Science.gov

Sample records for center comparison study

  1. Process comparison study. MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T.; Krawiec, J.

    1992-01-01

    A process comparison study was conducted using four different advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate a composite solid rocket booster systems tunnel cover. Costs and labor hours were tracked to provide the comparison between the processes. A relative structural comparison of the components is also included. The processes utilized included filament winding, pultrusion, automated tape laying, and thermoplastic thermoforming. The hand layup technique is also compared. Of the four advanced processes evaluated, the thermoformed thermoplastic component resulted in the least total cost. The automated tape laying and filament winding techniques closely followed the thermoplastic component in terms of total cost; and, these techniques show the most promise for high quality components and lower production costs. The pultruded component, with its expensive tooling and material requirements, was by far the most expensive process evaluated, although the results obtained would not be representative of large production runs.

  2. Comparison study of gear dynamic computer programs at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison study was performed on four gear dynamic analysis computer programs developed under NASA/Army sponsorship. These programs are GRDYNMULT (a multimesh program applicable to a number of epicyclic systems), TELSGE (a single mesh program), PGT (a multimesh program applicable to a planetary system with three planets), and DANST (a single mesh program). The capabilities and features, input and output options, and technical aspects of the programs were reviewed and compared. Results are presented in a concise tabular form. Parametric studies of the program models were performed to investigate the predicted results of the programs as input parameters such as speed, torque, and mesh damping were varied. In general, the program models predicted similar dynamic load and stress levels as operating conditions were varied. Flash temperature predictions from programs GRDYNMULT and TELSGE indicated similar trends; however, actual values were not in close agreement. The program GRDYNMULT was found to be the most versatile in system size, type, and analysis capabilities. The programs DANST, TELSGE, and PGT are more specialized for specific systems; however, in specific areas they provide a more detailed treatment than GRDYNMULT.

  3. The NASA-Ames Research Center stratospheric aerosol model. 2. Sensitivity studies and comparison with observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Kiang, C. S.; Whitten, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sensitivity tests were performed on a one-dimensional, physical-chemical model of the unperturbed stratospheric aerosols, and model calculations were compared with observations. The tests and comparisons suggest that coagulation controls the particle number mixing ratio, although the number of condensation nuclei at the tropopause and the diffusion coefficient at high altitudes are also important. The sulfur gas source strength and the aerosol residence time are much more important than the supply of condensation nuclei in establishing mass and large particle concentrations. The particle size is also controlled mainly by gas supply and residence time. In situ observations of the aerosols and laboratory measurements of aerosols, parameters that can provide further information about the physics and chemistry of the stratosphere and the aerosols found there are provided.

  4. Comparison of endoscopic stenting for malignant biliary obstruction: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Masatomo; Osafune, Yasuyo; Chinen, Katsuya; Kato, Shingo; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Yakabi, Koji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of single-step endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) for treatment of obstructive jaundice. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed among 90 patients who underwent transpapillary biliary metallic stent placement for malignant biliary obstruction (MBO) between April 2005 and October 2012. The diagnosis of primary disease and MBO was based on abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with brush cytology, biopsy, and/or a combination of these modalities. The type of SEMS (covered or non-covered, 8 mm or 10 mm in diameter) was determined by the endoscopist. Ninety patients were divided into two groups: group 1 (49 patients) who underwent a single-step SEMS placement and group 2 (41 patients) who underwent a two-step SEMS placement. The technical success rate, complication rate, stent patency, and patient survival rate were compared between the groups. In addition, to identify the clinical prognostic factors associated with patient survival, the following variables were evaluated in Cox-regression analysis: gender, age, etiology of MBO (pancreatic cancer or non-pancreatic cancer), clinical stage (IVb; with distant metastases or IVa >; without distant metastases), chemotherapy (with or without), patency of the stent, and the use of single-step or two-step SEMS. RESULTS: Immediate technical success was achieved in 93.9% (46/49) in group 1 and in 95.1% (39/41) in group 2, with no significant difference (P = 1.0). Similarly, there was no difference in the complication rates between the groups (group 1, 4.1% and group 2, 4.9%; P = 0.62). Stent failure was observed in 10 cases in group 1 (20.4%) and in 16 cases in group 2 (39.0%). The patency of stent and patient survival revealed no difference between the two groups with Kaplan-Meier analysis, with a mean patency of 111 ± 17 d in group 1 and 137 ± 19 d in

  5. URBAN STUDIES CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEBOUT, JOHN E.

    THE CENTER WORKS WITH RUTGERS UNIVERSITY TO MAKE USE OF URBAN STUDIES IN APPROPRIATE RESEARCH AND TEACHING PROGRAMS AND IN OTHER INTELLECTUAL SERVICES TO THE COMMUNITY. THE FIVE MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE CENTER - EXTENSION, RESEARCH AND EDUCATION, LIBRARY SERVICES, OPPORTUNITIES EXPANSION PROJECT, AND THE URBAN FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM - ARE…

  6. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup.

  7. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Srinivas, NCH; Kumar, Duddu Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The study is to evaluate changes in microhardness of enamel after exposure to acidic center filled chewing gum on primary and permanent teeth. Methods: Thirty primary and 30 permanent molar extracted teeth were painted with acid resistant varnish except a small window over buccal surface. Teeth were divided into four groups according to type of teeth and type of chewing gum (Center fresh and Bubbaloo) (D1, P1, D2 and P2); each tooth was exposed to whole chewing gum mashed with 5 ml of artificial saliva for five minutes at room temperature twice a day for 5 days. After the exposure, teeth were stored in deionized water and submitted for microhardness tests. Results: Paired t-test and independent sample t-test were used for statistical analysis. A significant reduction in microhardness was found between exposed and unexposed areas in all groups. There was no statistically significant difference in reduction of microhardness to chewing gums, and between primary and permanent enamel. Conclusion: There is a definite reduction in microhardness in all groups exposed to chewing gums. Both the chewing gums are equally erosive; both permanent and primary teeth were affected. How to cite this article: Mudumba VL, Muppa R, Srinivas NCH, Kumar DM. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):24-29. PMID:25206233

  8. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and complexity are studied for four nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme and three cell-centered schemes - a node-averaging scheme and two schemes with nearest-neighbor and adaptive compact stencils for least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Tests from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The tests of the second class are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes may degenerate on mixed grids, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to that of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly anisotropic

  9. Control Systems Security Center Comparison Study of Industrial Control System Standards against the Control Systems Protection Framework Cyber-Security Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    Cyber security standards, guidelines, and best practices for control systems are critical requirements that have been delineated and formally recognized by industry and government entities. Cyber security standards provide a common language within the industrial control system community, both national and international, to facilitate understanding of security awareness issues but, ultimately, they are intended to strengthen cyber security for control systems. This study and the preliminary findings outlined in this report are an initial attempt by the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) Standard Awareness Team to better understand how existing and emerging industry standards, guidelines, and best practices address cyber security for industrial control systems. The Standard Awareness Team comprised subject matter experts in control systems and cyber security technologies and standards from several Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories, including Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This study was conducted in two parts: a standard identification effort and a comparison analysis effort. During the standard identification effort, the Standard Awareness Team conducted a comprehensive open-source survey of existing control systems security standards, regulations, and guidelines in several of the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors, including the telecommunication, water, chemical, energy (electric power, petroleum and oil, natural gas), and transportation--rail sectors and sub-sectors. During the comparison analysis effort, the team compared the requirements contained in selected, identified, industry standards with the cyber security requirements in ''Cyber Security Protection Framework'', Version 0.9 (hereafter referred to as the ''Framework''). For each of the seven sector/sub-sectors listed above, one standard was selected from the list of standards identified

  10. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  11. A comparison of methods and results in recruiting white and black women into reproductive studies: the MMC-PSU cooperative center on reproduction experience.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Stephanie; Legro, Richard S; Coney, PonJola

    2008-07-01

    Establishing a holistic approach for the enrollment of subjects into clinical trials that includes strategies for the recruitment of non-traditional and minority populations has been an elusive task. The existence of such a design, that is understood and embraced by investigators and the target communities, would streamline the current level of commitment of time, energy and resources. This is necessary to successfully encourage individual and community participation in research studies. The Center for Research in Reproduction at Meharry set out to recruit a large number of African American women volunteers of reproductive age into clinical trials. The experience, of recruiting volunteers from the African American community for clinical trials in the Meharry Medical College/Pennsylvania State University (MMC/PSU)'s Cooperative Center for Research in Reproduction at Meharry, is presented.

  12. Comparison of canal transportation and centering ability of rotary protaper, one shape system and wave one system using cone beam computed tomography: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Varsha Harshal; Nagmode, Pradnya Sunil; Abraham, Sathish; Patait, Mahendra; Lahoti, Pratik Vinod; Jaju, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare the canal transportation and centering ability of Rotary ProTaper, One Shape and Wave One systems using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in curved root canals to find better instrumentation technique for maintaining root canal geometry. Materials and Methods: Total 30 freshly extracted premolars having curved root canals with at least 10 degrees of curvature were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. All teeth were scanned by CBCT to determine the root canal shape before instrumentation. In Group 1, the canals were prepared with Rotary ProTaper files, in Group 2 the canals were prepared with One Shape files and in Group 3 canals were prepared with Wave One files. After preparation, post-instrumentation scan was performed. Pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation images were obtained at three levels, 3 mm apical, 3 mm coronal and 8 mm apical above the apical foramen were compared using CBCT software. Amount of transportation and centering ability were assessed. The three groups were statistically compared with analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant. Results: All instruments maintained the original canal curvature with significant differences between the different files. Data suggested that Wave One files presented the best outcomes for both the variables evaluated. Wave One files caused lesser transportation and remained better centered in the canal than One Shape and Rotary ProTaper files. Conclusion: The canal preparation with Wave One files showed lesser transportation and better centering ability than One Shape and ProTaper. PMID:25506145

  13. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  14. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  15. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  16. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations. Part 1; Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and efficiency are studied for six nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme, cell-centered node-averaging schemes with and without clipping, and cell-centered schemes with unweighted, weighted, and approximately mapped least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Results from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The second class of tests are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes are less accurate, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to the complexity of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly

  17. Geology orbiter comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  18. Computer Networks and African Studies Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    The use of electronic communication in the 12 Title VI African Studies Centers is discussed, and the networks available for their use are reviewed. It is argued that the African Studies Centers should be on the cutting edge of contemporary electronic communication and that computer networks should be a fundamental aspect of their programs. An…

  19. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Inviscid Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-centered and node-centered approaches have been compared for unstructured finite-volume discretization of inviscid fluxes. The grids range from regular grids to irregular grids, including mixed-element grids and grids with random perturbations of nodes. Accuracy, complexity, and convergence rates of defect-correction iterations are studied for eight nominally second-order accurate schemes: two node-centered schemes with weighted and unweighted least-squares (LSQ) methods for gradient reconstruction and six cell-centered schemes two node-averaging with and without clipping and four schemes that employ different stencils for LSQ gradient reconstruction. The cell-centered nearest-neighbor (CC-NN) scheme has the lowest complexity; a version of the scheme that involves smart augmentation of the LSQ stencil (CC-SA) has only marginal complexity increase. All other schemes have larger complexity; complexity of node-centered (NC) schemes are somewhat lower than complexity of cell-centered node-averaging (CC-NA) and full-augmentation (CC-FA) schemes. On highly anisotropic grids typical of those encountered in grid adaptation, discretization errors of five of the six cell-centered schemes converge with second order on all tested grids; the CC-NA scheme with clipping degrades solution accuracy to first order. The NC schemes converge with second order on regular and/or triangular grids and with first order on perturbed quadrilaterals and mixed-element grids. All schemes may produce large relative errors in gradient reconstruction on grids with perturbed nodes. Defect-correction iterations for schemes employing weighted least-square gradient reconstruction diverge on perturbed stretched grids. Overall, the CC-NN and CC-SA schemes offer the best options of the lowest complexity and secondorder discretization errors. On anisotropic grids over a curved body typical of turbulent flow simulations, the discretization errors converge with second order and are small for the CC

  20. Tayamentasachta: A Center for Environmental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greencastle-Antrim School District, PA.

    This curriculum guide lists concepts and objectives for water study units in grades 1-6 and for secondary classes. Geared especially for this particular environmental center is a collection of teacher guidelines with possible trips and activities. A listing of the center's materials is also included. This work was prepared under an ESEA Title III…

  1. A multi-center, double-blind, randomised study of the Lavender oil preparation Silexan in comparison to Lorazepam for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Woelk, H; Schläfke, S

    2010-02-01

    Generalized and persistent anxiety, accompanied by nervousness and other symptoms (Generalised Anxiety Disorder, GAD) is frequent in the general population and leads to benzodiazepine usage. Unfortunately, these substances induce sedation and have a high potential for drug abuse, and there is thus a need for alternatives. As the anxiolytic properties of lavender have already been demonstrated in pharmacological studies and small-scale clinical trials, it was postulated that lavender has a positive effect in GAD. A controlled clinical study was then performed to evaluate the efficacy of silexan, a new oral lavender oil capsule preparation, versus a benzodiazepine. In this study, the efficacy of a 6-week-intake of silexan compared to lorazepam was investigated in adults with GAD. The primary target variable was the change in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A-total score) as an objective measurement of the severity of anxiety between baseline and week 6. The results suggest that silexan effectively ameliorates generalized anxiety comparable to a common benzodiazepine (lorazepam). The mean of the HAM-A-total score decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups (by 11.3+/-6.7 points (45%) in the silexan group and by 11.6+/-6.6 points (46%) in the lorazepam group, from 25+/-4 points at baseline in both groups). During the active treatment period, the two HAM-A subscores "somatic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore I) and "psychic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore II) also decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups. The changes in other subscores measured during the study, such as the SAS (Self-rating Anxiety Scale), PSWQ-PW (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), SF 36 Health survey Questionnaire and Clinical Global Impressions of severity of disorder (CGI item 1, CGI item 2, CGI item 3), and the results of the sleep diary demonstrated comparable positive effects of the two compounds. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that silexan is as effective as lorazepam

  2. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE

  3. PRB CHEMISTRY CASE STUDY: DENVER FEDERAL CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Denver Federal Center permeable reactive barrier is a funnel-and-gate system with four reactive gates, each separated by up to about 120 m of metal sheet pile. In this study, ground water sampling, core collection, and solid phase characterization studies were carried out in...

  4. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  5. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  6. Symmetry comparison between sacrum and center of mass during walking.

    PubMed

    Navvab Motlagh, Fateme; Arshi, Ahmed Reza

    2016-07-01

    Sacrum motion is used extensively in clinical research to represent movement of the entire body by replacing the center of mass. The primary objective of this article was to investigate the effect of this replacement on symmetry determination. The secondary objective was to assess the correlation between the symmetries of trajectories of center of mass and sacrum, and that of spatiotemporal parameters. Three-dimensional trajectories obtained from 37 markers placed on anatomical landmarks of 15 healthy subjects were recorded while walking at three speeds on the treadmill. Trajectory of center of mass was determined using segmental analysis method. The results indicated that two symmetries, one determined using sacrum marker and the other using segmental analysis method, were different and this difference was more pronounced in anterior-posterior direction. In other words, harmonic analysis of sacrum and center of mass trajectories revealed different results. Furthermore, low-to-moderate correlations were observed between spatiotemporal parameters symmetry and symmetries obtained from both center of mass and sacrum. In conclusion, the results indicated that it may not be analytically acceptable to substitute sacrum for center of mass in symmetry determination.

  7. Symmetry comparison between sacrum and center of mass during walking.

    PubMed

    Navvab Motlagh, Fateme; Arshi, Ahmed Reza

    2016-07-01

    Sacrum motion is used extensively in clinical research to represent movement of the entire body by replacing the center of mass. The primary objective of this article was to investigate the effect of this replacement on symmetry determination. The secondary objective was to assess the correlation between the symmetries of trajectories of center of mass and sacrum, and that of spatiotemporal parameters. Three-dimensional trajectories obtained from 37 markers placed on anatomical landmarks of 15 healthy subjects were recorded while walking at three speeds on the treadmill. Trajectory of center of mass was determined using segmental analysis method. The results indicated that two symmetries, one determined using sacrum marker and the other using segmental analysis method, were different and this difference was more pronounced in anterior-posterior direction. In other words, harmonic analysis of sacrum and center of mass trajectories revealed different results. Furthermore, low-to-moderate correlations were observed between spatiotemporal parameters symmetry and symmetries obtained from both center of mass and sacrum. In conclusion, the results indicated that it may not be analytically acceptable to substitute sacrum for center of mass in symmetry determination. PMID:27272201

  8. Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,…

  9. Energy Education Training Center--Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, George R.; And Others

    Presented are findings and recommendations of a study conducted to determine the need for an Energy Education Training Center in the Columbia Plateau region of Oregon and Washington. Four sections comprise this report: (1) service area, (2) service population, (3) problem definition, and (4) proposed solution, the EETC. Information summarized in…

  10. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details a study of regulations for day care centers in the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Data were collected by means of a mail questionnaire sent to each state central regulatory office. Following an introduction by Kay Hollestelle, the Children's Foundation executive director, the…

  11. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study updates 1991 information from the Children's Foundation. It contains results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The information is intended for use by center directors and staff, child advocates, the media, state and local regulatory offices, students,…

  12. A Comparison of Lead Abatement Technologies at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeziorowski, Luz Y.; Calla, Joanne

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, Lewis participated in a pilot test of Lead Specifications. The Specifications were sponsored by the Center to Protect Worker's Rights (CPWR). Entitled "Model Specifications for the Protection of Worker's from Lead on Steel Structures", one aspect of this endeavor was to test and compare several lead abatement technologies. The project overview, objectives, team, and requirements as well as abatement methods and materials are outlined.

  13. Space Operations Center: Shuttle interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the Space Operation Center (SOC), including constraints that the Shuttle will place upon the SOC design. The study identifies the considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and also identifies the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions.

  14. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  15. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  16. Studies on soft centered coated snacks.

    PubMed

    Pavithra, A S; Chetana, Ramakrishna; Babylatha, R; Archana, S N; Bhat, K K

    2013-04-01

    Roasted groundnut seeds, amaranth and dates pulp formed the center filling which was coated with sugar, breadings, desiccated coconut and roasted Bengalgram flour (BGF) to get 4 coated snacks. Physicochemical characteristics, microbiological profile, sorption behaviour and sensory quality of 4 coated snacks were determined. Centre filling to coating ratio of the products were in the range of 3:2-7:1, the product having BGF coating had the thinnest coating. Center filling had soft texture and the moisture content was 10.2-16.2% coating had lower moisture content (4.4-8.6%) except for Bengal gram coating, which had 11.1% moisture. Sugar coated snack has lowest fat (11.6%) and protein (7.2%) contents. Desiccated coconut coated snack has highest fat (25.4%) and Bengal gram flour coated snack had highest protein content (15.4%). Sorption studies showed that the coated snack had critical moisture content of 11.2-13.5%. The products were moisture sensitive and hence require packaging in films having higher moisture barrier property. In freshly prepared snacks coliforms, yeast and mold were absent. Mesophillic aerobes count did not show significant change during 90 days of storage at 27 °C and 37 °C. Sensory analysis showed that products had a unique texture due to combined effect of fairly hard coating and soft center. Flavour and overall quality of all the products were rated as very good. PMID:24425933

  17. Seismometer readings studied in Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The seismometer reading from the impact made by the Apollo 15 Saturn S-IVB stage when it struck the lunar surface is studied by scientists in the Mission Control Center. Dr. Gary Latham (dark suit, wearing lapel button) of Columbia University is responsible for the design and experiment data analysis of the Passive Seismic Experiment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). The man on the left, writing, is Nafi Toksos of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Looking on at upper left is Dave Lammlein, also with Columbia.

  18. The New Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Bond; K. Kostelnik; R.A. Wharton; A. Kadak

    2006-06-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundation to enable future economic growth. The next generation energy workforce in the U.S. is a critical element in meeting both national and global energy needs. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) was established in 2005 in response to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. CAES, located at the new Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will address critical energy education, research, policy study and training needs. CAES is a unique joint partnership between the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), the State of Idaho, an Idaho University Consortium (IUC), and a National University Consortium (NUC). CAES will be based in a new facility that will foster collaborative academic and research efforts among participating institutions.

  19. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  20. Study of Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center utility systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, T. E.; Huber, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an engineering study of potential energy saving utility system modifications for the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are presented. The objective of the study was to define and analyze utility options that would provide facility energy savings in addition to the approximately 25 percent already achieved through an energy loads reduction program. A systems engineering approach was used to determine total system energy and cost savings resulting from each of the ten major options investigated. The results reported include detailed cost analyses and cost comparisons of various options. Cost are projected to the year 2000. Also included are a brief description of a mathematical model used for the analysis and the rationale used for a site survey to select buildings suitable for analysis.

  1. Environmental Studies. Plano Outdoor Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plano Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide for the Plano Intermediate School District (Texas) Outdoor Learning Center is divided into three major sections. Section I provides information on the numbered stations/posts found along the perimeter and inner trails of the center and includes brief comments on the philosophy of environmental education and the history…

  2. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  3. RESQme studies for SDC regional computing centers

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.T.

    1993-02-01

    The Technical Design Report for the SDC proposes a model for offline computing which includes a computing center at the SSCL, containing all of the physics data, together with a number of regional computing centers around the world. These regional centers would contain subsets of the data, and would support the daily work of most physicists. For large or unusual requests, where the data are not held at the regional center, the requests would automatically be forwarded to the SSCL. It is assumed that the closeness'' of the regional centers and their reduced demand from fewer users would result in improved system performance. Such a system is too complex to model analytically; simulation is the only viable approach. However, Monte Carlo models built from scratch for complicated systems are very difficult to maintain and hard to modify. Fortunately, we have obtained from IBM a modeling framework, RESQme, explicitly designed for building statistical models of computer systems. This note describes a first pass at modeling the proposed offline system.

  4. RESQme studies for SDC regional computing centers

    SciTech Connect

    Day, C.T.

    1993-02-01

    The Technical Design Report for the SDC proposes a model for offline computing which includes a computing center at the SSCL, containing all of the physics data, together with a number of regional computing centers around the world. These regional centers would contain subsets of the data, and would support the daily work of most physicists. For large or unusual requests, where the data are not held at the regional center, the requests would automatically be forwarded to the SSCL. It is assumed that the ``closeness`` of the regional centers and their reduced demand from fewer users would result in improved system performance. Such a system is too complex to model analytically; simulation is the only viable approach. However, Monte Carlo models built from scratch for complicated systems are very difficult to maintain and hard to modify. Fortunately, we have obtained from IBM a modeling framework, RESQme, explicitly designed for building statistical models of computer systems. This note describes a first pass at modeling the proposed offline system.

  5. 2005 Workforce Study: Ohio Early Childhood Centers. General Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoneburner, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the characteristics of the current workforce in early childhood. This report highlights key characteristics of the 2005 early childhood center workforce in Ohio. Survey packets were sent to 3.600 randomly selected centers in April 2005, representing centers licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and…

  6. Comparison of Optimal Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Attended Urban Medical Health Center with those Attended a Tertiary Care Center: Experiences from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Sedighe; Haji Ghanbari, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahimi, Hedyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD accounts for primary cause of death among diabetic patients. Physicians, especially in the primary care setting, have effective role in the management of cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, we aimed to compare the prevalence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in Type 2 diabetic patients attending to an urban health center as a primary care center with Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism Diabetes Clinic (IEMDC) as a tertiary center. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 200 adult diabetic patients attending urban health center (Abouzar Health Center) and 201 diabetic patients in a tertiary center. The patients’ cardiovascular risk factors including lipid profile, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and smoking history were recorded. The number of patients who did not achieve the target according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines was determined and compared. Results: The patients in urban health center were older than those who attending IEMDC (P = 0.004). The duration of diabetes was longer among urban center patients (P < 0.001). Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors between two groups of patients showed a significant number of patients with poor-controlled low-density lipoprotein (75% vs. 44.7%) and triglyceride (74% vs. 51.7%) in patients attending primary center (P < 0.001). However, the prevalence of high diastolic BP (60.6% vs. 44.5%) was significantly higher in patients attending IEMDC (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two centers’ findings in glycosylated hemoglobin level, high-density lipoprotein level, and systolic BP. Conclusions: Both centers have failure in target achievement in some risk factors; however, the inability of the primary care center in controlling hyperlipidemia in comparison with the tertiary center is a serious warning to provide training about managing

  7. Vomiting Center reanalyzed: An electrical stimulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem of 15 decerebrate cats produced stimulus-bound vomiting in only 4 animals. Vomiting was reproducible in only one cat. Effective stimulating sites were located in the solitary tract and reticular formation. Restricted localization of a vomiting center, stimulation of which evoked readily reproducible results, could not be obtained.

  8. Student-Centered and Teacher-Centered Classroom Management: A Case Study of Three Elementary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    The major purpose of this case study was to document the classroom management beliefs and practices of three teachers reputed to implement student-centered instruction and to examine the relationship between their instructional and managerial approaches. More specifically, do teachers who use student-centered instruction also implement…

  9. Client Impact Study of Six Detoxification Centers ("Sub-Acute Receiving Centers").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Steven E.; And Others

    Results are reported of a study to determine the effects of detoxification centers on the people who use their services. A detoxification center is "a social rehabilitation facility established for the purpose of facilitating access into care and rehabilitation by detoxifying and evaluating the person and providing entrance into the continuum of…

  10. Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott E.

    2012-03-02

    We have discovered a possible "natural fueling" mechanism in tokamak fusion reactors using large scale gyrokinetic turbulence simulation. In the presence of a heat flux dominated tokamak plasma, cold ions naturally pinch radially inward. If cold DT fuel is introduced near the edge using shallow pellet injection, the cold fuel will pinch inward, at the expense of hot helium ash going radially outward. By adjusting the cold DT fuel concentration, the core DT density profiles can be maintained. We have also shown that cold source ions from edge recycling of cold neutrals are pinched radially inward. This mechanism may be important for fully understanding the edge pedestal buildup after an ELM crash. Work includes benchmarking the gyrokinetic turbulence codes in the electromagnetic regime. This includes cyclone base case parameters with an increasing plasma beta. The code comparisons include GEM, GYRO and GENE. There is good linear agreement between the codes using the Cyclone base case, but including electromagnetics and scanning the plasma beta. All the codes have difficulty achieving nonlinear saturation as the kinetic ballooning limit is approached. GEM does not saturate well when beta gets above about 1/2 of the ideal ballooning limit. We find that the lack of saturation is due to the long wavelength k{sub y} modes being nonlinearly pumped to high levels. If the fundamental k{sub y} mode is zeroed out, higher values of beta nonlinearly saturate well. Additionally, there have been studies to better understand CTEM nonlinear saturation and the importance of zonal flows. We have continued our investigation of trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence. More recently, we have focused on the nonlinear saturation of TEM turbulence. An important feature of TEM is that in many parameter regimes, the zonal flow is unimportant. We find that when zonal flows are unimportant, zonal density is the dominant saturation mechanism. We developed a simple theory that agrees with the

  11. A Comparison of Physical Medicine Departments in Vocational vs. Physical Restoration Oriented Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James D.; Egerman, Karl

    To compare the physical medicine departments of selected vocationally oriented rehabilitation centers with each other and with centers that are primarily oriented toward physical restoration, six facilities were studied. Conclusions were as follow: nearly all physical medicine departments have staffing problems; quality of service appears…

  12. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 4 - Case Study on aComputer-testing Center (No. 21)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-08-01

    The data center in this study had a total floor area of 8,580 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 440 racks, and was located in a 208,240 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally, it was served by a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power. The data center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had all hour full access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 23% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 30% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 63 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 84 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately 12 times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). For the data center, 75% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 11% of the power was consumed by chillers, 9% by CRAH units, 1% by lighting system, and about 4% of the power was consumed by pumps. The ratio of HVAC to IT power demand in the data center in this study was approximately 0.32. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, and control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in data centers. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided

  13. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-07-01

    The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power in the event of a power outage. The Data Center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had full-hour access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 15% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 22% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 61 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 88 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately eight times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). The building and its data center cooling system was provided with various energy optimizing systems that included the following: (1) Varying chilled water flow rate through variable speed drives on the primary pumps. (2) No energy losses due to nonexistence of UPS or standby generators. (3) Minimized under-floor obstruction that affects the delivery efficiency of supply air. (4) Elimination of dehumidification/humidification within the CRAH units. For the data center, 70% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 14% of the power was consumed by chillers, 12% by CRAH units, 2% by lighting system, and about 2% of the power was consumed by chilled

  14. DX centers in CdTe: a density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2008-01-01

    DX centers induced by both group-III and group-VII donors in CdTe are studied using density functional calculations. The results show that, for group-VII donors, the DX centers with a cation-cation bond ({alpha}- and {beta}-CCB-DX centers) are more stable than the previously proposed broken-bond DX (BB-DX) center and the {beta}-CCB-DX center is the most stable. The stability trend found for the CCB-DX centers for different donors in CdTe is consistent with that for GaAs and GaSb, which suggests a general rule that the CCB-DX centers are favored for small donor atoms on anion site especially for semiconductors with large anion size.

  15. Racial comparisons of diabetes care and intermediate outcomes in a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Joseph A; Fine, Michael J; Chen, Yi-Fan; Simak, Deborah; Hess, Rachel

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess racial differences in diabetes processes and intermediate outcomes of care in an internal medicine, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) group practice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1,457 adults with diabetes receiving care from 89 medical providers within a PCMH-designated academic practice between 1 July 2009 and 31 July 2010. We used mixed models to assess independent associations between patient race (non-Hispanic white or black) and 1) receipt of processes of care (A1C and LDL testing, foot and retinal examination, and influenza and pneumococcal vaccination) and 2) achievement of intermediate outcomes (LDL <100 mg/dL, blood pressure [BP] <140/90 mmHg, A1C <7.0% [<53 mmol/mol], and A1C >9.0% [>75 mmol/mol]), controlling for sociodemographic factors, health status, treatment intensity, and clinical continuity. RESULTS Compared with non-Hispanic white patients, black patients were younger, were more often single, had lower educational attainment, and were less likely to have commercial insurance. In unadjusted analyses, fewer black patients received a retinal examination and influenza vaccination during the study period or any lifetime pneumococcal vaccination (P < 0.05 [all comparisons]). Fewer black patients achieved an LDL <100 mg/dL, BP <140/90 mmHg, or A1C <7.0% (<53 mmol/mol), while more black patients had an A1C >9.0% (>75 mmol/mol) (P < 0.05 [all comparisons]). In multivariable models, black patients were less likely to receive A1C testing (odds ratio [OR] 0.57 [95% CI 0.34-0.95]) or influenza vaccination (OR 0.75 [95% CI 0.57-0.99]) or to achieve an LDL <100 mg/dL (OR 0.74 [95% CI 0.55-0.99]) or BP <140/90 mmHg (OR 0.64 [95% CI 0.49-0.84]). CONCLUSIONS Racial differences in processes and intermediate outcomes of diabetes care were present within this PCMH-designated practice, controlling for differences in sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment factors.

  16. MRI-Arthroscopic Correlation in Rotator Cuff Tendon Pathologies; A Comparison between Various Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Dehghani, Sakineh; Gerami, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been considered a perfect imaging study for evaluation of shoulder pathologies despite occasional discrepancies between MR reports and arthroscopic findings. In this study we aim to evaluate impact of imaging center as an indicator of image quality on accuracy of MRI reports in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon pathologies. Methods: We reviewed MR reports of 64 patients who underwent arthroscopy in university center hospital. MRIs were done in various centers including both university-affiliated and out-centers. All studies were reported by two radiologists in consensus unaware of the arthroscopic results or previous reports. An inter-observer agreement analysis using the kappa statistics was performed to determine consistency among imaging and surgical reports. Results: Kappa values for out-centers were as follows: 0.785 for biceps, 0.469 for suscapularis, 0.846 for supraspinatus and 0.785 for infraspinatus tendons. In university centers values were 0.799 for biceps, 0.802 for suscapularis, 0.789 for supraspinatus and 0.770 for infraspinatus tendons. Conclusion: Image reporting in university centers with proficient sequences increased accuracy of diagnosis in 3/4 of evaluated features and showed subtle decreased inter-observer agreement in 1/4 of features. Uniformity of the scanners and protocols as well as evaluation on a workstation rather than hard copies cumulatively resulted in a meaningful increase in the accuracy of the same radiologists in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon tear. PMID:27200392

  17. Center for the Study of Learning. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behr, Merlyn J.

    This report describes the conceptualization and planning for the Center for the Study of Learning at Northern Illinois University. The center's mission is to provide an institutional setting for the discovery, synthesis, and dissemination of knowledge about learning in three subject areas: mathematics, sciences, and social studies. The report…

  18. Evaluation Study of Day-Care Centers in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korazim, Malka; Trachtenberg, Silvia

    In recent years, day-care centers for the elderly have been playing an increasingly important role in the community service system for the elderly in Israel. ESHEL, one of the leading agencies in developing day-care services in Israel initiated a comprehensive evaluation study of day-care centers to identify variations among different types of…

  19. Center for the Study of Writing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Writing, Berkeley, CA.

    This final report from the Center for the Study of Writing, which, over the past 5 years, has engaged in a program of research aimed at understanding how written language is acquired and how it can best be taught, is in three main sections. The first section (Executive Summary) summarizes the Center's major findings related to each problem area…

  20. HBOC multi-gene panel testing: comparison of two sequencing centers.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Christopher; Faust, Ulrike; Sturm, Marc; Hackmann, Karl; Grundmann, Kathrin; Harmuth, Florian; Bosse, Kristin; Kehrer, Martin; Benkert, Tanja; Klink, Barbara; Mackenroth, Luisa; Betcheva-Krajcir, Elitza; Wimberger, Pauline; Kast, Karin; Heilig, Mechthilde; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Riess, Olaf; Schröck, Evelin; Bauer, Peter; Rump, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Multi-gene panels are used to identify genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in large patient cohorts. This study compares the diagnostic workflow in two centers and gives valuable insights into different next-generation sequencing (NGS) strategies. Moreover, we present data from 620 patients sequenced at both centers. Both sequencing centers are part of the German consortium for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (GC-HBOC). All 620 patients included in this study were selected following standard BRCA1/2 testing guidelines. A set of 10 sequenced genes was analyzed per patient. Twelve samples were exchanged and sequenced at both centers. NGS results were highly concordant in 12 exchanged samples (205/206 variants = 99.51 %). One non-pathogenic variant was missed at center B due to a sequencing gap (no technical coverage). The custom enrichment at center B was optimized during this study; for example, the average number of missing bases was reduced by a factor of four (vers. 1: 1939.41, vers. 4: 506.01 bp). There were no sequencing gaps at center A, but four CCDS exons were not included in the enrichment. Pathogenic mutations were found in 12.10 % (75/620) of all patients: 4.84 % (30/620) in BRCA1, 4.35 % in BRCA2 (27/620), 0.97 % in CHEK2 (6/620), 0.65 % in ATM (4/620), 0.48 % in CDH1 (3/620), 0.32 % in PALB2 (2/620), 0.32 % in NBN (2/620), and 0.16 % in TP53 (1/620). NGS diagnostics for HBOC-related genes is robust, cost effective, and the method of choice for genetic testing in large cohorts. Adding 8 genes to standard BRCA1- and BRCA2-testing increased the mutation detection rate by one-third. PMID:26022348

  1. Adult Skills Training Center: Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalski, John M.; Baratta, Anthony N.

    A 4-phase project, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a bilingual vocational skill training program for out-of-school youth and adults of the Perth Amboy Hispanic community. Sampled were 494 out-of-school youth and adults in the area. Findings include: (1) There is a significant need for an adult vocational skills training…

  2. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    An update of information first compiled by the Children's Foundation in 1991 and updated in 1993, this 1994 day care licensing study presents the results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Following a summary of results in question-answer format, the entries for…

  3. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study contains the results of a nationwide survey concerning day care regulations and licensing procedures throughout the United States. The regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands were surveyed. The listings, which are arranged according to location, provide the address and telephone…

  4. Does Family-Centered Out-of-Home Care Work? Comparison of a Family-Centered Approach and Traditional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Pierce, Lois

    2004-01-01

    This research assessed the effectiveness of a family-centered approach to out-of-home care in reunifying children with their families by comparing differential exit rates of children whose families received family-centered services with children whose families received routine child welfare services. The sample included 472 children who were in…

  5. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  6. Task-Values across Subject Domains: A Gender Comparison Using a Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Angela; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2011-01-01

    This study examined what kinds of groups can be identified according to students' task-values across four subject domains (languages, math and science, social sciences, practical subjects) and the related gender differences using a person-centered approach. Latent class analysis was applied to classify 638 students (mean age = 15) into four…

  7. A Gender Comparison of the Cooperation of 4-Year-Old Children in Classroom Activity Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Genan T.; Hilton, Sterling C.; Wouden-Miller, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the proportion of cooperative play in 4-year-old children across centers (housekeeping, block, manipulative, and computer) and gender in a natural classroom setting. Eighty-four white, middle-income children (41 boys and 43 girls, mean age = 55 months) were videotaped during free-play for 30 minutes per day for four weeks in…

  8. What's Wrong with Media Comparison Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surry, Daniel W.; Ensminger, David

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the use of media comparison studies in the field of educational technology, argues that they are weak and inappropriate, and recommends a new focus on the issues of instructional methods and learner characteristics. Discusses intra-medium studies and aptitude treatment interaction studies as better alternatives. (LRW)

  9. A comparison of vector magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center and Mees Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, R. S.; Orrall, F. Q.; Mickey, D. L.; West, E. A.; Hagyard, M. J.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper compares completely independent vector magnetic field measurements from two very different polarimetric instruments. The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) imaging vector magnetograph is based on a birefringent filter, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters integrated over the filter bandpass (1/8 A) which is tunable across the Fe I 5250 line in 10 mA steps. The Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter of the Mees Solar Observatory (MSO) is based on a spectrometer, routinely measuring all four Stokes parameters of the Fe I 6302.5 line simultaneously and then spatially scanning to build up a vector magnetogram. Active region magnetic field data were obtained with both the MSFC and MSO systems on five days during June 1985. After interpolating the MSFC vector fields onto the more coarse spatial grid of MSO, a point-by-point comparison of the two vector fields is made for data obtained on two of these days (June 8 and 9). From this comparison it is concluded that the spatially-averaged line-of-sight components agree quite well, and that although the MSO spatial grid is coarser, the quality of the MSO image is better than that of the MSFC data because of better seeing conditions.

  10. Optimal pleurodesis: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Bresticker, M A; Oba, J; LoCicero, J; Greene, R

    1993-02-01

    With the resurgence of thoracoscopy, there is renewed interest in less invasive methods of pleurodesis. We wished to compare in an animal model a variety of methods suggested in reports. The purpose of the study was to rank the effectiveness of each procedure against the standard mechanical pleurodesis. Twenty-five mongrel dogs (weight, 25 to 35 kg) underwent bilateral thoracotomy. Each animal was randomly assigned to receive two of the following methods of pleurodesis: tetracycline, talc, mechanical abrasion, neodymium: yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (Hereus Inc, E. Rutherford, NJ) photocoagulation, and argon beam coagulator (ABC) (Beacon Lab, Bloomfield, CO) electrocoagulation of the parietal pleura. At evaluation at 30 +/- 2 days, the efficacy of pleurodesis was graded on a scale of 0 to 4, with 0 representing a complete absence of pleural symphysis and 4 the adhesion of more than one lobe to both the chest wall and mediastinum. Mean grade and standard deviation of each method were: talc, 3.0 +/- 0.67; mechanical, 3.0 +/- 0.82; tetracycline, 2.3 +/- 1.4; ABC, 1.5 +/- 0.97; and Nd:YAG laser, 0.7 +/- 0.95. Both the talc and mechanical methods were superior to either the Nd:YAG laser or the ABC (p < 0.01). In this study, neither the Nd:YAG laser nor the ABC proved efficacious in producing pleurodesis. Talc poudrage is the only method of pleural symphysis comparable with mechanical abrasion.

  11. Optimal pleurodesis: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Bresticker, M A; Oba, J; LoCicero, J; Greene, R

    1993-02-01

    With the resurgence of thoracoscopy, there is renewed interest in less invasive methods of pleurodesis. We wished to compare in an animal model a variety of methods suggested in reports. The purpose of the study was to rank the effectiveness of each procedure against the standard mechanical pleurodesis. Twenty-five mongrel dogs (weight, 25 to 35 kg) underwent bilateral thoracotomy. Each animal was randomly assigned to receive two of the following methods of pleurodesis: tetracycline, talc, mechanical abrasion, neodymium: yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (Hereus Inc, E. Rutherford, NJ) photocoagulation, and argon beam coagulator (ABC) (Beacon Lab, Bloomfield, CO) electrocoagulation of the parietal pleura. At evaluation at 30 +/- 2 days, the efficacy of pleurodesis was graded on a scale of 0 to 4, with 0 representing a complete absence of pleural symphysis and 4 the adhesion of more than one lobe to both the chest wall and mediastinum. Mean grade and standard deviation of each method were: talc, 3.0 +/- 0.67; mechanical, 3.0 +/- 0.82; tetracycline, 2.3 +/- 1.4; ABC, 1.5 +/- 0.97; and Nd:YAG laser, 0.7 +/- 0.95. Both the talc and mechanical methods were superior to either the Nd:YAG laser or the ABC (p < 0.01). In this study, neither the Nd:YAG laser nor the ABC proved efficacious in producing pleurodesis. Talc poudrage is the only method of pleural symphysis comparable with mechanical abrasion. PMID:8431042

  12. The National Children's Study Waukesha County, Wisconsin Vanguard Center.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Jeanne B; Leuthner, Steven R; Weiss, Marianne; Whelan, David; Athey, Leslie; McElroy, Jane A; Durkin, Maureen S; Cronk, Christine E

    2006-03-01

    The National Children's Study (NCS) is a large, longterm study designed to detect environmental influences on the health and development of children. Waukesha County, Wisconsin, was selected as 1 of 7 "Vanguard Centers" currently funded to finalize and lead the implementation of the study protocol. The authors provide an overview of key design and planning processes that will be used at all NCS Vanguard locations, the specific approaches to be used in the NCS Waukesha County Vanguard Center, and information about how Wisconsin physicians and other health care professionals can become involved in working with the NCS.

  13. Comparison of total direct cost of conventional single use and mechanical reuse of dialyzers in patients of end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis: A single center study.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ruqaya; Dhrolia, Murtaza F; Nasir, Kiran; Imtiaz, Salman; Ahmad, Aasim

    2016-01-01

    Reusing dialyzers is almost universal in developing countries to reduce the cost of hemodialysis (HD). Economic benefits of dialyzer reuse, when estimated only on the basis of the dialyzer and its consumables are very significant and attractive. In this study, we compared the cost of mechanical reuse of dialyzer considering all of the direct costs (medications, dialyzer, and its consumables, disinfection fluid, and hospitalization if any) in HD treatment, which if significantly different between single use and reuse, can nullify the obvious cost benefits. A total of 70 adult patients of any gender on maintenance HD at The Kidney Centre Post Graduate Training Institute for more than three months were included. Equal numbers of patients were on single use (Group A) and reuse of dialyzer (Group B). Both groups were compared for total direct costs of HD over a six months period. Average six monthly total direct cost per patient of Group A was significantly high as compared to Group B, the United States Dollar (USD) 1750.67 ± 135.31$ vs. USD 1488.50 ± 132.23$); difference USD 262.18$ (P <0.001). The total cost saving being 14.97% in Group B. Our study shows that dialyzer reuse provides a significant economic benefit and remains a means of reducing the cost of HD. PMID:27424697

  14. Comparison between doppler ultrasound resistive index, serum creatinine, and histopathologic changes in patients with kidney transplant dysfunction in early posttransplantation period: A single center study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal N; Patel, Nitin A; Gandhi, Shruti P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relationship between resistive index (RI) measured by Doppler ultrasound, serum creatinine (SCr), and histopathological changes on biopsy during kidney trans- plant dysfunction in early postoperative period, we studied 47 kidney transplant patients; 61% of the patients had acute transplant rejection, 19% had acute tubular necrosis, 4% had calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, 11% had normal morphology in biopsy, and 5% had changes compatible with pyelonephritis. None of the study patients had interstitial fibrosis or tubular atrophy on biopsy. We found that the sensitivity and specificity of RI in diagnosing transplant dysfunction was highly variable depending on the selected cutoff value. Sensitivity of RI decreased and its specificity increased with increasing the RI thresholds. Using an RI threshold of 0.7 resulted in a high sensitivity of 78% at a cost of very low specificity 40%, whereas using an RI threshold of 0.9 resulted in 100% specificity at a cost of very low sensitivity 16%. Acceptable specificity was only achieved at the expense of very low sensitivity, resulting in poor utility of RI as a screening tool for dysfunction. We found that there were no significant differences in the mean RI value between patients with and without biopsy-proven transplant dysfunction. However, we found a significant correlation between SCr value and RI of 0.383, P = 0.007.

  15. Comparison between doppler ultrasound resistive index, serum creatinine, and histopathologic changes in patients with kidney transplant dysfunction in early posttransplantation period: A single center study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal N; Patel, Nitin A; Gandhi, Shruti P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relationship between resistive index (RI) measured by Doppler ultrasound, serum creatinine (SCr), and histopathological changes on biopsy during kidney trans- plant dysfunction in early postoperative period, we studied 47 kidney transplant patients; 61% of the patients had acute transplant rejection, 19% had acute tubular necrosis, 4% had calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, 11% had normal morphology in biopsy, and 5% had changes compatible with pyelonephritis. None of the study patients had interstitial fibrosis or tubular atrophy on biopsy. We found that the sensitivity and specificity of RI in diagnosing transplant dysfunction was highly variable depending on the selected cutoff value. Sensitivity of RI decreased and its specificity increased with increasing the RI thresholds. Using an RI threshold of 0.7 resulted in a high sensitivity of 78% at a cost of very low specificity 40%, whereas using an RI threshold of 0.9 resulted in 100% specificity at a cost of very low sensitivity 16%. Acceptable specificity was only achieved at the expense of very low sensitivity, resulting in poor utility of RI as a screening tool for dysfunction. We found that there were no significant differences in the mean RI value between patients with and without biopsy-proven transplant dysfunction. However, we found a significant correlation between SCr value and RI of 0.383, P = 0.007. PMID:27215246

  16. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  17. The Center for Coastal Studies: Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollervides, F.; Farrell, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present The School for Field Studies-Center for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) as a success story in sustainable development education. This success is based on a unique academic model, which incorporates sustainable development opportunities and challenges faced by the local community into the program…

  18. Case Studies in Managing School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel; Morris, Jacqueline

    Thirty-two case studies illustrating problem areas and situations that develop in the modern environment of the electronic school library media program are presented for use by library science students and library/media center managers. Based on input from practicing librarians at the elementary and secondary levels, the studies are designed to…

  19. Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) File Partition Study: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Cynthia C.; Wanger, Judith

    A study to provide the National Center for Educational Communication (NCE) with information that could be useful in making the ERIC data base more relevant to the needs of educators and more efficiently usable by them is discussed. Specific purposes of this project were to use an empirical field-survey study as an armature around which to: (1)…

  20. Center of Discovery I Study Guide. Education 302.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Robert B.; And Others

    This study guide contains the objectives, design, and evaluation in plan for Center of Discovery I, and lists topics, directives, and basic readings and in-depth references and the self-tests for an 11-week program of independent study within the first of four education courses in a 2-year program. The major part of the guide is devoted to a…

  1. [Space for the new. Archive - library - study center].

    PubMed

    Weber, Danny

    2014-01-01

    This article features a short outline of both the architectural history and the inventories of Leopoldina's archive and library. Moreover, the article presents the construction plans that will--when implemented in the near future--generate and provide outstanding working facilities in the form of a building ensemble consisting of an archive, library and study center. The future infrastructure of these Leopoldina buildings, located in the area of Emil-Abderhalden-/August-Bebel-Strasse, will sustainably foster and support the establishment of research projects at the Leopoldina Study Center.

  2. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  3. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Appendix II of The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of the following: Metro Center Program, Conventional Plan Building Prototypes and Detail Parcel Analysis, Energy Plan Building Prototypes, and Energy Plan Detail Parcel Analysis.

  4. National Traffic Safety Documentation Center Project Definition Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    A project definition study was conducted for the development, implementation and operation of a National Traffic Safety Documentation Center. Included in this final comprehensive report are: (1) the results of nationwide surveys of users and sources of traffic safety information; (2) a review of relevant information technology in terms of the…

  5. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  6. ACLCP Periodical Storage Center: Feasibility Study, September 1974-April 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cieslicki, Dorothy

    A study of alternative models for establishing a cooperative storage center for little used library materials by the members of the Area College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania (ACLCP) focused on periodicals. Considerations discussed include advantages--lower cost; space for growth and better access to holdings retained in active collections;…

  7. Usability Studies and User-Centered Design in Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Digital libraries continue to flourish. At the same time, the principles of user-centered design and the practice of usability testing have been growing in popularity, spreading their influence into the library sphere. This article explores the confluence of these two trends by surveying the current literature on usability studies of digital…

  8. Group Time in Early Childhood Centers: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Oralie

    To investigate the current status of group time in early childhood centers, a small-scale exploratory study was designed and executed. Results of interviews with 35 teachers and observations in five classrooms serving children ages 2 1/2 through kindergarten revealed that all classrooms had at least one group time or circle time, usually in the…

  9. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 1st Grade - Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade one prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. This…

  10. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 6th Grade - River Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade six prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  11. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 4th Grade - Mangrove Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade four prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  12. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  13. Studying and Incorporating Efficiency into Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Centers

    PubMed Central

    Day, Lukejohn W.; Belson, David

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency is defined as the use of resources in such a way as to maximize the production of goods and services. Improving efficiency has been the focus of management in many industries; however, it has not been until recently that incorporating efficiency models into healthcare has occurred. In particular, the study and development of improvement projects aimed at enhancing efficiency in GI have been growing rapidly in recent years. This focus on improving efficiency in GI has been spurred by the dramatic rise in the demand for endoscopic procedures as well as the rising number of insured patients requiring GI care coupled at the same time with limited resources in terms of staffing and space in endoscopy centers. This paper will critically review the history of efficiency in endoscopy centers, first by looking at other healthcare industries that have extensively studied and improved efficiency in their fields, examine a number of proposed efficiency metrics and benchmarks in endoscopy centers, and finally discuss opportunities where endoscopy centers could improve their efficiency. PMID:26101525

  14. The NASA Lewis Research Center: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), established in 1941, is one of ten NASA research centers in the country. It is situated on 350 acres of land in Cuyahoga County and occupies more than 140 buildings and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Most of LeRC's facilities are located in the City of Cleveland; some are located within the boundaries of the cities of Fairview Park and Brookpark. LeRC is a lead center for NASA's research, technology, and development in the areas of aeropropulsion and selected space applications. It is a center of excellence for turbomachinery, microgravity fluid and combustion research, and commercial communication. The base research and technology disciplines which serve both aeronautics and space areas include materials and structures, instrumentation and controls, fluid physics, electronics, and computational fluid dynamics. This study investigates LeRC's economic impact on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures LeRC's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. To fully explain LeRC's overall impact on the region, its contributions in the areas of technology transfer and education are also examined. The study uses a highly credible and widely accepted research methodology. First, regional economic multipliers based on input-output models were used to estimate the effect of LERC spending on the Northeast Ohio economy. Second, the economic models were complemented by interviews with industrial, civic, and university leaders to qualitatively assess LeRC's impact in the areas of technology transfer and education.

  15. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  16. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  17. Hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Cubbage, J. M.; Dillon, J. L.; Richie, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Carlson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and performance of several tactical and strategic hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed from an evolutionary perspective. A mid- and chin inlet missile design, constrained to the Navy's vertical box launcher, was investigated; a performance comparison is presented that is favorable to the mid-inlet approach. Parasol wing, confined flow field, and spatula-like cruise missile configurations were examined with strategic applications in mind. The preliminary results are encouraging with respect to aerodynamic and volumetric efficiency and choice of engine integration schemes.

  18. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  19. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  20. Vegetation studies, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the spring of 1992, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted surveys of the Avawatz and Granite mountains springs for the National Training Center (NTC) to evaluate the occurrence of sensitive plant species in these areas. PNNL also conducted a survey of the eastern outwash of the Paradise Range for the occurrence of Lane Mountain milk vetch (Astragalus jaegerianus). In spring of 1993, PNNL conducted an additional study of Lane Mountain milk vetch on the NTC to determine habitat characteristics for this plant and to develop a method for predicting its potential occurrence, based on simple habitat attributes. The results of these studies are itemized.

  1. Space Shuttle orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, W. I.; Phillips, W. P.

    1985-01-01

    Aerodynamic, heat transfer, and system design studies to determine removable modifications for the Space Shuttle orbiter that would extend its forward center-of-gravity triom capability are summarized. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0.25 to 20.3 to determine the most effective aerodynamic modifications. Heat transfer and system design studies determined the impact of the modifications on the thermal protection system and structural weight of the vehicle. The most effective modifications were in-fillet canards or a forward extension of the existing forward wing fillet.

  2. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  3. Electromyographic comparison of grand battement devant at the barre, in the center, and traveling.

    PubMed

    Krasnow, Donna; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Wilmerding, M Virginia; Stecyk, Shane; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew

    2012-09-01

    This study examined utilization of the trunk and lower extremity muscles during grand battement devant in three conditions: at the barre (supported stationary condition in 1st position), in the center (unsupported stationary condition in 1st position), and traveling through space. Forty dancers (age 30.0 ± 13.0 yrs, height 1.63 ± 0.06 m, weight 59.0 ± 7.4 kg, and 13.9 ± 13.3 yrs of training in ballet and/or modern dance) volunteered and were placed in three skill level groups: beginner (n = 12), intermediate (n = 14), and advanced (n = 14). Dancers executed five grand battement devant in each of the three conditions in randomized order. We examined muscle activation bilaterally in eight muscles (abdominals, abductor hallucis, erector spinae, gastrocnemius, gluteus maximus, hamstrings, quadriceps, and tibialis anterior) using surface electromyography, a three-dimensional video biomechanical tracking system to identify events, and force plates. All data were analyzed in four events: stance, initiation, peak, and end. Analysis was done using a linear mixed effects regression model with condition, event, muscle, level, and side as the fixed effects, and subject as the random effect. There were significant effects for muscle x event x condition (p<0.01) and for level x side x muscle (p<0.01). Muscle use varied according to the combination of event and condition that was executed, and these differences were also influenced by the level of training of the dancer and the side of the body used. It is recommended that dance educators consider the importance of allocating sufficient time to each of the three conditions (barre, center, and traveling) to ensure development of a variety of motor strategies and muscle activation levels for dance practice. PMID:22983132

  4. Miller-Unruh Reading Center: The Comparison of Progress in Reading with Second and Third Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mildred C.

    The study reported was designed to test the hypothesis that no difference in reading achievement scores of second and third grade children requiring remediation would result between Ss receiving both regular classroom and Miller-Unruh Reading Center instruction and Ss receiving classroom instruction only. Reading Center instruction took a…

  5. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana M.; Corsi, Carolina; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. Objective Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. Method Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children) and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children). All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. Results Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. Conclusion The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers. PMID:24346293

  6. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  7. Alternate Propulsion Subsystem Concepts Tripropellant Comparison Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted under MSFC contract NAS8-39210 to compare tripropellant and bipropellant engine configurations for the SSTO mission. The objective was to produce an 'apples-to-apples' comparison to isolate the effects of design implementation, designing company, year of design, or technologies included from the basic tripropellant/bipropellant comparison. Consequently, identical technologies were included (e.g., jet pumps) and the same design groundrules and practices were used. Engine power cycles were examined as were turbomachinery/preburner arrangements for each cycle. The bipropellant approach and two tripropellant approaches were separately optimized in terms of operating parameters: exit pressures, mixture ratios, thrust splits, etc. This briefing presents the results of the study including engine weights for both tripropellant and bipropellant engines; dry vehicle weight performance for a range of engine chamber pressures; discusses the basis for the results; examines vehicle performance due to engine cycles and the margin characteristics of various cycles; and identifies technologies with significant payoffs for this application.

  8. Case study: a data warehouse for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, J S; Scully, K W; Pates, R D; Schubart, J R; Reynolds, R E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical data repository (CDR) is a frequently updated relational data warehouse that provides users with direct access to detailed, flexible, and rapid retrospective views of clinical, administrative, and financial patient data for the University of Virginia Health System. This article presents a case study of the CDR, detailing its five-year history and focusing on the unique role of data warehousing in an academic medical center. Specifically, the CDR must support multiple missions, including research and education, in addition to administration and management. Users include not only analysts and administrators but clinicians, researchers, and students. PMID:11452578

  9. A Study of New York's Environmental Education Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzewich, Marsha Scott

    1978-01-01

    Based upon questionnaire responses from 96 of the 134 New York State environmental education centers, this article describes these centers in terms of location, employment opportunities (internships and volunteer positions), program offerings, and funding sources. (JC)

  10. A comparison of assertive community treatment fidelity measures and patient-centered medical home standards.

    PubMed

    Vanderlip, Erik R; Cerimele, Joseph M; Monroe-Devita, Maria

    2013-11-01

    OBJECTIVE This study compared program measures of assertive community treatment (ACT) with standards of accreditation for the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) to determine whether there were similarities in the infrastructure of the two methods of service delivery and whether high-fidelity ACT teams would qualify for medical home accreditation. METHODS The authors compared National Committee for Quality Assurance PCMH standards with two ACT fidelity measures (the Dartmouth Assertive Community Treatment Scale and the Tool for Measurement of Assertive Community Treatment [TMACT]) and with national ACT program standards. RESULTS PCMH standards pertaining to enhanced access and continuity, management of care, and self-care support demonstrated strong overlap across ACT measures. Standards for identification and management of populations, care coordination and follow-up, and quality improvement demonstrated less overlap. The TMACT and the program standards had sufficient overlap to score in the range of a level 1 PCMH, but no ACT measure sufficiently detailed methods of population-based screening and tracking of referrals to satisfy "must-pass" elements of the standards. CONCLUSIONS ACT measures and medical home standards had significant overlap in innate infrastructure. ACT teams following the program standards or undergoing TMACT fidelity review could have the necessary infrastructure to serve as medical homes if they were properly equipped to supervise general medical care and administer activities to improve management of chronic diseases.

  11. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  12. A static data flow simulation study at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barszcz, Eric; Howard, Lauri S.

    1987-01-01

    Demands in computational power, particularly in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), led NASA Ames Research Center to study advanced computer architectures. One architecture being studied is the static data flow architecture based on research done by Jack B. Dennis at MIT. To improve understanding of this architecture, a static data flow simulator, written in Pascal, has been implemented for use on a Cray X-MP/48. A matrix multiply and a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT), two algorithms used in CFD work at Ames, have been run on the simulator. Execution times can vary by a factor of more than 2 depending on the partitioning method used to assign instructions to processing elements. Service time for matching tokens has proved to be a major bottleneck. Loop control and array address calculation overhead can double the execution time. The best sustained MFLOPS rates were less than 50% of the maximum capability of the machine.

  13. Comparability of ophthalmic diagnoses by clinical and Reading Center examiners in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sperduto, R D; Hiller, R; Podgor, M J; Palmberg, P; Ferris, F L; Wentworth, D

    1986-12-01

    Technologic advances in ophthalmic equipment offer the possibility of replacing direct clinical examinations with Reading Center evaluations of data recorded in epidemiologic studies. Clinical and Reading Center examiners made independent ophthalmic diagnoses of 133 right and 132 left eyes of 138 adults in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study, carried out in three US cities, Boston, Detroit, and Minneapolis, in August 1981-December 1982. The Reading Center diagnosed eye conditions using only photographic and visual field data collected at the time of the clinical examination. In the comparisons of clinical and Reading Center evaluations reported here, only eyes judged by the examiners to have pathology severe enough to reduce visual acuity to 6/9 or worse were classified as having pathology. (No visual acuity criterion was required for the diagnosis of glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy.) There was agreement in diagnostic assessments between clinical and Reading Center examiners in about 80% of eyes. The kappa statistic, which adjusts for chance agreement, was in the fair to good range: 0.60 for 133 right eyes and 0.62 for 132 left eyes. When the Reading Center examiners were provided with additional information on medical history, refractive error and best corrected visual acuity, the agreement between clinical and Reading Center assessments among the subset of eyes with 6/9 or worse vision again was in the fair to good range, with kappas of 0.61 for 45 right eyes and 0.68 for 48 left eyes. Inter-observer agreement between Reading Center examiners in diagnosing pathology was in the good to excellent range. Use of Reading Centers in future epidemiologic studies should be considered, but elimination of the clinical examinations is not recommended until modifications in the protocol described here have been made and shown to improve levels of agreement between clinical and Reading Center examiners.

  14. Comparability of ophthalmic diagnoses by clinical and Reading Center examiners in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sperduto, R D; Hiller, R; Podgor, M J; Palmberg, P; Ferris, F L; Wentworth, D

    1986-12-01

    Technologic advances in ophthalmic equipment offer the possibility of replacing direct clinical examinations with Reading Center evaluations of data recorded in epidemiologic studies. Clinical and Reading Center examiners made independent ophthalmic diagnoses of 133 right and 132 left eyes of 138 adults in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study, carried out in three US cities, Boston, Detroit, and Minneapolis, in August 1981-December 1982. The Reading Center diagnosed eye conditions using only photographic and visual field data collected at the time of the clinical examination. In the comparisons of clinical and Reading Center evaluations reported here, only eyes judged by the examiners to have pathology severe enough to reduce visual acuity to 6/9 or worse were classified as having pathology. (No visual acuity criterion was required for the diagnosis of glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy.) There was agreement in diagnostic assessments between clinical and Reading Center examiners in about 80% of eyes. The kappa statistic, which adjusts for chance agreement, was in the fair to good range: 0.60 for 133 right eyes and 0.62 for 132 left eyes. When the Reading Center examiners were provided with additional information on medical history, refractive error and best corrected visual acuity, the agreement between clinical and Reading Center assessments among the subset of eyes with 6/9 or worse vision again was in the fair to good range, with kappas of 0.61 for 45 right eyes and 0.68 for 48 left eyes. Inter-observer agreement between Reading Center examiners in diagnosing pathology was in the good to excellent range. Use of Reading Centers in future epidemiologic studies should be considered, but elimination of the clinical examinations is not recommended until modifications in the protocol described here have been made and shown to improve levels of agreement between clinical and Reading Center examiners. PMID:3776982

  15. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the Qb semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the Qa site.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2011-04-13

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites, using samples of (15)N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe(2+) exchanged for diamagnetic Zn(2+), prepared in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the Q(A) SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J.2007, 92, 671-682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6-5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the Q(B) SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T ≈ 5.2, 3.7 MHz and T ≈ 1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the Q(B) site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the Q(B) SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T = 5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 N(δ)H···O(4) (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T = 3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the Q(B) site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the Q(A) site, consistent with available experimental data for (13)C and (17)O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for Q

  16. [Science and society. Guidelines for the Leopoldina Study Center].

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    In order to adequately perform its many diverse tasks as a scholars' society and as the German National Academy of Sciences, the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina needs to view itself in a historical context. This can only happen as part of a culture of remembrance which fosters the memory of the Leopoldina's past and subjects this to a critical analysis in the context of the history of science and academies. The newly founded Leopoldina Study Center for the History of Science and Science Academies is to be a forum that pursues established forms of historical research at the Leopoldina, organizes new scientific projects, and presents its findings to the public. The aim is to involve as many Leopoldina members as possible from all of its disciplines, as well as to collaborate with national and international partners.

  17. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  18. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzmiller, D.; Bradbury, M.; Cram, S.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratories Life Sciences Division and biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1991. Selected research highlights include: yeast artificial chromosome libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes 16 and 21; distances between the antigen binding sites of three murine antibody subclasses measured using neutron and x-ray scattering; NFCR 10th anniversary highlights; kinase-mediated differences found in the cell cycle regulation of normal and transformed cells; and detecting mutations that cause Gaucher's disease by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Project descriptions include: genomic structure and regulation, molecular structure, cytometry, cell growth and differentiation, radiation biology and carcinogenesis, and pulmonary biology.

  19. Cancer Prevalence among Physicians in Korea: A Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Lin; Park, Hae Jin; Sim, Yun Hye; Choi, Eun Young; Shim, Kyung Won; Lee, Sang Wha; Lee, Hong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little research regarding whether working as a physician affects cancer risk. Moreover, there is no research on cancer prevalence among physicians in Korea. This study utilized the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database to determine whether the prevalence of cancer among physicians differs from the prevalence of cancer within the general population. Methods We analyzed the medical records of a representative sample of 382 doctors who underwent a health examination between 2010 and 2013 at a health examination center in a Ewha Womans University Medical Center.Cancer incidence was measured as cases that were eventually diagnosed as cancer according to a biopsy. Results We collected medical records from 382 physicians (mean age, 51.9±8.1 years) and calculated the standardized prevalence ratios compared to the general population. Thirty physicians (9 male and 21 female) were identified as having cancer. Physicians had a significantly higher prevalence of cancer compared to the general population.Cancer prevalence in male physicians was found to be 2.47 times higher than the prevalence expected within the general population (P=0.006). Among female physicians, cancer prevalence was 3.94 times higher than that in the general population (P<0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that physicians had a higher prevalence of cancer compared to the general population in Korea, which suggests that there may be a problem present in the health care of physicians. Changes to the working environment of physicians will be needed to reduce the high prevalence of cancer among physicians. PMID:27073607

  20. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  1. Self-centering seismic retrofit scheme for reinforced concrete frame structures: SDOF system study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study of self-centering seismic retrofit schemes for reinforced concrete (RC) frame buildings. The self-centering retrofit system features flag-shaped hysteresis and minimal residual deformation. For comparison purpose, an alternate seismic retrofit scheme that uses a bilinear-hysteresis retrofit system such as buckling-restrained braces (BRB) is also considered in this paper. The parametric study was carried out in a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system framework since a multi-story building structure may be idealized as an equivalent SDOF system and investigation of the performance of this equivalent SDOF system can provide insight into the seismic response of the multi-story building. A peak-oriented hysteresis model which can consider the strength and stiffness degradation is used to describe the hysteretic behavior of RC structures. The parametric study involves two key parameters — the strength ratio and elastic stiffness ratio between the seismic retrofit system and the original RC frame. An ensemble of 172 earthquake ground motion records scaled to the design basis earthquake in California with a probability of exceedance of 10% in 50 years was constructed for the simulation-based parametric study. The effectiveness of the two seismic retrofit schemes considered in this study is evaluated in terms of peak displacement ratio, peak acceleration ratio, energy dissipation demand ratio and residual displacement ratio between the SDOF systems with and without retrofit. It is found from this parametric study that RC structures retrofitted with the self-centering retrofit scheme (SCRS) can achieve a seismic performance level comparable to the bilinear-hysteresis retrofit scheme (BHRS) in terms of peak displacement and energy dissipation demand ratio while having negligible residual displacement after earthquake.

  2. A Planning Study for the Billerica Human Service Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA.

    This document discusses the development and implementation of a multiservice center that could offer a variety of human social services in a single location. The paper focuses on seven components of the center's operation: governance, organizational structure, core services, joint funding, joint planning, joint programming, and evaluation. The…

  3. A Study of California Community College Career Centers, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Richard F.

    Designed for staff working in community college career centers, this report provides a practical and concise set of references on California community college career centers. The information presented in the report was collected in spring and summer 1987 through a formal questionnaire survey, on-site visitations throughout the state, and a review…

  4. A Comparison of Center/TRACON Automation System and Airline Time of Arrival Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heere, Karen R.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    Benefits from information sharing between an air traffic service provider and a major air carrier are evaluated. Aircraft arrival time schedules generated by the NASA/FAA Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) were provided to the American Airlines System Operations Control Center in Fort Worth, Texas, during a field trial of a specialized CTAS display. A statistical analysis indicates that the CTAS schedules, based on aircraft trajectories predicted from real-time radar and weather data, are substantially more accurate than the traditional airline arrival time estimates, constructed from flight plans and en route crew updates. The improvement offered by CTAS is especially advantageous during periods of heavy traffic and substantial terminal area delay, allowing the airline to avoid large predictive errors with serious impact on the efficiency and profitability of flight operations.

  5. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1st Jan 2014 to 1st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future. PMID:26435598

  7. Comparison of Orion Vision Navigation Sensor Performance from STS-134 and the Space Operations Simulation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A.; Patangan, Mogi; Hinkel, Heather; Chevray, Keiko; Brazzel, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is a new spacecraft being designed by NASA and Lockheed Martin for future crewed exploration missions. The Vision Navigation Sensor is a Flash LIDAR that will be the primary relative navigation sensor for this vehicle. To obtain a better understanding of this sensor's performance, the Orion relative navigation team has performed both flight tests and ground tests. This paper summarizes and compares the performance results from the STS-134 flight test, called the Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective, and the ground tests at the Space Operations Simulation Center.

  8. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  9. Biosphere 2 Center as a unique tool for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Walter, Achim; Lambrecht, Susanne Carmen

    2004-04-01

    The Biosphere 2 Laboratory of Biosphere 2 Center, Arizona, is a unique, self-contained glasshouse fostering several mesocosms of tropical and subtropical regions on an area of 12,700 m2. It was constructed around 1990 to test whether human life is possible in this completely sealed, self-sustaining artificial ecosystem. Mainly due to overly rich organic soils, the initial mission failed in a spectacular manner that raised enormous disbelief in the scientific seriousness of the project. From 1995 to 2003, the facility had been operated by Columbia University under a completely new scientific management. The aim of the project had then been to conduct research in the field of 'experimental climate change science'. Climatic conditions within the mesocosms can be precisely controlled. In studies with elevated CO2, altered temperature and irrigation regimes performed in the rainforest, coral reef and agriforestry mesocosm, the facility had proven to be a valuable tool for global climate change research. Upon submission of this manuscript, Columbia University is relinquishing the management of this facility now although there was a contract to operate the facility until 2010, leaving it with an unclear destiny that might bring about anything from complete abandonment to a new flowering phase with a new destination.

  10. Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kostelnik; Keith Perry

    2007-07-01

    Twenty-first century energy challenges include demand growth, national energy security, and global climate protection. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) is a public/private partnership between the State of Idaho and its academic research institutions, the federal government through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) managed by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). CAES serves to advance energy security for our nation by expanding the educational opportunities at the Idaho universities in energy-related areas, creating new capabilities within its member institutions, and delivering technological innovations leading to technology-based economic development for the intermountain region. CAES has developed this strategic plan based on the Balanced Scorecard approach. A Strategy Map (Section 7) summarizes the CAES vision, mission, customers, and strategic objectives. Identified strategic objectives encompass specific outcomes related to three main areas: Research, Education, and Policy. Technical capabilities and critical enablers needed to support these objectives are also identified. This CAES strategic plan aligns with and supports the strategic objectives of the four CAES institutions. Implementation actions are also presented which will be used to monitor progress towards fulfilling these objectives.

  11. Infrared studies of galactic center x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, Curtis

    In this dissertation I use a variety of approaches to discover the nature of a subset of the nearly 10,000 X-ray point sources in the 2° x 0.8° region around the Galactic Center. I produced a JHK s source catalog of the 170 x170 region around Sgr A* an area containing 4339 of these X-ray sources, with the ISPI camera on the CTIO 4-m telescope. I cross-correlated the Chandra and ISPI catalogs to find potential near-infrared (NIR) counterparts to the X-ray sources. The extreme NIR source crowding in the field means that it is not possible to establish the authenticity of the matches with astrometry and photometry alone. I found 2137 IR/X-ray astrometrically matched sources; statistically I calculated that my catalog contains 289+/-13 true matches to soft X-ray sources and 154 +/- 39 matches to hard X-ray sources. However, the fraction of matches to hard sources that are spurious is 90%, compared to 40% for soft source matches, making the hard source NIR matches particularly challenging for spectroscopic follow-up. I statistically investigated the parameter space of matched sources and identified a set of 98 NIR matches to hard X-ray sources with reddenings consistent with the GC distance which have a 45% probability of being true counterparts. I created two additional photometric catalogs of the GC region to investigate the variability of X-ray counterparts over a time baseline of several years. I found 48 variable NIR sources matched to X-ray sources, with 2 spectroscopically confirmed to be true counterparts (1 in previous literature and one in this study). I took spectra of 46 of my best candidates for counterparts to X-ray sources toward the GC, and spectroscopically confirmed 4 sources as the authentic physical counterpart on the basis of emission lines in the H and K band spectra. These sources include a Be high mass X-ray binary located 16 pc in projection away from Sgr A*; a hard X-ray symbiotic binary located 22 pc in projection from Sgr A*; an O

  12. Identifying the Local Impacts of National ATE Centers on Their Host Institutions: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Charles; Fynewever, Herb; Petcovic, Heather; Bierema, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the local impacts of national advanced technological education (ATE) centers on their host institutions. A sample of three mature, national ATE centers are chosen, with each center serving as a case for a mixed-methods, collective case study research design. Results, drawn from interviews and surveys,…

  13. Making the Change: From a Teacher-Centered to a Learner-Centered Environment--A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roof, Patty L.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education is calling for transformation in teaching practices which includes learner-centered environments. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore 15 nursing faculty life experiences as they relate to the choice of a learning environment. Participants expressed their life experiences through interview…

  14. 34 CFR 413.33 - What substantive studies must the National Center or Centers conduct and submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Committee on Labor and Human Resources... apprenticeship or mentoring approaches. (b) The National Center conducting dissemination and training activities shall annually prepare a study of its dissemination and training activities. (c) Annual...

  15. Manatí Medical Center Sepsis Management Epidemiological Study.

    PubMed

    Morales Serrano, Tamara; Ramos, Shirley; Lara Gonzalez, Yanira; Torres Colberg, Heileene; Vera Quiñones, Alexis; Miranda Santiago, Roberto; Amill, Samuel; Otero, Marielys; Cintron, Vielka; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the combination of infection and physiological changes known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There have been improvements in mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients based on "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" guidelines. Current management of sepsis at our Institution follows no specific mandatory protocols. This study aimed to verify the incidence and outcome of sepsis in Manati Medical Center, Puerto Rico. An observational retrospective study was conducted. All the Emergency Department admissions from May 1/ to October 31/ 2013 were screened for sepsis per ICD-9 code. For all included patients, demographic and clinical data at ED admission were collected. During this period 8931 patients were admitted and 148 met criteria for sepsis and related conditions. The overall mortality rate was 43.91%. Mortality increased with age, from 10.52% among ≤ 44 years old to 68.75% in those ≥ 85 years old. The main infection sources were respiratory (32.66%) and urinary tract (24.62%). Mean age among non-survivors was 10.8 years higher than the survivor group (95% Cl 5.2-1 6.5, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed an increased fatality rate associated to severity of sepsis (HR 1.33; 95% Cl; 1.03-1.72, p = 0.02) and the APACHE2 score (HR 1.05; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.09 p = 0.03). Our data suggests that sepsis is an important problem to consider. We strongly encourage an institutional standardized protocol to diminish the mortality impact. Our results will allow adequate preventive strategies to improve early diagnosis, mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients.

  16. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761.326 Section 761.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze...

  17. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761.326 Section 761.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze...

  18. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761.326 Section 761.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze...

  19. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761.326 Section 761.326 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze...

  20. Feeding and feedback in nearby AGN - comparison with the Milky Way center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2014-05-01

    I discuss feeding and feedback processes observed in the inner few hundred parsecs of nearby active galaxies using integral field spectroscopy at spatial resolutions of a few to tens of parsecs. Signatures of feedback include outflows from the nucleus with velocities ranging from 200 to 1000 km s-1, with mass outflow rates between 0.5 and a few M⊙ yr-1. Signatures of feeding include the observation of gas inflows along nuclear spirals and filaments, with velocities ranging from 50 to 100 km s-1 and mass flow rates from 0.1 to ˜1 M⊙ yr-1. These rates are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the mass accretion rate to the supermassive black hole (SMBH). These inflows can thus lead, during less than one activity cycle, to the accumulation of enough gas in the inner few hundred parsecs, to trigger the formation of new stars, leading to the growth of the galaxy bulge. Young to intermediate age stars have indeed been found in circumnuclear rings around a number of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). In particular, one of these rings, with radius of ≈ 100 pc is observed in the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068, and is associated to an off-centered molecular ring, very similar to that observed in the Milky Way (MW). On the basis of an evolutionary scenario in which gas falling into the nuclear region triggers star formation followed by the triggering of nuclear activity, we speculate that, in the case of the MW, molecular gas has already accumulated within the inner ≈ 100 pc to trigger the formation of new stars, as supported by the presence of blue stars close to the galactic center. A possible increase in the star-formation rate in the nuclear region will then be followed, probably tens of millions of years later, by the triggering of nuclear activity in Sgr A*.

  1. A Comparison of Innovative Training Techniques at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Research Report 1426.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Brian J.

    A study evaluated the comparative training effectiveness of three language instruction methods: (1) suggestopedia, (2) the standard methodology used at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, a functional skill-building approach, and (3) a flexible-scheduling version of the standard methodology, with pacing based on group…

  2. Quantitative comparison between Z{sub 1∕2} center and carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Koutarou Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Thang Trinh, Xuan; Tien Son, Nguyen; Janzén, Erik

    2014-04-14

    In this study, to reveal the origin of the Z{sub 1∕2} center, a lifetime killer in n-type 4H-SiC, the concentrations of the Z{sub 1∕2} center and point defects are compared in the same samples, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The Z{sub 1∕2} concentration in the samples is varied by irradiation with 250 keV electrons with various fluences. The concentration of a single carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) measured by EPR under light illumination can well be explained with the Z{sub 1∕2} concentration derived from C-V and DLTS irrespective of the doping concentration and the electron fluence, indicating that the Z{sub 1∕2} center originates from a single V{sub C}.

  3. Health Information Security: A Case Study of Three Selected Medical Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients’ electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. Methods This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts’ points of view. Results and discussion Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of “verification and system design, user access management, access control system”, Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of “access management and network access control” and Amin Hospital in “equipment safety and system design”. In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place. PMID:23572861

  4. 2005 Workforce Study: Ohio Early Childhood Centers--A Profession Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoneburner, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the characteristics of the current workforce in early childhood. This report highlights key characteristics of the 2005 early childhood center workforce in Ohio. Survey packets were sent to 3,600 randomly selected centers in April 2005, representing centers licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and…

  5. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  6. A Center for Environmental Communication and Education Studies. Periodic Report: 1968-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center for Environmental Communications and Education Studies.

    This report summarizes the role of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Center for Environmental Communication and Education Studies (CECES) in helping to foster teaching, research, and public service programs. Included in the first section are program highlights (1968-1982), Center organization, and lists of Center personnel (executive…

  7. The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Morris, Vernon R.

    1997-01-01

    The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA) was established in 1992. The center began with 14 active Principal Investigators (PI's). The research of the Center's PIs has, for the most part, continued in the same four areas as presented in the original proposal: Remote Sensing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Sensors and Detectors, and Spacecraft Dynamics.

  8. The Minnesota Project English Center: Selected Materials. Unit 701: Introduction to the Study of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English.

    This Minnesota Curriculum Center report recounts the development of teaching materials on the nature and uses of language for grades 7-12 and presents the first of five seventh-grade units. A description of the origins, purposes, and personnel of the Center is followed by brief discussions of (1) the Center's underlying assumption that a study of…

  9. Comparison of CDE data in phacoemulsification between an open hospital-based ambulatory surgical center and a free-standing ambulatory surgical center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Chen, Mindy

    2010-01-01

    Mean CDE (cumulative dissipated energy) values were compared for an open hospital- based surgical center and a free-standing surgical center. The same model of phacoemulsifier (Alcon Infiniti Ozil) was used. Mean CDE values showed that surgeons (individual private practice) at the free-standing surgical center were more efficient than surgeons (individual private practice) at the open hospital-based surgical center (mean CDE at the hospital-based surgical center 18.96 seconds [SD = 12.51]; mean CDE at the free-standing surgical center 13.2 seconds [SD = 9.5]). CDE can be used to monitor the efficiency of a cataract surgeon and surgical center in phacoemulsification. The CDE value may be used by institutions as one of the indicators for quality control and audit in phacoemulsification.

  10. Comparison of information obtained from a Usenet newsgroup and from drug information centers.

    PubMed

    Seaboldt, J A; Kuiper, R

    1997-08-01

    Responses to drug information questions posted on the Internet Usenet pharmacy newsgroup sci.med. pharmacy were compared for accuracy with responses from drug information centers (DICs). Twenty-five questions were randomly selected from the past five years' continuing-education sections of the Annals of Pharmacotherapy, and possible answers were determined on the basis of corresponding articles. The questions were randomly submitted to sci.med.pharmacy from various e-mail accounts over a 10-week period. The same questions were submitted by telephone to randomly selected DICs. The correctness of responses was judged by a panel of four pharmacists. The questions received 31 responses from sci.med. pharmacy and 38 from the DICs. The responses from sci.med.pharmacy received 38 (31%) judgments of correct and the responses from the DICs, 85 (56%). A significantly smaller proportion of drug information responses from the Usenet newsgroup sci.med.pharmacy were judged as being accurate compared with responses from DICs. PMID:9262746

  11. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  12. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care. PMID:27402986

  13. Evaluative Study of the Neighborhood Information Center Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Hardy R.; Summers, F. William

    The 1972-1974 Neighborhood Information Center (NIC) Project was undertaken in Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, and Queens Borough to demonstrate that urban public libraries could be a vital force in daily living by providing free information and referrals to low income communities, and by adapting in non-traditional ways to meet neighborhood…

  14. Case Study: Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, W. Va.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, West Virginia, received a grant in 1997 for a project that was part of the High Schools That Work (HSTW) initiative to improve academic skills of career-bound students. The superintendent and faculty knew that improving achievement meant reaching out to the three home high schools to bring them…

  15. Centers for Catholic Studies and the Public Voice of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This article explores debates about the public role of religion in a secular context. Drawing on the work of critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas, this article claims that the United States requires a viable public sphere in which religious and secular voices can learn from each other. Highlighting the work of the Lane Center for Catholic Studies…

  16. Study of an F center in molten KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, M.; Rahman, A.

    1983-05-01

    It is shown that a discretized version of Feynman's path integral provides a convenient tool for the numerical investigation of the properties of an electron solvated in molten KCl. The binding energy and the pair correlation functions are calculated. The local structure around the solute electron appears to be different from that of an F center in the solid.

  17. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  18. Feasibility Study for Expansion of Child Development Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Naomi

    This document contains recommendations and the rationale for expansion of existing child care development center facilities at San Joaquin Delta College. Such expansion, in addition to providing immediate child care to children of parents enrolled at the college, would provide vocational training and in-service training opportunities, and would…

  19. Perceived job stress and health complaints at a bank call center: comparison between inbound and outbound services.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Chen, Chih-Yong; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Chao

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated how perceived job stress and health status differ, as well as the relationships to inbound (incoming calls) versus outbound (outgoing calls) calling activities, for call center workers in a bank in Taiwan. The sample bank employed 289 call center workers at the time of the survey, ranging in age from 19 to 54 yr old. Data were obtained on individual factors, health complaints, perceived level job stress, and major job stressors. Overall, 33.5% of outbound operators and 27.1% of inbound operators reported frequently or always experiencing high stress at work, however, the differences between inbound and outbound operators were insignificant. "Having to deal with difficult customers" was the most frequent job stressor for all workers. Musculoskeletal discomfort, eye strain, and hoarse or sore throat were the most prevalent complaints among call center workers. The relationship between perceived job stress and health complaints indicated that workers who perceived higher job stress had significantly increased risk of multiple health problems, including eye strain, tinnitus, hoarse or sore throat, chronic cough with phlegm, chest tightness, irritable stomach or peptic ulcers, and musculoskeletal discomfort (with odds ratios ranging from 2.13 to 8.24). These analytical results suggest that perceived job stress in the call center profoundly affected worker health. This study identified main types of job stressors requiring further investigation.

  20. Comparison between a center of mass and a foot pressure sensor system for measuring gait parameters in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gunoh; Woo, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between an accelerometer system and a foot pressure sensor system for measuring gait characteristics during walking in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five healthy participants with no neurological, musculoskeletal, or cardiopulmonary disorders volunteered for this study. Gait characteristics were measured while participants walked freely along a 10-m walkway using two different measurement systems simultaneously. The first analysis system was based on center of mass using a wireless tri-axial accelerometer and the second system was a foot pressure sensor system. [Results] There was a significant and high correlation between the two systems with respect to gait velocity and cadence. The stride length as a percentage of the stride height measured with the center of mass system was significantly and highly correlated with stride length and stride velocity that was measured with the foot pressure system. Furthermore, stride length from the center of mass system was significantly and highly correlated with stride length and stride velocity from the foot pressure system. [Conclusion] A gait analysis based on a center of mass system is a valid method to assess the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions in a clinical setting. PMID:26644674

  1. REACTOR DOSIMETRY STUDY OF THE RHODE ISLAND NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTER.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.,; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC), located on the Narragansett Bay Campus of the University of Rhode Island, is a state-owned and US NRC-licensed nuclear facility constructed for educational and industrial applications. The main building of RINSC houses a two-megawatt (2 MW) thermal power critical reactor immersed in demineralized water within a shielded tank. As its original design in 1958 by the Rhode Island Atomic Energy Commission focused on the teaching and research use of the facility, only a minimum of 3.85 kg fissile uranium-235 was maintained in the fuel elements to allow the reactor to reach a critical state. In 1986 when RINSC was temporarily shutdown to start US DOE-directed core conversion project for national security reasons, all the U-Al based Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU, 93% uranium-235 in the total uranium) fuel elements were replaced by the newly developed U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al based Low Enriched Uranium (LEU, {le}20% uranium-235 in the total uranium) elements. The reactor first went critical after the core conversion was achieved in 1993, and feasibility study on the core upgrade to accommodate Boron Neutron-Captured Therapy (BNCT) was completed in 2000 [3]. The 2-MW critical reactor at RINSC which includes six beam tubes, a thermal column, a gamma-ray experimental station and two pneumatic tubes has been extensive utilized as neutron-and-photon dual source for nuclear-specific research in areas of material science, fundamental physics, biochemistry, and radiation therapy. After the core conversion along with several major system upgrade (e.g. a new 3-MW cooling tower, a large secondary piping system, a set of digitized power-level instrument), the reactor has become more compact and thus more effective to generate high beam flux in both the in-core and ex-core regions for advance research. If not limited by the manpower and operating budget in recent years, the RINSC built ''in concrete'' structure and control systems should have

  2. Planetary size comparisons: A photographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past two decades NASA spacecraft missions obtained photographs permitting accurate size measurements of the planets and moons, and their surface features. Planetary global views are displayed at the same scale, in each picture to allow visual size comparisons. Additionally, special geographical features on some of the planets are compared with selected Earth areas, again at the same scale. Artist renderings and estimated sizes are used for worlds not yet reached by spacecraft. Included with each picture is number designation for use in ordering copies of the photos.

  3. Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VIII: Medical Center Campus Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of the Medical Center Campus. The report contains the results of a campus study…

  4. A study of the remote neighborhood office center concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The substitution of communications for commuting to work is examined from several aspects. Attention is focused on the possibility of certain groups of white collar workers conducting their business affairs through a network of Remote Neighborhood Office Centers (RNOC's) located near their homes. Typically, employees would communicate with their headquarters organizations by means of voice and digital circuits. Although current technology is readily able to support such an RNOC network, the main problems confronting would-be implementers center around the need for demonstrating that a sufficient number of business operations can be carried out in such a decentralized configuration as efficiently as they are under more conventional circumstances. The description of a pilot program is presented which is intended to identify pacing issues that must be settled before firm conclusions can be reached on whether the concept is operationally viable.

  5. An X-ray study of the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, M. G.; Willingale, R.; Hertz, P.; Grindlay, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results from two long observations with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) of an approximately 1 x 1 deg field centered near the galactic nucleus are presented. The X-ray images reveal a complex of weak sources within 20 arcmin of the galactic nucleus (Sgr A West) together with a region of apparently diffuse emission about 25 x 15 arcmin in extent. Three of the sources are tentatively identified: two with nearby galactic objects, and a third positionally coincident with Sgr A West itself (within the arcmin-accuracy available with the IPC). The nature of this source and the implications of both the high source density and presence of diffuse emission in the galactic center region are discussed.

  6. Case Study: Sandia National Laboratories Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toussaint, Norm; Gerbo, Tom

    2005-08-01

    The Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), located at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is one of five new Department of Energy Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRC). The CINT vision is to become a world leader in nanoscale science by developing the scientific principles that govern the design, performance, and integration of nanoscale materials, with emphasis on exploring the path from scientific discovery to the integration of nanostructures into the micro and macro worlds. The CINT design team faced the challenge of creating a state-of-the art research facility that is functional, flexible, and reflects the local history and environment. Drawing inspiration from Pre-Columbian Chacoan culture, the resulting design integrates scientific spaces with "communal" spaces to encourage the cross-discipline interaction that is essential to scientific research, particularly in the area of nanotechnology. Careful attention to design also produced a facility that conserves resources in the demanding Southwestern climate.

  7. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  8. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  9. The Teaching of Afro-Asian Literature: A Comparison between the Nonconventional Learner-Centered and the Conventional Teacher-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel O.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, nonconventional learner-centered (NLC) trends in ELT have emerged amidst the current and probably dominant conventional teacher-centered (CTC) approaches used by majority of private and public schools in the Philippines. With the implementation of the K-12 curriculum, Afro-Asian literature remained the focus of the eighth…

  10. Spatial and temporal dynamics of visual search tasks distinguish subtypes of unilateral spatial neglect: Comparison of two cases with viewer-centered and stimulus-centered neglect.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Katsuhiro; Kato, Kenji; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Shindo, Keiichiro; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Liu, Meigen

    2016-08-01

    We developed a computerised test to evaluate unilateral spatial neglect (USN) using a touchscreen display, and estimated the spatial and temporal patterns of visual search in USN patients. The results between a viewer-centered USN patient and a stimulus-centered USN patient were compared. Two right-brain-damaged patients with USN, a patient without USN, and 16 healthy subjects performed a simple cancellation test, the circle test, a visuomotor search test, and a visual search test. According to the results of the circle test, one USN patient had stimulus-centered neglect and a one had viewer-centered neglect. The spatial and temporal patterns of these two USN patients were compared. The spatial and temporal patterns of cancellation were different in the stimulus-centered USN patient and the viewer-centered USN patient. The viewer-centered USN patient completed the simple cancellation task, but paused when transferring from the right side to the left side of the display. Unexpectedly, this patient did not exhibit rightward attention bias on the visuomotor and visual search tests, but the stimulus-centered USN patient did. The computer-based assessment system provided information on the dynamic visual search strategy of patients with USN. The spatial and temporal pattern of cancellation and visual search were different across the two patients with different subtypes of neglect.

  11. 21st Century Community Learning Centers Descriptive Study of Program Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; McGhee, Raymond, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Department of Education's Policy and Program Studies Service contracted with SRI International and its partner, Policy Studies Associates, to undertake an evaluation of the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. The following evaluation questions informed this study: (1) What is the nature of activities in centers that are…

  12. Are Psychotherapeutic Changes Predictable? Comparison of a Chicago Counseling Center Project with a Penn Psychotherapy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luborsky, Lester; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Compared studies predicting outcomes of psychotherapy. Level of prediction success in both projects was modest. Particularly for the rated benefits score, the profile of variables showed similar levels of success between the projects. Successful predictions were based on adequacy of personality functioning, match on marital status, and length of…

  13. Cholangiocarcinoma Secondary to Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Explanted Livers: A Single-Center Study in the South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Ghavvas, Roshanak; Kazemi, Kurosh; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Malekhosseini, Seyed-Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic disease, characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrosis of bile duct epithelial cells. This is a significant contributory factor to the development of malignancy, most commonly cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), which is the second most common malignant liver tumor. Objectives: For the first time in Iran, we intend to describe our experience with cases of PSC, with and without CCA, in explanted livers, and compare our results with those found in other areas of the world. Patients and Methods: The study population comprised 181 individuals with a diagnosis of PSC who had undergone liver transplantation in the main liver transplant center of Iran, the largest center of hepatobiliary surgery in the south of that country, over a 3-year period between 2012 and 2014. All explanted livers, with and without CCA, were evaluated. Results: Of the 181 patients, 16 were found to have CCA, two of whom had been diagnosed after pathologic study of the explanted livers. Therefore it appeared that 8.8% of the patients with PSC in our center had developed CCA before liver transplantation. Conclusions: A comparison of our results with those obtained from other centers in both Western and Asian countries (which reported CCA in 3.6% - 36.5% of patients with PSC), shows that the incidence of CCA in the patients we studied is intermediate. PMID:26977169

  14. User-centered semantic harmonization: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Gennari, John H; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2007-06-01

    Semantic interoperability is one of the great challenges in biomedical informatics. Methods such as ontology alignment or use of metadata neither scale nor fundamentally alleviate semantic heterogeneity among information sources. In the context of the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid program, the Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) has been making an ambitious effort to harmonize existing information models for clinical research from a variety of sources and modeling agreed-upon semantics shared by the technical harmonization committee and the developers of these models. This paper provides some observations on this user-centered semantic harmonization effort and its inherent technical and social challenges. The authors also compare BRIDG with related efforts to achieve semantic interoperability in healthcare, including UMLS, InterMed, the Semantic Web, and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations initiative. The BRIDG project demonstrates the feasibility of user-centered collaborative domain modeling as an approach to semantic harmonization, but also highlights a number of technology gaps in support of collaborative semantic harmonization that remain to be filled.

  15. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. [Comparison of management of ambulatory emergency patients in the family practice and the hospital emergency center].

    PubMed

    Bovet Fritschi, Caroline; Ballmer, Peter E

    2014-06-18

    The increase in health care cost is broadly discussed in the public, either in the hospital or ambulatory setting. With the present study we compared the invoice amount generated by a first doctor's advice in the general practitioner to the one in the emergency room. In addition, we compared the diagnostic procedures used in the general practice to the one in the hospital, and whether the choice of diagnostic procedures would substantially influence the invoice amount. The invoice amount in the hospital setting was on average CHF 197.-, i. e. 134%, higher compared to the general practice. The difference in the invoice amount was largely explained by more diagnostic procedures in the hospital. Moreover, part of the higher invoice amount was generated by the extensive physical examination by doctors in the hospital. PMID:24938157

  17. A comparison of speciated atmospheric mercury at an urban center and an upwind rural location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutter, A.P.; Schauer, J.J.; Lough, G.C.; Snyder, D.C.; Kolb, C.J.; Von Klooster, S.; Rudolf, T.; Manolopoulos, H.; Olson, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate mercury (PHg) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured every other hour at a rural location in south central Wisconsin (Devil's Lake State Park, WI, USA) between April 2003 and March 2004, and at a predominantly downwind urban site in southeastern Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI, USA) between June 2004 and May 2005. Annual averages of GEM, PHg, and RGM at the urban site were statistically higher than those measured at the rural site. Pollution roses of GEM and reactive mercury (RM; sum of PHg and RGM) at the rural and urban sites revealed the influences of point source emissions in surrounding counties that were consistent with the US EPA 1999 National Emission Inventory and the 2003-2005 US EPA Toxics Release Inventory. Source-receptor relationships at both sites were studied by quantifying the impacts of point sources on mercury concentrations. Time series of GEM, PHg, and RGM concentrations were sorted into two categories; time periods dominated by impacts from point sources, and time periods dominated by mercury from non-point sources. The analysis revealed average point source contributions to GEM, PHg, and RGM concentration measurements to be significant over the year long studies. At the rural site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (2%; 0.04 ng m-3); and, RM (48%; 5.7 pg m-3). At the urban site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (33%; 0.81 ng m-3); and, RM (64%; 13.8 pg m-3). ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Space operations center: Shuttle interaction study extension, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Operations Center (SOC) is conceived as a permanent facility in low Earth orbit incorporating capabilities for space systems construction; space vehicle assembly, launching, recovery and servicing; and the servicing of co-orbiting satellites. The Shuttle Transportation System is an integral element of the SOC concept. It will transport the various elements of the SOC into space and support the assembly operation. Subsequently, it will regularly service the SOC with crew rotations, crew supplies, construction materials, construction equipment and components, space vehicle elements, and propellants and spare parts. The implications to the SOC as a consequence of the Shuttle supporting operations are analyzed. Programmatic influences associated with propellant deliveries, spacecraft servicing, and total shuttle flight operations are addressed.

  19. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the shuttle remote manipulator system (SRMS)-aided space operations center (SOC)/orbiter berthing was evaluated to determine: (1) whether the initial rates between the SOC and the orbiter can be removed by the arm; (2) what is the best strategy to be used; (3) whether the post-capture and maneuvering loads are within the capability of the SRMS; (4) can the SOC berthing port be brought in the immediate proximity of the orbiter berthing port; and (5) what is the best way to remove the residual relative motions. Various notational conventions are established and various important locations on the orbiter and SOC structures are defined. Reference frames are defined together with the mass properties of both the SOC and the orbiter.

  20. Study of luminescence, color and paramagnetic centers properties of albite.

    PubMed

    Cano, Nilo F; dos Santos, Lara H E; Chubaci, Jose F D; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2015-02-25

    A sample of natural albite, NaAlSi3O8, from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, has been investigated. The mineral is a solid solution of K-feldspar (4600 ppm--K) and Ca-feldspar (1100 ppm--Ca). The TL spectra of natural and the pre-annealed at high temperature albite presented a very intense band around 275 nm and weaker bands around 400 and 560 nm. Other TL properties have been investigated through monochromatic (275 nm and 400 nm) glow curves. The EPR spectrum measured at low temperature (77K) shows the typical 11 lines signal due to Al-O(-)-Al center superposed on Fe(3+) signal around g=2.0. The EPR spectra above 260 K show only g=2.0 signal due to Fe(3+) ions.

  1. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Alan; Callcut, Rachael A.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Wade, Charles E.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; Phelan, Herb A.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated). We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating on parameters that

  2. Comparison Among Methods of Retinopathy Assessment (CAMRA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Martha E.; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjani, Harish; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Olsen, Timothy W.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ward, Laura A.; Lynn, Michael J.; Hendrick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared smartphone fundus photography, nonmydriatic fundus photography, and 7-field mydriatic fundus photography for their abilities to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy (DR). Design This was a prospective, comparative study of 3 photography modalities. Participants Diabetic patients (n = 300) were recruited at the ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary diabetes care center in Chennai, India. Methods Patients underwent photography by all 3 modalities, and photographs were evaluated by 2 retina specialists. Main Outcome Measures The sensitivity and specificity in the detection of DR for both smartphone and nonmydriatic photography were determined by comparison with the standard method, 7-field mydriatic fundus photography. Results The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography, compared with 7-field mydriatic fundus photography, for the detection of any DR were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43–56) and 94% (95% CI, 92–97), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 81% (95% CI, 75–86) and 94% (95% CI, 92–96%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography for the detection of vision-threatening DR were 59% (95% CI, 46–72) and 100% (95% CI, 99–100), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 54% (95% CI, 40–67) and 99% (95% CI, 98–100), respectively. Conclusions Smartphone and nonmydriatic fundus photography are each able to detect DR and sight-threatening disease. However, the nonmydriatic camera is more sensitive at detecting DR than the smartphone. At this time, the benefits of the smartphone (connectivity, portability, and reduced cost) are not offset by the lack of sufficient sensitivity for detection of DR in most clinical circumstances. PMID:26189190

  3. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located near Houston, including 22,000 acres; the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center (Metro), and a Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Included within the program for each village are schools and commercial activities, as well as employment activities. The Woodlands is planned to be developed over a 26-year period (commenced in 1972) with an ultimate population of 150,000. Following a summary chapter, Chapter II presents background material on The Woodlands and results of the study are summarized. Chapter III describes the project team and its organizational structure. Chapter IV outlines and documents the methodology that was employed in developing, analyzing, and evaluating the case study. The next chapter describes and analyzes the conventional plan, documents the process by which energy-conserving methods were selected, and evaluates the application of these methods to the Metro Center Study area. Chapter VI discusses constraints to implementation and is followed by a final chapter that presents the general conclusions from the case study and suggests directions for further investigation.

  4. Socio-Behavioral Study Center for Mental Retardation. Terminal Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific State Hospital, Pomona, CA.

    The terminal progress report of the Socio-Behavioral Study Center for Mental Retardation summarizes research activities and results of the Center's three major programs. The Community Research Program studied the epidemiological aspects of mental retardation in the community, including identification and classification of retardates, investigation…

  5. A Study of Community College Learner-Centered Teaching Styles and Students' Motivation to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between community college business faculty members' perceptions of their use of learner-centered teaching practices and their students' perceptions of their motivation to learn. Learner-centered teaching practices have been linked to students' motivation. This study used on-line survey…

  6. Evaluation of Participant Needs in a Regional Center for Security Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Oliver E., III.

    2009-01-01

    This research study was implemented within the subject headquarters of a regional center, an organization responsible for security cooperation in Europe and Eurasia. The focus of the study was the center's program of security education. This program was designed to support evolving security objectives of foreign countries in order to increase the…

  7. A multi-center quality control study of different CA15-3 immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Hubl, Walter; Demant, Thomas; Albrecht, Steffen; Bewarder, Nils; Grunow, Gabriele; Keller, Ruprecht; Klapdor, Rainer; Klos, Karl-Jürgen; Kruse, Klaus; Müller, Robert; Päge, Ilona; Schmidt, Reinhard; Stolle, Heidrun; Wiefelspütz, Johannes; vom Baur, Egon; Zinsmeyer, Jörg; Zwirner, Manfred

    2005-01-01

    A long-term multi-center quality control study of CA15-3 determinations based on measurements of liquid BIOREF CA15-3 control sera was conducted in 17 participating laboratories. Seven different CA15-3 assays were applied using the appropriate automatic immunoanalyzers. CA15-3 means were determined for BIOREF low, medium and high level control sera. Values were 19.3 +/- 2.7 kU/l, 75.2 +/- 11.4 kU/l and 162.9 +/- 37.1 kU/l, respectively. Inter-assay imprecisions were calculated for each of the controls for each laboratory and for each of the methods, with coefficients of variation (CV) ranging from 2.9-15.5%. As a means of evaluation of assay linearity concentration ratios (high/medium, medium/low, high/low) were calculated and found to be in good agreement with reference values throughout the study. Individual long-term time courses of CA15-3 control measurements provided evidence for variability of test results due to changes in assay calibration. Comparisons with CV data obtained with BIOREF controls 17 years ago demonstrate significant improvements of CA15-3 assay precision in recent years. In conclusion, test-independent reference material can be used for CA15-3 quality control and in particular enables applicants to check for long-term stability of CA15-3 assay performance.

  8. Study on the Realization of Zinc Point and the Zinc-Point Cell Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiatmo, J. V.; Sakai, M.; Satou, K.; Yamazawa, K.; Tamba, J.; Arai, M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing our study on aluminum, tin, and silver points, a study on the realization of the zinc point was conducted. Zinc-point cells were newly fabricated using 6N-nominal grade zinc samples, impurity elements of which were analyzed extensively based on glow-discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). The present paper reports the temperature measurements done using the newly fabricated cells during the zinc freezing process, under which the zinc fixed point is defined, and the analysis of the freezing curve obtained. Comparisons of zinc-point temperatures realized by the newly fabricated cells (cell-to-cell comparisons) were also conducted. Zinc-point depression due to impurity elements was calculated based on the sum of individual estimates and the impurity element analysis. One of the cells evaluated was drawn out from its crucible and analyzed by GDMS at four points, namely, at around the center of the top, of the middle, of the bottom, and around the outer part of the middle area. The purpose of this cell disassembly is to see whether or not there has been some difference before and after cell fabrication, as well as difference in impurity element distribution within the ingot. From the aforementioned studies, some findings were obtained. First finding is that the homogeneity of the zinc ingot was within 30%, except for Pb, which was more concentrated in the center part. Second finding is that the cell-to-cell temperature difference changes along with the progressing solidification process. As a consequence, for an accurate cell-to-cell comparison, the locus in the freezing plateau where the comparison is done should be determined. Third finding is that the slope analysis estimates accurately the cell-to-cell comparison, and is consistent with the impurity analysis. This shows that the slope analysis gives extensive information about the effect of impurity to the zinc-point realization, especially after the cell fabrication.

  9. 77 FR 39236 - Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether... Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether Flame-Retardant Coatings... ``Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Decabromodiphenyl Ether...

  10. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  11. Beyond active learning: a case study of teaching practices in an occupation-centered curriculum.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Although occupation-centered curricula are highly promoted, the teaching processes that convey such designs remain unclear. This case study elucidated occupation-centered teaching practices. Interview and observational data were collected over 8 weeks, and analysis involved coding transcriptions, data matrices, concept maps, journaling, and writing. Participants augmented active learning strategies with strategies that linked course topics to the subject of occupation. The use of linking strategies suggested that: (a) course content was treated as two-tiered; (b) neither content nor instructional processes were inherently occupation-centered; and (c) subject-centered education strengthens social learning theories. Although curricula may appear occupation-centered based on a curriculum description and course content, ultimately "linking opportunities" in the classroom constitute an essential feature that demarcates a program as occupation-centered.

  12. Study of Traces of Tritium at the World Trade Center

    SciTech Connect

    Semkow, T M; Hafner, S R; Parekh, P P; Wozniak, G J; Haines, D K; Husain, L; Rabun, R L; Williams, P G

    2002-10-01

    Traces of tritiated water (HTO) were detected at the World Trade Center (WTC) ground zero after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack. A water sample from the WTC sewer, collected on 9/13/01, contained 0.164 {+-} 0.074 (2 {sigma}) nCi/L of HTO. A split water sample, collected on 9/21/01 from the basement of WTC Building 6, contained 3.53 {+-} 0.17 and 2.83 {+-} 0.15 nCi/L, respectively. These results are well below the levels of concern to human exposure. Several water and vegetation samples were analyzed from sites outside ground zero, located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Kensico and Croton Reservoirs. No HTO above the background was found in those samples. Tritium radioluminescent (RL) devices were investigated as possible sources of the traces of tritium at ground zero. It was determined that the two Boeing 767 aircraft that hit the Twin Towers contained a combined 34 Ci of tritium at the time of impact in their emergency exit signs. There is also evidence that many weapons from law enforcement were present and destroyed at WTC. Such weaponry contains by design tritium sights. The fate and removal of tritium from ground zero were investigated, taking into consideration tritium chemistry and water flow originating from the fire fighting, rain, as well as leaks from the Hudson River and broken mains. A box model was developed to describe the above scenario. The model is consistent with instantaneous oxidation of the airplane tritium in the jet-fuel explosion, deposition of a small fraction of HTO at ground zero, and water-flow controlled removal of HTO from the debris. The model also suggests that tritium from the weapons would be released and oxidized to HTO at a much slower rate in the lingering fires at ground zero.

  13. Stockbridge Munsee Community Health and Wellness Center and the Mohican Family Center Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    DeRocher, Andy; Barrnett, Michael

    2014-03-14

    The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25-percent decrease in annual energyconsumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13-percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated

  14. Quantitative PCR analysis of fungal DNA in Swedish day care centers and comparison with building characteristics and allergen levels.

    PubMed

    Cai, G-H; Bröms, K; Mälarstig, B; Zhao, Z-H; Kim, J L; Svärdsudd, K; Janson, C; Norbäck, D

    2009-10-01

    Abstract Sweden has had allergen-avoidance day care centers (AADCs) since 1979. The aim of this study was to measure fungal DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), a new method, in AADCs and ordinary day care centers (ODCs) and examine associations between allergen levels and building characteristics. Dust samples were collected by swabbing doorframes, vacuum-cleaning, and using Petri dishes. In total, 11 AADCs and 11 ODCs were studied (70 rooms). Total fungal DNA, measured by qPCR in the swab dust, was detected in 89%, Aspergillus or Penicillium (Asp/Pen) DNA in 34%, and Stachybotrys chartarum DNA in 6% of the rooms. Total fungal DNA was significantly higher in rooms with linoleum floor (P = 0.02), textile carpets (P = 0.03), reported dampness/molds (P = 0.02) and reported odor (P < 0.001) in the buildings, and significantly lower in wooden facade buildings (P = 0.003). Reported odor was related to the amount of sieved fine dust, reported dampness/molds and type of building construction. Total fungal DNA was related to cat, dog, horse and total allergen levels (P = 0.003) in the day care centers. In conclusion, total fungal DNA is related to reported dampness/molds, reported odor, and type of wall construction. The association between fungal and allergen contamination indicated a general 'hygiene factor' related to biological contaminants. Practical Implications The associations between fungal DNA, reported dampness/molds, and odor support the view that buildings with odor problems should be investigated for possible hidden fungal growth. There is a need to measure fungal biomass in different types of building constructions by monitoring fungal DNA. Analysis of fungal DNA with quantitative PCR can be a fast and practical way to study indoor fungal contamination. Swabbing dust from the doorframe of the main entrance to the room can be a convenient method of sampling dust for fungal DNA analysis. The high prevalence of reported dampness/molds and the

  15. Survival of living donor renal transplant recipients in Sri Lanka: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Galabada, Dinith Prasanna; Nazar, Abdul L M; Ariyaratne, Prasad

    2014-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease is one of the main public health concerns in Sri Lanka. In comparison with dialysis, successful kidney transplantation improves both patient survival and quality of life, relieves the burden of dialysis in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease and decreases the cost of healthcare to the society and government. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate graft and patient survival rates in patients who were transplanted from living donors at the Nephrology Unit of the National Hospital of Sri Lanka from January 2005 to January 2011. Data were collected using an interviewer-administered questionnaire and through a review of past medical records. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the survival rate, the log rank test was used to compare survival curves and the Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis. Mean follow-up was 26.44±16.6 months. The five-year death-censored graft survival of kidney transplant recipients from living donors in our center was 93.5% and the five-year patient survival was 82.2%, which is comparable with other transplant programs around the world. The number of acute rejection episodes was an independent risk factor for graft survival. Delayed graft function, younger recipient age and unknown cause of end-stage renal disease were found to be risk factors for graft failure but after adjusting for confounding factors, and the difference was not apparent.

  16. Model-It: A Case Study of Learner-Centered Software Design for Supporting Model Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Shari L.; Stratford, Steven J.; Krajcik, Joseph S.; Soloway, Elliot

    Learner-centered software design (LCSD) guides the design of tasks, tools, and interfaces in order to support the unique needs of learners: growth, diversity and motivation. This paper presents a framework for LCSD and describes a case study of its application to the ScienceWare Model-It, a learner-centered tool to support scientific modeling and…

  17. Using Case Study Methodology to Examine Practices in Exemplary College Access Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillisano, Jacqueline R.; Waxman, Hersh C.; Brown, Danielle B.; Alford, Beverly L.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the unique qualities of selected college access centers established in Texas high schools with the dual goal of assisting students with college preparation activities and of creating a school-wide college going culture. Six centers demonstrating estimable outcomes on at least one of several different variables were…

  18. Ancillary Pilot Study for the Educational Policy Research Center Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson Inst., Croton-on-Hudson, NY.

    The role of the Hudson Institute in the policy research center program was to build on and adapt current studies of the future for the purpose of assisting the Office of Education and its five pilot centers. Part 1 of this report comments briefly on some methodological and substantive issues that arose during the pilot phase and suggests how…

  19. Data and spatial studies of the USGS Texas Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrologists, geographers, geophysicists, and geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TXWSC) work in the USGS Water Mission Area on a diverse range of projects built on a foundation of spatial data. The TXWSC has developed sophisticated data and spatial-studies-related capabilities that are an integral part of the projects undertaken by the Center.

  20. Postdoctoral study in a multidisciplinary research center: an alternative to more traditional nurse fellowships.

    PubMed

    Blank, D M

    1993-01-01

    This article examines postdoctoral study in a multidisciplinary research setting. The author describes the offerings of one particular multidisciplinary center, the Monell Chemical Senses Center, and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of a fellowship in such a setting. The relevance of this option for nursing is discussed.

  1. A Four Year Study of the Myers Center for Small Business. Pueblo Community College, April 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, P. Anthony; Hallock, Richard G.

    In May 1983, Pueblo (Colorado) Community College (PCC) established the Myers Center for Small Business to assist entrepreneurs in the operation of existing businesses and the development of new ones. In March 1987, a study was conducted to determine whether the center had met its long-term goals; the number of new businesses started by center…

  2. Comparison of stratospheric temperatures from several lidars, using National Meteorological Center and microwave limb sounder data as transfer references

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, J. D.; Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Chanin, M. L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Farley, R.; Dao, P. D.; Meriwether, J. W.; Gobbi, G. P.; Congeduti, F.; Adriani, A.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Fishbein, E. F.

    1995-06-01

    Stratospheric temperatures derived from five different lidars are compared. Although the lidars are in five separate geographic locations, the evaluation is accomplished by comparing each of the sets of lidar data taken over the course of a year (1991-1992) with temperatures interpolated to each location from daily global temperature analyses from the National Meteorological Center (NMC). Average differences between the lidars and NMC temperatures vary for the different lidars by up to 6.7 K. Part of this large average temperature difference is shown to be due to the real temperature variation throughout the day, and the different times of observation of the NMC data and each of the lidar systems. Microwave limb sounder (MLS) data from the upper atmosphere research satellite are used to model the diurnal and semidiurnal variations in temperature for each lidar location, for each season. After adjusting for the temperature changes caused by variations in observation time, average temperature differences are reduced among four of the five lidars, compared with the NMC temperatures, but still vary by as much as 3.9 K at stratospheric altitudes between 30 and 45 km. Results of direct comparisons at two permanent lidar sites with a mobile lidar show that sometimes agreement within 1 to 2 K is achieved, but for other cases, larger average differences are seen. Since the precision of lidar temperatures has been estimated to be better than 1 K, further research is needed to reconcile this small expected error with the larger average differences deduced here using measurements made under operational conditions.

  3. Mathematics Comparison Study = Etude Comporative Portant Sur les Mathematiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    At the request of the Council of Ministries of Education, Canada (CMEC), Alberta Learning conducted this Mathematics Comparison Study. The focus of this study is from Kindergarten to Grade 12. All provinces and territories were invited to participate, and only the Quebec region declined. Participating regions were invited to send a representative…

  4. Advancing videotape parent training: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Webster-Stratton, C

    1994-06-01

    This study examines the specific effects of adding a broader based, videotape treatment component (ADVANCE) to a basic videotape parent skills training program (GDVM). ADVANCE treatment trains parents to cope with interpersonal distress through improved communication, problem solving, and self-control skills. Seventy-eight families with a child diagnosed as oppositional-defiant or conduct-disordered were randomly assigned to either GDVM alone or GDVM plus ADVANCE. Parent reports of child adjustment and parent distress, assessment of child's knowledge of social skills, as well as independent observations of mother-and father-child interactions and communication and of problem solving between parents were obtained at pre- and post-GDVM and at post-ADVANCE. Both groups significantly improved at short-term follow-up. ADVANCE produced additional significant improvements in parents' communication, problem-solving skills, and consumer satisfaction, as well as children's increased knowledge of prosocial solutions. The clinical significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:8063985

  5. Comparison of the centering ability of Wave·One and Reciproc nickel-titanium instruments in simulated curved canals

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Jun; Park, Su-Jung; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the shaping ability of newly marketed single-file instruments, Wave·One (Dentsply-Maillefer) and Reciproc (VDW GmbH), in terms of maintaining the original root canal configuration and curvature, with or without a glide-path. Materials and Methods According to the instruments used, the blocks were divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, no glide-path / Wave·One; Group 2, no glide-path / Reciproc; Group 3, #15 K-file / Wave·One; Group 4, #15 K-file / Reciproc. Pre- and post-instrumented images were scanned and the canal deviation was assessed. The cyclic fatigue stress was loaded to examine the cross-sectional shape of the fractured surface. The broken fragments were evaluated under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for topographic features of the cross-section. Statistically analysis of the data was performed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Results The ability of instruments to remain centered in prepared canals at 1 and 2 mm levels was significantly lower in Group 1 (p < 0.05). The centering ratio at 3, 5, and 7 mm level were not significantly different. Conclusions The Wave·One file should be used following establishment of a glide-path larger than #15. PMID:23493484

  6. Case studies of individualized professional development at an outdoor education center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearsall, Marjorie

    various activities and lessons while at the center, and the assessment of the student's learning following the experience. The staff works with each teacher to prepare them to use transdisciplinary science lessons which were planned to satisfy and enrich state, district, and school expectations (Outdoor Education Guidebook, 1997). The staff members believe that if the teachers are prepared to do these things, not only will the current students learn more, but that the teacher will experience growth professionally and this will impact more children over time. The teachers gain science content knowledge and learn constructivist teaching strategies while learning how to use the facilities and equipment safely and confidently. Ideas for preparatory and follow-up activities are made available. This study looked closely at the individualization of the professional development provided by this informal science institution. Data from observations of professional development sessions as well as the on-site experiences with the children were used in the study. Teachers were asked to reflect on the degree to which the Arlington Echo approach to professional development was beneficial in building their confidence about providing science-based, interdisciplinary experiences for their students, with comparisons made between the responses of veteran teachers and those of teachers with fewer years of experience. Through the reflections of the participant teachers, it was possible to gather data about whether their beliefs about science and about how science is best taught were modified by this experience.

  7. Environmental contaminant studies by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of environmental contaminants on wildlife is geared to interpreting events in the field, especially population effects, and both field and laboratory studies are planned for this purpose; procedures are adapted to specific problems and therefore do not include strict protocols or routine testing. Field evaluations include measurements of cholinesterase inhibition in brain or blood, search for dead or disabled animals, study of nesting success of birds, and general ecological observations. Residue analyses are used in evaluating organochlorine chemicals; samples may include whole bodies for determining level of exposure, brains for mortality diagnosis, whole blood for certain special studies, and eggs to help in evaluation of possible reproductive effects. Bird counts, singing-male census counts, small mamrnal trapping, and cage-in-field tests have proven to be ineffective or misleading and are not considered suitable for field evaluations under most circumstances. Usefulness of simulated field trials is limited to very special situations. Experimental studies that help predict and interpret field effects include determinations of lethal diagnostic levels, comparative lethal dietary toxicity tests, tests of secondary poisoning measurement of residue loss rates, measurement of blood enzymes, tests of behavioral effects, and studies of reproductive effects.

  8. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the SOC, including constraints that the Shuttle places upon the SOC design is studied. The considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions are identified.

  9. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies.

  10. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies. PMID:27698566

  11. Highlighting High Performance: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College’s Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials

  12. Western Fisheries Research Center--Forage fish studies in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Western Fisheries Research Center are working with other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Centers to better understand the interconnected roles of forage fishes throughout the ecosystem of Puget Sound, Washington. Support for these studies primarily is from the USGS Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound (CHIPS) program, which supports studies of the nearshore areas of Puget Sound. Human perturbations in the nearshore area such as shoreline armoring or urban development can affect the nearshore habitats critical to forage fish.

  13. 1976-77 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1976-1977 were compared to 1975 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from a similar 1974-1975 study. Based on a sample of 212,263 applicants, findings include the following: during 1976-1977, 70.7 percent of all…

  14. 1979-80 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1979-1980 were compared to 1978 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from similar 1974-1975 and 1976-1977 studies. Based on a sample of 407,596 applicants, findings include the following: between 1976-1977 and…

  15. Does Matching Quality Matter in Mode Comparison Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Ji; Yin, Ping; Shedden, Kerby A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three matching approaches in forming comparable groups for a study comparing test administration modes (i.e., computer-based tests [CBT] and paper-and-pencil tests [PPT]): (a) a propensity score matching approach proposed in this article, (b) the propensity score matching approach used by…

  16. A Study of Flood Evacuation Center Using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, A. A.; Rosli, M. F.; Abustan, M. S.; Adib, R.; Rosli, M. I.; Masiri, K.; Saifullizan, B.

    2016-07-01

    This research demonstrated the use of Remote Sensing technique and GIS to determine the suitability of an evacuation center. This study was conducted in Batu Pahat areas that always hit by a series of flood. The data of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was obtained by ASTER database that has been used to delineate extract contour line and elevation. Landsat 8 image was used for classification purposes such as land use map. Remote Sensing incorporate with GIS techniques was used to determined the suitability location of the evacuation center from contour map of flood affected areas in Batu Pahat. GIS will calculate the elevation of the area and information about the country of the area, the road access and percentage of the affected area. The flood affected area map may provide the suitability of the flood evacuation center during the several levels of flood. The suitability of evacuation centers can be determined based on several criteria and the existing data of the evacuation center will be analysed. From the analysis among 16 evacuation center listed, there are only 8 evacuation center suitable for the usage during emergency situation. The suitability analysis was based on the location and the road access of the evacuation center toward the flood affected area. There are 10 new locations with suitable criteria of evacuation center proposed on the study area to facilitate the process of rescue and evacuating flood victims to much safer and suitable locations. The results of this study will help in decision making processes and indirectly will help organization such as fire-fighter and the Department of Social Welfare in their work. Thus, this study can contribute more towards the society.

  17. A study on confidential unit exclusion at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kasraian, Leila; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confidential unit exclusion (CUE) system has been designed to enhance transfusion safety as an extra additive approach. Aims: This study was designed to survey demographic characteristics, prevalence of serologic markers, and reasons of opting CUE. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was performed at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center (Southern Iran). CUE is used for all individuals who refer for blood donation, and donors can choose their blood not to be used if they have any doubt about their blood suitability for transfusion. The prevalence rate of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) was compared between the blood donors who opted into and out of CUE. Then, the donors were contacted to give another blood sample and the reasons of deferral. Researchers also determined whether their reasons were logical or not. Data were analyzed using comparison of proportions in MedCalc software 7. Results: Out of all the donors, 2365 ones (2.3%) opted for CUE. CUE was more frequent among men, singles, donors with low education levels, between 18 and 25 years old, and with history of previous donation (P < 0.05). The prevalence rate of HCV was higher among the donors who opted for CUE (P < 0.05), but it was not the case regarding HBV and HIV (P>0.05). Furthermore, 91.5% of the donors had opted for CUE by mistake and only 8% had chosen CUE logically. Conclusion: It is necessary to review the process of CUE, make some changes both in procedure and design, and then survey its effectiveness in blood safety. PMID:27605850

  18. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study

    PubMed Central

    Cnossen, Maryse C.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I. R.; Menon, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. Methods We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions. Results All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%), designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68%) and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%). The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57%) had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU), 36 (51%) had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45) of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers. Conclusion Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches. PMID:27571205

  19. Anal sphincter injuries during hemorrhoidectomy: a multi center study.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Rezvan; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Kadivar, Maryam; Azizi, Rasoul; Zahedi-Shoolami, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhoidectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with third or fourth-degree hemorrhoids. Although the majority of surgeons believe that surgical hemorrhoidectomy is the most effective approach with excellent results in the management of hemorrhoid disease, but hemorrhoidectomy is not a simple procedure. One of the complications of this surgery is an injury to anal sphincters that can lead to incontinency in some patients. In this study, we aimed to reveal the percentage of external and internal anal sphincter injuries in surgical hemorrhoidectomy. We prospectively enrolled 128 patients from April 2006 to February 2007. They underwent hemorrhoidectomy in three general hospitals in Tehran. All patients were in grade III or IV and underwent open hemorrhoidectomy (Milligan-Morgan). After surgery, all resected material was histopathologically examined by two expert pathologists and the results confirmed by other one if there is any discrepancy. From all specimens which sent to the pathology department 15.8% (21 Pts.) had muscle fibers that Smooth muscle fibers were seen in 80.5% (17 Pts.) of them and striated muscle fibers were found in 19.5% (4 Pts.). Although hemorrhoidectomy is a safe and effective method for treatment of hemorrhoid, but the inadvertent removal of smooth and striated muscle during open hemorrhoidectomy had raised concerns about its effects on postoperative anorectal function.

  20. Theoretical studies of thin-film superconductors with pinning centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sa Lin

    2001-07-01

    We investigate the effect of a ferromagnetic dot on a thin-film superconductor. We use a real-space method to solve the linearized Ginzburg-Landau equation in order to find the upper critical field, Hc3 . We show that Hc3 is crucially dependent on dot composition and geometry and may be significantly greater than Hc2 . Hc3 is maximally enhanced when: (1) the dot saturation magnetization is large, (2) the ratio of dot thickness to dot diameter is of order unity, and (3) the dot thickness is large. We also report on a study of vortex pinning in nanoscale antidot defect arrays in the context of the London theory. Using a wire network model, we discretize the array with a fine mesh, thereby providing a detailed treatment of pinning phenomena. We use Ewald's trick to efficiently calculate the vector potential of the supercurrent. The use of a fine grid has enabled us to examine both circular and elongated defects. We have given special attention to defects patterned in the form of a rhombus. The rhombic defects display pinning characteristics superior to circular defects constructed with the similar area. We calculate pinning potentials for defects containing zero and single quanta and we obtain a pinning phase diagram for the second matching field H = 2phio.

  1. Analysis on productivity of clinical studies across -- Asian countries a case comparison.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Sengoku, S; Kimura, H

    2007-08-01

    In an era of increasing global competition and an increased interest in global clinical studies Japan has been concerned with the risk of losing its attractiveness due to perceived longer execution times and higher cost structure. In contrast, other Asian countries particularly China and Singapore are widely recognized as potential key centers for fast conduction of global clinical studies. We conducted a case comparison based on two clinical studies performed by a multinational pharmaceutical company in order to measure the productivity of clinical studies by region and country. We focused on the site-related study cost which constituted the largest portion of the cost breakdown and also impacted both time and quality management. For investigation of the productivity we propose a breakdown model with two Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), enrollment efficiency and site-related cost efficiency, for the comparison of the number of enrolled subject per site and cost, respectively. Through the comparative analysis we found that the Asian countries (excluding Japan) on average achieved higher efficiency than Japan in both indicators. In the Asian group, China and Singapore stood out as the most efficient on both speed and site-related cost. However, when the site-related cost efficiency was adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) the cost advantage in China disappeared, implying the price level was critical for productivity management. Although quality aspects remain to be investigated we postulate that introducing a comparative approach based on a productivity framework would be useful for an accurate productivity comparison.

  2. XAS study of Sn-related DX centers in (Al, Ga)As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, J.; Lurio, L. B.; Hayes, T. M.; Williamson, D. L.; Gibart, P.; Theis, T. N.

    1995-02-01

    We have used fluorescence-detection X-ray absorption spectroscopy to measure the Sn atomic-scale environment in single-crystal Sn doped Al 0.23Ga 0.77As in two states for direct comparison: in the dark at 80 K, where Sn atoms are in DX states; after photoexcitation at 20 K, where they are in shallow donor states. The observed differences in Sn near neighbors are not consistent with the widely accepted model for DX centers put forth by Chadi and Chang (PRL 1988).

  3. Comparison of Symptom Severity between Clients at a University Counseling Center and a Community Mental Health Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Joshua E.; Grieve, Frederick G.; Greer, Richard M.; Thomas, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    University counseling centers have been in a constant state of transition since their inception. Many variables, including economics, the social and political climate on and off campus, staff interests, and changing consumer needs have driven the direction of the modern counseling center. Throughout the more than 70 years that university…

  4. A Comparison of Student-Centered versus Traditional Methods of Teaching Basic Nursing Skills in a Learning Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Pamela R.; Rew, Sandy; Cramer, Joni M.

    2002-01-01

    To learn surgical asepsis content, 70 nursing students used a student-centered interactive lab and 50 used textbooks, videotapes, and lecture-demonstrations. There were no differences in cognitive gains or ability to demonstrate the skills learned. The student-centered group was significantly more satisfied with their learning. (SK)

  5. Home hemodialysis and conventional in-center hemodialysis in Japan: a comparison of health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yusuke; Ohno, Yoichi; Inoue, Tsutomu; Takane, Hiroshi; Okada, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Hiromichi

    2014-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important measure of how disease affects patients' daily life. Conventional in-center hemodialysis (CHD) patients have been found to have decreased HRQOL. Recent study reported that at-home hemodialysis (HHD) improved the long-term HRQOL compared with CHD; however, there have been no data from Japanese HHD patients. A sample of 80 Japanese hemodialysis patients (46 HHD and 34 CHD) was matched for age, sex, and cause of end-stage renal disease. Patient HRQOL was measured using two health surveys: Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short Form Health Survey-Version 2 and Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form. HHD patients reported better scores on seven out of eight domains (all domains except general heath) of the Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short Form Health Survey-Version 2, as well as better Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form scores with respect to symptoms and problems, effect of kidney disease, and work status. No significant differences were observed for burden of kidney disease, cognitive function, quality of social interaction, sexual function, or sleep. More than 65% of HHD patients stated that they were not bothered at all by limitations on food and water intake. Japanese HHD patients demonstrate significantly higher HRQOL scores. However, while their HRQOL and employment rate were high and they were able to enjoy fewer dietary restrictions, kidney disease remained a great burden.

  6. Moessbauer studies of two-electron centers with negative correlation energy in crystalline and amorphous semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Nemov, S. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2012-01-15

    The results of the study of donor U{sup -}-centers of tin and germanium in lead chalcogenides by Moessbauer emission spectroscopy are discussed. The published data regarding the identification of amphoteric U{sup -}-centers of tin in glassy binary arsenic and germanium chalcogenides using Moessbauer emission spectroscopy, and in multicomponent chalcogenide glasses using Moessbauer absorption spectroscopy are considered. Published data concerning the identification of two-atom U{sup -}-centers of copper in lattices of semimetal copper oxides by Moessbauer emission spectroscopy are analyzed. The published data on the detection of spatial inhomogeneity of the Bose-Einstein condensate in superconducting semiconductors and semimetal compounds, and on the existence of the correlation between the electron density in lattice sites and the superconducting transition temperature are presented. The principal possibility of using Moessbauer U{sup -}-centers as a tool for studying the Bose-Einstein condensation of electron pairs during the superconducting phase transition in semiconductors and semimetals is considered.

  7. A Study of Day Care Costs: Their Impact on Day Care Center Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    REAP Associates, Washington, DC.

    This study analyzes the effects of costs on day care center quality for a total of 13 high cost ($40-50 per week for each child) and low cost ($20-30 per week) day care centers in three New York counties. A mail survey questionnaire (included in Appendix) was used to gather data on program operations, core services, and budget expenditures.…

  8. Head Start Evaluation and Research Center. Progress Report of Research Studies, 1966-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimiles, Herbert; Horton, Donald

    The studies which comprise this report are as follows: (a) Document 1, Development of the Matrix Test by Herbert Zimiles and Harvery Asch (PS 001 072); (b) Document 2, Studies of the Social Organization of Head Start Centers by Donald Horton and others (PS 001 073); (c) Document 3, An Experimental Approach to Studying Non-Verbal Representation in…

  9. The Effects of Policy Changes on the Educational Opportunity Centers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain-Ellis, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the programmatic changes that occurred in the Educational Opportunity Centers (EOC) and how those changes influenced educational opportunities for adults. A case study design was used for this investigation. The directors of three EOCs were selected and interviewed for the study. These directors combined…

  10. Using a Pattern-Centered Approach to Assess Sexual Risk-Taking in Study Abroad Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcantonio, Tiffany; Angelone, D. J.; Sledjeski, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several potential factors related to sexually risky behaviors in study abroad students. The authors utilized a pattern-centered analysis to identify specific groups that can be targeted for intervention. Participants: The sample consisted of 173 students who studied abroad in a…

  11. What Is Social Comparison and How Should We Study It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joanne V.

    1996-01-01

    Examines frequently used measures and procedures in social comparison research. The question of whether a method truly captures social comparison requires a clear understanding of what social comparison is; hence a definition of social comparison is proposed, multiple ancillary processes in social comparison are identified, and definitional…

  12. An exploratory study of alternative configurations of governing boards of substance abuse treatment centers

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Terry C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Boards of directors are the ultimate governing authorities for most organizations providing substance abuse treatment. A governing board may establish policies, monitor and improve operations, and represent a treatment organization to the public. This paper explores alternative configurations of governing boards in a national sample of 500 substance abuse treatment centers. The study proceeds from the premise that boards may be configured with varying levels of engagement in five aspects of internal management and external connections in treatment center operating environments. Based on interviews with treatment center administrative directors, four clusters emerge, describing boards that are: (1) active and balanced across internal and external domains; (2) active boundary spanners concentrating primarily on external relationships; (3) focused primarily on internal organizational management; and (4) relatively inactive. In post hoc analysis, we found that placement in these clusters is associated with treatment center attributes such as rate of growth and financial results, use of evidence based practices and provision of integrated care. PMID:21489737

  13. The Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  14. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  15. Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl levels across studies of human neurodevelopment.

    PubMed Central

    Longnecker, Matthew P; Wolff, Mary S; Gladen, Beth C; Brock, John W; Grandjean, Philippe; Jacobson, Joseph L; Korrick, Susan A; Rogan, Walter J; Weisglas-Kuperus, Nynke; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Ayotte, Pierre; Stewart, Paul; Winneke, Gerhard; Charles, M Judith; Jacobson, Sandra W; Dewailly, Eric; Boersma, E Rudy; Altshul, Larisa M; Heinzow, Birger; Pagano, James J; Jensen, Allan A

    2003-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants that are ubiquitous in the food chain, and detectable amounts are in the blood of almost every person in most populations that have been examined. Extensive evidence from animal studies shows that PCBs are neurotoxins, even at low doses. Interpretation of human data regarding low-level, early-life PCB exposure and subsequent neurodevelopment is problematic because levels of exposure were not similarly quantified across studies. We expressed the exposure levels from 10 studies of PCB and neurodevelopment in a uniform manner using a combination of data from original investigators, laboratory reanalyses, calculations based on published data, and expert opinion. The mainstay of our comparison was the median level of PCB 153 in maternal pregnancy serum. The median concentration of PCB 153 in the 10 studies ranged from 30 to 450 ng/g serum lipid, and the median of the 10 medians was 110 ng/g. We found that (a)) the distribution of PCB 153 exposure in most studies overlapped substantially, (b)) exposure levels in the Faroe Islands study were about 3-4-fold higher than in most other studies, and (c)) the exposure levels in the two recent U.S. studies were about one-third of those in the four earlier U.S. studies or recent Dutch, German, and northern Québec studies. Our results will facilitate a direct comparison of the findings on PCBs and neurodevelopment when they are published for all 10 studies. PMID:12515680

  16. Current prevention strategies against cytomegalovirus in the studies in pediatric liver transplantation (SPLIT) centers.

    PubMed

    Danziger-Isakov, L; Bucavalas, J

    2014-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) continues to be a significant posttransplant infectious complication after pediatric liver transplant (PLT). The optimal prevention strategy is not currently known. To assess current CMV prevention practices, a web-based survey was conducted within the North American Studies in Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT) network. Twenty-nine of the 31 centers (94%) surveyed responded. Only seven centers reported evidence-based development of protocols. For most at-risk (donor or recipient CMV seropositive) PLT recipients, a prophylactic strategy predominates current practice. For high-risk (D+/R-), only three centers used nonprophylaxis-based protocols: one preemptive and two sequential/hybrid. Duration of prophylaxis ranged from 84 to 730 days with 14 centers using around 100 days and nine centers using around 200 days. Initial therapy with ganciclovir followed by valganciclovir was the most common strategy. For lower-risk recipients (CMV D-/R-), more centers (10/29) employed a preemptive strategy while the remainder described prophylaxis (15) and sequential/hybrid (3) strategies. Prophylaxis predominates current CMV prevention strategies for at-risk recipients within SPLIT. The variation in duration of therapy provides the opportunity to perform comparative effectiveness studies within SPLIT. PMID:24903621

  17. A comparison of accelerometry and center of pressure measures during computerized dynamic posturography: A measure of balance

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, S.L.; Roche, J.L.; Marchetti, G.F.; Lin, C.-C.; Steed, D.P.; Furman, G.R.; Musolino, M.C.; Redfern, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometry (ACC) shows promise as an easily implemented clinical measure of balance. The purpose of the study was to estimate test–retest reliability of ACC measures and determine the relationship between ACC measured at the pelvis and underfoot center of pressure (COP) measures during sensory organization test (SOT) conditions. Eighty-one subjects were recruited from the community with no known orthopedic or vestibular deficits (19–85 years). Subjects completed three consecutive, ninety second trials for each of the six SOT conditions, while wearing the accelerometer. ACC and COP time series were described by calculating the normalized path length, root mean square (RMS), and peak-to-peak values. The test–retest reliability of the three measures within each SOT condition was estimated over three trials using the intraclass correlation coefficient. ACC and COP test–retest reliability were similar, ranging from 0.63 to 0.80 using ACC and 0.42 to 0.81 using COP for the measure of normalized path length. Linear regression between ACC and COP measures showed significant correlation under almost every SOT condition using both single and average measures across trials. The degree of association between COP and ACC was equivalent when using the first trial or the 3-trial average, suggesting that one trial may be sufficient. The use of accelerometry may have value in estimating balance function and minimizing clinical evaluation time. PMID:21333541

  18. The management approach to the NASA space station definition studies at the Manned Spacecraft Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heberlig, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The overall management approach to the NASA Phase B definition studies for space stations, which were initiated in September 1969 and completed in July 1972, is reviewed with particular emphasis placed on the management approach used by the Manned Spacecraft Center. The internal working organizations of the Manned Spacecraft Center and its prime contractor, North American Rockwell, are delineated along with the interfacing techniques used for the joint Government and industry study. Working interfaces with other NASA centers, industry, and Government agencies are briefly highlighted. The controlling documentation for the study (such as guidelines and constraints, bibliography, and key personnel) is reviewed. The historical background and content of the experiment program prepared for use in this Phase B study are outlined and management concepts that may be considered for future programs are proposed.

  19. The NASA Lewis Research Center's Expendable Launch Vehicle Program: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of the Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) Expendable Launch Vehicle Program (ELVP) on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures ELVP's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. The study uses regional economic multipliers based on input-output models to estimate the effect of ELVP spending on the Northeast Ohio economy.

  20. The NASA Lewis Research Center's Expendable Launch Vehicle Program: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of the Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) Expendable Launch Vehicle Program (ELVP) on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures ELVP's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they "ripple" throughout the economy. The study uses regional economic multipliers based on input-output models to estimate the effect of ELVP spending on the Northeast Ohio economy.

  1. Parameter identification studies on the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckavitt, Thomas P., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results of an aircraft parameters identification study conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) in conjunction with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics are given. The ACFS is a commercial airline simulator with a design based on future technology. The simulator is used as a laboratory for human factors research and engineering as applied to the commercial airline industry. Parametric areas examined were engine pressure ratio (EPR), optimum long range cruise Mach number, flap reference speed, and critical take-off speeds. Results were compared with corresponding parameters of the Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft. This comparison identified two areas where improvements can be made: (1) low maximum lift coefficients (on the order of 20-25 percent less than those of a 757); and (2) low optimum cruise Mach numbers. Recommendations were made to those anticipated with the application of future technologies.

  2. An analytical and experimental study of crack extension in center-notched composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The normal stress ratio theory for crack extension in anisotropic materials is studied analytically and experimentally. The theory is applied within a microscopic-level analysis of a single center notch of arbitrary orientation in a unidirectional composite material. The bulk of the analytical work of this study applies an elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center line to obtain critical stress and crack growth direction predictions. An elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center elliptical flaw is also used to obtain qualitative predictions of the location of crack initiation on the border of a rounded notch tip. The analytical portion of the study includes the formulation of a new crack growth theory that includes local shear stress. Normal stress ratio theory predictions are obtained for notched unidirectional tensile coupons and unidirectional Iosipescu shear specimens. These predictions are subsequently compared to experimental results.

  3. Study Skills and Critical Thinking Curriculum for Adolescents in a Psychiatric Treatment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peniston, Lorraine C.

    This report discusses the need to teach critical thinking and study skill strategies to improve the problem-solving ability, study habits, and knowledge of subject content to students in psychiatric treatment centers. The report asserts that this type of curriculum will assist students in comprehending new information and utilizing thinking skills…

  4. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Managers' Experiences and Perceptions Regarding Outsourced Data Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Eric Justin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perceptions and experiences of IT Managers in publicly traded companies within the San Antonio, Texas area about outsourced data centers. Narrative data was collected using open-ended questions and face-to-face interviews within semi-structured environments. The research questions guided the study: (1)…

  5. A Study of Faculty and Computer Center Personnel Perspectives on the Issues Surrounding Campuswide Microcomputer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Steven A.

    This paper reports the results of a study that examined the issues created by implementation of campuswide microcomputer networks in a four-year public institution of higher education, and the perspectives and attitudes from which faculty users and computer center personnel view those issues. Six questions served as the focus of the study: (1) the…

  6. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  7. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  8. A cross-study comparison of cannabis and tobacco withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Vandrey, Ryan G; Budney, Alan J; Moore, Brent A; Hughes, John R

    2005-01-01

    A valid cannabis withdrawal syndrome has recently been established, but its clinical importance remains unclear. One method to assess the importance of cannabis withdrawal is to compare it with an established withdrawal syndrome. Cannabis and tobacco withdrawal studies that employed similar methods were used to compare six participant-rated and four observer-rated symptoms. Descriptive and graphic comparisons indicate that the magnitude and time course of withdrawal effects are similar across the two syndromes. These findings are consistent with other evidence supporting the clinical importance of the cannabis withdrawal syndrome. There remains a need for prospective experimental studies to replicate these findings.

  9. Building America Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center, Denver, Colorado (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a 'Power of Zero Energy Center' linked to its model home in the Stapleton community of Denver. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. The case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  10. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  11. Disaster preparedness of poison control centers in the USA: a 15-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Darracq, Michael A; Clark, Richard F; Jacoby, Irving; Vilke, Gary M; DeMers, Gerard; Cantrell, F Lee

    2014-03-01

    There is limited published literature on the extent to which United States (US) Poison Control Centers (PCCs) are prepared for responding to disasters. We describe PCCs' disaster preparedness activities and compare and contrast these results to those previously reported in the medical literature. We also describe the extent to which PCCs are engaged in disaster and terrorism preparedness planning and other public health roles such as surveillance. An electronic questionnaire was sent via email to the managing directors of the 57 member PCCs of the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Collected data included the population served and number of calls received, extent of disaster preparedness including the presence of a written disaster plan and elements included in that plan, the presence and nature of regular disaster drills, experience with disaster including periods of inability to operate, involvement in terrorism and disaster preparedness/response policy development, and public health surveillance of US PCCs. Descriptive statistics were performed on collected data. Comparisons with the results from a previously published survey were performed. A response was obtained from 40/57 (70 %) PCCs. Each PCC serves a larger population (p < 0.0001) and receives more calls per year (p = 0.0009) than the previous descriptions of PCC preparedness. More centers report the presence of a written disaster plan (p < 0.0001), backup by another center (p < 0.0001), regular disaster drills (p < 0.0001), and comfort with ability to operate in a disaster (p < 0.0001) than previously described. PCCs are involved in disaster (34/40, 85 %) and terrorism (29/40, 73 %) preparedness at the local, state, or federal levels. PCCs (36/40, 90 %) are also involved in public health functions (illness surveillance or answering "after hours" public health calls). Despite an increase in calls received and population served per center as compared to previous

  12. A Study on the Tool Sharing Policy in FMS with Tool Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Fujii, Susumu; Kaihara, Toshiya

    In this paper we examine the issue of tool management in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS). A tool center storing all tools for jobs is introduced and all tools can be shared by the machining centers through tool change between the machining centers and the tool center. Two tool-change methods, “Augmented Magazine Method (AMM)” and “Magazine Carrier Method (MCM)”, are proposed and evaluated using the methods for the allocation of tools and jobs proposed in this study. A job in this study is defined as a sequence of processing operations and is thus processed by a single machining center. We propose a two-stage method to integrate tool planning and the allocation of tools and jobs. The method in the second stage for the allocation of tools and jobs is proposed on the basis of an auction method including a dispatching rule. For the tool planning with AMM at the first stage, we propose a greedy search method to decide the total number of tools. By simulation, we investigate the characteristics and effectiveness of the proposed two-stage method and the tool-change methods together with the effectiveness of several dispatching rules.

  13. Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; de Menezes, Tarciana Nobre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To obtain an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Data source: A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. Data synthesis: It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Conclusions: Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. PMID:26553574

  14. Stereogenic Centers and Axes: A Comparison of the Chiral Topologies Available to Cabcd and AbC=C=Ccd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Williams, Paul; Giralt, Ernest

    2005-01-01

    A clarification of concepts and a comparative analysis of chirality as a consequence of stereogenic center and axes are provided by considering the different possibilities for the archetypical molecule Cabcd. The key difference between Cabcd and abC=C=Ccd and, by extension, between molecules incorporating a stereogenic axis, is in the number of…

  15. Customer Satisfaction: A Comparison of Community College and Employment Security Commission Joblink Career Centers in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deese, Stephanie

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 provided states with a great amount of flexibility in the implementation of a system-wide approach to job training and workforce development. The legislation consolidated employment and training services into a one-stop system that is known as JobLink Career Centers in North Carolina. This document presents…

  16. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  17. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  18. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Updated information is given pertaining to Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) clients who are those that receive/use information as disseminated by the center. The client information is presented as a continuation of client data as set forth in the center's previous annual report.

  19. Connecting teens to caring adults in a school-based health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Blacksin, Beth A; Kelly, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    The traditional medical care system is generally unable to provide the broad health and wellness services needed by many adolescents, especially those from low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities. Using a theoretical framework adapted from Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of multiple influencers, this case study examined how a school-based health center was able to provide a network of connections for adolescents to caring adults within the school and the local community. Contributors to this network were the creation of a student-centered community with access to adolescent-friendly services, providers acting as connectors, and care of the whole adolescent.

  20. Study of spin centers in nanocrystalline titanium dioxide with a high degree of photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinova, E. A.; Gayvoronskiy, V. Ya.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2010-08-15

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to study the effects of illumination and changes in temperature on spin centers in nanocrystalline anatase powders synthesized by sol-gel methods with various complexing agents. A correlation between the concentration of oxygen radicals at the surface and the rate of photocatalytic decomposition of organic compounds in the presence of TiO{sub 2} is observed. It is shown that the concentration of centers active in the electron spin resonance spectra can be used for monitoring the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}.

  1. Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

  2. Oberlin College Lewis Center for Environmental Studies: A Low-Energy Academic Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Petersen, J.

    2004-07-01

    The Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies at Oberlin College in Ohio is a building that houses classrooms and offices. The building was designed to be an energy-efficient model for commercial design and serve as a teaching aid to students. The long-term vision for the building was to export more energy than it consumes, sometimes referred to as a zero-energy building. To accomplish this, the Lewis Center was designed to minimize site energy use while producing electricity on-site.

  3. A Case Study Using Child-Centered Play Therapy Approach to Treat Enuresis and Encopresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy-Casey, Maria

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates an alternative method (nondirective child-centered therapy) in treating enuresis and encopresis resulting from emotional disturbances. Examines various etiologies and approaches to treating these conditions. Provides a case study example. Claims that professionals must differentiate between primary and secondary occurrences of these…

  4. Reflections and Recommendations Based on a Migrant Health Center's Participation in a CDC Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolon, Anne K.; O'Barr, James

    Hudson Valley Migrant Health (HVMH) (a Public Health Service program) collaborated with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) on a study of the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among migrant farmworkers in the mid-Hudson region of New York. CDC research personnel…

  5. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  6. Evolving a University Center to a Branch Campus: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Steven C.; Plumb, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is now expected to respond to community demands that include fueling economic development and addressing the needs of a wider range of students. Colleges and universities have responded to these demands using a variety of delivery models. A study was conducted by the Ardmore Higher Education Center to identify the advantages and…

  7. Restrictive Access to Books in School Library Media Centers in Georgia. Research Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPree, Vi

    This study sought to determine the extent of restrictive access to books in Georgia school library media centers and to discover by whose authority and for what reason these books might be placed on restrictive shelves. Questionnaires were completed and received from a stratified random sampling of 119 media specialists in high schools, middle or…

  8. Recruitment Challenges: Lessons from Senior Centers and Older African-American Participants in a Literacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne W.; Stewart, Merry

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the challenges encountered in the recruitment of urban older African-Americans in a study to explore the effects of interactive educational intervention on functional health literacy and diabetes knowledge. Our methods included identification of challenges related to the individual characteristics of seniors' centers that…

  9. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College's Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials that are local, non-toxic, and durable.

  10. 75 FR 67999 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given...

  11. Validating the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa; Scorza, Pamela; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah; Mushashi, Christina; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Binagwaho, Agnes; Stulac, Sara; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) as a screen for depression in Rwandan children and adolescents. Although the CES-DC is widely used for depression screening in high-income countries, its validity in low-income and culturally diverse settings, including sub-Saharan…

  12. Handicapped Children's Nature Study Center: A Cooperative Project in Outdoor Education. End of Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanaghan, David M.

    Presented is the end of project report of the handicapped children's nature study center and outdoor education program (funded through Title III), a cooperative science/special education project serving approximately 1,000 children in the Muscatine-Scott County School System in Iowa. A 6 acre land strip bordered by a creek and a river is said to…

  13. A Work Sampling Study of Provider Activities in School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. Methods: All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this…

  14. Development of a Research Center: Planning Focus Group Studies To Build Connections with Stakeholders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spall, Sharon; Barrett, Barbara; Darragh, Sheron; Gill, Peggy; Schwei, Michael

    At Stephen F. Austin State University (Texas), focus group research was conducted to determine research needs and to inform the development of a new educational research center. Four graduate research assistants and a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership formed a study group to review the literature on focus groups and…

  15. Factorial and Discriminant Validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orme, John G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the factorial and discriminant validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale for 116 parents participating in family support programs. Factorial validity was adequate, and results indicated a moderate correlation between the CES-D and self-esteem and state anxiety. However, a high correlation was obtained…

  16. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 7th Grade - Spoil Island Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with secondary students in grade seven prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  17. The Learner-Centered Instructional Design Model: A Modified Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melsom, Duane Allan

    2010-01-01

    The learner-centered instructional design model redefines the standard linear instructional design model to form a circular model where the learner's needs are the first item considered in the development of instruction. The purpose of this modified Delphi study was to have a panel of experts in the instructional design field review the…

  18. Yale Child Study Center School Development Program: Developmental History and Long Term Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.; And Others

    Research findings indicate that the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program (SDP) has led to consistent progress in academic achievement and school attendance from 1969 to 1984 in the New Haven (Connecticut) schools in which it has been used. This report evaluates SDP, which attempts to strengthen student academic and social skills in…

  19. Racial Disparities in Colorectal Carcinoma Incidence, Severity and Survival Times Over 10 Years: A Retrospective Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Tetangco, Eula; Shah, Natasha; Kabir, Christopher; Raddawi, Hareth

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Although studies have been performed on malignancy behavior in African Americans and Caucasians, scant data are present on other minority racial groups. Methods A retrospective single center study was performed where 1,860 patient charts with a diagnosis of CRC from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed. Data collected on each patient included age, gender, ethnicity, primary site and histological stage at the time of diagnosis. Survival time over the course of 5 years was documented for patients from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2009. Comparisons were made amongst different racial groups for the above mentioned factors. Results Study population consisted of 27.09% African Americans, 65.61% Caucasians, 3.86% Hispanics, 0.54% South Asians, 1.03% Arabs, 0.54% Asians and 0.22% American Indians. Mean age of CRC presentation was found to be significantly different (P < 0.05) between the three largest racial groups: 71 years for Caucasians, 69 years for African Americans, and 61 years for Hispanics. African Americans (27.09%) and Hispanics (28.79%) presented predominantly at stage IV in comparison to other racial groups. Caucasians presented predominantly at stage III (24.84%). The rectum was the most common site of CRC across all racial groups with the exception of Asians, where sigmoid colon was the predominant site (30%). Adenocarcinoma remained the predominant cancer type in all groups. Hispanics had relatively higher incidence rate of carcinoid tumor (12.68%). Survival time analysis showed that Caucasians tend to have better survival probability over 5 years after initial diagnosis as compared to African Americans and Hispanic (P < 0.05). Conclusion There is lack of studies performed on minority racial groups in North America. Our study highlighted some important clinical differences of CRC presentation in different racial groups which are not

  20. Methane dehydrogenation on monomeric Rh center located on (100) γ-alumina — A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Song; Yang, Hua-Qing; Gao, Chao; Xu, Jian; Hu, Chang-Wei

    2012-12-01

    The reaction mechanism of methane dehydrogenation on monomeric Rh center located on (100) γ-alumina has been theoretically investigated at the PBE0/cc-pVTZ, SDD level. The (100) face of γ-alumina support is represented by an Al8O26H28 cluster, which is cut out from the ideal crystal structure. Then, two model Rh/γ-Al2O3 catalysts, in which Rh center interacts with one oxygen or two oxygen atoms of the (100) surface of γ-Al2O3, have been compared and denoted as Rh/Al8O26H27 and Rh/Al8O26H26, respectively. Toward methane activation, the model catalyst Rh/Al8O26H27 exhibits better performance than Rh/Al8O26H26. For the first Csbnd H bond cleavage of methane, the lowering of activation barriers on Rh/Al8O26H27 is mainly caused by lower substrate activation strain ΔE≠strain[substr], which is from substrate equilibrium geometry to the geometry it adopts in the TS, in comparison with that on Rh/Al8O26H26. These results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results, where the partially reduced Rh+ is one of the active sites for methane dissociation.

  1. [Mental health, vulnerability and general practice: a study of non-profit health centers in Grenoble].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Fabing, Delphine; Pichon, Philippe; Arnevielhe, Alizée; Suscillon, Marie-Paule; Caron, Bruno; Saillard, Fabienne; François, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Very little research has been conducted on the role of general practitioners (GPs) in mental health care among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations in France. The non-profit community health care centers in Grenoble provide populations living in sensitive urban zones with high quality primary health care that includes a medico-social and prevention dimension. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of mental health issues diagnosed by GPs in health care centers, to identify the factors associated with these issues and to describe treatment characteristics. This cross-sectional study focused on general practice consultations in the AGECSA Grenoble health care centers over the course of one week. At the end of each consultation, the GP collected information about the patient, including personal data, psychological disorders, vulnerability, and patient health management. Among the 451 patients included in the study, GPs found that 45.2% of patients were in vulnerable situations and 43% of patients suffered from a mental disorder, including 29% of cases of anxiety and 20% of cases of depression. 44% of patients suffered from a psychological disorder (mental disorder and/or psychological suffering). For these patients, 52.8% of the consultations lasted more than 20 minutes. Their treatment generally included a mental health care follow-up (in 76% of cases), including psychological support (59%) and treatment of functional somatic disorders (46%). The study shows the high prevalence of psychological disorders diagnosed in the patients treated by GPs working in health care centers in disadvantaged urban areas. Research shows that GPs play an important and specific role in mental health care and prevention. An analysis of the organizational methods used in health care centers is highly relevant.

  2. Experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of high density foods for the Space Operations Center is described. A sensory evaluation of the high density foods was conducted first to test the acceptability of the products. A shelf-life study of the high density foods was also conducted for three different time lengths at three different temperatures. The nutritional analysis of the high density foods is at present incomplete.

  3. OnWARD: Ontology-driven Web-based Framework for Multi-center Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up. PMID:21924379

  4. OnWARD: ontology-driven web-based framework for multi-center clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van-Anh; Johnson, Nathan; Redline, Susan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2011-12-01

    With a large percentage of clinical trials still using paper forms as the primary data collection tool, there is much potential for increasing efficiency through web-based data collection systems, especially for large-scale multi-center trials. This paper presents OnWARD, an ontology-driven, secure, rapidly-deployed, web-based framework supporting data capture for large-scale multi-center clinical research. Our approach is developed using the agile methodology to provide a flexible, user-centered dynamic form generator, which can be quickly deployed and customized for any clinical study without the need of deep technical expertise. Because of the flexible framework, the data management system can be extended to accommodate a large variety of data types, including genetic, genomic and proteomic data. In this paper, we demonstrate the initial deployment of OnWARD for a Phase II multi-center clinical trial after a development period of merely three months. The study utilizes 23 clinical report forms containing more than 1500 data points. Preliminary evaluation results show that OnWARD exceeded expectations of the clinical investigators in efficiency, flexibility and ease in setting up.

  5. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in Slovakia: Comparison of methodological approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubišová, Lenka

    2016-03-01

    We review the recent archaeomagnetic studies carried out on the territory of Slovakia, focusing on the comparison of methodological approaches, discussing pros and cons of the individual applied methods from the perspective of our experience. The most widely used methods for the determination of intensity and direction of the archaeomegnetic field by demagnetisation of the sample material are the alternating field (AF) demagnetisation and the Thellier double heating method. These methods are used not only for archaeomagnetic studies but also help to solve some geological problems. The two methods were applied to samples collected recently at several sites of Slovakia, where archaeological prospection invoked by earthwork or reconstruction work of developing projects demanded archaeomagnetic dating. Then we discuss advantages and weaknesses of the investigated methods from different perspectives based on several examples and our recent experience.

  6. Establishing disability weights from pairwise comparisons for a US burden of disease study.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Jürgen; Frick, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    To determine valid and reliable disability weights for a U.S. burden of disease study, a convenience sample of 68 clinical experts was recruited, including representatives from over 20 NIH institutes and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts were given various health state valuation tasks including pairwise comparison, ranking, and Person Trade Off. Materials consisted of standardized descriptions of 11 attributes per health state (Classification and Measurement System of Functional Health, CLAMES). Attributes comprised up to 5 ordinal levels of disability. All states were displayed either with or without health state labels. Health state descriptions were taken from an existing comprehensive Canadian system. Conditional Logistic (CLR) and Probit Regression (PR) were used to derive disability weights. CLR and PR converged in yielding stable regression weights to construct disability weights, with a correlation of 0.816. The overall test-retest reliability amounted to 92.5% identical decisions. No significant difference was found for the presentation of health states with or without labels. A comparison of the expert valuations from our study with a standard gamble based valuation in the general population resulted in agreement of r = 0.61. The chosen methodology yielded valid and reliable and disability weights. As it is based on a modularized set of attributes, this methodology will allow derivation of disability weights on the basis of existing descriptions using the CLAMES.

  7. The elderly in the shopping centers: the usability study of semipublic spaces as attractiveness generator.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Maria Cristina; do Valle Pereira, Vera Lúcia Duarte; Pacheco, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to study the importance of the attributes of usability and attractiveness for the semi-public spaces of Shopping Centers considering the elderly users, the psycho-cognitive and bio-physiological changes resulting from the aging process, as well as their expectations of the built space. Through a qualitative study of theoretical review with a multidisciplinary focus in architecture, ergonomics, gerontology, environmental psychology and management, the conditions of the elderly users were identified, and also the attributes related to usability and attractiveness, collected in order to understand and organize their interrelationships, to suggest recommendations about the drafting of Shopping Centers, aiming to generate projects and environments that should promote the efficient and satisfactory use for elderly and may also create a competitive advantage for these enterprises.

  8. The Center for Research Libraries. Preservation Planning Program Study Report. One of a Series of Self-Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shores, Cecelia; And Others

    This is the final report of an 8-month-long project undertaken in February 1985 to study existing preservation activities within Chicago's Center for Research Libraries (CRL) compare local practices with programs in similar organizations, and make recommendations for an effective preservation program to be instituted. The background and…

  9. Laser cooling of solids containing local centers with electric dipole allowed transitions: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, S. P.; Kulinkin, A. B.; Konyushkin, V. A.; Nakladov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Various insulating materials containing local centers with electric dipole allowed transitions were studied under excitation in the long-wavelength tail of the absorption spectrum ("laser cooling regime"). Though no actual cooling was detected, spectra with a strong anti-Stokes component were observed which demonstrate the possibility to employ electron-phonon bands of electric dipole allowed transitions for optical refrigeration. The mechanisms responsible for the absence of observable optical refrigeration are discussed.

  10. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed.

  11. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed. PMID:19213480

  12. Patient Satisfaction with Spanish Pain Centers: Observational Study with More than 3,000 Patients.

    PubMed

    García García, Juan Antonio; Hernández-Puiggròs, Patricia; Tesedo Nieto, Javier; Acín Lázaro, María Pilar; Carrera González, Alfredo; Soler, Miguel José Arranz; Maldonado Vega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious problem in Spain. This multicenter, epidemiological 3-month follow-up study investigates pain management efficacy in Spanish centers using patient satisfaction criteria. 3,414 eligible adult patients (65,6% female) with moderate to severe chronic pain from 146 pain centers were included. Patient satisfaction was assessed based onto question 18 of Spanish healthcare barometer-CSI. Pain evolution (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and visual analog scale (VAS)), quality of life/EuroQol-5, and pain control expectations fulfillment were also assessed. Mean age was 61.3 years. 64.4% of participating centers employed multidisciplinary pain management approach. After 3 months, mean patient satisfaction was 7.8 (1-10) on the CIS barometer. Medical staff received the highest scores, whereas waiting for tests, appointment request to appointment date time, and waiting times at the center the lowest. Mean pain decreased from 7.4 to 4.0; BPI-SF intensity decreased from 6.5 to 3.8; pain control expectations were met in 78.7% of patients; EuroQoL-5D utility index increased from 0.37 to 0.62, p < 0.001, and health status (VAS) from 40.6 to 61.9, p < 0.001. Chronic pain patients (90%) are satisfied with Spanish centers care; 80% had their pain control expectations met. Quality of life improved remarkably: 71% felt moderately to significantly better. However, waiting times need improvement. PMID:27516902

  13. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  14. Patient Satisfaction with Spanish Pain Centers: Observational Study with More than 3,000 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Puiggròs, Patricia; Tesedo Nieto, Javier; Acín Lázaro, María Pilar; Carrera González, Alfredo; Soler, Miguel José Arranz; Maldonado Vega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious problem in Spain. This multicenter, epidemiological 3-month follow-up study investigates pain management efficacy in Spanish centers using patient satisfaction criteria. 3,414 eligible adult patients (65,6% female) with moderate to severe chronic pain from 146 pain centers were included. Patient satisfaction was assessed based onto question 18 of Spanish healthcare barometer-CSI. Pain evolution (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and visual analog scale (VAS)), quality of life/EuroQol-5, and pain control expectations fulfillment were also assessed. Mean age was 61.3 years. 64.4% of participating centers employed multidisciplinary pain management approach. After 3 months, mean patient satisfaction was 7.8 (1–10) on the CIS barometer. Medical staff received the highest scores, whereas waiting for tests, appointment request to appointment date time, and waiting times at the center the lowest. Mean pain decreased from 7.4 to 4.0; BPI-SF intensity decreased from 6.5 to 3.8; pain control expectations were met in 78.7% of patients; EuroQoL-5D utility index increased from 0.37 to 0.62, p < 0.001, and health status (VAS) from 40.6 to 61.9, p < 0.001. Chronic pain patients (90%) are satisfied with Spanish centers care; 80% had their pain control expectations met. Quality of life improved remarkably: 71% felt moderately to significantly better. However, waiting times need improvement. PMID:27516902

  15. Comparison of reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and rhodopseudomonas viridis: Overall archistecture and protein-pigment interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Elkabbani, Ossama; Chang, Chonghwan; Tiede, D.; Norris, J.; Schiffer, M. )

    1991-06-04

    Photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are protein complexes closely related in both structure and function. The structure of the Rps. viridis RC was used to determine the structure of the RC from Rb. sphaeroides. Small but meaningful differences between the positions of the helices and the cofactors in the two complexes were identified. The distances between helices A{sub L} adn A{sub M}, between B{sub L} and B{sub M}, and between bacteriopheophytins BP{sub L} and BP{sub M} are significantly shorter in Rps. viridis than they are in Rb. sphaeroides RCs. There are a number of differences in the amino acid residues that surround the cofactors; some of these residues form hydrogen bonds with the cofactors. Differences in chemical properties of the two RCs.

  16. Comparison beetwen open and laparoscopic radical cistectomy in a latin american reference center: perioperative and oncological results

    PubMed Central

    Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Said, Danniel Frade; Mitre, Anuar Ibrahim; Pompeo, Alexandre; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the differences of peri-operatory and oncological outcomes between Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy and Open Radical Cystectomy in our center. Materials and Methods: Overall, 50 patients were included in this non randomized match-pair analysis: 25 patients who had undergone Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy for invasive bladder cancer (Group-1) and 25 patients with similar characteristics who had undergone Open Radical Cystectomy (Group-2). The patients were operated from January 2005 to December 2012 in a single Institution. Results: Mean operative time for groups 1 and 2 were 350 and 280 minutes (p=0.03) respectively. Mean blood loss was 330 mL for group 1 and 580 mL for group 2 (p=0.04). Intraoperative transfusion rate was 0% and 36% for groups 1 and 2 respectively (p=0.005). Perioperative complication rate was similar between groups. Mean time to oral intake was 2 days for group 1 and 3 days for group 2 (p=0.08). Median hospital stay was 7 days for group 1 and 13 for group 2 (p=0.04). There were no differences in positive surgical margins and overall survival, between groups. Conclusions: In a reference center with pelvic laparoscopic expertise, Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy may be considered a safe procedure with similar complication rate of Open Radical Cystectomy. Laparoscopic Radical Cystectomy is more time consuming, with reduced bleeding and transfusion rate. Hospital stay seems to be shorter. Oncologically no difference was observed in our mid-term follow-up. PMID:26401854

  17. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

  18. A PM6 study of Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila light harvesting center II B800 bacteriochlorophylls in representative protein environment.

    PubMed

    Türeli, Sina; Varnalı, Tereza

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial light-harvesting II (LH-II) centers contain two types of Bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl). One is named B800 and found as a single molecule within one monomer of the complex while the other named B850 is found as a dimer. Their names indicate their peak of UV absorbance around red spectrum. Both types of molecules are attached to the protein chain via ligation of their central Magnesium atom to an either Histidine or Deoxymethionine amino acid. They are also coordinated by peripheral hydrogen bonds that they accept with their carboxyl side group. Both the ligation and the hydrogen bonding are thought to have an effect on electronic structure of the Bchl hence its UV absorbance and energy transfer rate. Experiments and theoretic studies performed on this subject support the above idea. This theoretical molecular modeling study case aims to mimic the experimental mutations performed on certain amino acids in silico and study its effects on the electronic structure of Bchl. By comparison with experimental results it was observed that the likely place for the nearby Arginine is not below the plane of the Bchl as in the X-ray crystallographic structure but above the plane defined by the four nitrogen atoms and their rings. It was also seen that the coordination of the acetyl group is very sensitive to changes in ligation of the Bchl molecule.

  19. Lexical Decision with Left, Right and Center Visual Field Presentation: A Comparison between Dyslexic and Regular Readers by Means of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the differences in processing between regular and dyslexic readers in a lexical decision task in different visual field presentations (left, right, and center). The research utilized behavioral measures that provide information on accuracy and reaction time and electro-physiological measures that permit the examination of brain…

  20. Trap and recombination centers study in sprayed Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Courel, Maykel Vigil-Galán, O.; Jiménez-Olarte, D.; Espíndola-Rodríguez, M.; Saucedo, E.

    2014-10-07

    In this work, a study of trap and recombination center properties in polycrystalline Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin films is carried out in order to understand the poor performance in Cu₂ZnSnS₄ thin film solar cells. Thermally stimulated current has been studied in Cu₂ZnSnS₄ deposited by pneumatic spray pyrolysis method using various heating rates, in order to gain information about trap centers and/or deep levels present within the band-gap of this material. A set of temperature-dependent current curves revealed three levels with activation energy of 126±10, 476±25, and 1100±100 meV. The possible nature of the three levels found is presented, in which the first one is likely to be related to Cu{sub Zn} antisites, while second and third to Sn vacancies and Sn{sub Cu} antisites, respectively. The values of frequency factor, capture cross section, and trap concentration have been determined for each center.

  1. Bacteriologic Profile of Pericardial Infections After Cardiac Surgery: Study in an Iranian Cardiovascular Tertiary Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffari, Kambiz; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Soudi, Hengameh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bacterial pericarditis is an important cause of post-surgery mortality and morbidity. This can be a preventable complication and the involved pathogens vary according to the time and location. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the bacteriologic profile in patients with pericardial infections after cardiac surgery in the largest tertiary care center for cardiovascular diseases in Iran. The results can be applied for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of similar patients in Iran. Patients and Methods: This prospective study was performed in Rajaie Cardiovascular Medical and Research Center (RCMRC), the largest tertiary care center for cardiovascular disease in Iran from March 2011 to March 2012. Patients who had undergone cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and showed suggestive sign and symptoms of pericardial infections were registered and samples from their pericardial fluids were obtained to perform standard bacteriologic and antibiogram tests. Results: A total of 158 patients were registered. Bacteriologic findings were positive in 30 patients (19%). Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequent isolated organism, which was found in 22 patients (73.3%) with eight of them being methicillin-resistant strains. Conclusions: The bacteriologic profile in our patient is specific to our own community. Knowledge about this profile can help us to improve prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the affected patients. PMID:25478545

  2. Space Operations Center, Shuttle Interaction Study. Volume 2: Appendices, Book 1 of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of shuttle orbiter docking to the Space Operations Center (SOC) is studied. The in-orbit relative motion of the free flying orbiter and SOC was simulated, accounting for the Orbiter RCS and digital autopilot (DAP) systems, orbital mechanics, center of gravity offset of the orbiter docking port, aero and gravity gradient effects, and other pertinent natural and man-made phenomena. Since there is no specified flight path and procedure for docking, terminal closure sensitivities were investigated. Orbiter approach direction, Orbiter approach attitude out of plane, DAP thruster compensation mode, final ballistic docking distance and time to dock, rate and excursion attitude deadbands, and selection of various thruster combinations (differing from nominal) for translational pulses are considered.

  3. Phonon sideband studies of the spin-triplet optical transition in diamond nitrogen-vacancy centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkauskas, Audrius; Toyli, David M.; Buckley, Bob B.; Awschalom, David D.; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2013-03-01

    In the past decade, the nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond has emerged as a promising solid-state system for quantum-information processing, and also for nanoscale magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing. All of these applications are partly enabled because the spin of the center can be measured through photoluminescence. This calls for a deeper understanding of the photoluminescence spectrum, in particular its phonon side-band. In this work we study the coupling of lattice vibrations to the triplet (3E -->3A2) optical transition from first-principles electronic structure calculations. Our formulation includes both quasi-localized and bulk phonons, and leads to an excellent agreement of the calculated and the measured photoluminescence lineshape. This good agreement enables the application of the developed methodology to other defects in semiconductors that are currently being investigated as viable quantum bits. This work has been supported by the NSF, AFOSR, and the Swiss NSF.

  4. Comparison of two complex land surface schemes coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Bonan, Gordon; Williamson, David L.; Laval, Katia

    1997-08-01

    Two climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model (version CCM2) coupled either to the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) or to Sechiba land surface scheme are compared. Both parameterizations of surface-atmosphere exchanges may be considered as complex but represent the soil hydrology and the role of vegetation in very different ways. The global impact of the change in land surface scheme on the simulated climate appears to be small. Changes are smaller than those obtained when comparing either one of these schemes to the fixed hydrology used in the standard CCM2. Nevertheless, at the regional scale, changing the land-surface scheme can have a large impact on the local climate. As one example, wre detail how circulation patterns are modified above the Tibetan plateau during the monsoon season. Elsewhere, mainly over land, changes can also be important. In the tropics, during the dry season, Sechiba produces warmer surface temperatures than does BATS. This warming arises from differences in the soil hydrology, both storage capacity and the dynamics of soil water transport. Over the Tundra biotype, the formulation of the transpiration induces significant differences in the energy balance.

  5. Impact of Maintenance Steroids versus Rapid Steroid Withdrawal in African-American Kidney Transplant Recipients: Comparison of Two Urban Centers

    PubMed Central

    Chon, W. James; Desai, Amishi; Wing, Coady; Arwindekar, Divya; Tang, Ignatius Y. S.; Josephson, Michelle A.; Akkina, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid steroid withdrawal (RSW) is used increasingly in kidney transplantation but long-term outcomes in African-American (AA) recipients are not well known. We compared 1 and 5 year transplant outcomes in a large cohort of AA patients who were maintained on continued steroid therapy (CST) to those who underwent RSW. Methods Post-transplant courses of A as receiving kidney allografts from 2003–2011 at two urban transplant centers in Chicago were followed. Prior to outcome analysis, we used Inverse Probability of Treatment Weights (IPTW) to match the two groups on a set of baseline risk factors. Graft and patient survival, GFR at 1 and 5 years, incidence and type of rejection, incidence of post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM), delayed graft function, CMV and BK viremia were compared. Results There were 150 AA recipients in the CST analytic group and 157 in the RSW analytic group. Graft and patient survival was similar between the two groups. Rates of CMV viremia were higher in the RSW compared to the CST analytic group at 1 year. Biopsy-proven acute rejection and PTDM were similar between the RSW and CST groups. Conclusions In AA recipients, RSW has similar long-term outcomes to CST. PMID:27088051

  6. Problem Gambling Messages on College Counseling Center Websites: An Over-Time and Cross-Country Comparison.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Christopher J; Luo, Yi; Wright, Paul J; Kraus, Ashley

    2016-03-01

    Gambling problems remain more prevalent among college students than any other adult population. Among the different informational services available to students struggling with this issue, the convenience, anonymity, and accessibility of the college counseling center website (CCW) make this a particularly appealing resource. This updated assessment explored the nature and frequency of problem gambling messages on U.S. CCWs. and assessed whether differences existed between U.S. and U.K. sites. Results showed that problem gambling remains disproportionately underrepresented on U.S. CCWs compared to other mental health concerns. Furthermore, in only one instance-links to pamphlets-did findings indicate any over-time increase in website communications. Overall, <11 % of U.S. CCWs mentioned anything regarding this topic. When assessing U.K. CCWs, results were relatively consistent with U.S. CCWs. Specifically, while significantly more U.K. sites mentioned anything regarding problem gambling than U.S. CCWs, this was mostly limited to links to self-help groups and issue-specific websites. Given the substantial health, social, and financial consequences linked to problem gambling behaviors, universities must focus on incorporating more information about this issue on CCWs and pursue initiatives to promote this service.

  7. The 2006 Kennedy Space Center Range Reference Atmosphere Model Validation Study and Sensitivity Analysis to the Performance of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Shuttle Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Lee; Decker, Ryan; Harrington, Brian; Merry, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Range Reference Atmosphere (RRA) is a statistical model that summarizes wind and thermodynamic atmospheric variability from surface to 70 km. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Shuttle program, which launches from KSC, utilizes the KSC RRA data to evaluate environmental constraints on various aspects of the vehicle during ascent. An update to the KSC RRA was recently completed. As part of the update, the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted a validation study and a comparison analysis to the existing KSC RRA database version 1983. Assessments to the Space Shuttle vehicle ascent profile characteristics were performed by JSC/Ascent Flight Design Division to determine impacts of the updated model to the vehicle performance. Details on the model updates and the vehicle sensitivity analyses with the update model are presented.

  8. 1993 study of long-billed curlews on the Yakima Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, K.D.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1994-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study for the US Department of the Army on long-billed curlews (Numenius americanus) on the Yakima Training Center (YTC) in the spring and summer of 1993. Long-billed curlews are a Class IIIc federal candidate species and are listed as a ``species of special concern`` by the Washington Department of Wildlife. The objectives of this study were to (1) locate major nesting areas, (2) locate brood rearing areas, (3) evaluate habitat requirements, (4) determine diet, (5) evaluate response to troop activities, (6) estimate population size, (7) estimate recruitment rates, and (8) establish a relative abundance survey method.

  9. Outcome study of brief relational-cultural therapy in a women's mental health center.

    PubMed

    Oakley, M Anne; Addison, Shirley C; Piran, Niva; Johnston, Gary J; Damianakis, Mary; Curry, Joyce; Dunbar, Christine; Weigeldt, Almuth

    2013-01-01

    The current study is the first to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief relational-cultural model of therapy in a community-based mental health center for women. The study was distinctive in its use of a hybrid model that employed elements of randomized control and naturalistic design. Results showed that the entire treatment group of 91 women improved significantly on all eight outcome measures. Therapeutic gains were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The results lend support to the importance of including relational-cultural factors in the treatment of women. An adherence scale/manual was developed and implemented and will allow for replication.

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center data base requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the types of data that the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) should automate in order to make available essential management and technical information to support MSC's various functions and missions. In addition, the software and hardware capabilities to best handle the storage and retrieval of this data were analyzed. Based on the results of this study, recommendations are presented for a unified data base that provides a cost effective solution to MSC's data automation requirements. The recommendations are projected through a time frame that includes the earth orbit space station.

  11. Study of methods of improving the performance of the Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study has been made of possible ways to improve the performance of the Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). The major effort was directed toward obtaining increased dynamic pressure in the Mach number range from 0.8 to 1.2, but methods to increase Mach number capability were also considered. Methods studied for increasing dynamic pressure capability were higher total pressure, auxiliary suction, reducing circuit losses, reduced test medium temperature, smaller test section and higher molecular weight test medium. Increased Mach number methods investigated were nozzle block inserts, variable geometry nozzle, changes in test section wall configuration, and auxiliary suction.

  12. A Study of Remedial Reading Programs in the Omaha and Marquette Job Corps Centers for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bert; And Others

    This joint investigation involving the Omaha Job Corps Center for Women and the Marquette Job Corps Center for Women assessed the remedial reading programs of the two centers. A major objective was to provide Job Corps norms for the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test, Survey E, forms 1M and 2M. Each center designated control and experimental groups.…

  13. A Study of Supernova Remnants with Center-Filled X-Ray Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slane, Patrick O.

    2001-01-01

    The proposed study entails use of archival data, primarily from past and active X-ray observatories, to study the properties of a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) which display a centrally-bright X-ray morphology. Several models which have been proposed to explain the morphology are being investigated for comparisons with measured characteristics of several remnants: nonthermal emission from a central synchrotron nebula; thermal emission enhanced by slow evaporation of cool clouds in the hot SNR interior; and relic thermal emission from the SNR interior after the remnant has entered the radiative phase of evolution, thus causing the shell emission to cease.

  14. Hydrology and model study of the proposed Prosperity Reservoir, Center Creek Basin, southwestern Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Edward Joseph; Emmett, Leo F.

    1980-01-01

    A reservoir has been proposed on Center Creek, Jasper County, southwestern Missouri. Ground-water levels in the limestone uplands adjacent to the reservoir will rise when the impoundment is completed. The site is a few miles upstream from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt in the Tri-State zinc district. Grove Creek joins Center Creek downstream from the reservoir separating it from the mining belt. A model study indicates water-level rises varying from about 20 feet near the reservoir to 0.5 to 1.0 foot in the southern part of the Grove Creek drainage basin. A significant rise in the water table adjacent to the reservoir could increase mine-water discharge if Grove Creek is not an effective drain. However, it is probable that Grove Creek is an effective drain, and the higher ground-water levels in the reservoir area will increase ground-water discharge to Grove Creek, and in turn, Center Creek. The increase in ground-water discharge to Grove Creek will have the beneficial effect of diluting mine-water discharge from the Oronogo-Duenweg belt during periods of low flow. (USGS)

  15. Positron annihilation study for enhanced nitrogen-vacancy center formation in diamond by electron irradiation at 77 K

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Z.; Chiba, T.; Nagai, Y.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Hasegawa, M.

    2014-04-28

    A compact ensemble of high density nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond is essential to sense various external fields with a high precision at the nanoscale. Here, defects in type IIa and type Ib diamonds induced by 28 MeV electron irradiation at 77 K were studied by combining the positron annihilation spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. It is shown that the electron irradiation at 77 K can significantly enhance the NV center formation by directly converting 24% vacancies into the NV centers, indicating that it is an efficient way to produce the high density NV centers in the type Ib diamond.

  16. Comparison between a pediatric health promotion center and a pediatric obesity clinic in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Ran; Yi, Dae Yong; Choi, Hyoung Soo

    2014-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of health check-ups in children in detecting metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by comparing the pediatric health promotion center with the pediatric obesity clinic. Children who visited a pediatric health promotion center (n=218) or a pediatric obesity clinic (n=178) were included. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, laboratory tests, and abdominal ultrasonography were evaluated. Two different criteria were applied to diagnose metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the 2 units was 3.2%-3.7% in a pediatric health promotion center and 23%-33.2% in a pediatric obesity clinic. Significant differences were observed in the prevalence of each component of metabolic syndrome between the 2 units including abdominal adiposity, blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose (P<0.05). The prevalence of NAFLD was 8.7% and 71.9% in the 2 units according to liver enzymes and 5.9% and 61.8% according to ultrasonography (P<0.05). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and NAFLD was higher among patients visiting the obesity clinic targeting obese children than that among patients visiting the health promotion center offering routine check-ups. An obesity-oriented approach is required to prevent obesity-related health problems in children.

  17. Barriers to working with sexual assault survivors: a qualitative study of rape crisis center workers.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Sarah E; Townsend, Stephanie M

    2007-04-01

    To better understand barriers service providers may face when advocating for survivors, a study using grounded theory and qualitative, semistructured interviews was conducted of rape victim advocates (N= 25) working in rape crisis centers in a large metropolitan area. Broader societal attitudes framed and were reflected in institutional responses to victims and in barriers faced by advocates working with survivors. Organizational barriers noted by advocates related to resources, environmental factors, professionalization, and racism. Staff burnout was a major barrier affecting advocates' ability to help survivors. Finally, the most salient direct service barrier was secondary victimization by criminal justice and medical or mental health systems.

  18. Report on the feasibility study for improving electric motor service centers in Ghana

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Jallouk, P.A.; Staunton, R.H.

    1999-12-10

    On March 3 and 4, 1998, a visit was made to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by two officials from Ghana: Mr. I.K. Mintah, Acting Executive Director, Technical Wing, Ministry of Mines and Energy (MOME) and Dr. A.K. Ofosu-Ahenkorah, Coordinator, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program, MOME. As a result of this visit, Dr. John S. Hsu of ORNL was invited by MOME to visit the Republic of Ghana in order to study the feasibility of improving electric motor service centers in Ghana.

  19. Affordable Care Act Impact on Community Health Center Staffing and Enrollment: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sophie C; Frogner, Bianca K; Saganic, Laura M; Cole, Allison M; Rosenblatt, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Over 500 000 Washingtonians gained health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). As more patients gain insurance, community health centers (CHCs) expect to see an increase in demand for their services. This article studies the CHCs in Washington State to examine how the increase in patients has been impacting their workload and staffing. We found a reported mean increase of 11.7% and 5.4% in new Medicaid and Exchange patients, respectively. Half of the CHCs experienced large or dramatic workload impact from the ACA. Our findings suggest that CHCs need further workforce support to meet the expanding patient demand.

  20. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA Glenn Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schey, Stephen; Francfort, Jim

    2014-10-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) transportation. This report focuses on the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  1. A study of shame from sexual abuse within the context of a Norwegian incest center.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Kaare Torgny

    2013-01-01

    Working with those who have experienced sexual abuse is a complicated matter because such abuse not only involves the violation of the victim's body, but it often generates shame in those involved. This article is based on empirical data from 26 hours of videotaped focus group interviews with 19 adult men and women in a Norwegian incest center who spoke openly of the shame they experienced from sexual abuse as children, parents, and employees. Findings from this study show that shame from sexual abuse can be grouped into seven major categories: (a) family, (b) emotions, (c) body, (d) food, (e) self-image, (f) sex, and (g) therapy.

  2. An Analysis of Factors that Inhibit Business Use of User-Centered Design Principles: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Tod M.

    2010-01-01

    The use of user-centered design (UCD) principles has a positive impact on the use of web-based interactive systems in customer-centric organizations. User-centered design methodologies are not widely adopted in organizations due to intraorganizational factors. A qualitative study using a modified Delphi technique was used to identify the factors…

  3. Regional Center for the Improvement of Instruction in Elementary School Social Studies. Final Report, May, 1969-December, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Robert S.

    This document summarizes, analyzes, and reflects upon the activities of the Southeastern Regional Center for the Improvement of Elementary School Social Studies established at Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida. There are five major parts to the report. Part I contains a narrative summary of regional center activity from 1969 to…

  4. The Children's Learning Center: A Study of a Self-Manipulative Physical Environment on Early Childhood Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studio of Environmental Technology, Providence, RI.

    The Children's Learning Center in Providence, Rhode Island, is a prototypical teaching/learning environment for preschool children aged 3-5. The center represents the first prototypical application of the Multi-Activity Zones for Education (MAZE) system. This study attempts to demonstrate and test the physical and operational performances of the…

  5. Presence of Observable Conditions of Positive Self-Concept in Elementary School Media Centers: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dianne McAfee

    In order to focus on important contributions of elementary school instructional media centers (IMC's) to the educational program, a study was conducted to determine the presence of conditions of positive self-concept--cooperation, independence, success, positive atmosphere, challenge, feeling of value or acceptance--in such centers. A descriptive,…

  6. The reliability-centered maintenance study at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, S F

    1988-01-01

    A reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) program was applied to two Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) systems to evaluate this method for improving the equipment reliability and reducing maintenance costs. This technique is a systematic approach to failure analysis and maintenance task development. The RCM method was originally developed by the airline industry to reduce maintenance costs and improve reliability and it has since been adopted by the military. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed two pilot studies with a third in progress to determine the RCM applicability to the commercial nuclear power industry. These studies showed that the RCM methodology could be beneficial to the nuclear power industry. The EPRI study performed at the McGuire nuclear power station (EPRI 1986) was used as the model for the FFTF study.

  7. A study of NASA occupational injuries and property damage at Goddard Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center and Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of NASA's accident/injury/illness and health data was performed. The analysis included: (1) an on-site study of the existing data; (2) evaluation of the findings to develop criteria for the subsequent implementation of safety and health standards; (3) preparation of a graphical loss control assessment; and (4) recommendations to reduce accident rates.

  8. Variable-Centered and Person-Centered Approaches to Studying Mexican-Origin Mother-Daughter Cultural Orientation Dissonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamaca-Colbert, Mayra Y.; Gayles, Jochebed G.

    2010-01-01

    The overall aim of the current study was to identify the methodological approach and corresponding analytic procedure that best elucidated the associations among Mexican-origin mother-daughter cultural orientation dissonance, family functioning, and adolescent adjustment. To do so, we employed, and compared, two methodological approaches (i.e.,…

  9. Laser welding and syncristallization techniques comparison: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Merigo, E; Vescovi, P; Meleti, M; Nammour, S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  10. Laser Welding and Syncristallization Techniques Comparison: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, C.; Merigo, E.; Vescovi, P.; Meleti, M.; Nammour, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Laser welding was first reported in 1967 and for many years it has been used in dental laboratories with several advantages versus the conventional technique. Authors described, in previous works, the possibility of using also chair-side Nd : YAG laser device (Fotona Fidelis III, λ = 1064 nm) for welding metallic parts of prosthetic appliances directly in the dental office, extra- and also intra-orally. Syncristallisation is a soldering technique based on the creation of an electric arc between two electrodes and used to connect implants to bars intra-orally. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare two different laser welding devices with a soldering machine, all of these used in prosthetic dentistry. Material and Methods. In-lab Nd : YAG laser welding (group A = 12 samples), chair-side Nd : YAG laser welding (group B = 12 samples), and electrowelder (group C = 12 samples) were used. The tests were performed on 36 CrCoMo plates and the analysis consisted in evaluation, by microscopic observation, of the number of fissures in welded areas of groups A and B and in measurement of the welding strength in all the groups. The results were statistically analysed by means of one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests. Results. The means and standard deviations for the number of fissures in welded areas were 8.12 ± 2.59 for group A and 5.20 ± 1.38 for group B. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.0023 at the level 95%). On the other hand, the means and standard deviations for the traction tests were 1185.50 ± 288.56 N for group A, 896.41 ± 120.84 N for group B, and 283.58 ± 84.98 N for group C. The difference was statistical significant (P = 0.01 at the level 95%). Conclusion. The joint obtained by welding devices had a significant higher strength compared with that obtained by the electrowelder, and the comparison between the two laser devices used demonstrated that the chair-side Nd : YAG, even giving

  11. A comparison study on the measurement of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen-Yu; Pan, Shan-Peng; Peng, Gwo-Sheng; Tsai, Jen-Hui

    2005-08-01

    Despite the fact that there exists several techniques capable of characterizing the nanoparticle sizes, their measurement results from the same sample often deviate from each other at an amount that is considered significant in the nanometer scale. The principles of measurements these techniques or instruments based upon might contribute a notable portion to the disagreement of the measurement results. The sample preparation itself could only further add to the complexity of the problem. In the absence of international standards, or world-wide recognized protocols dealing with nanoparticle characterization, a comparison study was carried out to investigate the systematic deviations in measuring nanoparticle diameters. Three types of commonly used nanoparticle sizing instruments, Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were utilized to take measurements on traceable polystyrene latex samples at 100 nm, 50 nm, and 20 nm in diameter. The final analysis showed a fairly satisfactory agreement of the measured data from the samples' certified values, with the exception of the result from the Field-Emission TEM (FE-TEM). It was later determined that the major source of the deviation was attributed to the instrument rather than to the sample. Instrument calibration was the course of action taken to bring the outlier to the desired accuracy. Additionally, discussions were also made with regards to the need of standardization in nanoparticle measurements.

  12. Gender and Women Development Initiatives in Bangladesh: A Study of Rural Mother Center.

    PubMed

    Karim, K M Rabiul; Emmelin, Maria; Lindberg, Line; Wamala, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Women-focused development initiatives have become a controversial issue connected with women's health and welfare. Previous studies indicated that development initiatives might increase women's workload, family conflict, and marital violence. This study explored the gendered characteristics of a development initiative Rural Mother Center in Bangladesh. Data incorporated policy document and interviews of social workers working with the mother centers in two northwest subdistricts. The qualitative content analysis of data emerged a general theme of expanding women's responsibility while maintaining male privilege explaining gendered design and practice of the development initiative. The theme was supported by two gendered categories related to the design: (a) essentializing women's participation; (b) maintaining traditional gender, and four categories related to the practice; (c) inadequate gender knowledge and skills; (d) reinforcing traditional gender; (e) using women for improving office performance; and (f) upholding male privilege. The study suggests that though women-focused development initiatives need to be embraced with gender-redistributive policies, the social workers should be trained for attaining gender-transformative motivation and competencies. PMID:27149647

  13. Gender and Women Development Initiatives in Bangladesh: A Study of Rural Mother Center.

    PubMed

    Karim, K M Rabiul; Emmelin, Maria; Lindberg, Line; Wamala, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Women-focused development initiatives have become a controversial issue connected with women's health and welfare. Previous studies indicated that development initiatives might increase women's workload, family conflict, and marital violence. This study explored the gendered characteristics of a development initiative Rural Mother Center in Bangladesh. Data incorporated policy document and interviews of social workers working with the mother centers in two northwest subdistricts. The qualitative content analysis of data emerged a general theme of expanding women's responsibility while maintaining male privilege explaining gendered design and practice of the development initiative. The theme was supported by two gendered categories related to the design: (a) essentializing women's participation; (b) maintaining traditional gender, and four categories related to the practice; (c) inadequate gender knowledge and skills; (d) reinforcing traditional gender; (e) using women for improving office performance; and (f) upholding male privilege. The study suggests that though women-focused development initiatives need to be embraced with gender-redistributive policies, the social workers should be trained for attaining gender-transformative motivation and competencies.

  14. Coastal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Geological Survey dedicated its new Center for Coastal Geology June 12 at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. Robert Halley leads the staff of nine USGS scientists studying coastal erosion and pollution and underwater mineral resources in cooperation with the university's Marine Science Department. Current research is on erosion along Lake Michigan and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The number of USGS scientists at the center should increase to 30 over five years.

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  17. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  18. Soot Particle Studies - Instrument Inter-Comparison – Project Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.; Sedlacek, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Ahern, A.; Wrobel, W.; Slowik, J. G.; Olfert, J.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Cappa, C. D.; Schwarz, J.; Spackman, J. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Trimborn, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Freedman, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ng, N. L.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M.; Brem, B.; Kok, G.; Subramanian, R.; Freitag, S.; Clarke, A.; Thornhill, D.; Marr, L.; Kolb, C. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Davidovits, P.

    2010-03-06

    An inter-comparison study of instruments designed to measure the microphysical and optical properties of soot particles was completed. The following mass-based instruments were tested: Couette Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyzer (CPMA), Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer - Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (AMS-SMPS), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Soot Particle-Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) and Photoelectric Aerosol Sensor (PAS2000CE). Optical instruments measured absorption (photoacoustic, interferometric, and filter-based), scattering (in situ), and extinction (light attenuation within an optical cavity). The study covered an experimental matrix consisting of 318 runs that systematically tested the performance of instruments across a range of parameters including: fuel equivalence ratio (1.8 {le} {phi} {le} 5), particle shape (mass-mobility exponent (D{sub f m}), 2.0 {le} D{sub f m} {le} 3.0), particle mobility size (30 {le} d{sub m} {le} 300 nm), black carbon mass (0.07 {le} m{sub BC} {le} 4.2 fg) and particle chemical composition. In selected runs, particles were coated with sulfuric acid or dioctyl sebacate (DOS) (0.5 {le} {Delta}r{sub ve} {le} 201 nm) where {Delta}r{sub ve} is the change in the volume equivalent radius due to the coating material. The effect of non-absorbing coatings on instrument response was determined. Changes in the morphology of fractal soot particles were monitored during coating and denuding processes and the effect of particle shape on instrument response was determined. The combination of optical and mass based measurements was used to determine the mass specific absorption coefficient for denuded soot particles. The single scattering albedo of the particles was also measured. An overview of the experiments and sample results are presented.

  19. Comparison of VIIRS Prelaunch RVS Among Independent Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Aisheng; McIntire, Jeff; DeLuccia, F. J.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor carried on the NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System), upgraded and developed recently from heritage instruments including AVHRR, OLS, MODIS, and SeaWiFS. It has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. These on-board calibrators are located at fixed scan angles. The VIIRS response versus scan angle (RVS) was characterized prelaunch in lab ambient conditions and will be used on-orbit to characterize the response for the all scan angles relative to the calibrator scan angle (SD for RSB and blackbody for TEB). Since the RVS is vitally important to the quality of calibrated radiance products, several independent studies were performed and their results were compared and validated. This document provides RVS results from three groups: the NPP Instrument Calibration Support Team (NICST), Raytheon, and the Aerospace Corporation. A comparison of the RVS results obtained using a 2nd order polynomial fit to measurement data is conducted for each band, detector, and half angle mirror (HAM) side. The associated RVS fitting residuals are examined and compared with the relative differences in RVS found between independent studies. Results show that the agreement is within 0.1% and comparable with fitting residuals for all bands except for RSB band M9, where a difference of 0.2% results from the application of the atmospheric water vapor correction for laboratory conditions during the test by Raytheon. NICST has slightly larger RSB RVS uncertainties but still well within the 0.3% total uncertainty allowed for the RVS characterization defined in the Performance Verification Plan.

  20. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  1. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  2. Feasibility study to update annualized cost of leaving (ACOL) procedures at the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center (NPRDC)

    SciTech Connect

    Trumble, D.; Flanagan, D.M.

    1990-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of officer retention rates are required in order to shape correctly the size and internal structure of the Navy manpower force through accession, promotion, and related policies. This study, conducted in 1987 for the Navy Personnel Research and Development Center (NPRDC), reviews existing forecasting and simulation methodologies and suggests new methods to implement in the future in order to improve forecasts of naval officer retention rates. The study also considers alternative sources of data to capture civilian earnings opportunities in the models. Two major types of models -- Annualized Cost of Leaving (ACOL) and Dynamic Retention (DR) -- are discussed in detail with respect to the ability to model and evaluate manpower policies of interest to NPRDC staff. A variety of other techniques which should be considered during the estimation stage are also discussed. The general study approach involved researching the subject area, the current data, the current models, and current estimation procedures. Available data and methodologies were then compared with the NPRDC problem in order to recommend potential solutions. This study did not include data collection or data analysis. This report is organized in eight sections. The Background Section discusses the history of officer retention models, the scope of officer manpower analysis at NPRDC, and NPRDC's history of officer loss-rate forecasting. Section 3 discusses the approach to model selection, which includes addition to a thorough discussion of the Dynamic Retention Model (DRM) and a comparison of the DRM and ACOL model. Section 5 presents alternative modeling directions for forecasting and a summary of compensation policy issues. The summary and conclusions appear in Section 6, and recommendations are in Section 7. References are in Section 8.2. 30 refs., 1 tab. (JF)

  3. The Einstein Center for Epigenomics: studying the role of epigenomic dysregulation in human disease.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Andrew S; Dubin, Robert A; Jing, Qiang; Maqbool, Shahina B; Olea, Raul; Westby, Gael; Broin, Pilib Ó; Fazzari, Melissa J; Zheng, Deyou; Suzuki, Masako; Greally, John M

    2009-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of epigenetic and transcriptional dysregulation in the pathogenesis of a range of human diseases, not just in the best-studied example of cancer. It is, however, quite difficult for an individual investigator to perform these studies, as they involve genome-wide molecular assays combined with sophisticated computational analytical approaches of very large datasets that may be generated from various resources and technologies. In 2008, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, USA established a Center for Epigenomics to facilitate the research programs of its investigators, providing shared resources for genome-wide assays and for data analysis. As a result, several avenues of research are now expanding, with cancer epigenomics being complemented by studies of the epigenomics of infectious disease and a neuroepigenomics program.

  4. Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

    2008-11-01

    This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

  5. An Educational Shopping Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bernardis, Amo

    1970-01-01

    A comparison is made between the Portland Community College (Oregon) physical plant and a shopping center. The college planners have arranged the facilities to provide useful, practical, and effective educational opportunities for all of the students. (BB)

  6. Sex expression and floral diversity in Jatropha curcas: a population study in its center of origin.

    PubMed

    Adriano-Anaya, María de Lourdes; Pérez-Castillo, Edilma; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Ruiz-González, Sonia; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo; Grajales-Conesa, Julieta; Ovando-Medina, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Sex expression and floral morphology studies are central to understand breeding behavior and to define the productive potential of plant genotypes. In particular, the new bioenergy crop Jatropha curcas L. has been classified as a monoecious species. Nonetheless, there is no information about its reproductive diversity in the Mesoamerican region, which is considered its center of origin and diversification. Thus, we determined sex expression and floral morphology in J. curcas populations from southern Mexico and Guatemala. Our results showed that most of J. curcas specimens had typical inflorescences with separate sexes (monoecious); meanwhile, the rest were atypical (gynoecious, androecious, andromonoecious, androgynomonoecious). The most important variables to group these populations, based on a discriminant analysis, were: male flower diameter, female petal length and male nectary length. From southern Mexico "Guerrero" was the most diverse population, and "Centro" had the highest variability among the populations from Chiapas. A cluster analysis showed that the accessions from southern Mexico were grouped without showing any correlation with the geographical origin, while those accessions with atypical sexuality were grouped together. To answer the question of how informative are floral morphological traits compared to molecular markers, we perform a Mantel correlation test between the distance matrix generated in this study and the genetic distance matrix (AFLP) previously reported for the same accessions. We found significant correlation between data at the level of accessions. Our results contribute to design genetic improvement programs by using sexually and morphologically contrasting plants from the center of origin. PMID:27257548

  7. Seroepidemiological Study of Toxoplasmosis in Women Referred to Arak Marriage Consulting Center during 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMADI, Alireza; SHOJAEE, Saeedeh; SALIMI, Mahboobeh; ZAREEI, Mehdi; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; KESHAVARZ, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is a zoonotic and usually asymptomatic infection. This study was carried out to investigate the seroepidemiology of Toxoplasma infection in women referred to Arak Marriage Consulting Center during 2012–2013. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, serum samples were collected from 400 women referred to Marriage Consulting Center in Arak City, Markazi Province, central Iran during 2012–2013. Anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies were measured by ELISA using homemade antigen. Results were analyzed by SPSS 18 and the correlation between toxoplasmosis and some affecting factors were estimated. Results: Overall, 97 cases (24.3%) had IgG antibodies against T. gondii and 19 cases (4.8%) were positive for IgM antibodies. A significant correlation was seen between T. gondii infection with clinical symptoms, keeping cat as pet animal, education and handling or eating raw or undercooked meat (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prevalence of (24.3%) for Toxoplasma infection was seen in Arak City. It seems that keeping cat as pet and consumption of undercooked liver and uncooked hamburger are the most important transmission routes for the infection in this city. Since the majority of women are Toxoplasma sero-negative (75.7%) in Arak City, using serological tests and health education prior to marriage or during pregnancy is recommended. PMID:26284206

  8. Sex expression and floral diversity in Jatropha curcas: a population study in its center of origin

    PubMed Central

    Adriano-Anaya, María de Lourdes; Pérez-Castillo, Edilma; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Ruiz-González, Sonia; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo; Grajales-Conesa, Julieta

    2016-01-01

    Sex expression and floral morphology studies are central to understand breeding behavior and to define the productive potential of plant genotypes. In particular, the new bioenergy crop Jatropha curcas L. has been classified as a monoecious species. Nonetheless, there is no information about its reproductive diversity in the Mesoamerican region, which is considered its center of origin and diversification. Thus, we determined sex expression and floral morphology in J. curcas populations from southern Mexico and Guatemala. Our results showed that most of J. curcas specimens had typical inflorescences with separate sexes (monoecious); meanwhile, the rest were atypical (gynoecious, androecious, andromonoecious, androgynomonoecious). The most important variables to group these populations, based on a discriminant analysis, were: male flower diameter, female petal length and male nectary length. From southern Mexico “Guerrero” was the most diverse population, and “Centro” had the highest variability among the populations from Chiapas. A cluster analysis showed that the accessions from southern Mexico were grouped without showing any correlation with the geographical origin, while those accessions with atypical sexuality were grouped together. To answer the question of how informative are floral morphological traits compared to molecular markers, we perform a Mantel correlation test between the distance matrix generated in this study and the genetic distance matrix (AFLP) previously reported for the same accessions. We found significant correlation between data at the level of accessions. Our results contribute to design genetic improvement programs by using sexually and morphologically contrasting plants from the center of origin. PMID:27257548

  9. A multi-center milestone study of clinical vertebral CT segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E; Forsberg, Daniel; Seitel, Alexander; Rasoulian, Abtin; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Hammernik, Kerstin; Urschler, Martin; Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M; Frangi, Alejandro F; Summers, Ronald M; Li, Shuo

    2016-04-01

    A multiple center milestone study of clinical vertebra segmentation is presented in this paper. Vertebra segmentation is a fundamental step for spinal image analysis and intervention. The first half of the study was conducted in the spine segmentation challenge in 2014 International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) Workshop on Computational Spine Imaging (CSI 2014). The objective was to evaluate the performance of several state-of-the-art vertebra segmentation algorithms on computed tomography (CT) scans using ten training and five testing dataset, all healthy cases; the second half of the study was conducted after the challenge, where additional 5 abnormal cases are used for testing to evaluate the performance under abnormal cases. Dice coefficients and absolute surface distances were used as evaluation metrics. Segmentation of each vertebra as a single geometric unit, as well as separate segmentation of vertebra substructures, was evaluated. Five teams participated in the comparative study. The top performers in the study achieved Dice coefficient of 0.93 in the upper thoracic, 0.95 in the lower thoracic and 0.96 in the lumbar spine for healthy cases, and 0.88 in the upper thoracic, 0.89 in the lower thoracic and 0.92 in the lumbar spine for osteoporotic and fractured cases. The strengths and weaknesses of each method as well as future suggestion for improvement are discussed. This is the first multi-center comparative study for vertebra segmentation methods, which will provide an up-to-date performance milestone for the fast growing spinal image analysis and intervention. PMID:26878138

  10. A multi-center milestone study of clinical vertebral CT segmentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E; Forsberg, Daniel; Seitel, Alexander; Rasoulian, Abtin; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Hammernik, Kerstin; Urschler, Martin; Ibragimov, Bulat; Korez, Robert; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M; Frangi, Alejandro F; Summers, Ronald M; Li, Shuo

    2016-04-01

    A multiple center milestone study of clinical vertebra segmentation is presented in this paper. Vertebra segmentation is a fundamental step for spinal image analysis and intervention. The first half of the study was conducted in the spine segmentation challenge in 2014 International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) Workshop on Computational Spine Imaging (CSI 2014). The objective was to evaluate the performance of several state-of-the-art vertebra segmentation algorithms on computed tomography (CT) scans using ten training and five testing dataset, all healthy cases; the second half of the study was conducted after the challenge, where additional 5 abnormal cases are used for testing to evaluate the performance under abnormal cases. Dice coefficients and absolute surface distances were used as evaluation metrics. Segmentation of each vertebra as a single geometric unit, as well as separate segmentation of vertebra substructures, was evaluated. Five teams participated in the comparative study. The top performers in the study achieved Dice coefficient of 0.93 in the upper thoracic, 0.95 in the lower thoracic and 0.96 in the lumbar spine for healthy cases, and 0.88 in the upper thoracic, 0.89 in the lower thoracic and 0.92 in the lumbar spine for osteoporotic and fractured cases. The strengths and weaknesses of each method as well as future suggestion for improvement are discussed. This is the first multi-center comparative study for vertebra segmentation methods, which will provide an up-to-date performance milestone for the fast growing spinal image analysis and intervention.

  11. R&D Characteristics and Organizational Structure: Case Studies of University-Industry Research Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Maureen McArthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few decades, university-industry research centers have been developed in large numbers and emphasized as a valuable policy tool for innovation. Yet little is known about the heterogeneity of organizational structure within these centers, which has implications regarding policy for and management of these centers. This dissertation…

  12. Building a Student-Centered Culture in Times of Natural Disaster: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlinka, Karen Ramey

    2013-01-01

    Increased rates of student success and persistence have been positively linked to community colleges with student-centered cultures. A student-centered culture is one in which policies and practices promote a consistent message of concern and respect while expecting high standards of academic accomplishment. Developing a student-centered culture…

  13. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured.

  14. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured. PMID:27688990

  15. Seizure Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Inglet, Shannon; Baldwin, Margaret; Quinones, Amie H; Majercik, Sarah; Collingridge, Dave S; MacDonald, Joel

    2016-01-01

    The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures. Of the 2,111 patients with TBI, 557 (26.4%) received seizure prophylaxis and 1,554 (73.6%) did not. Two early PTSs occurred in the prophylaxis group (0.4%), whereas 21 occurred in the non-prophylaxis group (1.4%) (p = 0.05). The overall mortality rate was higher in patients who received prophylaxis (14.2% vs. 6.2%; p < 0.001), and the mean hospital length of stay (LOS) was longer (6.8 ± 6.9 vs. 3.8 ± 5 days; p < 0.001). In patients with severe and moderate TBI, the rate of prophylaxis administration was approximately half, whereas significantly fewer patients with mild TBI received prophylaxis than did not (20.2% vs 79.8%, p < 0.001). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and longer hospital LOS were associated with early PTS (p = 0.008 for both comparisons), but sex and age were not. Brain hemorrhage was present in 78.3% of those patients who experienced early seizures. In our cohort, patients who received seizure prophylaxis had a lower GCS score, higher overall mortality rate, longer LOS, and more frequent ICU admissions, suggesting that patients who received prophylaxis were likely more severely injured. PMID:27688990

  16. Audit of a Scientific Data Center for Certification as a Trustworthy Digital Repository: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Services that preserve and enable future access to scientific data are necessary to ensure that the data that are being collected today will be available for use by future generations of scientists. Many data centers, archives, and other digital repositories are working to improve their ability to serve as long-term stewards of scientific data. Trust in sustainable data management and preservation capabilities of digital repositories can influence decisions to use these services to deposit or obtain scientific data. Building on the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model developed by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and adopted by the International Organization for Standardization as ISO 14721:2003, new standards are being developed to improve long-term data management processes and documentation. The Draft Information Standard ISO/DIS 16363, "Space data and information transfer systems - Audit and certification of trustworthy digital repositories" offers the potential to evaluate digital repositories objectively in terms of their trustworthiness as long-term stewards of digital resources. In conjunction with this, the CCSDS and ISO are developing another draft standard for the auditing and certification process, ISO/DIS 16919, "Space data and information transfer systems - Requirements for bodies providing audit and certification of candidate trustworthy digital repositories". Six test audits were conducted of scientific data centers and archives in Europe and the United States to test the use of these draft standards and identify potential improvements for the standards and for the participating digital repositories. We present a case study of the test audit conducted on the NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC) and describe the preparation, the audit process, recommendations received, and next steps to obtain certification as a trustworthy digital repository, after approval of the ISO/DIS standards.

  17. NASA Langley Research Center Systems Analysis & Concepts Directorate Participation in the Exploration Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyes, Jennifer; Troutman, Patrick A.; Saucillo, Rudolph; Cirillo, William M.; Cavanaugh, Steve; Stromgren, Chel

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Systems Analysis & Concepts Directorate (SACD) began studying human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) in the year 1999. This included participation in NASA s Decadal Planning Team (DPT), the NASA Exploration Team (NExT), Space Architect studies and Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts (RASC) architecture studies that were used in formulating the new Vision for Space Exploration. In May of 2005, NASA initiated the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS). The primary outputs of the ESAS activity were concepts and functional requirements for the Crewed Exploration Vehicle (CEV), its supporting launch vehicle infrastructure and identification of supporting technology requirements and investments. An exploration systems analysis capability has evolved to support these functions in the past and continues to evolve to support anticipated future needs. SACD had significant roles in supporting the ESAS study team. SACD personnel performed the liaison function between the ESAS team and the Shuttle/Station Configuration Options Team (S/SCOT), an agency-wide team charged with using the Space Shuttle to complete the International Space Station (ISS) by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. The most significant of the identified issues involved the ability of the Space Shuttle system to achieve the desired number of flights in the proposed time frame. SACD with support from the Kennedy Space Center performed analysis showing that, without significant investments in improving the shuttle processing flow, that there was almost no possibility of completing the 28-flight sequence by the end of 2010. SACD performed numerous Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM) trades to define top level element requirements and establish architecture propellant needs. Configuration trades were conducted to determine the impact of varying degrees of segmentation of the living capabilities of the combined descent stage, ascent stage, and other

  18. [The utilization of parenteral nutrition at Hospital de Jerez (Cádiz): a description and comparison with other hospital centers].

    PubMed

    Gómez Henry, J C; Méndez Martínez, C; Blanco Rodríguez, D; Rodríguez Quirós, M

    1996-01-01

    This retrospective study aims to analyze, and compare with other Spanish hospitals, the use of parenteral nutrition, its characteristics and complications, in a general hospital with 610 beds, during 1992. To conduct this study, we have used clinical histories and follow up sheets made up by the Department of Pharmacy for each patient, as well as the results of the sample processing in the microbiology laboratory. Between 1992 and 1993 we have seen an increase in the use of parenteral nutrition, with the number of bags increasing from 2134 to 2575. The departments which have used parenteral nutrition most, were Surgery (57.3%), and ICU (24.8%), with the mean duration being 10.4 days 8SD = +/- 9.3 days). The most frequently used access route in the hospital was the drum, but there are significant differences between the departments. Gastroenterological pathology was, with 71.4% the most frequent indication for its use, and within this, the neoplasias stand out with 26.3% of the total of parenteral nutrition. The complications which affected most patients are: increases of the liver enzymes, hypokalemias, hyponatremias, and hyperglycemias.

  19. Increasing access--a qualitative study of homelessness and palliative care in a major urban center.

    PubMed

    Krakowsky, Yonah; Gofine, Mirriam; Brown, Pnina; Danziger, Jana; Knowles, Holly

    2013-05-01

    Rates of morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in homeless populations. Homeless people experience many barriers to receive adequate palliative care. This qualitative study examines how a major urban city's palliative care resources can be improved to increase access and better serve the homeless. Audiotaped interviews were preformed with 7 homeless care providers in Toronto, Canada, and their transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings of the study suggest that in order to increase access and to serve the city's terminally ill homeless better, the following 4 areas must be addressed: (1) increasing positive interaction between the health care system and the homeless, (2) training staff to deal with the unique issues confronting the homeless, (3) providing patient-centered care, and (4) diversifying the methods of delivery.

  20. The patient-centered medical home: a case study in transforming the military health system.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Ronald P; Julian, Regina; Kugler, John; Dorrance, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Dinneen, Michael; Evans, Paula; Kosmatka, Timothy; Padden, Maureen; Reeves, Mark

    2013-02-01

    This case study describes the Military Health System's (MHS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) initiative and how it is being delivered across the MHS by the Army, Navy, and Air Force. The MHS, an integrated delivery model that includes both military treatment facilities and civilian providers and health care institutions, is transforming its primary care platforms from the traditional acute, episodic system to the PCMH model of care to maximize patient experience, satisfaction, health care quality, and readiness and to control cost growth. Preliminary performance measures are analyzed to assess the impact of PCMH implementation on the core primary care processes of the MHS. This study also discusses lessons learned and recommendations for improving health care performance through the PCMH care model.

  1. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies: 1992--1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The annual report of the Center for Volcanic Studies (CVTS) contains a series of papers, reprints and a Master of Science thesis that review the progress made by the CVTS between October 1, 1992 and February 1, 1994. During this period CVTS staff focused on several topics that have direct relevance to volcanic hazards related to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These topics include: (1) polygenetic/polycyclic volcanism in Crater Flat, Nevada; (2) the role of the mantle during crustal extension; (3) the detailed geology of Crater Flat, Nevada; (4) Pliocene volcanoes in the Reveille Range, south-central Nevada; (5) estimating the probability of disruption of the proposed repository by volcanic eruptions. This topic is being studied by Dr. C.H. Ho at UNLV. The report contains copies of these individual papers as they were presented in various conference proceedings.

  2. Study on load forecasting to data centers of high power density based on power usage effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. C.; Zhang, F.; Yuan, Z.; Zhou, L. M.; Wang, F. M.; Li, W.; Yang, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    There is usually considerable energy consumption in data centers. Load forecasting to data centers is in favor of formulating regional load density indexes and of great benefit to getting regional spatial load forecasting more accurately. The building structure and the other influential factors, i.e. equipment, geographic and climatic conditions, are considered for the data centers, and a method to forecast the load of the data centers based on power usage effectiveness is proposed. The cooling capacity of a data center and the index of the power usage effectiveness are used to forecast the power load of the data center in the method. The cooling capacity is obtained by calculating the heat load of the data center. The index is estimated using the group decision-making method of mixed language information. An example is given to prove the applicability and accuracy of this method.

  3. High voltage electrical injury: an 11-year single center epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lipový, B; Kaloudová, Y; Ríhová, H; Chaloupková, Z; Kempný, T; Suchanek, I; Brychta, P

    2014-06-30

    The aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of patients with high voltage electrical injury from 1999 to 2009. The Clinic of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery, Faculty Hospital Brno is located in a region of 2,505,000 inhabitants. In total 13,911 patients (including both children and adults, and outpatients as well as hospitalized patients) were treated at our burn center during the period of study. Of these patients, 1,030 were hospitalized for burns treatment. For the purposes of this study, we have included only patients with high voltage electrical trauma, of which there were 58, 2 of whom were female. Basic epidemiological indicators were gathered on these patients, including age, gender, place of accident, extent of trauma, mortality and whether the injury was occupational or non-occupational. Electrical burns (caused by both low-voltage and high-voltage electric current) made up 1.10% of all burns treated in our burn center and high voltage electrical injuries represented 0.42% of all burn injuries. The average incidence of high voltage electrical trauma was 0.21 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The average age of the patients was 28.59 years. Nine patients died and the mortality was fixed at 15.52%. The average length of hospitalization was 53.43 days. The average extent of burnt area was 35.01% TBSA. In our study, we were able to define the basic epidemiological parameters in 58 patients with high voltage electrical trauma. We also have to highlight the still disappointingly high number of non-occupational electrical injuries affecting those in the lower age groups, especially children. However, preventive programmes for educating specific risk groups have shown positive results.

  4. The proton therapy nozzles at Samsung Medical Center: A Monte Carlo simulation study using TOPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Sunghwan; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    To expedite the commissioning process of the proton therapy system at Samsung Medical Center (SMC), we have developed a Monte Carlo simulation model of the proton therapy nozzles by using TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS). At SMC proton therapy center, we have two gantry rooms with different types of nozzles: a multi-purpose nozzle and a dedicated scanning nozzle. Each nozzle has been modeled in detail following the geometry information provided by the manufacturer, Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. For this purpose, the novel features of TOPAS, such as the time feature or the ridge filter class, have been used, and the appropriate physics models for proton nozzle simulation have been defined. Dosimetric properties, like percent depth dose curve, spreadout Bragg peak (SOBP), and beam spot size, have been simulated and verified against measured beam data. Beyond the Monte Carlo nozzle modeling, we have developed an interface between TOPAS and the treatment planning system (TPS), RayStation. An exported radiotherapy (RT) plan from the TPS is interpreted by using an interface and is then translated into the TOPAS input text. The developed Monte Carlo nozzle model can be used to estimate the non-beam performance, such as the neutron background, of the nozzles. Furthermore, the nozzle model can be used to study the mechanical optimization of the design of the nozzle.

  5. Identifying Elements of Patient-Centered Care in Underserved Populations: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  6. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign. PMID:23348094

  7. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  8. Comparison of biodegradable and titanium fixation systems in maxillofacial surgery: a two-year multi-center randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van Bakelen, N B; Buijs, G J; Jansma, J; de Visscher, J G A M; Hoppenreijs, Th J M; Bergsma, J E; Stegenga, B; Bos, R R M

    2013-12-01

    Biodegradable osteosynthesis could reduce/delete the problems associated with titanium plate removal. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical performance in the first 2 post-operative years between a biodegradable and a titanium system in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) was performed in the Netherlands from December 2006 to July 2009. Included were 230 patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) and/or a Le Fort-I osteotomy and those treated for fractures of the mandible, maxilla, or zygoma. The patients were randomly assigned to a titanium group (KLS Martin) or to a biodegradable group (Inion CPS). Plate removal was necessary in 16 of the 134 patients (11.9%) treated with titanium and in 21 of the 87 patients (24.1%) treated with the biodegradable system within the first 2 post-operative years [p = .016, HR biodegradable (95% CI) = 2.2 (1.1-4.2), HR titanium = 1]. Occlusion, VAS, and MFIQ scores showed that both groups had good mandibular function and were (almost) free of pain 1 and 2 years post-operatively (http://controlled-trials.com ISRCTN 44212338).

  9. Community outreach and engagement strategies from the Wisconsin Study Center of the National Children's Study.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Susan K; Ngui, Emmanuel M; Ehlert, Carey; Miller, M Katie; Cronk, Christine A; Leuthner, Steven; Strehlow, Mary; Hewitt, Jeanne B; Durkin, Maureen S

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this methods article was to describe and evaluate outreach and engagement strategies designed to initially build county-wide awareness and support for the National Children's Study (NCS or the study) and subsequently to target the segment communities where recruitment for the study occurred. Selected principles from community outreach, social marketing, and health care system and personal referral formed the foundation for the strategies. The strategies included a celebration event, community advisory board, community needs assessment, building relationships with health care providers and systems, eliciting a network of study supporters, newsletters, appearances at local young family-oriented events (health fairs, parades), presentations to local community leaders, community forums, "branding" with assistance from a women-owned local marketing firm, and mailings including an oversized, second-touch postcard. Six months after study launch, approximately 4,600 study-eligible women were asked in a door-to-door survey if and how they became aware of the study. On average, 40% of eligible women reported being aware of the study. The most frequently cited strategy to cultivate their awareness was study-specific mailings. Awareness of the NCS increased by 7.5% among those receiving a second-touch postcard relative to controls (95% CIs [4.9, 10.7] z = 5.347, p < 0.0000, d = 0.16). Community outreach and engagement strategies, in particular the oversized postcard as a second-touch effort, may be used effectively by researchers for participant recruitment and by public health nurses for delivery of important population-focused messages. PMID:23586770

  10. A comparison of different transarterial embolization techniques for direct carotid cavernous fistulas: a single center experience in 32 patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaojian; Hussain, Mohammed; Ni, Lanchun; Huang, Qinfeng; Zhou, Fei; Gu, Zhikai; Chen, Jian; Ding, Yuchuan; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transarterial treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas (DCCF) via embolic materials has been well documented. This study reports, validates, and compares with existing literature our experience treating DCCFs via endovascular approaches by using detachable balloons, coils, and covered stents. Methods Between June 2006 to October 2011, 32 patients (21 male, 11 female) with 32 DCCFs (30 traumatic, 2 spontaneous cavernous ICA aneurysms) were embolized endovascularly. Followup was performed for at least 6 months. Results Among the 32 DCCFs, 21 (65.6%) were embolized using detachable balloons, eight (25.0%) with coils, one (3.1%) with balloons and coils, and two (6.3%) with covered stents. Complete DCCF obliteration was achieved in 31 (96.9%) cases. One fistula failed to respond due to premature balloon detachment. Intracranial bruit in 31 (100%) chemosis and exophthalmos in 28 (100%) cases resolved after embolization. Visual acuity and oculomotor palsy improved in 18 (90%) and 18 (69.2%) cases, respectively. There was no evidence of DCCF recurrence. Thirteen DCCFs were followed up by MRI and five by DSA. In these cases, four (4/13, 30.8%) balloon-embolized DCCFs showed pseudoaneurysms. Three patients were asymptomatic; one had minor left oculomotor palsy. Conclusions Our results correlate and reinforce literature regarding endovascular treatment of DCCFs. Application of Transarterial embolization with detachable balloons, despite extensive use has been decreasing. Coil embolization is an effective and safe alternative for treatment, especially when balloon embolization fails. Covered stent placement may be used as another alternative for selected cases. PMID:25566340

  11. Identification of Fluid on Optical Coherence Tomography by Treating Ophthalmologists versus a Reading Center in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT)

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Cynthia A.; DeCroos, Francis Char; Ying, Gui-shuang; Stinnett, Sandra S.; Heydary, Cynthia S.; Burns, Russell; Maguire, Maureen; Martin, Daniel; Jaffe, Glenn J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Examine treatment decisions by ophthalmologists versus Reading Center (RC) fluid identification from OCT in Comparisons of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials (CATT). METHODS Fluid in 6210 OCT scans (598 patients) in "as needed treatment" arm of CATT year one was compared to ophthalmologist's treatment: positive fluid agreement (PFA, fluid+, treatment+) and discrepancy (PFD, fluid+, treatment−), negative fluid agreement (NFA, fluid−, treatment−) and discrepancy (NFD, fluid−, treatment+). For PFDs, fluid location and visual acuity (VA) were characterized. RESULTS Treatment and RC fluid determination agreed in 72.1% (53.0% PFA, 19.1% NFA) and disagreed in 27.9% (25.7% PFD, 2.2 % NFD) of visits, with no discrepancies for 20.9% of patients. Compared to PFA, PFD occurred more commonly with lower total foveal thickness (mean ±SD: 265 ± 103 PFD, 366 ± 151 microns PFA), presence of intraretinal fluid only, smaller fluid areas (PFA areas > twice those of PFD, p<0.001), and greater decrease in retinal and lesion thickness. Mean acuities before, at and after PFD were 65.8, 66.9 and 66.3 letters. CONCLUSIONS Treatment decisions by ophthalmologists matched RC fluid determination in majority of visits. More pronounced response to treatment and smaller foci of fluid likely contributed to PFD. PFD did not have substantial impact on subsequent VA. PMID:26102433

  12. Comparison between a clinical diagnosis method and the surveillance technique of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention for identification of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Waltrick, Renata; Possamai, Dimitri Sauter; de Aguiar, Fernanda Perito; Dadam, Micheli; de Souza, Valmir João; Ramos, Lucas Rocker; Laurett, Renata da Silva; Fujiwara, Kênia; Caldeira, Milton; Koenig, Álvaro; Westphal, Glauco Adrieno

    2015-01-01

    Objective >To evaluate the agreement between a new epidemiological surveillance method of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the clinical pulmonary infection score for mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia detection. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that evaluated patients in the intensive care units of two hospitals who were intubated for more than 48 hours between August 2013 and June 2014. Patients were evaluated daily by physical therapist using the clinical pulmonary infection score. A nurse independently applied the new surveillance method proposed by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The diagnostic agreement between the methods was evaluated. A clinical pulmonary infection score of ≥ 7 indicated a clinical diagnosis of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the association of a clinical pulmonary infection score ≥ 7 with an isolated semiquantitative culture consisting of ≥ 104 colony-forming units indicated a definitive diagnosis. Results Of the 801 patients admitted to the intensive care units, 198 required mechanical ventilation. Of these, 168 were intubated for more than 48 hours. A total of 18 (10.7%) cases of mechanical ventilation-associated infectious conditions were identified, 14 (8.3%) of which exhibited possible or probable mechanical ventilatorassociated pneumonia, which represented 35% (14/38) of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia cases. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention method identified cases of mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia with a sensitivity of 0.37, specificity of 1.0, positive predictive value of 1.0, and negative predictive value of 0.84. The differences resulted in discrepancies in the mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia incidence density (CDC, 5.2/1000 days of mechanical ventilation; clinical pulmonary infection score ≥ 7, 13.1/1000 days of mechanical ventilation). Conclusion The Center for Disease Control and Prevention method failed to

  13. Denoising seismic data using wavelet methods: a comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hloupis, G.; Vallianatos, F.

    2009-04-01

    In order to derive onset times, amplitudes or other useful characteristic from a seismogram, the usual denoising procedure involves the use of a linear pass-band filter. This family of filters is zero-phase and is useful according to phase properties but their efficiency is reduced when transients are existing near seismic signals. The alternative solution is the Wiener filter which focuses on the elimination of the mean square error between recorded and expected signal. Its main disadvantage is the assumption that signal and noise are stationary. This assumption does not hold for the seismic signals leading to denoising solutions that does not assume stationarity. Solutions based on Wavelet Transform proved effective for denoising problems across several areas. Here we present recent WT denoising methods (WDM) that will applied later to seismic sequences of Seismological Network of Crete. Wavelet denoising schemes have proved to be well adapted to several types of signals. For non-stationary signals, such as seismograms, the use of linear and non-linear wavelet denoising methods seems promising. The contribution of this study is a comparison for wavelet denoising methods suitable for seismic signals, which proved from previous studies their superiority against appropriate conventional filtering techniques. The importance of wavelet denoising methods relies on two facts: they recovered the seismic signals having fewer artifacts than conventional filters (for high SNR seismograms) and at the same time they can provide satisfactory representations (for detecting the earthquake's primary arrival) for low SNR seismograms or microearthquakes. The latter is very important for a possible development of an automatic procedure for the regular daily detection of small or non-regional earthquakes especially when the number of the stations is quite big. Initially, their performance is measured over a database of synthetic seismic signals in order to evaluate the better wavelet

  14. Erectile Dysfunction in Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome: Outcomes from a Multi-Center Study and Risk Factor Analysis in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhu; Chen, Shengfu; Yang, Qiyun; Wan, Zi; Han, Dayu; Xiao, Haipeng; Sun, Xiangzhou; Deng, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and explore the influence of UPOINT domains, National Institutes of Health-CP symptom index (NIH-CPSI) and other factors on ED prevalence. This was a prospective study of consecutive patients with CP/CPPS seen at 11 tertiary hospitals during January–July 2014. ED was diagnosed as a score of<21 on the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5). Patients from one center were evaluated by the UPOINT system and NIH-CPSI. Each patient was assessed using clinical examination, asocio-demographic questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), NIH-CPSI and IIEF-5.1406 patients from 11 centers (mean age, 32.18 years; range 18–60 years) were enrolled. ED was found in 638/1406 patients (45.4%), and was categorized as mild in 291(45.6%), moderate in 297(46.6%) and severe in50(7.7%). 192 patients from one center(mean age,31.3 years; range 18–57 years) were further studied.IIEF-5 score correlated negatively with NIH-CPSI(r = 0.251), PHQ (r = 0.355) and PCS (r = 0.322)scores (P<0.001).PHQ score correlated positively with NIH-CPSI (r = 0.586) and PCS(r = 0.662) scores (P<0.001).NIH-CPSI, PHQ, PCS and IIEF-5 scores did not differ significantly between class IIIA and IIIB CP/CPPS. Multivariate logistic regression showed that UPOINT psychological (P) domain and NIH-CPSI symptom severity were independent risk factors for ED in CP/CPPS. It is concluded that psychological factors and symptom severity are independent risk factors for ED in CP/CPPS. PMID:27120096

  15. Burns in mobile home fires--descriptive study at a regional burn center.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Robert F; Alarm, Badrul; Huq Mian, Mohammad Anwarul; Samples, Jancie M; Friedman, Bruce C; Shaver, Joseph R; Brandigi, Claus; Hassan, Zaheed

    2009-01-01

    Death from fires and burns are the sixth most common cause of unintentional injury death in the United States. More than (3/4) of burn deaths occurring in the United States are in the home. Mobile home fires carry twice the death rate as other dwellings. The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of deaths and injuries in mobile home fire admitted in a regional Burn Center and to identify possible risk factors. A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out among all burn patients admitted to a regional Burn Center between January 2002 and December 2004 (3469 patients). The study included patients who suffered a burn injury from a mobile home fire. The demographic characteristics of the patients, location of mobile home, associated inhalation injury, source of fire, comorbidity of the victims, employment status, insurance status, family history of burns, and outcomes of the treatment were incorporated in a data collection record. There were 65 burn patients in mobile home fires admitted to the Burn Center during the studied period. The average age of the patients was 39 years (ranging from 2 to 81 years, SD=16.06), 77% were male, 67% were white, and 79% were the residents in the suburban areas of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Florida. The average TBSA of burns was about 21% (ranging from 1 to 63%, SD=17.66), 63% of the patients had associated inhalation, three inhalation injury only, and 69% patients required ventilator support. The average length of stay per TBSA percentage of burn was 1.01 days (P=0.00), controlling for age, preexisting medical comorbidities, and inhalation injury. About 88% of the patients had preexisting medical comorbid conditions, 74% were smokers, 64% reported as alcoholic, and 72% had at least some form of health insurance coverage. In 40% of the cases, the cause of the fire was unknown, 31% were caused by accidental explosions, such as electric, gasoline, or kerosene appliances, and 29% were due to other

  16. Study protocol of the Center for Oral Health Research in Appalachia (COHRA) etiology study

    PubMed Central

    Polk, Deborah E; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard J; McNeil, Daniel W; Tarter, Ralph E; Thomas, John G; Marazita, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Background People in Appalachia experience some of the worst oral health in the United States. To develop effective intervention and prevention strategies in Appalachia, we must understand the complex relationships among the contributing factors and how they affect the etiology of oral diseases. To date, no such comprehensive analysis has been conducted. This report summarizes the characteristics of the sample and describes the protocol of a study determining contributions of individual, family, and community factors to oral diseases in Appalachian children and their relatives. Methods/Design Families participated in a comprehensive assessment protocol involving interviews, questionnaires, a clinical oral health assessment, a microbiological assessment, and collection of DNA. The design of the study is cross-sectional. Conclusion Due to its multilevel design and large, family-based sample, this study has the potential to greatly advance our understanding of factors that contribute to oral health in Appalachian children. PMID:18522740

  17. Is the Dark Triad Better Studied Using a Variable- or a Person-Centered Approach? An Exploratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Chester Chun Seng; Zhou, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Despite Allport’s early call to study personality as a coordinated system of traits within individual rather than separate traits, researchers often assume personality variables are largely distinct, independent characteristics. In the current research, we examined the usual assumption that Dark Triad traits (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism) are best studied using a variable-centered (dimensional), rather than a person-centered (taxonic), approach. Results showed that a variable-centered approach is appropriate in understanding the Dark Triad, and yet individuals scoring high on one Dark Triad dimension also tend to score high on other dimensions. Based on these results, we concluded that it is appropriate to study individual differences in the Dark Triad (inferences based on persons) by capturing the common variance among the three traits using a variable-centered approach, rather than treating these traits as independent or uncoordinated characteristics. PMID:27580224

  18. Is the Dark Triad Better Studied Using a Variable- or a Person-Centered Approach? An Exploratory Investigation.

    PubMed

    Kam, Chester Chun Seng; Zhou, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Despite Allport's early call to study personality as a coordinated system of traits within individual rather than separate traits, researchers often assume personality variables are largely distinct, independent characteristics. In the current research, we examined the usual assumption that Dark Triad traits (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism) are best studied using a variable-centered (dimensional), rather than a person-centered (taxonic), approach. Results showed that a variable-centered approach is appropriate in understanding the Dark Triad, and yet individuals scoring high on one Dark Triad dimension also tend to score high on other dimensions. Based on these results, we concluded that it is appropriate to study individual differences in the Dark Triad (inferences based on persons) by capturing the common variance among the three traits using a variable-centered approach, rather than treating these traits as independent or uncoordinated characteristics. PMID:27580224

  19. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA Stennis Space Center

    SciTech Connect

    Schey, Stephen; Francfort, Jim

    2015-05-01

    Federal agencies are mandated to purchase alternative fuel vehicles, increase consumption of alternative fuels, and reduce petroleum consumption. Available plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) provide an attractive option in the selection of alternative fuel vehicles. PEVs, which consist of both battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), have significant advantages over internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in terms of energy efficiency, reduced petroleum consumption, and reduced production of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and they provide performance benefits with quieter, smoother operation. This study intended to evaluate the extent to which NASA Stennis Space Center (Stennis) could convert part or all of their fleet of vehicles from petroleum-fueled vehicles to PEVs.

  20. Gear noise, vibration, and diagnostic studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coy, John J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. This program consists of analytical as well as experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing weight, noise, and vibration, while increasing life and reliability. Recent analytical activities are highlighted in the areas of gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics performed in-house and through NASA and U.S. Army sponsored grants and contracts. These activities include studies of gear tooth profiles to reduce transmission error and vibration as well as gear housing and rotordynamic modeling to reduce structural vibration transmission and noise radiation, and basic research into current gear failure diagnostic methodologies. Results of these activities are presented along with an overview of near term research plans in the gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics area.

  1. A cephalometric study to determine the center of anteroposterior curve of occlusion in the cranium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Thota Kiran; Thomas, Vivek; Nilawar, Sanjay; Balamurugan, R; Marwaha, Baldeep Singh; Vinod, V

    2013-09-01

    Proper management of the occlusal plane is an essential consideration when multiple long span posterior restorations are designed. When restorations are added to an existing tooth arrangement characterized by rotated, tipped or extruded teeth, excursive interferences may be incorporated. The curve of Spee which exists in natural dentition, allows harmony to exist between the anterior teeth and the condylar guidance. Broadrick fag or occlusal plane analyzer is used to assist in the reproduction of tooth morphology that is commensurate with the curve of Spee when posterior restorations are designed; its use prevents the introduction of protrusive interferences. The current study determines the relationship of the center of anteroposterior curve of occlusion in the cranium and its relationship to other cephalometric landmarks and also evaluates the relationship of anteroposterior curve of occlusion to the condyle.

  2. The Center for Astrochemical Studies at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Bizzocchi, Luca; Laas, Jacob; Giuliano, Barbara Michela; Spezzano, Silvia; Endres, Christian; Caselli, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The Center for Astrochemical Studies (CAS), at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) in Garching, has been founded to incorporate scientists with different background to elucidate the physical-chemical processes that lead to the formation of stars and planets. The CAS group includes experts in observations (including millimetre and sub-millimetre interferometry, radio and infrared telescopes), theory (physical processes and dynamics, gas-grain chemical processes and dust evolution, molecular astrophysics and collisional/rate coefficients), and laboratory. The latter is mainly focused on spectroscopic characterisation of molecular species relevant in space, including ions, radicals and astronomically complex organic molecules. In this talk the laboratory group of the CAS will be briefly presented, including current projects and planned experiments.

  3. Pilot Study: Measuring the Effects of Center of Gravity Shift on Postural Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Times-Marshall, Chelsea; Reschke, Millard

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that astronauts returning from space often experience postural instability due to the stimulus rearrangement of the visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. However, postural control may also be influenced by the head-ward shift in their center of gravity (CG) that occurs as a result of the expansion of their spinal column by as much as two inches during long duration space flight, as well as the CG shift that occurs from the Life Support Pack on the extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit. This study investigated the effect on postural stability after (1) an immediate shift in the CG towards the head, (2) a 30 minute adaptation to the shifted CG, and (3) immediate shift of the CG back to normal, accomplished by donning and removing a modified backpack. We hypothesized that at each immediate shift in CG, postural performance will be compromised.

  4. Flow quality studies of the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pickett, Mark T.; Sheldon, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose was to document the airflow characteristics in the diffuser of the NASA Lewis Research Center Icing Research Tunnel and to determine the effects of vortex generators on the flow quality in the diffuser. The results were used to determine how to improve the flow in this portion of the tunnel so that it can be more effectively used as an icing test section and such that overall tunnel efficiency can be improved. The demand for tunnel test time and the desire to test models that are too large for the test section were two of the drivers behind this diffuser study. For all vortex generator configurations tested, the flow quality was improved.

  5. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies. Annual report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzmiller, D.; Bradbury, M.; Cram, S.

    1992-05-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratories Life Sciences Division and biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1991. Selected research highlights include: yeast artificial chromosome libraries from flow sorted human chromosomes 16 and 21; distances between the antigen binding sites of three murine antibody subclasses measured using neutron and x-ray scattering; NFCR 10th anniversary highlights; kinase-mediated differences found in the cell cycle regulation of normal and transformed cells; and detecting mutations that cause Gaucher`s disease by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Project descriptions include: genomic structure and regulation, molecular structure, cytometry, cell growth and differentiation, radiation biology and carcinogenesis, and pulmonary biology.

  6. Gear noise, vibration, and diagnostic studies at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, J. J.; Oswald, F. B.; Townsend, D. P.; Coy, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command are involved in a joint research program to advance the technology of rotorcraft transmissions. This program consists of analytical as well as experimental efforts to achieve the overall goals of reducing weight, noise, and vibration, while increasing life and reliability. Recent analytical activities are highlighted in the areas of gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics performed in-house and through NASA and U.S. Army sponsored grants and contracts. These activities include studies of gear tooth profiles to reduce transmission error and vibration as well as gear housing and rotordynamic modeling to reduce structural vibration and transmission and noise radiation, and basic research into current gear failure diagnostic methodologies. Results of these activities are presented along with an overview of near-term research plans in the gear noise, vibration, and diagnostics area.

  7. Scientific Visualization to Study Flux Transfer Events at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastatter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Sibeck, David G.; Berrios, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present results of modeling of reconnection at the dayside magnetopause with subsequent development of flux transfer event signatures. The tools used include new methods that have been added to the suite of visualization methods that are used at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). Flux transfer events result from localized reconnection that connect magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma with magnetospheric fields and plasma and results in flux rope structures that span the dayside magnetopause. The onset of flux rope formation and the three-dimensional structure of flux ropes are studied as they have been modeled by high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the dayside magnetosphere of the Earth. We show that flux transfer events are complex three-dimensional structures that require modern visualization and analysis techniques. Two suites of visualization methods are presented and we demonstrate the usefulness of those methods through the CCMC web site to the general science user.

  8. Studies on the Magnetic Center of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Khalatian, V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of the magnetic center in the Mu2e solenoid system is not trivial given the S-shaped nature of the transport solenoid. Moreover, due to the fringe field of the larger bore adjacent magnets-production solenoid and the detector solenoid-the magnetic center does not coincide with the geometric center of the system. The reference magnetic center can be obtained by tracking a low-momentum charged particle through the whole system. This paper will discuss this method and will evaluate the deviations from the nominal magnetic center given the tolerances in the manufacturing and the alignment of the coils. Methods for the correction of the magnetic center will also be presented.

  9. Malaria in India: The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aparup; Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Cator, Lauren J.; Dhiman, Ramesh C.; Eapen, Alex; Mishra, Neelima; Nagpal, Bhupinder N.; Nanda, Nutan; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Read, Andrew F.; Sharma, Surya K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Vineeta; Sinnis, Photini; Srivastava, Harish C.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Carlton, Jane M.; Valecha, Neena

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in India and one which contributes significantly to the overall malaria burden in Southeast Asia. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Program of India reported ~1.6 million cases and ~1100 malaria deaths in 2009. Some experts argue that this is a serious underestimation and that the actual number of malaria cases per year is likely between 9 and 50 times greater, with an approximate 13-fold underestimation of malaria-related mortality. The difficulty in making these estimations is further exacerbated by (i) highly variable malaria eco-epidemiological profiles, (ii) the transmission and overlap of multiple Plasmodium species and Anopheles vectors, (iii) increasing antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance, and (iv) the impact of climate change on each of these variables. Simply stated, the burden of malaria in India is complex. Here we describe plans for a Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India (CSCMi), one of ten International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) located in malarious regions of the world recently funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The CSCMi is a close partnership between Indian and United States scientists, and aims to address major gaps in our understanding of the complexity of malaria in India, including changing patterns of epidemiology, vector biology and control, drug resistance, and parasite genomics. We hope that such a multidisciplinary approach that integrates clinical and field studies with laboratory, molecular, and genomic methods will provide a powerful combination for malaria control and prevention in India. PMID:22142788

  10. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis: A preliminary single-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-07-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS.We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison.Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (-) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73-0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = -0.73 to -0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = -0.81 to -0.91, P < 0.05).Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  11. Cancer screenee cohort study of the National Cancer Center in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongseon

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Screenee Cohort Study was first established in 2002 by the National Cancer Center in South Korea to investigate all possible risk factors related to cancers and to expand biological specimen banking for the development of effective methodologies for cancer detection, diagnosis, and prevention. As of July in 2014, total 41,105 participants were enrolled in this cohort. Data were collected via questionnaire, clinical examination, cancer screening, and biological specimen testing including blood, urine, and exfoliated cervical cells. The highest incidence was found to be thyroid cancer, according to a nested case-control study that was linked to the National Cancer Registry information as of December 31, 2011. Case-control, cross-sectional, and cohort studies have been published using these data since 2009. Diet and nutrition was the most published topic, followed by genetics, hepatitis B virus and liver cancer screening, methodologies, physical activity, obesity, metabolic syndrome, smoking and alcohol consumption, and blood type. Evidence from the Cancer Screenee Cohort Study is highly anticipated to reduce the burden of cancer in the Korean population and aid in the detection, diagnosis, and prevention of cancer. PMID:25119453

  12. PEDIATRIC DELIRIUM AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS: A SINGLE-CENTER PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Linda M.; Sun, Xuming; Kearney, Julia; Patel, Anita; Greenwald, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a single-institution pilot study regarding prevalence and risk factors for delirium in critically ill children. Design A prospective observational study, with secondary analysis of data collected during the validation of a pediatric delirium screening tool, the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium (CAPD). Setting This study took place in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at an urban academic medical center. Patients 99 consecutive patients, ages newborn to 21 years. Intervention Subjects underwent a psychiatric evaluation for delirium based on the DSM-IV criteria. Measurements and Main Results Prevalence of delirium in this sample was 21%. In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with the diagnosis of delirium were presence of developmental delay, need for mechanical ventilation, and age 2-5 years. Conclusions In our institution, pediatric delirium is a prevalent problem, with identifiable risk factors. Further large-scale prospective studies are required to explore multi-institutional prevalence, modifiable risk factors, therapeutic interventions, and effect on long-term outcomes. PMID:25647240

  13. High pressure study of low compressibility tetracalcium aluminum carbonate hydrates 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}11H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Juhyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-01-15

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data was collected from a sample of monocarboaluminate 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}11H{sub 2}O from ambient pressure to 4.3 GPa. The refined crystal structure at ambient pressure is triclinic with parameters a = 5.77(2) A, b = 8.47(5) A, c = 9.93(4) A, {alpha} = 64.6(2) Degree-Sign , {beta} = 82.8(3) Degree-Sign , {gamma} = 81.4(4) Degree-Sign , and space group of P1 or P1{sup Macron }. It showed some degree of perfectly reversible pressure-induced dehydration with a non-hygroscopic pressure-transmitting medium. However the dehydration effect does not critically affect a bulk modulus due to its strong framework. The isothermal bulk modulus of monocarboaluminate was found to be 53(5) GPa and 54(4) GPa with 3rd order and 2nd order Birch-Murnaghan Equation of state, respectively. That value is higher than for any other reported AFm or AFt phase. The pressure-volume behavior of the monocarboaluminate was compared with that of previous studied hemicarboaluminate.

  14. China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Prospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Dreyer, Rachel P; Li, Xi; Du, Xue; Downing, Nicholas S; Li, Li; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Feng, Fang; Guan, Wen-Chi; Xu, Xiao; Li, Shu-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Qiu; Masoudi, Frederick A; Spertus, John A; Krumholz, Harlan M; Jiang, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the rapid growth in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in China, there is limited information about patients’ experiences after AMI hospitalization, especially on long-term adverse events and patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Methods: The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)-Prospective AMI Study will enroll 4000 consecutive AMI patients from 53 diverse hospitals across China and follow them longitudinally for 12 months to document their treatment, recovery, and outcomes. Details of patients’ medical history, treatment, and in-hospital outcomes are abstracted from medical charts. Comprehensive baseline interviews are being conducted to characterize patient demographics, risk factors, presentation, and healthcare utilization. As part of these interviews, validated instruments are administered to measure PROs, including quality of life, symptoms, mood, cognition, and sexual activity. Follow-up interviews, measuring PROs, medication adherence, risk factor control, and collecting hospitalization events are conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after discharge. Supporting documents for potential outcomes are collected for adjudication by clinicians at the National Coordinating Center. Blood and urine samples are also obtained at baseline, 1- and 12-month follow-up. In addition, we are conducting a survey of participating hospitals to characterize their organizational characteristics. Conclusion: The China PEACE-Prospective AMI study will be uniquely positioned to generate new information regarding patient's experiences and outcomes after AMI in China and serve as a foundation for quality improvement activities. PMID:26712436

  15. How local and state regulations affect the child care food environment: A qualitative study of child care center directors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd-Williams, C. E.; Camp, E. J.; Mullen, P. D.; Briley, M. E.; Hoelscher, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-third of preschoolers spend regular time in child care centers where they can consume the majority of their daily dietary intake. The child care setting influences children’s dietary intake. Thus, it is important to examine factors, such as local and state regulations, that influence the food environment at the center. This qualitative study explored directors’ perceptions of how regulations influence the foods available at child care centers. Ten directors of centers in Travis County, Texas completed semi-structured interviews. Directors reported that changes in local health department regulations (e.g., kitchen specifications) result in less-healthful foods being served (e.g., more prepackaged foods). Directors of centers that do not participate in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) said the state licensing regulations clarify the portion size and nutritional requirements for preschoolers thereby improving the nutritional quality of the food served. Directors of centers participating in CACFP said they are not affected by state mandates, because the CACFP regulations are more stringent. These findings suggest that state regulations that specify and quantify nutritional standards may beneficially impact preschoolers’ diets. However, local health department regulations enacted to improve food safety may negatively influence the nutritional value of food served in centers. PMID:26251694

  16. Prospective study of cost of care at multidisciplinary ALS centers adhering to American Academy of Neurology (AAN) ALS practice parameters.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Kevin; Levine, Todd; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Lyon, Mary; Maginnis, Kimberly; Callas, Peter; Gaspari, Celeste; Tandan, Rup

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary care in ALS is associated with longer survival, improved quality of life, and reduced hospital admissions, but there are no published data on institutional costs associated with multidisciplinary ALS care at U.S. centers. We prospectively examined institutional costs, adherence to AAN Practice Parameters and patient satisfaction in multidisciplinary ALS clinics at 18 U.S. ALS centers. Centers reported patient volumes; direct costs for staff salary/benefits, supplies and equipment; and institutional non-salary and overhead costs over a three-month period. In 1117 patients seen during this period, mean age was 61.5 years (range 25-91 years), 56% were male, and mean ALSFRS-R score was 29. Mean total salary/benefit cost per clinic day for all providers was $2964 (range $1692-$5236 across centers). Mean salary/benefit cost per patient per clinic was $507 (range $258-$806 across centers). Differences among centers in reporting non-salary costs prevented meaningful analysis. Practice parameter adherence and patient satisfaction were high. This prospective collaborative study demonstrates the direct financial burden of evidence-based multidisciplinary ALS care in the U.S.; more refined non-salary and overhead cost data are needed to evaluate the full cost impact of care. These data may be useful in supporting evidence-based models of patient centered care for ALS. PMID:26462131

  17. Structural studies of bacterioferritin B from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggest a gating mechanism for iron uptake via the ferroxidase center .

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Saroja K; Lovell, Scott; Yao, Huili; Battaile, Kevin P; Fischer, Christopher J; Gee, Casey E; Rivera, Mario

    2010-02-16

    The structure of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin B (Pa BfrB) has been determined from crystals grown from protein devoid of core mineral iron (as-isolated) and from protein mineralized with approximately 600 iron atoms (mineralized). Structures were also obtained from crystals grown from mineralized BfrB after they had been soaked in an FeSO(4) solution (Fe soak) and in separate experiments after they had been soaked in an FeSO(4) solution followed by a soak in a crystallization solution (double soak). Although the structures consist of a typical bacterioferritin fold comprised of a nearly spherical 24-mer assembly that binds 12 heme molecules, comparison of microenvironments observed in the distinct structures provided interesting insights. The ferroxidase center in the as-isolated, mineralized, and double-soak structures is empty. The ferroxidase ligands (except His130) are poised to bind iron with minimal conformational changes. The His130 side chain, on the other hand, must rotate toward the ferroxidase center to coordinate iron. In comparison, the structure obtained from crystals soaked in an FeSO(4) solution displays a fully occupied ferroxidase center and iron bound to the internal, Fe((in)), and external, Fe((out)), surfaces of Pa BfrB. The conformation of His130 in this structure is rotated toward the ferroxidase center and coordinates an iron ion. The structures also revealed a pore on the surface of Pa BfrB that likely serves as a port of entry for Fe(2+) to the ferroxidase center. On its opposite end, the pore is capped by the side chain of His130 when it adopts its "gate-closed" conformation that enables coordination to a ferroxidase iron. A change to its "gate-open", noncoordinative conformation creates a path for the translocation of iron from the ferroxidase center to the interior cavity. These structural observations, together with findings obtained from iron incorporation measurements in solution, suggest that the ferroxidase

  18. 78 FR 42084 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support; Availability of the Center for Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ...; Availability of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Data Standards Program Documents AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER... Strategy (version 1.0) and the CDER Data Standards Strategy--Action Plan (version 1.0). This action...

  19. Feasibility Study of Resource-Use, Outdoor Education Center, Taylor County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Master Enterprises, Athens, GA.

    Extensive planning in relation to the establishment of an outdoor education center in the State of Florida is reported. The proposed outdoor education center, designed to enrich the public school program if instruction in such fields as conservation, recreation, and resource-use, is outlined. The report contains an account of socioeconomic…

  20. Bibliography of Materials Available from the Russian Studies Center for Secondary Schools, Supplement, May 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate School, Wallingford, CT. Russian Studies Center for Secondary Schools.

    Background and instructional materials acquired since the February 1967 supplement are listed in this supplement to the "Bibliography of Materials" issued by the Russian Center for Secondary Schools. The majority of the items are in English, and all are available from the Center on a 3-week loan to secondary school teachers of Russian. Major…

  1. A Multi-Center, Cross-Sectional Study on the Burden of Infectious Keratitis in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiusheng; Xie, Lixin; Tan, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhichong; Yang, Yanning; Yuan, Yuansheng; Deng, Yingping; Fu, Shaoying; Xu, Jianjiang; Sun, Xuguang; Sheng, Xunlun; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the prevalence and demographic characteristics of infectious keratitis and infectious corneal blindness. Methods A multi-center, population-based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 1 to August 31, 2010. A total of 191,242 individuals of all age groups from 10 geographically representative provinces were sampled using stratified, multi-stage, random and systematic sampling procedures. A majority, 168,673 (88.2%), of those sampled participated in the study. The examination protocol included a structured interview, visual acuity testing, an external eye examination, and an anterior segment examination using a slit lamp. The causes and sequelae of corneal disease were identified using uniform customized protocols. Blindness in one eye caused by infectious keratitis was defined as infectious corneal blindness. Results The prevalence of past and active infectious keratitis was 0.192% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.171–0.213%), and the prevalence of viral, bacterial, and fungal keratitis was 0.11%, 0.075%, and 0.007%, respectively. There were 138 cases of infectious corneal blindness in at least one eye in the study population (prevalence of 0.082% [95%CI, 0.068%–0.095%]). Statistical analysis suggested that ocular trauma, alcoholic consumption, low socioeconomic levels, advanced age, and poor education were risk factors for infectious corneal blindness. Conclusions Infectious keratitis is the leading cause of corneal blindness in China. Eye care strategies should focus on the prevention and rehabilitation of infectious corneal blindness. PMID:25438169

  2. Ophthalmologic Findings in Children with Leukemia: A Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Betül; Malbora, Barış; Akça Bayar, Sezin; Avcı, Zekai; Alioğlu, Bülent; Özbek, Namık

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ophthalmologic disease in patients with acute leukemia occurs due to primary leukemic infiltration (involvement), or secondary to the disease and its treatment. In recent years the life expectancy of acute leukemia patients has increased with the advent of modern therapies. The present study aimed to determine the incidence of ocular manifestations in children with acute leukemia. Materials and Methods: The study included 120 patients diagnosed with acute leukemia at Başkent University Hospital, Pediatric Hematology Department between 1995 and 2010. All the patients were examined by an ophthalmologist via direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Results: Among the patients, 83 (69.2%) were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 35 (29.1%) with acute myeloblastic leukemia, and 2 (1.7%) with mixed-lineage leukemia. In all, 58 ophthalmic manifestations were noted in 41 patients (34.2%). In our patients, 12 ophthalmologic involvements were present at admission and 46 ocular findings occurred during follow-up. The incidence of these manifestations increased with age. Conclusion: Ophthalmologic manifestations were not correlated with gender, hematological parameters at disease onset, type of leukemia, or the frequency of relapse and survival. To more clearly determine the effect of ophthalmologic manifestations on the prognosis of leukemia, larger scale and multi-center studies are needed. PMID:27800262

  3. Center of Mass Compensation during Gait in Hip Arthroplasty Patients: Comparison between Large Diameter Head Total Hip Arthroplasty and Hip Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Vicky; Nantel, Julie; Therrien, Marc; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Lavigne, Martin; Prince, François

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To compare center of mass (COM) compensation in the frontal and sagittal plane during gait in patients with large diameter head total hip arthroplasty (LDH-THA) and hip resurfacing (HR). Design. Observational study. Setting. Outpatient biomechanical laboratory. Participants. Two groups of 12 patients with LDH-THA and HR recruited from a larger randomized study and 11 healthy controls. Interventions. Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures. To compare the distance between the hip prosthetic joint center (HPJC) and the COM. The ratio (R(HPJC-COM)) and the variability (CV(HPJC-COM)) were compared between groups. Hip flexor, abductor, and adductor muscle strength was also correlated between groups while radiographic measurements were correlated with the outcome measures. Results. In the frontal plane, HR shows less variability than healthy controls at push-off and toe-off and R(HPJC-COM) is correlated with the muscle strength ratios (FR(ABD)) at heel contact, maximal weight acceptance, and mid stance. In the sagittal plane, LDH-THA has a higher R(HPJC-COM) than healthy controls at push-off, and CV(HPJC-COM) is significantly correlated with FR(FLEX). Conclusions. One year after surgery, both groups of patients, LDH-THA and HR, demonstrate minor compensations at some specific instant of the gait cycle, in both frontal and sagittal planes. However, their locomotion pattern is similar to the healthy controls. PMID:22110976

  4. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I; Lee, J W; Warmack, R J; Allison, D P; Greenbaum, E

    1995-01-01

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:11607515

  5. Relation of people-centered public health and person-centered healthcare management: a case study to reduce burn-out

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanov, Drozdstoj S.; Cloninger, C. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare management is one practical tool for mediation and implementation of public health into clinical healthcare outcomes and is taken in our case study as an exemplar arena to demonstrate the vital importance of the person-centered approach. Healthcare personnel are frequently at risk for the ‘burn-out’ syndrome. However, modern measures of burn-out recognize burn-out only at a late stage when it is fully developed. There are no available methods to assess the risk for vulnerability to burnout in healthcare systems. Our aim was therefore to design a complex person-centered model for detection of high risk for burn-out at an early stage, that has been termed ‘flame-out’. We accept the observation that decreased personal performance is one crucial expression of burn-out. Low personal performance and negative emotions are strongly related to low self-directedness as measured by the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). At the same time, burn-out is characterized by decreased interest and positive emotions from work. Decreased positive emotion is directly related to low self-transcendence as measured by the TCI. Burn-out is also frequently associated with feelings of social alienation or inadequacy of support, which is in turn related to low TCI Cooperativeness. However, high Persistence and Harm Avoidance are predisposing traits for burn-out in healthcare professionals who are often overly perfectionistic and compulsive, predisposing them to anxiety, depression, suicide and burn-out. Hence, people at risk for future burn-out are often highly conscientious over-achievers with intense mixtures of positive and negative emotions. The high demand for perfection comes from both intrinsic characteristics and from features of the social milieu in their psychological climate. Letting go of the unfulfillable desire to be perfect by increasing self-transcendence allows acceptance of the imperfection of the human condition, thereby preventing burn-out and

  6. A comparison of traditional vs. Canadian tailored prophylaxis dosing of prophylactic factor infusions in children with haemophilia A and B in a single hemophilia treatment center.

    PubMed

    Dodd, C; Watts, R G

    2012-07-01

    Prophylactic infusion of clotting factor concentrates is a developing standard of care for individuals with haemophilia. The ideal schedule and techniques of prophylactic infusions remain incompletely defined. Our aim was to determine the optimal techniques and schedules for factor prophylaxis in paediatric patients. A retrospective electronic medical record review of all children treated with prophylactic factor infusions in a single Haemophilia Treatment Center was conducted. Comparison of traditional vs. Canadian dosing regimens and primary vs. secondary prophylaxis was made. Failure of prophylaxis was defined as the first serious bleed. A total of 58 children were identified for review. Five cases were excluded (four due to high titre inhibitors and one due to repeated non-compliance), thus there were 53 total cases: 46 with severe haemophilia, 2 with moderate haemophilia, 5 with mild haemophilia, 44 with haemophilia A and 9 with haemophilia B; 32 Traditional dosing and 21 Canadian dosing regimens. Patients on primary prophylaxis had a decreased failure rate (25%) compared to children treated with secondary prophylaxis (67%) regardless of technique of prophylaxis. When compared to a 'Traditional' factor prophylaxis schedule, the 'Canadian' tailored prophylaxis protocol was comparable with the exception of a decreased use of implanted venous devices in the 'Canadian' group. Ongoing bleeding (primarily joint bleeds) occurs with all prophylactic regimens. The lowest incidence of treatment failure was noted in children who began primary prophylaxis at a young age and before initial joint bleeds. Primary prophylaxis is superior to secondary prophylaxis regardless of dosing regimen. Traditional and Canadian dosing regimens were equivalent in outcome when measured over several years of follow-up.

  7. Comparison of TOPEX/Poseidon orbit determination solutions obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Division and Precision Orbit Determination Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doll, C.; Mistretta, G.; Hart, R.; Oza, D.; Cox, C.; Nemesure, M.; Bolvin, D.; Samii, Mina V.

    1993-01-01

    Orbit determination results are obtained by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) and a real-time extended Kalman filter estimation system to process Tracking Data and Relay Satellite (TDRS) System (TDRSS) measurements in support of the Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/Poseidon spacecraft navigation and health and safety operations. GTDS is the operational orbit determination system used by the FDD, and the extended Kalman fliter was implemented in an analysis prototype system, the Real-Time Orbit Determination System/Enhanced (RTOD/E). The Precision Orbit Determination (POD) team within the GSFC Space Geodesy Branch generates an independent set of high-accuracy trajectories to support the TOPEX/Poseidon scientific data. These latter solutions use the Geodynamics (GEODYN) orbit determination system with laser ranging tracking data. The TOPEX/Poseidon trajectories were estimated for the October 22 - November 1, 1992, timeframe, for which the latest preliminary POD results were available. Independent assessments were made of the consistencies of solutions produced by the batch and sequential methods. The batch cases were assessed using overlap comparisons, while the sequential cases were assessed with covariances and the first measurement residuals. The batch least-squares and forward-filtered RTOD/E orbit solutions were compared with the definitive POD orbit solutions. The solution differences were generally less than 10 meters (m) for the batch least squares and less than 18 m for the sequential estimation solutions. The differences among the POD, GTDS, and RTOD/E solutions can be traced to differences in modeling and tracking data types, which are being analyzed in detail.

  8. A Family-Centered Positive Behavior Support Approach to the Amelioration of Food Refusal Behavior: An Empirical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binnendyk, Lauren; Lucyshyn, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a family-centered positive behavior support approach to the amelioration of food refusal behavior in a child with autism. The study was conducted with the child and his family in their home. It employed an empirical case study design with one meal routine: snack time. Following…

  9. Comparison of continuous air monitor utilization: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.; Whicker, J.J.; Voss, J.T.

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Metallurgy Research (CMR) building has been upgrading to different continuous air monitors (CAMs) over the past several years. During the transition, both the newer and older CAMs were positioned in the rooms for field testing and comparison. On December 19, 1996, an accidental release of plutonium aerosol occurred into a laboratory in the CMR building. The event occurred while the room was unoccupied, and no personnel were exposed from this incident. There were two fixed air samplers (FASs) and three CAMs operating in the room at the time the release occurred, including two of the recently installed Canberra Alpha Sentry CAMs and one older Eberline CAM. The apparent cause of the release was a procedure carried out in the basement involving the replacement of the HEPA filter in the ventilation exhaust of a slot-box in the laboratory. For a short period, the ventilation was disconnected from the slot-box in this room, but not from the chemical hood exhaust on the opposite side of the laboratory. Therefore, a condition was created where backflow could occur out of the slot-box and into the room. Eventually all three CAMs in the room alarmed, and the situation was successfully monitored and brought under control by health physics personnel. Data on CAM performance were logged, and Pu activity collected on CAM and FAS filters were measured. A comparison of the new and old continuous air monitoring programs was performed and many interesting lessons on CAM performance and CAM utilization were learned. Overall, this comparison showed the advantages of remote monitoring, timely spectral information, and concentration measurements resolved in time and space.

  10. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) is a method to measure perfusion using magnetically labeled blood water as an endogenous tracer. Being fully non-invasive, this technique is attractive for longitudinal studies of cerebral blood flow in healthy and diseased individuals, or as a surrogate marker of metabolism. So far, ASL has been restricted mostly to specialist centers due to a generally low SNR of the method and potential issues with user-dependent analysis needed to obtain quantitative measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Here, we evaluated a particular implementation of ASL (called Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated and a total of 284 healthy volunteers were scanned. Minimal operator dependence was assured by using an automatic planning tool and its accuracy and potential usefulness in multi-center trials was evaluated as well. Accurate repositioning between sessions was achieved with the automatic planning tool showing mean displacements of 1.87+/-0.95 mm and rotations of 1.56+/-0.66 degrees . Mean gray matter CBF was 47.4+/-7.5 [ml/100 g/min] with a between-subject standard variation SD(b)=5.5 [ml/100 g/min] and a within-subject standard deviation SD(w)=4.7 [ml/100 g/min]. The corresponding repeatability was 13.0 [ml/100 g/min] and was found to be within the range of previous studies.

  11. Comparison study of seizure detection using stationary and nonstationary methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Liu, Wentai

    2014-01-01

    We present an accurate seizure detection algorithm, and make a detailed comparison of two frequency analysis methods: a widely used stationary method - Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and a relatively new nonstationary method - Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT). Two public databases and one our own database were tested. The results show that our algorithm has very high accuracy compared with the state-of-the-art. More interestingly, it shows that the nonstationary method HHT offers better performance than the stationary method FFT in seizure detection. Therefore we propose that we should pay attention to the nonstationarity of EEG signal, since the "stationary assumption" may introduce some inaccuracy.

  12. Study on project schedule management based on comprehensive comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jun-ying

    2011-10-01

    Project schedule management is the central content in project organization plan, which affects the project time and investment. The traditional representation methods of schedule are gant chart, network chart, S curve, etc. With the engineering scale increasing constantly, techniques and management level are improving, single method can not meet the requirements of project schedule management. Comprehensive comparison method gets more and more attention, and has become one symbol of project management modernization with its vivacity and brevity form. The paper analyzes the factors that affect the project, and then compare the progress of the different control methods, finally it made some management measures of project schedule.

  13. Sage grouse on the Yakima Training Center: A summary of studies conducted during 1989 and 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, L.E. ); Hofmann, L.A. . Coe-Truman Technologies)

    1991-03-01

    A two-year study, sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Army and conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, was initiated in 1989 to study sage grouse on the Yakima Training Center (YTC). The specific objectives of this study were (1) to obtain detailed information on the distribution and relative density of sage grouse on the YTC, (2) to identify movement and habitat use patterns of sage grouse on the YTC, (3) to identify crucial habitat for sage grouse on the YTC, and (4) to provide management recommendations. Sage grouse were selected for study because they are a US Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list in Washington, and because the YTC probably contains the largest population of sage grouse left on federally owned lands in this state. The locations of 11 sage grouse leks, or breeding grounds, were determined on the YTC during extensive spring helicopter surveys. The maximum number of sage grouse observed during ground surveys of these leks varied from 2 to 55 birds. One lek, located near Range 19, was probably used by 40 to 50% of the YTC sage grouse population. Fifteen years of counts of males on leks indicate that the YTC sage grouse population was most numerous during the early to mid 1980s. Since the mid-1980s, sage grouse numbers appear to have declined on the YTC and in other locations in Washington. Forty-six sage grouse (17 females and 29 males) were captured and fitted with radio transmitters during 1989 and 1990. Movements by these sage grouse were both erratic and large when compared with other studies. We believe that many of the atypical movements were in response to military training activities. Sage grouse appeared to seek out areas on the YTC where human disturbance was low. Recommendations are made for improving the management of grouse habitat.

  14. Factitious disease: clinical lessons from case studies at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Adria C.; Fordtran, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Factitious disease is defined as the intentional production (or feigning) of disease in oneself to relieve emotional distress by assuming the role of a sick person. Although the self-induction of disease is a conscious act, the underlying motivation is usually unconscious. It has been estimated that 3% to 5% of physician-patient encounters involve factitious disease. This article presents 6 case studies from Baylor University Medical Center that highlight various clinical aspects of factitious disease. Patients with factitious diseases are extremely difficult to recognize because they do not appear different from patients with authentic causes of similar symptoms, because their psychiatric abnormalities are not appreciated, and because doctors and nurses have alowindex of suspicion. Since patients with factitious disease present a false medicalhistory, their physicians prescribe unnecessary procedures and therapies that may result in iatrogenic disease. In many cases, damage to these patients from doctors' actions exceeds the harm resulting from the patients' self-induced illness. The clues that should suggest factitious disease, the diagnostic roles of the clinician and a consulting psychiatrist, and the ethical conflicts that confront doctors taking care of such patients are discussed. To help keep factitious disease in clinical perspective, one of the case studies involves the antithesis of factitious disease, where a patient was mistakenly diagnosed as having psychogenic pain when in fact the symptoms were caused by an overlooked physical disease. Better knowledge of the clinical features of factitious disease might have prevented the disastrous outcome. PMID:17252033

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures at risk: a two-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury in mandibular fractures. This study is based on two databases that have continuously recorded patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures in two departments-Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Vrije Universiteit University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy. Demographic, anatomic, and etiology variables were considered for each patient and statistically assessed in relation to the neurosensory IAN impairment. Statistically significant associations were found between IAN injury and fracture displacement (p = 0.03), isolated mandibular fractures (p = 0.01), and angle fractures (p = 0.004). A statistically significant association was also found between IAN injury and assaults (p = 0.03). Displaced isolated mandibular angle fractures could be considered at risk for increased incidence of IAN injury. Assaults seem to be the most important etiological factor that is responsible for IAN lesions. PMID:25383147

  16. C-130 Advanced Technology Center wing box conceptual design/cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.; Foreman, C. R.; Silva, K.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed by Northrop/LTV for an advanced C-130 Center Wing Box (CWB) which could meet the severe mission requirements of the SOF C-130 aircraft. The goals for the advanced technology CWB relative to the current C-130H CWB were: (1) the same acquisition cost; (2) lower operating support costs; (3) equal or lower weight; (4) a 30,000 hour service life for the SOF mission; and (5) minimum impact on the current maintenance concept. Initially, the structural arrangement, weight, external and internal loads, fatigue spectrum, flutter envelope and design criteria for the SOF C-130 aircraft CWB were developed. An advanced materials assessment was then conducted to determine the suitability of advanced materials for a 1994 production availability and detailed trade studies were performed on candidate CWB conceptual designs. Finally, a life-cycle cost analysis was performed on the advanced CWB. The study results showed that a hybrid composite/metallic CWB could meet the severe SOF design requirements, reduce the CWB weight by 14 pct., and was cost effective relative to an all metal beefed up C-130H CWB.

  17. An Epidemiological Study of Hyperhidrosis Patients Visiting the Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Jung; Han, Kyung Ream; Choi, Ho; Kim, Do Wan

    2010-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a disorder of perspiration in excess of the body's physiologic need and significantly impacts one's occupational, physical, emotional, and social life. The purpose of our study was to investigate the characteristics of primary hyperhidrosis in 255 patients at Ajou University Hospital Hyperhidrosis Center from March 2006, to February 2008. Information collected from the medical records was: sex, sites of hyperhidrosis, age at visit, age of onset, aggravating factors, hyperhidrosis disease severity scale (HDSS) rank, family history, occupation, and past treatment. A total of 255 patient records were reviewed; 57.6% were male. Patients with a family history (34.1%) showed a lower age of onset (13.21±5.80 yr vs. 16.04±9.83 yr in those without family history); 16.5% had previous treatment, most commonly oriental medicine. Palmar and plantar sites were the most commonly affected, and 87.9% of patients felt their sweating was intolerable and always interfered with their daily activities. Our study provides some original information on the Korean primary hyperhidrosis population. Patients who have a family history show signs of disease in early age than those without family history. PMID:20436716

  18. Retrospective Single Center Study of Granulocyte Monocyte Adsorption Apheresis Treatment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Edfors, Kajsa; Ståhlberg, Dagny; Söderman, Charlotte

    2016-02-01

    Patients with active inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have elevated and activated myeloid leukocytes, which infiltrate the intestinal mucosa. A significant proportion of IBD patients do not respond adequately to conventional treatment regimes. Studies have suggested that treatment with granulocyte monocyte apheresis (GMA) could be a safe and efficacious alternative for these patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of granulocyte/monocyte apheresis in patients with IBD in a retrospective cohort study, conducted from a single center in Stockholm. Clinical details from consecutive apheresis treated patients were retrospectively reviewed from 2004 to 2012. A total of 37 patients were included, 23 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 14 with Crohn's disease (CD). Clinical response was seen in 11 patients (30%) and complete remission in 11 patients (30%). The remission rate was higher in UC patients compared to CD patients, 39% (N = 9) and 14% (N = 2) respectively. A total of 9 patients experienced adverse events. Most frequently reported was headache (N = 4). GMA seems to be a valuable adjuvant treatment regime in the care of patients with refractory IBD.

  19. A Polysomnography Study of Kleine–Levin Syndrome in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan-Wen; Yu, Huan; Yuan, Lu-Hua; Zhu, Guo-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of hypersomnia. Polysomnographic (PSG) researches of KLS have been reported only in few publications in the past decades. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of PSG of KLS. Methods: This study, which was conducted from March 2010 to July 2014, included seven patients diagnosed with KLS in the Sleep and Wake Disorder Center of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University (Shanghai, China). PSG and multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) were performed during their episodes and the results were evaluated. Results: Five of the seven patients were males. The mean age at KLS onset was 15.6 ± 3.6 years. The number of episodes ranged from 2 to 7. The duration of episodes lasted from 4 to 11 days. The sleep architecture and proportion were normal in most of the patients. The average value of mean sleep latency was 6.9 ± 4.1 min. No sleep-onset rapid eye movement (SOREM) was detected in three of the patients, whereas one patient experienced one period of SOREM, and such episodes occurred twice in other two patients. Conclusions: We found that sleep architecture and proportion were normal in most KLS patients. However, the results of PSG and MSLT had no specificity for KLS patients. PMID:27364793

  20. A WFPC2 Study of Proplyds and a Protostellar Condensation at the Center of M20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    2001-07-01

    The Trifid nebula {M20} is a well-known prominent optical HII region trisected by bands of obscuring dust lanes and excited by an O7.5 star HD 164492A. Our recent study of near-IR ground-based observations of this region at J, H, K and L show all seven components of HD 164492 {A to G} identified optically. Our sub-arcsecond radio continuum VLA and ground- based observations of M20 also show free-free emission from three stellar sources {B, C and D} and a bright rim outlining a protostellar condensation {TC1} lying close to the O7V star {HD 164492A} at the center of the nebula. Based on a number of strong arguments, these stars have disks associated with them and their envelopes are photoionized externally by the UV radiation from the hot central star, HD 164492A. The proposed WFPC2 observations are intended to search for neutral protoplanetary disks ``proplyds'', to study the optically bright rim of ionized gas associated with TC1 for signs of star formation, and to make a detailed subarcsecond determination of extinction toward the dust lanes of M20 using HAlpha and 6cm data.

  1. Feasibility of a Patient-Centered, Smartphone-Based, Diabetes Care System: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ky; Kwak, Soo Heon; Baek, Seungsu; Lee, Seung Lyeol; Jang, Hak Chul; Park, Kyong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background We developed a patient-centered, smartphone-based, diabetes care system (PSDCS). This study aims to test the feasibility of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction with the PSDCS. Methods This study was a single-arm pilot study. The participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus were instructed to use the PSDCS, which integrates a Bluetooth-connected glucometer, digital food diary, and wearable physical activity monitoring device. The primary end point was the change in HbA1c from baseline after a 12-week intervention. Results Twenty-nine patients aged 53.9±9.1 years completed the study. HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose levels decreased significantly from baseline (7.7%±0.7% to 7.1%±0.6%, P<0.0001; 140.9±39.1 to 120.1±31.0 mg/dL, P=0.0088, respectively). The frequency of glucose monitoring correlated with the magnitude of HbA1c reduction (r=–0.57, P=0.0013). The components of the diabetes self-care activities, including diet, exercise, and glucose monitoring, were significantly improved, particularly in the upper tertile of HbA1c reduction. There were no severe adverse events during the intervention. Conclusion A 12-week application of the PSDCS to patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes resulted in a significant HbA1c reduction with tolerable safety profiles; these findings require confirmation in a future randomized controlled trial. PMID:27098508

  2. Women's Centers: The Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Jodi

    1988-01-01

    Presents a typology of women's centers and provides an overview of state, regional, and national networks of women's centers, including the evolution of the Women's Center/Services Caucus of the National Women's Studies Association and the more recently organized National Association of Women's Centers. (NB)

  3. Aerial Measuring System (AMS)/Israel Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC) Joint Comparison Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wasiolek, P.; Halevy, I.

    2013-12-23

    Under the 13th Bilateral Meeting to Combat Nuclear Terrorism conducted on January 8–9, 2013, the committee approved the development of a cost-effective proposal to conduct a Comparison Study of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Israel Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC). The study was to be held at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada, with measurements at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The goal of the AMS and the IAEC joint survey was to compare the responses of the two agencies’ aerial radiation detection systems to varied radioactive surface contamination levels and isotopic composition experienced at the NNSS, and the differing data processing techniques utilized by the respective teams. Considering that for the comparison both teams were using custom designed and built systems, the main focus of the short campaign was to investigate the impact of the detector size and data analysis techniques used by both teams. The AMS system, SPectral Advanced Radiological Computer System, Model A (SPARCS-A), designed and built by RSL, incorporates four different size sodium iodide (NaI) crystals: 1" × 1", 2" × 4" × 4", 2" × 4" ×16", and an “up-looking” 2" × 4" × 4". The Israel AMS System, Air RAM 2000, was designed by the IAEC Nuclear Research Center – Negev (NRCN) and built commercially by ROTEM Industries (Israel) and incorporates two 2" diameter × 2" long NaI crystals. The operational comparison was conducted at RSL-Nellis in Las Vegas, Nevada, during week of June 24–27, 2013. The Israeli system, Air RAM 2000, was shipped to RSL-Nellis and mounted together with the DOE SPARCS on a DOE Bell-412 helicopter for a series of aerial comparison measurements at local test ranges, including the Desert Rock Airport and Area 3 at the NNSS. A 4-person Israeli team from the IAEC NRCN supported the activity together with 11

  4. Feasibility study of an integrated optic switching center. [satellite tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design of a high data rate switching center for a satellite tracking station is discussed. The feasibility of a switching network using an integrated switching matrix is assessed. The preferred integrated optical switching scheme was found to be an electro-optic Bragg diffraction switch. To ascertain the advantages of the integrated optics switching center, its properties are compared to those of opto-electronic and to electronics switching networks.

  5. A group center overlap based approach for "3D QSAR" studies on TIBO derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sapre, Nitin S; Gupta, Swagata; Pancholi, Nilanjana; Sapre, Neelima

    2009-04-30

    Current challenges in drug designing and lead optimization has reached a bottle neck where the main onus lies on rigorous validation to afford robust and predictive models. In the present study, we have suggested that predictive structure-activity relationship (SAR) models based on robust statistical analyses can serve as effective screening tools for large volume of compounds present either in chemical databases or in virtual libraries. 3D descriptors derived from the similarity-based alignment of molecules with respect to group center overlap from each individual template point and other "alignment averaged," but significant descriptors (ClogP, molar refractivity, connolly accessible area) were used to generate QSAR models. The results indicated that the artificial neural network method (r(2) = 0.902) proved to be superior to the multiple linear regression method (r(2) = 0.810). Cross validation of the models with an external set was reasonably satisfactory. Screening PubChem compound database based on the models obtained, yielded 14 newer modified compounds belonging to the TIBO class of inhibitors, as well as, two novel scaffolds, with enhanced binding efficacy as hits. These hits may be targeted toward potent lead-optimization and help in designing and synthesizing new compounds with potential therapeutic utility. PMID:18785154

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of radiation damage in photosynthetic reaction center crystals.

    SciTech Connect

    Utschig, L. M.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Tiede, D. M.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used to simultaneously study radiation-induced cofactor reduction and damaging radical formation in single crystals of the bacterial reaction center (RC). Crystals of Fe-removed/Zn-replaced RC protein from Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides R26 were irradiated with varied radiation doses at cryogenic temperature and analyzed for radiation-induced free radical formation and alteration of light-induced photosynthetic electron transfer activity using high-field (HF) D-band (130 GHz) and X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR spectroscopies. These analyses show that the formation of radiation-induced free radicals saturated at doses 1 order of magnitude smaller than the amount of radiation at which protein crystals lose their diffraction quality, while light-induced RC activity was found to be lost at radiation doses at least 1 order of magnitude lower than the dose at which radiation-induced radicals exhibited saturation. HF D-band EPR spectra provide direct evidence for radiation-induced reduction of the quinones and possibly other cofactors. These results demonstrate that substantial radiation damage is likely to have occurred during X-ray diffraction data collection used for photosynthetic RC structure determination. Thus, both radiation-induced loss of photochemical activity in RC crystals and reduction of the quinones are important factors that must be considered when correlating spectroscopic and crystallographic measurements of quinone site structures.

  7. Asthma care in community health centers: a study by the southeast regional clinicians' network.

    PubMed Central

    Rust, G. S.; Murray, V.; Octaviani, H.; Schmidt, E. D.; Howard, J. P.; Anderson-Grant, V.; Willard-Jelks, K.

    1999-01-01

    Federally funded community health centers (CHCs) were surveyed to assess their ability to serve low-income asthma patients in the southeastern United States. Data were collected on CHC clinicians, pharmacy services, and patient characteristics. Twenty-six (74%) of 35 participating CHCs provided data on 83 distinct clinic sites in eight states, representing 898,977 billable patient visits to 318,920 people during the one-year study period. Participating CHCs provided 23% of all CHC patient visits in Region IV in 1995. Sixty-two percent of patients had a family income below poverty level. Almost 75% of the patients were uninsured or receiving Medicaid. Asthma was the diagnosis code for 2.04% of all medical encounters. Twenty-nine percent of sites were unable to provide medications for uninsured asthma patients, while 66% could provide drug samples. Thirty-three percent of CHCs had in-house pharmacies and 33% offered pharmacy vouchers. Eighty-two percent could provide beta-agonist inhalers, 54% could provide steroid inhalers, and 17% could provide peak flow meters. Federally funded CHCs provide care to many asthma patients from the highest risk segments of the population, but often do not have the resources needed to follow current clinical guidelines. PMID:10643212

  8. Ecological baseline study of the Yakima Firing Center proposed land acquisition: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.E.; Beedlow, P.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Dauble, D.D.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides baseline environmental information for the property identified for possible expansion of the Yakima Firing Center. Results from this work provide general descriptions of the animals and major plant communities present. A vegetation map derived from a combination of on-site surveillance and remotely sensed imagery is provided as part of this report. Twenty-seven wildlife species of special interest (protected, sensitive, furbearer, game animal, etc.), and waterfowl, were observed on the proposed expansion area. Bird censuses revealed 13 raptorial species (including four of special interest: bald eagle, golden eagle, osprey, and prairie falcon); five upland game bird species (sage grouse, California quail, chukar, gray partridge, and ring-necked pheasant); common loons (a species proposed for state listing as threatened); and five other species of special interest (sage thrasher, loggerhead shrike, mourning dove, sage sparrow, and long-billed curlew). Estimates of waterfowl abundance are included for the Priest Rapids Pool of the Columbia River. Six small mammal species were captured during this study; one, the sagebrush vole, is a species of special interest. Two large animal species, mule deer and elk, were noted on the site. Five species of furbearing animals were observed (coyote, beaver, raccoon, mink, and striped skunk). Four species of reptiles and one amphibian were noted. Fisheries surveys were conducted to document the presence of gamefish, and sensitive-classified fish and aquatic invertebrates. Rainbow trout were the only fish collected within the boundaries of the proposed northern expansion area. 22 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. De Novo Malignancy Post Liver Transplantation: A Single Center, Population Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Hemant; Berman, Kenneth; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Slaven, James; Kwo, Paul; Tector, A Joseph; Chalasani, Naga; Ghabril, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    Background With the growing numbers of liver transplant recipients, it is increasingly important to understand the risks of de novo malignancy after liver transplantation. Aim To characterize the incidence of de novo malignancy after liver transplantation compared to a control non-transplant population. Methods We studied 534 Indiana state residents undergoing liver transplantation at our center between 1997 and 2004, followed through August 2010 The incidence and predictors of malignancy were determined. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of cancer in our cohort was compared to age, gender and period matched state population using the Indiana State Cancer Registry. Results After a mean follow up of 5.7 ± 3.2 years, 73 patients (13.7%) developed 80 cancers, with 5 and 10 year incidence rates of 11.7%, and 24.8%, respectively. These included 24 (30%) skin, 16 (20%) hematologic and 40 (50%) solid tumors. The most common solid cancers were aerodigestive. Compared to matched state population, liver transplant recipients had significantly higher incidence of all cancers (SIR:3.1, 95%CI:2.9–3.2), skin (melanoma) (SIR:5.8, 95%CI:4.7–7.0), hematologic (SIR:7.1, 95%CI:6.3–8.0), and solid (SIR:2.7, 95%CI:2.5–2.8) tumors. Conclusion There is a significantly increased risk of de novo malignancies after liver transplantation, highlighting the need for surveillance strategies in this population. PMID:23808800

  10. Economic Consequences Incurred by Living Kidney Donors: A Canadian Multi-Center Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Klarenbach, S; Gill, J S; Knoll, G; Caulfield, T; Boudville, N; Prasad, G V R; Karpinski, M; Storsley, L; Treleaven, D; Arnold, J; Cuerden, M; Jacobs, P; Garg, A X

    2014-01-01

    Some living kidney donors incur economic consequences as a result of donation; however, these costs are poorly quantified. We developed a framework to comprehensively assess economic consequences from the donor perspective including out-of-pocket cost, lost wages and home productivity loss. We prospectively enrolled 100 living kidney donors from seven Canadian centers between 2004 and 2008 and collected and valued economic consequences ($CAD 2008) at 3 months and 1 year after donation. Almost all (96%) donors experienced economic consequences, with 94% reporting travel costs and 47% reporting lost pay. The average and median costs of lost pay were $2144 (SD 4167) and $0 (25th–75th percentile 0, 2794), respectively. For other expenses (travel, accommodation, medication and medical), mean and median costs were $1780 (SD 2504) and $821 (25th–75th percentile 242, 2271), respectively. From the donor perspective, mean cost was $3268 (SD 4704); one-third of donors incurred cost >$3000, and 15% >$8000. The majority of donors (83%) reported inability to perform usual household activities for an average duration of 33 days; 8% reported out-of-pocket costs for assistance with these activities. The economic impact of living kidney donation for some individuals is large. We advocate for programs to reimburse living donors for their legitimate costs. In a prospective costing study, the authors find that economic consequences incurred by living kidney donors are frequent and nontrivial, and a notable proportion of donors experience significant costs. PMID:24597854

  11. A randomized study of internet parent training accessed from community technology centers.

    PubMed

    Irvine, A Blair; Gelatt, Vicky A; Hammond, Michael; Seeley, John R

    2015-05-01

    Behavioral parent training (BPT) has been shown to be efficacious to improve parenting skills for problematic interactions with adolescents displaying oppositional and antisocial behaviors. Some research suggests that support group curricula might be transferred to the Internet, and some studies suggest that other curriculum designs might also be effective. In this research, a BPT program for parents of at-risk adolescents was tested on the Internet in a randomized trial (N = 307) from computer labs at six community technology centers in or near large metropolitan areas. The instructional design was based on asynchronous scenario-based e-learning, rather than a traditional parent training model where presentation of course material builds content sequentially over multiple class sessions. Pretest to 30-day follow-up analyses indicated significant treatment effects on parent-reported discipline style (Parenting Scale, Adolescent version), child behavior (Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory), and on social cognitive theory constructs of intentions and self-efficacy. The effect sizes were small to medium. These findings suggest the potential to provide effective parent training programs on the Internet. PMID:25351866

  12. A 20 Year Lifecycle Study for Launch Facilities at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Li. Wenyan; Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz-Marina

    2009-01-01

    The lifecycle cost analysis was based on corrosion costs for the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complexes and Mobile Launch Platforms. The first step in the study involved identifying the relevant assets that would be included. Secondly, the identification and collection of the corrosion control cost data for the selected assets was completed. Corrosion control costs were separated into four categories. The sources of cost included the NASA labor for civil servant personnel directly involved in overseeing and managing corrosion control of the assets, United Space Alliance (USA) contractual requirements for performing planned corrosion control tasks, USA performance of unplanned corrosion control tasks, and Testing and Development. Corrosion control operations performed under USA contractual requirements were the most significant contributors to the total cost of corrosion. The operations include the inspection of the pad, routine maintenance of the pad, medium and large scale blasting and repainting activities, and the repair and replacement of structural metal elements. Cost data was collected from the years between 2001 and 2007. These costs were then extrapolated to future years to calculate the 20 year lifecycle costs.

  13. Melanoma patterns of distant relapse: a study of 108 cases from a South Brazilian center*

    PubMed Central

    Rovere, Rodrigo Kraft; de Souza, Maria Eduarda Pires; Cidral, Danielle Louise da Maia; Hilgert, Sara Fernanda; Ddine, Yasmine Rodrigues Chamse; Stein, Carlos Efrain; Borges, Giuliano Santos; de Lima, Adma Silva

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased over the last decades. Recurrences occur most frequently within the first 2-3 years after diagnosis but patients carry a lifelong risk of relapse. Nevertheless, there is no consensus in the literature on what screening tests patients should undergo. Objectives: To evaluate the most common melanoma metastasis sites among a South Brazilian population from a city with one of the highest melanoma rates, and establish the best screening method for these patients. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study of 108 consecutive melanoma patients followed up at a center from 2009 to 2013. Data were collected on demographic and tumoral characteristics, as well as the site of the first diagnosed metastasis. Results: Patients were divided into 3 groups for analytical purposes: Non-visceral metastases (48% of patients), visceral metastasis (39%) and brain metastasis (13%). We tried to correlate age, gender, mean Breslow thickness, mitosis and death rates with the aforementioned groups but none showed any statistically significant association. Conclusion: Melanoma patients must be monitored to detect early relapse and subsequent effective treatment but the best follow-up strategy remains to be established. PMID:26982777

  14. Disease Course and Therapeutic Approach in Dermatomyositis: A Four-Center Retrospective Study of 100 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E.; Arnold, W. David; Hebert, Donald; Gwathmey, Kelly; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.; McVey, April L.; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Amato, Anthony A.; McDermott, Michael P.; Kissel, John; Heatwole, Chad R.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is a life-altering inflammatory disorder of skin and muscle. Details regarding the natural course of this disorder, the effects of specific therapies on its progression, and the optimal therapeutic dosage and duration of prednisone are limited. We performed a retrospective medical record review of dermatomyositis patients at four medical centers. All patients were over the age of 21 and had a clinical diagnosis of dermatomyositis with pathological confirmation. We reviewed average muscle strength, corticosteroid use, creatine kinase levels, and supplemental immunosuppressant use during the 36-month period following each patient’s initial assessment. 100 patients participated with an average age of 50.1 years. Average muscle strength improved and prednisone requirements lessened six months after initial assessment. There was no difference in the mean change in muscle strength or cumulative corticosteroid use over 36 months among those initially treated with methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, pulse IVIG, or azathioprine. There was a 5% mortality rate in dermatomyositis patients due to infections. Treated dermatomyositis patients demonstrate the most significant improvement in strength during the first six-to-twelve months following their initial clinical assessment. Additional prospective studies are needed to determine the relative benefit of select immunosuppressant agents in preserving strength and reducing corticosteroid use in dermatomyositis. PMID:26022999

  15. Disease course and therapeutic approach in dermatomyositis: A four-center retrospective study of 100 patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Arnold, W David; Hebert, Donald; Gwathmey, Kelly; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J; McVey, April L; Pasnoor, Mamatha; Amato, Anthony A; McDermott, Michael P; Kissel, John; Heatwole, Chad R

    2015-08-01

    Dermatomyositis is a life-altering inflammatory disorder of skin and muscle. Details regarding the natural course of this disorder, the effects of specific therapies on its progression, and the optimal therapeutic dosage and duration of prednisone are limited. We performed a retrospective medical record review of dermatomyositis patients at four medical centers. All patients were over the age of 21 and had a clinical diagnosis of dermatomyositis with pathological confirmation. We reviewed average muscle strength, corticosteroid use, creatine kinase levels, and supplemental immunosuppressant use during the 36-month period following each patient's initial assessment. One hundred patients participated with an average age of 50.1 years. Average muscle strength improved and prednisone requirements lessened six months after initial assessment. There was no difference in the mean change in muscle strength or cumulative corticosteroid use over 36 months among those initially treated with methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, pulse IVIG, or azathioprine. There was a 5% mortality rate in dermatomyositis patients due to infections. Treated dermatomyositis patients demonstrate the most significant improvement in strength during the first six-to-twelve months following their initial clinical assessment. Additional prospective studies are needed to determine the relative benefit of select immunosuppressant agents in preserving strength and reducing corticosteroid use in dermatomyositis.

  16. Flow Quality Studies of the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel Circuit (1995 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie A.; Gonsalez, Jose C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of conducting the flow-field surveys described in this report was to more fully document the flow quality in several areas of the tunnel circuit in the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel. The results from these surveys provide insight into areas of the tunnel that were known to exhibit poor flow quality characteristics and provide data that will be useful to the design of flow quality improvements and a new heat exchanger for the facility. An instrumented traversing mechanism was used to survey the flow field at several large cross sections of the tunnel loop over the entire speed range of the facility. Flow-field data were collected at five stations in the tunnel loop, including downstream of the fan drive motor housing, upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, and upstream and downstream of the spraybars located in the settling chamber upstream of the test section. The data collected during these surveys greatly expanded the data base describing the flow quality in each of these areas. The new data matched closely the flow quality trends recorded from earlier tests. Data collected downstream of the heat exchanger and in the settling chamber showed how the configuration of the folded heat exchanger affected the pressure, velocity, and flow angle distributions in these areas. Smoke flow visualization was also used to qualitatively study the flow field in an area downstream of the drive fan and in the settling chamber/contraction section.

  17. Facial Nerve Monitoring During Parotidectomy:A Two-Center Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Régloix, Stanislas Ballivet-de; Grinholtz-Haddad, Julia; Maurin, Olga; Genestier, Louise; Lisan, Quentin; Pons, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We present a retrospective two-center study series and discussion of the current literature to assess the benefits of facial nerve monitoring during parotidectomy. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2012, 128 parotidectomies were performed in 125 patients. Of these, 47 procedures were performed without facial nerve monitoring (group 1) and 81 with facial nerve monitoring (group 2). The primary endpoint was the House-Brackmann classification at 1 month and 6 months. Facial palsy was determined when the House-Brackmann grade was 3 or higher. Results: In group 1, 15 facial palsies were noted; 8 were transient and 7 were definitive. In group 2, 19 facial palsies were noted; 12 were transient and 7 were definitive. At both one and six months after parotidectomy, the rate of facial palsy in reoperation cases was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2. Conclusion: Facial nerve monitoring is a simple, effective adjunct method that is available to surgeons to assist with the functional preservation of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Although it does not improve the facial prognosis in first-line surgery, it does improve the facial prognosis in reoperations. PMID:27602336

  18. Nutritional management of enterocutaneous fistula: a retrospective study at a Malaysian university medical center.

    PubMed

    Badrasawi, Manal Mh; Shahar, Suzana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula is a challenging clinical condition with serious complications and considerable morbidity and mortality. Early nutritional support has been found to decrease these complications and to improve the clinical outcome. Location of the fistula and physiological status affect the nutrition management plan in terms of feeding route, calories, and protein requirements. This study investigated the nutritional management procedures at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, and attempted to determine factors that affect the clinical outcome. Nutritional management was evaluated retrospectively in 22 patients with enterocutaneous fistula seen over a 5-year period. Medical records were reviewed to obtain data on nutritional status, biochemical indices, and route and tolerance of feeding. Calories and protein requirements are reported and categorized. The results show that surgery was the predominant etiology and low output fistula was the major physiological category; anatomically, the majority were ileocutaneous. The spontaneous healing rate was 14%, the total healing rate was 45%, and the mortality rate was 22%, with 14% due to fistula-associated complications. There was a significant relationship between body mass index/serum albumin levels and fistula healing; these parameters also had a significant relationship with mortality. Glutamine was used in 50% of cases; however, there was no significant relationship with fistula healing or mortality rate. The nutritional status of the patient has an important impact on the clinical outcome. Conservative management that includes nutrition support is very important in order to improve nutritional status before surgical repair of the fistula.

  19. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study

    SciTech Connect

    Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

    1998-05-01

    Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  20. Building an outpatient imaging center: A case study at genesis healthcare system, part 2.

    PubMed

    Yanci, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In the second of 2 parts, this article will focus on process improvement projects utilizing a case study at Genesis HealthCare System located in Zanesville, OH. Operational efficiency is a key step in developing a freestanding diagnostic imaging center. The process improvement projects began with an Expert Improvement Session (EIS) on the scheduling process. An EIS session is a facilitated meeting that can last anywhere from 3 hours to 2 days. Its intention is to take a group of people involved with the problem or operational process and work to understand current failures or breakdowns in the process. Recommendations are jointly developed to overcome any current deficiencies, and a work plan is structured to create ownership over the changes. A total of 11 EIS sessions occurred over the course of this project, covering 5 sections: Scheduling/telephone call process, Pre-registration, Verification/pre-certification, MRI throughput, CT throughput. Following is a single example of a project focused on the process improvement efforts. All of the process improvement projects utilized a quasi methodology of "DMAIC" (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control). PMID:17172093

  1. A protein dynamics study of photosystem II: the effects of protein conformation on reaction center function.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug

    2006-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study photosystem II structure and function. Structural information obtained from simulations was combined with ab initio computations of chromophore excited states. In contrast to calculations based on the x-ray structure, the molecular-dynamics-based calculations accurately predicted the experimental absorbance spectrum. In addition, our calculations correctly assigned the energy levels of reaction-center (RC) chromophores, as well as the lowest-energy antenna chlorophyll. The primary and secondary quinone electron acceptors, Q(A) and Q(B), exhibited independent changes in position over the duration of the simulation. Q(B) fluctuated between two binding sites similar to the proximal and distal sites previously observed in light- and dark-adapted RC from purple bacteria. Kinetic models were used to characterize the relative influence of chromophore geometry, site energies, and electron transport rates on RC efficiency. The fluctuating energy levels of antenna chromophores had a larger impact on quantum yield than did their relative positions. Variations in electron transport rates had the most significant effect and were sufficient to explain the experimentally observed multi-component decay of excitation in photosystem II. The implications of our results are discussed in the context of competing evolutionary selection pressures for RC structure and function.

  2. Nutritional management of enterocutaneous fistula: a retrospective study at a Malaysian university medical center

    PubMed Central

    Badrasawi, Manal MH; Shahar, Suzana; Sagap, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Enterocutaneous fistula is a challenging clinical condition with serious complications and considerable morbidity and mortality. Early nutritional support has been found to decrease these complications and to improve the clinical outcome. Location of the fistula and physiological status affect the nutrition management plan in terms of feeding route, calories, and protein requirements. This study investigated the nutritional management procedures at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, and attempted to determine factors that affect the clinical outcome. Nutritional management was evaluated retrospectively in 22 patients with enterocutaneous fistula seen over a 5-year period. Medical records were reviewed to obtain data on nutritional status, biochemical indices, and route and tolerance of feeding. Calories and protein requirements are reported and categorized. The results show that surgery was the predominant etiology and low output fistula was the major physiological category; anatomically, the majority were ileocutaneous. The spontaneous healing rate was 14%, the total healing rate was 45%, and the mortality rate was 22%, with 14% due to fistula-associated complications. There was a significant relationship between body mass index/serum albumin levels and fistula healing; these parameters also had a significant relationship with mortality. Glutamine was used in 50% of cases; however, there was no significant relationship with fistula healing or mortality rate. The nutritional status of the patient has an important impact on the clinical outcome. Conservative management that includes nutrition support is very important in order to improve nutritional status before surgical repair of the fistula. PMID:25187726

  3. Safety and efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis: a multi-center observational study.

    PubMed

    Miclea, A; Leussink, V I; Hartung, H P; Gold, R; Hoepner, R

    2016-08-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved for treating patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) based on two phase III clinical trials demonstrating its efficacy. This prompts the need for demonstrating the clinical efficacy and safety of DMF in the real world. By retrospective analysis of medical records at two German MS centers, 644 MS patients treated with DMF were identified. All were included in a safety analysis, and a subgroup of patients with available efficacy data during previous MS therapies (n = 352) was further analyzed for annualized relapse rate and disability progression assessed by the EDSS. In the overall DMF population studied, the annualized relapse rate decreased from 0.52 at baseline to 0.35, and the annualized disability progression from 0.15 to 0.10. Patients who were switched from interferons or glatiramer acetate to DMF revealed a greater benefit, whereas patients pretreated with more potent immunotherapies did not respond that well. Interestingly, patients with a lymphocyte count ≥2000/µl after 0.52 years (mean, SD 0.2) of DMF treatment did not benefit compared to those with lower lymphocyte counts. In total, 22.2 % of the patients withdrew from DMF due to side effects, with gastrointestinal discomfort (12.7 %) and lymphopenia (5.3 %) as most frequently reported reasons. Our study corroborates that DMF is an overall safe and effective drug that reduces relapse rate as well as disability progression in MS patients. Further prospective studies are warranted to establish the additional parameters predicting DMF response, especially in patients switching from other first-line immunotherapies. PMID:27260297

  4. Impact of Pediatric Chronic Dialysis on Long-Term Patient Outcome: Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Irit; Dagan, Amit; Cleper, Roxana; Falush, Yafa; Davidovits, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Owing to a shortage of kidney donors in Israel, children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may stay on maintenance dialysis for a considerable time, placing them at a significant risk. The aim of this study was to understand the causes of mortality. Study Design. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the files of children on chronic dialysis (>3 months) during the years 1995–2013 at a single pediatric medical center. Results. 110 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 10.7 ± 5.27 yrs. (range: 1 month–24 yrs). Forty-five children (42%) had dysplastic kidneys and 19 (17.5%) had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Twenty-five (22.7%) received peritoneal dialysis, 59 (53.6%) hemodialysis, and 6 (23.6%) both modalities sequentially. Median dialysis duration was 1.46 years (range: 0.25–17.54 years). Mean follow-up was 13.5 ± 5.84 yrs. Seventy-nine patients (71.8%) underwent successful transplantation, 10 (11.2%) had graft failure, and 8 (7.3%) continued dialysis without transplantation. Twelve patients (10.9%) died: 8 of dialysis-associated complications and 4 of their primary illness. The 5-year survival rate was 84%: 90% for patients older than 5 years and 61% for younger patients. Conclusions. Chronic dialysis is a suitable temporary option for children awaiting renal transplantation. Although overall long-term survival rate is high, very young children are at high risk for life-threatening dialysis-associated complications.

  5. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Anthony; Horanyi, Mihaly; Kempf, Sascha; Thomas, Evan; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Northway, Paige; Gruen, Eberhard; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Srama, Ralf; and others

    2012-07-15

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Instituet fuer Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -7} torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10{sup -10} torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  6. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10-7 torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10-10 torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  7. Impact of Pediatric Chronic Dialysis on Long-Term Patient Outcome: Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Irit; Dagan, Amit; Cleper, Roxana; Falush, Yafa; Davidovits, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Owing to a shortage of kidney donors in Israel, children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may stay on maintenance dialysis for a considerable time, placing them at a significant risk. The aim of this study was to understand the causes of mortality. Study Design. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the files of children on chronic dialysis (>3 months) during the years 1995–2013 at a single pediatric medical center. Results. 110 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 10.7 ± 5.27 yrs. (range: 1 month–24 yrs). Forty-five children (42%) had dysplastic kidneys and 19 (17.5%) had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Twenty-five (22.7%) received peritoneal dialysis, 59 (53.6%) hemodialysis, and 6 (23.6%) both modalities sequentially. Median dialysis duration was 1.46 years (range: 0.25–17.54 years). Mean follow-up was 13.5 ± 5.84 yrs. Seventy-nine patients (71.8%) underwent successful transplantation, 10 (11.2%) had graft failure, and 8 (7.3%) continued dialysis without transplantation. Twelve patients (10.9%) died: 8 of dialysis-associated complications and 4 of their primary illness. The 5-year survival rate was 84%: 90% for patients older than 5 years and 61% for younger patients. Conclusions. Chronic dialysis is a suitable temporary option for children awaiting renal transplantation. Although overall long-term survival rate is high, very young children are at high risk for life-threatening dialysis-associated complications. PMID:27597898

  8. Ecological baseline study of the Yakima Firing Center proposed land acquisition: A Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.E.; Beedlow, P.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Dauble, D.D.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1988-02-01

    A baseline census was conducted from October 1987 to Janurary 1988 on the property identified for possible expansion of the Yakima Firing Center. These studies provide general descriptions of the major plant communities presentand animal inhabitants during the late fall and winter study period. A vegetation map derived from a combination of onsite surveillance and remotely sensed imagery is also provided as part of this report. Through January 1988, 13 wildlife species of special interest to state and federal agencies, in addition to ducks and geese, were observed on the proposed expansion area. Then raptorial bird species were observed in the area, including bald eagles, golden eagles, and prairie falcons. Upland game bird species, such as sage grouse, California quail, chuckars, and gray (Hungarian) partridge were present. Loggerhead shrikes, a species of special interest, were also observed on the site. Estimates of waterfowl abundance are included for the Priest Rapids Pool of the Columbia River, which includes the proposed river crossing sites. The number of waterfowl on the proposed crossing areas were comparatively low during the winter of 1986 to 1987 and high in 1987 to 1988. Bald eagles ad common loons were observed on the crossing areas. Six small mammal species were captured during this study period;one, the sagebrush vole, is a species of special interest. Two large animal species, mule deer and elk, were noted on the site. Beaver were the only furbearig animals noted to date. Rainbow trout were the only fish species collected within the proposed northern expansion area. The distribution of fall chinook salmon spawning areas was documented within the proposed river crossing areas. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. 3 MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies.

    PubMed

    Shu, Anthony; Collette, Andrew; Drake, Keith; Grün, Eberhard; Horányi, Mihály; Kempf, Sascha; Mocker, Anna; Munsat, Tobin; Northway, Paige; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Thomas, Evan

    2012-07-01

    A hypervelocity dust accelerator for studying micrometeorite impacts has been constructed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) at the University of Colorado. Based on the Max-Planck-Institüt für Kernphysik (MPI-K) accelerator, this accelerator is capable of emitting single particles of a specific mass and velocity selected by the user. The accelerator consists of a 3 MV Pelletron generator with a dust source, four image charge pickup detectors, and two interchangeable target chambers: a large high-vacuum test bed and an ultra-high vacuum impact study chamber. The large test bed is a 1.2 m diameter, 1.5 m long cylindrical vacuum chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-7) torr while the ultra-high vacuum chamber is a 0.75 m diameter, 1.1 m long chamber capable of pressures as low as 10(-10) torr. Using iron dust of up to 2 microns in diameter, final velocities have been measured up to 52 km/s. The spread of the dust particles and the effect of electrostatic focusing have been measured using a long exposure CCD and a quartz target. Furthermore, a new technique of particle selection is being developed using real time digital filtering techniques. Signals are digitized and then cross-correlated with a shaped filter, resulting in a suppressed noise floor. Improvements over the MPI-K design, which include a higher operating voltage and digital filtering for detection, increase the available parameter space of dust emitted by the accelerator. The CCLDAS dust facility is a user facility open to the scientific community to assist with instrument calibrations and experiments.

  10. Impact of Pediatric Chronic Dialysis on Long-Term Patient Outcome: Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Levy Erez, Daniella; Krause, Irit; Dagan, Amit; Cleper, Roxana; Falush, Yafa; Davidovits, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Owing to a shortage of kidney donors in Israel, children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) may stay on maintenance dialysis for a considerable time, placing them at a significant risk. The aim of this study was to understand the causes of mortality. Study Design. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the files of children on chronic dialysis (>3 months) during the years 1995-2013 at a single pediatric medical center. Results. 110 patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 10.7 ± 5.27 yrs. (range: 1 month-24 yrs). Forty-five children (42%) had dysplastic kidneys and 19 (17.5%) had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Twenty-five (22.7%) received peritoneal dialysis, 59 (53.6%) hemodialysis, and 6 (23.6%) both modalities sequentially. Median dialysis duration was 1.46 years (range: 0.25-17.54 years). Mean follow-up was 13.5 ± 5.84 yrs. Seventy-nine patients (71.8%) underwent successful transplantation, 10 (11.2%) had graft failure, and 8 (7.3%) continued dialysis without transplantation. Twelve patients (10.9%) died: 8 of dialysis-associated complications and 4 of their primary illness. The 5-year survival rate was 84%: 90% for patients older than 5 years and 61% for younger patients. Conclusions. Chronic dialysis is a suitable temporary option for children awaiting renal transplantation. Although overall long-term survival rate is high, very young children are at high risk for life-threatening dialysis-associated complications. PMID:27597898

  11. Elderly pedestrian neurotrauma: A descriptive study from a premier neurotrauma center in India

    PubMed Central

    Munivenkatappa, Ashok; Pruthi, Nupur; Philip, Mariamma; Devi, Bhagavatula I; Somanna, Sampath

    2013-01-01

    Context: Experience with elderly pedestrian neurotrauma at a major neurotrauma tertiary center. Aims: To highlight the specific injuries and outcome of the elderly pedestrian neurotrauma patients within the city of Bangalore and its surrounding districts. Settings and Design: A retrospective study consisting of demographic data, clinical findings, radiological details, and outcomes. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted at the casualty services, in which 143 consecutive elderly pedestrian (age >60 years) head injury victims were studied from June to September 2009. The records from the hospital mortuary were analyzed from 2007 to 2009. An analysis of 77 elderly patients who died as a pedestrian in accidents during this period was performed. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 15. Results: The elderly pedestrians constituted 27% (143/529) of all pedestrian traumas. Two wheelers were the most common accident vehicle (56.6%, 81/143). Most of the injuries (38.5%, 55/143) occurred during peak traffic hours, that is, 4 pm to 9 pm. Majority sustained moderate to severe head injury (61%, 87/143). More than three-fourths of patients required a computed tomography (CT) scan (77%, 110/143), in which there was a higher frequency of contusion (31.5%, 45/143), and subdural hemorrhage (23.1%, 33/143). Most of the injured (43.3%, 13/30) underwent surgery for intracranial hematoma. The mortality rate was 22.8% (8/35). Nearly one-fourth of conducted postmortems among pedestrians belonged to the elderly age group (77/326, 23.6%). Conclusions: Elderly pedestrian neurotrauma patients sustain a more severe injury as evident by poorer Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) scores and CT scan findings, and hence have a higher mortality rate. PMID:23546344

  12. Future mission studies: Preliminary comparisons of solar flux models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of comparisons of the solar flux models are presented. (The wavelength lambda = 10.7 cm radio flux is the best indicator of the strength of the ionizing radiations such as solar ultraviolet and x-ray emissions that directly affect the atmospheric density thereby changing the orbit lifetime of satellites. Thus, accurate forecasting of solar flux F sub 10.7 is crucial for orbit determination of spacecrafts.) The measured solar flux recorded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is compared against the forecasts made by Schatten, MSFC, and NOAA itself. The possibility of a combined linear, unbiased minimum-variance estimation that properly combines all three models into one that minimizes the variance is also discussed. All the physics inherent in each model are combined. This is considered to be the dead-end statistical approach to solar flux forecasting before any nonlinear chaotic approach.

  13. Fixation method does not affect restoration of rotation center in hip replacements: A single-site retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aseptic loosening is one of the greatest problems in hip replacement surgery. The rotation center of the hip is believed to influence the longevity of fixation. The aim of this study was to compare the influence of cemented and cementless cup fixation techniques on the position of the center of rotation because cemented cup fixation requires the removal of more bone for solid fixation than the cementless technique. Methods We retrospectively compared pre- and post-operative positions of the hip rotation center in 25 and 68 patients who underwent artificial hip replacements in our department in 2007 using cemented or cementless cup fixation, respectively, with digital radiographic image analysis. Results The mean horizontal and vertical distances between the rotation center and the acetabular teardrop were compared in radiographic images taken pre- and post-operatively. The mean horizontal difference was −2.63 mm (range: -11.00 mm to 10.46 mm, standard deviation 4.23 mm) for patients who underwent cementless fixation, and −2.84 mm (range: -10.87 to 5.30 mm, standard deviation 4.59 mm) for patients who underwent cemented fixation. The mean vertical difference was 0.60 mm (range: -20.15 mm to 10.00 mm, standard deviation 3.93 mm) and 0.41 mm (range: -9.26 mm to 6.54 mm, standard deviation 3.58 mm) for the cementless and cemented fixation groups, respectively. The two fixation techniques had no significant difference on the position of the hip rotation center in the 93 patients in this study. Conclusions The hip rotation center was similarly restored using either the cemented or cementless fixation techniques in this patient cohort, indicating that the fixation technique itself does not interfere with the position of the center of rotation. To completely answer this question further studies with more patients are needed. PMID:22686355

  14. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: Factor Validity and Reliability in a French Sample of Adolescents with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiano, Christophe; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Begarie, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the factor validity and reliability of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) within a sample of adolescents with mild to moderate Intellectual Disability (ID). A total sample of 189 adolescents (121 boys and 68 girls), aged between 12 and 18 years old, with mild to moderate ID were…

  15. US Study Abroad from the Periphery to the Center of the Global Curriculum in the Information Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Mousumi

    2012-01-01

    The Higher Education Act of 1965 for the first time gave discretionary authority to campuses to use federal financial aid in support of students studying abroad. Thereafter, US study abroad has thus evolved from the periphery to the center of the global curriculum. In 2005 the Lincoln Commission report proposed an ambitious goal of sending one…

  16. Lightcurves of Jovian Trojan Asteroids from the Center for Solar System Studies: L4 Greek Camp and Spies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel R.; Warner, Brian D.; French, Linda, M.

    2016-10-01

    Jovian Trojan asteroids larger than ~ 30 km were studied from the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3, MPC U81). Lightcurves for 30 Trojan asteroids in the L4 (Greek) cloud were between May and June 2016. These were mostly from the L4 "Greek" cloud, but several were L5 "Trojan" cloud lightcurves not previously published.

  17. Differential Item Functioning for Lesbians, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Women in the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnholz, Justin L.; Young, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed whether the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) functions equivalently in assessing depressive symptom severity in lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual women. Using differential item functioning methods, the authors examined (a) whether there is a bias in CES-D total scores and in individual item scores…

  18. Makers of Meaning in a Learning-Centered School: A Case Study of Central Park East 1 Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Jon; And Others

    A case study was done of Central Park East Elementary School (CPE 1), in New York City, a school with a reputation for extraordinary work with students and their families in a student-centered environment. The study includes an overview of CPE 1 culled from the school's descriptions of itself and other public documents; a descriptive narrative of…

  19. Ocular mycosis at a referral center in Saudi Arabia: A 20-year study

    PubMed Central

    Jastaneiah, Sabah S.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Abbott, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To review the clinical experience of fungal keratitis cases at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods Retrospective observational review and analysis of 124 patient charts with confirmed diagnosis of fungal keratitis between 1984 and 2004. Results One hundred and twenty four eyes of 124 patients had proven fungal infection; 101 eyes had fungal keratitis and 23 eyes had fungal endophthalmitis complicating keratitis. Estimated proportion of fungal keratitis and endophthalmitis was 10.3%. Mean age was 55 years with male predominance (79.0%). Commonly associated factors were previous intraocular surgery (38.7%) and trauma (20.9%). Major risk factor for progressing to endophthalmitis was previous intraocular surgery (65.2%), p < 0.001. Initial laboratory results were fungal positive only in 30.6% (p < 0.001). Commonest organisms isolated were Aspergillus spp. (29.8%) followed by Trichophyton sp. (16.1%), then Candida and Fusarium sp. Comparison of both phases of the study showed improvement in the rate of successfully treated cases from 34.6% to 58.3%, and a decline in cases progressing to endophthalmitis from 25.0% to 13.9%. Therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty increased from 26.9% to 73.6% (p < 0.001). Thirteen eyes required enucleation or evisceration. Conclusions In contrast to other studies on fungal keratitis, Aspergillusspp. and Trichophyton sp. were the most commonly isolated fungal pathogens; the former carries the worst prognosis. Risk factors included previous intraocular surgery and trauma. Poor outcome was associated with Aspergillus spp., delayed presentation, previous intraocular surgery and late surgical intervention. This study recommends early surgical intervention to improve the outcome. PMID:23960930

  20. A study on evaluation of center of resistance of maxillary four incisors during simultaneous intrusion and retraction: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the center of resistance of maxillary incisors during simultaneous intrusion and retraction. Subjects and Methods: In this study, the following steps were employed namely, (1) Preprocessing - the creation of geometric model, mesh generation and boundary conditions. (2) Postprocessing - the tooth movement and determination of center of resistance. Results: The center of the mid-sagittal plane approximately 6 mm apical and 4 mm posterior to a line perpendicular to the occlusal plane from the labial alveolar crest of the central incisor resistance for the maxillary four incisors was located within the. Conclusion: Finite element is a sound mechanical method of analysis as it was sufficient enough to provide insight into interactions between orthodontic forces, and dental tissues and reliability of this study. Further by using this study clinically, the center of resistance can be precisely located in single rooted tooth during orthodontic treatment. PMID:25210384

  1. Cancer Therapy Directed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling: A Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David S; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-07-01

    Innovative molecular diagnostics deployed in the clinic enable new ways to stratify patients into appropriate treatment regimens. These approaches may resolve a major challenge for early-phase clinical trials, which is to recruit patients who, while having failed previous treatments, may nevertheless respond to molecularly targeted drugs. We report the findings of a prospective, single-center study conducted in patients with diverse refractory cancers who underwent comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP; next-generation sequencing, 236 genes). Of the 500 patients enrolled, 188 (37.6%) received either matched (N = 122/188, 65%) or unmatched therapy (N = 66/188, 35%). The most common reasons that patients were not evaluable for treatment included insufficient tissue, death, or hospice transfer. The median number of molecular alterations per patient was five (range, 1-14); median number of prior therapies, four. The most common diagnoses were ovarian cancer (18%), breast cancer (16%), sarcoma (13%), and renal cancer (7%). Of the 339 successfully profiled patients, 317 (93.5%) had at least one potentially actionable alteration. By calculating matching scores, based on the number of drug matches and genomic aberrations per patient, we found that high scores were independently associated with a greater frequency of stable disease ≥6 months/partial/complete remission [22% (high scores) vs. 9% (low scores), P = 0.024], longer time-to-treatment failure [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.36-0.74; P = 0.0003], and survival (HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.43-1.0; P = 0.05). Collectively, this study offers a clinical proof of concept for the utility of CGP in assigning therapy to patients with refractory malignancies, especially in those patients with multiple genomic aberrations for whom combination therapies could be implemented. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3690-701. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197177

  2. Acculturation and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Brian E.; Vermeesch, Amber L.; Hall, Rosemary F.; Peragallo, Nilda P.; Mitrani, Victoria B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Culturally valid measures of depression for Spanish-speaking Hispanic women are important for developing and implementing effective interventions to reduce health disparities. The Center for Epidemiological Studies--Depression Scale (CES-D) is a widely used measure of depression. Differential item functioning has been studied using language preference as a proxy for acculturation, but it is unknown if the results were due to acculturation or the language of administration. Objective To evaluate the relationship of acculturation, defined with a dimensional measure, to Spanish CES-D item responses. Method Spanish-speaking Hispanic women (n = 504) were recruited for a randomized controlled trial of Salud, Educación, Prevención y Autocuidado (Health, Education, Prevention and Self-care). Acculturation, an important dimension of variation within the diverse United States Hispanic community, was defined by high or low scores on the Americanism subscale of the Bidimensional Acculturation Scale. Differential item functioning for each of the 20 CES-D items between more acculturated and less acculturated women was tested using ordinal logistic regression. Results No items on the Depressed Affect, Somatic Activity, or Positive Affect subscales showed meaningful differential item functioning, but one item (“People were unfriendly”) on the Interpersonal subscale had small results (R2 = 1.1%). Discussion The majority of CES-D items performed similarly for Spanish-speaking Hispanic women with high and low acculturation. Less acculturated women responded more positively to “People were unfriendly,” despite having an equivalent level of depression, than more acculturated women. Possibilities for improving this item are proposed. PMID:21677596

  3. Cardiorespiratory fitness and digestive cancer mortality: findings from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS)

    PubMed Central

    Peel, J. Brent; Sui, Xuemei; Matthews, Charles E.; Adams, Swann A.; Hébert, James R.; Hardin, James W.; Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.

    2009-01-01

    Although higher levels of physical activity are inversely associated with risk of colon cancer, few prospective studies have evaluated overall digestive system cancer mortality in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). The authors examined this association among 38,801 men aged 20−88 years and who performed a maximal treadmill exercise test at baseline in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (Dallas, Texas) during 1974−2003. Mortality was assessed over 29 years of follow-up (1974−2003). 283 digestive system cancer deaths occurred during a mean 17-year of observation. Age-adjusted mortality rates per 10,000 person-yrs according to low, moderate, and high CRF groups were 6.8, 4.0, and 3.3 for digestive system cancer (trend p < 0.001). After adjustment for age, examination year, body mass index, smoking, drinking, family history of cancer, personal history of diabetes, hazard ratios for overall digestive cancer deaths (95% confidence interval) for those in the middle and upper 40% of the distribution of CRF relative to those in the lowest 20% were 0.66 (0.49, 0.88) and 0.56 (0.40, 0.80), respectively. Being fit (the upper 80% of CRF) was associated with a lower risk of mortality from colon (0.61 [0.37, 1.00]), colorectal (0.58 [0.37, 0.92]), and liver cancer (0.28 [0.11, 0.72]), compared with being unfit (the lowest 20% of CRF). These findings support a protective role of CRF against total digestive tract, colorectal, and liver cancer deaths in men. PMID:19293313

  4. An excellent navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery: a double-center study.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiewen; Wu, Jinyang; Wang, Xudong; Yang, Xudong; Wu, Yunong; Xu, Bing; Shi, Jun; Yu, Hongbo; Cai, Min; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Guofang; Zhang, Shilei

    2016-06-16

    Numerous problems regarding craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery are not well understood. In this study, we performed a double-center clinical study to quantitatively evaluate the characteristics of our navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery. Fifty-six patients with craniomaxillofacial disease were included and randomly divided into experimental (using our AccuNavi-A system) and control (using Strker system) groups to compare the surgical effects. The results revealed that the average pre-operative planning time was 32.32 mins vs 29.74 mins between the experimental and control group, respectively (p > 0.05). The average operative time was 295.61 mins vs 233.56 mins (p > 0.05). The point registration orientation accuracy was 0.83 mm vs 0.92 mm. The maximal average preoperative navigation orientation accuracy was 1.03 mm vs 1.17 mm. The maximal average persistent navigation orientation accuracy was 1.15 mm vs 0.09 mm. The maximal average navigation orientation accuracy after registration recovery was 1.15 mm vs 1.39 mm between the experimental and control group. All patients healed, and their function and profile improved. These findings demonstrate that although surgeons should consider the patients' time and monetary costs, our qualified navigation surgery system and experience could offer an accurate guide during a variety of craniomaxillofacial surgeries.

  5. An excellent navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery: a double-center study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jiewen; Wu, Jinyang; Wang, Xudong; Yang, Xudong; Wu, Yunong; Xu, Bing; Shi, Jun; Yu, Hongbo; Cai, Min; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hao; Shen, Guofang; Zhang, Shilei

    2016-01-01

    Numerous problems regarding craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery are not well understood. In this study, we performed a double-center clinical study to quantitatively evaluate the characteristics of our navigation system and experience in craniomaxillofacial navigation surgery. Fifty-six patients with craniomaxillofacial disease were included and randomly divided into experimental (using our AccuNavi-A system) and control (using Strker system) groups to compare the surgical effects. The results revealed that the average pre-operative planning time was 32.32 mins vs 29.74 mins between the experimental and control group, respectively (p > 0.05). The average operative time was 295.61 mins vs 233.56 mins (p > 0.05). The point registration orientation accuracy was 0.83 mm vs 0.92 mm. The maximal average preoperative navigation orientation accuracy was 1.03 mm vs 1.17 mm. The maximal average persistent navigation orientation accuracy was 1.15 mm vs 0.09 mm. The maximal average navigation orientation accuracy after registration recovery was 1.15 mm vs 1.39 mm between the experimental and control group. All patients healed, and their function and profile improved. These findings demonstrate that although surgeons should consider the patients’ time and monetary costs, our qualified navigation surgery system and experience could offer an accurate guide during a variety of craniomaxillofacial surgeries. PMID:27305855

  6. Features of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iran: a Report from Double Center Study.

    PubMed

    Mehrvar, Azim; Rahiminejad, Mohammad Saeid; Hedayati Asl, Amir Abbas; Tashvighi, Maryam; Faranoush, Mohammad; Alebouyeh, Mardawig; Kuchakzadeh, Leili; Ramyar, Asghar; Sabery Nejad, Javad; Mehrvar, Narjes

    2015-12-01

    Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia is one of the important malignancies in children. For better managing the prognosis of this disease, there should be enough information about common features of this malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate these common features in children with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia. A total of 104 eligible children less than 15-year-old have been referred from 2007-2011 to two referral centers for childhood malignancies. Basic epidemiological information recorded in checklists for each individual. Analyzes have been done by SPSS version 22. Out of patients, 57 cases were males (54.8%). The male/female ratio was 1.2. The mean age of patients was 6.5 ± 4.3 years. The majority subtypes of patients were M3, M4, non-M3, and M2, respectively. The common molecular abnormalities were t (15;17) and inv (16). Of patients, 19.2% had an early relapse. The mean age of relapse in patients was 6.7 ± 3.9 years. Sixty patients (57.7%) were alive, and 44 cases (42.3%) died during or after therapy. The three years overall survival rate of patients was 42% in this study. According to our data, AML has the same frequency as compared with data from developing countries. But different epidemiological characteristic was a lower rate of three years overall survival in patients. These data may serve the health authorities for more effective environmental and preventive measurements, purposeful allocation of resources for facilitating up-to-date diagnostic and treatment modalities, psychological support programs for respective family members and educational purposes. PMID:26749231

  7. The Uses of the Smartphone for Doctors: An Empirical Study from Samsung Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Soo; Yi, Byoungkee; Park, Jong Hwan; Choi, Kyesook; Jung, Jaegon; Park, Seung Woo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives In healthcare, mobile computing made possible by smartphones is becoming an important tool among healthcare professionals. However, currently there is very little research into the effectiveness of such applications of technology. This study aims to present a framework for a smartphone application to give doctors mobile access to patient information, then review the consequences of its use and discuss its future direction. Methods Since 2003 when Samsung Medical Center introduced its first mobile application, a need to develop a new application targeting the latest smartphone technology was identified. To that end, an application named Dr. SMART S was officially launched on December 22nd, 2010. Results We analyzed the usage data of the application for a month until April 25th, 2011. On average, 170 doctors (13% of the entire body of doctors) logged on 2.4 times per day and that number keeps growing. The number was uniformly distributed across all working hours, with exceptions of heavy accesses around 6-8 AM and 4-6 PM when doctors do their regular rounds to see the patients. The most commonly accessed content was inpatient information, this constituted 78.6% of all accesses, within this 50% was to accesses lab results. Conclusions Looking at the usage data, we can see the use of Dr. SMART S by doctors is growing in sync with the popularity of smartphones. Since u-Health seem an inevitable future trend, a more rigorous study needs to be conducted on how such mobile applications as Dr. SMART S affect the quality of care and patient safety to derive directions for further improvements. PMID:21886874

  8. Determinants of intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungmee; Yum, Mi-Sun; Choi, Hae-won; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the intelligence of children with epilepsy and to determine the clinical factors associated with intellectual impairment. The medical records of patients diagnosed with childhood-onset epilepsy at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The Korean Education Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children or Korean Wechsler Intelligence Scale for adults was used to quantify the level of intelligence. Age at seizure onset, etiology, epilepsy duration, number of seizures in the last year, use of antiepileptic drugs, EEG/MRI findings, and epilepsy classification were recorded. The association between clinical factors and the intelligence was determined using logistic regression. Three hundred and twenty-two patients were included in the analysis. One hundred and seventy-six (54.7%) patients had low intelligence (intelligence quotient [IQ]<80) with 18 (5.6%) defined as borderline mental retardation (IQ 70-79), 47 (14.6%) as mild mental retardation (IQ 60-69), and 111 (34.5%) as moderate-to-severe mental retardation (IQ<60). Epilepsy duration, number of seizures in the last year, and epilepsy classification were significantly associated with low intelligence in multivariate logistic regression (p<0.05). However, when analyzed according to etiology, these factors were not associated with low intelligence in children with idiopathic epilepsy. The most important factors associated with low intelligence in childhood-onset epilepsy are the underlying etiology and, in cryptogenic and symptomatic epilepsy, seizure burden. The results of this study underscore the importance of seizure control to alleviate the harmful impact of epilepsy on cognition.

  9. Bariatric surgery outcomes: a single-center study in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Abusnana, Salah; Abdi, Sarah; Tagure, Brigette; Elbagir, Murtada; Maleckas, Almantas

    2015-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery has become an attractive treatment for severe obesity over the last decade, due to its impacts on weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In the United Arab Emirates, a country where the rate of obesity is dramatically increasing bariatric surgery has gained popularity in recent years; however, published data on its outcomes in the Emirati population are lacking. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 95 patients who underwent bariatric surgery (ie, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy) at the Rashid Center for Diabetes and Research in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Weight outcomes and metabolic marker data were abstracted at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Results Laparoscopic RYGB was the main procedure performed by our bariatric unit. All variables demonstrated postoperative improvement. An average excess weight loss of 68% was observed at 12 months. Fat mass was the body component that decreased the most, with an average reduction of 46%. Additionally, lipid profiles were significantly different (P<0.01) at 12 months, with triglyceride levels improving by 27% and low-density lipoprotein levels improving by 21%. Similarly, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels decreased significantly (P<0.001) in patients with type 2 diabetes, with an average reduction of 73%. Conclusion Our results show that a substantial short-term reduction in weight and significant improvements in metabolic markers followed bariatric surgery in severely obese Emirati patients. Our results are consistent with the outcomes of other internationally published studies. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether the favorable impacts of bariatric surgery can be sustained over the long term. PMID:26425103

  10. Designing Excellence and Quality Model for Training Centers of Primary Health Care: A Delphi Method Study

    PubMed Central

    TABRIZI, Jafar-Sadegh; FARAHBAKHSH, Mostafa; SHAHGOLI, Javad; RAHBAR, Mohammad Reza; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; AHADI, Hamid-Reza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excellence and quality models are comprehensive methods for improving the quality of healthcare. The aim of this study was to design excellence and quality model for training centers of primary health care using Delphi method. Methods: In this study, Delphi method was used. First, comprehensive information were collected using literature review. In extracted references, 39 models were identified from 34 countries and related sub-criteria and standards were extracted from 34 models (from primary 39 models). Then primary pattern including 8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards was developed as a Delphi questionnaire and evaluated in four stages by 9 specialists of health care system in Tabriz and 50 specialists from all around the country. Results: Designed primary model (8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards) were concluded with 8 criteria, 45 sub-criteria, and 192 standards after 4 stages of evaluations by specialists. Major criteria of the model are leadership, strategic and operational planning, resource management, information analysis, human resources management, process management, costumer results, and functional results, where the top score was assigned as 1000 by specialists. Functional results had the maximum score of 195 whereas planning had the minimum score of 60. Furthermore the most and the least sub-criteria was for leadership with 10 sub-criteria and strategic planning with 3 sub-criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The model that introduced in this research has been designed following 34 reference models of the world. This model could provide a proper frame for managers of health system in improving quality. PMID:26576350

  11. Independent and joint effects of sedentary time and cardiorespiratory fitness on all-cause mortality: the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Shuval, Kerem; Finley, Carrie E; Barlow, Carolyn E; Nguyen, Binh T; Njike, Valentine Y; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent and joint effects of sedentary time and cardiorespiratory fitness (fitness) on all-cause mortality. Design, setting, participants A prospective study of 3141 Cooper Center Longitudinal Study participants. Participants provided information on television (TV) viewing and car time in 1982 and completed a maximal exercise test during a 1-year time frame; they were then followed until mortality or through 2010. TV viewing, car time, total sedentary time and fitness were the primary exposures and all-cause mortality was the outcome. The relationship between the exposures and outcome was examined utilising Cox proportional hazard models. Results A total of 581 deaths occurred over a median follow-up period of 28.7 years (SD=4.4). At baseline, participants’ mean age was 45.0 years (SD=9.6), 86.5% were men and their mean body mass index was 24.6 (SD=3.0). Multivariable analyses revealed a significant linear relationship between increased fitness and lower mortality risk, even while adjusting for total sedentary time and covariates (p=0.02). The effects of total sedentary time on increased mortality risk did not quite reach statistical significance once fitness and covariates were adjusted for (p=0.05). When examining this relationship categorically, in comparison to the reference category (≤10 h/week), being sedentary for ≥23 h weekly increased mortality risk by 29% without controlling for fitness (HR=1.29, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.63); however, once fitness and covariates were taken into account this relationship did not reach statistical significance (HR=1.20, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.51). Moreover, spending >10 h in the car weekly significantly increased mortality risk by 27% in the fully adjusted model. The association between TV viewing and mortality was not significant. Conclusions The relationship between total sedentary time and higher mortality risk is less pronounced when fitness is taken into account. Increased car time, but

  12. The Outcomes of Esophageal and Gastric Cancer Treatments in a Retrospective Study, Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Arash; Aliabadi, Leyla Sharifi; Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Maheri, Roghieh; Eini, Ezzat; Mashhadireza, Maryam; Mousavi, Seied Asadollah; Bahar, Babak; Jahani, Mohammad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal and gastric cancers are among the most common cancers in Iran. Usually survival of these cases is poor despite of treatment. Here we studied outcome of these cases in our center to have an estimation of general prognosis of patients. Methods In this retrospective study, we reviewed the data of patient's files before treatment, including cancer stage at diagnosis, types of treatments and outcomes. We studied 368 patients treated between 1995 and 2011. Results The study included 368 patients (248 [67.4%] males and 120 [32.6%] females) with a median age of 58 (range: 23 - 94). Sixty nine patients (18.8%) had esophageal cancer with a median age of 58.5 years (range: 33 – 84), and 47.8% (33/69) of whom were male. Sixty five (17.7%) were reported to have gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) with a median age of 62.0 (range: 32 – 94), among them 72.3% (47/65) of whom were male and finally Two hundred thirty four (63.6%) had gastric cancer with a median age of 57.0 (range: 23 – 82), which 71.8% (168/234) of whom were male. The Median follow-up was 10 months. The majority of patients were diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease. Stage III or IV was observed in 65.0% (39/60) of patients with esophageal cancer, 75.0% (33/44) with GEJ cancer and 65.4% (121/185) with gastric cancer. In this study, 58% of patients with esophageal cancer, 50.8% with GEJ and gastric cancers had unresectable disease or metastases at presentation. One-year EFS was 51.8% (95% CI: 39.8 – 67.3%), 32.8% (95% CI: 22.1 – 48.7%), and 56.7% (95% CI: 50.1 – 64.3%) in patients with esophageal, GEJ and gastric cancers, respectively (p = 0.002). The 1-year OS was 54.5% (95% CI: 42.6 – 69.8%), 39.5% (95 CI: 28.1 – 55.5%), and 68.2% (95% CI: 61.8 – 75.3%), respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Cancers of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract contribute to the high mortality and morbidity rates because they are more likely to be diagnosed at late or advanced stages of disease

  13. Antiresorptive treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: review of randomized clinical studies and rationale for the Evista alendronate comparison (EVA) trial.

    PubMed

    Lufkin, Edward G; Sarkar, Somnath; Kulkarni, Pandurang M; Ciaccia, Angelina V; Siddhanti, Suresh; Stock, John; Plouffe, Leo

    2004-03-01

    Standard pharmacological antiresorptive therapy for the prevention and/or treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis now consists of four categories of drugs: estrogens, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), bisphosponates, and calcitonin. All of these drugs have been studied in randomized controlled trials, but meaningful comparisons of the efficacy of drugs have been difficult due to differences in baseline risks for fracture and differences in study design, including calcium and vitamin D supplementation, definition of fracture, and discontinuation rates. The current paper reviews results from pivotal studies of antiresorptive therapies with fracture as a primary endpoint, as well as head-to-head trials comparing these therapies using surrogate markers of fracture risk, and introduces the first head-to-head trial with fracture as a primary endpoint. The Evista Alendronate Comparison (EVA) trial, a multi-center, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized trial with two active treatment arms is currently underway to compare directly the osteoporotic fracture risk reduction efficacy of raloxifene and alendronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis as defined by bone mineral density. The results from this trial will permit more informed judgment by practitioners and provider groups concerning the relative clinical utility of these two drugs.

  14. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center - Denver, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a "Power of Zero Energy Center" linked to its model home in the Stapleton community. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. This case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  15. An Experimental Study of Upward Burning Over Long Solid Fuels: Facility Development and Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2011-01-01

    As NASA's mission evolves, new spacecraft and habitat environments necessitate expanded study of materials flammability. Most of the upward burning tests to date, including the NASA standard material screening method NASA-STD-6001, have been conducted in small chambers where the flame often terminates before a steady state flame is established. In real environments, the same limitations may not be present. The use of long fuel samples would allow the flames to proceed in an unhindered manner. In order to explore sample size and chamber size effects, two large chambers were developed at NASA GRC under the Flame Prevention, Detection and Suppression (FPDS) project. The first was an existing vacuum facility, VF-13, located at NASA John Glenn Research Center. This 6350 liter chamber could accommodate fuels sample lengths up to 2 m. However, operational costs and restricted accessibility limited the test program, so a second laboratory scale facility was developed in parallel. By stacking additional two chambers on top of an existing combustion chamber facility, this 81 liter Stacked-chamber facility could accommodate a 1.5 m sample length. The larger volume, more ideal environment of VF-13 was used to obtain baseline data for comparison with the stacked chamber facility. In this way, the stacked chamber facility was intended for long term testing, with VF-13 as the proving ground. Four different solid fuels (adding machine paper, poster paper, PMMA plates, and Nomex fabric) were tested with fuel sample lengths up to 2 m. For thin samples (papers) with widths up to 5 cm, the flame reached a steady state length, which demonstrates that flame length may be stabilized even when the edge effects are reduced. For the thick PMMA plates, flames reached lengths up to 70 cm but were highly energetic and restricted by oxygen depletion. Tests with the Nomex fabric confirmed that the cyclic flame phenomena, observed in small facility tests, continued over longer sample. New

  16. Lattice study on QCD-like theory with exact center symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritani, Takumi; Itou, Etsuko; Misumi, Tatsuhiro

    2015-11-01

    We investigate QCD-like theory with exact center symmetry, with emphasis on the finite-temperature phase transition concerning center and chiral symmetries. On the lattice, we formulate center symmetric SU(3) gauge theory with three fundamental Wilson quarks by twisting quark boundary conditions in a compact direction ( Z 3-QCD model). We calculate the expectation value of Polyakov loop and the chiral condensate as a function of temperature on 163 × 4 and 203 × 4 lattices along the line of constant physics realizing m PS / m V = 0.70. We find out the first-order center phase transition, where the hysteresis of the magnitude of Polyakov loop exists depending on thermalization processes. We show that chiral condensate decreases around the critical temperature in a similar way to that of the standard three-flavor QCD, as it has the hysteresis in the same range as that of Polyakov loop. We also show that the flavor symmetry breaking due to the twisted boundary condition gets qualitatively manifest in the high-temperature phase. These results are consistent with the predictions based on the chiral effective model in the literature. Our approach could provide novel insights to the nonperturbative connection between the center and chiral properties.

  17. EPR studies of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. Evidence for a diiron carboxylate center.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Deborah A; Voevodskaya, Nina; Stenmark, Pål; Gräslund, Astrid; Nordlund, Pär

    2002-11-15

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is a ubiquinol oxidase found in the mitochondrial respiratory chain of plants as well as some fungi and protists. It has been predicted to contain a coupled diiron center on the basis of a conserved sequence motif consisting of the proposed iron ligands, four glutamate and two histidine residues. However, this prediction has not been experimentally verified. Here we report the high level expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana alternative oxidase AOX1a as a maltose-binding protein fusion in Escherichia coli. Reduction and reoxidation of a sample of isolated E. coli membranes containing the alternative oxidase generated an EPR signal characteristic of a mixed-valent Fe(II)/Fe(III) binuclear iron center. The high anisotropy of the signal, the low value of the g-average tensor, and a small exchange coupling (-J) suggest that the iron center is hydroxo-bridged. A reduced membrane preparation yielded a parallel mode EPR signal with a g-value of about 15. In AOX containing a mutation of a putative glutamate ligand of the diiron center (E222A or E273A) the EPR signals are absent. These data provide evidence for an antiferromagnetic-coupled binuclear iron center, and together with the conserved sequence motif, identify the alternative oxidase as belonging to the growing family of diiron carboxylate proteins. The alternative oxidase is the first integral membrane protein in this family, and adds a new catalytic activity (ubiquinol oxidation) to this group of enzymatically diverse proteins.

  18. Design of an experiment to study optically-active centers in diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ankit; Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh

    2012-03-01

    The silicon-vacancy (SiV) and nitrogen-vacancy (NV) complexes in diamond nanoparticles (NPs) are optically active centers, which produce single photon events. These centers may be formed when a silicon atom from the silicon substrate often used in CVD growth or nitrogen from impurities in the feed gas ends up next to a vacancy in the diamond lattice. Because of their stability and high quantum efficiency, SiV and NV centers in diamond NPs are attractive for applications in quantum computing, optics, biotechnology, and medicine. We briefly review our recently published results on diamond NPs, describe the design of an experimental system for carrying out in-situ optical spectroscopy and time-correlation measurements, and show preliminary photoluminescence data.

  19. Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation After Lung Transplantation-A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Hadem, J; Gottlieb, J; Seifert, D; Fegbeutel, C; Sommer, W; Greer, M; Wiesner, O; Kielstein, J T; Schneider, A S; Ius, F; Fuge, J; Kühn, C; Tudorache, I; Haverich, A; Welte, T; Warnecke, G; Hoeper, M M

    2016-05-01

    This single-center study examines the incidence, etiology, and outcomes associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV), defined as time to definite spontaneous ventilation >21 days after double lung transplantation (LTx). A total of 690 LTx recipients between January 2005 and December 2012 were analyzed. PMV was necessary in 95 (13.8%) patients with decreasing incidence during the observation period (p < 0.001). Independent predictors of PMV were renal replacement therapy (odds ratio [OR] 11.13 [95% CI, 5.82-21.29], p < 0.001), anastomotic dehiscence (OR 8.74 [95% CI 2.42-31.58], p = 0.001), autoimmune comorbidity (OR 5.52 [95% CI 1.86-16.41], p = 0.002), and postoperative neurologic complications (OR 5.03 [95% CI 1.98-12.81], p = 0.001), among others. Overall 1-year survival was 86.0% (90.4% for LTx between 2010 and 2012); it was 60.7% after PMV and 90.0% in controls (p < 0.001). Conditional long-term outcome among hospital survivors, however, did not differ between the groups (p = 0.78). Multivariate analysis identified renal replacement therapy (hazard ratio [HR] 3.55 [95% CI 2.40-5.25], p < 0.001), post-LTx extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (HR 3.47 [95% CI 2.06-5.83], p < 0.001), and prolonged inotropic support (HR 1.95 [95% CI 1.39-2.75], p < 0.001), among others, as independent predictors of mortality. In conclusion, PMV complicated 14% of LTx procedures and, although associated with increased in-hospital mortality, outcomes among patients surviving to hospital discharge were unaffected. PMID:26607844

  20. Near-Earth Asteroid Program at the Center for Solar System Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Robert D.; Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Coley, Daniel R.

    2014-11-01

    As of August 2014, the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB; Warner et al., 2009) contains 611 near-Earth asteroids with statistically useful rotation rates, about 5% of all known NEAs. The LCDB also contains 48 NEAs that are known or suspected binary or multiple systems, 46 with approximate or known spin orientations, and 36 confirmed or suspected tumblers (non-principal axis rotation). 131 NEAs have a rotation period of P ≤ 2 h, and 116 with P ≤ 1 h. While these counts are sufficient to make reasonable inferences about NEA rotation rate statistics, the significantly smaller sampling of binaries, tumblers, and known spin orientations in both the NEA and the general populations often leads to more questions than answers.Starting in mid-2013, the Center for Solar System Studies (CS3) located in the Mojave Desert in Southern California began a concentrated campaign using up to nine robotic telescopes to find reliable rotation periods for as many NEAs as possible. We sometimes obtained multiple dense lightcurve sets to be used in lightcurve inversion modeling if the viewing aspect changed signifcantly over an apparition. We worked closely with the radar teams at Arecibo and Goldstone so that we could supplement their radar observations with dense lightcurves, which can lead to a successful determination of the spin orientation in less time than by either method alone. We report on the results from the first year of our efforts, which includes lightcurves for 159 NEAs, about 63% of all NEA lightcurves reported in this time span. The CS3 lightcurves include 12 confirmed or suspected tumblers and three objects with P ≤ 0.12 h.

  1. Radionuclide Emission Estimation for the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES)

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley J Schrader

    2010-02-01

    An Radiological Safety Analysis Computer Program (RSAC)-7 model dose assessment was performed to evaluate maximum Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) boundary effective dose equivalent (EDE, in mrem/yr) for potential individual releases of radionuclides from the facility. The CAES is a public/private partnership between the State of Idaho and its academic research institutions, the federal government through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) managed by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). CAES serves to advance energy security for our nation by expanding educational opportunities at Idaho universities in energy-related areas, creating new capabilities within its member institutions, and delivering technological innovations leading to technology-based economic development for the intermountain region. CAES has developed a strategic plan (INL/EXT-07-12950) based on the balanced scorecard approach. At the present time it is unknown exactly what processes will be used in the facility in support of this strategic plan. What is known is that the Idaho State University (ISU) Radioactive Materials License (Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] license 11-27380-01) is the basis for handling radioactive material in the facility. The material in this license is shared between the ISU campus and the CAES facility. There currently are no agreements in place to limit the amount of radioactive material at the CAES facility or what is done to the material in the facility. The scope of this analysis is a summary look at the basis dose for each radionuclide included under the license at a distance of 100, 500, and 1,000 m. Inhalation, ingestion and ground surface dose was evaluated using the NRC design basis guidelines. The results can be used to determine a sum of the fractions approach to facility safety. This sum of the fractions allows a facility threshold value (TV) to be established and potential activities to be evaluated against

  2. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: THEORY STUDIES FOR POLARIZED PP SCATTERING (VOLUME 53)

    SciTech Connect

    KRETZER,S.VOGELSANG,W.

    2003-09-15

    In the past two runs of RHIC, the first measurements with polarized proton beams have been performed. For many years to come, the RHIC spin program will offer exciting physics, exploring QCD and the nucleon in new ways. The aim of this small workshop was to attract several spin theorists to the center for about two weeks, in order to collaborate with both experimentalists and theorists at RBRC, and to initiate and/or complete studies of relevance to RHIC spin. A major focus of polarized-pp measurements at RHIC is on measuring the spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g. A channel for accessing {Delta}g is high-p{sub T} pion production. The unpolarized cross section for this reaction has been measured by PHENIX and was found in good agreement with a perturbative-QCD based (NLO) calculation. It was a remarkable and exciting coincidence that PHENIX presented also the first results for the spin asymmetry for {rvec p}{rvec p} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X during this workshop. This sparked a lot of additional activity and discussion. First steps toward the interpretation of the data were taken. Marco Stratmann and Barbara Jager (Regensburg University) presented recent work on the NLO calculation of the polarized cross section and the spin asymmetry, setting the stage for future full analysis of the data in terms of {Delta}g. Applications to {rvec e}{rvec p} scattering, very relevant to eRHIC, were also worked out and published during this workshop. Stratmann also discussed the procedure of NLO calculations for the case of transverse polarization in pp scattering.

  3. HIV infection in dialysis centers in Italy: a nationwide multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Barbiano di Belgiojoso, G; Trezzi, M; Scorza, D; Barone, M T; Landriani, N; Genderini, A; Bertoli, S

    1998-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV infection in dialysis populations varies according to different countries and geographic areas. We performed a nationwide epidemiological study by means of a questionnaire in the period from January 1990 to December 1995. Questions were about whether and which HIV tests were performed and which preventive measures were adopted. A separate survey evaluated the data the HIV-positive patients. Only 62% of the centers responded to the questionnaire, corresponding to 21,500 dialysis patients in 1990 and 27,000 in 1995. The prevalence of HIV-positive subjects was 0,13% for 1995. A total of 48 patients with HIV infection were identified: risk factors were drug abuse in 16 cases, homosexuality in 9, heterosexual contact in 8, transfusion in 7, renal transplant in 3 and unknown cause in 5. Forty-five patients were on hemodialysis, and 3 were receiving peritoneal dialysis. At follow-up, 19 patients died: infection and malnutrition were the most frequent causes of death. The death rate of patients who were already HIV positive when dialysis was started (group 1, 29 cases) was 19.36 deaths/1,000 patient/month. The correlations, performed only for group 1, showed a significantly worse prognosis for patients with CD4 < 200/mm3 and for those with AIDS. In conclusion, in Italy the prevalence of HIV infection in the dialysis population is low, and the outcome of HIV-positive patients in dialysis was found to be better than earlier literature reports. The use of chronic dialysis for HIV patients with uremia should not be discouraged.

  4. Results from a Case Study Investigation on the Adoption of Learner-Centered Strategies in Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Nagamine, K.

    2008-05-01

    Recent research in science education suggests that learner-centered instructional strategies can promote more learning than traditional teacher-based strategies such as lecture. However, the adoption of such strategies by instructors can elicit many concerns, including, for example, concerns of increased time requirements for preparation and grading, reduced content coverage, reactions of students and colleagues, and, of course, student achievement. Ethan, an astronomy instructor early in his career, recently adopted learner-centered strategies into his introductory course for nonscience majors on stars and galaxies. He shared the concerns listed above, but after receiving training in learner-centered strategies from the Center for Astronomy Education and support from an experienced colleague while implementing the changes for the first time, Ethan's overall reaction was a positive one. Although the preparation time was somewhat higher than would have been required had he repeated his previous semester, Ethan felt that it was worth it to move away from lecture-only style and to incorporate learner-centered strategies into his course. For him, it simply felt more gratifying when he walked out of the classroom after using learner-centered methods than it had when he used only lecture. He also felt that many students learned more than those in previous lecture-based course offerings, and that their increased active participation during the class was a constructive change. In fact, average exam scores were comparable or higher than two previous semesters, as were student evaluations. Overall, Ethan felt that the integration of learner-centered strategies was well worth the time and effort, as evidenced by his statement, "I'll never go back to lecture-only again!" This project is supported by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Division of Research and Graduate Studies.

  5. A comparative study of staggered and cell-centered Lagrangian formulation for multimaterial hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Francois, Marianne M; Shashkov, Misha J; Lowrie, Robert B; Dendy, Edward D

    2010-10-13

    We compare a staggered Lagrangian formulation with a cell-centered Lagrangian formulation for a two-material compressible flow. In both formulation, we assume a single velocity field and rely on pressure relaxation techniques to close the system of equations. We employ Tipton's mixture model for both formulation. However, for the cell-centered formulation, employing Tipton's model for the mixture cell results in loss of conservation of total energy. We propose a numerical algorithm to correct this energy discrepancy. We test both algorithms on the two-materials Sod shock tube test problem and compare the results with the analytical solution.

  6. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  7. Identifying the HIV Testing Beliefs of Healthcare Provider Staff at a University Student Health Center: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Cornelia A.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the views and perceptions of healthcare provider staff regarding HIV testing and the implementation of HIV testing as a routine part of medical practice in a university student health center at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). This study further explored whether healthcare provider staff promoted…

  8. A Study of the Leadership Styles of Campus Based Women's Centers in Higher Education in the Southeast United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuz, Nikki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the organizational and institutional variables that influence the leadership styles of directors of campus-based women's centers at public and private four-year universities in the southeast United States. The researcher examined the leadership frame (or frames), as measured by Bolman and Deal's (1990) Leadership Orientations…

  9. The Quarterly of the National Writing Project and the Center for the Study of Writing and Literacy, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loofbourrow, Peggy Trump, Ed.; Peterson, Art, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This publication is devoted to concerns surrounding the teaching and learning of writing, and offers resources and ideas for professionals, including articles, interviews with prominent members of the field, book reviews, and brief updates on research by the National Center for the Study of Writing and National Writing Project activities. Articles…

  10. A Comparative Study of Structural and Process Quality in Center-Based and Family-Based Child Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigras, Nathalie; Bouchard, Caroline; Cantin, Gilles; Brunson, Liesette; Coutu, Sylvain; Lemay, Lise; Tremblay, Melissa; Japel, Christa; Charron, Annie

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to determine whether center-based and family-based child care services differ with respect to process quality, as measured by the Educative Quality Observation Scales ("EQOS", Bourgon and Lavallee 2004a, b, c), for groups of children 18 months old and younger. It also seeks to identify structural variables associated with process…

  11. An Exploratory Study on Using Wiki to Foster Student Teachers' Learner-Centered Learning and Self and Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eugenia M. W.; Lai, Yiu Chi

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an exploratory study that examined whether a wiki-based project could foster student-centered learning. Student teachers were divided into five groups to tackle a group project which involved creating digital learning materials on wiki that could teach information technology (IT) to secondary school students. As assessment…

  12. National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education Proceedings, Annual Conference (1st, April 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benewitz, Maurice C., Ed.

    This compendium of papers presented at the First Annual Conference of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education surveys the status of bargaining as it now exists in higher education, some of the reasons for it, some of the effects already detected, some of the problems created, and some of the expected future…

  13. The Mental and Physical Health Difficulties of Children Held within a British Immigration Detention Center: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorek, Ann; Ehntholt, Kimberly; Nesbitt, Anne; Wey, Emmanuel; Githinji, Chipo; Rossor, Eve; Wickramasinghe, Rush

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to assess the mental and physical health of children held within a British immigration detention center. Method: A total of 24 detained children (aged 3 months to 17 years) were assessed with their parents or carer after being referred by a registered legal charity. Thirteen were seen by a pediatrician alone, 4…

  14. At the Intersection of Leadership and Learning: A Self-Study of Using Student-Centered Pedagogies in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillapaugh, Daniel; Haber-Curran, Paige

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the outcomes of a self-study that we undertook as instructors of a capstone undergraduate leadership course. Using the framework of action inquiry and a variety of pedagogical approaches, we sought to create a course and classroom environment that was student-centered, empowering, and transformative. Three questions are…

  15. Liberal Adult Education Adapts to the Technological Society: Case Study of West Germany's Adult Education Centers (Volkshochschulen).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert A.

    The report, based on a six-month study as a participant-observer, discusses developments now under way in West Germany's Adult Education Centers movement. The article offers a comparative approach that takes account of trends in Europe and North America. It puts these developments into a philosophical framework, noting that Germany may provide a…

  16. A Study of the Impacts of Selected Products Developed by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kenneth W.; Rhodes, Isabelle N.

    The impact of NCHEMS (National Center for Higher Education Management Systems) products upon planning and management tasks is examined in this study performed at a sample of 126 institutions. The institutions have used one or more of the following NCHEMS products: Program Classification of Structure (PCS); Resource Requirements Prediction Model…

  17. A Study to Determine the Presence of Observable Conditions of Positive Self-Concept in Elementary School Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Dianne Talmadge

    Elementary school instructional media centers (IMC's) were studied to determine the presence or absence of six conditions identified as promoting positive self-concept: cooperation, independence, success, positive atmosphere, challenge, and a feeling of value or acceptance. Following a review by a panel of experts of a preliminary observation…

  18. Creating a Classroom of Inquiry at the University of California at Berkeley: The Harold E. Jones Child Study Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Barbara; Perry, Jane; Tracy, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: Three former teaching colleagues at the University of California's Harold E. Jones Child Study Center discuss an interpretative approach to child observation and assessment and how this approach was developed (1970s-2005) within this lab school's early childhood education setting. With teaching practice shaped and driven by a…

  19. [Science cultures in the global perspective. Thoughts on content design and operation of the Leopoldina Study Center].

    PubMed

    Labisch, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    The Leopoldina Center for the Study of the History of Science and Science Academies is a place to openly discuss the cooperation between science and society across all of the disciplines represented at the Leopoldina and beyond. This dialogue shall, by all means, also include researchers who are not members of the Leopoldina and people from outside of the academia who are interested in the topic. Like the Leopoldina, its Study Center builds bridges: between various academic disciplines, across generations and in local, national, and international communities. All interested members of the Leopoldina--not just members from the humanities, the social sciences or the behavioral sciences, but also scientists from the areas of the natural sciences, technology, the life sciences and physicians--are kindly invited to incorporate their research interests, with regard to the history and theory of their respective academic disciplines, in the research portfolio of the Leopoldina Study Center. In so doing, the Leopoldina Center for the Study of the History of Science and Science Academies should and will become a source of energy for permanent reflection and innovation when contemplating the issues of science and society.

  20. Identifying Conditions That Support Causal Inference in Observational Studies in Education: Empirical Evidence from within Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallberg, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three papers that employ empirical within study comparisons (WSCs) to identify conditions that support causal inference in observational studies. WSC studies empirically estimate the extent to which a given observational study reproduces the result of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) when both share the same…