

    Between January 1987 and December 1990, 221 Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasties were performed in 211 patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis. A total of 136 patients (142 prostheses) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 134 months (SD 9.5). The study group consisted of 78 Hochgezogen and 64 Stepless stem prostheses, all with a threaded titanium cup and ceramic head. No clinical and radiological differences were found between the 2 stem prostheses. Seven cups had been revised because of aseptic loosening; 17 cups showed radiolucent lines, osteolysis, or migration. Mean linear polyethylene wear of 105 (74%) cups was 0.46 mm (SD 0.27), with an annual wear of 0.04 mm (SD 0.02). Wear did not correlate with pain, cup migration, radiolucent lines, or osteolysis. Cumulative survival was 96%. Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasty showed good midterm results. PMID:15809956

  6. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  7. A cementless, elastic press-fit socket with and without screws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The acetabular component has remained the weakest link in hip arthroplasty regarding achievement of long-term survival. Primary fixation is a prerequisite for long-term performance. For this reason, we investigated the stability of a unique cementless titanium-coated elastic monoblock socket and the influence of supplementary screw fixation. Patient and methods During 2006–2008, we performed a randomized controlled trial on 37 patients (mean age 63 years (SD 7), 22 females) in whom we implanted a cementless press-fit socket. The socket was implanted with additional screw fixation (group A, n = 19) and without additional screw fixation (group B, n = 18). Using radiostereometric analysis with a 2-year follow-up, we determined the stability of the socket. Clinically relevant migration was defined as > 1 mm translation and > 2º rotation. Clinical scores were determined. Results The sockets without screw fixation showed a statistically significantly higher proximal translation compared to the socket with additional screw fixation. However, this higher migration was below the clinically relevant threshold. The numbers of migratory sockets were not significantly different between groups. After the 2-year follow-up, there were no clinically relevant differences between groups A and B regarding the clinical scores. 1 patient dropped out of the study. In the others, no sockets were revised. Interpretation We found that additional screw fixation is not necessary to achieve stability of the cementless press-fit elastic RM socket. We saw no postoperative benefit or clinical effect of additional screw fixation. PMID:23083434

  8. Good short-term outcome of primary total hip arthroplasty with cementless bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Cementless total hip arthroplasty is currently favored by many orthopedic surgeons. The design of the porous surface is critically important for long-term fixation. We examined the clinical and radiographic outcome of the cementless titanium hip implant with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 hips (92 patients) that had undergone primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants. The mean follow-up period was 7 (3–9) years. Hip joint function was evaluated with the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel hip score, and radiographic changes were determined from anteroposterior radiographs. Results The mean hip score improved from 9.7 preoperatively to 17 at the final follow-up. The overall survival rate was 100% at 9 years, when radiographic loosening or revision for any reason was used as the endpoint. 3 stems in 2 patients subsided more than 3 mm vertically within 1 year after implantation. Radiographs of the interface of the stem and femur were all classified as bone ingrowth fixation. Conclusions The short-term results of this study show good outcome for cementless implants with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. PMID:23043270

  9. Influence of cementless cup surface on stability and bone fixation 2 years after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urbański, Wiktor; Krawczyk, Artur; Dragan, Szymon Ł; Kulej, Mirosław; Dragan, Szymon F

    2012-01-01

    Loss of fixation between bone and implant surface is one of the main treatment problems in total hip arthroplasty. It might lead to implant instability, bone loss and treatment failure resulting in revision surgery. Surface modification is a method for improving bone response to implant and increasing implant osseointegration. However, the currently applied modifications such as hydroxyapatite coatings do not meet expectation and do not provide good clinical result. The object of the study was to evaluate the influence of acetabular cup surface modification on fixation and bone remodelling in total hip arthroplasty. Clinical and radiological outcomes were evaluated in patients two years after cementless total hip replacement. Two groups were compared: patients with acetabular component with uncoated titanium surface and patients with hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular surface. Hips X-rays were analysed for early signs of losing stability of acetabular cups. Two years after surgery the analysis of X-rays did not reveal any statistical differences in stability, migration of acetabular components of endoprosthesis between both groups. No differences were also observed in bone remodelling around implants. Particularly high percentage of cups, i.e. 17.64%, were classified into the group with high risk of early implant loosening, i.e., the group with HA coatings. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium cementless acetabular cups implanted by press-fit technique have no influence on their stability, bone-implant fixation and the remodelling of bone surrounding an implant two years after surgery.

  10. Improved design of cementless hip stems using two-dimensional functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Shabara, M A N; El-Midany, T T; Fouda, N

    2006-10-01

    Increasingly, it is acknowledged that bone resorption around cementless hip implants may cause future problems. The solution is frequently sought in reducing implant stiffness. However, this confronts the designer with a true design conflict: how to reduce the stiffness without excessively loading the proximal bone/prosthesis interface? The aim of this work is to improve the design of cementless hip stem material, using two-dimensional (2D) functionally graded material (FGM) concept in order to solve the above problems. Two models were used in this analysis, using three materials with different elastic moduli, E(1), E(2), and E(3). In model I, the elastic moduli E(1) and E(2) gradually change along the upper stem surface, while E(3) is maintained constant along all the lower surface of the stem. However, in model II, the elastic moduli E(1) and E(2) gradually change along the lower stem surface, while E(3) is maintained constant all along the upper stem surface. It is found that the recommended model is model I, which has three distinct materials of hydroxyapatite, Bioglass, and collagen. The recommended design of 2D FGM is expected to reduce the stress shielding by 91% and 12%, respectively, compared with titanium stem and model II of FGM. It is found that this new design reduces the maximum interface shear stress at the lateral and medial sides of the femur by about 50%, compared with titanium stem. Furthermore, the maximum interface shear stress is reduced by about 17% and 11% at the lateral and medial sides of the femur, respectively, compared with that of model II of FGM.

  11. Modeling of Closed-Die Forging for Estimating Forging Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Debashish; Das, Santanu; Chatterjee, Avik; Bhattacharya, Anirban

    2016-05-01

    Closed die forging is one common metal forming process used for making a range of products. Enough load is to exert on the billet for deforming the material. This forging load is dependent on work material property and frictional characteristics of the work material with the punch and die. Several researchers worked on estimation of forging load for specific products under different process variables. Experimental data on deformation resistance and friction were used to calculate the load. In this work, theoretical estimation of forging load is made to compare this value with that obtained through LS-DYNA model facilitating the finite element analysis. Theoretical work uses slab method to assess forging load for an axi-symmetric upsetting job made of lead. Theoretical forging load estimate shows slightly higher value than the experimental one; however, simulation shows quite close matching with experimental forging load, indicating possibility of wide use of this simulation software.

  12. Fallon FORGE Well Lithologies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z text file of the downhole lithologic interpretations in the wells in and around the Fallon FORGE site. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  13. Design optimization of cementless metal-backed cup prostheses using the concept of functionally graded material.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; El-Midany, T T; Shabara, M A N; Fouda, N

    2006-09-01

    Metal backing has been widely used in acetabular cup design. A stiff backing for a polyethylene liner was initially believed to be mechanically favourable. Yet, recent studies of the load transfer around acetabular cups have shown that a stiff backing causes two problems. It generates higher stress peaks around the acetabular rim than those caused by full polyethylene cups and reduces the stresses transferred to the dome of the acetabulum causing stress shielding. The aim of this study is to overcome these two problems by improving the design of cementless metal-backed acetabular cups using the two-dimensional functionally graded material (FGM) concept through finite-element analysis and optimization techniques. It is found that the optimal 2D FGM model must have three bioactive materials of hydroxyapatite, Bioglass and collagen. This optimal material reduces the stress shielding at the dome of the acetabulum by 40% and 37% compared with stainless steel and titanium metal backing shells, respectively. In addition, using the 2D FGM model reduces the maximum interface shear stress in the bone by 31% compared to the titanium metal backing shell.

  14. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  15. Bone ingrowth through porous titanium granulate around a femoral stem: histological assessment in a six-month canine hemiarthroplasty model.

    PubMed

    Turner, Thomas M; Urban, Robert M; Hall, Deborah J; Andersson, Gunnar B J

    2007-01-01

    The procedure of using of porous titanium granules for cementless fixation of a hip replacement femoral stem was studied in a hemiarthroplasty model in 10 canines for 6 months. A vibrating instrument was used to facilitate both the delivery and distribution of the irregularly shaped porous titanium granules into the femoral canal as well as the subsequent insertion of a titanium alloy stem into the intramedullary bed of granules. Histological examination revealed lamellar bone formation through the mantle of porous titanium granules in continuity with the surrounding cortex resulting in the formation of an integrated mantle of bone and titanium granulate around the prosthesis. PMID:17578819

  16. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  17. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  18. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  19. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  20. Early results with the cementless Variall hip system.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Knahr, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the early results of the Variall cementless hip system, a further development of the reliable Alloclassic Zweymüller system. In a prospective randomized study, 319 patients (333 hips) underwent the Variall cementless hip system with four different bearings and were scored using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Score and the Short Form-36 health survey form, with a follow-up period of 3 years. The patients were grouped according to age, with those in the age range 23-75 years as group one (n = 285) and those over 75 years of age as group two (n = 48). For both the Short Form-36 and WOMAC scoring, worse function was found in group two (i.e., patients >75 years). In this group, the function scores were worse in patients who received a conventional polyethylene bearing. The clinical and radiological results after 5 or more years will lead to a clearer prediction. PMID:19105776

  1. Large forging manufacturing process

    DOEpatents

    Thamboo, Samuel V.; Yang, Ling

    2002-01-01

    A process for forging large components of Alloy 718 material so that the components do not exhibit abnormal grain growth includes the steps of: a) providing a billet with an average grain size between ASTM 0 and ASTM 3; b) heating the billet to a temperature of between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; c) upsetting the billet to obtain a component part with a minimum strain of 0.125 in at least selected areas of the part; d) reheating the component part to a temperature between 1750.degree. F. and 1800.degree. F.; e) upsetting the component part to a final configuration such that said selected areas receive no strains between 0.01 and 0.125; f) solution treating the component part at a temperature of between 1725.degree. F. and 1750.degree. F.; and g) aging the component part over predetermined times at different temperatures. A modified process achieves abnormal grain growth in selected areas of a component where desirable.

  2. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  4. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Forging machines. 1910.218 Section 1910.218 Labor... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... other identifier, for the forging machine which was inspected. (ii) Scheduling and recording...

  5. Outcomes of a Newer-Generation Cementless Total Knee Arthroplasty Design.

    PubMed

    Harwin, Steven F; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Mont, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Newer-generation cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) aim to improve durability, function, and longevity. In a large series of cementless TKAs at a mean 4-year follow-up, the authors evaluated (1) survivorship, (2) range of motion, (3) patient-reported outcomes, and (4) complications. Mean age was 66 years (range, 34-88 years) and mean body mass index was 32.5 kg/m(2) (range, 20-54 kg/m(2)). Aseptic and septic implant survivorships were 99.6% and 99.5%, respectively. Mean extension, flexion, and Knee Society scores improved significantly. There were 3 septic failures. Aseptic failures included 3 aseptic loosenings, 1 polyethylene revision, and 1 revision to a cemented patella. This study showed excellent clinical and patient-reported outcomes of cementless TKA.

  6. Fallon FORGE Well Temp data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z downhole temperature data for wells in and around the Fallon FORGE site. Data for the following wells are included: 82-36, 82-19, 84.31, 61-36, 88-24, FOH-3D, FDU-1, and FDU-2. Data are formatted in txt format and in columns for importing into Earthvision Software. Column headers and coordinate system information is stored in the file header.

  7. Morphological Study of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem

    PubMed Central

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias

    2014-01-01

    A morphology study was essential to the development of the cementless femoral stem because accurate dimensions for both the periosteal and endosteal canal ensure primary fixation stability for the stem, bone interface, and prevent stress shielding at the calcar region. This paper focused on a three-dimensional femoral model for Asian patients that applied preoperative planning and femoral stem design. We measured various femoral parameters such as the femoral head offset, collodiaphyseal angle, bowing angle, anteversion, and medullary canal diameters from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below the osteotomy level to determine the position of the isthmus. Other indices and ratios for the endosteal canal, metaphyseal, and flares were computed and examined. The results showed that Asian femurs are smaller than Western femurs, except in the metaphyseal region. The canal flare index (CFI) was poorly correlated (r < 0.50) to the metaphyseal canal flare index (MCFI), but correlated well (r = 0.66) with the corticomedullary index (CMI). The diversity of the femoral size, particularly in the metaphyseal region, allows for proper femoral stem design for Asian patients, improves osseointegration, and prolongs the life of the implant. PMID:25025068

  8. Preparation of the proximal femur in cementless total hip revision.

    PubMed

    Mallory, T H

    1988-10-01

    With an increased incidence of revision for the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty, techniques of revision surgery need meticulous attention to detail. Although the causes of the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty are many, they tend to follow characteristic patterns. The proximal femur can be exposed through an extensive muscle split incision, which offers a complete circumferential view of the femur. The cement removal is enhanced by controlled perforation using high-speed drills. Classification of bony deficits of the proximal femur can be divided into Type I, including intact cortex and medullary content; Type II, in which there is intact cortex but deficient medullary content; and Type III, in which deficits of both the cortex and medullary canal are present. Prosthetic selection is based on residual bone stock. In general, cementless fixation is advocated, with distal fixation using long-stem devices. Augmentation of bone deficits requires the use of segmental prosthetic replacement or fresh-frozen allografts. One hundred sixty patients were followed for two to six years. Satisfactory results have occurred in over 90% of the patients; better results are anticipated in patients with minimal bone deficits. Aseptic loosening requiring rerevision has occurred in 5% of the patient population. Understanding the dynamics of failure and the residual bone deficits allows one to manage the failed cemented total hip arthroplasty with greater efficiency and predictability. PMID:3416541

  9. Study of bone remodeling of two models of femoral cementless stems by means of DEXA and finite elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A hip replacement with a cemented or cementless femoral stem produces an effect on the bone called adaptive remodelling, attributable to mechanical and biological factors. All of the cementless prostheses designs try to achieve an optimal load transfer in order to avoid stress-shielding, which produces an osteopenia. Long-term densitometric studies taken after implanting ABG-I and ABG-II stems confirm that the changes made to the design and alloy of the ABG-II stem help produce less proximal atrophy of the femur. The simulation with FE allowed us to study the biomechanical behaviour of two stems. The aim of this study was, if possible, to correlate the biological and mechanical findings. Methods Both models with prostheses ABG-I and II have been simulated in five different moments of time which coincide with the DEXA measurements: postoperative, 6 months, 1, 3 and 5 years, in addition to the healthy femur as the initial reference. For the complete comparative analysis of both stems, all of the possible combinations of bone mass (group I and group II of pacients in two controlled studies for ABG-I and II stems, respectively), prosthetic geometry (ABG-I and ABG-II) and stem material (Wrought Titanium or TMZF) were simulated. Results and Discussion In both groups of bone mass an increase of stress in the area of the cancellous bone is produced, which coincides with the end of the HA coating, as a consequence of the bottleneck effect which is produced in the transmission of loads, and corresponds to Gruen zones 2 and 6, where no osteopenia can be seen in contrast to zones 1 and 7. Conclusions In this study it is shown that the ABG-II stem is more effective than the ABG-I given that it generates higher tensional values on the bone, due to which proximal bone atrophy diminishes. This biomechanical behaviour with an improved transmission of loads confirmed by means of FE simulation corresponds to the biological findings obtained with Dual-Energy X

  10. High-energy rate forgings of wedges :

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  11. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  12. Reactor pressure vessel with forged nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Desai, Dilip R.

    1993-01-01

    Inlet nozzles for a gravity-driven cooling system (GDCS) are forged with a cylindrical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section to which a support skirt for the RPV is attached. The forging provides enhanced RPV integrity around the nozzle and substantial reduction of in-service inspection costs by eliminating GDCS nozzle-to-RPV welds.

  13. Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy LSHR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Falsey, John

    2005-01-01

    The powder metallurgy disk alloy LSHR was designed with a relatively low gamma precipitate solvus temperature and high refractory element content to allow versatile heat treatment processing combined with high tensile, creep and fatigue properties. Grain size can be chiefly controlled through proper selection of solution heat treatment temperatures relative to the gamma precipitate solvus temperature. However, forging process conditions can also significantly influence solution heat treatment-grain size response. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the relationships between forging process conditions and the eventual grain size of solution heat treated material. A series of forging experiments were performed with subsequent subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments, in search of suitable forging conditions for producing uniform fine grain and coarse grain microstructures. Subsolvus, supersolvus, and combined subsolvus plus supersolvus heat treatments were then applied. Forging and subsequent heat treatment conditions were identified allowing uniform fine and coarse grain microstructures.

  14. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis. PMID:26210779

  15. Cost comparison of cementless versus cemented hemiarthroplasty for displaced femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Tripuraneni, Krishna R; Carothers, Joshua T; Junick, Daniel W; Archibeck, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Hip hemiarthroplasties are frequently performed for displaced femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to identify the costs associated with cementless and cemented hemiarthroplasties, compare operative times, and identify complications. The hypothesis was that cementless hemiarthroplasties cost less than cemented hemiarthroplasties, require less operative time, and have fewer perioperative complications. A retrospective review was conducted of 2 surgeons' patients admitted for displaced femoral neck fractures between 2006 and 2010. Group 1 included 45 patients who underwent monopolar hemiarthroplasties with cementless femoral components via a standard posterior approach by a single surgeon. Group 2 included 49 patients who underwent monopolar hemiarthroplasties with cemented femoral components via a modified lateral approach by a single surgeon. Surgical and anesthesia times and the cost of implants and accessories were recorded. The cost for cementless components was $3275.60 (femoral stem, $2800; monopolar head, $400; sleeve, $75.60), whereas the cost of cemented components was $3694.47 (femoral stem, $1800; monopolar head, $400; sleeve, $75.60, 3 Simplex with tobramycin cement packets, $1221; cement mixer/irrigator with tip/centralizer and plug/pressurizer, $197.87), a cost savings of 12.7% ($418.87). Operative time was significantly reduced in group 1 vs group 2 (mean, 32.9 vs 56.1 minutes, respectively; P<.01). Anesthesia time was also significantly reduced in group 1 (mean, 82.3 vs 102.9 minutes, respectively; P<.01). The difference in mean anesthetic times demonstrates an overall cost savings of 18.6%, or $1161.30. No difference in complications was noted between the groups perioperatively. Regional cost variances, vendor-hospital contracts, and surgeons' operative times are factors that may influence cost savings. This study demonstrates significantly lower operative and anesthetic times and observable cost savings with cementless femoral

  16. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis.

  17. Effects of Process Parameters on Deformation and Temperature Uniformity of Forged Ti-6Al-4V Turbine Blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shiyuan; Zhu, Dahu; Hua, Lin; Qian, Dongsheng; Yan, Sijie; Yu, Fengping

    2016-09-01

    This work is motivated by the frequent occurrence of macro- and microdefects within forged Ti-6Al-4V turbine blades due to the severely nonuniform strain and temperature distributions. To overcome the problem of nonuniformity during the blade forging operation, firstly, a 2D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element approach using the strain-compensated Arrhenius-type constitutive model is employed to simulate the real movements and processing conditions, and its reliability is verified experimentally. Secondly, two evaluation indexes, standard deviation of equivalent plastic strain and standard deviation of temperature, are proposed to evaluate the uniformity characteristics within the forged blade, and the effects of four process parameters including the forging velocity, friction factor, initial workpiece temperature and dwell time on the uniformity of strain and temperature distributions are carefully studied. Finally, the numerically optimized combination of process parameters is validated by the application in a practical process. The parametric study reveals that a reasonable combination of process parameters considering the flow resistance, flow localization and the effects of deformation and friction heating is crucial for the titanium alloy blade forging with uniformity. This work can provide a significant guidance for the design and optimization of blade forging processes.

  18. Microstructural Evaluation of Forging Parameters for Superalloy Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falsey, John R.

    2004-01-01

    Forgings of nickel base superalloy were formed under several different strain rates and forging temperatures. Samples were taken from each forging condition to find the ASTM grain size, and the as large as grain (ALA). The specimens were mounted in bakelite, polished, etched and then optical microscopy was used to determine grain size. The specimens ASTM grain sizes from each forging condition were plotted against strain rate, forging temperature, and presoak time. Grain sizes increased with increasing forging temperature. Grain sizes also increased with decreasing strain rates and increasing forging presoak time. The ALA had been determined from each forging condition using the ASTM standard method. Each ALA was compared with the ASTM grain size of each forging condition to determine if the grain sizes were uniform or not. The forging condition of a strain rate of .03/sec and supersolvus heat treatment produced non uniform grains indicated by critical grain growth. Other anomalies are noted as well.

  19. Forging of FeAl intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Juarez, J.; Campillo, B.; Martinez, L.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Much activity has been concentrated on the development of intermetallic compounds with the aim of improving tensile ductility, fracture toughness and high notch sensitivity in order to develop an attractive combination of properties for high and low temperature applications. This paper reports experience in processing and forging of FeAl intermetallic of B2 type. During the experiments two different temperatures were employed, and the specimens were forged after annealing in air, 10{sup {minus}2} torr vacuum and argon. From the results it was learned that annealing FeAl in argon atmosphere prior to forging resulted in better deformation behavior than for the other two environments. For the higher forging temperature used in the experiments (700C), the as-cast microstructure becomes partially recrystallized.

  20. Mechanical Testing Development for Reservoir Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wenski, E.G.

    2000-05-22

    The goal of this project was to determine the machining techniques and testing capabilities required for mechanical property evaluation of commercially procured reservoir forgings. Due to the small size of these specific forgings, specialized methods are required to adequately machine and test these sub-miniature samples in accordance with the requirements of ASTM-E8 and ASTM-E9. At the time of project initiation, no capability existed at Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) to verify the physical properties of these reservoirs as required on the drawing specifications. The project determined the sample definitions, machining processes, and testing procedures to verify the physical properties of the reservoir forgings; specifically, tensile strength, yield strength, reduction of area, and elongation. In addition, a compression test method was also developed to minimize sample preparation time and provide a more easily machined test sample while maintaining the physical validation of the forging.

  1. Near Net Shape Manufacturing of New Titanium Powders for Industry

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop a manufacturing technology to process new titanium powders into fully consolidated near net shape components for industrial applications. This will be achieved using various technologies, including press and sinter, pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF), hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and adiabatic compaction.

  2. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Modular Cementless Stem Prostheses and Coated Cementless Long-Stem Prostheses on Bone Defect in Hip Revision Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huibin; Chen, Fang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the clinical efficacy of modular cementless stem and coated cementless long-stem prostheses in hip revision arthroplasty. Material/Methods Sixty-five patients with complete hip revision surgery data during January 2005 to March 2015 were selected from the People’s Hospital of Linyi City and randomly divided into a S-ROM group (implanted with cementless modular stem prostheses, n=32) and a SLR-PLUS group (implanted with cementless coated long-stem prostheses, n=33). Harris score was used to evaluate the hip function of the patients in order to measure the clinical efficacy of the prostheses in total hip arthroplasty. Anteroposterior pelvic radiographs and lateral pelvic radiographs were taken and each patient’s hip arthroplasty condition was recorded. Kaplan-Meier method was applied to compare the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the 2 prostheses and log-rank method was used to inspect the statistical data. Results The Harris scores of both the S-ROM group and the SLR-PLUS group were significantly higher at 12 months after the operation than those before the operation (both P<0.05). The Harris scores of the patients with type I/II bone defects in the S-ROM group were not significantly different from those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at all time points (all P>0.05), while the Harris scores of the patients with type IIIA/IIIB in the S-ROM group were both significantly higher than those of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the operation (all P<0.05). No significant difference was found in the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate between the type I/II patients in the S-ROM group (92.31%) and the patients of the same types in the SLR-PLUS group (85.71%) (P>0.05). However, the cumulative 5-year non-revision rate of the type IIIA/IIIB patients in the S-ROM group (89.47%) was significantly different from the patients of the same types in

  3. Total knee arthroplasty using cementless keels and cemented tibial trays: 10-year results

    PubMed Central

    Kolisek, Frank R.; Mont, Michael A.; Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Jessup, Nenette M.; Siddiqui, Junaed A.; Monesmith, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The problem of early mechanical stability of cemented and cementless keels of the tibial component in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess clinical and radiographic outcomes of a cohort of 51 TKAs using a cemented platform with cementless keel fixation. At a mean follow-up of 10.4 years (range, 7 to 14 years), the mean Knee Society Score (KSS) was 93 points (range, 59 to 100 points), and the mean functional score was 73 points (range, 0 to 100 points). Only one patient demonstrated progressive tibial radiolucencies at 13.1 years follow-up, which resolved with a revision with an exchange of components. The results of this study suggest that a proximally cemented tibial tray with a press-fit keel TKA provides excellent mean 10-year outcomes. PMID:18185931

  4. Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Southern Iran, Midterm Outcome and Comparison of Two Designs

    PubMed Central

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossein; Hashemi, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cementless hip prosthesis was designed to provide biologic fixation, without the use of cement. The second generation components have shown more reliable bone ingrowths and survival rates. We are reporting a midterm result of two designs of cementless prosthesis in a unique culture with different social habits and expectations. Methods: 52 primary cementless total hip arthroplasty in 42 patients with the mean age of 48.8 years were retrospectively studied. Two groups of prosthesis had been implanted: Harris-Galante II (HGII) in 15 and Versys-Trilogy (V-T) in 37 hips, both from Zimmer company. The patients were assessed clinically, radiographically and with Harris hip score, SF36, WOMAC, and MACTAR questionnaires, with 65 months (26-136) mean follow-up. Results: All the V-T prostheses had survived well. Eight of HG II were revised by the last follow-up in 19-102 months. All had undergone acetabular revision and 2 combined with femoral revision. Broken tines of HGII cups were seen in 4 radiographs. The 65 months overall survival was 96.2% for femoral and 84.6% for acetabular components. 90% had good or excellent Harris hip scores. The functional scores were poorer in the HG II group. Pain relief and improved walking were the two main patients’ expectations fulfilled in 97.6% and 92.8%, respectively. Conclusions: The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) is satisfactory and comparable with the literature based on the results of function and survival of this small comparative group. The use of HGII acetabular component should be abandoned. PMID:26379348

  5. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  6. 1. MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY, ACROSS FROM BUILDING NO. 114 on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY, ACROSS FROM BUILDING NO. 114 on FARLEY AVE. MARKER ON DISPLAY ITSELF READS: FORGE AND TOOLS, USED AT MIDDLE FORGE LOCATED AT PICATINNY LAKE OUTLETS 1749 TO 1880. NEARBY MARKER READS: THE MIDDLE FORGE. THE MT. HOPE IRONWORKS INCLUDING A TRACT CALLED THE MIDDLE FORGE, SUPPLIED ORDNANCE MATERIAL TO THE CONTINENTAL ARMY IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. GENERAL WASHINGTON INSPECTED THE FACILITY. THE WAR DEPARTMENT PURCHASED THE MIDDLE FORGE PORPERTY FOR AN ARMY POWDER DEPOT IN 1879-80. THE FORGE AND TOOLS WERE RECOVERED AT THE ACTUAL SITE NEAR PICATINNY PEAK. THROUGH THE YEARS, THE MIDDLE FORGE DISPLAY CAME TO BE THE UNOFFICIAL SYMBOL OF PICATINNY ARSENAL. -- HISTORICAL OFFICE NO DATE - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  7. 4. FORGE, ANVIL, PEDESTAL GRINDER, AND BELT DRIVES. NOTE WATERWHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. FORGE, ANVIL, PEDESTAL GRINDER, AND BELT DRIVES. NOTE WATERWHEEL NEEDLE VALVE CASTING HANGING ON THE WALL ABOVE THE FORGE. VIEW TO NORTH. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-1 Machine Shop, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. Near-Net Forging Technology Demonstration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, I. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Significant advantages in specific mechanical properties, when compared to conventional aluminum (Al) alloys, make aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys attractive candidate materials for use in cryogenic propellant tanks and dry bay structures. However, the cost of Al-Li alloys is typically five times that of 2219 aluminum. If conventional fabrication processes are employed to fabricate launch vehicle structure, the material costs will restrict their utilization. In order to fully exploit the potential cost and performance benefits of Al-Li alloys, it is necessary that near-net manufacturing methods be developed to off-set or reduce raw material costs. Near-net forging is an advanced manufacturing method that uses elevated temperature metal movement (forging) to fabricate a single piece, near-net shape, structure. This process is termed 'near-net' because only a minimal amount of post-forge machining is required. The near-net forging process was developed to reduce the material scrap rate (buy-to-fly ratio) and fabrication costs associated with conventional manufacturing methods. The goal for the near-net forging process, when mature, is to achieve an overall cost reduction of approximately 50 percent compared with conventional manufacturing options for producing structures fabricated from Al-Li alloys. This NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) sponsored program has been a part of a unique government / industry partnership, coordinated to develop and demonstrate near-net forging technology. The objective of this program was to demonstrate scale-up of the near-net forging process. This objective was successfully achieved by fabricating four integrally stiffened, 170- inch diameter by 20-inch tall, Al-Li alloy 2195, Y-ring adapters. Initially, two 2195 Al-Li ingots were converted and back extruded to produce four cylindrical blockers. Conventional ring rolling of the blockers was performed to produce ring preforms, which were then contour ring rolled to produce

  9. Impact of Temperature on Cooling Structural Variation of Forging Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piesova, Marianna; Czan, Andrej

    2014-12-01

    The article is focused on the issue of die forging in the automotive industry. The cooling effect of temperature on the structure of forged die are under review. In the article, there is elaborated the analysis of theoretical knowledge in the field, focusing on die forging and experimentally proven effect of the cooling rate on the final structure of forged dies made of hypoeutectic carbon steel C56E2.

  10. 22 CFR 121.10 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. 121.10... STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.10 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. The U.S. Munitions List controls as defense articles those forgings, castings, and other unfinished products, such...

  11. Co-Operative Training in the Sheffield Forging Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give details of an operation carried out in Sheffield to increase the recruitment of young men into the steel forging industry. Design/methodology/approach: The Sheffield Forges Co-operative Training Scheme was designed to encourage boys to enter the forging industry and to provide them with training and…

  12. Risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture in cementless total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Simo S A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Kostensalo, Inari; Mäkelä, Keijo; Huhtala, Heini; Kettunen, Jukka S; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose — Intraoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture is a known complication of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). We determined the incidence of—and risk factors for—intraoperative calcar fracture, and assessed its influence on the risk of revision. Patients and methods — This retrospective analysis included 3,207 cementless THAs (in 2,913 patients). 118 intraoperative calcar fractures were observed in these hips (3.7%). A control group of 118 patients/hips without calcar fractures was randomly selected. The mean follow-up was 4.2 (1.8–8.0) years. Demographic data, surgical data, type of implant, and proximal femur morphology were evaluated to determine risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. Results — The revision rates in the calcar fracture group and the control group were 10% (95% CI: 5.9–17) and 3.4% (CI: 1.3–8.4), respectively. The revision rate directly related to intraoperative calcar fracture was 7.6%. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for calcar fracture. In the fracture group, 55 of 118 patients (47%) had at least one risk factor, while only 23 of118 patients in the control group (20%) had a risk factor (p = 0.001). Radiological analysis showed that in the calcar fracture group, there were more deviated femoral anatomies and proximal femur bone cortices were thinner. Interpretation — Intraoperative calcar fracture increased the risk of revision. The Hardinge approach and lower age were risk factors for intraoperative calcar fracture. To avoid intraoperative fractures, special attention should be paid when cementless stems are used with deviant-shaped proximal femurs and with thin cortices. PMID:26541230

  13. Endo medullary extractability of cementless full HA coated femoral stem: Results from 19 cases.

    PubMed

    Lecuire, François; Melere, Gilles; Martres, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    The Aura cementless full HA coated stem is an anatomical femoral component with a different surface treatment in the metaphyseal and diaphyseal areas. We have studied the feasibility of isolated endo-medullar extraction of the stem. 19 patients (6 infections, 6 neck fractures, 3 stems with risk of fracture, 3 head fractures, and 1 recurrent dislocation) were subjected to the removal of a stable and bone integrated implant at a mean of 4.5 years after surgery. The 19 cases represent the entire population of Aura cementless integrated stem requiring revision during the period of 2003 through 2011, excluding periprosthetic bone fracture cases. The technique consisted of a careful release of the metaphyseal part of the implant with thin osteotomes, followed by the use of a highly efficient extractor. The re-implanted procedure always utilised standard stems: 17 cementless stems full HA coated (13 had the same size as the removed implant, 4 cases had larger sizes) and two received cemented stems. The 19 stems were extracted by simple endo-medullary approach, without the need for additional action. Several complications were encountered, 1 intraoperative diaphyseal fracture, requiring a wiring, 1 fracture of the lesser trochanter at 15 days post-surgery, requiring a revision and 2 postoperative dislocations. Except for the early revision due to fracture, no other stem was revised. There was no recurrence of infection and the functional results were satisfactory (PMA 15-18). 3 patients showed metaphyseal lucent lines on X-Ray leading us to advise the use of a standard stem with larger size after distal reaming, combined with preventive circulate of the calcar. The use of dedicated instrumentation allows successful extraction of full HA coated short stem by endomedullary approach. PMID:26280859

  14. Titanium 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  15. Forging Collaborative Partnerships: The Waterloo Neighborhood Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, Anne

    The Forging Collaborative Partnerships Project in Waterloo, Iowa is a collaborative venture to assist voluntary agencies in developing tools and strategies to strengthen collaborative relationships among public and nonprofit child welfare agencies and other key stakeholders as they adopt a family-focused philosophy. This monograph details how the…

  16. Forging Inclusive Solutions: Experiential Earth Charter Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda D.

    2010-01-01

    Forging Inclusive Solutions describes the aims, methodology and outcomes of Inclusive Leadership Adventures, an experiential education curriculum for exploring the Earth Charter. Experiential education builds meaningful relationships, skills, awareness and an inclusive community based on the Earth Charter principles. When we meet people where they…

  17. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specifications or dimensions shown in Table O-11. (2) Hydraulic forging presses. When dies are being changed or maintenance is being performed on the press, the following shall be accomplished: (i) The hydraulic pumps and... a manner that they will not fly off or fall in event of failure. (3) Hammers and presses. (i)...

  18. Excellent Survivorship With the Use of Proximally Coated Tapered Cementless Stems for Total Hip Arthroplasty in Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, D. Alex; Johnson, Aaron J.; Mont, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of total hip arthroplasty (THA) continues to grow partially because of the increasing life expectancy of the American population. Whether to use cemented or cementless femoral fixation options in older patients is often debated. The purpose of the present study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes after cementless THA in patients ≥80 years to younger patients. Clinical and radiographic data were gathered on 33 patients (35 hips) all 80 years or older who had undergone proximally coated cementless total hip arthroplasties. Outcomes were compared with a matching group for age, body mass index, and diagnosis, who had undergone the same procedure by the same surgeon at a similar time. Harris hip scores were evaluated pre- and postoperatively, and radiographs were reviewed for evaluation of fixation and stability. At a mean follow-up of 4 years, 97% of the hips (34 of 35) remained unrevised and the mean Harris hip score had improved by 39 points to 83 points (range, 26-100 points). On radiographic evaluation, 91% were found to have full bony ingrowth, with 1 hip having osteolysis of the proximal femur. Mortality was 23% at 86 months. Except for mortality, the outcomes and complication rates were similar to the younger group except that the matching group had higher final postoperative Harris hip scores. Proximally coated tapered cementless THA is a safe and efficacious method for providing good clinical outcomes with low revision rates in patients 80 years of age or older. PMID:23569678

  19. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  20. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  1. Custom Cementless Stem Improves Hip Function in Young Patients at 15-year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Flecher, Xavier; Pearce, Oliver; Parratte, Sebastien; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    THA in young patients is challenging regarding restoration and survival because patients are young, active, and tend to have disturbed anatomy. We asked whether a three-dimensional custom cementless stem could restore hip function, decrease osteolysis and wear, and enhance stem survival in young patients. We retrospectively reviewed 212 patients (233 hips) younger than 50 years (mean, 40 years) at a followup of 5 to 16 years (mean, 10 years). The Merle D’Aubigné-Postel and Harris hip scores improved at last followup. No thigh pain was recorded for any of the patients; 187 of the 212 patients (88%) had full activity recovery, 206 had full range of motion, and 151 had a score greater than 80 points for all five categories of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome score. Five patients had femoral osteolysis not associated with pain. With revision for any reason as an end point, the survivorship was 87% (range, 77%–97%) at 15 years, and considering stem revision only, the survivorship was 93% (confidence interval, 90%–97%) at 15 years. Our data compare favorably with those from series using standard cementless stems at the same followup with a high percentage of patients achieving functional restoration and a low rate of complications. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19690930

  2. The use of cementless acetabular component in revision surgery without pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; D'Angelo, Fabio; Surace, Michele Francesco; Murena, Luigi; Vulcano, Ettore

    2010-10-01

    Reconstruction of the failed acetabular component in total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be challenging. Although there are multiple reconstructive options available, a cementless acetabular component inserted with screws has been shown to have good intermediate-term results and is the reconstructive method of choice for the majority of acetabular revisions This reconstruction is feasible provided at least 50% of the implant contacts host bone. When such contact is not possible, and there is adequate medial and peripheral bone, techniques using alternative uncemented implants can be used for acetabular reconstruction. An uncemented cup can be placed at a "high hip center." Alternatively, the acetabular cavity can be progressively reamed to accommodate extra-large cups. Oblong cups, which take advantage of the oval-shaped cavity resulting from many failed acetabular components, can also be used. The success of these cementless techniques depends on the degree and location of bone loss. The correct indication to revision and the choice of the correct implant is the keystone for the success of this type of surgery and follows an accurate preoperative planning in order to understand the specific pathologic scenario. The aim of this paper is to review some technical options for the revision of the acetabular component also taking into account our personal experiences and series. PMID:21082580

  3. The Otto Aufranc Award: Enhanced Biocompatibility of Stainless Steel Implants by Titanium Coating and Microarc Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young Wook; Kwon, Soon Yong; Sun, Doo Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Background Stainless steel is one of the most widely used biomaterials for internal fixation devices, but is not used in cementless arthroplasty implants because a stable oxide layer essential for biocompatibility cannot be formed on the surface. We applied a Ti electron beam coating, to form oxide layer on the stainless steel surface. To form a thicker oxide layer, we used a microarc oxidation process on the surface of Ti coated stainless steel. Modification of the surface using Ti electron beam coating and microarc oxidation could improve the ability of stainless steel implants to osseointegrate. Questions/purposes The ability of cells to adhere to grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated stainless steel in vitro was compared with that of two different types of surface modifications, machined and titanium-coated, and microarc-oxidated. Methods We performed energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy investigations to assess the chemical composition and structure of the stainless steel surfaces and cell morphology. The biologic responses of an osteoblastlike cell line (SaOS-2) were examined by measuring proliferation (cell proliferation assay), differentiation (alkaline phosphatase activity), and attraction ability (cell migration assay). Results Cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, migration, and adhesion were increased in the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated group compared to the two other groups. Osteoblastlike cells on the grit-blasted, titanium-coated, microarc-oxidated surface were strongly adhered, and proliferated well compared to those on the other surfaces. Conclusions The surface modifications we used (grit blasting, titanium coating, microarc oxidation) enhanced the biocompatibility (proliferation and migration of osteoblastlike cells) of stainless steel. Clinical Relevance This process is not unique to stainless steel; it can be applied to many metals to improve their biocompatibility

  4. Focusing aberration corrections for ultrasonic inspections of disk forgings when using a surface compensating mirror and segmented annular phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Jon Hiram, Jr.

    Phased array transducers are playing an increasing role in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation inspection applications, and one area of their use is in the inspection of critical jet engine components such as titanium alloy turbine disk forgings. Inspection of these forging disks is performed during stages of their manufacturing, particularly at an intermediate stage when the forging disk has a deliberate "sonic shape." A forging's sonic shape, from which the final disk shape will be machined, is conducive to ultrasonic testing inspections due to its simple entry surfaces. These entry surfaces are primarily planar or conical surfaces. In prior work, forgings from General Electric Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, and Honeywell Engines and Systems were ultrasonically inspected through their planar interfaces, accomplished with a 10 MHz, segmented annular, compound spherical, phased array transducer designed to perform inspections through planar interfaces. Proof-of-concept research used this array along with surface compensating ultrasonic mirrors to inspect through the conical entry surfaces in these forgings. While successful, it was believed that the results of these inspections fell below what would be possible due to non-ideal focusing conditions and other focusing aberrations. To correct for focusing aberrations when inspecting through forging material planar and curved interfaces, three progressively more sophisticated ray-tracing algorithms were developed to generate delay time sets for phasing transducer array elements, including an initial 2D method from prior work, a refined 2D method designed to more accurately account for refraction at interfaces, and a 3D method designed for circumferentially phasing the segmented annular array. Ultrasonic inspections using these methods were performed on two sets of forging material specimens, with either planar or curved interfaces, thicknesses ranging from 0.2 inches to 2.7 inches, and each containing a 1/128-inch

  5. Performance of Porous Tantalum vs. Titanium Cup in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Randomized Trial with Minimum 10-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Julien; Kaufman, Kenton R; Hanssen, Arlen D; Lewallen, David G

    2015-06-01

    Porous tantalum monoblock cups have been proposed to improve survivorship of cementless primary THA. However, there are few direct comparative trials to established implants such as porous-coated titanium cups. 113 patients were randomized into two groups according to the cup: a porous tantalum monoblock cup (TM) or a porous-coated titanium monoblock cup (control). At a mean of 12 years after THA, no implants migrated in both groups. Two TM patients (4%) and 13 control patients (33%) presented with radiolucency around the cup (P<0.001). In the control group, 1 cup (2%) was revised for aseptic loosening. At 12 years post-implantation, porous tantalum monoblock cups demonstrated 100% survivorship, and significantly less radiolucency as compared to porous-coated titanium monoblock cups.

  6. Improvements in the process of boss bar upset forging into a horizontal forging machine with the aim of joint knuckle forging quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, D. L.; Nizamov, R. S.; Kharisov, I. Zh

    2016-06-01

    A new technique for tapered composing transition shaping has been put forward in the process of upset forging with the use of an experimental tool. The results of the upset forging process with the use of a new composing transition has been computer simulated.

  7. Enhancement of Aluminum Alloy Forgings through Rapid Billet Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kervick, R.; Blue, C. A.; Kadolkar, P. B.; Ando, T.; Lu, H.; Nakazawa, K.; Mayer, H.; Mochnal, G.

    2006-06-01

    Forging is a manufacturing process in which metal is pressed, pounded or squeezed under great pressure and, often, under high strain rates into high-strength parts known as forgings. The process is typically performed hot by preheating the metal to a desired temperature before it is worked. The forging process can create parts that are stronger than those manufactured by any other metal working process. Forgings are almost always used where reliability and human safety are critical. Forgings are normally component parts contained inside assembled items such airplanes, automobiles, tractors, ships, oil drilling equipment, engines missiles, and all kinds of capital equipment Forgings are stronger than castings and surpass them in predictable strength properties, producing superior strength that is assured, part to part.

  8. Increased risk of revision of cementless stemmed total hip arthroplasty with metal-on-metal bearings

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Alma B; Mäkelä, Keijo; Eskelinen, Antti; Havelin, Leif Ivar; Furnes, Ove; Kärrholm, Johan; Garellick, Göran; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Data from the national joint registries in Australia and England and Wales have revealed inferior medium-term survivorship for metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) than for metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Based on data from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA), we compared the revision risk of cementless stemmed THA with MoM and MoP bearings and we also compared MoM THA to each other. Patients and methods We identified 32,678 patients who were operated from 2002 through 2010 with cementless stemmed THA with either MoM bearings (11,567 patients, 35%) or MoP bearings (21,111 patients, 65%). The patients were followed until revision, death, emigration, or the end of the study period (December 31, 2011), and median follow-up was 3.6 (interquartile range (IQR): 2.4–4.8) years for MoM bearings and 3.4 (IQR: 2.0–5.8) years for MoP bearings. Multivariable regression in the presence of competing risk of death was used to assess the relative risk (RR) of revision for any reason (with 95% confidence interval (CI)). Results The cumulative incidence of revision at 8 years of follow-up was 7.0% (CI: 6.0–8.1) for MoM bearings and 5.1% (CI: 4.7–5.6) for MoP bearings. At 6 years of follow-up, the RR of revision for any reason was 1.5 (CI: 1.3–1.7) for MoM bearings compared to MoP bearings. The RR of revision for any reason was higher for the ASR (adjusted RR = 6.4, CI: 5.0–8.1), the Conserve Plus (adjusted RR = 1.7, CI: 1.1–2.5) and “other” acetabular components (adjusted RR = 2.4, CI: 1.5–3.9) than for MoP THA at 6 years of follow-up. Interpretation At medium-term follow-up, the survivorship for cementless stemmed MoM THA was inferior to that for MoP THA, and metal-related problems may cause higher revision rates for MoM bearings with longer follow-up. PMID:25715878

  9. [Development and evaluation of a new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Akira

    2004-06-01

    We developed and evaluated a new method of titanium surface treatment for direct bone fixation of implants. This method consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) flame coating onto a porous titanium surface which is arc-sprayed with pure titanium material in argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The surface roughness of the porous layer was 360 microm, Rmax, and showed higher resistance to blast erosion in comparison with the conventional low-pressure plasma-sprayed porous layers of titanium. The thickness of the HA layer was between 20 and 40 microm considering the balance of bone conduction effect of HA and the possibility of mechanical detachment of the layers from the porous titanium. Short-term animal tests showed excellent results. This new surface treatment method was applied to cementless total hip joints which were used clinically. The results obtained from observations of the retrieved specimens show that the thickness of the HA coating layer is sufficient for the new bone formation after implantation. It was concluded that the new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants is effective and successful for direct bone fixation. PMID:15301280

  10. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, A. D.; Pandit, H. G.; Jenkins, C.; Lobenhoffer, P.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Dodd, C. A. F.; Murray, D. W.

    2014-01-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:345–9. PMID:24589789

  11. Biomechanical Study on Distal Filling Effects in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Jun-Hyoung; Choi, Hyung-Yun

    In cementless total hip replacement, initial stability of the femoral component is important in the long term fixation of the femoral stem. Initial stability is closely related to the relative displacement between the prosthesis and the cancellous bone of the proximal femur. After implantation of the prosthesis, the surrounding bone is partially shielded from load carrying and starts to resorb. Stress shielding causes the loss of the proximal bone. The stress distribution of femur must be assessed to predict stress shielding. The initial stability and the stress shielding were investigated for two loading conditions approximating a single leg stance and stair climbing. Two types of stems involving a distal filling and a distal short stem were studied by the finite element method to investigate the biomechanical distal filling effects. The distal short stem produced less stress shielding at the proximal bone than the distal filling stem, while both types of stems seemed to satisfy the initial stability requirement.

  12. Valgus subsidence of the tibial component in cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Liddle, A D; Pandit, H G; Jenkins, C; Lobenhoffer, P; Jackson, W F M; Dodd, C A F; Murray, D W

    2014-03-01

    The cementless Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement has been demonstrated to have superior fixation on radiographs and a similar early complication rate compared with the cemented version. However, a small number of cases have come to our attention where, after an apparently successful procedure, the tibial component subsides into a valgus position with an increased posterior slope, before becoming well-fixed. We present the clinical and radiological findings of these six patients and describe their natural history and the likely causes. Two underwent revision in the early post-operative period, and in four the implant stabilised and became well-fixed radiologically with a good functional outcome. This situation appears to be avoidable by minor modifications to the operative technique, and it appears that it can be treated conservatively in most patients.

  13. Minimum 10-Year Wear Analysis of Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    So, Kazutaka; Goto, Koji; Kuroda, Yutaka; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Fifty-four patients (64 hips) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty between 2000 and 2003 with a 22-mm zirconia ceramic bearing on highly cross-linked polyethylene, and were evaluated with a mean 11.9-year postoperative follow-up (range, 10-14 years). Linear wear was measured on the anteroposterior radiograph of the hip. No evidence of osteolysis and loosening was found on the final radiograph in any of the cases, and the steady-state linear wear rate was 0.017±0.018 mm/year. No significant correlation was found between the linear wear rate and age, body weight, cup inclination angle, or polyethylene thickness. Highly cross-linked polyethylene showed excellent wear resistance for >10 years when used in combination with 22-mm zirconia heads.

  14. Long-term outcome of a metal-on-polyethylene cementless hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Timothy L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Campbell, Patricia A; Al-Hamad, Mariam; Amstutz, Harlan C

    2014-04-01

    Due to the well-documented problems surrounding metal-on-metal bearings, the use of hip resurfacing has declined. Since the potential benefits of hip resurfacing remain desirable, it may be beneficial to investigate the long-term outcome of hip resurfacings using metal-on-polyethylene in the 1980's. We report the long-term survivorship and modes of failure of a cementless metal-on-polyethylene resurfacing (n = 178) with different porous ingrowth surfaces. While acetabular loosening was absent, a high incidence of femoral failures (femoral loosening = 18.1%, osteolytic neck fracture = 21%) occurred despite using the same ingrowth surface for both components. Ongoing developments using the lessons learned from these previous generation components and utilizing modern low wear materials, e.g., cross-linked polyethylene, may lead to improved implants for future hip resurfacings. PMID:24090660

  15. An analysis of screw fixation of the femoral component in cementless hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Sugiyama, H; Kaiser, A D; Van Hoech, J; Whiteside, L A

    1990-01-01

    A cementless hip stem that allows screw fixation of the collar to cortical bone in the calcar region was found to achieve enhanced rotational stability when implanted in preserved cadaveric human femora. Although the implants with screws showed less tendency for subsidence than the implants without screws, rotational micromotion was not found to be statistically different under light loading conditions. When implanted in composite bone, the addition of screws in the configuration tested was associated with significant metal-on-metal wear during combined compression and rotational cyclic loading. This finding is of concern due to potential wear particle toxicity and possible lowered fatigue life of the prosthesis. Therefore, specific design changes are recommended. PMID:2243211

  16. 77 FR 23496 - Boundary Revision of Valley Forge National Historical Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Boundary Revision of Valley Forge National Historical Park AGENCY: National Park... to the boundary of Valley Forge National Historical Park, pursuant to the authority specified below... ``Valley Forge National Historical Park Proposed Boundary Expansion, Montgomery County,...

  17. Outcomes of Surgical Treatment of Periprosthetic Femoral Fractures in Cementless Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Wook; Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Ji-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to evaluate the results of surgical treatment of periprosthetic femoral fractures in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Materials and Methods From June 2002 to May 2012, 40 patients who could be followed-up for more than 1 year after surgery were enrolled in this study. The mean duration of follow-up was 28.5 months (range, 15-97 months) and the average age at the time of surgery was 71.5 years (range, 38-89 years). The fracture types were determined by using the Vancouver classification. Among intraoperative fractures, there were type A in 3 hips, type B2 in 2 hips and type B3 in one. Among postoperative fractures, type AG was present in 5 hips, type AL in 2 hips, type B1 in 15 hips, type B2 in 6 hips, type B3 in 3 hips, and type C in 3 hips. Evaluation of the results was based on bony union, stability of the prosthesis, postoperative complications, and Harris hip score at the final follow-up. Results Bony union was achieved in all but one case and the average time for bony union was 21 weeks. The mean Harris hip score was 86 at the final follow-up. Clinical results were above good in 34 of 40 hips (85.0%). Stem loosening occurred in one patient with a type B1 fracture treated with open reduction and plate fixation. Nonunion was observed in 1 patient with an AG type fracture. Conclusion Open reduction and fixation using a plate with a screw and cerclage wiring provided good results for periprosthetic fractures in patients who had a stable femoral stem without bone defects. Revision surgery with a cementless long stem should be considered in patients with an unstable stem or suspected stability in B1 type of THA using a proximal fixation type. PMID:27536618

  18. [Cementless total hip arthroplasty--results of 8-year follow-up study].

    PubMed

    Wall, Andrzej; Dragan, Szymon

    2006-01-01

    The subjects of the clinical examinations were 382 patients who from 1994 to 1999 were treated with the method of total cementless arthroplasty. The observation time ranged from 3 to 8 years. In the examined group the secondary cause of degenerative changes was identified in 210 (55%) patients. In the remaining 172 cases (45%) the primary cause of degenerative changes in the hip was diagnosed. Four types of cementless endoprostheses, varied in their construction, structure of their surfaces and material they were made of, were used to carry out the postoperative treatment of the degenerative changes in the hip: Antega, Zweymüller SL PLUS (Endoprosthetic) or Alloclasic type of stem, GSS-CL and PM-Plasmapore. The findings of the clinical investigation made it possible to determine the probability of surviving of an endoprosthesis up to the 8th year after an operation depending on a type of implanted stem, which according to Kaplan-Meier's method, amounted to 0.9603. The results of Harris scale evaluation of the function of the operated joints demonstrated the existence of the relationship between the function and the course of bone osteointegration and growth process. The detailed analysis of the X-ray examinations, and especially of the roentgenometric ones, taking into account stability of the endoprosthesis stem enabled to distinguish two stages of the clinical and roentgenological changes: the early stage (up to 6 months after an operation) characterised by settling and micromotions of the stem and the late stage (starting 6-9 months after an operation) with slowly gradual increasing of the function and holding back of stem settling. PMID:17017478

  19. Clinical results of cementless total hip arthroplasty with shortening osteotomy for high dislocation with developmental dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Desteli, Engin Eren; Imren, Yunus; Tan, Erkan; Erdoğan, Murat; Özcan, Hüseyin

    2015-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip is a technically challenging procedure. Subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy enables reducing the femoral head and restoring abductor muscle strength without compromising proximal femoral bone stock in advanced dysplasia.We aimed to retrospectively evaluate Crowe type III or IV developmental dysplasia of the hip who underwent reconstruction with cementless total hip arthroplasty combined with a transverse subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy. Sixty hips of 52 patients (11 male, 49 female) with Crowe type III (n: 37) or IV (n: 23) developmental dysplasia of the hip were included. The average age was 51.4 years. Surgery was performed in lateral decubitis position with posterolateral approach. Subtrochanteric transverse femoral osteotomy were used with cementless components. 40 of the femoral components were Secur-Fit type, and 20 of them were secur-fit plus max type. Ceramic-ceramic coupling was used in 24 cases and metal-polyethylene coupling was used in 36 cases. Merle D'Aubigne and Harris Hip score were used to rate the clinical outcome at the final follow up. All femoral shortening osteotomies were united at a mean of 5.7 months. Mean Merle D'Aubigne pain score was increased from 3.1 to 5.4, and mean Harris Hip score improved from 39 to 92.8, postoperatively (p<0.01). There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. 4 femoral stems had asymptomatic radiolucent lines. There was no significant difference in time to union between different types of stems. PMID:26280851

  20. Primary Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Unstable Intertrochanteric Femur Fracture in Elderlys: Short-term Results

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyung Lae; Cho, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to explore and report the short term results of primary cementless hip arthroplasty in treatment of unstable intertrochanteric femur fracture in elderlys. Materials and Methods Between March 2009 and Feburary 2012, 35 arthroplasty cases performed by single surgeon and followed up for more than one year were evaluated. They were 21 females and 14 males with mean age of 78 years (range, 71-92 years). Preoperative evaluation was performed by American Society of Anesthesia score. Retrospective evaluation was performed by operative time, transfusion amount, time to operation days, hospital stay and time to full weight bearing. Clinically, ambulatory ability was checked by Parker and Palmer (P&P) score and function of hip was appraised by Harris hip score (HSS). Radiologically, bone healing of fractured trochanteric fragment and presence of subsidence, stress shielding or osteolysis were checked. Results Fracture type was 11 cases of A2.2, 18 cases of A2.3 and 6 cases of A3.3. Femoral stems used were 8 cases of rectangular tapered wedge type and 27 cases of fluted modular distal fixation type. P&P score improved from mean preinjury score of 7.1 to mean postoperative last follow-up score of 6.5. Median HHS at last follow-up was 75. Mean time to full weight bearing was 47 days (24-79 days). Postoperative complications were one case of linear periprosthetic femoral fracture and one case of postoperative dislocation. Conclusion Cementless hip replacement arthroplasty could be a good option for unstable intertrochanteric femoral fracture in elderlys. PMID:27536574

  1. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  2. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Seismic Reflection

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    PDFs of seismic reflection profiles 101,110, 111 local to the West Flank FORGE site. 45 line kilometers of seismic reflection data are processed data collected in 2001 through the use of vibroseis trucks. The initial analysis and interpretation of these data was performed by Unruh et al. (2001). Optim processed these data by inverting the P-wave first arrivals to create a 2-D velocity structure. Kirchhoff images were then created for each line using velocity tomograms (Unruh et al., 2001).

  3. Simultaneous interaction of bacteria and tissue cells with photocatalytically activated, anodized titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chongxia; Kuijer, Roel; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-03-01

    Photocatalytic-activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces has been demonstrated to yield antibacterial and tissue integrating effects, but effects on simultaneous growth of tissue cells and bacteria in co-culture have never been studied. Moreover, it is unknown how human-bone-marrow-mesenchymal-stem (hBMMS) cells, laying the groundwork for integration of titanium implants in bone, respond to photocatalytic activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces. Photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium and titanium-alloy surfaces achieved 99.99% killing of adhering Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, an effect that lasted for 30 days of storage in air. Surface coverage by osteoblasts was not affected by photocatalytic activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces. Co-cultures of osteoblasts with contaminating S. epidermidis however, enhanced surface coverage on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces. hBMMS cells grew less on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium surfaces, while not at all on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces and did not survive the presence of contaminating staphylococci. This reduced surface coverage by hBMMS cells disappeared when photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces were exposed to buffer for 60 min, both in absence or presence of contaminating S. aureus. Consequently, it is concluded that photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium and titanium-alloy surfaces will effectively kill peri-operatively introduced staphylococci contaminating an implant surface and constitute an effective means for antibiotic prophylaxis in cementless fixation of orthopaedic hardware.

  4. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Forgings, castings, and... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR The U.S. Munitions Import List § 447.22 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  5. 22 CFR 121.10 - Forgings, castings and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Forgings, castings and machined bodies. 121.10... STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.10 Forgings, castings and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  6. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Forgings, castings, and... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR The U.S. Munitions Import List § 447.22 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  7. 22 CFR 121.10 - Forgings, castings and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Forgings, castings and machined bodies. 121.10... STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.10 Forgings, castings and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  8. 22 CFR 121.10 - Forgings, castings and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forgings, castings and machined bodies. 121.10... STATES MUNITIONS LIST Enumeration of Articles § 121.10 Forgings, castings and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  9. 76 FR 168 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... antidumping duty order on imports of heavy forged hand tools from China (65 FR 48962). Following second five... continuation of the antidumping duty orders on imports of heavy forged hand tools from China (71 FR 8276). The... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this...

  10. 17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Forge building, fuel storage shed, and foundry, 1906 Photocopied from a photograph by Thomas S. Bronson, 'Group at Whitney Factory, 5 November 1906,' NHCHSL. The most reliable view of the fuel storage sheds and foundry, together with a view of the forge building. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  11. Construction of a test bench for closed die forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batit, G.; Kaczmarek, B.; Ravassard, P.

    1984-03-01

    A swan neck press was equipped with hydraulic jacks to enable it to press and forge complex shapes in closed dies in one operation without wasting metal. Maximum closing stress is 250 kN, maximum pressing stress is 250 kN, maximum forging stress is 70 kN.

  12. 76 FR 50755 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... determined on April 8, 2011 that it would conduct expedited reviews (76 FR 31631, June 1, 2011). The... COMMISSION Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China Determinations On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty orders on heavy forged hand tools from China would be likely to lead to continuation...

  13. View west of small tooling and forging dies in Blacksmith ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west of small tooling and forging dies in Blacksmith Shop, Boilermakers Department, east side of building 57; during World War II approximately forty women were employed as blacksmith's forging a variety of small tools; these may be the tools they used. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Structure Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. Bipolar Hemarthroplasty Using Cementless Conical Stem for Treatment of Dorr Type B and C Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to evaluate the clinical and the radiological outcome of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using cementless cone stem to treat osteoporotic femoral neck fracture and compare the results according to the proximal femur geometry. Materials and Methods Seventy-five hips (75 patients) that underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem between September 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. The minimum follow-up period was 3 years. Thirty-three hips were classified as type B and 41 as type C. The clinical outcome was assessed using Harris hip score and the walking ability score. Radiographic evaluation was performed to evaluate the stability of the prosthesis. Results At the most recent follow up, the mean Harris hip score was 86 (range, 70-92) and 65% recovered to preoperative ambulatory status. In the radiographic exam, stable stem fixation was achieved in all cases. For the complications, eight hips developed deep vein thrombosis while three hips showed heterotopic ossification. Dislocation and delayed deep infection occurred in one hip resepectively. There were no significance differences in Harris hip score and walking ability score when the type B group was compare with the type C. Conclusion Bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem showed an excellent early outcome both clinically and radiographically regardless of the shape of the proximal femur. We believe this prosthesis can provide early stability to the Dorr type B and C femur and is an effective treatment for treating osteoporotic femoral neck fracture. PMID:27536631

  15. Excellent results with cementless total hip arthroplasty and alumina-on-alumina pairing: minimum ten-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Alexander M.; Schmidt, Rainer; Holzwarth, Ulrich; Forst, Raimund

    2010-01-01

    Ceramic-on-ceramic coupling is thought to be a durable alternative to metal- or alumina-on-polyethylene pairing. No evidence exists suggesting superior clinical and radiological results for hydroxyapatite-coated stems versus uncoated stems. The aim of this study is to report the performance of an alumina-on-alumina bearing cementless total hip arthroplasty and to compare stems with a tapered design with and without hydroxyapatite coating. We prospectively analysed the results of cementless tapered femoral stems (40 hydroxyapatite-coated versus 22 uncoated stems), a metal-backed fibre mesh hydroxyapatite-coated socket and alumina-on-alumina pairing. Of 75 hips studied, 62 were available for follow-up (mean of 10.5 years after surgery). The average Harris hip score was 90. Only one hydroxyapatite-coated stem was revised for aseptic loosening. One instance of non-progressive osteolysis was detected around a screw of a cup. All other components showed radiographic signs of stable ingrowth. Hydroxyapatite coating of the stem had no significant impact on the clinical or radiological results. Total hip arthroplasty with the presented implant and pairing provides a durable standard for all patients requiring hip joint replacement against which all newer generations of cementless implants should be judged. PMID:21079952

  16. A technique to remove a well-fixed titanium-coated RM acetabular cup in revision hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Judas, Fernando M J; Dias, Rui F; Lucas, Francisco M

    2011-01-01

    A major concern during revision hip arthroplasty is acetabular bone loss and bleeding during the extraction of well-fixed cementless acetabular cup, because no interface exists between the host bone and the cup. Forceful removal of such component using curved gouges and osteotomes often leads to extended bone loss and compromises reimplantation of a new socket. In the following case report, we removed a well-fixed polyethylene titanium-coated RM acetabular cup with 20 years of follow-up, by significant wear of the polyethylene layer. The isoelastic femoral stem was also removed by mechanical failure. We report a technique for removal of the cementless acetabular cup using powered acetabular reamers. The RM cup was sequentially reamed and when the polyethylene layer was thin enough, the remaining cup was removed easily by hand tools. The acetabular bone stock is preserved and the risks of bone fractures and bleeding are minimized. To our knowledge, these principles were applied only in cemented cups. We have used this technique in 10 cases with excellent results and no complications were noted. This is a simple, reproducible, non-costly, non-timing consuming, safe and successful technique to remove well-fixed titanium-coated RM acetabular cups.

  17. Initial billet and forging dies shape optimization: Application on an axisymetrical forging with a hammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal

    2011-05-01

    In metal forming process, the forging die design is the most important step for products quality control. Reasonable dies shape can not only reduce raw material cost but also improving material flow and eliminating defects. The main objective of this paper is to obtain some optimal parameters of the initial billet and forging dies shape according to the simulation results of a two-step metal forming process (platting step and forging step). To develop this metal forming process optimization system several numerical tools are required: geometric modelling (CATIA V5™), FEM analysis (ABAQUS®), work-flow control and optimization computation (MODEFRONTIER®). This study is done in three stages: simulating the two-step metal forming process, building surrogate meta-models to relate response and variables and optimizing the process by using advanced optimization algorithms. In this paper, a two-step axisymmetric metal forming project was studied as an example. By using our simulation model, we get 581 correct real simulation results totally. According to all these real values, we build the surrogate meta-models and obtain Pareto points for a two-objective optimization process. The choice of a solution in all Pareto points will be done by the engineer who can choose his best values according to their criterions of project.

  18. Factors Affecting Scale Adhesion on Steel Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitterman, J. A.; Bacco, R. P.; Boggs, W. E.

    1982-04-01

    Occasionally, undesirable "sticky" adherent scale forms on low-carbon steel during reheating for hot forging. The mechanical abrading or chemical pickling required to remove this scale adds appreciably to the fabrication cost. Characterization of the steel-scale system by metallographic examination, x-ray diffraction, and electron-probe microanalysis revealed that nickel, silicon, and/or sulfur might be involved in the mechanism of sticky-scale formation. Laboratory reheating tests were conducted on steels with varied concentrations of nickel and silicon in atmospheres simulating those resulting from burning natural gas or sulfur-bearing fuels. Subsequent characterization of the scale formed during the tests tends to confirm that the composition of the steel, especially increased nickel and silicon contents, and the presence of the sulfur in the furnace atmosphere cause the formation of this undesirable scale.

  19. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  20. Non-linear three-dimensional finite element analysis of a cementless hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Tensi, H M; Gese, H; Ascherl, R

    1989-01-01

    In this finite element study the stresses between a stem component of a cementless hip endoprosthesis (Young modulus of Co-Cr-Mo) and the human femur were calculated for two different loading types. Linear and non-linear models were used to simulate the interface implant bone. Two models, a stem with a porous coated surface over the entire length and a stem with a porous coated surface in the proximal region were compared regarding the load transmission to the femur. An additional calculation of an 'isoelastic' stem (Young modulus of cortical bone) was done to show the influence of the stem stiffness. A porous coated surface over the entire length causes principal shear stresses up to 2.75 MPa in the distal-medial region during level walking. The highest compressive stresses were calculated in the proximal-lateral region as 1.5 MPa in cancellous bone. A more physiological load transmission is obtained by limiting the coated area to the proximal region. All stresses in the two models are lower than experimentally evaluated strengths in the interface between implant and bone. A strong influence of the Young modulus of the stem material on the interface stresses was found. An 'isoelastic' stem causes compressive stresses in the proximal-lateral region whose values exceed the experimental strength of cancellous bone.

  1. Failure of Polyethylene Inlays in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christoph; Heisel, Christian; Thomsen, Marc; Bitsch, Rudi G.

    2016-01-01

    A retrieval analysis has been performed on 50 polyethylene inlays of cementless screw ring implants (Mecring, Mecron, Berlin, Germany) to investigate the failure mechanism of this specific open cup hip arthroplasty design that has shown a high clinical failure rate. Design-specific damage modes like rim creep, collar fatigue, and backside wear were assessed. Furthermore, the inlays were measured using a CMM to determine deformation. In 90% backside wear was observed and collar fatigue occurred in 68% of the cases. Rim creep was present in 38% of the polyethylene inlays. In 90% of the cases the cup opening diameter was 32.1 mm or less and 46% had a diameter less than 32 mm. It seems that creep and deformation of the polyethylene leads to a reduced diameter at the cup opening and consequently decreased clearance. To avoid this type of failure, polyethylene inlays should be supported at the back by the cup to reduce the risk of ongoing creep deformation. PMID:27660758

  2. A finite element analysis of the vibration behaviour of a cementless hip system.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M A; Seral-García, B

    2013-01-01

    An early diagnosis of aseptic loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) by plain radiography, scintigraphy or arthography has been shown to be less reliable than using a vibration technique. However, it has been suggested that it may be possible to distinguish between a secure and a loose prosthesis using a vibration technique. In fact, vibration analysis methods have been successfully used to assess dental implant stability, to monitor fracture healing and to measure bone mechanical properties. Several studies have combined the vibration technique with the finite element (FE) method in order to better understand the events involved in the experimental technique. In the present study, the main goal is to simulate the change in the resonance frequency during the osseointegration process of a cementless THR (Zweymüller). The FE method was used and a numerical modal analysis was conducted to obtain the natural frequencies and mode shapes under vibration. The effects were studied of different bone and stem material properties, and different contact conditions at the bone-implant interface. The results were in agreement with previous experimental and computational observations, and differences among the different cases studied were detected. As the osseointegration process at the bone-implant interface evolved, the resonance frequency values of the femur-prosthesis system also increased. In summary, vibration analysis combined with the FE method was able to detect different boundary conditions at the bone-implant interface in cases of both osseointegration and loosening. PMID:22300407

  3. Design process of cementless femoral stem using a nonlinear three dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimal available information concerning hip morphology is the motivation for several researchers to study the difference between Asian and Western populations. Current use of a universal hip stem of variable size is not the best option for all femur types. This present study proposed a new design process of the cementless femoral stem using a three dimensional model which provided more information and accurate analysis compared to conventional methods. Methods This complete design cycle began with morphological analysis, followed by femoral stem design, fit and fill analysis, and nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). Various femur parameters for periosteal and endosteal canal diameters are measured from the osteotomy level to 150 mm below to determine the isthmus position. Results The results showed better total fit (53.7%) and fill (76.7%) canal, with more load distributed proximally to prevent stress shielding at calcar region. The stem demonstrated lower displacement and micromotion (less than 40 μm) promoting osseointegration between the stem–bone and providing primary fixation stability. Conclusion This new design process could be used as a preclinical assessment tool and will shorten the design cycle by identifying the major steps which must be taken while designing the femoral stem. PMID:24484753

  4. Mid-term Results of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Modular Cementless Femoral Stems

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyung-Gyu; Min, Byung-Woo; Ye, Hee-Uk; Lim, Kyung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of revision total hip arthroplasty using modular distal fixation stems for proximal femoral deficiency. Materials and Methods Forty-five patients (47 hips) were analyzed more than 24 months after revision total hip arthroplasty that used modular distal fixation stems and was performed between 2006 and 2012. There were proximal femoral defects in all cases. Preoperative femoral defect classification revealed Paprosky type II in 31 cases, type IIIA in 7, and type IIIB in 9. The mean duration of follow-up was 53.4 (25-100) months. We evaluated the Harris hip score (HHS), walking ability according to Koval as clinical parameters, stem stability, and stem position change as radiographic parameters. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed. Results The average HHS improved form 39.5 points to 91.3 points and walking ability also improved in most cases; all patients had stable fixation of the femoral stem. Postoperative complications included 5 cases of infection and 2 cases of dislocation. The survival rate with the end point of re-revision surgery due to infection or dislocation was 86% after 8-year follow-up. Conclusion Cementless revision total hip arthroplasty using modular femoral stems is useful because the stems can be stably fixed on the diaphyseal portion of the femur, which has relatively good bone quality at mid-term follow-up. PMID:27536616

  5. Primary stability recognition of the newly designed cementless femoral stem using digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Baharuddin, Mohd Yusof; Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Hamedi, Mahyar; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias; Harris, Arief Ruhullah A; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-01-01

    Stress shielding and micromotion are two major issues which determine the success of newly designed cementless femoral stems. The correlation of experimental validation with finite element analysis (FEA) is commonly used to evaluate the stress distribution and fixation stability of the stem within the femoral canal. This paper focused on the applications of feature extraction and pattern recognition using support vector machine (SVM) to determine the primary stability of the implant. We measured strain with triaxial rosette at the metaphyseal region and micromotion with linear variable direct transducer proximally and distally using composite femora. The root mean squares technique is used to feed the classifier which provides maximum likelihood estimation of amplitude, and radial basis function is used as the kernel parameter which mapped the datasets into separable hyperplanes. The results showed 100% pattern recognition accuracy using SVM for both strain and micromotion. This indicates that DSP could be applied in determining the femoral stem primary stability with high pattern recognition accuracy in biomechanical testing. PMID:24800230

  6. Cementless total knee arthroplasty with Profix: a 8- to 10-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hardeman, François; Vandenneucker, Hilde; Van Lauwe, Johan; Bellemans, Johan

    2006-12-01

    A consecutive series of 115 cementless Profix (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, USA) Total Knee Arthroplasties performed in 113 patients were followed in order to determine the functional results and survivorship at 8 to 10 years. All patients were included in a prospective database and were reviewed annually until final follow-up. Patients overall satisfaction was excellent or good in 91.3% of cases. The mean Knee Society's knee and function scores increased respectively from 49.3 and 36.7 preoperatively to 93.1 and 82.2 postoperatively. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of implant survival at 10 years was 97.1%. Two patients underwent revision and were considered as failures. One patient had a fracture of the medial condyle at 4 days post-surgery, and the other was revised for aseptic loosening of the tibial component at 6 years post-surgery. On the basis of this long-term follow-up study, we can conclude that the Profix Total Knee System is effective and safe. PMID:17064905

  7. Primary Stability Recognition of the Newly Designed Cementless Femoral Stem Using Digital Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Sh-Hussain; Hamedi, Mahyar; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam; Mohd Noor, Alias; Harris, Arief Ruhullah A.; Abdul Majid, Norazman

    2014-01-01

    Stress shielding and micromotion are two major issues which determine the success of newly designed cementless femoral stems. The correlation of experimental validation with finite element analysis (FEA) is commonly used to evaluate the stress distribution and fixation stability of the stem within the femoral canal. This paper focused on the applications of feature extraction and pattern recognition using support vector machine (SVM) to determine the primary stability of the implant. We measured strain with triaxial rosette at the metaphyseal region and micromotion with linear variable direct transducer proximally and distally using composite femora. The root mean squares technique is used to feed the classifier which provides maximum likelihood estimation of amplitude, and radial basis function is used as the kernel parameter which mapped the datasets into separable hyperplanes. The results showed 100% pattern recognition accuracy using SVM for both strain and micromotion. This indicates that DSP could be applied in determining the femoral stem primary stability with high pattern recognition accuracy in biomechanical testing. PMID:24800230

  8. Failure of Polyethylene Inlays in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Retrieval Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christoph; Heisel, Christian; Thomsen, Marc; Bitsch, Rudi G.

    2016-01-01

    A retrieval analysis has been performed on 50 polyethylene inlays of cementless screw ring implants (Mecring, Mecron, Berlin, Germany) to investigate the failure mechanism of this specific open cup hip arthroplasty design that has shown a high clinical failure rate. Design-specific damage modes like rim creep, collar fatigue, and backside wear were assessed. Furthermore, the inlays were measured using a CMM to determine deformation. In 90% backside wear was observed and collar fatigue occurred in 68% of the cases. Rim creep was present in 38% of the polyethylene inlays. In 90% of the cases the cup opening diameter was 32.1 mm or less and 46% had a diameter less than 32 mm. It seems that creep and deformation of the polyethylene leads to a reduced diameter at the cup opening and consequently decreased clearance. To avoid this type of failure, polyethylene inlays should be supported at the back by the cup to reduce the risk of ongoing creep deformation.

  9. Accuracy and repeatability of cementless total hip replacement surgery in patients with deformed anatomies.

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Riccardo; Grazi, Erika; Testi, Debora; Viceconti, Marco; Cappello, Angelo; Toni, Aldo

    2003-03-01

    The present study is aimed to assess the repeatability of orthopaedic surgeons in planning total hip replacement surgery, and the Planned-vs.-Achieved accuracy obtainable with a conventional unassisted surgical procedure. A CT-based surgical planning system called Hip-Op was used for pre-operative planning the pose of the cementless components. The study group included only patients affected by severe deformities of the hip joint. In the repeatability study three surgeons were asked to repetitively plan the same three cases in a blind way. There was agreement among surgeons and also consistency for each surgeon in planning the implant position, while the most expert surgeon was more repeatable in planning the implant orientation. For all patients of the study group, the Planned-vs.-Achieved accuracy was computed as the difference between the spatial position of both prosthetic components derived from the post-operative CT scans and that achieved by the surgeon in the pre-operative planning. The average differences for the stem were lower than 5 mm for the position, and lower than 5 degrees for the orientation. For the socket the average differences increased to 8 mm and 10 degrees. The study shows the need for a more informative planning environment and for intra-operative supports, especially when deformed anatomies are involved.

  10. The effect of stem fit on bone hypertrophy and pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1989-10-01

    This study was designed to clinically evaluate the effects of a tight distal fit and collar seating in hips with a cylindrical distal stem, collar, and proximal porous coating. A clinical assessment of pain and a roentgenographic assessment of patterns of proximal femoral hypertrophy were made in 105 patients. Intraoperative evaluations of the distal stem fit were performed so that a tight distal fit was ensured in 67 patients. Thirty-eight patients who did not have intraoperative sizing were determined roentgenographically to have a loose distal fit. Pain was significantly more likely to occur in those patients with a loose distal fit (20 of 38) than in those with a tight distal fit (two of 67). Collar seating was associated with hypertrophy under the seated portion of the collar in all cases, and failure to seat the collar was associated with recession and rounding of the upper femoral cortical edge. Distal hypertrophy occurred in 24 of the 67 hips with a tight distal fit, and a tight distal fit did not prevent proximal hypertrophy. It was concluded that a tight distal fit is associated with more complete pain relief in cementless total hip arthroplasty and that a tight distal fit of a cylindrical stem does not prevent proximal load bearing. PMID:2791383

  11. 6. NORTH END OF MACHINE SHOP. FORGE SHOP (HAER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. NORTH END OF MACHINE SHOP. FORGE SHOP (HAER No. CA-326-K) ON LEFT, FORD PLANT IN DISTANCE, NE BY 60. - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Machine Shop, 1311 Canal Boulevard, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  12. DETAIL VIEW OF BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK AREA ON WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK AREA ON WEST SIDE OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, LOOKING EAST. FORGE IS IN FOREGROUND, WITH THE ANVIL BLOCK JUST TO THE RIGHT AND BEHIND IT. A TRAM CAR IS UPSIDE DOWN TO THE LEFT OF THE FORGE. THE PIPE GOING INTO THE FORGE ON THE RIGHT CARRIED COMPRESSED AIR TO BLOW THE COALS. AT CENTER RIGHT ON THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE THE OPENING AND CLOSING MECHANISMS FOR THE ORE BUCKETS. AT CENTER LEFT IS A BRAKE WHEEL. THE ANCHOR POINTS FOR THE STATIONARY TRAM CABLES ARE JUST BELOW THIS WHEEL. THE FRONT END OF THE TERMINAL IS JUST OFF FRAME ON THE RIGHT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View facing east of top of quarry wall with forge site in foreground - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 4, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  14. Osseointegration into a Novel Titanium Foam Implant in the Distal Femur of a Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Bettina M.; Yang, Xu; Kelly, Natalie H.; Merkow, Justin; Gagne, Shawn; Ware, Robin; Wright, Timothy M.; Bostrom, Mathias P.G.

    2010-01-01

    A novel porous titanium foam implant has recently been developed to enhance biological fixation of orthopaedic implants to bone. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical and histological characteristics of bone apposition into two different pore sizes of this titanium foam (565 and 464 micron mean void intercept length) and to compare these characteristics to those obtained with a fully porous conventionally sintered titanium bead implant. Cylindrical implants were studied in a rabbit distal femoral intramedullary osseointegration model at time zero and at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. The amount of bone ingrowth, amount of periprosthetic bone, and mineral apposition rate of periprosthetic bone measured did not differ among the three implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. By 12 weeks, the interface stiffness and maximum load of the beaded implant was significantly greater than either foam implant. No significant difference was found in the interface stiffness or maximum load between the two foam implant designs at 3, 6, or 12 weeks. The lower compressive modulus of the foam compared to the more dense sintered beaded implants likely contributed to the difference in failure mode. However, the foam implants have a similar compressive modulus to other clinically successful coatings, suggesting they are nonetheless clinically adequate. Additional studies are required to confirm this in weight-bearing models. Histological data suggest that these novel titanium foam implants are a promising alternative to current porous coatings and should be further investigated for clinical application in cementless joint replacement. PMID:20024964

  15. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem

    PubMed Central

    Oba, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Ike, H.; Tezuka, T.; Saito, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the cementless, tapered-wedge stem design contributes to achieving initial stability and providing optimal load transfer in the proximal femur. However, loading conditions on the femur following THA are also influenced by femoral structure. Therefore, we determined the effects of tapered-wedge stems on the load distribution of the femur using subject-specific finite element models of femurs with various canal shapes. Patients and Methods We studied 20 femurs, including seven champagne flute-type femurs, five stovepipe-type femurs, and eight intermediate-type femurs, in patients who had undergone cementless THA using the Accolade TMZF stem at our institution. Subject–specific finite element (FE) models of pre- and post-operative femurs with stems were constructed and used to perform FE analyses (FEAs) to simulate single-leg stance. FEA predictions were compared with changes in bone mineral density (BMD) measured for each patient during the first post-operative year. Results Stovepipe models implanted with large-size stems had significantly lower equivalent stress on the proximal-medial area of the femur compared with champagne-flute and intermediate models, with a significant loss of BMD in the corresponding area at one year post-operatively. Conclusions The stovepipe femurs required a large-size stem to obtain an optimal fit of the stem. The FEA result and post-operative BMD change of the femur suggest that the combination of a large-size Accolade TMZF stem and stovepipe femur may be associated with proximal stress shielding. Cite this article: M. Oba, Y. Inaba, N. Kobayashi, H. Ike, T. Tezuka, T. Saito. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:362–369. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000525. PMID:27601435

  16. A Multicenter Approach Evaluating the Impact of Vitamin E-Blended Polyethylene in Cementless Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Marcus; van Wasen, Andrea; Warwas, Sebastian; Landgraeber, Stefan; Haversath, Marcel; Group, VITAS

    2014-01-01

    Since polyethylene is one of the most frequently used biomaterials as a liner in total hip arthroplasty, strong efforts have been made to improve design and material properties over the last 50 years. Antioxidants seems to be a promising alternative to further increase durability and reduce polyethylene wear in long term. As of yet, only in vitro results are available. While they are promising, there is yet no clinical evidence that the new material shows these advantages in vivo. To answer the question if vitamin-E enhanced ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is able to improve long-term survivorship of cementless total hip arthroplasty we initiated a randomized long-term multicenter trial. Designed as a superiority study, the oxidation index assessed in retrieval analyses of explanted liners was chosen as primary parameter. Radiographic results (wear rate, osteolysis, radiolucency) and functional outcome (Harris Hip Scores, University of California-Los Angeles, Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Visual Analogue Scale) will serve as secondary parameters. Patients with the indication for a cementless total hip arthroplasty will be asked to participate in the study and will be randomized to either receive a standard hip replacement with a highly cross-linked UHMWPE-X liner or a highly cross-linked vitamin-E supplemented UHMWPE-XE liner. The follow-up will be 15 years, with evaluation after 5, 10 and 15 years. The controlled randomized study has been designed to determine if Vitamin-E supplemented highly cross-linked polyethylene liners are superior to standard XLPE liners in cementless total hip arthroplasty. While several studies have been started to evaluate the influence of vitamin-E, most of them evaluate wear rates and functional results. The approach used for this multicenter study, to analyze the oxidation status of retrieved implants, should make it possible to directly evaluate the ageing process and development of the implant

  17. Snake River Plain FORGE Site Characterization Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    2016-04-18

    The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models, gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro.

  18. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE Magnetotelluric Inversion

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-05-16

    The Coso Magnetotelluric (MT) dataset of which the West Flank FORGE MT data is a subset, was collected by Schlumberger / WesternGeco and initially processed by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy. The 2011 data was based on 99 soundings that were centered on the West Flank geothermal prospect. The new soundings along with previous data from 2003 and 2006 were incorporated into a 3D inversion. Full impedance tensor data were inverted in the 1-3000 Hz range. The modelling report notes several noise sources, specifically the DC powerline that is 20,000 feet west of the survey area, and may have affected data in the 0.02 to 10 Hz range. Model cell dimensions of 450 x 450 x 65 feet were used to avoid computational instability in the 3D model. The fit between calculated and observed MT values for the final model run had an RMS value of 1.807. The included figure from the WesternGeco report shows the sounding locations from the 2011, 2006 and 2003 surveys.

  19. Mathematical optimization of elastic properties: application to cementless hip stem design.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, J H; Huiskes, R

    1997-05-01

    The designer of a cementless hip stem in total hip replacement must find a balance between two conflicting demands. On the one hand, a stiff stem shields the surrounding bone from mechanical loading (stress shielding), which may lead to bone loss, particularly around the proximal part of the stem. Reducing the stem stiffness decreases the amount of stress shielding and hence the amount of bone loss. However, this measure inevitably promotes higher proximal interface stresses and thereby increases the risk of proximal interface failure. The designer's task therefore is to optimize the stem stiffness in order to find the best compromise in the conflict. Yet, a better compromise might be found when the stem material was nonhomogeneous, in other words when an arbitrary distribution of the elastic properties inside the stem was allowed. The number of conceivable designs would increase enormously, making the designer's task almost impossible. In the present paper, we develop a numerical design optimization method to determine the optimal stiffness characteristics for a hip stem. A finite element program is coupled with a numerical optimization method, thus producing a design optimization scheme. The scheme minimizes the probability for interface failure while limiting the amount of bone loss, by adapting the parameters describing the nonhomogeneous elastic modulus distribution. As an example, a simplified model of a hip stem is made, whose modulus distribution is optimized. Assuming equal long-term bone loss, the maximum interface stress can be reduced by over 50 percent when compared to a homogeneous flexible stem, thus demonstrating the value of the new approach. PMID:9168392

  20. Development of high purity large forgings for nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Sato, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    The recent increase in the size of energy plants has been supported by the development of manufacturing technology for high purity large forgings for the key components of the plant. To assure the reliability and performance of the large forgings, refining technology to make high purity steels, casting technology for gigantic ingots, forging technology to homogenize the material and consolidate porosity are essential, together with the required heat treatment and machining technologies. To meet these needs, the double degassing method to reduce impurities, multi-pouring methods to cast the gigantic ingots, vacuum carbon deoxidization, the warm forging process and related technologies have been developed and further improved. Furthermore, melting facilities including vacuum induction melting and electro slag re-melting furnaces have been installed. By using these technologies and equipment, large forgings have been manufactured and shipped to customers. These technologies have also been applied to the manufacture of austenitic steel vessel components of the fast breeder reactors and components for fusion experiments.

  1. Have cementless and resurfacing components improved the medium-term results of hip replacement for patients under 60 years of age?

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James; Baker, Paul; Gregg, Paul J; Porter, Martyn; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal hip replacement for young patients remains unknown. We compared patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), revision risk, and implant costs over a range of hip replacements. Methods We included hip replacements for osteoarthritis in patients under 60 years of age performed between 2003 and 2010 using the commonest brand of cemented, cementless, hybrid, or resurfacing prosthesis (11,622 women and 13,087 men). The reference implant comprised a cemented stem with a conventional polyethylene cemented cup and a standard-sized head (28- or 32-mm). Differences in implant survival were assessed using competing-risks models, adjusted for known prognostic influences. Analysis of covariance was used to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score (OHS) and EQ5D index) in 2014 linked procedures. Results In males, PROMs and implant survival were similar across all types of implants. In females, revision was statistically significantly higher in hard-bearing and/or small-stem cementless implants (hazard ratio (HR) = 4) and resurfacings (small head sizes (< 48 mm): HR = 6; large head sizes (≥ 48 mm): HR = 5) when compared to the reference cemented implant. In component combinations with equivalent survival, women reported significantly greater improvements in OHS with hybrid implants (22, p = 0.006) and cementless implants (21, p = 0.03) (reference, 18), but similar EQ5D index. For men and women, National Health Service (NHS) costs were lowest with the reference implant and highest with a hard-bearing cementless replacement. Interpretation In young women, hybrids offer a balance of good early functional improvement and low revision risk. Fully cementless and resurfacing components are more costly and do not provide any additional benefit for younger patients. PMID:25285617

  2. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, D. S.; Engelbrecht, A. D.; Hadley, T. D.

    2005-10-01

    The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about 9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about 1.7/kg. Electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide is therefore believed to have significant potential to reduce the cost of titanium products. The process is hampered by the high operating temperatures and sophisticated materials of construction required; the high affinity of titanium for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen; and physical and chemical properties of the different titanium oxide species when reducing titanium from Ti4+ to metallic titanium.

  3. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  4. West Flank Coso FORGE Magnetotelluric 3D Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-01-01

    This is the 3D version of the MT data for the West Flank FORGE area.The Coso geothermal field has had three Magnetotelluric (MT) datasets collected including surveys in 2003, 2006, and 2011. The final collection, in 2011, expanded the survey to the west and covers the West Flank of FORGE area.This most recent data set was collected by Schlumberger/WesternGeco and inverted by the WesternGeco GeoSolutions Integrated EM Center of Excellence in Milan, Italy; the 2003 and 2006 data were integrated for these inversions in the present study.

  5. Modelling of the radial forging process of a hollow billet with the mandrel on the lever radial forging machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamyshev, A. P.; Nekrasov, I. I.; Pugin, A. I.; Fedulov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The finite-element method (FEM) has been used in scientific research of forming technological process modelling. Among the others, the process of the multistage radial forging of hollow billets has been modelled. The model includes both the thermal problem, concerning preliminary heating of the billet taking into account thermal expansion, and the deformation problem, when the billet is forged in a special machine. The latter part of the model describes such features of the process as die calibration, die movement, initial die temperature, friction conditions, etc. The results obtained can be used to define the necessary process parameters and die calibration.

  6. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  7. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  8. Cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wong, C; Xiong, J; Hodgson, P; Wen, C

    2010-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that titanium and the titanium alloying elements of tantalum, niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, and silicon are biocompatible. However, our research in the development of new titanium alloys for biomedical applications indicated that some titanium alloys containing molybdenum, niobium, and silicon produced by powder metallurgy show a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity is linked to the ion release from the metals. To prove this hypothesis, we assessed the cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements in both forms of powder and bulk, using osteoblast-like SaOS(2) cells. Results indicated that the metal powders of titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and silicon are cytotoxic, and the bulk metals of silicon and molybdenum also showed cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, we established that the safe ion concentrations (below which the ion concentration is non-toxic) are 8.5, 15.5, 172.0, and 37,000.0 microg/L for molybdenum, titanium, niobium, and silicon, respectively.

  9. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  10. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  11. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... machined bodies. 447.22 Section 447.22 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR The U.S. Munitions Import List § 447.22 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  12. 27 CFR 447.22 - Forgings, castings, and machined bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... machined bodies. 447.22 Section 447.22 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR The U.S. Munitions Import List § 447.22 Forgings, castings, and machined bodies. Articles..., castings, extrusions, and machined bodies) which have reached a stage in manufacture where they are...

  13. Forging an Identity over the Life-Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiteri, Damian

    2009-01-01

    Using a social constructionist approach, this study explores the self-perceptions of young men who, when at school, were classed as boys with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD). The aim is to understand how these perceptions were forged throughout the young men's life-courses resulting in changing self-identities. The study also…

  14. Family Health and Financial Literacy--Forging the Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Bonnie; Kim, Jinhee; Anderson, Elaine A.

    2009-01-01

    Families are at-risk of or experiencing a diminished quality of living and life in current economic times and difficult decisions are required. Health and financial literacy are the basis for wise personal and public decision making. Family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals can forge connections between health and financial literacy to…

  15. Electronic Portfolios in Teacher Education: Forging a Middle Ground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strudler, Neal; Wetzel, Keith

    2012-01-01

    At a time when implementation of electronic portfolios (EPs) is expanding, the issues of clarifying their purposes continue to plague teacher education programs. Are student-centered uses of EPs compatible with program assessment and accreditation efforts? Is this an either/or situation, or can a productive middle ground be forged? This article…

  16. 16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Forge building and fuel storage shed from the southwest, c.1918 Photocopied from a photograph in the collection of William F. Applegate, 43 Grandview Avenue, Wallingford, Connecticut. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. Forging Consensus for Implementing Youth Socialization Policy in Northwest China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine how the provincial education media in China play a role of forging consensus among local actors responsible for the implementation of new centrally-promulgated youth socialization policy. In doing so, it also explores the tension among three of the Chinese state's claims to legitimacy: economic development,…

  18. Industrial forging applications of shaping simulation using modeling clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravassard, P.; Bournicon, C.

    1982-09-01

    The use of Plasticine and similar modeling materials to simulate forgings is advocated. It permits low cost studies of complex processes for manufacturing or training purposes without interfering with work schedules of real machines. Criteria for choosing a clay, construction of dies, equipment, and laboratory procedures are described.

  19. The Valley Forge Encampment: Epic on the Schuylkill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, John B. B., Jr.

    Valley Forge, outside Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), has long been recognized as the site of a great victory of the human spirit. Eleven thousand men including Blacks and Indians resided there during the winter of 1777-78 and triumphed over cold, starvation, nakedness, disease, and uncertainty. The encampment site was unprepared for the tattered,…

  20. Cementless total hip arthroplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip with end stage osteoarthritis: 2-7 years' clinical results.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Tugrul; Guclu, Berk; Karaguven, Dogac; Kaya, Alper; Akan, Burak; Cetin, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Between 2006 and 2011, 102 hips of 78 patients with end-stage osteoarthritis secondary to developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). According to the Crowe's classification, 22 hips (21%) were type 1, 19 hips (18%) were type 2, 22 hips (21%) were type 3 and 39 hips (38%) were type 4 respectively. Functional and clinical analyses were performed by Harris Hip Scores (HHS). There were 73 (71%) excellent or good results according to HHS. The postoperative HHS was significantly lower in patients who underwent femoral shortening (p<0.01). We observed 25 (24.5%) complications in total, 15 (14.7%) of which required revision surgery. The authors concluded that THA for DDH is a safe and a reliable procedure with good clinical outcomes. PMID:25907395

  1. Transverse Subtrochanteric Shortening Osteotomy During Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV Developmental Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sofu, Hakan; Kockara, Nizamettin; Gursu, Sarper; Issin, Ahmet; Oner, Ali; Sahin, Vedat

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy during cementless total hip arthroplasty in Crowe Type-III or IV developmental dysplasia. Seventy-three osteotomies were included in our study. Mean follow-up was 61 months. Harris hip score, leg length discrepancy, neurological status, union status of the osteotomy, and femoral component stability were the criteria for evaluation. All complications were noted. The mean Harris hip score improved from 38.6 points to 83.7 points. The mean leg length discrepancy decreased from 56.5 mm to 10.7 at the latest follow-up. The mean union time was 5.2 months. We observed 4 non-unions. Transverse subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy is an effective and reliable method in restoration of a more normal limb. PMID:25707993

  2. Parameter Optimization During Forging Process of a Novel High-Speed-Steel Cold Work Roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Ligang; Sun, Yanliang; Li, Qiang; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The forging of high-speed-steel (HSS) roll has always been a technical problem in manufacturing industry. In this study, the forging process of a novel HSS cold work roll was simulated by deform-3D on the basis of rigid-viscoplastic finite element model. The effect of heating temperature and forging speed on temperature and stress fields during forging process was simulated too. The results show that during forging process, the temperature of the contact region with anvils increases. The stress of the forging region increases and distributes un-uniformly, while that of the non-forging region is almost zero. With increasing forging time, Z load on anvil increases gradually. With increasing heating temperature or decreasing forging speed, the temperature of the whole billet increases, while the stress and Z load on anvil decrease. In order to ensure the high efficiency and safety of the forging process, the heating temperature and the forging speed are chosen as 1160 °C and 16.667 mm/s, respectively.

  3. Titanium Process Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Gerdemann

    2001-07-01

    Titanium has a unique set of properties: low density, high specific strength, high temperature strength, and exceptional resistance to corrosion. Titanium is the fourth most common structural metal in the earth's crust. Only iron, aluminum, and magnesium are more abundant. More titanium is available than nickel, copper, chromium, lead, tin, and zinc put together. However, the current titanium production system is extremely labor and capital intensive. Titanium is expensive only because the current process for refining the ore to metal is a multi-step, high temperature batch process. This article will first describe current titanium technology, and will then discuss four of the most promising approaches to reduce the cost of titanium. These include the Kroll, Hunter, Cambridge, and Armstrong processes.

  4. A comparison of the sintering of various titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press- and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics; with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  5. Cementless total hip replacement without femoral osteotomy in patients with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip: minimum 15-year clinical and radiological results.

    PubMed

    Imbuldeniya, A M; Walter, W L; Zicat, B A; Walter, W K

    2014-11-01

    We describe the clinical and radiological results of cementless primary total hip replacement (THR) in 25 patients (18 women and seven men; 30 THRs) with severe developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Their mean age at surgery was 47 years (23 to 89). In all, 21 hips had Crowe type III dysplasia and nine had Crowe type IV. Cementless acetabular components with standard polyethylene liners were introduced as close to the level of the true acetabulum as possible. The modular cementless S-ROM femoral component was used with a low resection of the femoral neck. A total of 21 patients (25 THRs) were available for review at a mean follow-up of 18.7 years (15.8 to 21.8). The mean modified Harris hip score improved from 46 points pre-operatively to 90 at final follow up (p < 0.001). A total of 15 patients (17 THRs; 57%) underwent revision of the acetabular component at a mean of 14.6 years (7 to 20.8), all for osteolysis. Two patients (two THRs) had symptomatic loosening. No patient underwent femoral revision. Survival with revision of either component for any indication was 81% at 15 years (95% CI 60.1 to 92.3), with 21 patients at risk. This technique may reduce the need for femoral osteotomy in severe DDH, while providing a good long-term functional result. PMID:25371455

  6. Sustained load crack growth design data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Kenny, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Sustained load crack growth data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy in hydrazine per MIL-P-26536 and refined hydrazine are presented. Fracture mechanics data on crack growth thresholds for heat-treated forgings, aged and unaged welds, and aged and unaged heat-affected zones are reported. Fracture mechanics design curves of crack growth threshold stress intensity versus temperature are generated from 40 to 71 C.

  7. First Results of Energy Saving at Process Redesign of Die Forging Al-Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pepelnjak, Tomaz; Kuzman, Karl; Kokol, Anton

    2011-05-04

    The contribution deals with eco-friendly solutions for shortened production chains of forging light alloys. During the die forging operations a remarkable amount of material goes into the flash and later on into chips during finish machining. These low value side products are rich with embedded energy therefore recycling or reprocessing could be very energy saving procedure.In cooperation with a die forging company a shortened reprocessing cycle has been studied starting from re-melting the forging flash and without additional heating to cast preforms for subsequent die forging. As such preforms have not as good formability characteristics as those done from extruded billets the isothermal forging process has been adopted. First results showed that without cracks and other defects the formability is sufficient for a broad spectrum of forgings.To improve the formability a homogenization process of cast preforms has been implemented. As the process started immediately after casting, amount of additional energy for heating was minimized. To reduce voids forging process was redesigned in a way to assure greater hydrostatic pressures in parts during forging. First results were promising therefore research is going towards improving processes without adding significantly more energy as it is needed for casting with homogenization and die forging.

  8. Performance Assessment Method for a Forged Fingerprint Detection Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong Nyuo; Jun, In-Kyung; Kim, Hyun; Shin, Woochang

    The threat of invasion of privacy and of the illegal appropriation of information both increase with the expansion of the biometrics service environment to open systems. However, while certificates or smart cards can easily be cancelled and reissued if found to be missing, there is no way to recover the unique biometric information of an individual following a security breach. With the recognition that this threat factor may disrupt the large-scale civil service operations approaching implementation, such as electronic ID cards and e-Government systems, many agencies and vendors around the world continue to develop forged fingerprint detection technology, but no objective performance assessment method has, to date, been reported. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a methodology designed to evaluate the objective performance of the forged fingerprint detection technology that is currently attracting a great deal of attention.

  9. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point loaded beryllium bend specimens cut from hot pressed block and a forged disk. These specimens had plane proportions conforming to ASTM E 399 and covered a thickness range of from 1/32 to 1/2 in. Two sets of bend specimens were tested, one having fatigue cracks and the other 0.5 mil radius notches. One objective of the investigation was the development of techniques to produce fatigue cracks in accordance with the procedures specified in ASTM E 399. This objective was achieved for the hot pressed material. In plane cracks were not consistently produced in the specimens cut from forged stock.

  10. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE ArcGIS data 2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    archive of ArcGIS data from the West Flank FORGE site located in Coso, California. Archive contains: 8 shapefiles polygon of the 3D geologic model polylines of the traces 3D modeled faults polylines of the fault traces from Duffield and Bacon, 1980 polygon of the West Flank FORGE site polylines of the traces of the geologic cross-sections (cross-sections in a separate archive in the GDR) polylines of the traces of the seismic reflection profiles through and adjacent to the West Flank site (seismic reflection profiles in a separate archive in the GDR) points of the well collars in and around the West Flank site polylines of the surface expression of the West Flank well paths

  11. Process modelings and simulations of heavy castings and forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dianzhong; Sun, Mingyue; Wang, Pei; Kang, Xiuhong; Fu, Paixian; Li, Yiyi

    2013-05-01

    The Materials Process Modeling Division, IMR, CAS has been promoting for more than 10 years research activities on modeling and experimental studies on heavy castings and forgings. In this report, we highlight some selected achievements and impacts in this area: To satisfy domestic strategic requirements, such as nuclear and hydraulic power, marine projects and high speed rail, we have developed a number of casting and forging technologies, which combine advanced computing simulations, X-ray real time observation techniques and industrial-scaled trial experiments. These technologies have been successfully applied in various industrial areas and yielded a series of scientific and technological breakthroughs and innovation. Important examples of this strategic research include the hot-processing technologies of the Three Gorge water turbine runner, marine crankshaft manufacturers, backup rolls for hot rolling mills and the production of hundreds-ton steel ingot.

  12. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  13. Direct visualization and quantification of bone growth into porous titanium implants using micro computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Baril, E; Lefebvre, L P; Hacking, S A

    2011-05-01

    The utility of porous metals for the integration of orthopaedic implants with host bone has been well established. Quantification of the tissue response to cementless implants is laborious and time consuming process requiring tissue processing, embedding, sectioning, polishing, imaging and image analysis. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) is a promising three dimensional (3D) imaging technique to quantify the tissue response to porous metals. However, the suitability and effectiveness of μCT for the quantification of bone ingrowth remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare bone growth within porous titanium implants using both μCT and traditional hard-tissue histology techniques. Cylindrical implants were implanted in the distal femora and proximal tibiae of a rabbit. After 6 weeks, bone ingrowth was quantified and compared by μCT, light microscopy and backscattered electron microscopy. Quantification of bone volume and implant porosity as determined by μCT compared well with data obtained by traditional histology techniques. Analysis of the 3D dataset showed that bone was present in the pores connected with openings larger 9.4 μm. For pore openings greater than 28.2 μm, the size of the interconnection had little impact on the bone density within the porosity for the titanium foams. PMID:21512898

  14. Influence of Processing Parameters on Grain Size Evolution of a Forged Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, L. A.; Páramo, P.; Salas Zamarripa, A.; de la Garza, M.; Guerrero-Mata, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure evolution of nickel-based superalloys has a great influence on the mechanical behavior during service conditions. Microstructure modification and the effect of process variables such as forging temperature, die-speed, and tool heating were evaluated after hot die forging of a heat-resistant nickel-based alloy. Forging sequences in a temperature range from 1253 to 1323 K were considered through experimental trials. An Avrami model was applied using finite element data to evaluate the average grain size and recrystallization at different evolution zones. It was observed that sequential forging at final temperatures below 1273 K provided greater grain refinement through time-dependent recrystallization phenomena. This investigation was aim to explore the influence of forging parameters on grain size evolution in order to design a fully homogenous and refined microstructure after hot die forging.

  15. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  16. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-07-15

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure of Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr die forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Donald; Kirkbride, Richard

    1986-11-01

    Four forgings of Al 8090 alloy were evaluated for strength, toughness, and stress corrosion resistance. A microstructural evaluation was also conducted. The forgings easily met the strength requirements for Al 7075-T73 but only just met the 7 pct minimum elongation requirement. The stress corrosion threshold was less than 35 MPa in the short transverse orientation, a value that is far below the 310 MPa minimum often required for Al 7075-T73. Fracture in areas which received low forging reductions was intergranular, while fracture in more heavily forged areas was also along subgrain boundaries. Possible mechanisms for the low toughness and stress corrosion resistance of Al-Li alloys are discussed.

  18. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  19. Sprayable titanium composition

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, Chester E.; Kern, Werner; Vibronek, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to an organometallic titanium compound dissolved in a diluent and optionally containing a lower aliphatic alcohol spreading modifier, produces a solution that can be sprayed onto a substrate and cured to form an antireflection titanium oxide coating having a refractive index of from about 2.0 to 2.2.

  20. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty. PMID:23218622

  1. Prospective five-year subsidence analysis of a cementless fully hydroxyapatite-coated femoral hip arthroplasty component.

    PubMed

    Clauss, Martin; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; Goossens, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Early subsidence >1.5 mm is considered to be a predictive factor for later aseptic loosening of the femoral component following total hip arthroplasty (THA). The aim of this study was to assess five-year subsidence rates of the cementless hydroxyapatite-coated twinSys stem (Mathys Ltd., Bettlach, Switzerland).This prospective single-surgeon series examined consecutive patients receiving a twinSys stem at Maria Middelares Hospital, Belgium. Patients aged >85 years or unable to come to follow-up were excluded. Subsidence was assessed using Ein Bild Roentgen Analyse--Femoral Component Analysis (EBRA-FCA). Additional clinical and radiographic assessments were performed. Follow-ups were prospectively scheduled at two, five, 12, 24, and 60 months.In total, 218 THA (211 patients) were included. At five years, mean subsidence was 0.66 mm (95% CI: 0.43-0.90). Of the 211 patients, 95.2% had an excellent or good Harris Hip Score. There were few radiological changes. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated five-year stem survival to be 98.4% (95% CI: 97.6-100%).Subsidence levels of the twinSys femoral stem throughout the five years of follow-up were substantially lower than the 1.5 mm level predictive of aseptic loosening. This was reflected in the high five-year survival rate.

  2. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Contact Pattern between the Cortical Bone and Femoral Prosthesis after Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hajime; Sugaya, Hisashi; Nishino, Tomofumi; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The cementless stem Excia (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) implant has a rectangular cross-sectional shape with back-and-forth flanges and a plasma-sprayed, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating from the middle to proximal portion to increase initial fixation and early bone formation. Here, the conformity of the Excia stem to the femoral canal morphology was three-dimensionally assessed using computed tomography. Forty-three patients (45 hips) were examined after primary total hip arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 27 ± 3 months (range: 24–36 months). Spot welds occurred at zone 2 in 16 hips and at zone 6 in 24 hips, with 83% (20/24 hips) of those occurring within 3 months after surgery. First- (n = 12 hips), second- (n = 32), and third- (n = 1) degree stress shielding were observed. The stem was typically in contact with the cortical bone in the anterolateral mid-portion (100%) and posteromedial distal portions (85%). Stress shielding did not progress, even in cases where the stems were in contact with the distal portions. The anterior flange was in contact with the bone in all cases. The stability of the mid-lateral portion with the dicalcium phosphate dihydrate coating and the anterior flange may have inhibited the progression of stress shielding beyond the second degree. PMID:26881087

  3. Correlative analysis of MRI-evident abductor hip muscle degeneration and power after minimally invasive versus conventional unilateral cementless THA.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Ekaterini; Vitsas, Vasilis; Fennema, Peter; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Siamblis, Dimitrios K

    2012-12-01

    The 2 main null hypotheses of this study were: (1) the 4-year surgical trauma-related degeneration within the hip abductor muscles after a minimally invasive approach to total hip arthroplasty would be similar to that following a conventional approach; and (2) no differences in perioperative blood loss or postoperative hip pain would be observed between the minimally invasive and conventional approaches.In 40 consecutive randomly selected adult patients with unilateral primary hip osteoarthritis, a cementless Zweymüller-Plus THA (Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics, Baar, Switzerland) was implanted by a single surgeon in 1 institution during the same period. Twenty patients underwent a minimally invasive approach (group A), and 20 patients underwent a conventional anterolateral approach (group B). Four years postoperatively, the operated and contralateral nonoperated hips of 37 available patients from both groups were examined with magnetic resonance imaging to show any changes in the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae. Simultaneously, hip abductor power was measured bilaterally in both groups. Anthropometric data, blood loss, Short Form 36 self-assessment questionnaire, visual analog pain score, and walking distance were also analyzed.The reliability of magnetic resonance imaging and hip abductor power measurements was high. No difference was found in hip abductor power on the operated side between the 2 groups, whereas hip abductor power on the nonoperated side was significantly higher in both groups. This study revealed no mechanical and functional benefits in favor of patients undergoing minimally invasive vs conventional total hip arthroplasty.

  4. The effect of patient age, gender, and tibial component fixation on pain relief after cementless total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A

    1991-10-01

    Cementless total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) were prospectively evaluated for pain relief in 1110 knees. The effect of screws in the tibial component, the age of the patients, and the gender of the patients were studied to determine the effect of these parameters on pain relief one and two years postsurgery. The group with screws in the tibial component (Ortholoc II) had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees at one year than at two years postsurgery, and the older patients had a significantly higher rate of pain-free knees at one- and two years postsurgery than the younger patients. Older female patients with Ortholoc I TKAs had a significantly higher percentage of pain-free knees than did older male patients at one-year postsurgery, but not at two years. The group with screws in the tibial components (Ortholoc II) had a higher percentage of pain-free knees at one-year postsurgery than did the Ortholoc I knees, but there was no difference between Ortholoc I and II at two-years postsurgery. In the Ortholoc II group, there was also no difference in results among sexes or between patients older and younger than 65 years old. The correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the relationship between body weight and the degree of pain after TKA. No significant correlation could be found at one and two years after surgery. PMID:1914298

  5. Friction and wear in hot forging of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Daouben, E.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Deltombe, R.; Dubois, A.; Truong-Dinh, N.; Lazzarotto, L.

    2007-04-07

    In the field of hot forging of steels, the mastering of wear phenomena enables to save cost production, especially concerning tools. Surfaces of tools are protected thanks to graphite. The existing lubrication processes are not very well known: amount and quality of lubricant, lubrication techniques have to be strongly optimized to delay wear phenomena occurrence. This optimization is linked with hot forging processes, the lubricant layers must be tested according to representative friction conditions. This paper presents the first part of a global study focused on wear phenomena encountered in hot forging of steels. The goal is the identification of reliable parameters, in order to bring knowledge and models of wear. A prototype testing stand developed in the authors' laboratory is involved in this experimental analysis. This test is called Warm and Hot Upsetting Sliding Test (WHUST). The stand is composed of a heating induction system and a servo-hydraulic system. Workpieces taken from production can be heated until 1200 deg. C. A nitrided contactor representing the tool is heated at 200 deg. C. The contactor is then coated with graphite and rubs against the workpiece, leaving a residual track on it. Friction coefficient and surface parameters on the contactor and the workpiece are the most representative test results. The surface parameters are mainly the sliding length before defects occurrence, and the amplitude of surface profile of the contactor. The developed methodology will be first presented followed by the different parts of the experimental prototype. The results of experiment show clearly different levels of performance according to different lubricants.

  6. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  7. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE 3D geologic model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    This is an x,y,z file of the West Flank FORGE 3D geologic model. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  8. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for USGS-142

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney

    2015-11-23

    Well data for the USGS-142 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, and photos of rhyolite core samples. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  9. Comparison of the risk of revision in cementless total hip arthroplasty with ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-polyethylene bearings

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, Claus; Pedersen, Alma B; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Overgaard, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearings were introduced in total hip arthroplasty (THA) to reduce problems related to polyethylene wear. We compared the 9-year revision risk for cementless CoC THA and for cementless metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Patients and methods In this prospective, population-based study from the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Registry, we identified all the primary cementless THAs that had been performed from 2002 through 2009 (n = 25,656). Of these, 1,773 THAs with CoC bearings and 9,323 THAs with MoP bearings were included in the study. To estimate the relative risk (RR) of revision, we used regression with the pseudo-value approach and treated death as a competing risk. Results 444 revisions were identified: 4.0% for CoC THA (71 of 1,773) and 4.0% for MoP THA (373 of 9,323). No statistically significant difference in the risk of revision for any reason was found for CoC and MoP bearings after 9 years of follow-up (adjusted RR = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.72–2.4). Revision rates due to component failure were 0.5% (n = 8) for CoC bearings and 0.1% (n = 6) for MoP bearings (p < 0.001). 6 patients with CoC bearings (0.34%) underwent revision due to ceramic fracture. Interpretation When compared to the “standard” MoP bearings, CoC THA had a 33% higher (though not statistically significantly higher) risk of revision for any reason at 9 years. PMID:25637339

  10. Prospective randomised clinical trial assessing subsidence and rotation, using radiostereometric analysis, of two modular cementless femoral stems (Global K2 and Apex)

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Mark; Ebert, Jay; Nivbrant, Oscar; Wood, David

    2014-01-01

    Aims To accurately assess subsidence, rotation and clinical scores in two cementless femoral stems. Methods 260 patients received either K2 or Apex femoral stems and were studied over 2y, with RSA and clinical scores. Results Mean Oxford Hip score for both stems was excellent (45.78 and 46.76). Very little subsidence or rotation were noted on RSA in either stem. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical scores, or radiological motion between stems. Revision rate was 0.8% over the study period. Conclusion Excellent clinical and RSA scores over the 2y study period predict good long term outcomes for these stems. PMID:25104894

  11. Forging; Heat Treating and Testing; Technically Oriented Industrial Materials and Process 1: 5898.05.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course provides students with advanced and exploratory experience in the area of plastic deformation of metals and in the changing of the physical characteristics of metals by the controlled application and timed removal of heat. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, safety in forge work, forging tools and equipment, industrial…

  12. 77 FR 14445 - Application for a License To Export Steel Forging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... FR 49139 (Aug. 28, 2007). Information about filing electronically is available on the NRC's public... Spain. December 15, 2011 head steel head steel February 7, 2012 forging. forging will be XR175 machined into the 11005983 finished vessel head at ENSA Equipos Nucleares, S.A. in Spain, for use in...

  13. Microstructure Modeling of a Ni-Fe-Based Superalloy During the Rotary Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyda, A.; Hernández-Muñoz, G. M.; Reyes, L. A.; Zambrano-Robledo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure evolution of Ni-Fe superalloys has a great influence on the mechanical behavior during service conditions. The rotary forging process offers an alternative to conventional bulk forming processes where the parts can be rotary forged with a fraction of the force commonly needed by conventional forging techniques. In this investigation, a numerical modeling of microstructure evolution for design and optimization of the hot forging operations has been used to manufacture a heat-resistant nickel-based superalloy. An Avrami model was implemented into finite element commercial platform DEFORM 3D to evaluate the average grain size and recrystallization during the rotary forging process. The simulations were carried out considering three initial temperatures, 980, 1000, and 1050 °C, to obtain the microstructure behavior after rotary forging. The final average grain size of one case was validated by comparing with results of previous experimental work of disk forging operation. This investigation was aimed to explore the influence of the rotary forging process on microstructure evolution in order to obtain a homogenous and refined grain size in the final component.

  14. Investigations on Forging Dies with Ceramic Inserts by means of Finite-Element-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Schäfer, F.; Bistron, M.

    2007-05-01

    The tools in hot forging processes are exposed to high thermal and mechanical loadings. Tempering of the tool edge layer occurs as a result of thermal loadings. This leads to a gradual hardness loss of the tool material and increase of wear over forging cycles. Hence, the tool life in hot forging is mainly limited by wear. An extension of the die service life can be achieved by the use of ceramic inserts. The integration of ceramics into the die base plate made of hot-work steel is realised by active brazing, whereby it possible to apply ceramic in region with high wear. It has to be ensured in the design process of ceramic inserts for forging dies that no critical tensile stresses occur in the ceramics. A reliable design of the ceramic inserts is possible only through consideration of brazing and forming process. The development of a Finite-Element-model for the design of forging dies with ceramic inserts is the intention of the work presented in this paper. At first the forging process with a conventional die is analyzed concerning abrasive die wear to identify regions with high wear risk applying a modified Archard model. Based on the results of wear calculation, a forging die with ceramic inserts is investigated in terms of joint stresses at the end of the active brazing process. Subsequently, the forging process considering the residual stresses caused by joining is simulated in order to obtain the die stress in use.

  15. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  16. Characterization of a Viking Blade Fabricated by Traditional Forging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Traylor, R.; Austin, J.; Pringle, J.; Bickel, J.; Connick, R.; Connick, W.; Hosemann, P.

    2016-09-01

    A team of students from the University of California, Berkeley, participated in a blade-smithing competition hosted by the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society at the TMS 2015 144th annual meeting and exhibition. Motivated by ancient forging methods, the UC Berkeley team chose to fabricate our blade from historical smithing techniques utilizing naturally-occurring deposits of iron ore. This approach resulted in receiving the "Best Example of a Traditional Blade Process/Ore Smelting Technique" award for our blade named "Berkelium." First, iron-enriched sand was collected from local beaches. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was then extracted from the sand and smelted into individual high- and low-carbon steel ingots. Layers of high- and low-carbon steels were forge-welded together, predominantly by hand, to form a composite material. Optical microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Vickers hardness mechanical testing were conducted at different stages throughout the blade-making process to evaluate the microstructure and hardness evolution during formation. It was found that the pre-heat-treated blade microstructure was composed of ferrite and pearlite, and contained many nonmetallic inclusions. A final heat treatment was performed, which caused the average hardness of the blade edge to increase by more than a factor of two, indicating a martensitic transformation.

  17. Morphometric examination of straight, tapered titanium stems: a retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Böhm, G; Lintner, F; Auterith, A; Lester, D K; Zweymüller, K A

    2001-12-01

    Cementless straight, tapered rectangular cross section titanium stems have been used by the senior author since 1979. Thirty-four stems retrieved postmortem, after between 10 days and 15.2 years in situ, were studied morphometrically and histologically. Nineteen stems were first generation (1979-1986), with an incomplete sagittal taper and a mean surface roughness of 1 microm (Ra 1.23 +/- 0.3 microm); 15 stems were second generation after 1986, with a full biplane taper and a mean surface roughness of 4 microm (Ra 4.14 +/- 0.36 microm). Implant surface bony coverage was determined morphometrically in 10 segments of the stems, and expressed as a bone implant contact index. Histologically, there were no differences between implants with different levels of roughness. Morphometrically, the first-generation stems showed significant differences in coverage (distal > proximal); second-generation stems had a more uniform pattern. Stems retrieved early after arthroplasty had a mean bone implant contact index of 10%. The mean bone implant contact index showed attainment of maximum coverage by 5 years after arthroplasty, without additional apposition or loss thereafter. Patients younger than 65 years at arthroplasty had similar bone implant contact indices to patients 65 years or older; coverage in the six patients 80 years of age at retrieval did not differ from the rates in the other patients. Morphometry was able to provide objective evidence of design change effects. No differences in coverage were found in terms of times in situ, patient age at arthroplasty and at retrieval, and degree of stem surface roughness. PMID:11764342

  18. Research on the Microstructure and Mechanical Property of Ti-7Cu Alloy after Semi-Solid Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongnan; Huo, Yazhou; Zhao, Yongqing; Sun, Zhiping; Bai, Fan

    2016-06-01

    The present work is focused on the development of microstructure of Ti-7Cu alloy as a function of forging temperature and forging ratio in semi-solid state and the influence of resulting microstructure on the mechanical properties. The experimental results showed that the dynamic recrystallization occurred during semi-solid forging and the grain refinement was attained which is considered to be favorable for improving the semi-solid formability. The grain size increased with forging temperature and decreased with forging ratio. Forging temperature has a significant effect on the precipitation behavior in grain boundary regions during the semi-solid processing. More acicular-Ti2Cu tended to precipitate in grain boundary regions with higher forging temperature and finally formed precipitates zones adjacent to grain boundaries after forged at 1,100°C. High ultimate tensile strengths and low elongation have been achieved after semi-solid forging. The strength and hardness decreased with increase of forging temperature, while the ductility increased with increase of forging ratio. The relative contributions of tensile properties were attributed to the varieties of grain size and the distribution of Ti2Cu precipitates obtained by semi-solid forging.

  19. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  20. Cementless total hip arthroplasty with the rectangular titanium Zweymüller stem: a concise follow-up, at a minimum of twenty years, of previous reports.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Alexander; Grübl, Alexander; Schneckener, Charlotte-Dorothé; Chiari, Catharina; Kaider, Alexandra; Lass, Richard; Windhager, Reinhard

    2012-09-19

    In 2002 and 2006, we reported the long-term results of 208 total hip replacements performed with the Zweymüller stem and a threaded cup in 200 patients. The present study gives an update on this patient cohort. At a minimum of twenty years postoperatively, seventy-three patients (seventy-five hips) were available for follow-up; twelve patients were lost to follow-up. The key findings of our previous reports were the absence of aseptic femoral stem loosening and a poor rate of survival of the threaded cup. Since then, two revisions have been performed because of aseptic stem loosening. We observed osteolytic lesions around the proximal part of the femoral component on twenty-four (47%) of fifty-one radiographs, but no stem was deemed at risk for loosening. The probability of survival of the stem at twenty years was 0.96 (95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 0.99), and the probability of survival of the cup at twenty years was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.75). The Zweymüller femoral stem, a tapered, rectangular implant, continues to give excellent long-term results. PMID:22992879

  1. Survival of the Cementless Spotorno® Stem in the Second Decade

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Alexander W.; Breusch, Steffen J.; Ewerbeck, Volker; Parsch, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    High survival rates have been reported for the uncemented CLS® Spotorno® stem up to 10 years. To confirm survival at longer followup we report the minimum 15-year (mean, 17 years; range, 15–20 years) for 257 hips using this stem. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of all 326 patients (354 THAs) operated between 1985 and 1989. The patients had a mean age of 57 years using an uncemented grit-blasted, tapered titanium femoral stem. Eighty-six patients (89 hips) died and eight patients (eight hips) were lost to followup, leaving 240 patients (257 hips) for evaluation. The femoral component was revised in 35 hips: eight for infection, nine for periprosthetic fracture, one for traumatic loosening, and 17 for aseptic loosening. Survival of the stem was 88% at 17 years (95% confidence interval, 84%–92%), and survival with femoral revision for aseptic loosening as an end point was 94% (95% confidence interval, 91%–97%). The median Harris hip score at followup was 80 points. No thigh pain was reported. Small osteolytic lesions (< 1 cm2) were found in the proximal Gruen zones (1 or/and 7) in 28 hips (15%). No distal femoral osteolysis was found. The long-term survival with this type of femoral component remains high in the second decade. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19504161

  2. Titanium Allergy: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Goutam, Manish; Giriyapura, Chandu; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Titanium has gained immense popularity and has successfully established itself as the material of choice for dental implants. In both medical and dental fields, titanium and its alloys have demonstrated success as biomedical devices. Owing to its high resistance to corrosion in a physiological environment and the excellent biocompatibility that gives it a passive, stable oxide film, titanium is considered the material of choice for intraosseous use. There are certain studies which show titanium as an allergen but the resources to diagnose titanium sensivity are very limited. Attention is needed towards the development of new and precise method for early diagnosis of titanium allergy and also to find out the alternative biomaterial which can be used in place of titanium. A review of available articles from the Medline and PubMed database was done to find literature available regarding titanium allergy, its diagnosis and new alternative material for titanium. PMID:25484409

  3. Clinical and radiographic results and wear performance in different generations of a cementless porous-coated acetabular cup

    PubMed Central

    García-Cimbrelo, E.

    2007-01-01

    We compared clinical results and wear performance in two different generations of a cementless porous-coated cup, analysing the long-term results of 83 uncemented Harris-Galante I cups (32-mm femoral head) and 93 uncemented Harris-Galante II cups (28-mm femoral head). All polyethylene liners were gamma irradiated in air. Polyethylene linear wear was estimated using a software package. The minimum follow-up was 10 years. Nine Harris-Galante I cups and two Harris-Galante II cups were revised due to aseptic loosening or polyethylene problems. The mean femoral head penetration at 6 weeks after surgery was 0.15 ± 0.05 mm for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.12 ± 0.03 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p < 0.001);but mean wear was 0.13 ± 0.23 mm per year for the Harris-Galante I cups and 0.11 ± 0.10 for the Harris-Galante II cups (p = 0.740). Most of the metallic shells in both groups showed stable fixation. The so-called second-generation cups had lower initial polyethylene wear that resulted in less polyethylene wear at the latest the follow-up, but the overall wear rate was similar in both groups despite the different femoral head sizes and the improved locking mechanism. PMID:17265157

  4. Fracture Mechanical Measurements with Commercial Stainless Steels at 4 K and with Cp-Titanium at 173 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Mitterbacher, H.

    2010-04-01

    Using the JETT (J-Evaluation on Tensile Test) technique, measurements have been performed with commercial stainless steels in forged and cast condition for the reason of an assessment for low temperature service down to 4 K. These steels frequently used for industrial applications are designated by German Werkstoff (WNr) 1.4308 and 1.4408 cast stainless steels and a forged material with the number 1.4307. The fracture toughness tests at 4 K with forged material 1.4307 comprised apart from the base metal also the weld zone and additionally the 5% and 8% pre-strained conditions of the base metal. Fracture toughness reduced slightly for cold worked condition gradually as well as for the weld joint. The Reliability of the JETT measurements has been also checked using the ASTM E 1820—99a standard. In addition, to these measurements, commercial pure ASTM grade 2 titanium (WNr 3.7035) has been also examined using the same JETT method for the reason of industrial application and the requirement of minimum fracture toughness of 100 MPa√m was fulfilled at 173 K. Furthermore, test results performed at 7 K of pure titanium plate material (ASTM grade 1) with respect to fracture mechanical JETT method are presented.

  5. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  6. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment.

  7. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement.

  8. Carbon/PEEK composite materials as an alternative for stainless steel/titanium hip prosthesis: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshid; Hassani, Kamran; Solhjoei, Nosratollah; Karimi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has been ranked within the most typical surgical processes in the world. The durability of the prosthesis and loosening of prosthesis are the main concerns that mostly reported after THR surgeries. In THR, the femoral prosthesis can be fixed by either cement or cementless methods in the patient's bones. In both procedures, the stability of the prosthesis in the hosted bone has a key asset in its long-term durability and performance. This study aimed to execute a comparative finite element simulation to assess the load transfer between the prosthesis, which is made of carbon/PEEK composite and stainless steel/titanium, and the femur bone. The mechanical behavior of the cortical bone was assumed as a linear transverse isotropic while the spongy bone was modeled like a linear isotropic material. The implants were made of stainless steel (316L) and titanium alloy as they are common materials for implants. The results showed that the carbon/PEEK composites provide a flatter load transfer from the upper body to the leg compared to the stainless steel/titanium prosthesis. Furthermore, the results showed that the von Mises stress, principal stress, and the strain in the carbon/PEEK composites prosthesis were significantly lower than that made of the stainless steel/titanium. The results also imply that the carbon/PEEK composites can be applied to introduce a new optimum design for femoral prosthesis with adjustable stiffness, which can decrease the stress shielding and interface stress. These findings will help clinicians and biomedical experts to increase their knowledge about the hip replacement. PMID:26462678

  9. Design and Analysis of a Forging Die for Manufacturing of Multiple Connecting Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megharaj, C. E.; Nagaraj, P. M.; Jeelan Pasha, K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper demonstrates to utilize the hammer capacity by modifying the die design such that forging hammer can manufacture more than one connecting rod in a given forging cycle time. To modify the die design study is carried out to understand the parameters that are required for forging die design. By considering these parameters, forging die is designed using design modelling tool solid edge. This new design now can produce two connecting rods in same capacity hammer. The new design is required to validate by verifying complete filing of metal in die cavities without any defects in it. To verify this, analysis tool DEFORM 3D is used in this project. Before start of validation process it is require to convert 3D generated models in to. STL file format to import the models into the analysis tool DEFORM 3D. After importing these designs they are analysed for material flow into the cavities and energy required to produce two connecting rods in new forging die design. It is found that the forging die design is proper without any defects and also energy graph shows that the forging energy required to produce two connecting rods is within the limit of that hammer capacity. Implementation of this project increases the production of connecting rods by 200% in less than previous cycle time.

  10. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  11. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for INEL-1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1979-03-01

    Well data for the INEL-1 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes caliper logs, lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, full color logs, fracture analysis, photos, and rock strength parameters for the INEL-1 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  12. Physics and Technological Training in Bulgarian Forge Craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Petya N.; Velcheva, Keranka G.

    2010-01-01

    The contemporary world regenerates and preserves the traditions of decorative—applied art and the national crafts. This brings up young generation and helps them to uncover the sources of national culture. In the commonly educational system the technological training realizes succession of new methods for national and applied art. The aim is examination of the national crafts as technological processes for cultivation of different metal constructions. There are enforced physical laws here. Seven basic groups of forging methods consider in Bulgarian tradition craft as heat treatment, plastic deformation and applying of different tensions. This gives information about morphology of construction after applying of stress, enlarging or decreasing of the linear sizes, structure change and the change of physical and mechanical properties.

  13. Snake River Plain FORGE Well Data for WO-2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Robert Podgorney

    1991-07-29

    Well data for the WO-2 well located in eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. This data collection includes lithology reports, borehole logs, temperature at depth data, neutron density and gamma data, and rock strength parameters for the WO-2 well. This collection of data has been assembled as part of the site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. They were assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  14. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  15. Analysis of the thermo-mechanical deformations in a hot forging tool by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L-Cancelos, R.; Varas, F.; Martín, E.; Viéitez, I.

    2016-03-01

    Although programs have been developed for the design of tools for hot forging, its design is still largely based on the experience of the tool maker. This obliges to build some test matrices and correct their errors to minimize distortions in the forged piece. This phase prior to mass production consumes time and material resources, which makes the final product more expensive. The forging tools are usually constituted by various parts made of different grades of steel, which in turn have different mechanical properties and therefore suffer different degrees of strain. Furthermore, the tools used in the hot forging are exposed to a thermal field that also induces strain or stress based on the degree of confinement of the piece. Therefore, the mechanical behaviour of the assembly is determined by the contact between the different pieces. The numerical simulation allows to analyse different configurations and anticipate possible defects before tool making, thus, reducing the costs of this preliminary phase. In order to improve the dimensional quality of the manufactured parts, the work presented here focuses on the application of a numerical model to a hot forging manufacturing process in order to predict the areas of the forging die subjected to large deformations. The thermo-mechanical model developed and implemented with free software (Code-Aster) includes the strains of thermal origin, strains during forge impact and contact effects. The numerical results are validated with experimental measurements in a tooling set that produces forged crankshafts for the automotive industry. The numerical results show good agreement with the experimental tests. Thereby, a very useful tool for the design of tooling sets for hot forging is achieved.

  16. Hot Superplastic Powder Forging for Transparent nanocrystalline Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, W. Roger

    2006-05-22

    The program explored a completely new, economical method of manufacturing nanocrystalline ceramics, Hot Superplastic Powder Forging (HSPF). The goal of the work was the development of nanocrystalline/low porosity optically transparent zirconia/alumina. The high optical transparency should result from lack of grain boundary scattering since grains will be smaller than one tenth the wavelength of light and from elimination of porosity. An important technological potential for this process is manufacturing of envelopes for high-pressure sodium vapor lamps. The technique for fabricating monolithic nanocrystalline material does not begin with powder whose particle diameter is <100 nm as is commonly done. Instead it begins with powder whose particle diameter is on the order of 10-100 microns but contains nanocrystalline crystallites <<100 nm. Spherical particles are quenched from a melt and heat treated to achieve the desired microstructure. Under a moderate pressure within a die or a mold at temperatures of 1100C to 1300C densification is by plastic flow of superplastic particles. A nanocrystalline microstructure results, though some features are greater than 100nm. It was found, for instance, that in the fully dense Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic specimens that a bicontinuous microstructure exists containing <100 nm ZrO2 particles in a matrix of Al2O3 grains extending over 1-2 microns. Crystallization, growth, phase development and creep during hot pressing and forging were studied for several compositions and so provided some details on development of polycrystalline microstructure from heating quenched ceramics.

  17. Follow-up of hearing thresholds among forge hammering workers

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.A.; Mikael, R.A.; Faris, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Hearing threshold was reexamined in a group of forge hammering workers investigated 8 years ago with consideration of the age effect and of auditory symptoms. Workers were exposed to impact noise that ranged from 112 to 139 dB(A)--at an irregular rate of 20 to 50 drop/minute--and a continuous background noise that ranged from 90 to 94 dB(A). Similar to what was observed 8 years ago, the present permanent threshold shift (PTS) showed a maximum notch at the frequency of 6 kHz and considerable elevations at the frequencies of 0.25-1 kHz. The age-corrected PTS and the postexposure hearing threshold were significantly higher than the corresponding previous values at the frequencies 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 8 kHz only. The rise was more evident at the low than at the high frequencies. Temporary threshold shift (TTS) values were significantly less than those 8 years ago. Contrary to the previous TTS, the present TTS were higher at low than at high frequencies. Although progression of PTS at the frequencies 0.25 and 0.5 kHz was continuous throughout the observed durations of exposure, progression at higher frequencies occurred essentially in the first 10 to 15 years of exposure. Thereafter, it followed a much slower rate. Tinnitus was significantly associated with difficulty in hearing the human voice and with elevation of PTS at all the tested frequencies, while acoustic after-image was significantly associated with increment of PTS at the frequencies 0.25-2 kHz. No relation between PTS and smoking was found. PTS at low frequencies may provide an indication of progression of hearing damage when the sensitivity at 6 and 4 kHz diminishes after prolonged years of exposure. Tinnitus and acoustic after-image are related to the auditory effect of forge hammering noise.

  18. Deformation Mechanisms in Tube Billets from Zr-1%Nb Alloy under Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Perlovich, Yuriy; Isaenkova, Margarita; Fesenko, Vladimir; Krymskaya, Olga; Zavodchikov, Alexander

    2011-05-04

    Features of the deformation process by cold radial forging of tube billets from Zr-1%Nb alloy were reconstructed on the basis of X-ray data concerning their structure and texture. The cold radial forging intensifies grain fragmentation in the bulk of billet and increases significantly the latent hardening of potentially active slip systems, so that operation only of the single slip system becomes possible. As a result, in radially-forged billets unusual deformation and recrystallization textures arise. These textures differ from usual textures of {alpha}-Zr by the mutual inversion of crystallographic axes, aligned along the axis of tube.

  19. Assessment of NASA Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment Method for Multiple Forging Batch Heat Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John (Technical Monitor); Lemsky, Joe

    2004-01-01

    NASA dual microstructure heat treatment technology previously demonstrated on single forging heat treat batches of a generic disk shape was successfully demonstrated on a multiple disk batch of a production shape component. A group of four Rolls-Royce Corporation 3rd Stage AE2100 forgings produced from alloy ME209 were successfully dual microstructure heat treated as a single heat treat batch. The forgings responded uniformly as evidenced by part-to-part consistent thermocouple recordings and resultant macrostructures, and from ultrasonic examination. Multiple disk DMHT processing offers a low cost alternative to other published dual microstructure processing techniques.

  20. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen Austenitic Steel after Ultrasonic Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narkevich, N. A.; Tolmachev, A. I.; Vlasov, I. V.; Surikova, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate a nitrogen 07Kh17AG18 steel with an austenitic structure after the surface deformation treatment—ultrasonic forging. During ultrasonic forging, an austenitic structure transforms into a new structure with an elevated concentration of deformation-induced stacking faults, a lot of deformation microtwins, ɛ-martensite crystals. The austenite lattice parameter is found to be decreased in the surface layer. After ultrasonic forging, nitrided steel exhibits enhanced strength properties with retained high plasticity.

  1. Deformation Mechanisms in Tube Billets from Zr-1%Nb Alloy under Radial Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovich, Yuriy; Isaenkova, Margarita; Fesenko, Vladimir; Krymskaya, Olga; Zavodchikov, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    Features of the deformation process by cold radial forging of tube billets from Zr-1%Nb alloy were reconstructed on the basis of X-ray data concerning their structure and texture. The cold radial forging intensifies grain fragmentation in the bulk of billet and increases significantly the latent hardening of potentially active slip systems, so that operation only of the single slip system becomes possible. As a result, in radially-forged billets unusual deformation and recrystallization textures arise. These textures differ from usual textures of α-Zr by the mutual inversion of crystallographic axes, aligned along the axis of tube.

  2. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect

    Gambogi, Joseph; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  3. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  4. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  5. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  6. Titanium alkoxide compound

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  7. Computational Evaluation of the Effects of Bone Ingrowth on Bone Resorptive Remodeling after a Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Kang, Yu-Bong; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    In this study, we simulated a wide cortex separation from a cementless hip prosthesis using the bone resorption remodeling method that is based on the generation of high compressive stress around the distal cortical bone. Thereafter, we estimated the effect on late migration quantities of the hip prosthesis produced by the interface state arising from bone ingrowth. This was accomplished using cortical bone remodeling over a long period of time. Two-dimensional natural hip and implanted hip FEM models were constructed with each of the following interface statements between the bone and prosthesis: (1) non-fixation, (2) proximal 1/3, (3) proximal 2/3 and (4) full-fixation. The fixation interfaces in the fully and partially porous coated regions were rigidly fixed by bony ingrowth. The non-fixation model was constructed as a critical situation, with the fibrous or bony tissue not integrated at all into the implant surface. The daily load history was generated using the three loading cases of a one-legged stance as well as abduction and adduction motions. With the natural hip and one-legged stance, the peak compressive principal stresses were found to be under the criteria value for causing bone resorption, while no implant movement occurred. The migration magnitude of the stem of the proximal 1/3 fixation model with adduction motion was much higher, reaching 6%, 11%and 21%greater than those of the non-fixation, proximal 2/3 fixation and all-fixation models, respectively. The full-fixation model showed the lowest compressive principal stress and implant movement. Thus, we concluded that the late loosening and subsequent movement of the stem in the long term could be estimated with the cortical bone remodeling method based on a high compressive stress at the bone-implant interface. The change caused at the bone-prosthesis interface by bony or fibrous tissue ingrowth constituted the major factor in determining the extent of cortical bone resorption occurring with

  8. 75 FR 20859 - Notice of Realty Action, Independence National Historical Park, Pennsylvania and Valley Forge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Realty Action, Independence National Historical Park, Pennsylvania and Valley Forge National Historical Park, Pennsylvania AGENCY: National Park Service, Department of the... is located within the boundary of Independence National Historical Park (INDE). The privately...

  9. Recrystallization behavior of Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy during hot working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yun-jin; Xin, She-wei; Zhang, Ping-xiang; Zhao, Yong-qing; Ma, Fan-jiao; Liu, Xiang-hong; Feng, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The recrystallization behavior of deformed Ti40 alloy during a heat-treatment process was studied using electron backscatter diffraction and optical microscopy. The results show that the microstructural evolution of Ti40 alloy is controlled by the growth behavior of grain-boundary small grains during the heating process. These small grains at the grain boundaries mostly originate during the forging process because of the alloy's inhomogeneous deformation. During forging, the deformation first occurs in the grain-boundary region. New small recrystallized grains are separated from the parent grains when the orientation between deformation zones and parent grains exceeds a certain threshold. During the heating process, the growth of these small recrystallized grains results in a uniform grain size and a decrease in the average grain size. The special recrystallization behavior of Ti40 alloy is mainly a consequence of the alloy's high β-stabilized elemental content and high solution strength of the β-grains, which partially explains the poor hot working ability of Ti-V-Cr-type burn-resistant titanium alloys. Notably, this study on Ti40 burn-resistant titanium alloy yields important information related to the optimization of the microstructures and mechanical properties.

  10. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-10-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  11. Deformation, recrystallization, strength, and fracture of press-forged ceramic crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Sapphire and ruby were very difficult to press-forge because they deformed without cracking only in a limited temperature range before they melted. Spinel crystals were somewhat easier and MgO, CaO, and TiC crystals much easier to forge. The degree of recrystallization that occurred during forging (which was related to the ease and type of slip intersections) varied from essentially zero in Al2O3 to complete (i.e., random polycrystalline bodies were produced) in CaO. Forging of bi- and polycrystalline bodies produced incoherent bodies as a result of grain-boundary sliding. Strengths of the forged crystals were comparable to those of dense polycrystalline bodies of similar grain size. However, forged and recrystallized CaO crystals were ductile at lower temperatures than dense hot-pressed CaO. This behavior is attributed to reduced grain-boundary impurities and porosity. Fracture origins could be located, indicating that fracture in the CaO occurs internally as a result of surface work hardening caused by machining.-

  12. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-08-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  13. West Flank Coso, CA FORGE 3D temperature model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    x,y,z data of the 3D temperature model for the West Flank Coso FORGE site. Model grid spacing is 250m. The temperature model for the Coso geothermal field used over 100 geothermal production sized wells and intermediate-depth temperature holes. At the near surface of this model, two boundary temperatures were assumed: (1) areas with surface manifestations, including fumaroles along the northeast striking normal faults and northwest striking dextral faults with the hydrothermal field, a temperature of ~104˚C was applied to datum at +1066 meters above sea level elevation, and (2) a near-surface temperature at about 10 meters depth, of 20˚C was applied below the diurnal and annual conductive temperature perturbations. These assumptions were based on heat flow studies conducted at the CVF and for the Mojave Desert. On the edges of the hydrothermal system, a 73˚C/km (4˚F/100’) temperature gradient contour was established using conductive gradient data from shallow and intermediate-depth temperature holes. This contour was continued to all elevation datums between the 20˚C surface and -1520 meters below mean sea level. Because the West Flank is outside of the geothermal field footprint, during Phase 1, the three wells inside the FORGE site were incorporated into the preexisting temperature model. To ensure a complete model was built based on all the available data sets, measured bottom-hole temperature gradients in certain wells were downward extrapolated to the next deepest elevation datum (or a maximum of about 25% of the well depth where conductive gradients are evident in the lower portions of the wells). After assuring that the margins of the geothermal field were going to be adequately modelled, the data was contoured using the Kriging method algorithm. Although the extrapolated temperatures and boundary conditions are not rigorous, the calculated temperatures are anticipated to be within ~6˚C (20˚F), or one contour interval, of the

  14. Trial production of titanium orthodontic brackets fabricated by metal injection molding (MIM) with sintering.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, T; Ito, M; Obata, A; Koh, Y; Yamagishi, T; Oshida, Y

    1996-07-01

    Safety and esthetics are two indispensable factors to consider when fabricating orthodontic brackets. However, these factors are not easily achieved when conventional techniques (including forging and casting) are used in the mass production of titanium brackets, albeit the brackets exhibit excellent biocompatibility. In the present study, orthodontic brackets were manufactured by metal powder injection molding with sintering. Brackets with three different base designs were made and subjected to compression shear tests for evaluation of their bonding strength to enamel substrate. The shapes given to the dimple of the base were spherical, oval, and grooved. The maximum shear forces for each type were 11.1 kgf, 7.6 kgf, and 18.5 kgf, respectively. The bonding strengths of the titanium bracket were equivalent to those obtained with conventional stainless steel brackets. Moreover, uniform distribution of Vickers hardness values (average, 240 +/- 40 Hv) measured at three locations indicated that the titanium bracket was uniformly sintered. Accordingly, titanium brackets thus fabricated exhibit a potential for clinical application.

  15. Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Hip Dysplasia with an Extensively Porous-Coated Cylindrical Stem Modified for Asians: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tsutomu; Otani, Takuya; Sugiyama, Hajime; Hayama, Tetsuo; Katsumata, Souichi; Marumo, Keishi

    2015-06-01

    Long-term outcomes of primary cementless total hip arthroplasty were examined for 198 hips of Asian patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip. AML stems were modified for patients' relatively small physique. Stable fixation was achieved despite various proximal femoral deformities. At follow up (mean 12.1 years), radiographs demonstrated fixation in all hips, with 100% stem survivorship. Radiographic changes revealed that the severity of stress-shielding was mild in 55% of hips, moderate in 26%, and severe in 19%. Longer follow up is needed to determine whether these changes will develop into clinical manifestations. A distal fixation stem can be a useful reconstruction option when application of a proximal fixation stem in primary total hip arthroplasty is difficult for various reasons. PMID:25677937

  16. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Non-Modular Cementless Long-Stem Distal Fixation for Salvage of Failed Internal Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fracture.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojun; Zhou, Zongke; Yang, Jing; Shen, Bin; Kang, Pengde; Pei, Fuxing

    2015-11-01

    Thirty one patients were treated with salvage total hip arthroplasty (THA) for failed internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture. After a mean follow-up of 47.5 months, all patients reported remarkable pain relief and return to ambulation. Twenty five patients had no pain, and 6 patients complained of residual trochanteric low-grade pain without compromise of activities. The Harris Hip score increased from a preoperative average of 28.4 points to a postoperative average of 85.6 points. All patients demonstrated successful bony union and five had Brooker I or II heterotopic ossification. Seven patients had intraoperative or early complications and were treated successfully. There was no infection, re-fracture, loosening, or revision for any reason. Salvage THA using non-modular cementless long-stem prosthesis represents an effective procedure after failed intertrochanteric fixation.

  17. The influence of contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of cementless total hip arthroplasty: A finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Reimeringer, M; Nuño, N

    2016-05-01

    Cementless hip stems are fixed to the surrounding bone by means of press-fit. To ensure a good press-fit, current surgical technique specifies an under-reaming of the bone cavity using successively larger broaches. Nevertheless, this surgical technique is inaccurate. Several studies show that the contact ratio (percentage of stem interface in contact with bone) achieved after surgery can vary between 20% and 95%. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of the contact ratio and its location on the primary stability of a cementless total hip arthroplasty using finite element analysis. A straight tapered femoral stem implanted in a composite bone was subjected to stair climbing. Micromotion of 7600 nodes at the stem-bone interface was computed for different configurations of contact ratios between 2% and 98%) along the hip stem. Considering the 15 configurations evaluated, the average micromotion ranges between 27μm and 54μm. The percentage of the porous interface of the stem having micromotion below 40μm that allows bone ingrowth range between 25-57%. The present numerical study shows that full contact (100%) between stem and bone is not necessary to obtain a good primary stability. The stem primary stability is influenced by both the contact ratio and its location. Several configurations with contact ratio lower than 100% and involving either the proximal or the cortical contact provide better primary stability than the full contact configuration. However, with contact ratio lower than 40%, the stem should be in contact with cortical bone to ensure a good primary stability. PMID:26920509

  18. Movement Synchrony Forges Social Bonds across Group Divides

    PubMed Central

    Tunçgenç, Bahar; Cohen, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Group dynamics play an important role in the social interactions of both children and adults. A large amount of research has shown that merely being allocated to arbitrarily defined groups can evoke disproportionately positive attitudes toward one's in-group and negative attitudes toward out-groups, and that these biases emerge in early childhood. This prompts important empirical questions with far-reaching theoretical and applied significance. How robust are these inter-group biases? Can biases be mitigated by behaviors known to bond individuals and groups together? How can bonds be forged across existing group divides? To explore these questions, we examined the bonding effects of interpersonal synchrony on minimally constructed groups in a controlled experiment. In-group and out-group bonding were assessed using questionnaires administered before and after a task in which groups performed movements either synchronously or non-synchronously in a between-participants design. We also developed an implicit behavioral measure, the Island Game, in which physical proximity was used as an indirect measure of interpersonal closeness. Self-report and behavioral measures showed increased bonding between groups after synchronous movement. Bonding with the out-group was significantly higher in the condition in which movements were performed synchronously than when movements were performed non-synchronously between groups. The findings are discussed in terms of their importance for the developmental social psychology of group dynamics as well as their implications for applied intervention programs. PMID:27303341

  19. Comparison of pitting fatigue life of ausforged and standard forged AISI M-50 and AISI 9310 spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Standard forged and ausforged spur gears made of vacuum-induction-melted, consumable-electrode, vacuum-arc-remelted AISI M-50 steel were tested under conditions that produced fatigue pitting. The gears were 8.89 cm (3.5 in.) in pitch diameter and had tip relief. The M-50 standard forged and ausforged test results were compared with each other. They were then compared with results for machined vacuum-arc-remelted AISI 9310 gears tested under identical conditions. Both types of M-50 gears had lives approximately five times that of the 9310 gears. The life at which 10 percent of the M-50 ausforged gears failed was slightly less than that at which the M-50 standard forged gears failed. The ausforged gears had a slightly greater tendency to fail by tooth fracture than did the standard forged gears, most likely because of the better forging and grain flow pattern of standard forged gears.

  20. A comparative study of zinc, magnesium, strontium-incorporated hydroxyapatite-coated titanium implants for osseointegration of osteopenic rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhou-Shan; Zhou, Wan-Shu; He, Xing-Wen; Liu, Wei; Bai, Bing-Li; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Zheng-Liang; Tu, Kai-kai; Li, Hang; Sun, Tao; Lv, Yang-Xun; Cui, Wei; Yang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    Surface modification techniques have been applied to generate titanium implant surfaces that promote osseointegration for the implants in cementless arthroplasty. However, its effect is not sufficient for osteoporotic bone. Zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), and strontium (Sr) present a beneficial effect on bone growth, and positively affect bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to confirm the different effects of the fixation strength of Zn, Mg, Sr-substituted hydroxyapatite-coated (Zn-HA-coated, Mg-HA-coated, Sr-HA-coated) titanium implants via electrochemical deposition in the osteoporotic condition. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. Twelve weeks after bilateral ovariectomy, all animals were randomly divided into four groups: group HA; group Zn-HA; group Mg-HA and group Sr-HA. Afterwards, all rats from groups HA, Zn-HA, Mg-HA and Sr-HA received implants with hydroxyapatite containing 0%, 10% Zn ions, 10% Mg ions, and 10% Sr ions. Implants were inserted bilaterally in all animals until death at 12 weeks. The bilateral femurs of rats were harvested for evaluation. All treatment groups increased new bone formation around the surface of titanium rods and push-out force; group Sr-HA showed the strongest effects on new bone formation and biomechanical strength. Additionally, there are significant differences in bone formation and push-out force was observed between groups Zn-HA and Mg-HA. This finding suggests that Zn, Mg, Sr-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings can improve implant osseointegration, and the 10% Sr coating exhibited the best properties for implant osseointegration among the tested coatings in osteoporosis rats. PMID:26952418

  1. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    components used to make the stainless steel and the 6A1--4V titanium alloy cases. The forward dome and aft fitting for the stainless steel assembly were fabricated from a combination of forged, spun and machined parts.. In order to facilitate the fabrication of the titanium alloy motor ) these components were machined from a large-diameter billet.

  2. Making randomised trials more efficient: report of the first meeting to discuss the Trial Forge platform.

    PubMed

    Treweek, Shaun; Altman, Doug G; Bower, Peter; Campbell, Marion; Chalmers, Iain; Cotton, Seonaidh; Craig, Peter; Crosby, David; Davidson, Peter; Devane, Declan; Duley, Lelia; Dunn, Janet; Elbourne, Diana; Farrell, Barbara; Gamble, Carrol; Gillies, Katie; Hood, Kerry; Lang, Trudie; Littleford, Roberta; Loudon, Kirsty; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Nelson, Annmarie; Norrie, John; Ramsay, Craig; Sandercock, Peter; Shanahan, Daniel R; Summerskill, William; Sydes, Matt; Williamson, Paula; Clarke, Mike

    2015-06-05

    Randomised trials are at the heart of evidence-based healthcare, but the methods and infrastructure for conducting these sometimes complex studies are largely evidence free. Trial Forge ( www.trialforge.org ) is an initiative that aims to increase the evidence base for trial decision making and, in doing so, to improve trial efficiency.This paper summarises a one-day workshop held in Edinburgh on 10 July 2014 to discuss Trial Forge and how to advance this initiative. We first outline the problem of inefficiency in randomised trials and go on to describe Trial Forge. We present participants' views on the processes in the life of a randomised trial that should be covered by Trial Forge.General support existed at the workshop for the Trial Forge approach to increase the evidence base for making randomised trial decisions and for improving trial efficiency. Agreed upon key processes included choosing the right research question; logistical planning for delivery, training of staff, recruitment, and retention; data management and dissemination; and close down. The process of linking to existing initiatives where possible was considered crucial. Trial Forge will not be a guideline or a checklist but a 'go to' website for research on randomised trials methods, with a linked programme of applied methodology research, coupled to an effective evidence-dissemination process. Moreover, it will support an informal network of interested trialists who meet virtually (online) and occasionally in person to build capacity and knowledge in the design and conduct of efficient randomised trials.Some of the resources invested in randomised trials are wasted because of limited evidence upon which to base many aspects of design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials. Trial Forge will help to address this lack of evidence.

  3. Making randomised trials more efficient: report of the first meeting to discuss the Trial Forge platform.

    PubMed

    Treweek, Shaun; Altman, Doug G; Bower, Peter; Campbell, Marion; Chalmers, Iain; Cotton, Seonaidh; Craig, Peter; Crosby, David; Davidson, Peter; Devane, Declan; Duley, Lelia; Dunn, Janet; Elbourne, Diana; Farrell, Barbara; Gamble, Carrol; Gillies, Katie; Hood, Kerry; Lang, Trudie; Littleford, Roberta; Loudon, Kirsty; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Nelson, Annmarie; Norrie, John; Ramsay, Craig; Sandercock, Peter; Shanahan, Daniel R; Summerskill, William; Sydes, Matt; Williamson, Paula; Clarke, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Randomised trials are at the heart of evidence-based healthcare, but the methods and infrastructure for conducting these sometimes complex studies are largely evidence free. Trial Forge ( www.trialforge.org ) is an initiative that aims to increase the evidence base for trial decision making and, in doing so, to improve trial efficiency.This paper summarises a one-day workshop held in Edinburgh on 10 July 2014 to discuss Trial Forge and how to advance this initiative. We first outline the problem of inefficiency in randomised trials and go on to describe Trial Forge. We present participants' views on the processes in the life of a randomised trial that should be covered by Trial Forge.General support existed at the workshop for the Trial Forge approach to increase the evidence base for making randomised trial decisions and for improving trial efficiency. Agreed upon key processes included choosing the right research question; logistical planning for delivery, training of staff, recruitment, and retention; data management and dissemination; and close down. The process of linking to existing initiatives where possible was considered crucial. Trial Forge will not be a guideline or a checklist but a 'go to' website for research on randomised trials methods, with a linked programme of applied methodology research, coupled to an effective evidence-dissemination process. Moreover, it will support an informal network of interested trialists who meet virtually (online) and occasionally in person to build capacity and knowledge in the design and conduct of efficient randomised trials.Some of the resources invested in randomised trials are wasted because of limited evidence upon which to base many aspects of design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials. Trial Forge will help to address this lack of evidence. PMID:26044814

  4. Corrosion of stainless steel, nickel-titanium, coated nickel-titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Johnson, J W

    1999-02-01

    Orthodontic wires containing nickel have been implicated in allergic reactions. The potential for orthodontic wires to cause allergic reactions is related to the pattern and mode of corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions, such as nickel, into the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in the corrosive potential of stainless steel, nickel titanium, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires. At least two specimens of each wire were subjected to potentiostatic anodic dissolution in 0.9% NaCl solution with neutral pH at room temperature. Using a Wenking MP 95 potentiostat and an electrochemical corrosion cell, the breakdown potential of each wire was determined. Photographs were taken of the wire speci mens using a scanning electron microscope, and surface changes were qualitatively evaluated. The breakdown potentials of stainless steel, two nickel titanium wires, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium were 400 mV, 300 mV, 750 mV, 300 mV, 1800 mV, and >2000 mV, respectively. SEM photographs revealed that some nickel titanium and stainless steel wires were susceptible to pitting and localized corrosion. The results indicate that corrosion occurred readily in stainless steel. Variability in breakdown potential of nickel titanium alloy wires differed across vendors' wires. The nitride coating did not affect the corrosion of the alloy, but epoxy coating decreased corrosion. Titanium wires and epoxy-coated nickel titanium wires exhibited the least corrosive potential. For patients allergic to nickel, the use of titanium or epoxy-coated wires during orthodontic treatment is recommended.

  5. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  6. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  7. Forging of Naval Brass (ASTM B16) - Finite Element Analysis using Ls Dyna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subha Sankari, T.; Sangavi, S.; Paneerselvam, T.; Venkatraman, R.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Forging is one of the important manufacturing process in which products like connecting rod, transmission shaft, clutch hubs and gears are produced. Finite element analysis (FEA) in forming techniques is of recent interest for the optimal design and determination of right manufacturing forming process. The data from the numerical results can help in providing the information for selecting the ideal process conditions. Thus aside from experimental values, simulation by the finite element analysis software's such as LS DYNA can be used for the analysis of strain distribution in forging processes. In the present work, Finite element simulation of open die forging of naval brass (ASTM B16) is done at an optimal temperature. An advanced multi physics simulation software package by the Livermore software technology cooperation LSTC - LS DYNA is utilized for the simulation of forging process. For the forging validation, experiment is conducted with a cylindrical billet having height 45 mm and diameter of 40mm. The numerical results are compared with that of experimental results carried out at the same temperature and dimensions for validation. The distribution of strain is analyzed. Energy analysis due to impact load is detailed. The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Effect of Die Strength and Work Piece Strength on the Wear of Hot Forging Dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; Van Tyne, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the strength ratio extracted from an Archard model for wear is used to describe the wear rates expected in hot forging dies. In the current study, the strength ratio is the strength of the hot forging die to the strength of the work piece. Three hot forging die steels are evaluated. The three die steels are FX, 2714, and WF. To determine the strength of the forging die, a continuous function has been developed that describes the yield strength of three die steels for temperatures from 600 to 700 °C and for times up to 20 h (i.e., tempering times of up to 20 h). The work piece material is assumed to be AISI 1045. Based on the analysis, the wear resistance of WF should be superior and FX should be slightly better than 2714. Decreasing the forging temperature increases the strength ratio, because the strength of the die surface increases faster than the flow strength of AISI 1045. The increase in the strength ratio indicates a decrease in the expected wear rate.

  9. Identification of forged Bank of England £20 banknotes using IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnex, Emily; Almond, Matthew J.; Baum, John V.; Bond, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Bank of England notes of £20 denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. An aim of this work was to develop a non-destructive method so that a small, compact Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 cm-1 arising from νasym (CO32-) from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine £20 notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 cm-1), ν(Csbnd H) (ca. 2900 cm-1) and ν(Cdbnd O) (ca. 1750 cm-1) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper.

  10. Identification of Forged Bank of England 20 Gbp Banknotes Using IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnex, Emily

    2014-06-01

    Bank of England notes of 20 GBP denomination have been studied using infrared spectroscopy in order to generate a method to identify forged notes. A principal aim of this work was to develop a method so that a small, compact ATR FTIR instrument could be used by bank workers, police departments or others such as shop assistants to identify forged notes in a non-lab setting. The ease of use of the instrument is the key to this method, as well as the relatively low cost. The presence of a peak at 1400 wn from the blank paper section of a forged note proved to be a successful indicator of the note's illegality for the notes that we studied. Moreover, differences between the spectra of forged and genuine 20 GBP notes were observed in the ν(OH) (ca. 3500 wn), ν(C-H) (ca. 2900 wn) and ν(C=O) (ca. 1750 wn) regions of the IR spectrum recorded for the polymer film covering the holographic strip. In cases where these simple tests fail, we have shown how an infrared microscope can be used to further differentiate genuine and forged banknotes by producing infrared maps of selected areas of the note contrasting inks with background paper. Further to this, with an announcement by the Bank of England to produce polymer banknotes in the future, the work has been extended using Australian polymer banknotes to show that the method would be transferable.

  11. TDNiCr (ni-20Cr-2ThO2) forging studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Elevated temperature tensile and stress rupture properties were evaluated for forged TDNiCr (Ni-20Cr-2ThO2) and related to thermomechanical history and microstructure. Forging temperature and final annealed condition had pronounced influences on grain size which, in turn, was related to high temperature strength. Tensile strength improved by a factor of 8 as grain size changed from 1 to 150 microns. Stress-rupture strength was improved by a factor of 3 to 5 by a grain size increase from 10 to 1000 microns. Some contributions to the elevated temperature strength of very large grain material may also occur from the development of a strong texture and a preponderance of small twins. Other conditions promoting the improvement of high temperature strength were: an increase of total reduction, forging which continued the metal deformation inherent in the starting material, a low forging speed, and prior deformation by extrusion. The mechanical properties of optimally forged TDNiCr compared favorably to those of high strength sheet developed for space shuttle application.

  12. Titanium Optics for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1999-01-01

    Ion thruster total impulse capability is limited, in part, by accelerator grid sputter erosion. A development effort was initiated to identify a material with a lower accelerator grid volumetric sputter erosion rate than molybdenum, but that could utilize the present NSTAR thruster grid design and fabrication techniques to keep development costs low, and perform as well as molybdenum optics. After comparing the sputter erosion rates of several atomic materials to that of molybdenum at accelerator voltages, titanium was found to offer a 45% reduction in volumetric erosion rates. To ensure that screen grid sputter erosion rates are not higher at discharge chamber potentials, titanium and molybdenum sputter erosion rates were measured at these potentials. Preliminary results showed only a slightly higher volumetric erosion rate for titanium, so that screen grid erosion is insignificant. A number of material, thermal, and mechanical properties were also examined to identify any fabrication, launch environment, and thruster operation issues. Several titanium grid sets were successfully fabricated. A titanium grid set was mounted onto an NSTAR 30 cm engineering model ion thruster and tested to determine optics performance. The titanium optics operated successfully over the entire NSTAR power range of 0.5 to 2.3 kW. Differences in impingement-limited perveances and electron backstreaming limits were found to be due to a larger cold gap for the titanium optics. Discharge losses for titanium grids were lower than those for molybdenum, likely due to a slightly larger titanium screen grid open area fraction. Radial distributions of beam current density with titanium optics were very similar to those with molybdenum optics at all power levels. Temporal electron backstreaming limit measurements showed that titanium optics achieved thermal equilibrium faster than molybdenum optics.

  13. Cementless total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Salvatore; Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Agati, Gabriele; Massè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Interest for uncemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has greatly increased in recent years. This technique, less used than cemented knee replacement in the last decades, sees a revival thanks an advance in prosthetic design, instrumentation and operative technique. The related literature in some cases shows conflicting data on survival and on the revision’s rate, but in most cases a success rate comparable to cemented TKA is reported. The optimal fixation in TKA is a subject of debate with the majority of surgeons favouring cemented fixation. PMID:27162779

  14. Simulation of 7050 Wrought Aluminum Alloy Wheel Die Forging and its Defects Analysis based on DEFORM

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shiquan; Yi Youping; Zhang Yuxun

    2010-06-15

    Defects such as folding, intercrystalline cracking and flow lines outcrop are very likely to occur in the forging of aluminum alloy. Moreover, it is difficult to achieve the optimal set of process parameters just by trial and error within an industrial environment. In producing 7050 wrought aluminum alloy wheel, a rigid-plastic finite element method (FEM) analysis has been performed to optimize die forging process. Processing parameters were analyzed, focusing on the effects of punch speed, friction factor and temperature. Meanwhile, mechanism as well as the evolution with respect to the defects of the wrought wheel was studied in details. From an analysis of the results, isothermal die forging was proposed for producing 7050 aluminum alloy wheel with good mechanical properties. Finally, verification experiment was carried out on hydropress.

  15. Analysis Of Potentiometric Methods Used For Crack Detection In Forging Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Drbúl, Mário; Stančeková, Dana; Varga, Daniel; Martinček, Juraj; Kuždák, Viktor

    2015-12-01

    Increased use of forging tools in mass production causes their increased wear and creates pressure to design more efficient renovation process. Renovation is complicated because of the identification of cracks expanding from the surface to the core material. Given that the production of forging tools is expensive, caused by the cost of tool steels and the thermo-chemical treatment, it is important to design forging tool with its easy renovation in mind. It is important to choose the right renovation technology, which will be able to restore the instrument to its original state while maintaining financial rentability. Choosing the right technology is difficult because of nitrided and heat-treated surface for high hardness and wear resistance. Article discusses the use of non-destructive method of detecting cracks taking into account the size of the cracks formed during working process.

  16. Development of forging and heat treating practices for AMS 5737 for use at liquid helium temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Greenlee, M.

    1981-08-10

    To achieve a combination of high yield-strength (sigma y), plane-strain fracture-toughness (K/sub IC/) and resistance to galling when turned against austenitic stainless steels in highly-loaded threaded turnbuckles in the M.F.T.F.-B (Mirror Fusion Test Facility), AMS 5737 (Fe-15Cr-25Ni-1Mo-V-Ti-Al-B), a heat-treatable Fe-base superalloy that is slightly-ferromagnetic under high magnetic fields at 4K, was chosen for large (approx. 340 kg) forged turn buckles. This report describes the forging and heat-treatment optimization program that resulted in good sigma y and K/sub IC/ over the 4 to 300K range of service-temperatures and the verification tests run on a pre-production forging and actual production parts.

  17. Evaluation of Die Chilling Effects during Forging of Nimonic-80A Superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriari, D.; Sadeghi, M. H.; Amiri, A.; Cheraghzadeh, M.

    2010-06-15

    Nimonic-80A is a kind of nickel-based superalloys which is used in high temperature components of land gas turbines. In this paper, the influence of four design factors: die temperature, strain rate, friction coefficient and geometry size of ring sample over the variation of internal diameters (VID) and forging load (FL) was studied. It was done by means of design methodology based on DOE-designated full factorial and FE simulations. FEM and experimental results showed that the variation of internal diameters and forging load had inverse proportion to the die temperature. Regression models were developed by using the response surface methodology (RSM) for VID and FL. Rate of the dynamic recrystallization varied depending on different amounts of die temperature. The results can be used in the semi-isothermal forging of complex part of the Nimonic-80A.

  18. 76 FR 5331 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan: Final Results of Sunset Reviews and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    .... See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 75 FR 67082 (November 1, 2010). We did not receive a... Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India, 59 FR 5994 (February 9, 1994) and Antidumping Duty Order: Certain Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From Taiwan, 59 FR 5995 (February 9, 1994). On January 23,...

  19. 76 FR 31631 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... of institution (76 FR 168, January 3, 2011) of the subject five-year reviews was adequate and that... COMMISSION Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China; Scheduling of Expedited Five- Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Heavy Forged Hand Tools From China. AGENCY: United States International...

  20. Polyisocyanides of titanium.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2009-02-26

    Neutral Ti[CN](n) complexes have been investigated with quantum chemistry techniques. According to our theoretical predictions, these complexes are shown to prefer isocyanide arrangements. Therefore, these compounds are good candidates to be the first polyisocyanides to be characterized. The theoretical calculations predict Ti(NC)(4), a methane-like tetrahedral structure with four isocyanide ligands, as the most stable neutral complex. The fact that the isocyanide ligand is a better pi-donor than the cyanide one seems to be the key factor for the preference for isocyanides in neutral titanium complexes.

  1. A material based approach to creating wear resistant surfaces for hot forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sailesh

    Tools and dies used in metal forming are characterized by extremely high temperatures at the interface, high local pressures and large metal to metal sliding. These harsh conditions result in accelerated wear of tooling. Lubrication of tools, done to improve metal flow drastically quenches the surface layers of the tools and compounds the tool failure problem. This phenomenon becomes a serious issue when parts forged at complex and are expected to meet tight tolerances. Unpredictable and hence uncontrolled wear and degradation of tooling result in poor part quality and premature tool failure that result in high scrap, shop downtime, poor efficiency and high cost. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a computer-based methodology for analyzing the requirements hot forging tooling to resist wear and plastic deformation and wear and predicting life cycle of forge tooling. Development of such is a system is complicated by the fact that wear and degradation of tooling is influenced by not only the die material used but also numerous process controls like lubricant, dilution ratio, forging temperature, equipment used, tool geometries among others. Phenomenological models available u1 the literature give us a good thumb rule to selecting materials but do not provide a way to evaluate pits performance in field. Once a material is chosen, there are no proven approaches to create surfaces out of these materials. Coating approaches like PVD and CVD cannot generate thick coatings necessary to withstand the conditions under hot forging. Welding cannot generate complex surfaces without several secondary operations like heat treating and machining. If careful procedures are not followed, welds crack and seldom survive forging loads. There is a strong need for an approach to selectively, reliably and precisely deposit material of choice reliably on an existing surface which exhibit not only good tribological properties but also good adhesion to the substrate

  2. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  3. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  4. Electrorotation of titanium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; Ramos, Antonio; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-04-01

    Electrorotation (ROT) data for solid titanium micrometer-sized spheres in an electrolyte are presented for three different ionic conductivities, over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The direction of rotation was found to be opposite to the direction of rotation of the electric field vector (counterfield electrorotation), with a single rotation peak. The maximum rotation rate occurs at a frequency of the order of the reciprocal RC time constant for charging the particle double layer capacitance through the resistor of the electrolyte bulk. A model for the electrical torque acting on a metallic sphere is presented, using a constant phase element impedance to describe the metal/electrolyte interface. The titanium spheres are much denser than the electrolyte and rest on the bottom substrate. Therefore, the electrical and viscous torques near a wall are considered in the analysis. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured rotational speed as a function of frequency. Theory shows that there is no effect of induced charge electroosmotic flow on the ROT, as observed experimentally.

  5. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  6. Flow softening and microstructure evolution during hot working of wrought near-gamma titanium aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiatin, S. L.; Frey, N.; El-Soudani, S. M.; Bryant, J. D.

    1992-06-01

    The hot-working behavior of two wrought ingot-metallurgy near-gamma titanium aluminides was established using the isothermal, hot compression test. Experiments were conducted in both the two-phase (alpha+gamma) and single-phase (alpha) regimes at strain rates typical of conventional metalworking operations (0.1 to 10 s-1). As for conventional titanium alloys, the flow stress showed a strong dependence on temperature and strain rate. In addition, the stress-strain curves revealed substantial levels of flow softening. Under subtransus conditions, the majority of this softening was ascribed to deformation heating effects and, secondarily, to microstructural effects. By contrast, microstructural changes, associated with the dissolution of remnant gamma grains and redistribution of solute, appeared to lead to the majority of the softening observed in the nominally single-phase alpha regime. Metallography on as-received (isothermally forged), heat-treated, isothermally upset, and upset and heat-treated samples revealed the persistence of segregation which appears to be a signature of the solidification process characteristic of near-gamma titanium aluminides.

  7. Evaluation of cast titanium alloy compressor components. Volume I. Final report May 76-Aug 78. [Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, A.N.

    1981-11-01

    The objective of this program was to characterize the properties of cast titanium alloy compressor impellers to provide a background for design, processing, and qualification for service in the Solar T62T-40 Titan auxiliary power unit and similar small radial gas turbine engines. Four titanium alloy investment casting foundries participated in the production of straight vane test wheels, a low-cost representation of the compressor impellers. As-cast and hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) Ti-6A1-4V was seen to have less than half the high cycle fatigue strength (20 to 30 ksi versus 60 ksi) of equvalent sections from forged and machined impellers. A modified solution heat treatment and aging cycle was developed which restored the fatigue strength to approximately 50 ksi, and which provided adequate tensile strength and ductility. High cycle fatigue strength of weld repaired vanes was significantly lower than that of unwelded, however. Cast and machined wheels offer substantial cost savings over wheels conventionally machined from forgings. These savings may be as much as 50%, or about $900 per wheel.

  8. Characterization of Cracking and Crack Growth Properties of the C5A Aircraft Tie-Box Forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed destructive examinations were conducted to characterize the integrity and material properties of two aluminum alloy (7075-T6) horizontal stabilizer tie box forgings removed.from US. Air Force C5A and C5B transport aircraft. The C5B tie box forging was,found to contain no evidence of cracking. Thirteen cracks were found in the CSA,forging. All but one of the cracks observed in the C5A component were located along the top cap region (one crack was located in the bottom cap region). The cracks in the C5A component initiated at fastener holes and propagated along a highly tunneled intergranular crack path. The tunneled crack growth configuration is a likelv result of surface compressive stress produced during peening of the .forging suijace. The tie box forging ,fatigue crack growth, fracture and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) properties were characterized. Reported herein are the results of laboratory air ,fatigue crack growth tests and 95% relative humidity SCC tests conducted using specimens machined from the C5A ,forging. SCC test results revealed that the C5A ,forging material was susceptible to intergranular environmental assisted cracking: the C5A forging material exhibited a SCC crack-tip stress-intensity factor threshold of less than 6 MPadn. Fracture toughness tests revealed that the C5A forging material exhibited a fracture toughness that was 25% less than the C5B forging. The C5A forging exhibited rapid laboratory air fatigue crack growth rates having a threshold crack-tip stress-intensity factor range of less than 0.8 MPa sup m. Detailed fractographic examinations revealed that the ,fatigue crack intergranular growth crack path was similar to the cracking observed in the C5A tie box forging. Because both fatigue crack propagation and SCC exhibit similar intergranular crack path behavior, the damage mechanism resulting in multi-site cracking of tie box forgings cannot be determined unless local cyclic stresses can be quantified.

  9. TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-04-14

    The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

  10. 76 FR 66996 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Forging...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ..., see the related notice published in the Federal Register on May 24, 2011 (76 FR 30200). Interested...; Forging Machines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the Occupational... Machines,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for continued use...

  11. Hot Cutting of Real-Time Cast-Forged GS Ductile Iron for Automotive Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilland, Laurence; Mansori, Mohamed El

    2011-01-01

    In the global economy context, automotive industry suppliers have to keep a constant advance on products design and manufacturing process. Concerning automotive rods, the substitution of forged steel by spherical graphite iron (SG iron) with high mechanical properties constitutes a valid economic alternative. Such rods are produced using a complex coupled process: casting and forging followed by an austempered heat treatment. The forging operation is capable to shape the cast rod which introduces hot deformation to increase mechanical properties of net-shape SG iron rod. However, the intermediate re-heating between casting and forging must be avoided to keep competitive manufacturing costs. A major concern of this new process development is the cracks produced in rod's surface which are consecutive to hot spruing involved after casting operations. This issue is addressed in this paper which discusses the physical mechanisms involved in the hot ductile damage of SG iron. Hot cutting tests were performed to simulate the spruing operation which shows the close interactions between microstructure, machining parameters and resulting damages. The damage mechanisms in terms of crack initiation and its growth have been studied with respect to the constituent phases (austenite+graphite nodules), the cut surface morphology and the hot cutting performance.

  12. Jernberg Industries, Inc: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh.

  13. 75 FR 70689 - Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division; Currently...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... in the Federal Register on November 17, 2009 (74 FR 59254). At the request of the State agency and a... Employment and Training Administration Kaiser Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC; Kaiser Aluminum- Greenwood... Aluminum Fabricated Products, LLC, Kaiser Aluminum-Greenwood Forge Division, including on- site...

  14. 76 FR 30200 - Forging Machines; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Order No. 5-2010 (72 FR 55355). Signed at Washington, DC, on May 19, 2011. David Michaels, Assistant... operated valves and switches. DATES: Comments must be submitted (postmarked, sent, or received) by July 25... clearly and properly identify manually operated valves and switches. Inspection of Forging...

  15. From Pastoralism to Industrial Antipathy in William Attaway's Blood on the Forge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Philip

    1975-01-01

    Asserts that Blood on the Forge, published in 1941 by black novelist, William Attaway, represented a literary achievement in its own right, and at the same time realistically portrayed the transition of a people from a structured, authoritarian, rural existence to an industrialized urban frontier. Attaway rejected traditional forms of agrarianism…

  16. 76 FR 8773 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... reviews, * * *'' (76 FR 5331). Accordingly, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C... COMMISSION Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade... steel flanges from India and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  17. 75 FR 67110 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (65 FR 49964). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce... duty orders on imports of forged stainless steel flanges from India and Taiwan (71 FR 3457, January 23... part 201), and part 207, subparts A, D, E, and F (19 CFR part 207), as most recently amended at 74...

  18. 76 FR 31585 - Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... International Trade Administration Forged Stainless Steel Flanges From India: Notice of Rescission of... stainless steel flanges from India. The period of review is February 1, 2010, through January 22, 2011... stainless steel flanges from India. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order, Finding, or...

  19. A Life Study of Ausforged, Standard Forged and Standard Machined AISI M-50 Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted at 350 K (170 F) with three groups of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.) pitch diameter spur gears made of vacuum induction melted (VIM) consumable-electrode vacuum-arc melted (VAR), AISI M-50 steel and one group of vacuum-arc remelted (VAR) AISI 9310 steel. The pitting fatigue life of the standard forged and ausforged gears was approximately five times that of the VAR AISI 9310 gears and ten times that of the bending fatigue life of the standard machined VIM-VAR AISI M-50 gears run under identical conditions. There was a slight decrease in the 10-percent life of the ausforged gears from that for the standard forged gears, but the difference is not statistically significant. The standard machined gears failed primarily by gear tooth fracture while the forged and ausforged VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and the VAR AISI 9310 gears failed primarily by surface pitting fatigue. The ausforged gears had a slightly greater tendency to fail by tooth fracture than the standard forged gears.

  20. iPads as Placed Resources: Forging Community in Online and Off line Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowsell, Jennifer; Saudelli, Mary Gene; Scott, Ruth Mcquirter; Bishop, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The article focuses on the notion of tablet technologies as placed resources (Prinsloo, 2005; Prinsloo & Rowsell, 2012) by exploring how an international research project in Australia, Canada, and the United States forged community through online spaces. There is a tendency in media and in literature to romanticize technologies like iPads as a…

  1. HotEye (tm) Based Coordinate Measuring Machine for Forging Industry

    SciTech Connect

    OG Technologies

    2003-06-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a 3 dimensional measurement system for the domestic forging industry based on HotEye{trademark}. This technology will allow high definition camera to accurately image a red hot object. The project marries conventional Coordinate Measurement Machine ''CMM'' technology to HotEye{trademark} technology to permit the accurate measurement of forged parts while they are at high temperature. Being able to take such measurements will dramatically reduce the amount of scrap produced by the domestic forging industry. This industry wastes a significant amount of energy because of the high rate of scrap it produces. OGT will: (1) Develop a 3D measurement sensor head that will work on a part at a temperature up to 1,450 C with an accuracy of 0.1mm or better and with a scanning speed of less than 10 seconds for an area of 100mm x 100mm. (2) Develop a Virtual-Fixturing software package to alleviate the need of precise hard fixturing. (3) Integrate the 3D measurement sensor head and the Virtual-Fixturing software into a standard CMM, both hardware (replacing the probes) and software (data format and user interface match) so that the system can automatically perform a complete preprogrammed measurement of a hot product. (4) Test and evaluate the system in a forging facility.

  2. Social Work and Engineering Collaboration: Forging Innovative Global Community Development Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Dorie J.

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary programs in schools of social work are growing in scope and number. This article reports on collaboration between a school of social work and a school of engineering, which is forging a new area of interdisciplinary education. The program engages social work students working alongside engineering students in a team approach to…

  3. The Ties That Bind: How Social Capital Is Forged and Forfeited in Teacher Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.; Cooc, North

    2016-01-01

    The effects of social capital on school improvement make it important to understand how teachers forge, maintain, or forfeit collegial relationships. Two common explanations focused on formal organizational features and individual characteristics do not address how social capital accrues from informal dynamics of teachers' interactions in…

  4. T & I--Metalworking, Forging. Kit No. 55. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert J.

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on forging are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (metalworking). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  5. Beta titanium alloys and their role in the titanium industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Paul J.

    1994-07-01

    The class of titanium alloys generically referred to as the beta alloys is arguably the most versatile in the titanium family. Since these alloys offer the highest strength-to-weight ratios and deepest hardenability of all titanium alloys, one might expect them to compete favorably for a variety of aerospace applications. To the contrary, however, except for one very successful application (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al on the SR-71), the beta alloys have remained a very small segment of the industry. As a perspective on this situation, this article reviews some past and present applications of titanium alloys. It also descibes some unique new alloys and applications that promise to reverse historical trends.

  6. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  7. Mid-term results using a cementless hip prosthesis in young Chinese patients: a five- to seven-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, XueYong; Yang, Jing; Shen, Bin; Zhou, ZongKe; Zhang, Hui

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of 74 cementless total hip arthroplasties (THA) in 69 young Chinese patients. The Asian size and MMA AML stems with smoothly tapered tip were used, and the patients were followed up for at least five years. The mean Harris hip score was 45.4 preoperatively and 95.3 at the last follow-up. The incidence of thigh pain was 5.4%, and was related to the short stature of the patient (<160 cm) (P = 0.030). Six patients (6 hips, 8.1%) had acetabular osteolysis in zone 2; reoperation was performed in one patient because of osteolysis and wear of the polyethylene liner. The survival rate of the metal acetabular and femoral components was 100% (95% confidence interval, 0.95–1.0). Primary THA with this AML prosthesis had an acceptable mid-term result in young Chinese patients. PMID:19050881

  8. REVISION TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY USING A MODULAR CEMENTLESS DISTAL FIXATION PROSTHESIS: THE ZMR® HIP SYSTEM. CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF 30 CASES

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Richard Prazeres; de Alencar, Paulo Gilberto Cimbalista; Ganev, Gerson Gandhi; de Vincenzi, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results from 30 cases of revision of total hip arthroplasty using a modular cementless distal fixation prosthesis: the ZMR® Hip System. Method: Between July 2005 and December 2008, 30 operations were performed, on 14 men and 14 women. Two male patients had bilateral surgery. The mean age was 59.2 years (29-81 years), with a mean follow-up of 24 months. The Paprosky classification was used for periprosthetic bone loss, and the Harris Hip Score (HHS) was used to evaluate clinical results. On radiographs, distal migration of the femoral stem was defined in accordance with Sporer. Proximal bone remodeling was classified using the Callaghan criteria. Results: The mean preoperative HHS was 39, and there was a significant increase to 93 points in the final evaluation, which indicated excellent clinical results. No femoral stem migration greater than 5 mm (Sporer) was observed on radiographs, thus suggesting that all the femoral prostheses presented osseointegration and remained stable from the time of the surgery until the final evaluation. The proximal femoral remodeling was either type B or type C in 29 hips, according to Callaghan. Seven patients had complications, but without interfering with osseointegration of the femoral components. Conclusion: Our results from revision of total hip arthroplasty using the ZMR® Hip System were extremely encouraging, and all the components became osseointegrated and remained fixed at the time of the final evaluation. PMID:27022553

  9. Advanced titanium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Alan D.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Schrems, Karol K.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating a means to form useful wrought products by direct and continuous casting of titanium bars using cold-wall induction melting rather than current batch practices such as vacuum arc remelting. Continuous ingots produced by cold-wall induction melting, utilizing a bottomless water-cooled copper crucible, without slag (CaF2) additions had minor defects in the surface such as ''hot tears''. Slag additions as low as 0.5 weight percent were used to improve the surface finish. Therefore, a slag melted experimental Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot was compared to a commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot in the areas of physical, chemical, mechanical, and corrosion attributes to address the question, ''Are any detrimental effects caused by slag addition''?

  10. The use of β titanium alloys in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, R. R.; Briggs, R. D.

    2005-12-01

    Beta titanium alloys have been available since the 1950s (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Mo or B120VCA), but significant applications of these alloys, beyond the SR-71 Blackbird, have been slow in coming. The next significant usage of a β alloy did not occur until the mid-1980s on the B-1B bomber. This aircraft used Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn sheet due to its capability for strip rolling, improved formability, and higher strength than Ti-6Al-4V. The next major usage was on a commercial aircraft, the Boeing 777, which made extensive use of Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al high-strength forgings. Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn environmental control system ducting, castings, and springs were also used, along with Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (β-C) springs. Beta-21S was also introduced for high-temperature usage. More recent work at Boeing has focused on the development of Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr, a high-strength alloy that can be used at higher strength than Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and is much more robust; it has a much wider, or friendlier, processing window. This, along with additional studies at Boeing, and from within the aerospace industry in general will be discussed in detail, summarizing applications and the rationale for the selection of this alloy system for aerospace applications.

  11. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  12. The near-net-shape manufacturing of affordable titanium components for the M777 lightweight howitzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Kevin L.; Ucok, Ibrahim; Gungor, Mehmet N.; Guclu, Mustafa; Kramer, Lawrence S.; Tack, Wm. Troy; Nastac, Laurentiu; Martin, Nicholas R.; Dong, Hao; Pickens, Joseph R.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Marines’ and U.S. Army’s next-generation, titanium-intensive M777 howitzer offers reduced weight, increased mobility, and improved survivability over its aging, M198 steel-based predecessor. The National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT), operated by Concurrent Technologies Corporation, is helping to meet M777 program goals for cost, performance, and production schedule by developing near-net-shape manufacturing routes for traditionally machined and welded components. Under two projects sponsored by the Navy Manufacturing Technology Program, the NCEMT has developed investment cast spade and saddle components as well as flowformed tubes and forged bell housings. This paper summarizes the results of the two ongoing projects.

  13. Low cost titanium--myth or reality

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

  14. TC17 titanium alloy laser melting deposition repair process and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Yudai; Zheng, Hang; Tang, Kang; Li, Huaixue; Gong, Shuili

    2016-08-01

    Due to the high manufacturing cost of titanium compressor blisks, aero engine repairing process research has important engineering significance and economic value. TC17 titanium alloy is a rich β stable element dual α+β phase alloy whose nominal composition is Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Mo-4Cr. It has high mechanical strength, good fracture toughness, high hardenability and a wide forging-temperature range. Through a surface response experiment with different laser powers, scanning speeds and powder feeding speeds, the coaxial powder feeding laser melting deposition repair process is studied for the surface circular groove defects. In this paper, the tensile properties, relative density, microhardness, elemental composition, internal defects and microstructure of the laser-repaired TC17 forging plate are analyzed. The results show that the laser melting deposition process could realize the form restoration of groove defect; tensile strength and elongation could reach 1100 MPa and 10%, which could reach 91-98% that of original TC17 wrought material; with the optimal parameters (1000 W-25 V-8 mm/s), the microhardness of the additive zone, the heat-affected zone and base material is evenly distributed at 370-390 HV500. The element content difference between the additive zone and base material is less than ±0.15%. Due to the existence of the pores 10 μm in diameter, the relative density could reach 99%, which is mainly inversely proportional to the powder feeding speed. The repaired zone is typically columnar and dendrite crystal, and the 0.5-1.5 mm-deep heat-affected zone in the groove interface is coarse equiaxial crystal.

  15. Periosteal and endosteal reaction to reaming and nailing: the possible role of revascularization on the endosteal anchorage of cementless stems.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, U E

    1996-05-01

    The reaction of bone to titanium implants of different shapes inserted in the rabbit tibia was investigated with histological and perfusion techniques to determine the pattern of vessel distribution. The experimental implants included full cylindrical rods, hollow rods with holes on the surface and wire mesh rods. In the implanted bones the rods were found to fill a large area of the medullary canal; however, owing to the discrepancy between the shape of the diaphysis and the implant, the endosteal contact was never complete. In an early phase, reactive bone filled the gap between the endosteal and the implant surface; in hollow and wire mesh rods bone had grown inside through the lateral holes or loops of the mesh. Revascularization took place together with remodelling of the endosteal, primary bone to mature lamellar. In full implants a reticle of newly formed vessels developed around the rods; in hollow and wire mesh implants vessels had grown inside the implant itself and the endosteal surface had a more regular profile than in full rods. Wire mesh plugs prevented formation of a peripheral medullary space and showed no encapsulation; wires in contact with or in proximity to the endosteal surface were incorporated by lamellar systems with strong connections with the original cortical bone. PMID:8736736

  16. Omega phase formation in titanium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Morris, C.E.; Lawson, A.C.

    1992-05-01

    Although the response of titanium alloys to dynamic loading is receiving increased attention in the literature (particularly in the area of shear-band formation), a more limited experimental database exists concerning the detailed structure/property relationships of titanium alloys subjected to shock loading. In this study, preliminary results concerning the influence of alloy chemistry on the property of omega-phase formation and its structure in three titanium alloys are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium, A-70 (3700 ppm oxygen) titanium, and Ti-6Al-4V were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and ``soft`` shock-recovery techniques. VISAR wave profiles of shock-loaded high-purity titanium revealed the omega-phase pressure-induced transition to occur at approximately 10.4 GPa. Wave profile measurements on A-70 Ti shocked to pressures up to 35 GPa and Ti-6Al-4V shocked to pressures up to 25 GPa exhibited no evidence of a three-wave structure indicative of a pressure-induced phase transition. Neutron and X-ray diffractometry and TEM analysis confirmed the presence of retained {omega}-phase in the electrolytic-Ti and the absence of {omega}-phase in the shock-recovered A-70 Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correlate with suppression of deformation twinning. Neutron diffraction was used to measure the in-situ bulk lattice constants and volume fraction of the {alpha} and {omega} phases in the recovered high-purity titanium samples that were shock loaded. The influence of alloy content on the kinetics of formation/retention of {omega}-phase and substructure evolution is discussed and contrasted in light of previous literature studies.

  17. Interfacial oxidations of pure titanium and titanium alloys with investments.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Watanabe, T; Mizutani, N; Fukui, H; Hasegawa, J; Nakamura, H

    2000-12-01

    External oxides of a commercially pure titanium (cpTi), Ti6Al4V alloy, and an experimental beta-type titanium alloy (Ti 53.4 wt%, Nb 29 wt%, Ta 13 wt%, and Zr 4.6 wt%) were characterized after heating to 600, 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C in contact with three types of investments (alumina cement, magnesia cement, and phosphate-bonded) in air. XRD studies demonstrated that MgO, Li2TiO3 and/or Li2Ti3O7 were formed through reactions with the metal and the constituents in the magnesia cement-investment after heating to 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C. Except for these conditions, TiO2 (rutile) was only formed on cpTi. For titanium alloys, the other components apart from Ti also formed simple and complex oxides such as Al2O3 and Al2TiO5 on Ti6Al4V, and Zr0.25Ti0.75Nb2O7 on the beta-type titanium alloy. However, no oxides containing V or Ta were formed. These results suggest that the constituents of titanium alloys reacted with the investment oxides and atmospheric oxygen to form external oxides due to the free energy of oxide formation and the concentration of each element on the metal surface.

  18. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells.

  19. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  20. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. PMID:25611515

  1. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  2. Effects of Cryogenic Forging and Anodization on the Mechanical Properties of AA 7075-T73 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Liao, Tien-Wei; Hsu, Wen-Nong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, high-strength AA7075 alloy samples were cryogenically forged after annealing and then subjected to solution and aging treatments. The cryogenically forged 7075-T73 alloy samples displayed equiaxed fine grains associated with abundant fine precipitates in their matrix. Compared with conventional 7075-T73 alloy samples, the cryogenically forged samples exhibited an 8-12% reduction in tensile strength and an increased fatigue strength and higher corrosion resistance. The fatigue strength measured at 107 cycles was 225 MPa in the bare samples; the strength was increased to 250 MPa in the cryogenically forged samples. The effect of anodization on the corrosion resistance of the bare samples was improved from (E corr) -0.80 to -0.61 V.

  3. 76 FR 52313 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools (i.e., Axes & Adzes, Bars & Wedges, Hammers & Sledges, and Picks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Heavy Forged Hand Tools (i.e., Axes & Adzes, Bars & Wedges, Hammers & Sledges... AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: As...

  4. Plasma quench production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project, Plasma Quench Production of Titanium from Titanium Tetrachloride, centers on developing a technique for rapidly quenching the high temperature metal species and preventing back reactions with the halide. The quenching technique chosen uses the temperature drop produced in a converging/diverging supersonic nozzle. The rapid quench provided by this nozzle prevents the back reaction of the halide and metal. The nature of the process produces nanosized particles (10 to 100 nm). The powders are collected by cyclone separators, the hydrogen flared, and the acid scrubbed. Aluminum and titanium powders have been produced in the laboratory-scale device at 1 gram per hour. Efforts to date to scale up this process have not been successful.

  5. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  6. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-05-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis.

  7. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  8. Fatigue life on a full scale test rig: Forged versus cast wind turbine rotor shafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, J.; Rauert, T.; Dalhoff, P.; Sander, M.

    2016-09-01

    To reduce uncertainties associated with the fatigue life of the highly safety relevant rotor shaft and also to review today's design practice, the fatigue behaviour will be tested on a full scale test rig. Until now tests on full scale wind turbine parts are not common. Therefore, a general lack of experience on how to perform accelerated life time tests for those components exists. To clarify how to transfer real conditions to the test environment, the arrangements and deviations for the upcoming experimental test are discussed in detail. In order to complete investigations of weight saving potentials, next to getting a better comprehension of the fatigue behaviour by executing a full scale test, a further outcome are suggestions for the usage of cast and forged materials regarding the fatigue and the remaining life of the rotor shaft. It is shown, that it is worthwhile to think about a material exchange for the forged rotor shaft.

  9. HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M

    2008-03-28

    The effect of hydrogen on the fracture toughness properties of Types 304L, 316L and 21-6-9 forged stainless steels was investigated. Fracture toughness samples were fabricated from forward-extruded forgings. Samples were uniformly saturated with hydrogen after exposure to hydrogen gas at 34 MPa or 69 and 623 K prior to testing. The fracture toughness properties were characterized by measuring the J-R behavior at ambient temperature in air. The results show that the hydrogen-charged steels have fracture toughness values that were about 50-60% of the values measured for the unexposed steels. The reduction in fracture toughness was accompanied by a change in fracture appearance. Both uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples failed by microvoid nucleation and coalescence, but the fracture surfaces of the hydrogen-charged steels had smaller microvoids. Type 316L stainless steel had the highest fracture toughness properties and the greatest resistance to hydrogen degradation.

  10. Meta-Model Based Optimisation Algorithms for Robust Optimization of 3D Forging Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Fourment, Lionel

    2007-04-07

    In order to handle costly and complex 3D metal forming optimization problems, we develop a new optimization algorithm that allows finding satisfactory solutions within less than 50 iterations (/function evaluation) in the presence of local extrema. It is based on the sequential approximation of the problem objective function by the Meshless Finite Difference Method (MFDM). This changing meta-model allows taking into account the gradient information, if available, or not. It can be easily extended to take into account uncertainties on the optimization parameters. This new algorithm is first evaluated on analytic functions, before being applied to a 3D forging benchmark, the preform tool shape optimization that allows minimizing the potential of fold formation during the two-stepped forging sequence.

  11. Tool Path Design of Incremental Open-Die Disk Forging Using Physical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    A small-batch product of large-sized parts is usually manufactured using incremental open-die forging. In order to control the overall change in the shape of a part, it is essential to be able to predict the shape changes that occur during each step. This paper addresses shape changes of a material according to the forging path. Rapid prediction of metal flows for continuing incremental deformation using theoretical methods is difficult. Accordingly, instead of a theoretical approach, an experiment that tests the tendency of the metal flow for development of forming processes is required. For the sake of convenience, simulative experiments are carried out using plasticine at room temperature. In present study, the tool movement is dominant parameters to with respect to changing the shape of the workpiece.

  12. Rifampicin-fosfomycin coating for cementless endoprostheses: antimicrobial effects against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kirchhof, Kristin; Seim, Florian; Hrubesch, Isabelle; Lips, Katrin S; Mannel, Henrich; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    New strategies to decrease infection rates in cementless arthroplasty are needed, especially in the context of the growing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a rifampicin-fosfomycin coating against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA in a rabbit infection prophylaxis model. Uncoated or rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated K-wires were inserted into the intramedullary canal of the tibia in rabbits and contaminated with an inoculation dose of 10(5) or 10(6) colony-forming units of MSSA EDCC 5055 in study 1 and MRSA T6625930 in study 2, respectively. After 28days the animals were killed and clinical, histological and microbiological assessment, including pulse-field gel electrophoresis, was conducted. Positive culture growth in agar plate testing and/or clinical signs and/or histological signs were defined positive for infection. Statistical evaluation was performed using Fisher's exact test. Both studies showed a statistically significant reduction of infection rates for rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implants compared to uncoated K-wires (P=0.015). In both studies none of the 12 animals that were treated with a rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implant showed clinical signs of infection or a positive agar plate testing result. In both studies, one animal of the coating group showed the presence of sporadic bacteria with concomitant inflammatory signs in histology. The control groups in both studies exhibited an infection rate of 100% with clear clinical signs of infection and positive culture growth in all animals. In summary, the rifampicin-fosfomycin-coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity against both MSSA and MRSA, and therefore warrants further clinical testing.

  13. Cementless anatomical prosthesis for the treatment of 3-part and 4-part proximal humerus fractures: cadaver study and prospective clinical study with minimum 2 years followup

    PubMed Central

    Obert, Laurent; Saadnia, Rachid; Loisel, François; Uhring, Julien; Adam, Antoine; Rochet, Séverin; Clappaz, Pascal; Lascar, Tristan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes of a cementless, trauma-specific locked stem for 3- and 4-part proximal humeral fractures. Materials and methods: This study consisted of two parts: a cadaver study with 22 shoulders and a multicenter prospective clinical study of 23 fracture patients evaluated at least 2 years after treatment. In the cadaver study, the locked stem (HumelockTM, FX Solutions) and its instrumentation were evaluated. In the clinical study, five senior surgeons at four different hospitals performed the surgical procedures. An independent surgeon evaluated the patients using clinical (Constant score, QuickDASH) and radiological (X-rays, CT scans) outcome measures. Results: The cadaver study allowed us to validate the height landmarks relative to the pectoralis major tendon. In the clinical study, at the review, abduction was 95° (60–160), forward flexion was 108° (70–160), external rotation (elbow at body) was 34° (0–55), the QuickDASH was 31 (4.5–59), the overall Constant score was 54 (27–75), and the weighted Constant score was 76 (31.5–109). Discussion: This preliminary study of hemiarthroplasty (HA) with a locked stem found results that were at least equivalent to published series. As all patients had at least a 2-year follow-up, integration of the locked stem did not cause any specific complications. These results suggest that it is possible to avoid using cement when hemiarthroplasty is performed for the humeral stem. This implant makes height adjustment and transosseous suturing of the tuberosities more reproducible. PMID:27194107

  14. Numerical simulation and experimental study for the die forging process of a high-speed railway brake disc hub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Long; LI, Dianzhong

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of manufacturing a near-net shape forging product of a brake disk hub for the high-speed railway, the die forging process was designed and optimized in this study. Firstly, based on the measured stress-strain curves at different strain rates and the thermal-physical parameters of 40Cr A steel, a finite element model for the forging process of a high-speed railway brake disc hub was established. Then, the temperature, stress and strain fields were studied and analyzed at the pre-forging and the finial-forging stages. Besides, in order to trace the stress and strain evolution, five points at different positions were chosen on the billet, and the comparison of the state conditions was made among these points. The results have demonstrated that the product can be well formed by an elaborately designed three-stage forging process, which may reduce the metal machine allowance and the producing cost effectively. Finally, an industrial trial was made and a machined product with sound quality was obtained.

  15. Effect of forging strain rate and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties of warm-worked 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, N. T.; Van Tyne, C. J.; Mataya, M. C.

    2010-01-25

    Stainless steel 304L forgings were produced with four different types of production forging equipment – hydraulic press, mechanical press, screw press, and high-energy rate forging (HERF). Each machine imparted a different nominal strain rate during the deformation. The final forgings were done at the warm working (low hot working) temperatures of 816 °C, 843°C, and 871°C. The objectives of the study were to characterize and understand the effect of industrial strain rates (i.e. processing equipment), and deformation temperature on the mechanical properties for the final component. Some of the components were produced with an anneal prior to the final forging while others were deformed without the anneal. The results indicate that lower strain rates produced lower strength and higher ductility components, but the lower strain rate processes were more sensitive to deformation temperature variation and resulted in more within-part property variation. The highest strain rate process, HERF, resulted in slightly lower yield strength due to internal heating. Lower processing temperatures increased strength, decreased ductility but decreased within-part property variation. The anneal prior to the final forging produced a decrease in strength, a small increase in ductility, and a small decrease of within-part property variation.

  16. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  17. Process for reproducibly preparing titanium subhydride

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Richard S.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium subhydride is produced in a reactor by heating a selected amount of finely divided titanium compound at a selected temperature for a selected period of time under dynamic vacuum conditions. Hydrogen is removed substantially uniformly from each powder grain and there is produced a subhydride of substantially uniform titanium-hydrogen composition. Selection of the amount, temperature and time produces a subhydride of selected titanium-hydrogen composition.

  18. Parallel investigation of double forged pure tungsten samples irradiated in three DPF devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Laas, T.; Shirokova, V.; Väli, B.; Paju, J.; Pimenov, V. N.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Niemela, J.; Crespo, M.-L.; Cicuttin, A.; Talab, A. A.; Pokatilov, A.; Parker, M.

    2015-08-01

    The double forged pure tungsten (W) samples (supplied by IAEA CRP from the FZJ team in Juelich, Germany) were irradiated in DPF (dense plasma focus) devices PF-12, "Bora" and PF-1000 by hot plasma and fast ion streams. We have used the following analytical methods: microscopy (optical and scanning electron), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electrical conductivity and microroughness measurements. The damage dependence of the tungsten grades on irradiation conditions and power flux densities of irradiation processes is discussed.

  19. Innovative Die Material and Lubrication Strategies for Clean and Energy Conserving Forging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Rajiv Shivpuri; Sailesh Babu; Lin Yang; Yijun Zhu

    2007-01-08

    The objective of this project was to develop and implement innovative die material and surface coating strategies such as composite dies and lubricated coatings to increase die lives and to reduce environmental pollution. In this project approaches and software were developed for die life optimization and optimal design of lubrication systems for hot forging. In addition, LENS applied nickel-aluminide coatings were developed and validated in the industrial environment for significant improvements in die life.

  20. Microstructure and degradation behavior of forged Fe-Mn-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhigang; Hodgson, Michael A.; Cao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This work presents a comparative study of a series of Fe-Mn-Si alloys proposed as degradable biomaterials for medical applications. Five Fe-28wt.%Mn-xSi (where x = 0 to 8 wt.%) alloys were fabricated by an arc-melting method. All the as-cast alloys were subsequently subjected to homogenization treatment and hot forging. The microstructure and phase constituents were investigated. It is found that the grain size of the as-forged alloys ranged approximately from 30 to 50 μm. The as-forged Fe-Mn-Si alloys containing Si from 2 to 6 wt.% was comprised of duplex martensitic ɛ and austenitic γ phases; however, the Si-free and 8 wt.% Si alloys only consisted of a single γ phase. After 30 days of static immersion test in a simulated body fluid (SBF) medium, it is found that pitting and general corrosion occur on the sample surfaces. Potentiodynamic analysis reveals that the degradation rate of the Fe-Mn-Si alloys increased gradually with Si content up to 6 wt.%, beyond which the degradation slows down.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forging Process to Reproduce a 3D Aluminium Foam Complex Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filice, Luigino; Gagliardi, Francesco; Shivpuri, Rajiv; Umbrello, Domenico

    2007-05-01

    Metallic foams represent one of the most exciting materials introduced in the manufacturing scenario in the last years. In the study here addressed, the experimental and numerical investigations on the forging process of a simple foam billet shaped into complex sculptured parts were carried out. In particular, the deformation behavior of metallic foams and the development of density gradients were investigated through a series of experimental forging tests in order to produce a selected portion of a hip prosthesis. The human bone replacement was chosen as case study due to its industrial demand and for its particular 3D complex shape. A finite element code (Deform 3D®) was utilized for modeling the foam behavior during the forging process and an accurate material rheology description was used based on a porous material model which includes the measured local density. Once the effectiveness of the utilized Finite Element model was verified through the comparison with the experimental evidences, a numerical study of the influence of the foam density was investigated. The obtained numerical results shown as the initial billet density plays an important role on the prediction of the final shape, the optimization of the flash as well as the estimation of the punch load.

  2. Effects of Forging Process Parameters on Microstructure Evolution of Aluminum Alloy 7050

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Youping; Shi Yan; Yang Jihui; Lin Yongcheng

    2007-04-07

    The objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of microstructure evolution of aluminum alloy 7050 under the condition of different forging process parameters by means of combining materials physical model with finite element code. For the purpose of establishing constitutive equation and physical model of microstructure evolution, the isothermal compression test were performed by machine Gleeble 1500 on the condition of temperatures ranging from 250 deg. C to 450 deg. C and constant strain rates of 0.01s-1, 0.1s-1, 1s-1 and 10s-1. The behaviors of microstructure evolutions of aluminum alloy 7050 under difference process parameters were studied by metallographic observations. The experiment results showed that recrystallization during forming process occurred at the critical strain and the volume fraction of recrystallization changed with the temperature and strain rate. According to the results of isothermal compression test, a constitutive equation and an empirical model of DRX were obtained. A finite element code DEFORM 3D was used to analyze the influence of different forging process parameters on the behavior of microstructure evolution in details. The present model and simulation method can be served as a useful tool to predict and control the properties and shape of aluminum alloy 7050 components during forging.

  3. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-15

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  4. Simulations and Experiments of the Nonisothermal Forging Process of a Ti-6Al-4V Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a nonisothermal precision forging process of a Ti-6Al-4V first-stage impeller for the gas turbine engine was simulated using the finite element software. The simulation results such as load requirements, damage, velocity field, stress, strain, and temperature distributions are discussed in detail. Simulations predicted the maximum load requirement of about 80 MN. The maximum temperature loss was observed at the contour surface regions. The center and contour regions are the high-strained regions in the part. To validate the model, forging experiments mimicking simulations were performed in the α + β phases region (930 °C). The selected locations of the part were characterized for tensile properties at 27 and 200 °C, hardness, microstructure, grain size, and the amount of primary α phase based on the strain distribution results. The soundness of the forged part was verified using fluorescent penetrant test (Mil Std 2175 Grade A) and ultrasonic test (AMS 2630 class A1). From the experimental results, it was found that the variations in the hardness, tensile properties at room, and elevated temperature are not significant. The microstructure, grain size, and primary α phase content are nearly same.

  5. Magnetic and mechanical properties of rotary forged aluminum compacted Nd-Fe-B magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Brett, R.L.; Rowlinson, N.; Ashraf, M.M.; Harris, I.R.; Bowen, P. )

    1990-05-01

    Magnetic and mechanical properties have been studied and compared for rotary forged aluminum compacts containing MQI and MQIII (isotropic and anisotropic melt-spun Nd-Fe-B, respectively) in the as-forged condition, and after subsequent heat treatment both above and below the Curie point. A maximum coercivity of 1165 kA m{sup {minus}1} and a maximum energy product of 84 kJ m{sup {minus}3} have been measured for compacts containing MQI material and 10% aluminum by volume. Compacts containing MQIII material possess superior fracture strengths to those containing MQI material in both bend tests (30 compared with 17 MPa) and uniaxial compression tests (185 compared with 67 MPa), and this is attributed primarily to more uniform compaction due to the morphology of the MQIII particles. Energy dispersive spectrography and fractography have indicated failure of MQIII compacts along interfaces between the aluminum and magnetic material, whereas MQI compacts fail through areas of incomplete compaction. In addition, heat treatment in vacuum subsequent to forging is shown to strengthen compacts containing both MQI and MQIII material substantially with only minor reductions measured in magnetic properties.

  6. Cold-forged connector ties back well risers in Congo field

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.M.; Tison, M.; Bahoumina, A.

    1997-05-05

    The tieback of eleven 10 3/4-in., high-pressure risers in Elf Congo`s offshore N`Kossa field used a cold-forge tieback system to create a metal seal. The time-saving tieback method allows for placing the risers in residual tension. The installation work was completed in the fall of 1995. Average time to complete the 10 3/4-in. casing tiebacks, including test and nipple-up and nipple-down times, averaged 52 hr/well. Tiebacks for all three casing strings averaged 90 hr for all surface and subsea operations including BOP test and nipple-up/nipple-down time. Metal sealing of the primary casing annulus has been made practical because the offshore industry has gone toward compact-wellheads and hanging of the completion on a mandrel. Hanging the completion on a mandrel, however, has it own set of considerations. Exact riser length may be difficult to predict before running because the riser must first be locked into the mudline casing hanger and then landed out on the support shoulder in the surface head. Also, a general desire is that riser tieback strings should be in tension after installation. This is not always easy with a passive or dumb hanger and fixed should configuration. Threaded, adjustable mandrel hanger systems exist but can require very close casing string space-out to achieve the desired residual riser tension. The paper describes the objectives, forged sleeves, running sequence, cold forging, and the prototype test.

  7. Microstructural changes in as-cast M2 grade high speed steel during hot forging

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomashchi, M.R. . Metallurgy Dept.); Sellars, C.M. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1993-10-01

    High speed steels have a complex carbide pattern in the as-cast state which has to be modified to achieve the desired properties of adequate toughness, hot hardness, and wear resistance. The High speed steels have a complex carbide pattern in the as-cast state which has to be modified to achieve the desired properties of adequate toughness, hot hardness, and wear resistance. The effects of hot forging and postdeformation annealing on carbide distribution and morphology in M2 grade high speed steel were studied, and it was shown that hot forging accelerates the spheroidization rate of M[sub 6]C carbide with little effect on coarsening. The mechanism responsible for such acceleration is dominated by mechanical disintegration of M[sub 6]C carbide plates, while diffusion-controlled spheroidization was not significant. For MC carbide particles, coarsening was the dominant mechanism, but it was not possible to ascertain whether diffusion had been unaffected by deformation or even increased by a factor that could be as high as 10,000 times. Annealing after deformation accelerated spheroidization which was attributed to the damaging of carbide plates during forging rather than an increase in diffusion rate, since the matrix was almost substructure-free in the annealed condition, i.e., lack of short-circuiting paths for diffusion.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forging Process to Reproduce a 3D Aluminium Foam Complex Shape

    SciTech Connect

    Filice, Luigino; Gagliardi, Francesco; Umbrello, Domenico; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    2007-05-17

    Metallic foams represent one of the most exciting materials introduced in the manufacturing scenario in the last years. In the study here addressed, the experimental and numerical investigations on the forging process of a simple foam billet shaped into complex sculptured parts were carried out. In particular, the deformation behavior of metallic foams and the development of density gradients were investigated through a series of experimental forging tests in order to produce a selected portion of a hip prosthesis. The human bone replacement was chosen as case study due to its industrial demand and for its particular 3D complex shape. A finite element code (Deform 3D) was utilized for modeling the foam behavior during the forging process and an accurate material rheology description was used based on a porous material model which includes the measured local density. Once the effectiveness of the utilized Finite Element model was verified through the comparison with the experimental evidences, a numerical study of the influence of the foam density was investigated. The obtained numerical results shown as the initial billet density plays an important role on the prediction of the final shape, the optimization of the flash as well as the estimation of the punch load.

  9. An Approach to Optimize Size Parameters of Forging by Combining Hot-Processing Map and FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. E.; Wang, X. Y.; Deng, L.

    2014-11-01

    The size parameters of 6061 aluminum alloy rib-web forging were optimized by using hot-processing map and finite element method (FEM) based on high-temperature compression data. The results show that the stress level of the alloy can be represented by a Zener-Holloman parameter in a hyperbolic sine-type equation with the hot deformation activation energy of 343.7 kJ/mol. Dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization concurrently preceded during high-temperature deformation of the alloy. Optimal hot-processing parameters for the alloy corresponding to the peak value of 0.42 are 753 K and 0.001 s-1. The instability domain occurs at deformation temperature lower than 653 K. FEM is an available method to validate hot-processing map in actual manufacture by analyzing the effect of corner radius, rib width, and web thickness on workability of rib-web forging of the alloy. Size parameters of die forgings can be optimized conveniently by combining hot-processing map and FEM.

  10. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-01

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  11. Simulations and Experiments of the Nonisothermal Forging Process of a Ti-6Al-4V Impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. Ram

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, a nonisothermal precision forging process of a Ti-6Al-4V first-stage impeller for the gas turbine engine was simulated using the finite element software. The simulation results such as load requirements, damage, velocity field, stress, strain, and temperature distributions are discussed in detail. Simulations predicted the maximum load requirement of about 80 MN. The maximum temperature loss was observed at the contour surface regions. The center and contour regions are the high-strained regions in the part. To validate the model, forging experiments mimicking simulations were performed in the α + β phases region (930 °C). The selected locations of the part were characterized for tensile properties at 27 and 200 °C, hardness, microstructure, grain size, and the amount of primary α phase based on the strain distribution results. The soundness of the forged part was verified using fluorescent penetrant test (Mil Std 2175 Grade A) and ultrasonic test (AMS 2630 class A1). From the experimental results, it was found that the variations in the hardness, tensile properties at room, and elevated temperature are not significant. The microstructure, grain size, and primary α phase content are nearly same.

  12. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  13. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  14. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  18. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  1. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  3. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  4. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  5. Hypervelocity-impact studies on titanium, titanium alloys, and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Bless, S.J.; Girrens, S.P.; Green, J.E.

    1982-08-01

    The hypervelocity-impact behavior of commercial-pure, Grade 2 Ti, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.25Si, and pure beryllium was studied by impacting targets of these materials with millimeter-sized spheres of glass, copper, aluminum, and cadmium propelled from a light-gas gun at velocities ranging from 4.5 to 7.6 km/s. Target temperatures ranged from 295 to 775/sup 0/K when impacted. Semi-infinite targets were impacted to determine cratering behavior, and some correlations were made to thin-target perforation. Thin titanium targets with a variety of surface coatings and finishes were also impacted. Titanium and the titanium alloys were found to behave in a ductile manner when impacted, but beryllium was found to be brittle even at 775/sup 0/K. An extrapolation equation was used to optimize a titanium heat pipe radiator mass for a space nuclear power application.

  6. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  7. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    An eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  8. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  9. Investigation of the Workability and Response of Ti-6Al-4V Titanium alloys at Lower Elevated Temperature and Higher Strain Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Cindy Xiaohui; Lim, Chao Voon; Castagne, Sylvie

    2011-05-04

    Titanium and its alloys have a wide range of applications in various industries such as aerospace, medical, automotive and even commercial products. However, formability of titanium alloys has always been an issue. This study presents the results of an investigation on the workability and response of Ti-6Al-4V deformed at different strain rates and lower elevated temperatures with different initial microstructures. Compression tests of cylindrical specimens were performed at various temperatures (300 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 450 deg. C, 500 deg. C) and at different strain rates (0.001 s{sup -1}, 0.02 s{sup -1} and 0.1 s{sup -1}). The effects of strain rate, temperature and initial microstructure on the workability of the Ti alloy were investigated. Based on these experimental results, workability maps for the respective initial microstructures were developed. Results showed that temperature played an important role in the formability of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloys unlike strain rate. In addition, feasibility study on Multi-Directional Forging (MDF) was performed and positive results were obtained. It was demonstrated that Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloys can undergo severe plastic deformation at lower elevated temperature (400-500 deg. C) and at a higher strain rate of 0.1 s{sup -1}.

  10. Effect of Forging Parameters on Low Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of Al/Basalt Short Fiber Metal Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, R.; Ranganath, G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface. PMID:24298207

  11. Effect of forging parameters on low cycle fatigue behaviour of Al/basalt short fiber metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, R; Ranganath, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with metal matrix composites (MMCs) of Al 7075 alloy containing different weight percentage (2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10) basalt short fiber reinforcement and unreinforced matrix alloy. The samples were produced by the permanent stir casting technique. The casting ingots were cut into blanks to be forged in single stage and double stage, using MN press and graphite-based lubricant. The microstructures and fatigue properties of the matrix alloy and MMC samples were investigated in the as cast state and in the single and double stage forging operations. The microstructure results showed that the forged sample had a uniform distribution of the basalt short fiber throughout the specimens. Evaluation of the fatigue properties showed that the forged samples had higher values than those of the as cast counterparts. After forging, the enhancement of the fatigue strength of the matrix alloy was so significant and high in the case of 2.5 and 5.0 wt. percentage basalt short fiber reinforced MMC, and there was no enhancement in 7.5 and 10 weight percentages short fiber reinforced MMCs. The fracture damage was mainly due to decohesion at the matrix-fiber interface.

  12. Effects of Low Temperature on Hydrogen-Assisted Crack Growth in Forged 304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Heather; San Marchi, Chris; Balch, Dorian; Somerday, Brian; Michael, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of low temperature on hydrogen-assisted crack propagation in forged 304L austenitic stainless steel. Fracture initiation toughness and crack-growth resistance curves were measured using fracture mechanics specimens that were thermally precharged with 140 wppm hydrogen and tested at 293 K or 223 K (20 °C or -50 °C). Fracture initiation toughness for hydrogen-precharged forgings decreased by at least 50 to 80 pct relative to non-charged forgings. With hydrogen, low-temperature fracture initiation toughness decreased by 35 to 50 pct relative to room-temperature toughness. Crack growth without hydrogen at both temperatures was microstructure-independent and indistinguishable from blunting, while with hydrogen microcracks formed by growth and coalescence of microvoids. Initiation of microvoids in the presence of hydrogen occurred where localized deformation bands intersected grain boundaries and other deformation bands. Low temperature additionally promoted fracture initiation at annealing twin boundaries in the presence of hydrogen, which competed with deformation band intersections and grain boundaries as sites of microvoid formation and fracture initiation. A common ingredient for fracture initiation was stress concentration that arose from the intersection of deformation bands with these microstructural obstacles. The localized deformation responsible for producing stress concentrations at obstacles was intensified by low temperature and hydrogen. Crack orientation and forging strength were found to have a minor effect on fracture initiation toughness of hydrogen-supersaturated 304L forgings.

  13. Computer-Aided Design of Manufacturing Chain Based on Closed Die Forging for Hardly Deformable Cu-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Maciej; Kuziak, Roman; Pidvysots'kyy, Valeriy; Nowak, Jarosław; Węglarczyk, Stanisław; Drozdowski, Krzysztof

    2013-07-01

    Two copper-based alloys were considered, Cu-1 pct Cr and Cu-0.7 pct Cr-1 pct Si-2 pct Ni. The thermal, electrical, and mechanical properties of these alloys are given in the paper and compared to pure copper and steel. The role of aging and precipitation kinetics in hardening of the alloys is discussed based upon the developed model. Results of plastometric tests performed at various temperatures and various strain rates are presented. The effect of the initial microstructure on the flow stress was investigated. Rheologic models for the alloys were developed. A finite element (FE) model based on the Norton-Hoff visco-plastic flow rule was applied to the simulation of forging of the alloys. Analysis of the die wear for various processes of hot and cold forging is presented as well. A microstructure evolution model was implemented into the FE code, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of final products were predicted. Various variants of the manufacturing cycles were considered. These include different preheating schedules, hot forging, cold forging, and aging. All variants were simulated using the FE method and loads, die filling, tool wear, and mechanical properties of products were predicted. Three variants giving the best combination of forging parameters were selected and industrial trials were performed. The best manufacturing technology for the copper-based alloys is proposed.

  14. Ability of zirconia double coated with titanium and hydroxyapatite to bond to bone under load-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Noda, Iwao; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    As a preclinical study, we evaluated the ability of hydroxyapatite and titanium on zirconia (HTOZ) to bond to bone under load-bearing conditions in animal experiments. HTOZ, HA, and Ti on Co-Cr alloy (HTOC) and Ti on Co-Cr alloy (TOC) were implanted into the weight-bearing portion of the femoral condyles of nine beagle dogs. Femurs were extracted 4, 12, and 52 weeks after implantation and examined mechanically by pullout testing, and histologically by toluidine blue staining, SEM, and calculation of the affinity index. The interfacial shear strengths (mean+/-SD) of the HTOZ, HTOC, and TOC groups were 4.42+/-0.453, 3.90+/-0.903, and 4.08+/-0.790 MPa at 4 weeks; 6.82+/-2.64, 6.00+/-1.88, and 6.63+/-1.63 MPa at 12 weeks; and 13.98+/-1.94, 11.95+/-1.51, and 10.78+/-0.83 MPa at 52 weeks. There were no significant differences in the interfacial shear strengths between the three groups at any time. Affinity indices (mean+/-SD) obtained from SEM images of the HTOZ, HTOC, and TOC groups were 49.6+/-6.52%, 43.3+/-10.43%, and 23.7+/-3.95% at 4 weeks; 55.0+/-6.72%, 51.5+/-3.07%, and 28.6+/-4.09% at 12 weeks; and 59.1+/-6.73%, 63.0+/-6.40%, and 34.3+/-6.72% at 52 weeks. HA-coated implants (HTOZ, HTOC) had significantly higher affinity indices than non-HA-coated implants (TOC) at all times. HTOZ has the ability to bond to bone equivalent to HTOC and TOC. HTOZ is an excellent material for components of cementless joint prostheses.

  15. High Temperature, Slow Strain Rate Forging of Advanced Disk Alloy ME3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; OConnor, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    The advanced disk alloy ME3 was designed in the HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 F in large disks. This was achieved by designing a disk alloy and process producing balanced monotonic, cyclic, and time-dependent mechanical properties. combined with robust processing and manufacturing characteristics. The resulting baseline alloy, processing, and supersolvus heat treatment produces a uniform, relatively fine mean grain size of about ASTM 7, with as-large-as (ALA) grain size of about ASTM 3. There is a long term need for disks with higher rim temperature capabilities than 1250 F. This would allow higher compressor exit (T3) temperatures and allow the full utilization of advanced combustor and airfoil concepts under development. Several approaches are being studied that modify the processing and chemistry of ME3, to possibly improve high temperature properties. Promising approaches would be applied to subscale material, for screening the resulting mechanical properties at these high temperatures. n obvious path traditionally employed to improve the high temperature and time-dependent capabilities of disk alloys is to coarsen the grain size. A coarser grain size than ASTM 7 could potentially be achieved by varying the forging conditions and supersolvus heat treatment. The objective of this study was to perform forging and heat treatment experiments ("thermomechanical processing experiments") on small compression test specimens of the baseline ME3 composition, to identify a viable forging process allowing significantly coarser grain size targeted at ASTM 3-5, than that of the baseline, ASTM 7.

  16. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Aliquippa Forge site

    SciTech Connect

    Monette, F.; Jones, L.; Yu, C.

    1992-09-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Aliquippa Forge site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Aliquippa Forge site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the Aliquippa Forge site does not exceed the following levels: 1,700 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario); 3,900 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario); 20 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario), and 530 pCi/g for Scenario D (resident farmer using a distant water source not affected by site conditions as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr.

  17. Thermo-mechanical modeling of the electrically-assisted manufacturing (EAM) technique during open die forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salandro, Wesley A.

    This thesis contains all of the steps which allow the Electrically-Assisted Manufacturing (EAM) technique to be experimentally explored and analytically modeled for an electrically-assisted forging operation. Chapter 1 includes the problem statement, proposed solution, and literature reviews on EAM. Chapter 2 describes a thorough background on the EAM technique, highlights prior EAM research, and explains the research approach taken for this thesis. The coupled thermo-mechanical modeling strategy, along with the introduction of the Electroplastic Effect Coefficient (EEC) is provided in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 explains the two different approaches to determine the EEC profiles when modeling a particular metal. The simplified EAF mechanical model for electrically-assisted forging is presented in Chapter 5. Also in this chapter, the same modeling methodology (i.e. thermo-mechanical, EEC, etc.) is used to predict loads for an electrically-assisted bending (EAB) process. The following chapters explore how different material- and process-based parameters affect the EAF technique. Chapter 6 examines how different workpiece contact areas affect EAF effectiveness, along with an exploration of how well different metal forming lubricants perform with EAF. Chapter 7 explores if there is a difference in the thermal or mechanical profiles of specimens undergoing EAF forging tests with different average grain sizes. Chapter 8 examines the same effects as the previous chapter on specimens with varying levels of prior cold work. The materials- and process-based simplifications and sensitivities of the proposed modeling strategy are outlined in Chapter 9. Chapters 10-14 include the science behind the electroplastic effect, conclusions, future work, broader impacts, and intellectual merit, respectively. The overall intention of this thesis is to show the candidate's ability to take an idea for a new manufacturing process, prove that it works, and then understand and model the process

  18. Forging of eccentric co-extruded Al-Mg compounds and analysis of the interface strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, W.; Binotsch, C.; Awiszus, B.; Lehmann, T.; Müller, J.; Kirbach, C.; Stockmann, M.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-03-01

    Within the subproject B3 of the Collaborative Research Center 692 it has been shown that Al-Mg compounds with a good bonding quality can be produced by hydrostatic coextrusion. During processing by forging, the aluminum sleeve is thinned in areas of high strains depending on the component geometry. To solve this problem an eccentric core arrangement during co-extrusion was investigated. Based on the results of FE-simulations, the experimental validation is presented in this work. Rods with an offset of 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mm were produced by eccentric hydrostatic co-extrusion. Ultrasonic testing was used to evaluate the bonding quality across the entire rods. For the forging investigations the basic process Rising was chosen. The still good bonding quality after forging was examined by dye penetrant testing and optical microscopy. For an optimal stress transfer between the materials across the entire component, a sufficient bonding between the materials is essential. To evaluate the interface strength, a special bending test was developed. For the conception of the bending specimens it was required to analyze the Rising specimens geometry. These analyses were performed using a reconstruction of the geometrical data based on computer tomography (CT) investigations. The comparison with the numerically deter-mined Rising specimen geometry shows good correlation. Parametric Finite Element Analyses of the bending test were used to develop the load case and the specimen geometry. By means of iterative adaption of load application, bearing and specimen geometry parameters, an advantageous stress state and experimentally applicable configuration were found. Based on this conception, the experimental setup was configured and bending tests were performed. The interface strength was deter-mined by the calculation of the maximum interlaminar interfacial tension stress using the experimental interface failure force and the bending FE model.

  19. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  20. Forging partnerships between rural women with chronic conditions and their health care providers.

    PubMed

    Cudney, Shirley; Weinert, Clarann; Kinion, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Successful adaptation to chronic illness is enhanced by active client-health care provider partnerships. The purposes of this article are to (a) examine the health care partnership needs of western rural women with chronic illness who participated in a computer-based support and education project, (b) describe how the role of the women in the partnership can be maximized by the use of a personal health record and improving health literacy, and (c) discuss ways health care providers can enhance their role in the partnership by careful listening and creating environments conducive to forging productive client-provider partnerships.

  1. Conventionally cast and forged copper alloy for high-heat-flux thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Repas, George A.

    1987-01-01

    The combustion chamber liner of the space shuttle main engine is made of NARloy-Z, a copper-silver-zirconium alloy. This alloy was produced by vacuum melting and vacuum centrifugal casting; a production method that is currently now available. Using conventional melting, casting, and forging methods, NASA has produced an alloy of the same composition called NASA-Z. This report compares the composition, microstructure, tensile properties, low-cycle fatigue life, and hot-firing life of these two materials. The results show that the materials have similar characteristics.

  2. Development of measurement method of work hardeningbehavior in large plastic strain for sheet metal forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Nobuo; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Shirakami, Satoshi; kada, Osamu; Yoshida, Tohru; Hiwatashi, Shunji

    2016-08-01

    For the purpose of accuracy improvement of sheet metal forging FE analysis, we have developed a new measurement method of work hardening behavior in large plastic strain by repeatedly performing simple shear test using pre-strained steel sheet. In this method, it is possible to measure work hardening behavior more than equivalent plastic strain 2.0. In addition, it was carried out a comparison between developed method and compression test in order to verify the validity of the results by the developed method. As a result, both results were in good agreement. The validity of developed method has been verified.

  3. Modelling of Viscoplastic Behaviour of IN718 Under Hot Forging Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y. P.; Lin, J.; Dean, T. A.; Brown, P. D.

    2007-04-07

    The mechanical properties of IN718 are directly related to microstructure such as grain size and the hardening mechanisms, which are effective during thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. In this study a set of unified viscoplastic constitutive equations were determined for IN718 from experimental data of hot forging conditions. Techniques were developed to analyse the reliability and consistency of the experimental data derived from different previous publications. In addition to viscoplastic flow of the material, the determined material model can be used to predict the evolution of dislocations, recrystallisation and grain size occurring during thermomechanical processing.

  4. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  5. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  6. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  7. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  8. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  9. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  10. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  11. Study on Pot Forming of Induction Heater Type Rice Cookers by Forging Cast Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Ohashi, Osamu

    This paper describes a study result on pot fabrication by the forging cast process of stainless steel with aluminum. Rice cooked with the new bowl-shaped pot for the induction heater type rice cookers is better tasting than rice cooked with the conventional cylindrical one, due to the achievement of better heat conduction and convection. The conventional pot is made of the clad sheet, consisting of stainless steel and aluminum. However, it is rather difficult to form a bowl shape from the clad sheet, primarily due to the problem of a material spring back. The fabrication of a new type of a pot was made possible by means of the adoption of a forging cast process instead of the clad sheet. In this process, iron powder is inserted between stainless steel and aluminum in order to alleviate the large difference on the coefficient of expansion between each material. It was made clear that the application of two kinds of iron particle, namely 10 μm size powder on the stainless steel side and 44 μm on the aluminum side, enables the joints to become strong enough. The joint strength of the new pot by this fabrication process was confirmed by the tests of the shear strength and the fatigue tests together with the stress analysis.

  12. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  13. [Experimental research on porcelain fused to the surface of pure titanium and titanium alloys].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Ai, S; Xu, J

    1995-07-01

    Titanium material has been widely used in prosthodontics since the end of 1980s. However, the research on porcelain fused to the surfaces of titanium material was quite few. This article introduced the technological process of low-fusing dental porcelain--Ceratin fused to pure titanium and titanium alloys. The values of the bond strength of Ceratin and titanium substrates were obtained by shearing test with INSTRON Model-1185. The average value of the shearing strength between TA2 and Ceratin was 31. 01MPa. The corresponding value between TC4 and Ceratin was 33.73MPa. The interface between Ceratin and titanium substrate was observed with scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of this research proposed that it is hopeful that Ceratin is used as special procelain with titanium material.

  14. Fungal leaching of titanium from rock.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Munoz, E. F.

    1971-01-01

    Penicillium simplicissimum is found to solubilize up to 80% of the titanium in granitic rocks but less than 2% of the titanium in basaltic rocks. These findings were made in investigating the interactions of microorganisms with rocks and minerals of the biosphere in studies aimed at developing experiments for the detection of extraterrestrial life.

  15. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR...) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.575(a)(1) and (b). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with titanium dioxide...

  20. Mineral resource of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Titanium is hip - at least when it comes to airplanes and jewelry. Known for its high strength-to weight ratio and its resistance to corrosion, titanium and its alloys can also be found in everything from knee replacements to eyeglass frames to baseball bats to fighter planes.

  1. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity...

  2. Wettability studies of topologically distinct titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Patil-Sen, Yogita; Junkar, Ita; Kulkarni, Chandrashekhar V; Lorenzetti, Martina; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical implants made of titanium-based materials are expected to have certain essential features including high bone-to-implant contact and optimum osteointegration, which are often influenced by the surface topography and physicochemical properties of titanium surfaces. The surface structure in the nanoscale regime is presumed to alter/facilitate the protein binding, cell adhesion and proliferation, thereby reducing post-operative complications with increased lifespan of biomedical implants. The novelty of our TiO2 nanostructures lies mainly in the high level control over their morphology and roughness by mere compositional change and optimisation of the experimental parameters. The present work focuses on the wetting behaviour of various nanostructured titanium surfaces towards water. Kinetics of contact area of water droplet on macroscopically flat, nanoporous and nanotubular titanium surface topologies was monitored under similar evaporation conditions. The contact area of the water droplet on hydrophobic titanium planar surface (foil) was found to decrease during evaporation, whereas the contact area of the droplet on hydrophobic nanorough titanium surfaces practically remained unaffected until the complete evaporation. This demonstrates that the surface morphology and roughness at the nanoscale level substantially affect the titanium dioxide surface-water droplet interaction, opposing to previous observations for microscale structured surfaces. The difference in surface topographic nanofeatures of nanostructured titanium surfaces could be correlated not only with the time-dependency of the contact area, but also with time-dependency of the contact angle and electrochemical properties of these surfaces.

  3. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    2000-07-04

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  4. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  5. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  6. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  7. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  8. 31 CFR 370.40 - Can I be held accountable if my negligence contributes to a forged signature?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can I be held accountable if my negligence contributes to a forged signature? 370.40 Section 370.40 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE...

  9. Quenching and Cold-Work Residual Stresses in Aluminum Hand Forgings : Contour Method Measurement and FEM Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, M. B.; Newborn, M. A.; Balog, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings does not fully relieve the stresses. This study measured and predicted the residual stress in 7050-T74 (solution heat treated, quenched, and artificially overaged) and 7050-T7452 (cold compressed prior to aging) hand forgings. The manufacturing process was simulated by finite element analysis. First, a thermal analysis simulated the quench using appropriate thermal boundary conditions and temperature dependent material properties. Second, a structural analysis used the thermal history and a temperature and strain-rate dependent constitutive model to predict the stresses after quenching. Third, the structural analysis was continued to simulate the multiple cold compressions of the stress relief process. Experimentally, the residual stresses in the forgings were mapped using the contour method, which involved cutting the forgings using wire EDM and then measuring the contour of the cut surface using a CMM. Multiple cuts were used to map different stress components. The results show a spatially periodic variation of stresses that results from the periodic nature of the cold work stress relief process. The results compare favorably with the finite element prediction of the stresses.

  10. Jernberg Industries, Inc.: Forging Facility Uses Plant-Wide Energy Assessment to Aid Conversion to Lean Manufacturing (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-10-01

    Jernberg Industries conducted a plant-wide assessment while converting to lean manufacturing at a forging plant. Seven projects were identified that could yield annual savings of $791,000, 64,000 MMBtu in fuel and 6 million kWh

  11. Taking the Lead in Science Education: Forging Next-Generation Science Standards. International Science Benchmarking Report. Appendix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This appendix accompanies the report "Taking the Lead in Science Education: Forging Next-Generation Science Standards. International Science Benchmarking Report," a study conducted by Achieve to compare the science standards of 10 countries. This appendix includes the following: (1) PISA and TIMSS Assessment Rankings; (2) Courses and Levels…

  12. 76 FR 24856 - Heavy Forged Hand Tools (i.e., Axes & Adzes, Bars & Wedges, Hammers & Sledges, and Picks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Heavy Forged Hand Tools (i.e., Axes & Adzes, Bars & Wedges, Hammers & Sledges..., Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On January 3, 2011, the Department of Commerce (``Department'') initiated...

  13. Forging New Cocoa Keys: The Impact of Unlocking the Cocoa Bean’s Genome on Pre-harvest Food Safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forging New Cocoa Keys: The Impact of Unlocking the Cocoa Bean’s Genome on Pre-harvest Food Safety David N. Kuhn, USDA ARS SHRS, Miami FL Sometimes it's hard to see the value and application of genomics to real world problems. How will sequencing the cacao genome affect West African farmers? Thi...

  14. Microstructure and corrosion behaviour in biological environments of the new forged low-Ni Co-Cr-Mo alloys.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Sachiko; Onodera, Emi; Chiba, Akihiko; Asami, Katsuhiko; Hanawa, Takao

    2005-08-01

    Corrosion behaviour and microstructure of developed low-Ni Co-29Cr-(6, 8)Mo (mass%) alloys and a conventional Co-29Cr-6Mo-1Ni alloy (ASTM F75-92) were investigated in saline solution (saline), Hanks' solution (Hanks), and cell culture medium (E-MEM + FBS). The forging ratios of the Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy were 50% and 88% and that of the Co-29Cr-8Mo alloy was 88%. Ni content in the air-formed surface oxide film of the low-Ni alloys was under the detection limit of XPS. The passive current densities of the low-Ni alloys were of the same order of magnitude as that of the ASTM alloy in all the solutions. The passive current densities of all the alloys did not significantly change with the inorganic ions and the biomolecules. The anodic current densities in the secondary passive region of the low-Ni alloys were lower than that of the ASTM alloy in the E-MEM + FBS. Consequently, the low-Ni alloys are expected to show as high corrosion resistance as the ASTM alloy. On the other hand, the passive current density of the Co-29Cr-6Mo alloy with a forging ratio of 50% was slightly lower than that with a forging ratio of 88% in the saline. The refining of grains by further forging causes the increase in the passive current density of the low-Ni alloy. PMID:15769525

  15. 78 FR 8587 - Heraeus Kulzer, LLC., Including On-Site Leased Workers from People Link Staffing, Forge Staffing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... products. The notice was published in the Federal Register on January 8, 2013 (78 FR 1255). At the request... Link Staffing, Forge Staffing, Career Transitions and Talent Source; South Bend, Indiana; Amended... information from the company shows that workers leased from Career Transitions and Talent Source were...

  16. The present status of dental titanium casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Toru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okuno, Osamu; Takada, Yukyo

    1998-09-01

    Experimentation in all aspects of titanium casting at universities and industries throughout the world for the last 20 years has made titanium and titanium-alloy casting nearly feasible for fabricating sound cast dental prostheses, including crowns, inlays, and partial and complete dentures. Titanium casting in dentistry has now almost reached the stage where it can seriously be considered as a new method to compete with dental casting using conventional noble and base-metal alloys. More than anything else, the strength of titanium’s appeal lies in its excellent biocompatibility, coupled with its comparatively low price and abundant supply. Research efforts to overcome some problems associated with this method, including studies on the development of new titanium alloys suitable for dental use, will continue at many research sites internationally.

  17. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  18. [Use of titanium alloys for medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Feofilov, R N; Chirkov, V K; Levin, M V

    1977-01-01

    On the ground of an analysis into properties of titanium and its alloys the fields of their possible utilization for making various medical instruments are proposed. Because of their insufficient hardness and wear-resistance the titanium alloys cannot be recommended for making medical instruments with thin cutting edges. For the reasons of their insufficient strength, low wear-resistance and substandard modulus of elasticity, it is inexpedient to use titanium alloys in making many types of clamping medical instruments. Nor is it advisable to employ titanium alloys in handles of the instruments, for this may lead to a contact corrosion of their working parts. The use of titanium alloys is recommended for making bone-joining members, retracting medical instruments, of the spatula and speculum types, some kinds of non-magnetic pincers and ultrasonic medical instruments.

  19. Microstructural stability and thermomechanical processing of boron modified beta titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuri, Balakrishna

    One of the main objectives during primary processing of titanium alloys is to reduce the prior beta grain size. Producing an ingot with smaller prior beta grain size could potentially eliminate some primary processing steps and thus reduce processing cost. Trace additions of boron have been shown to decrease the as-cast grain size in alpha + beta titanium alloys. The primary focus of this dissertation is to investigate the effect of boron on microstructural stability and thermomechanical processing in beta titanium alloys. Two metastable beta titanium alloys: Ti-15Mo-2.6Nb-3Al-0.2Si (Beta21S) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553) with 0.1 wt% B and without boron additions were used in this investigation. Significant grain refinement of the as-cast microstructure and precipitation of TiB whiskers along the grain boundaries was observed with boron additions. Beta21S and Beta21S-0.1B alloys were annealed above the beta transus temperature for different times to investigate the effect of boron on grain size stability. The TiB precipitates were very effective in restricting the beta grain boundary mobility by Zener pinning. A model has been developed to predict the maximum grain size as a function of TiB size, orientation, and volume fraction. Good agreement was obtained between model predictions and experimental results. Beta21S alloys were solution treated and aged for different times at several temperatures below the beta transus to study the kinetics of alpha precipitation. Though the TiB phase did not provide any additional nucleation sites for alpha precipitation, the grain refinement obtained by boron additions resulted in accelerated aging. An investigation of the thermomechanical processing behavior showed different deformation mechanisms above the beta transus temperature. The non-boron containing alloys showed a non-uniform and fine recrystallized necklace structure at grain boundaries whereas uniform intragranular recrystallization was observed in boron containing

  20. Comparison between 2D and 3D Numerical Modelling of a hot forging simulative test

    SciTech Connect

    Croin, M.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-04-07

    The paper presents the comparative analysis between 2D and 3D modelling of a simulative experiment, performed in laboratory environment, in which operating conditions approximate hot forging of a turbine aerofoil section. The plane strain deformation was chosen as an ideal case to analyze the process because of the thickness variations in the final section and the consequent distributions of contact pressure and sliding velocity at the interface that are closed to the conditions of the real industrial process. In order to compare the performances of 2D and 3D approaches, two different analyses were performed and compared with the experiments in terms of loads and temperatures peaks at the interface between the dies and the workpiece.

  1. Development of Replacements for Phoscoating Used in Forging, Extrusion and Metal Forming Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kerry Barnett

    2003-03-01

    Many forging, extrusion, heading and other metal forming processes use graphite-based lubricants, phosphate coatings, and other potentially hazardous or harmful substances to improve the tribology of the metal forming process. The application of phosphate-based coatings has long been studied to determine if other synthetic ''clean'' lubricants could provide the same degree of protection afforded by phoscoatings and its formulations. So far, none meets the cost and performance objectives provided by phoscoatings as a general aid to the metal forming industry. In as much as phoscoatings and graphite have replaced lead-based lubricants, the metal forming industry has had previous experience with a legislated requirement to change processes. However, without a proactive approach to phoscoating replacement, many metal forming processes could find themselves without a cost effective tribology material necessary for the metal forming process

  2. Effects of Forged Stock and Pure Aluminum Coating on Cryogenic Performance of Heat Treated Aluminum Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Barthelmy, Michael P.; Zewari, S. Wahid; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an on-going test program designed to empirically determine the effects of different stress relief procedures for aluminum mirrors. Earlier test results identified a preferred heat treatment for flat and spherical mirrors diamond turned from blanks cut out of Al 6061-T651 plate stock. Further tests have been performed on mirrors from forged stock and one set from plate stock coated with Alumiplate(trademark) aluminum coating to measure the effect of these variables on cryogenic performance. The mirrors are tested for figure error and radius of curvature at room temperature and at 80 K for three thermal cycles. We correlate the results of our optical testing with heat treatment and metallographic data.

  3. Friction and Adhesion in Dry Warm Forging of Magnesium Alloy with Coated Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Kawashima, Hiroaki; Osakada, Kozo

    In order to develop forging process of magnesium alloys without lubrication, frictional behavior of magnesium alloy AZ31B (Mg-3%Al-1%Zn) is evaluated by a tapered plug penetration test under dry condition. The cemented tungsten carbide (WC) plugs polished to be a mirror-like surface are coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) and TiAlN by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The cylindrical hollow billets of AZ31B are penetrated by the tapered plugs at a temperature of 200°C. The surface roughness of the hole of the billet, the adhesion length of AZ31B on the plug surface and the penetration load are measured. Compared with WC and TiAlN coating, it is found that DLC coating is effective in preventing AZ31B from adhering to the tool surface and reducing the penetration load.

  4. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  5. FEM simulation for cold press forging forming of the round-fin heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kesheng; Han, Yu; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lihan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the forming process of cold press forging for the round-fin heat sink in the automotive lighting. A series of simulations on the round-fin heat sink forming using the program DEFORM were carried out. The blank thickness and friction coefficient on the formation of round-fin were studied, and the tooling structure with counterpressure on the heat sink formation was also investigated. The results show that the blank thickness is very good for the round-fin formation, and the thicker the blank is, the better the round-fin can be formed; and also When both the punch-blank interface and the die-blank interface have the same value of friction factor, the larger value of friction factor is in favor of round-fin forming, the further investigation reveals that the friction at the punch-blank interface has more significant effect on preventing the initiation of flow-through compared with the friction at the die-blank interface, which implies that the punch-blank interface has more significant effect on the material flow in the formation of round-fin. Meanwhile, The tooling structure with counterpressure is helpful to the formation of round-fin heat sink, which not only ensures the height of each round-fin on the heat sink is uniform but also retards the initiation of flow-through on the reverse side of round-fin. In addition, the experiments of press forging process were conducted to validate the finite element analysis, and the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Titanium in Engine Valve Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. E.; Sherman, A. M.; Bapna, M. R.

    1987-03-01

    Titanium alloys offer a unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio, good corrosion resistance and favorable high temperature mechanical properties. Still, their relatively high cost has discouraged consideration for widespread use in automotive components. Recent demands for increased fuel economy have led to the consideration of these alloys for use as valve train materials where higher costs might be offset by improvements in performance and fuel economy. Lighter weight valve train components permit the use of lower spring loads, thus reducing friction and increasing fuel economy. Camshaft friction measurements made on a typical small displacement engine indicate that a twoto-four percent increase in fuel economy can be achieved. Valve train components are, however, subject to a severe operating environment, including elevated temperatures, sliding wear and high mechanical loads. This paper discusses the details of alloy and heat treatment selection for optimizing valve performance. When properly manufactured, titanium valves have been shown to withstand very stringent durability testing, indicating the technical feasibility of this approach to fuel economy improvement.

  7. Sustained load crack growth design data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. C.; Kenny, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to provide sustained load crack growth (SLCG) data for Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy tanks containing MIL-P-26536 hydrazine and refined hydrazine. Fracture mechanics data on crack growth threshold for heat-treated forgings, aged and unaged welds, and aged and unaged heat-affected zones (HAZ) are presented. All tests were made on uniaxially loaded fracture mechanics specimens involving part-through cracks, and an electrical discharge machined notch was used to start the crack. Fracture mechanics design curves of crack growth threshold stress intensity versus temperature are obtained for the temperature range 40-71 C. Major conclusions are that extreme susceptibility to SLCG in hydrazine is a universal property of unaged weld metal in Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy of normal interstitial content, and that aging both weld metal and HAZ at 510 C for 4 hr after welding completely removes all susceptibility to SLCG induced by hydrazine, with less susceptibility to SLCG in refined hydrazine.

  8. Titanium Coating of the Boston Keratoprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Culla, Borja; Jeong, Kyung Jae; Kolovou, Paraskevi Evi; Chiang, Homer H.; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the feasibility of using titanium to enhance adhesion of the Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro), ultimately to decrease the risk of implant-associated complications. Methods Cylindrical rods were made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), PMMA coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) over a layer of polydopamine (PMMATiO2), smooth (Ti) and sandblasted (TiSB) titanium, and titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox and TiSBox). Topography and surface chemistry were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adhesion force between rods and porcine corneas was measured ex vivo. Titanium sleeves, smooth and sandblasted, were inserted around the stem of the B-KPro and implanted in rabbits. Tissue adhesion to the stem was assessed and compared to an unmodified B-Kpro after 1 month. Results X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated successful deposition of TiO2 on polydopamine-coated PMMA. Oxygen plasma treatment did not change the XPS spectra of titanium rods (Ti and TiSB), although it increased their hydrophilicity. The materials did not show cell toxicity. After 14 days of incubation, PMMATiO2, smooth titanium treated with oxygen plasma (Tiox), and sandblasted titanium rods (TiSB, TiSBox) showed significantly higher adhesion forces than PMMA ex vivo. In vivo, the use of a TiSB sleeve around the stem of the B-KPro induced a significant increase in tissue adhesion compared to a Ti sleeve or bare PMMA. Conclusions Sandblasted titanium sleeves greatly enhanced adherence of the B-KPro to the rabbit cornea. This approach may improve adhesion with the donor cornea in humans as well. Translational Relevance This approach may improve adhesion with donor corneas in humans. PMID:27152247

  9. Oxygen-Barrier Coating for Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-barrier coating for titanium developed to provide effective and low-cost means for protecting titanium alloys from oxygen in environment when alloys used in high-temperature mechanical or structural applications. Provides protective surface layer, which reduces extent of surface oxidation of alloy and forms barrier to diffusion of oxygen, limiting contamination of substrate alloy by oxygen. Consists of submicron layer of aluminum deposited on surface of titanium by electron-beam evaporation, with submicron layer of dioxide sputtered onto aluminum to form coat.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  11. Contemplating a role for titanium in organisms.

    PubMed

    Zierden, Mark R; Valentine, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the Earth's crust and some organisms sequester it avidly, though no essential biological role has yet been recognized. This Minireview addresses how the properties of titanium, especially in an oxic aqueous environment, might make a biological role difficult to recognize. It further considers how new -omic technologies might overcome the limitations of the past and help to reveal a specific role for this metal. While studies with well established model organisms have their rightful place, organisms that are known avid binders or sequesterers of titanium should be promising places to investigate a biological role.

  12. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Ali; Kline, Kristopher P; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies.

  13. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ataya, Ali; Kline, Kristopher P.; Cope, Jessica; Alnuaimat, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies. PMID:26744684

  14. Titanium-potassium heat pipe corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1984-07-01

    An experimental study of the susceptibility of wickless titanium/potassium heat pipes to corrosive attack has been conducted in vacuo at 800/sup 0/K for 6511h and at 900/sup 0/K for 4797h without failure or degradation. Some movement of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen was observed in the titanium container tube, but no evidence of attack could be detected in metallographic cross sections of samples taken along the length of the heat pipes. The lack of observable attack of titanium by potassium under these conditions refutes previous reports of Ti-K incompatibility.

  15. Ultraviolet laser treatment of titanium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balchev, Ivaylo; Minkovski, Nikolai; Dimitrov, Krasimir; Shipochka, Maria; Barbucha, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Interaction of a third harmonic of DPSS laser, wavelength 355 nm and pulse duration of 30 ns with titanium wafers was studied. It was investigated the structure of laser ablated titanium surface, depending on the laser beam scanning speed, and laser pulse frequency. The titanium surface modification was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XPS (X- ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). Nanosecond irradiation with ultraviolet light of Ti plate led to the formation of high porous granular structures consisting of agglomerated micro- and submicro- particles.

  16. [Comparison of the biological tolerance of titanium and titanium alloys in human gingiva cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Hehner, B; Heidemann, D

    1989-01-01

    Mirror-finished solid specimens of pure titanium and the titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V as well as Ti-5Al-2.5Fe showed no effects on the growth behavior and cell morphology of human gingival epithelial cell and fibroblast cultures. The growth of the cells contacting all three materials was uninhibited. SEM revealed growth of fibroblasts on the surfaces of the specimens, too. No differences could be found between the biocompatibility of titanium alloys and that of pure titanium. The formation of a stable surface oxide layer providing resistance to corrosion may be decisive.

  17. Adherence of sputtered titanium carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The study searches for interface treatment that would increase the adhesion of TiC coating to nickel- and titanium-base alloys. Rene 41 (19 wt percent Cr, 11 wt percent Mo, 3 wt percent Ti, balance Ni) and Ti-6Al-4V (6 wt percent Al, 4 wt percent V, balance Ti) are considered. Adhesion of the coatings is evaluated in pin-and disk friction tests. The coatings and interface regions are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results suggest that sputtered refractory compound coatings adhere best when a mixed compound of coating and substrate metals is formed in the interfacial region. The most effective type of refractory compound interface appears to depend on both substrate and coating material. A combination of metallic interlayer deposition and mixed compound interface formation may be more effective for some substrate coating combinations than either alone.

  18. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  19. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot-forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1987-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground AISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  20. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground SISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  1. A Comparison between the Properties of Solid Cylinders and Tube Products in Multi-Pass Hot Radial Forging Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedian, A.; Poursina, M.; Golestanian, H.

    2007-05-01

    Radial forging is an open die forging process used for reducing the diameter of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, and creating internal profiles for tubes such as rifling of gun barrels. In this work, a comprehensive study of multi-pass hot radial forging of short hollow and solid products are presented using 2-D axisymmetric finite element simulation. The workpiece is modeled as an elastic-viscoplastic material. A mixture of Coulomb law and constant limit shear is used to model the die-workpiece and mandrel-workpiece contacts. Thermal effects are also taken in to account. Three-pass radial forging of solid cylinders and tube products are considered. Temperature, stress, strain and metal flow distribution are obtained in each pass through thermo-mechanical simulation. The numerical results are compared with available experimental data and are in good agreement with them.

  2. Fracture Growth Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Martinez, Jonathan; McLean, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant in orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent flaws will not cause failure during the design life. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environmentally-assisted cracking (K (sub EAC)) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched specimens SE(B) representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to the monopropellant at 50 degrees Centigrade for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant was found to be at least 22.0 kilopounds per square inch. The stress intensity factor of the weld material was at least 31.3 kilopounds per square inch.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Testing of Titanium 6AL-4V in AF-M315E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. W.; Martinez, J.; McLean, C.

    2016-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the performance of AF-M315E monopropellant on orbit. Flight certification requires a safe-life analysis of the titanium alloy fuel tank to ensure inherent processing flaws will not cause failure during the design life of the tank. Material property inputs for this analysis require testing to determine the stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking (KEAC) of Ti 6Al-4V in combination with the AF-M315E monopropellant. Testing of single-edge notched, or SE(B), specimens representing the bulk tank membrane and weld material were performed in accordance with ASTM E1681. Specimens with fatigue pre-cracks were loaded into test fixtures so that the crack tips were exposed to AF-M315E at 50 C for a duration of 1,000 hours. Specimens that did not fail during exposure were opened to inspect the crack surfaces for evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity value, KEAC, is the highest applied stress intensity that produced neither a failure of the specimen during the exposure nor showed evidence of crack growth. The threshold stress intensity factor for environment-assisted cracking of the Ti 6Al-4V forged tank material was found to be at least 22 ksivin and at least 31 ksivin for the weld material when exposed to AF-M315E monopropellant.

  4. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  5. Copper/nickel eutectic brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutchera, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    Technique joins titanium or one of its alloys to materials, such as iron, nickel or cobalt base material, or to refractory metals. To ensure formation of a satisfactory bond, the temperature, time, environment and pressure must be controlled.

  6. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  7. Hot isostatic pressing of titanium based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Froes, F.H.; Widmer, R.; Hebeisen, J.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of titanium in demanding aerospace and terrestrial applications is presented, and the necessity to reduce cost to increase use is discussed. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP`ing) can be utilized with titanium based materials to obtain cost reduction and to enhance performance. The science/technology of various facets of the titanium scenario where HIP`ing can be used to advantage is presented, including powder metallurgy, castings, metal matrix composites and use of thermochemical processing. The major application of HIP`ing for titanium based materials is in castings; followed by blended elemental concepts. Much work has been conducted on continuous fiber reinforced materials, with the first use in actual commercial components likely to occur in engine components. Discontinuously reinforced products are already in use in aerospace and terrestrial applications. For the future, developing processing such as mechanical alloying, nanostructured materials and rapidly solidified product could benefit from compaction by HIP`ing. 55 refs., 30 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications... safely used in cosmetics, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in...

  13. Valve, normally open, titanium: Pyronetics Model 1425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avalos, E.

    1972-01-01

    An operating test series was applied to two explosive actuated, normally open, titanium valves. There were no failures. Tests included: proof pressure and external leakage test, gross leak test, post actuation leakage test, and burst pressure test.

  14. Effect of Prior and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Electron Beam Weldments of (α + β) Titanium alloy Ti-5Al-3Mo-1.5V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil Kumar, V.; Gupta, R. K.; Manwatkar, Sushant K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy Ti5Al3Mo1.5V is used in the fabrication of critical engine components for space applications. Double vacuum arc re-melted and (α + β) forged blocks were sliced into 10-mm-thick plates and subjected to electron beam welding (EBW) with five different variants of prior and post-weld heat treatment conditions. Effects of various heat treatment conditions on the mechanical properties of the weldments have been studied. The welded coupons were characterized for microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture analysis. An optimized heat treatment and welding sequence has been suggested. Weld efficiency of 90% could be achieved. Weldment has shown optimum properties in solution treated and aged condition. Heat-affected zone adjacent to weld fusion line is found to have lowest hardness in all conditions.

  15. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Brow, R.K.; Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I.

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  16. Influence of Hot forging on Tribological behavior of Al6061-TiB2 In-situ composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep kumar, G. S.; Keshavamurthy, R.; kuppahalli, Prabhakar; kumari, Prachi

    2016-09-01

    Al6061-TiB2 metal matrix composite was fabricated by stir casting technique via in-situ reaction, using mixture of Al6061 alloy, Potassium tetraflouroborate salt (KBF4) and tetraflourotitanate (K2TiF6). The cast composites were processed to hot forging, SEM studies; X- ray Diffraction studies (XRD), Microhardness and Dry friction and wear tests. Pin on disc type machine was used to perform tribological tests over a load range of 20-100N and sliding velocities of 0.314-1.57m/s. SEM and XRD studies confirms formation of fine in-situ TiB2 particles. Composites exhibit higher Microhardness, improved wear resistance and Lower COF with formation of TiB2 particles when compared with the unreinforced alloy. Compared to cast alloy and its Composites, forged alloy and its composites show superior Tribological behavior under similar test conditions.

  17. Hydrocarbon Deposition Attenuates Osteoblast Activity on Titanium

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, R.; Ueno, T.; Migita, S.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Doi, H.; Ogawa, T.; Hanawa, T.; Wakabayashi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although the reported percentage of bone-implant contact is far lower than 100%, the cause of such low levels of bone formation has rarely been investigated. This study tested the negative biological effect of hydrocarbon deposition onto titanium surfaces, which has been reported to be inevitable. Osteogenic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on titanium disks on which the carbon concentration was experimentally regulated to achieve carbon/titanium (C/Ti) ratios of 0.3, 0.7, and 1.0. Initial cellular activities such as cell attachment and cell spreading were concentration-dependently suppressed by the amount of carbon on the titanium surface. The osteoblastic functions of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization were also reduced by more than 40% on the C/Ti (1.0) surface. These results indicate that osteoblast activity is influenced by the degree of hydrocarbon contamination on titanium implants and suggest that hydrocarbon decomposition before implant placement may increase the biocompatibility of titanium. PMID:24868012

  18. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  19. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of Valley Forge National Historical Park, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; McManus, B. Craig

    1996-01-01

    Valley Forge National Historical Park is just southwest of the Commodore Semiconductor Group (CSG) National Priorities List (Superfund) Site, a source of volatile organic compounds (VOC's) in ground water. The 7.5-square-mile study area includes the part of the park in Lower Providence and West Norriton Townships in Montgomery County, Pa., and surrounding vicinity. The park is underlain by sedimentary rocks of the Upper Triassic age stockton Formation. A potentiometric-surface map constructed from water levels measured in 59 wells shows a cone of depression, approximately 0.5 mile in diameter, centered near the CSG Site. The cone of depression is caused by the pumping of six public supply wells. A ground-water divide between the cone of depression and Valley Forge National Historical Park provides a hydraulic barrier to the flow of ground water and contaminants from the CSG Site to the park. If pumping in the cone of depression was to cease, water levels would recover, and the ground-water divide would shift to the north. A hydraulic gradient between the CSG Site and the Schuylkill River would be established, causing contaminated ground water to flow to the park. Water samples were collected from 12 wells within the park boundary and 9 wells between the park boundary and the ground-water divide to the north of the park. All water samples were analyzed for physical properties (field determinations), nutrients, common ions, metals and other trace constituents, and VOC's. Water samples from the 12 wells inside the park boundary also were analyzed for pesticides. Concentrations of inorganic constituents in the water samples did not exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant levels. Very low concentrations of organic compounds were detected in some of the water samples. VOC's were detected in water from 76 percent of the wells sampled; the maximum concentration detected was 5.8 micrograms per liter of chloroform. The most commonly detected VOC was

  20. Simulations and Experiments of Hot Forging Design and Evaluation of the Aircraft Landing Gear Barrel Al Alloy Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhu, T.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the hot forging design of a typical landing gear barrel was evolved using finite element simulations and validated with experiments. A DEFORM3D software was used to evolve the forging steps to obtain the sound quality part free of defects with minimum press force requirements. The hot forging trial of a barrel structure was carried out in a 30 MN hydraulic press based on the simulation outputs. The tensile properties of the part were evaluated by taking samples from all three orientations (longitudinal, long transverse, short transverse). The hardness and microstructure of the part were also investigated. To study the soundness of the product, fluorescent penetrant inspection and ultrasonic testing were performed in order to identify any potential surface or internal defects in the part. From experiments, it was found that the part was formed successfully without any forging defects such as under filling, laps, or folds that validated the effectiveness of the process simulation. The tensile properties of the part were well above the specification limit (>10%) and the properties variation with respect to the orientation was less than 2.5%. The part has qualified the surface defects level of Mil Std 1907 Grade C and the internal defects level of AMS 2630 Class A (2 mm FBh). The microstructure shows mean grain length and width of 167 and 66 µm in the longitudinal direction. However, microstructure results revealed that the coarse grain structure was observed on the flat surface near the lug region due to the dead zone formation. An innovative and simple method of milling the surface layer after each pressing operation was applied to solve the problem of the surface coarse grain structure.

  1. Effect of Nano-Scale and Micro-Scale Yttria Reinforcement on Powder Forged AA-7075 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Tilak C.; Prakash, U.; Dabhade, Vikram V.

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation deals with the development of AA-7075 metal matrix composites reinforced with nano yttria particles (0.1 to 3 vol.%) and micron yttria particles (1 to 15 vol.%) by powder forging. Matrix powders (AA-7075) and reinforcement powders (yttria) were blended, cold compacted, sintered under pure nitrogen, and finally hot forged in a closed floating die. The hot forged samples were artificially age hardened at 121 °C for various time durations to determine the peak aging time. The mechanical properties in the peak-aged condition as well as density and microstructure were determined and correlated with the reinforcement size and content. The nano composites exhibited a well-densified structure as well as better hardness and tensile/compressive strength as compared to micro-scale composites. The mechanical properties in nano-scale composites peaked at 0.5 vol.% yttria addition while for micro-scale composites these properties peaked at 5 vol.% yttria addition.

  2. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  3. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-07-08

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed.

  4. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, S D; Xu, D K; Wang, B J; Sheng, L Y; Han, E H; Dong, C

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  5. Dependence of Microstructure on Solution and Aging Treatment for Near-β Forged TA15 Ti-Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhichao; Wu, Huili; Ma, Xiaoyong; Mao, Xiaojun; Yang, He

    2016-10-01

    For TA15 Ti-alloy, a tri-modal microstructure was obtained via near-β forging combined with solution and aging treatment (SAT) with a short time of air cooling (AC) during forgings transferring before water quenching (WQ). The influence of SAT conditions on final microstructures via 970 °C/0.1 s-1/60%/(AC + WQ) and SAT was investigated. Solution temperature determined the proportion of α and β phases and mainly affected the volume fraction of secondary lamellar α. Solution time mainly influenced the morphology of secondary lamellar α. Solution cooling method was the main factor affecting the thickness of lamellar α. Lower cooling rate resulted in more and thicker lamellar α. Aging treatment had little influence on the volume fraction, size, and morphology of each phase in the microstructure. The main function of aging treatment was to homogenize and stabilize the microstructure. The volume fraction and thickness of lamellar α were increased, and the distribution homogeneity became better during aging. Under the given forging condition, the reasonable solution and aging conditions to obtain tri-modal microstructure were determined as 930 °C/1~2 h/AC + 550~600 °C/5 h/AC.

  6. Microstructure characterization and mechanical behaviors of a hot forged high Nb containing PM-TiAl alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianbo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Bin; Wang, Yan; Liang, Xiaopeng; He, Yuehui

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the effects of deformation on the microstructure and mechanical behaviors of TiAl alloy were investigated. Deformed microstructure observation was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction technique, transmission electron microscopy and DEFORM-3D software. Results indicated that the core area of the TiAl pancake was characterized by completely dynamically recrystallized microstructures, however some residual lamellar colonies can be observed near the edge area, which are primarily caused by a temperature drop and inhomogenous plastic flow. The main softening mechanism is dynamic recrystallization of γ grains. The as-forged alloy exhibited excellent mechanical properties at both room temperature and high temperature. Tensile test results showed that the ultimate tensile strength of the alloy increased from 832 MPa at room temperature to 853 MPa at 700 °C, while the elongation increased from 2.7% to 17.8%. Even at the temperature of 850 °C, the ultimate tensile strength maintained 404 MPa, and the elongation increased to 75%. The as-forged alloy also exhibited remarkable low-temperature superplasticity at 850 °C, with an elongation of 120%. - Highlights: • The core area of the TiAl pancake was characterized by DRX microstructure. • The elongation at RT is higher than that of other high Nb-containing TiAl alloys. • The forged alloy exhibited low-temperature superplasticity at 850 °C.

  7. Effect of solution treatment on stress corrosion cracking behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Sheng, L. Y.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-01-01

    Effect of solid solution treatment (T4) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7%Zn-1.3%Y-0.6%Zr (in wt.%) alloy has been investigated using slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results demonstrated that the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC) of as-forged samples was 0.95 and its elongation-to-failure (εf) was only 1.1%. After T4 treatment, the SCC resistance was remarkably improved. The ISCC and εf values of T4 samples were 0.86 and 3.4%, respectively. Fractography and surface observation indicated that the stress corrosion cracking mode for as-forged samples was dominated by transgranular and partially intergranular morphology, whereas the cracking mode for T4 samples was transgranular. In both cases, the main cracking mechanism was associated with hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Through alleviating the corrosion attack of Mg matrix, the influence of HE on the SCC resistance of T4 samples can be greatly suppressed. PMID:27387817

  8. [Research on the temperature field detection method of hot forging based on long-wavelength infrared spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Cun; Wei, Bin; Fu, Xian-Bin

    2014-02-01

    A temperature field detection method based on long-wavelength infrared spectrum for hot forging is proposed in the present paper. This method combines primary spectrum pyrometry and three-stage FP-cavity LCTF. By optimizing the solutions of three group nonlinear equations in the mathematical model of temperature detection, the errors are reduced, thus measuring results will be more objective and accurate. Then the system of three-stage FP-cavity LCTF was designed on the principle of crystal birefringence. The system realized rapid selection of any wavelength in a certain wavelength range. It makes the response of the temperature measuring system rapid and accurate. As a result, without the emissivity of hot forging, the method can acquire exact information of temperature field and effectively suppress the background light radiation around the hot forging and ambient light that impact the temperature detection accuracy. Finally, the results of MATLAB showed that the infrared spectroscopy through the three-stage FP-cavity LCTF could meet the requirements of design. And experiments verified the feasibility of temperature measuring method. Compared with traditional single-band thermal infrared imager, the accuracy of measuring result was improved. PMID:24822408

  9. Dependence of Microstructure on Solution and Aging Treatment for Near-β Forged TA15 Ti-Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhichao; Wu, Huili; Ma, Xiaoyong; Mao, Xiaojun; Yang, He

    2016-08-01

    For TA15 Ti-alloy, a tri-modal microstructure was obtained via near-β forging combined with solution and aging treatment (SAT) with a short time of air cooling (AC) during forgings transferring before water quenching (WQ). The influence of SAT conditions on final microstructures via 970 °C/0.1 s-1/60%/(AC + WQ) and SAT was investigated. Solution temperature determined the proportion of α and β phases and mainly affected the volume fraction of secondary lamellar α. Solution time mainly influenced the morphology of secondary lamellar α. Solution cooling method was the main factor affecting the thickness of lamellar α. Lower cooling rate resulted in more and thicker lamellar α. Aging treatment had little influence on the volume fraction, size, and morphology of each phase in the microstructure. The main function of aging treatment was to homogenize and stabilize the microstructure. The volume fraction and thickness of lamellar α were increased, and the distribution homogeneity became better during aging. Under the given forging condition, the reasonable solution and aging conditions to obtain tri-modal microstructure were determined as 930 °C/1~2 h/AC + 550~600 °C/5 h/AC.

  10. Effect of solution treatment on the fatigue behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-01-01

    Through investigating and comparing the fatigue behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7Zn-1.3Y-0.6Zr (wt.%) alloy before and after solid solution treatment (T4) in laboratory air, the effect of T4 treatment on fatigue crack initiation was disclosed. S-N curves illustrated that the fatigue strength of as-forged samples was 110 MPa, whereas the fatigue strength of T4 samples was only 80 MPa. Observations to fracture surfaces demonstrated that for as-forged samples, fatigue crack initiation sites were covered with a layer of oxide film. However, due to the coarse grain structure and the dissolution of MgZn2 precipitates, the activation and accumulation of {10–12} twins in T4 samples were much easier, resulting in the preferential fatigue crack initiation at cracked twin boundaries (TBs). Surface characterization demonstrated that TB cracking was mainly ascribed to the incompatible plastic deformation in the twinned area and nearby α-Mg matrix. PMID:27032532

  11. Microstructure and Texture Evolution in Cold Rotary Forging of Spur Bevel Gears of 20CrMnTi Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xinghui; Dong, Liying; Hua, Lin; Zhuang, Wuhao

    2016-03-01

    The microstructure of cold rotary forged gears greatly affects their working life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to reveal the evolution of microstructure and texture that occurs during the cold rotary forging of spur bevel gears of 20CrMnTi alloy steel. The evolution of grains of the gear tooth is investigated through optical microscopy. By employing scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, the evolution of the cementite particles and the texture of the gear tooth is also revealed. The results indicate that the grain size distribution is non-uniform from the tooth profile to its center. The cementite particles in the tooth profile are finer and more uniformly distributed than those in the tooth center. After cold rotary forging, the tooth center has a combination of α- and γ-fibers, and the γ-fibers are more developed than the α-fibers, while most of the components in the tooth profile are assembled along the α-fibers.

  12. Effect of solution treatment on the fatigue behavior of an as-forged Mg-Zn-Y-Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. D.; Xu, D. K.; Wang, B. J.; Han, E. H.; Dong, C.

    2016-04-01

    Through investigating and comparing the fatigue behavior of an as-forged Mg-6.7Zn-1.3Y-0.6Zr (wt.%) alloy before and after solid solution treatment (T4) in laboratory air, the effect of T4 treatment on fatigue crack initiation was disclosed. S-N curves illustrated that the fatigue strength of as-forged samples was 110 MPa, whereas the fatigue strength of T4 samples was only 80 MPa. Observations to fracture surfaces demonstrated that for as-forged samples, fatigue crack initiation sites were covered with a layer of oxide film. However, due to the coarse grain structure and the dissolution of MgZn2 precipitates, the activation and accumulation of {10–12} twins in T4 samples were much easier, resulting in the preferential fatigue crack initiation at cracked twin boundaries (TBs). Surface characterization demonstrated that TB cracking was mainly ascribed to the incompatible plastic deformation in the twinned area and nearby α-Mg matrix.

  13. The Influence of Temperature on the Frictional Behavior of Duplex-Coated Die Steel Rubbing Against Forging Brass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimzadeh, I.; Ashrafizadeh, F.

    2015-01-01

    Improvement of die life under hot forging of brass alloys is considered vital from both economical and technical points of view. One of the best methods for improving die life is duplex coatings. In this research, the influence of temperature on the tribological behavior of duplex-coated die steel rubbing against forging brass was investigated. The wear tests were performed on a pin-on-disk machine from room temperature to 700 °C; the pins were made in H13 hot work tool steel treated by plasma nitriding and by PVD coatings of TiN-TiAlN-CrAlN. The disks were machined from a two-phase brass alloy too. The results revealed that the friction coefficient of this tribosystem went through a maximum at 550 °C and decreased largely at 700 °C. Furthermore, the formation of Cr2O3 caused the reduction of friction coefficient at 700 °C. PVD coatings proved their wear resistance up to 550 °C, well above the working temperature of the brass forging dies.

  14. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  15. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  16. Microstructural, mechanical, corrosion and cytotoxicity characterization of the hot forged FeMn30(wt.%) alloy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    An interest in biodegradable metallic materials has been increasing in the last two decades. Besides magnesium based materials, iron-manganese alloys have been considered as possible candidates for fabrication of biodegradable stents and orthopedic implants. In this study, we prepared a hot forged FeMn30 (wt.%) alloy and investigated its microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics as well as cytotoxicity towards mouse L 929 fibroblasts. The obtained results were compared with those of iron. The FeMn30 alloy was composed of antiferromagnetic γ-austenite and ε-martensite phases and possessed better mechanical properties than iron and even that of 316 L steel. The potentiodynamic measurements in simulated body fluids showed that alloying with manganese lowered the free corrosion potential and enhanced the corrosion rate, compared to iron. On the other hand, the corrosion rate of FeMn30 obtained by a semi-static immersion test was significantly lower than that of iron, most likely due to a higher degree of alkalization in sample surrounding. The presence of manganese in the alloy slightly enhanced toxicity towards the L 929 cells; however, the toxicity did not exceed the allowed limit and FeMn30 alloy fulfilled the requirements of the ISO 10993-5 standard. PMID:26478385

  17. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  18. Forging Links between Human Mental Retardation–Associated CNVs and Mouse Gene Knockout Models

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Caleb; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Nguyen, Duc-Quang; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Veltman, Joris A.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2009-01-01

    Rare copy number variants (CNVs) are frequently associated with common neurological disorders such as mental retardation (MR; learning disability), autism, and schizophrenia. CNV screening in clinical practice is limited because pathological CNVs cannot be distinguished routinely from benign CNVs, and because genes underlying patients' phenotypes remain largely unknown. Here, we present a novel, statistically robust approach that forges links between 148 MR–associated CNVs and phenotypes from ∼5,000 mouse gene knockout experiments. These CNVs were found to be significantly enriched in two classes of genes, those whose mouse orthologues, when disrupted, result in either abnormal axon or dopaminergic neuron morphologies. Additional enrichments highlighted correspondences between relevant mouse phenotypes and secondary presentations such as brain abnormality, cleft palate, and seizures. The strength of these phenotype enrichments (>100% increases) greatly exceeded molecular annotations (<30% increases) and allowed the identification of 78 genes that may contribute to MR and associated phenotypes. This study is the first to demonstrate how the power of mouse knockout data can be systematically exploited to better understand genetically heterogeneous neurological disorders. PMID:19557186

  19. Forging Hispanic communities in new destinations: A case study of Durham, NC1

    PubMed Central

    Flippen, Chenoa A.; Parrado, Emilio A.

    2013-01-01

    The Chicago School of urban sociology and its extension in the spatial assimilation model have provided the dominant framework for understanding the interplay between immigrant social and spatial mobility. However, the main tenets of the theory were derived from the experience of pre-war, centralized cities; scholars falling under the umbrella of the Los Angeles school have recently challenged the extent to which they are applicable to the contemporary urban form, which is characterized by sprawling, decentralized, and multi-nucleated development. Indeed, new immigrant destinations, such as those scattered throughout the American Southeast, are both decentralized and lack prior experience with large scale immigration. Informed by this debate this paper traces the formation and early evolution of Hispanic neighborhoods in Durham, NC, a new immigrant destination. Using qualitative data we construct a social history of immigrant neighborhoods and apply survey and census information to examine the spatial pattern of neighborhood succession. We also model the sorting of immigrants across neighborhoods according to personal characteristics. Despite the many differences in urban form and experience with immigration, the main processes forging the early development of Hispanic neighborhoods in Durham are remarkably consistent with the spatial expectations from the Chicago School, though the sorting of immigrants across neighborhoods is more closely connected to family dynamics and political economy considerations than purely human capital attributes. PMID:24482612

  20. Processing and properties of superclean ASTM A508 Cl. 4 forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, A.V.; Handerhan, K.J.; Manzo, G.J.; Simkins, G.P.

    1988-12-31

    Steels with improved resistance to temper embrittlement are now being produced using ``superclean`` steelmaking technology. This technology involves the use of scrap control, proper electric arc furnace and ladle refining furnace practices to produce steel with very low Mn, Si, P, S and other residual impurities such as Sn, As and Sb. This technology has been applied on a production basis to modified ASTM A508 Cl- 4 material intended for high temperature pressure vessel forgings. Processing and properties of this superclean material are reviewed. In addition, the cleanliness and mechanical properties are compared to conventionally melted A508 Cl. 4 material. The ``superclean`` A508 Cl. 4 mod. was found to meet all specification requirements. In addition, the superclean material was found to possess superior upper shelf CVN properties, a lower FATT{sub 50} and NDTT, along with superior microcleanliness compared to conventional material. Finally, the superclean material was found to be immune to temper embrittlement based on the short-term embrittlement treatments examined.

  1. Quench-Induced Stresses in AA2618 Forgings for Impellers: A Multiphysics and Multiscale Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chobaut, Nicolas; Saelzle, Peter; Michel, Gilles; Carron, Denis; Drezet, Jean-Marie

    2015-05-01

    In the fabrication of heat-treatable aluminum parts such as AA2618 compressor impellers for turbochargers, solutionizing and quenching are key steps to obtain the required mechanical characteristics. Fast quenching is necessary to avoid coarse precipitation as it reduces the mechanical properties obtained after heat treatment. However, fast quenching induces residual stresses that can cause unacceptable distortions during machining. Furthermore, the remaining residual stresses after final machining can lead to unfavorable stresses in service. Predicting and controlling internal stresses during the whole processing from heat treatment to final machining is therefore of particular interest to prevent negative impacts of residual stresses. This problem is multiphysics because processes such as heat transfer during quenching, precipitation phenomena, thermally induced deformations, and stress generation are interacting and need to be taken into account. The problem is also multiscale as precipitates of nanosize form during quenching at locations where the cooling rate is too low. This precipitation affects the local yield strength of the material and thus impacts the level of macroscale residual stresses. A thermomechanical model accounting for precipitation in a simple but realistic way is presented. Instead of modelling precipitation that occurs during quenching, the model parameters are identified using a limited number of tensile tests achieved after representative interrupted cooling paths in a Gleeble machine. The simulation results are compared with as-quenched residual stresses in a forging measured by neutron diffraction.

  2. Seasonal food use by white-tailed deer at Valley Forge National Historical Park, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cypher, Brian L.; Yahner, Richard H.; Cypher, Ellen A.

    1988-03-01

    Food habits of white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus) were examined from January to November 1984 via fecal-pellet analysis at Valley Forge National Historical Park (VFNHP), which represents an “island” habitat for deer surrounded by extensive urbanization, in southeastern Pennsylvania. In addition, use of fields by deer was compared to food habits. Herbaceous vegetation (forbs, leaves of woody plants, and conifer needles) was the predominant food type in all seasons except fall. Acorns and graminoids (grasses and sedges) were important food resources in fall and spring, respectively. Use of woody browse (twigs) was similar among seasons. Field use was relatively high during fall, winter without snow cover (<20 cm), and spring when food resources in fields were readily available. In contrast, use of fields was lowest in summer when preferred woodland foods were available and in winter with snow cover when food in fields was not readily accessible. Patterns of food-type use by deer at VFNHP indicate the year-round importance of nonwoody foods and field habitats to deer populations on public lands such as national parks in the northeastern United States.

  3. Microstructural, mechanical, corrosion and cytotoxicity characterization of the hot forged FeMn30(wt.%) alloy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Kubásek, Jiří; Vojtěch, Dalibor; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    An interest in biodegradable metallic materials has been increasing in the last two decades. Besides magnesium based materials, iron-manganese alloys have been considered as possible candidates for fabrication of biodegradable stents and orthopedic implants. In this study, we prepared a hot forged FeMn30 (wt.%) alloy and investigated its microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics as well as cytotoxicity towards mouse L 929 fibroblasts. The obtained results were compared with those of iron. The FeMn30 alloy was composed of antiferromagnetic γ-austenite and ε-martensite phases and possessed better mechanical properties than iron and even that of 316 L steel. The potentiodynamic measurements in simulated body fluids showed that alloying with manganese lowered the free corrosion potential and enhanced the corrosion rate, compared to iron. On the other hand, the corrosion rate of FeMn30 obtained by a semi-static immersion test was significantly lower than that of iron, most likely due to a higher degree of alkalization in sample surrounding. The presence of manganese in the alloy slightly enhanced toxicity towards the L 929 cells; however, the toxicity did not exceed the allowed limit and FeMn30 alloy fulfilled the requirements of the ISO 10993-5 standard.

  4. Forging School-Scientist Partnerships: A Case of Easier Said than Done?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falloon, Garry

    2013-12-01

    Since the early 1980s, a number of initiatives have been undertaken worldwide which have involved scientists and teachers working together in projects designed to support the science learning of students. Many of these have attempted to establish school-scientist partnerships. In these, scientists, teachers, and students formed teams engaged in mutually beneficial science-based activities founded on principles such as equal recognition and input, and shared vision, responsibility and risk. This article uses two partnership programmes run by a New Zealand Science Research Institute, to illustrate the challenges faced by scientists and teachers as they attempted to forge meaningful and effective partnerships. It argues that achieving the theorised position of a shared partnership space at the intersection of the worlds of scientists and teachers is problematic, and that scientists must instead be prepared to penetrate deeply into the world of the classroom when undertaking any such interactions. Findings indicate epistemological differences, curriculum and school systems and issues, and teacher efficacy and science knowledge significantly affect the process of partnership formation. Furthermore, it is argued that a re-thinking of partnerships is needed to reflect present economic and education environments, which are very different to those in which they were originally conceived nearly 30 years ago. It suggests that technology has an important role to play in future partnership interactions.

  5. Closed Die Deformation Behavior of Cylindrical Iron-Alumina Metal Matrix Composites During Cold Sinter Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Kumar, Undeti Jacob; Gupta, Pallav; Jha, Arun Kant; Kumar, Devendra

    2015-09-01

    The present paper aims to study the closed die deformation behavior of cylindrical Fe-Al2O3 metal matrix composites (MMCs). Closed die was manufactured by machining the high carbon steel block followed by oil quenching and then finishing. Samples sintered at a temperature of 1100 °C for 1 h were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which showed the formation of Fe, Al2O3 and nano size FeAl2O4 phases respectively. Density and hardness of the composite samples were determined after sintering. Closed die deformation studies of the prepared composite samples were carried under three different interfacial frictional conditions i.e. dry, solid lubricating and liquid lubricating. Hardness, density and metallographic characterizations were also done for the deformed samples. On comparing the micrographs of the samples before and after deformation it was revealed that in deformed specimens recrystallization has taken place due to the difference in the energy between the strained iron matrix and unstrained alumina reinforcement during closed die forging process. Experimental density of the samples was also verified with the theoretical density using the standard equations. It is expected that the results of the present investigations will be helpful in developing quality MMC components for wide industrial applications.

  6. Development and Evaluation of Titanium Spacesuit Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Richard; Battisti, Brian; Ytuarte, Raymond, Jr.; Schultz, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The Z-2 Prototype Planetary Extravehicular Space Suit Assembly is a continuation of NASA's Z-series of spacesuits, designed with the intent of meeting a wide variety of exploration mission objectives, including human exploration of the Martian surface. Incorporating titanium bearings into the Z-series space suit architecture allows us to reduce mass by an estimated 23 lbs per suit system compared to the previously used stainless steel bearing race designs, without compromising suit functionality. There are two obstacles to overcome when using titanium for a bearing race- 1) titanium is flammable when exposed to the oxygen wetted environment inside the space suit and 2) titanium's poor wear properties are often challenging to overcome in tribology applications. In order to evaluate the ignitability of a titanium space suit bearing, a series of tests were conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) that introduced the bearings to an extreme test profile, with multiple failures imbedded into the test bearings. The testing showed no signs of ignition in the most extreme test cases; however, substantial wear of the bearing races was observed. In order to design a bearing that can last an entire exploration mission (approx. 3 years), design parameters for maximum contact stress need to be identified. To identify these design parameters, bearing test rigs were developed that allow for the quick evaluation of various bearing ball loads, ball diameters, lubricants, and surface treatments. This test data will allow designers to minimize the titanium bearing mass for a specific material and lubricant combination and design around a cycle life requirement for an exploration mission. This paper reviews the current research and testing that has been performed on titanium bearing races to evaluate the use of such materials in an enriched oxygen environment and to optimize the bearing assembly mass and tribological properties to accommodate for the high bearing cycle life for an

  7. Weldability of a titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Baeslack, W.A., III ); Mascorella, T.J. ); Kelly, T.J. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors report the weldability of an alpha-two titanium auuminide, Ti-13.5 wt-%Al-21.5 wt-%Nb (Ti-24 at.-%Al-11 at.-%Nb), investigated from a perspective of developing relationships between the weld cooling rate, microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture behavior. Dilatometry studies performed over a range of cooling rates from 1{degree} to 150{degrees}C/s(1.8{degrees} to 270{degrees}F/s) show a continuous decrease in the body-centered cubic (BCC) to hexagonal close-packed (HCP) transformation start temperature. Water quenching from above the beta transus temperature provided a rapid cooling rate of 750{degrees}C/s(1350 {degrees}F/s), which promoted complete retention of BCC beta phase. Implications of the continuous-cooling phase transformation study on the joining of Ti-13.5 wt-%Al-21.5 wt-%Nb using alternate welding processes are discussed.

  8. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system. PMID:27767103

  9. Titanium template for scaphoid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, M; Schaefer, D J; Schumacher, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Honigmann, P

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of a non-united scaphoid with a humpback deformity involves resection of the non-union followed by bone grafting and fixation of the fragments. Intraoperative control of the reconstruction is difficult owing to the complex three-dimensional shape of the scaphoid and the other carpal bones overlying the scaphoid on lateral radiographs. We developed a titanium template that fits exactly to the surfaces of the proximal and distal scaphoid poles to define their position relative to each other after resection of the non-union. The templates were designed on three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and manufactured using selective laser melting technology. Ten conserved human wrists were used to simulate the reconstruction. The achieved precision measured as the deviation of the surface of the reconstructed scaphoid from its virtual counterpart was good in five cases (maximal difference 1.5 mm), moderate in one case (maximal difference 3 mm) and inadequate in four cases (difference more than 3 mm). The main problems were attributed to the template design and can be avoided by improved pre-operative planning, as shown in a clinical case. PMID:25167978

  10. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  11. Engineering titanium surfaces for improving osteointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiong

    Titanium is one of the most important metallic biomedical materials in clinical applications. One of the key issues for successful application of titanium is the interaction at the interface between the titanium and the bone. The present study focuses on improving the surfaces of titanium to achieve better capability to bond with natural bone (i.e. better osteointegration). The objectives of this work include: (1) Developing microfabrication methods to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces for promoting osteointegration; (2) Studying the calcium phosphate (Ca-P) formation on the chemical treated titanium surface and elucidating the mechanism of precipitation theoretically; and (3) Evaluating osteoconductivity of engineering titanium surfaces in vitro and in vivo. Through mask electrochemical micromachining (TMEMM), jet electrochemical micromachining (Jet-EMM) and the confined etchant layer technique (CELT) were attempted to produce micropatterns on titanium surfaces. TMEMM has a high etching rate and good reproducibility and was used to produce micro-hole arrays on Ti plates for in vivo testing. The driving force and nucleation rate of Ca-P precipitation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were analyzed based on the classical crystallization theory. SBF supersaturation with respect to HA, OCP and DCPD (dicalcium phosphate) was carefully calculated, considering all the association/dissociation reactions of related ion groups in SBF. The analysis indicates that the nucleation rate of OCP is substantially higher than that of HA, while HA is most thermodynamically stable in SBF. DCPD precipitation is thermodynamically impossible in normal SBF, unless calcium and phosphate ion concentrations of SBF increase. Osteoconduction of Ti6Al4V surfaces under various conditions, including micro-patterned, alkali-treated, micro-patterned plus alkali-treated, and surfaces without any treatment, was evaluated. TMEMM was used to fabricate micro-hole arrays on the titanium alloy

  12. Steel and titanium hollow sphere foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hurysz, K.M.; Clark, J.L.; Nagel, A.R.; Lee, K.J.; Cochran, J.K.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Hardwicke, C.U.

    1998-12-31

    Metal hollow sphere foams are fabricated by bonding millimeter sized metal alloy hollow spheres at points of contact. The spheres are formed as powder shells from slurries. For stainless steel spheres, the starting powder is a mixture of iron and chromium oxide. Thermal treatment in hydrogen reduces the oxides to Fe/Cr alloys with less than 2% porosity in sphere walls. The nominal composition is close to that of 405 stainless. Carburization in CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere followed by heat treatment produces foams of either 410 or 420 type stainless steels depending on carbon content. Compressive stress-strain behavior was measured on point contact bonded stainless foams both before and after carburization. Hardness measurements on steel sphere walls were used to estimate the yield strength. Relative strengths of the foams were positioned between open and closed cell models. This was encouraging because bonding in the foams was less than optimum and the hollow sphere walls contained defects. As processing improves, strengths should increase. To produce titanium alloy spheres, the starting powder is titanium alloy hydride. Thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere decomposes the hydride and sinters the titanium powder in the sphere walls to greater than 96% relative density. Both titanium and Ti-6V-4V spheres and foams have been produced. Oxygen contents are a concern for titanium compositions and processing is being altered to reduce oxygen levels to increase ductility.

  13. Titanium nitride deposited by dual ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamaji, S.; Maeyama, Y.; Ina, T.; Minowa, Y.

    1989-03-01

    Titanium nitride films have been prepared by the dual ion beam (DIB) deposition technique, which consists of the ionized cluster beam (ICB) and the ionized gas beam (IGB). As the source of ICB, vaporized titanium is ejected through the multinozzle of the crucible into a high vacuum chamber and is cooled and clustered by adiabatic expansion. The titanium clusters thus obtained are partially ionized in an electron shower and accelerated to the substrate. At the same time, as the source of IGB, nitrogen molecules are partially ionized, excited and decomposed in an electron shower and also accelerated to the substrate. These two beams collide and combine together on their way to the substrate. The characteristics of the ion current density and the properties of titanium nitride films are investigated. It is found that the DIB technique has a great advantage in preparing titanium nitride films of various crystalline structures from TiN to Ti 2N at a low temperature with a high deposition rate over a large substrate. Therefore, the chemical reaction is enhanced by the irradiation of the ionized and excited gases and the migration of ionized clusters on the substrate.

  14. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  15. Individual prefabricated titanium implants and titanium mesh in skull base reconstructive surgery. A report of cases.

    PubMed

    Schipper, J; Ridder, G J; Spetzger, U; Teszler, C B; Fradis, M; Maier, W

    2004-05-01

    Titanium implants can be shaped by traditional hand forming, press shaping, modular construction by welding, construction on full-size models shaped from CT coordinates and, most recently, by computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that consist in the direct prefabrication of individual implants by milling them out of a solid block of titanium. The aim of our study was to present a set of preliminary cases of an ongoing program of reconstructive procedures of the skull base using titanium implants. The subjects underwent ablative procedures of the skull base with reconstruction either by titanium mesh or individual prefabricated CAD/CAM implants. Six patients have been operated on successfully since 2000: two received prefabricated CAD/CAM titanium plates and four others underwent reconstruction with titanium mesh. The stability of CAD/CAM plates is superior to that of mesh, thus it is more useful in reconstructing large lesions of the frontal skull base and the temporal and occipital bones. Titanium mesh was successfully used for defects smaller than 100 cm(2) or where selected viscerocranial defects are complicated in design and less reproducible by CAD/CAM. The intraoperative design, shaping and adjustment characteristic of titanium mesh can be dispensed with when CAD/CAM implants are used. The 3-D data set used in the CAD/CAM process also operates in the navigated simulation and planning of the ablation contours, the latter being of great assistance in establishing the optimal future defect. As a disadvantage, CAD/CAM technology is more expensive than titanium mesh, and the process is time-consuming as it is carried out in advance of surgery.

  16. Recent developments in Japanese titanium research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinomi, M.

    1996-07-01

    Activity in the titanium industries in Japan has been steadily increasing as the demand for titanium and titanium alloys in consumer goods grows. The key issues in continuing the growth of these applications are lowering costs and developing new markets. In this article, advances in R&D reported mainly in the Japanese journals and at Japanese conferences are briefly described.

  17. Biocompatible glass ceramic coatings for titanium alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, A.S.; Ludanova, O.V.

    1995-11-01

    Coatings from hydroxylapatite and bioglass for titanium are considered. A review of patents and scientific publications shows that there are prerequisites for creating coatings on titanium alloys that would ensure the biological compatibility of titanium on the basis of known technologies.

  18. Titanium-nitrogen reaction investigated for application to gettering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arntzen, J. D.; Coleman, L. F.; Kyle, M. L.; Pierce, R. D.

    1968-01-01

    Titanium is one of several gettering materials available for removing nitrogen from inert gases. The reaction rate of titanium-metal sponge and nitrogen in argon-nitrogen mixtures was studied at 900 degrees C. The rate was found to depend upon the partial pressure of nitrogen in the gas phase. Mathematical relationships simulate titanium systems.

  19. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  20. Laser action of optically pumped atomic titanium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, H.; Hirata, K.

    1989-09-01

    Laser action has been observed on the titanium 551.4 nm, 3D0(1)-F2, transition. A nitrogen laser is used to produce the titanium vapor by irradiating a metal plate, and the titanium atoms are optically pumped by another nitrogen laser.

  1. New Method For Joining Stainless Steel to Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emanuel, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    In new process, edge of stainless-steel sheet is perforated, and joined to titanium by resistance seam welding. Titanium flows into perforations, forming a strong interlocking joint. Process creates a quasi-metallurgical bond between the thin sheets of stainless steel and titanium.

  2. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    DOEpatents

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  3. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  4. Stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-12-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  5. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-12-02

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 2 figs.

  6. Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  7. Process for preparing titanium nitride powder

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-06-17

    A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

  8. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J G; Geremias, T C; Montero, J F D; Vahey, B R; Benfatti, C A M; Souza, J C M; Magini, R S; Pimenta, A L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml(-)(1)), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5×10(2)CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4×10(2)CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. PMID:27524086

  9. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaluzny, J. A.; Grimm, C.; Passarelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  10. Genotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Yan, Jian; Li, Yan

    2014-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO(2)-NPs, <100 nm) are increasingly being used in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics due to the unique properties derived from their small sizes. However, their large surface-area to mass ratio and high redox potential may negatively impact human health and the environment. TiO(2)-NPs can cause inflammation, pulmonary damage, fibrosis, and lung tumors and they are possibly carcinogenic to humans. Because cancer is a disease involving mutation, there are a large number of studies on the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs. In this article, we review the results that have been reported in the literature, with a focus on data generated from the standard genotoxicity assays. The data include genotoxicity results from the Ames test, in vitro and in vivo Comet assay, in vitro and in vivo micronucleus assay, sister chromatid exchange assay, mammalian cell hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase gene assay, the wing somatic mutation and recombination assay, and the mouse phosphatidylinositol glycan, class A gene assay. Inconsistent results have been found in these assays, with both positive and negative responses being reported. The in vitro systems for assessing the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs have generated a greater number of positive results than the in vivo systems, and tests for DNA and chromosome damage have produced more positive results than the assays measuring gene mutation. Nearly all tests for measuring the mutagenicity of TiO(2)-NPs were negative. The current data indicate that the genotoxicity of TiO(2)-NPs is mediated mainly through the generation of oxidative stress in cells.

  11. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Damage during Forging with Superimposed Hydrostatic Pressure by Active Media

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, B.-A.; Hagen, T.; Roehr, S.; Sidhu, K. B.

    2007-05-17

    The effective reduction of energy consumption and a reasonable treatment of resources can be achieved by minimizing a component's weight using lightweight metals. In this context, aluminum alloys play a major role. Due to their material-sided restricted formability, the mentioned aluminum materials are difficult to form. The plasticity of a material is ascertained by its maximum forming limit. It is attained, when the deformation causes mechanical damage within the material. Damage of that sort is reached more rapidly, the greater the tensile strength rate in relation to total tension rate. A promising approach of handling these low ductile, high-strength aluminum alloys within a forming process, is forming with a synchronized superposition of comprehensive stress by active media such as by controlling oil pressure. The influence of superimposed hydrostatic pressure on the flow stress was analyzed as well as the formability for different procedures at different hydrostatic pressures and temperature levels. It was observed that flow stress is independent of superimposed hydrostatic pressure. Neither the superimposed pressure has an influence on the plastic deformation, nor does a pressure dependent material hardening due to increasing hydrostatic pressure take place. The formability increases with rising hydrostatic pressure. The relative gain at room temperature and increase of the superimposed pressure from 0 to 600 bar for tested materials was at least 140 % and max. 220 %. Therefore in this paper, based on these experimental observations, it is the intended to develop a numerical simulation in order to predict ductile damage that occurs in the bulk forging process with superimposed hydrostatic pressure based Lemaitre's damage model.

  13. Low cost forged Y-pattern valves control hot corrosive/erosive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, A.

    1987-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center in Morgantown, West Virginia is a research facility of the US Department of Energy (DOE) that does research on fossil fuels utilization and conversion to provide improved and environmentally acceptable energy sources. One area of investigation in the Morgantown facility is the use of gaseous fuels derived from coal from fluidized-bed and fixed-bed gasification technologies. The corrosive and slightly erosive gases and vapors at about 1000F and from 100 to 300 psi are treated in an experimental desulfurization unit to produce fuel gas with greatly enhanced environmental characteristics. The valves in use were constructed of Type 347 stainless steel, a stabilized version of 316 SS, and cost about $6000 for the 2'' size and about $4000 for the 1'' size. Despite the high cost, the valve sometimes became difficult or impossible to operate due to metal failures. The Technology Center had a number of new Class 1500 Y-pattern (angle-style) globe valves in inventory. The control valve body and bonnet are forged chrome moly steel (ASTM-H182-F22), the stem assembly is a 13% chrome alloy with an erosion resistant hard faced disc, and the seat ring is a cobalt-base alloy fused in place as an integral part of the body. Stem packing as an either wire inserted molded asbestos or Grafoil flexible graphite. The Y-pattern globe valves in 1 and 2'' sizes, which were judged potentially suitable and on hand, were installed in the experimental desulfization unit as well as in the connecting hot gas piping system to a new coal gasification process. The Class 1500 Y-pattern valves have provided reliable control of the hot corrosive and erosive gas streams with very little maintenance.

  14. Titanium nitride thin films for minimizing multipactoring

    DOEpatents

    Welch, Kimo M.

    1979-01-01

    Applying a thin film coating to the surface of a workpiece, in particular, applying a coating of titanium nitride to a klystron window by means of a crossed-field diode sputtering array. The array is comprised of a cohesive group of numerous small hollow electrically conducting cylinders and is mounted so that the open ends of the cylinders on one side of the group are adjacent a titanium cathode plate. The workpiece is mounted so as to face the open ends of the other side of the group. A magnetic field is applied to the array so as to be coaxial with the cylinders and a potential is applied across the cylinders and the cathode plate, the cylinders as an anode being positive with respect to the cathode plate. The cylinders, the cathode plate and the workpiece are situated in an atmosphere of nitrogen which becomes ionized such as by field emission because of the electric field between the cylinders and cathode plate, thereby establishing an anode-cathode discharge that results in sputtering of the titanium plate. The sputtered titanium coats the workpiece and chemically combines with the nitrogen to form a titanium nitride coating on the workpiece. Gas pressure, gas mixtures, cathode material composition, voltages applied to the cathode and anode, the magnetic field, cathode, anode and workpiece spacing, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to inner diameter) of the anode cylinders, all may be controlled to provide consistent optimum thin film coatings of various compositions and thicknesses. Another facet of the disclosure is the coating of microwave components per se with titanium nitride to reduce multipactoring under operating conditions of the components.

  15. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  16. Beta titanium: a new orthodontic alloy.

    PubMed

    Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1980-02-01

    Historically, few alloys have been used in the fabrication of orthodontic appliances. This article reviews the gold-based, stainless steel, chrome-cobalt-nickel, and nitinol alloys, as well as beta titanium, a new material for orthodontics. Mechanical properties and manipulative characteristics are summarized to develop a basis for the selection of the proper alloy for a given clinical situation. The beta titanium wire has a unique balance of low stiffness, high springback, formability, and weldability which indicates its use in a wide range of clinical applications. A number of such applications are described. PMID:6928342

  17. Laser deposition of multiwalled titanium oxide microtubes

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, A A; Arakelyan, Sergei M; Kutrovskaya, S V; Kucherik, A O; Prokoshev, V G

    2010-09-10

    We propose approaches to producing micro- and nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces via exposure to cw laser radiation and repetitive laser pulses. By varying the experimental geometry (angle of incidence, substrate-target separation and other parameters), various structures can be obtained. Titanium oxide tubes grown in a nonuniform magnetic field are up to 1 {mu}m in diameter and up to 500 {mu}m in length. Such structures can be used in catalytic filtration and as multiwalled structures similar to superlattices. (laser technologies)

  18. Rapidly solidified titanium alloys by melt overflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Thomas A.; Bruce, Thomas J., Jr.; Hackman, Lloyd E.; Brasmer, Susan E.; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Baeslack, William A., III

    1989-01-01

    A pilot plant scale furnace was designed and constructed for casting titanium alloy strips. The furnace combines plasma arc skull melting techniques with melt overflow rapid solidification technology. A mathematical model of the melting and casting process was developed. The furnace cast strip of a suitable length and width for use with honeycomb structures. Titanium alloys Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-14Al-21 Nb were successfully cast into strips. The strips were evaluated by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, chemical analysis, and cold rolling.

  19. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.; Orshanskaya, E. G.

    2015-09-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density.

  20. Hydrogen partitioning and transport in titanium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Weon S.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives the final summary of the research work perfomed from March 1, 1990 to August 28, 1993. Brief descriptions of the research findings are given on the surface variation of Ti-14Al-21Nb as a function of temperature under ultrahigh vacuum conditions; titanium aluminides: surface composition effects as a function of temperature; Auger electron intensity variation in oxygen-charged silver; and segregation of sulfur on a titanium surface studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. Each description details one or more of the attached corresponding figures. Published journal documents are provided as appendices to give further detail.