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Sample records for center comparison study

  1. Process comparison study. MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T.; Krawiec, J.

    1992-01-01

    A process comparison study was conducted using four different advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate a composite solid rocket booster systems tunnel cover. Costs and labor hours were tracked to provide the comparison between the processes. A relative structural comparison of the components is also included. The processes utilized included filament winding, pultrusion, automated tape laying, and thermoplastic thermoforming. The hand layup technique is also compared. Of the four advanced processes evaluated, the thermoformed thermoplastic component resulted in the least total cost. The automated tape laying and filament winding techniques closely followed the thermoplastic component in terms of total cost; and, these techniques show the most promise for high quality components and lower production costs. The pultruded component, with its expensive tooling and material requirements, was by far the most expensive process evaluated, although the results obtained would not be representative of large production runs.

  2. Process comparison study. MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, T.; Krawiec, J.

    1992-11-01

    A process comparison study was conducted using four different advanced manufacturing techniques to fabricate a composite solid rocket booster systems tunnel cover. Costs and labor hours were tracked to provide the comparison between the processes. A relative structural comparison of the components is also included. The processes utilized included filament winding, pultrusion, automated tape laying, and thermoplastic thermoforming. The hand layup technique is also compared. Of the four advanced processes evaluated, the thermoformed thermoplastic component resulted in the least total cost. The automated tape laying and filament winding techniques closely followed the thermoplastic component in terms of total cost; and, these techniques show the most promise for high quality components and lower production costs. The pultruded component, with its expensive tooling and material requirements, was by far the most expensive process evaluated, although the results obtained would not be representative of large production runs.

  3. Comparison study of gear dynamic computer programs at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    A comparison study was performed on four gear dynamic analysis computer programs developed under NASA/Army sponsorship. These programs are GRDYNMULT (a multimesh program applicable to a number of epicyclic systems), TELSGE (a single mesh program), PGT (a multimesh program applicable to a planetary system with three planets), and DANST (a single mesh program). The capabilities and features, input and output options, and technical aspects of the programs were reviewed and compared. Results are presented in a concise tabular form. Parametric studies of the program models were performed to investigate the predicted results of the programs as input parameters such as speed, torque, and mesh damping were varied. In general, the program models predicted similar dynamic load and stress levels as operating conditions were varied. Flash temperature predictions from programs GRDYNMULT and TELSGE indicated similar trends; however, actual values were not in close agreement. The program GRDYNMULT was found to be the most versatile in system size, type, and analysis capabilities. The programs DANST, TELSGE, and PGT are more specialized for specific systems; however, in specific areas they provide a more detailed treatment than GRDYNMULT.

  4. The NASA-Ames Research Center stratospheric aerosol model. 2. Sensitivity studies and comparison with observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Kiang, C. S.; Whitten, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sensitivity tests were performed on a one-dimensional, physical-chemical model of the unperturbed stratospheric aerosols, and model calculations were compared with observations. The tests and comparisons suggest that coagulation controls the particle number mixing ratio, although the number of condensation nuclei at the tropopause and the diffusion coefficient at high altitudes are also important. The sulfur gas source strength and the aerosol residence time are much more important than the supply of condensation nuclei in establishing mass and large particle concentrations. The particle size is also controlled mainly by gas supply and residence time. In situ observations of the aerosols and laboratory measurements of aerosols, parameters that can provide further information about the physics and chemistry of the stratosphere and the aerosols found there are provided.

  5. Multi-center comparison of medial temporal atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease--data from the ICTUS study.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Samantha; Talassi, Erika; Belussi, Michela; Scheltens, Philip; van de Pol, Laura; Nobili, Flavio; Rodriguez, Guido; Froelich, Lutz; Damian, Marinella; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Reynish, Emma; Ousset, Pierre Jean; Vellas, Bruno; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2008-01-01

    To study multi-center variability of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) recruited in a European observational study of AD. 117 mild to moderate AD patients from 5 European centers (Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Brescia and Genova, Italy; Mannheim, Germany; Pamplona, Spain) had magnetic resonance imaging scans performed as part of the routine diagnostic examination. MTA was assessed with the visual Scheltens scale. AD patients from Brescia, Genova, Pamplona, and Mannheim had a mean 32% prevalence of no or borderline MTA vs. 62% of patients from Amsterdam (p = 0.002 for the difference between Amsterdam and all the other centers). The peculiar distribution of MTA in the Amsterdam patients may be attributable to younger age (70.7 +/- 8.4 vs. 75.3 +/- 6.8 years, p = 0.002), milder dementia severity (score 0.5 on the clinical dementia rating scale: 52 vs. 23%, p = 0.003), and less frequent depression (14 vs. 49%, p < 0.0005 in Amsterdam vs. all the other centers, respectively). Patients with probable AD recruited in different centers of Europe generally have similar MTA distribution, even if peculiar demographic and clinical findings might explain occasional differences. These results have implications for clinical trials in AD with biological markers as outcome measures. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup.

  7. Comparison of immune manifestations between refractory cytopenia of childhood and aplastic anemia in children: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Cheng, Yifei; Zhang, Leping

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective single-center study assessed the incidence and clinical features of immune manifestations of refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC) and childhood aplastic anemia (AA). We evaluated 72 children with RCC and 123 with AA between February 2008 and March 2013. RCC was associated with autoimmune disease in 4 children, including 1 case each with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and anaphylactoid purpura. No children with AA were diagnosed with autoimmune diseases. Immune abnormalities were common in both RCC and AA; the most significant reductions were in the relative numbers of CD3-CD56+ subsets found in RCC. Despite the many similar immunologic abnormalities in AA and RCC, the rate of autoimmune disease was significantly lower in childhood AA than RCC (p=0.008, χ2=6.976). The relative numbers of natural killer cells were significantly lower in RCC patients than AA patients. By month 6, there was no significant difference in autoimmune manifestations between RCC and AA in relation to the response to immunosuppressive therapy (p=0.907, χ2=0.014). The large overlap of analogous immunologic abnormalities indicates that RCC and childhood AA may share the same pathogenesis.

  8. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Srinivas, NCH; Kumar, Duddu Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The study is to evaluate changes in microhardness of enamel after exposure to acidic center filled chewing gum on primary and permanent teeth. Methods: Thirty primary and 30 permanent molar extracted teeth were painted with acid resistant varnish except a small window over buccal surface. Teeth were divided into four groups according to type of teeth and type of chewing gum (Center fresh and Bubbaloo) (D1, P1, D2 and P2); each tooth was exposed to whole chewing gum mashed with 5 ml of artificial saliva for five minutes at room temperature twice a day for 5 days. After the exposure, teeth were stored in deionized water and submitted for microhardness tests. Results: Paired t-test and independent sample t-test were used for statistical analysis. A significant reduction in microhardness was found between exposed and unexposed areas in all groups. There was no statistically significant difference in reduction of microhardness to chewing gums, and between primary and permanent enamel. Conclusion: There is a definite reduction in microhardness in all groups exposed to chewing gums. Both the chewing gums are equally erosive; both permanent and primary teeth were affected. How to cite this article: Mudumba VL, Muppa R, Srinivas NCH, Kumar DM. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):24-29. PMID:25206233

  9. Active surveillance of abused and misused prescription opioids using poison center data: a pilot study and descriptive comparison.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alice A; Bogdan, Gregory M; Dart, Richard C

    2007-01-01

    Prescription opioids are abused throughout the United States. Several monitoring programs are in existence, however, none of these systems provide up-to-date information on prescription opioid abuse. This article describes the use of poison centers as a real-time, geographically specific, surveillance system for prescription opioid abuse and compares our system with an existing prescription drug abuse monitoring program, the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN). Data were collected from eight geographically dispersed poison centers for a period of twelve months. Any call involving buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, and oxycodone was considered a case. Any case coded as intentional exposure (abuse, intentional misuse, suicide, or intentional unknown) was regarded as misuse and abuse. Comparative data were obtained from DAWN. Poison center rates of abuse and misuse were highest for hydrocodone at 3.75 per 100,000 population, followed by oxycodone at 1.81 per 100,000 population. DAWN emergency department (ED) data illustrate a similar pattern of abuse with most mentions involving hydrocodone and oxycodone. Poison center data indicate that people aged 18 to 25 had the highest rates of abuse. DAWN reported the majority of ED mentions among 35 to 44-year-olds. Geographically, Kentucky had the uppermost rates of abuse and misuse for all opioids combined at 20.69 per 100,000 population. CONCLUSIONS. Comparing poison center data to DAWN yielded mostly comparable results, including hydrocodone as the most commonly mentioned drug. Our results suggest poison center data can be used as an indicator for prescription opioid abuse and misuse and can provide timely, geographically specific information on prescription drug abuse.

  10. Stress among Croatian physicians: comparison between physicians working in emergency medical service and health centers – pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Gregov, Ljiljana; Kovačević, Ana; Slišković, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Aim To determine the sources of stress, its intensity, frequency, and psychophysical and behavioral reactions in physicians working in emergency medical service and those working in health centers. Methods To a convenience sample of primary care physicians employed in emergency medical service (n = 79) and health centers (n = 81), we administered the list of demographic questions, Scale of Sources of Stress, Scale of Intentions of Leaving the Job, and Scale of Psychosomatic Symptoms. Results Emergency medicine physicians experienced significantly more intense and more frequent uncontrollable working situations, conflict between work and family roles, and unfavorable relationships with coworkers than physicians working in health centers. They were also more likely to leave the job during the next few years and/or change jobs within the profession (scores 2.2 ± 0.9 vs 1.7 ± 0.9 out of maximum 5.0, F = 12.2, P = 0.001) and they had a poorer physical health status (scores 1.8 ± 0.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.5 out of maximum 4.0, F = 5.3, P = 0.023). Conclusion Physicians working in emergency medical service experience more stress in almost all aspects of their work than physicians working in health centers. They also have a stronger intention of leaving the job, which decreases with years of experience. PMID:21328715

  11. Brain morphometry reproducibility in multi-center 3T MRI studies: a comparison of cross-sectional and longitudinal segmentations.

    PubMed

    Jovicich, Jorge; Marizzoni, Moira; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Bosch, Beatriz; Bartrés-Faz, David; Arnold, Jennifer; Benninghoff, Jens; Wiltfang, Jens; Roccatagliata, Luca; Nobili, Flavio; Hensch, Tilman; Tränkner, Anja; Schönknecht, Peter; Leroy, Melanie; Lopes, Renaud; Bordet, Régis; Chanoine, Valérie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Didic, Mira; Gros-Dagnac, Hélène; Payoux, Pierre; Zoccatelli, Giada; Alessandrini, Franco; Beltramello, Alberto; Bargalló, Núria; Blin, Olivier; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale longitudinal multi-site MRI brain morphometry studies are becoming increasingly crucial to characterize both normal and clinical population groups using fully automated segmentation tools. The test-retest reproducibility of morphometry data acquired across multiple scanning sessions, and for different MR vendors, is an important reliability indicator since it defines the sensitivity of a protocol to detect longitudinal effects in a consortium. There is very limited knowledge about how across-session reliability of morphometry estimates might be affected by different 3T MRI systems. Moreover, there is a need for optimal acquisition and analysis protocols in order to reduce sample sizes. A recent study has shown that the longitudinal FreeSurfer segmentation offers improved within session test-retest reproducibility relative to the cross-sectional segmentation at one 3T site using a nonstandard multi-echo MPRAGE sequence. In this study we implement a multi-site 3T MRI morphometry protocol based on vendor provided T1 structural sequences from different vendors (3D MPRAGE on Siemens and Philips, 3D IR-SPGR on GE) implemented in 8 sites located in 4 European countries. The protocols used mild acceleration factors (1.5-2) when possible. We acquired across-session test-retest structural data of a group of healthy elderly subjects (5 subjects per site) and compared the across-session reproducibility of two full-brain automated segmentation methods based on either longitudinal or cross-sectional FreeSurfer processing. The segmentations include cortical thickness, intracranial, ventricle and subcortical volumes. Reproducibility is evaluated as absolute changes relative to the mean (%), Dice coefficient for volume overlap and intraclass correlation coefficients across two sessions. We found that this acquisition and analysis protocol gives comparable reproducibility results to previous studies that used longer acquisitions without acceleration. We also show that

  12. [Comparison of chest and abdominal x-ray radiation dose and its image quality-a multi-center study].

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki; Ishiyama, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroya; Katuragi, Yuji; Masunari, Toyokazu; Shibutani, Takayuki; Ishiki, Koichi; Nakanishi, Ken; Anai, Tatuya; Sumida, Shigeru; Morimatu, Takashi; Miyano, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    While radiography provides us clinically valuable information, it increases the risk of radiation exposure. Previous studies have reported great variations in radiation doses among institutions. It is concerning that radiation doses will increase and vary greatly from institution to institution when digital radiographic modalities become more common. In the present study, we measured chest and abdominal radiation doses at 10 institutions that had X-ray digital imaging systems. Differences in radiation doses among the institutions were evaluated and compared with the previous reports. The image quality at the measured radiation doses were also evaluated. The doses were measured by the same dosimeter, and the image quality at a specific dose was evaluated using the standard deviation of the digital values and Wiener spectrum. Our results indicate that the difference in radiation among institutions was approximately five-fold at a maximum and smaller than the previous reports had indicated. The image quality was improved as the dose was increased. We considered the five-fold difference to be the result of variations in optimum image quality and associated radiation doses among institutions. In summary, evaluating the radiation dose along with the image quality is important to optimize the doses.

  13. Relationship between anxiety level and radiological investigation. Comparison among different diagnostic imaging exams in a prospective single-center study.

    PubMed

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; De Luca, Rossella; Muscarneri, Filippa; Dorangricchia, Patrizia; Picone, Dario; Vernuccio, Federica; Salerno, Sergio; La Tona, Giuseppe; Pinto, Antonio; Midiri, Massimo; Russo, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Cicero, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Every patient could feel anxious when he waits in a radiological department to undergo diagnostic exams. The aim of our study is to evaluate the impact of the radiological exams on patient anxiety. We evaluated 343 patients (mean age 54.83 years) who underwent different types of diagnostic exams in the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at our Hospital from April 2013 to August 2014. We administered to patients the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory Test, which detected with high sensitivity both state anxiety and trait anxiety. A team of clinical psychologists and radiologists evaluated the scores obtained. 83 out of 343 patients were excluded because refused to file the questionnaire. 31 % of the patients were submitted to MR, 18 % to breast imaging, 10 % to X-ray, 22 % Computer Tomography and 19 % to ultrasound, as previously described. 41 % of patients were submitted to the examination because of an oncologic disease, while 59 % because of non-oncological disease. Therefore, it was found that high levels of anxiety were present in most (about 91 %) of the patients and the scores varied according to the imaging examination and to the examination's reason: anxiety level was higher in non-oncological patients (54 %) and in patients waiting to undergo to MRI exams (29 %). Our data suggest that the diagnostic exams are stressful events for the patient, also in non-oncological patients. So, it is important to adequate the radiological staff to receive the patient, to inform him and perform exams with emotive involvement with a targeted education. Also, further studies are needed to evaluate the anxiety level and the quality of the images, because the anxiety can result in a somatic disorder with hyperactivity of the autonomic nervous system which may affect the patient's physical examination, causing problems in the evaluation of radiological images making to non-cooperative patient. MRI imaging is the examination that more of all led to an anxious state of

  14. Comparison of different comorbidity measures for oral cancer patients with surgical intervention: A longitudinal study from a single cancer center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Po-Chun; Yu, Chia-Hui; Yang, Ching-Chieh

    2016-06-01

    Several comorbid measures have been developed and demonstrated the predictive ability for cancer mortality. We conducted a retrospective study on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients to compare the Charlson comorbidity index score (CCIS) to the Elixhauser comorbidity index score (ECIS). Newly diagnosed OSCC patients (n=232) post major surgery with or without adjuvant therapy were identified from the cancer registry database between 2006 and 2011. Comorbidities present prior to the cancer diagnosis were obtained and adapted to the CCIS and ECIS. The prevalence of comorbid conditions and the influence on disease-specific survival (DSS) rate were calculated and analyzed by Cox regression model. The discriminatory ability of these two comorbid measures was evaluated by using the adjusted hazard ratio and Akaike information criterion (AIC) in a multivariate regression model. The prediction accuracy was assessed using Harrell's c-statistic. Most of the patients (93.5%) were male with a mean age of 54 ± 11 years and 77 of them (33.1%) had at least one comorbid condition. The ECIS was associated DSS, with an additional 10% increased risk observed for mortality for each increased score (HR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.18) after adjusting with pathological risk features. However, the CCIS was not an independent prognostic factor for these patients. The ECIS increased discriminatory ability but the CCIS did not improve discrimination. Comorbid conditions significantly influenced the clinical outcomes of patient with OSCC post major surgery. A higher ECIS was associated with worse disease specific survival indicative of a valuable prognostic indicator. The ECIS may be considered in further clinical trials for a variety of cancers, including head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and complexity are studied for four nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme and three cell-centered schemes - a node-averaging scheme and two schemes with nearest-neighbor and adaptive compact stencils for least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Tests from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The tests of the second class are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes may degenerate on mixed grids, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to that of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly anisotropic

  16. Center for Dielectric Studies,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    able to show by z -ray studies that in PST quenched rapidly from high temperature So and Ta ions are disordered as in 3.2(b) while by long annealing...micropositioners. 3.2.2 Lead Iron Niobate:Lead Nickel Niobate Results of a preliminary study of the x(Pb(Fo 1 /2 Nbl/ 2 )03 ) - (1- z )Pb(Ni1/3Nb2 /$)0 3 PN:PNN...Curia temperature Tc (17*C) at zerZ bias fi.aid. * Z -;her blas 1-0 -, Z shifts the transition coward higher :,rpara:.-re. .owl:-r" :’" DEPOLARIZATION

  17. PSI-Center Validation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Akcay, C.; Glasser, A. H.; Hansen, C. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Marklin, G. J.; Milroy, R. D.; Morgan, K. D.; Norgaard, P. C.; Shumlak, U.; Sutherland, D. A.; Victor, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; O'Bryan, J. B.; Held, E. D.; Ji, J.-Y.; Lukin, V. S.

    2014-10-01

    The Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center - http://www.psicenter.org) supports collaborating validation platform experiments with 3D extended MHD simulations using the NIMROD, HiFi, and PSI-TET codes. Collaborators include the Bellan Plasma Group (Caltech), CTH (Auburn U), HBT-EP (Columbia), HIT-SI (U Wash-UW), LTX (PPPL), MAST (Culham), Pegasus (U Wisc-Madison), SSX (Swarthmore College), TCSU (UW), and ZaP/ZaP-HD (UW). The PSI-Center is exploring application of validation metrics between experimental data and simulations results. Biorthogonal decomposition (BOD) is used to compare experiments with simulations. BOD separates data sets into spatial and temporal structures, giving greater weight to dominant structures. Several BOD metrics are being formulated with the goal of quantitive validation. Results from these simulation and validation studies, as well as an overview of the PSI-Center status will be presented.

  18. Control Systems Security Center Comparison Study of Industrial Control System Standards against the Control Systems Protection Framework Cyber-Security Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    Cyber security standards, guidelines, and best practices for control systems are critical requirements that have been delineated and formally recognized by industry and government entities. Cyber security standards provide a common language within the industrial control system community, both national and international, to facilitate understanding of security awareness issues but, ultimately, they are intended to strengthen cyber security for control systems. This study and the preliminary findings outlined in this report are an initial attempt by the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) Standard Awareness Team to better understand how existing and emerging industry standards, guidelines, and best practices address cyber security for industrial control systems. The Standard Awareness Team comprised subject matter experts in control systems and cyber security technologies and standards from several Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories, including Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This study was conducted in two parts: a standard identification effort and a comparison analysis effort. During the standard identification effort, the Standard Awareness Team conducted a comprehensive open-source survey of existing control systems security standards, regulations, and guidelines in several of the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors, including the telecommunication, water, chemical, energy (electric power, petroleum and oil, natural gas), and transportation--rail sectors and sub-sectors. During the comparison analysis effort, the team compared the requirements contained in selected, identified, industry standards with the cyber security requirements in ''Cyber Security Protection Framework'', Version 0.9 (hereafter referred to as the ''Framework''). For each of the seven sector/sub-sectors listed above, one standard was selected from the list of standards identified

  19. Prospective randomized comparison of rotational angiography with three-dimensional reconstruction and computed tomography merged with electro-anatomical mapping: a two center atrial fibrillation ablation study.

    PubMed

    Anand, Rishi; Gorev, Maxim V; Poghosyan, Hermine; Pothier, Lindsay; Matkins, John; Kotler, Gregory; Moroz, Sarah; Armstrong, James; Nemtsov, Sergei V; Orlov, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    To compare the efficacy and accuracy of rotational angiography with three-dimensional reconstruction (3DATG) image merged with electro-anatomical mapping (EAM) vs. CT-EAM. A prospective, randomized, parallel, two-center study conducted in 36 patients (25 men, age 65 ± 10 years) undergoing AF ablation (33 % paroxysmal, 67 % persistent) guided by 3DATG (group 1) vs. CT (group 2) image fusion with EAM. 3DATG was performed on the Philips Allura Xper FD 10 system. Procedural characteristics including time, radiation exposure, outcome, and navigation accuracy were compared between two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in total procedure duration or time spent for various procedural steps. Minor differences in procedural characteristics were present between two centers. Segmentation and fusion time for 3DATG or CT-EAM was short and similar between both centers. Accuracy of navigation guided by either method was high and did not depend on left atrial size. Maintenance of sinus rhythm between the two groups was no different up to 24 months of follow-up. This study did not find superiority of 3DATG-EAM image merge to guide AF ablation when compared to CT-EAM fusion. Both merging techniques result in similar navigation accuracy.

  20. Center for Micro Air Vehicle Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    25 Figure 30: Insect Wing Comparison: (Top) Bumblebee; (Center) Cicada ; (Bottom) Wasp ......... 26 Figure 31... cicada , and wasp. At first glance, these wings appear to be unrelated in venial structure. It was found that each of these insects belong to...Bumblebee; (Center) Cicada ; (Bottom) Wasp Another common characteristic of these wings is the tendency to maintain a heavy structure closest to the wing

  1. Comparison between horse and rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first-line treatment for patients with severe aplastic anemia: a single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Atta, Elias Hallack; Dias, Danielle Saldanha Peixoto; Marra, Vera Lúcia Neves; de Azevedo, Alexandre Mello

    2010-09-01

    The best antithymocyte globulin preparation for first-line immune suppression in patients with severe aplastic anemia is still not clear. The aim of this study was to compare hematological response and overall survival in patients submitted to horse or rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first-line treatment for severe aplastic anemia. We retrospectively compared 71 consecutive patients with severe aplastic anemia, classified according to the antithymocyte globulin preparation. Analyses included variables related to patients and to immune suppression. Forty two patients (59.1%) received horse and 29 (40.9%) rabbit antithymocyte globulin. Response rates were higher at 6 months in patients submitted to horse in comparison to rabbit antithymocyte globulin (59.5% versus 34.5% respectively, p = 0.05). Median time to response was similar between the two groups (99 versus 88.5 days, respectively, for horse and rabbit antithymocyte globulin; p = 0.98). Overall survival at 2 years was significantly higher in patients submitted to horse in comparison to rabbit antithymocyte globulin (78.4% versus 55.4%, p = 0.03). Post-treatment response was strongly associated with survival at 2 years (97% in responders versus 41.2% in non-responders, p < 0.001). Use of rabbit antithymocyte globulin was an independent predictor of death (odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval 1.03-6.04; p = 0.04). Rabbit antithymocyte globulin was associated with a significant and prolonged lymphopenia in comparison with horse antithymocyte globulin. Our data suggest the superiority of horse over rabbit antithymocyte globulin as first-line treatment for severe aplastic anemia, both regarding hematological response and survival.

  2. Time to activate lung cancer clinical trials and patient enrollment: a representative comparison study between two academic centers across the atlantic.

    PubMed

    Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Williams, Kristina; Novello, Silvia; Gao, Feng; Scagliotti, Giorgio V; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2010-08-20

    Activation of clinical trials is a lengthy process. We studied the procedures and time required to activate lung cancer clinical trials in a US academic center compared with a European center. A retrospective review was performed of all thoracic oncology therapeutic trials submitted for regulatory review between 2001 and 2008 at Washington University School of Medicine (WUSM; St Louis, MO) and the University of Torino (UT; Torino, Italy). A process map was drafted by both institutions to establish the order of required events. We reviewed 137 therapeutic thoracic oncology trials from WUSM (n = 83) and UT (n = 54). The median times from submission to opening a trial were 163 days for WUSM and 112.5 days for UT (P = .048). The median times for regulatory approval were 75 days for WUSM and 31 days for UT (P < .001). The difference is more pronounced in a homogeneous subset of phase II, industrial-sponsored trials for the median calendar time from submission to opening a trial (239.5 days for WUSM v 112.5 days for UT; P < .001) and time for regulatory approval (99 days for WUSM v 13.5 days for UT; P < .001). The median number of patients accrued at WUSM was 7.4 patients per study compared with an average of 37 patients per study at UT. The proportion of trials that enrolled 20 patients or more represented 22.2% of trials at UT but only 1.1% of trials at WUSM. It takes additional steps and significantly longer time to activate a therapeutic thoracic clinical trial at a representative US site (WUSM) compared with a European site (UT).

  3. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  4. Practice-based depression screening for psychiatry outpatients: feasibility comparison of two-types of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scales.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takeshi; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2009-10-01

    The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) has been validated to avoid misdiagnoses of major depression in routine psychiatric outpatient settings, but it was reported to be only marginally feasible in these specific settings. A briefer and simpler version, known as the 10-item CES-D, meant to attain adequate feasibility, has been validated in geriatric outpatient settings, but it has not yet been examined in psychiatry outpatient settings. The purpose of the present study was therefore to compare the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the two types of CES-D. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 86 consecutive outpatients in a psychiatric department in a general hospital. The 10-item CES-D has a higher feasibility than the 20-item CES-D, and its internal consistency, reliability, and validity are almost identical to those of the 20-item CES-D. The 10-item CES-D is the better instrument to use because of the higher feasibility than the 20-item CES-D in psychiatric outpatient settings. The different answer format used in each questionnaire (a yes or no format in the former vs a multiple-choice format in the latter) may influence the feasibility, rather than the number of items.

  5. A comparison of CPAP and CPAPFLEX in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in World Trade Center responders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ayappa, Indu; Sunderram, Jag; Black, Kathleen; Twumasi, Akosua; Udasin, Iris; Harrison, Denise; Carson, Jeffrey L; Lu, Shou-En; Rapoport, David M

    2015-09-10

    Following the World Trade Center disaster, a large number of individuals involved in rescue and recovery activity were exposed to significant amounts of dust, and reported symptoms of chronic nasal and sinus inflammation. An unusually high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has also been observed in this World Trade Center Responder population. This project aims to examine the relationship between nasal pathology and OSA. Our hypothesis is that increased nasal resistance due to nasal inflammation predisposes to OSA in this population. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is the standard therapy for OSA but despite its efficacy has poor adherence. Subjects with high nasal resistance may have greater difficulty in tolerating this therapy than those who do not have high nasal resistance. Reduction of excess expiratory positive pressure by the modality known as Cflex(™) during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure therapy (CPAP(Flex)) has been suggested to improve comfort without compromising efficacy. We will compare CPAP to CPAP(Flex) in subjects with OSA. Subjects with new onset habitual snoring will be screened for OSA using home sleep studies and rhinomanometry will be used to determine nasal resistance. In 400 subjects with OSA we will perform a randomized double blind cross-over study comparing CPAP to CPAP(flex), and relate nasal resistance to adherence to CPAP therapy. This is the first multicenter trial designed to test the hypothesis that adherence to CPAP therapy relates to nasal resistance and CPAP(Flex) will improve adherence to CPAP in those subjects with high nasal resistance. We anticipate the following results from this trial: 1. Increased nasal resistance is associated with decreased adherence to CPAP therapy. 2. Use of CPAP(Flex) improves adherence with CPAP therapy in subjects with high nasal resistance, but not in those with low nasal resistance. 3. The benefit of CPAP(Flex) on adherence is greatest when offered at CPAP therapy

  6. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  7. Center for Creative Studies, Detroit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AIA Journal, 1976

    1976-01-01

    One of the ten buildings chosen to receive 1976 AIA honor awards, the arts center houses the departments of sculpture, painting, graphics, advertising art, photography, and industrial design. (Author/MLF)

  8. Comparison of patency and cost-effectiveness of self-expandable metal and plastic stents used for malignant biliary strictures: a Polish single-center study.

    PubMed

    Budzyńska, Agnieszka; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Marek, Tomasz; Hartleb, Marek

    2016-10-01

    Most patients with malignant biliary obstruction are suited only for palliation by endoscopic drainage with plastic stents (PS) or self-expandable metal stents (SEMS). To compare the clinical outcome and costs of biliary stenting with SEMS and PS in patients with malignant biliary strictures. A total of 114 patients with malignant jaundice who underwent 376 endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD) were studied. ERBD with the placement of PS was performed in 80 patients, with one-step SEMS in 20 patients and two-step SEMS in 14 patients. Significantly fewer ERBD interventions were performed in patients with one-step SEMS than PS or the two-step SEMS technique (2.0±1.12 vs. 3.1±1.7 or 5.7±2.1, respectively, P<0.0001). The median hospitalization duration per procedure was similar for the three groups of patients. The patients' survival time was the longest in the two-step SEMS group in comparison with the one-step SEMS and PS groups (596±270 vs. 276±141 or 208±219 days, P<0.001). Overall median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 89.3±159 days for PS and 120.6±101 days for SEMS (P=0.01). The total cost of hospitalization with ERBD was higher for two-step SEMS than for one-step SEMS or PS (1448±312, 1152±135 and 977±156&OV0556;, P<0.0001). However, the estimated annual cost of medical care for one-step SEMS was higher than that for the two-step SEMS or PS groups (4618, 4079, and 3995&OV0556;, respectively). Biliary decompression by SEMS is associated with longer patency and reduced number of auxiliary procedures; however, repeated PS insertions still remain the most cost-effective strategy.

  9. Comparison of industrial emissions and carpet dust concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in a multi-center U.S. study.

    PubMed

    Deziel, Nicole C; Nuckols, John R; Jones, Rena R; Graubard, Barry I; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Pronk, Anjoeka; Gourley, Chris; Colt, Joanne S; Ward, Mary H

    2017-02-15

    Proximity to facilities emitting polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) has been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). There is limited information about whether proximity to industrial sources leads to indoor PCDD/F contamination of homes. We measured carpet dust concentrations (pg/g) of 17 toxic PCDD/F congeners and calculated their toxic equivalence (TEQ) in 100 homes in a population-based case-control study of NHL in Detroit, Los Angeles, Seattle, and Iowa (1998-2000). We took global positioning system readings at residences and obtained coordinates and PCDD/F emissions (ng TEQ/yr) from an Environmental Protection Agency database for 6 facility types: coal-fired electricity generating plants, cement kilns burning non-hazardous waste, hazardous waste incinerators, medical waste incinerators, municipal solid waste incinerators, and sewage sludge incinerators. For each residence, we computed an inverse distance-squared weighted average emission index (AEI [pg TEQ/km(2)/yr]) for all facilities within 5km from 1983 to 2000. We also computed AEIs for each of the 6 facility types. We evaluated relationships between PCDD/F dust concentrations and the all-facility AEI or categories of facility-type AEIs using multivariable linear regression, adjusting for study center, demographics, and home characteristics. A doubling of the all-facility AEI was associated with a 4-8% increase in PCDD/F dust concentrations of 7 of 17 PCDD/F congeners and the TEQ (p-value<0.1). We also observed positive associations between PCDD/F dust concentrations and facility-type AEIs (highest vs. lowest exposure category) for municipal solid waste incinerators (9 PCDD/F, TEQ), and medical waste incinerators (7 PCDD/F, TEQ) (p<0.1). Our results from diverse geographical areas suggest that industrial PCDD/F emission sources contribute to residential PCDD/F dust concentrations. Our emissions index could be improved by incorporating local

  10. Job Corps Centers. Comparison of Costs and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    A study examined the costs, outcomes, and administrative structure of the Job Corps program. Information obtained from the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Job Corps and discussions with DOL officials was used to study the structure of the Job Corps program, cost differences between Job Corps centers run by contractors and Civilian…

  11. Colorectal cancer anatomic distribution patterns remain the same after sessile serrated adenoma/polyp considered cancer precursor: a 9-year comparison study from community-based endoscopy centers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Juliana F.; Noffsinger, Amy E.; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background The overall incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States has steadily decreased. However, the incidence of right-sided CRC remains unchanged for the past two decades. The serrated neoplastic pathway (sessile serrated adenoma/polyp, SSA/P) has been considered an important pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis, especially in the right-sided CRC. The aim of this study was to compare CRC anatomic distribution patterns in a 9-year interval in the general population before and after SSA/P was recognized and treated as a CRC precursor. Methods The Miraca Life Sciences (MLS) pathology database was queried for all primary CRCs diagnosed between 8/3/2000 to 12/31/2005 (control group) and 1/1/2014 to 12/31/2014 (current group). Patients’ demographics, clinical information, and pathology reports were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 5,602 patients with 5,685 CRCs were identified, of which 2,728 patients with 2,765 CRCs in current group and 2,874 patients with 2,920 CRCs in control group. Overall, there were no statistical differences in the current group in regards to the anatomical distribution patterns of CRCs in the proximal, right-sided, distal, and left-sided colon or genders compared with the control group (all P>0.05). Among the current group, there were 33 (1.2%) patients with 38 (1.4%) CRCs arising in SSA/Ps [serrated carcinomas (SCAs)], of which 33 (86.8%) were in the right-sided colon and 5 (13.2%) in the left-sided colon. Twenty-three (69.7%) SCA patients were female with significant advanced age than male (76.4 vs. 69.6, P=0.023). Conclusions The overall current CRC anatomic distribution patterns after SSA/Ps managed as CRC precursor remain the same in the patients’ population from the community-based endoscopy centers in the U.S. It is suggested that the current SSA/P management might need to be further modified. PMID:28078114

  12. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations. Part 1; Viscous Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; White, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    Discretization of the viscous terms in current finite-volume unstructured-grid schemes are compared using node-centered and cell-centered approaches in two dimensions. Accuracy and efficiency are studied for six nominally second-order accurate schemes: a node-centered scheme, cell-centered node-averaging schemes with and without clipping, and cell-centered schemes with unweighted, weighted, and approximately mapped least-square face gradient reconstruction. The grids considered range from structured (regular) grids to irregular grids composed of arbitrary mixtures of triangles and quadrilaterals, including random perturbations of the grid points to bring out the worst possible behavior of the solution. Two classes of tests are considered. The first class of tests involves smooth manufactured solutions on both isotropic and highly anisotropic grids with discontinuous metrics, typical of those encountered in grid adaptation. The second class concerns solutions and grids varying strongly anisotropically over a curved body, typical of those encountered in high-Reynolds number turbulent flow simulations. Results from the first class indicate the face least-square methods, the node-averaging method without clipping, and the node-centered method demonstrate second-order convergence of discretization errors with very similar accuracies per degree of freedom. The second class of tests are more discriminating. The node-centered scheme is always second order with an accuracy and complexity in linearization comparable to the best of the cell-centered schemes. In comparison, the cell-centered node-averaging schemes are less accurate, have a higher complexity in linearization, and can fail to converge to the exact solution when clipping of the node-averaged values is used. The cell-centered schemes using least-square face gradient reconstruction have more compact stencils with a complexity similar to the complexity of the node-centered scheme. For simulations on highly

  13. Comparison of laparoscopy-assisted and open radical gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer: A retrospective study in a single minimally invasive surgery center.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yingxue; Yu, Peiwu; Qian, Feng; Zhao, Yongliang; Shi, Yan; Tang, Bo; Zeng, Dongzhu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) has gained international acceptance for the treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC). However, the use of laparoscopic surgery in the management of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) has not attained widespread acceptance. This retrospective large-scale patient study in a single center for minimally invasive surgery assessed the feasibility and safety of LAG for T2 and T3 stage AGC. A total of 628 patients underwent LAG and 579 patients underwent open gastrectomy (OG) from Jan 2004 to Dec 2011. All cases underwent radical lymph node (LN) dissection from D1 to D2+. This study compared short- and long-term results between the 2 groups after stratifying by pTNM stages, including the mean operation time, volume of blood loss, number of harvested LNs, average days of postoperative hospital stay, mean gastrointestinal function recovery time, intra- and post-operative complications, recurrence rate, recurrence site, and 5-year survival curve. Thirty-five patients (5.57%) converted to open procedures in the LAG group. There were no significant differences in retrieved LN number (30.4 ± 13.4 vs 28.1 ± 17.2, P = 0.43), proximal resection margin (PRM) (6.15 ± 1.63 vs 6.09 ± 1.91, P = 0.56), or distal resection margin (DRM) (5.46 ± 1.74 vs 5.40 ± 1.95, P = 0.57) between the LAG and OG groups, respectively. The mean volume of blood loss (154.5 ± 102.6 vs 311.2 ± 118.9 mL, P < 0.001), mean postoperative hospital stay (7.6 ± 2.5 vs 10.7 ± 3.6 days, P < 0.001), mean time for gastrointestinal function recovery (3.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.9 ± 1.5 days, P < 0.001), and postoperative complications rate (6.4% vs 10.5%, P = 0.01) were clearly lower in the LAG group compared to the OG group. However, the recurrence pattern and site were not different between the 2 groups, even they were stratified by the TNM stage. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 85.38%, 79.70%, 57

  14. Computer Networks and African Studies Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    The use of electronic communication in the 12 Title VI African Studies Centers is discussed, and the networks available for their use are reviewed. It is argued that the African Studies Centers should be on the cutting edge of contemporary electronic communication and that computer networks should be a fundamental aspect of their programs. An…

  15. Stent Grafts Provided Superior Primary Patency for Central Venous Stenosis Treatment in Comparison with Angioplasty and Bare Metal Stent: A Retrospective Single Center Study on 70 Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Quaretti, Pietro; Galli, Franco; Moramarco, Lorenzo Paolo; Corti, Riccardo; Leati, Giovanni; Fiorina, Ilaria; Tinelli, Carmine; Montagna, Giovanni; Maestri, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    To compare patency in dialysis patients following different endovascular treatment of symptomatic central venous stenosis. A 10-year retrospective evaluation in 70 patients (32 men) dialyzing through vascular access (33, 47%) and tunneled catheters (37, 53%) was made. Three cohorts were compared: angioplasty alone (22), bare metal stent (28), and stent graft (20). Patencies were described with Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox uni- and multivariate models were analyzed to find factors associated. All patients had a favorable anatomical and clinical outcome. Restenosis occurred in 22 (31%) of 70 patients requiring 41 additional interventions; 34 of 70 patients died (median follow-up 19.4 months). Primary patency at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months was 100%, 100%, 100%, and 84% for stent graft versus 90%, 79%, 58%, and 43% for angioplasty (P = .014) versus 84%, 80%, 75%, and 46% for bare-metal stent (P = .062). The overall comparison was more favorable for stent graft (P = .020) when the sites of lesions were matched. Patencies for angioplasty and bare-metal stents were equivalent (P = .141). A lower risk of restenosis (hazard rate [HR] 0.20, confidence interval [CI] 0.06-0.7) and fewer reinterventions (P < .01) were associated with stent graft, whereas age (HR 1.04, CI 1.001-1.08) and cardiovascular disease (HR 2.26, CI 1.06-4.84) influenced the overall survival. No difference in assisted primary patency was found. Stent graft seems to improve primary patency for central venous stenosis and requires fewer reinterventions in a dialysis population with a high prevalence of long-term catheters. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Comparison of Node-Centered and Cell-Centered Unstructured Finite-Volume Discretizations: Inviscid Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-centered and node-centered approaches have been compared for unstructured finite-volume discretization of inviscid fluxes. The grids range from regular grids to irregular grids, including mixed-element grids and grids with random perturbations of nodes. Accuracy, complexity, and convergence rates of defect-correction iterations are studied for eight nominally second-order accurate schemes: two node-centered schemes with weighted and unweighted least-squares (LSQ) methods for gradient reconstruction and six cell-centered schemes two node-averaging with and without clipping and four schemes that employ different stencils for LSQ gradient reconstruction. The cell-centered nearest-neighbor (CC-NN) scheme has the lowest complexity; a version of the scheme that involves smart augmentation of the LSQ stencil (CC-SA) has only marginal complexity increase. All other schemes have larger complexity; complexity of node-centered (NC) schemes are somewhat lower than complexity of cell-centered node-averaging (CC-NA) and full-augmentation (CC-FA) schemes. On highly anisotropic grids typical of those encountered in grid adaptation, discretization errors of five of the six cell-centered schemes converge with second order on all tested grids; the CC-NA scheme with clipping degrades solution accuracy to first order. The NC schemes converge with second order on regular and/or triangular grids and with first order on perturbed quadrilaterals and mixed-element grids. All schemes may produce large relative errors in gradient reconstruction on grids with perturbed nodes. Defect-correction iterations for schemes employing weighted least-square gradient reconstruction diverge on perturbed stretched grids. Overall, the CC-NN and CC-SA schemes offer the best options of the lowest complexity and secondorder discretization errors. On anisotropic grids over a curved body typical of turbulent flow simulations, the discretization errors converge with second order and are small for the CC

  17. Geology orbiter comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  18. A multi-center, double-blind, randomised study of the Lavender oil preparation Silexan in comparison to Lorazepam for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Woelk, H; Schläfke, S

    2010-02-01

    Generalized and persistent anxiety, accompanied by nervousness and other symptoms (Generalised Anxiety Disorder, GAD) is frequent in the general population and leads to benzodiazepine usage. Unfortunately, these substances induce sedation and have a high potential for drug abuse, and there is thus a need for alternatives. As the anxiolytic properties of lavender have already been demonstrated in pharmacological studies and small-scale clinical trials, it was postulated that lavender has a positive effect in GAD. A controlled clinical study was then performed to evaluate the efficacy of silexan, a new oral lavender oil capsule preparation, versus a benzodiazepine. In this study, the efficacy of a 6-week-intake of silexan compared to lorazepam was investigated in adults with GAD. The primary target variable was the change in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A-total score) as an objective measurement of the severity of anxiety between baseline and week 6. The results suggest that silexan effectively ameliorates generalized anxiety comparable to a common benzodiazepine (lorazepam). The mean of the HAM-A-total score decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups (by 11.3+/-6.7 points (45%) in the silexan group and by 11.6+/-6.6 points (46%) in the lorazepam group, from 25+/-4 points at baseline in both groups). During the active treatment period, the two HAM-A subscores "somatic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore I) and "psychic anxiety" (HAM-A subscore II) also decreased clearly and to a similar extent in both groups. The changes in other subscores measured during the study, such as the SAS (Self-rating Anxiety Scale), PSWQ-PW (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), SF 36 Health survey Questionnaire and Clinical Global Impressions of severity of disorder (CGI item 1, CGI item 2, CGI item 3), and the results of the sleep diary demonstrated comparable positive effects of the two compounds. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that silexan is as effective as lorazepam

  19. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Radpay, Rojan; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. Materials and Methods: 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (p<0.005) indicating improved nutritional status in each groups. Conclusion: This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress. PMID:27403176

  20. Quality of Life Shift after Aortic Valve Replacement in the Era of TAVI: Single-Center Class Comparison Study Between Different Procedural Techniques.

    PubMed

    Blehm, Alexander; Sorokin, Vitaly A; Hartman, Mikael; Wai, Khin Lay; Schmitz, Karoline; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2015-09-01

    The health-related quality of life (QOL) is one of the most important outcome indicators for elderly people undergoing aortic valve interventions, and should be assessed across different interventions, including emerging percutaneous techniques. The study aim was to assess the change in QOL after different procedures for aortic valve replacement (AVR). QOL was assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) for 59 patients after conventional AVR; of these patients, 28 had AVR via a J-sternotomy, a transapical approach was used in 20 patients, and a transfemoral approach in 34. The early mortality during hospitalization was not significantly different among all four groups. The inverse probability weighted propensity scores adjusted Kaplan-Meier curve revealed that the transapical group had the lowest survival rate. The treatment effect analysis was most prominent in the transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) group across all domains for QOL. The multivariate hierarchical linear mixed final fitted model shows that the transapical TAVI procedure and NYHA class (III-IV) had a significant negative effect on the physical domain and overall QOL score. Changes in QOL after interventions on the aortic valve were determined by the patient's preoperative status and the surgical intervention. The transcatheter intervention, even in 'sicker' patients, provided a gain in QOL comparable with that after an open-heart procedure. Transfemoral TAVI was shown to have advantages over transapical TAVI in terms of QOL improvement at three months and six months, and should be considered the first choice for patients in the high-risk surgical group.

  1. Data Center Economizer Contamination and Humidity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok

    2007-03-06

    Data centers require continuous air conditioning to address high internal heat loads (heat release from equipment) and maintain indoor temperatures within recommended operating levels for computers. Air economizer cycles, which bring in large amounts of outside air to cool internal loads when weather conditions are favorable, could save cooling energy. There is reluctance from many data center owners to use this common cooling technique, however, due to fear of introducing pollutants and potential loss of humidity control. Concerns about equipment failure from airborne pollutants lead to specifying as little outside air as permissible for human occupants. To investigate contamination levels, particle monitoring was conducted at 8 data centers in Northern California. Particle counters were placed at 3 to 4 different locations within and outside of each data center evaluated in this study. Humidity was also monitored at many of the sites to determine how economizers affect humidity control. Results from this study indicate that economizers do increase the outdoor concentration in data centers, but this concentration, when averaged annually, is still below current particle concentration limits. Study results are summarized below: (1) The average particle concentrations measured at each location, both outside and at the servers, are shown in Table 1. Measurements show low particle concentrations at all data centers without economizers, regardless of outdoor particle concentrations. Particle concentrations were typically an order of magnitude below both outside particle concentrations and recently published ASHRAE standards. (2) Economizer use caused sharp increases in particle concentrations when the economizer vents were open. The particle concentration in the data centers, however, quickly dropped back to pre-economizer levels when the vents closed. Since economizers only allow outside air part of the time, the annual average concentrations still met the ASHRAE

  2. Efficacy of topical 10% urea-based lotion in patients with ichthyosis vulgaris: a two-center, randomized, controlled, single-blind, right-vs.-left study in comparison with standard glycerol-based emollient cream.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Gianluca; Giustini, Sandra; Milani, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Ichthyoses are genetic disorders of keratinization which are uncomfortable due to their conspicuous scaling, itching and cosmetic problems. Ichthyoses can lead to social discrimination and psychological problems. Ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) is the most common form of these geno-dermatoses. IV is a chronic disorder that often requires continuous therapy. Emollient and keratolytic products are the mainstay treatments of IV. It is important that efficient, safe and well tolerated therapies should be available. Direct comparative data regarding efficacy of different emollient products in IV patients are very few. The aim of the study was to investigate the keratolytic and moisturizing properties as well as the tolerance of a new urea topical formulation (Ureadin Rx10) when applied to hyperkeratotic and dry skin in patients with (IV) in comparison with a standard emollient cream. The study was conducted as a two-center, randomized, controlled, single-blind, intra-patient (right-vs.-left) trial design. A total of 30 patients with IV between 8 and 65 (mean age: 25 years) treated with a 10% urea-based lotion, Ureadin Rx 10 * *Ureadin RX 10 is a registered trade name of ISDIN, Spain. (URx), for 4 weeks or a glycerol-based emollient cream, Dexeryl † †Dexeryl is a registered trade name of Pierre Fabre Dermatologie. (DC), in a right-vs.-left study design. Primary outcome was a 5-point SRRC Index score (evaluating scaling roughness, redness and cracks) evaluated at baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. As secondary endpoints patients evaluated also the global efficacy (GE) and global tolerability (GT) scores with the help of a 10 cm visual analogue scale (0 = no efficacy at all/very bad tolerability; 10: excellent efficacy/excellent tolerability). At baseline the mean (SD) SRRC score was 9.5 (1.9) in the URx treated sites and 9.5 (1.9) in the DC treated sites. A total of 27 patients (90%) concluded the study period. Three patients were withdrawn prematurely

  3. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  4. Center for Japanese Study Abroad. Fastback 386.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jassey, William

    The Center for Japanese Study Abroad (CJSA) is a Japanese immersion and study abroad program implemented as a magnet program at inner-city Brien MacMahon High School in Norwalk, Connecticut. The program is supported by a grant from the state department of education. Attended by 60-70 students from high schools in southern Fairfield County…

  5. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  6. Weekend Study Buddies: Using Portable Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Harristina; Jairrels, Veda

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how one teacher uses a weekend study buddy as a portable learning center for students (ages 5-9) with mild disabilities. The study buddy is a colorful cloth or paper bag that the students take home over the weekend. It can also be individualized to target particular needs. (Contains 8 references.) (CR)

  7. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  8. Cosmos, an international center for advanced studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, Iurii; Alifanov, Oleg; Sadin, Stanley; Coleman, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The concept of Cosmos, a Soviet operating center for aerospace activities, is presented. The main Cosmos participants are the Institute for Aerospace Education, the Institute for Research and Commercial Development, and the Department of Space Policy and Socio-Economic Studies. Cosmos sponsors a number of educational programs, basic research, and studies of the social impact of space-related technologies.

  9. American Indian Studies Center Fortieth Anniversary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his comments on the past, present, and future of the American Indian Studies Center (AISC). He discusses how AISC was established and describes how American Indian studies have come a long way from the neglect and disparagement of Native Americans in the way American history is written and taught. He also…

  10. Cosmos, an international center for advanced studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhov, Iurii; Alifanov, Oleg; Sadin, Stanley; Coleman, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The concept of Cosmos, a Soviet operating center for aerospace activities, is presented. The main Cosmos participants are the Institute for Aerospace Education, the Institute for Research and Commercial Development, and the Department of Space Policy and Socio-Economic Studies. Cosmos sponsors a number of educational programs, basic research, and studies of the social impact of space-related technologies.

  11. The Center for Star Formation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D.; Bell, K. R.; Laughlin, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Center for Star Formation Studies, a consortium of scientists from the Space Science Division at Ames and the Astronomy Departments of the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Cruz, conducts a coordinated program of theoretical research on star and planet formation. Under the directorship of D. Hollenbach (Ames), the Center supports postdoctoral fellows, senior visitors, and students; meets regularly at Ames to exchange ideas and to present informal seminars on current research; hosts visits of outside scientists; and conducts a week-long workshop on selected aspects of star and planet formation each summer.

  12. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This study updates 1991 information from the Children's Foundation. It contains results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The information is intended for use by center directors and staff, child advocates, the media, state and local regulatory offices, students,…

  13. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details a study of regulations for day care centers in the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Data were collected by means of a mail questionnaire sent to each state central regulatory office. Following an introduction by Kay Hollestelle, the Children's Foundation executive director, the…

  14. Teacher Curriculum Work Center: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    This monograph is one of a continuing series initiated to provide materials for teachers, parents, school administrators, and governmental decision-makers that might encourage reexamination of a range of evaluation issues and perspectives about schools and schooling. This monograph is a descriptive study of the Teacher Curriculum Work Center,…

  15. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details a study of regulations for day care centers in the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Data were collected by means of a mail questionnaire sent to each state central regulatory office. Following an introduction by Kay Hollestelle, the Children's Foundation executive director, the…

  16. Energy Education Training Center--Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, George R.; And Others

    Presented are findings and recommendations of a study conducted to determine the need for an Energy Education Training Center in the Columbia Plateau region of Oregon and Washington. Four sections comprise this report: (1) service area, (2) service population, (3) problem definition, and (4) proposed solution, the EETC. Information summarized in…

  17. Energy Education Training Center--Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, George R.; And Others

    Presented are findings and recommendations of a study conducted to determine the need for an Energy Education Training Center in the Columbia Plateau region of Oregon and Washington. Four sections comprise this report: (1) service area, (2) service population, (3) problem definition, and (4) proposed solution, the EETC. Information summarized in…

  18. Comparison of a center and off-center BWR control rod drop accident

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.M.; Neogy, P.; Carew, J.F.

    1984-07-01

    A BWR control rod drop accident (RDA) induces a rapid core power transient involving strong neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupling, which requires a detailed multi-dimensional spatial kinetics analysis. Typical two-dimensional (r,z) RDA calculations require that the dropped rod be a center rod, as a result of geometric limitations, while in three-dimensional (x,y,z) calculations the dropped rod is generally taken to be the center rod in order to allow a quarter-core representation and limit computer running times. However, for typical BWR core loadings, the highest worth rod is not necessarily the center rod and it is not known, a priori, what effect this difference in spatial location has on the RDA dynamics. In order to evaluate the effects of this simplification, three-dimensional RAMONA-3B calculations have been performed for both a center and off-center control rod drop accident.

  19. Space Operations Center: Shuttle interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the Space Operation Center (SOC), including constraints that the Shuttle will place upon the SOC design. The study identifies the considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and also identifies the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions.

  20. A Comparison of Lead Abatement Technologies at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeziorowski, Luz Y.; Calla, Joanne

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, Lewis participated in a pilot test of Lead Specifications. The Specifications were sponsored by the Center to Protect Worker's Rights (CPWR). Entitled "Model Specifications for the Protection of Worker's from Lead on Steel Structures", one aspect of this endeavor was to test and compare several lead abatement technologies. The project overview, objectives, team, and requirements as well as abatement methods and materials are outlined.

  1. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  2. Assessing Latina/o Undergraduates' Depressive Symptomatology: Comparisons of the Beck Depression Inventory-II, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, and the Self-Report Depression Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gloria, Alberta M.; Castellanos, Jeanett; Kanagui-Munoz, Marlen; Rico, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of depression scales as screening tools at university and college centers is increasing and thus, the question of whether scales are culturally valid for different student groups is increasingly more relevant with increased severity of depression for students and changing student demographics. As such, this study examined the reliability…

  3. A Comparison of Ambulatory Surgery Center Production Costs and Medicare Payments: Evidence on Colonoscopy and Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jean M; Carey, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are freestanding facilities that specialize in surgical and diagnostic procedures that do not require an overnight stay. While it is generally assumed that ASCs are less costly than hospital outpatient surgery departments, there is sparse empirical evidence regarding their relative production costs. To estimate ASC production costs using financial and claims records for procedures performed by surgery centers that specialize in gastroenterology procedures (colonoscopy and endoscopy). We estimate production costs in ASCs that specialize in gastroenterology procedures using financial cost and patient discharge data from Pennsylvania for the time period 2004-2013. We focus on the 2 primary procedures (colonoscopies and endoscopies) performed at each ASC. We use our estimates to predict average costs for each procedure and then compare predicted costs to Medicare ACS payments for these procedures. Comparisons of the costs of each procedure with 2013 national Medicare ASC payment rates suggest that Medicare payments exceed production costs for both colonoscopy and endoscopy. This study demonstrated that it is feasible to estimate production costs for procedures performed in freestanding surgery centers. The procedure-specific cost estimates can then be compared with ASC payment rates to ascertain if payments are aligned with costs. This approach can serve as an evaluation template for CMS and private insurers who are concerned that ASC facility payments for specific procedures may be excessive.

  4. Seismometer readings studied in Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The seismometer reading from the impact made by the Apollo 15 Saturn S-IVB stage when it struck the lunar surface is studied by scientists in the Mission Control Center. Dr. Gary Latham (dark suit, wearing lapel button) of Columbia University is responsible for the design and experiment data analysis of the Passive Seismic Experiment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). The man on the left, writing, is Nafi Toksos of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Looking on at upper left is Dave Lammlein, also with Columbia.

  5. Seismometer readings studied in Mission Control Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-29

    The seismometer reading from the impact made by the Apollo 15 Saturn S-IVB stage when it struck the lunar surface is studied by scientists in the Mission Control Center. Dr. Gary Latham (dark suit, wearing lapel button) of Columbia University is responsible for the design and experiment data analysis of the Passive Seismic Experiment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). The man on the left, writing, is Nafi Toksos of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Looking on at upper left is Dave Lamneline, also with Columbia.

  6. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  7. The New Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Bond; K. Kostelnik; R.A. Wharton; A. Kadak

    2006-06-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundation to enable future economic growth. The next generation energy workforce in the U.S. is a critical element in meeting both national and global energy needs. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) was established in 2005 in response to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. CAES, located at the new Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will address critical energy education, research, policy study and training needs. CAES is a unique joint partnership between the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA), the State of Idaho, an Idaho University Consortium (IUC), and a National University Consortium (NUC). CAES will be based in a new facility that will foster collaborative academic and research efforts among participating institutions.

  8. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  9. Fleet Readiness Center Mid-Atlantic Worker Cost Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    their children a right to study painting, poetry , music, architecture, tapestry, and porcelain.” As she was patient with this program and my master’s...displayed and explained when using this method. The attempt to trace indirect and overhead costs is not an absolutely precise process and is subject to

  10. Low-level radioactive waste disposal. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. [Comparison of on-site disposal and transport to nearest commercial disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Card, D.H.; Hunter, P.H.; Barg, D.; de Souza, F.; Felthauser, K.; Winkler, V.; White, R.

    1982-02-01

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramifications of constructing a nuclear energy center in an arid western region. In this phase of the study, the alternatives for disposing of the low-level waste on the site are compared with the alternative of transporting the waste to the nearest commercial waste disposal site for permanent disposal. Both radiological and nonradiological impacts on the local socioeconomic infrastructure and the environment are considered. Disposal on the site was found to cost considerably less than off-site disposal with only negligible impacts associated with the disposal option on either mankind or the environment.

  11. Environmental Studies. Plano Outdoor Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plano Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide for the Plano Intermediate School District (Texas) Outdoor Learning Center is divided into three major sections. Section I provides information on the numbered stations/posts found along the perimeter and inner trails of the center and includes brief comments on the philosophy of environmental education and the history…

  12. Writing Centers in Context: Twelve Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinkead, Joyce A., Ed.; Harris, Jeanette G., Ed.

    This book profiles 12 writing centers that function effectively on their college and university campuses. Following an introduction that provides an overview and suggests ways the book can be used, the centers are examined in detail in the following chapters: (1) "A Multiservice Writing Lab in a Multiversity: The Purdue University Writing…

  13. Environmental Studies. Plano Outdoor Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plano Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide for the Plano Intermediate School District (Texas) Outdoor Learning Center is divided into three major sections. Section I provides information on the numbered stations/posts found along the perimeter and inner trails of the center and includes brief comments on the philosophy of environmental education and the history…

  14. Comparison of three methods to estimate the center of mass during balance assessment.

    PubMed

    Lafond, D; Duarte, M; Prince, F

    2004-09-01

    Evaluation of postural control is generally based on the interpretation of the center of pressure (COP) and the center of mass (COM) time series. The purpose of this study is to compare three methods to estimate the COM which are based on different biomechanical considerations. These methods are: (1) the kinematic method; (2) the zero-point-to-zero-point double integration technique (GLP) and (3) the COP low-pass filter method (LPF). The COP and COM time series have been determined using an experimental setup with a force plate and a 3D kinematic system on six healthy young adult subjects during four different 30 s standing tasks: (a) quiet standing; (b) one leg standing; (c) voluntary oscillation about the ankles and (d) voluntary oscillation about the ankles and hips. To test the difference between the COM trajectories, the root mean square (RMS) differences between each method (three comparisons) were calculated. The RMS differences between kinematic-LPF and GLP-LPF are significantly larger than kinematic-GLP. Our results show that the GLP method is comparable to the kinematic method. Both agree with the unified theory of balance during upright stance. The GLP method is attractive in the clinical perspective because it requires only a force plate to determine the COP-COM variable, which has been demonstrated to have a high reliability.

  15. Study of Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center utility systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, T. E.; Huber, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an engineering study of potential energy saving utility system modifications for the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center are presented. The objective of the study was to define and analyze utility options that would provide facility energy savings in addition to the approximately 25 percent already achieved through an energy loads reduction program. A systems engineering approach was used to determine total system energy and cost savings resulting from each of the ten major options investigated. The results reported include detailed cost analyses and cost comparisons of various options. Cost are projected to the year 2000. Also included are a brief description of a mathematical model used for the analysis and the rationale used for a site survey to select buildings suitable for analysis.

  16. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  17. Vomiting Center reanalyzed: An electrical stimulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem of 15 decerebrate cats produced stimulus-bound vomiting in only 4 animals. Vomiting was reproducible in only one cat. Effective stimulating sites were located in the solitary tract and reticular formation. Restricted localization of a vomiting center, stimulation of which evoked readily reproducible results, could not be obtained.

  18. Clinical routine implantation of a dual chamber pacemaker system designed for safe use with MRI: a single center, retrospective study on lead performance of Medtronic lead 5086MRI in comparison to Medtronic leads 4592-53 and 4092-58.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, C G; Thudt, K; Vock, P; Globits, S; Mayr, H

    2011-12-01

    both dual chamber PM groups, but did not differ significantly between the two groups (DC-PM: 5 patients, 8.5%; MRI-PM: 5 patients, 13.2%). Our study demonstrates favorable lead measurements of lead model 5086MRI in comparison to lead 4592 and 4092 in a short-term follow-up. The number of re-operations was higher in the MRI-PM group, but not statistically different in comparison with the standard dual chamber PM group.

  19. Client Impact Study of Six Detoxification Centers ("Sub-Acute Receiving Centers").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Steven E.; And Others

    Results are reported of a study to determine the effects of detoxification centers on the people who use their services. A detoxification center is "a social rehabilitation facility established for the purpose of facilitating access into care and rehabilitation by detoxifying and evaluating the person and providing entrance into the continuum…

  20. Student-Centered and Teacher-Centered Classroom Management: A Case Study of Three Elementary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    The major purpose of this case study was to document the classroom management beliefs and practices of three teachers reputed to implement student-centered instruction and to examine the relationship between their instructional and managerial approaches. More specifically, do teachers who use student-centered instruction also implement…

  1. Center for the Study of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott E.

    2012-03-02

    We have discovered a possible "natural fueling" mechanism in tokamak fusion reactors using large scale gyrokinetic turbulence simulation. In the presence of a heat flux dominated tokamak plasma, cold ions naturally pinch radially inward. If cold DT fuel is introduced near the edge using shallow pellet injection, the cold fuel will pinch inward, at the expense of hot helium ash going radially outward. By adjusting the cold DT fuel concentration, the core DT density profiles can be maintained. We have also shown that cold source ions from edge recycling of cold neutrals are pinched radially inward. This mechanism may be important for fully understanding the edge pedestal buildup after an ELM crash. Work includes benchmarking the gyrokinetic turbulence codes in the electromagnetic regime. This includes cyclone base case parameters with an increasing plasma beta. The code comparisons include GEM, GYRO and GENE. There is good linear agreement between the codes using the Cyclone base case, but including electromagnetics and scanning the plasma beta. All the codes have difficulty achieving nonlinear saturation as the kinetic ballooning limit is approached. GEM does not saturate well when beta gets above about 1/2 of the ideal ballooning limit. We find that the lack of saturation is due to the long wavelength k{sub y} modes being nonlinearly pumped to high levels. If the fundamental k{sub y} mode is zeroed out, higher values of beta nonlinearly saturate well. Additionally, there have been studies to better understand CTEM nonlinear saturation and the importance of zonal flows. We have continued our investigation of trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence. More recently, we have focused on the nonlinear saturation of TEM turbulence. An important feature of TEM is that in many parameter regimes, the zonal flow is unimportant. We find that when zonal flows are unimportant, zonal density is the dominant saturation mechanism. We developed a simple theory that agrees with the

  2. [Comparison of diffusion tensor imaging-derived fractional anisotropy in multiple centers for identical human subjects].

    PubMed

    Saotome, Kousaku; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Isobe, Tomonori; Satou, Eisuke; Shinoda, Kazuya; Ookubo, Jun; Hirano, Yuuji; Oosuka, Satoru; Matsushita, Akira; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sankai, Yoshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    The fractional anisotropy (FA) is calculated by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with multiple motion probing gradients (MPG). While FA has become a widely used tool to detect moderate changes in water diffusion in brain tissue, the measured value is sensitive to scan parameters (e.g. MPG-direction, signal to noise ratio, etc.). Therefore, it is paramount to address the reproducibility of DTI measurements among multiple centers. The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-center variability of FA. We studied five healthy volunteers who underwent DTI brain scanning three times at three different centers (I-III), each with a 1.5 T scanner having a different MPG-schema. Then, we compared the FA and eigenvalue from the three centers measured in seven brain regions: splenium of corpus callosum (CCs), genu of corpus callosum (CCg), putamen, posterior limb of internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, optic radiation, and middle cerebellar peduncle. At the CCs and CCg, there was a statistical difference (p<0.05) between center Iand center IIfor the same MPG-directions. Furthermore, at CCs and CCg, there was a statistical difference (p<0.05) between center II and center III for different MPG-directions. Conversely, no statistical differences were found between center I and center III for the different MPG-directions for all regions. These results indicate that the FA value was affected by the MPG-schema as well as by the MPG-directions.

  3. Comparison of Unintentional Exposures to Codeine and Hydrocodone Reported to Texas Poison Centers.

    PubMed

    Day, Lindsay; Kleinschmidt, Kurt; Forrester, Mathias B; Feng, Sing-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Hydrocodone has recently been reclassified as a Schedule II drug by the United States Drug Enforcement Administration and Food and Drug Administration in order to curtail prescription drug abuse. There is concern that analgesic substitutes, such as codeine, will not be as safe or effective. The purpose of this study is to compare the demographics, adverse events, and medical outcomes of patients who had unintentional hydrocodone or codeine exposures through the use of a state's poison center database. The Texas Poison Center Network's database was utilized to find all reported unintentional ingestions or adverse reactions of products containing codeine or hydrocodone. Comparisons were made between the two medications by calculating the rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Children aged 5 years or younger were more exposed to codeine (51.6%). Hydrocodone exposures had more serious outcomes (11% vs. 9%; RR = 0.82; 95% CI 0.73-0.91) and had more nausea (7.1% vs. 2.8%; RR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.32-0.48) and vomiting (6.5% vs. 3.3%; RR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.43-0.62). Hydrocodone had a higher rate of intravenous fluids administration (2.4% vs. 1.7%; RR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.54-0.92) and antiemetics (0.4% vs. 0.1%; RR = 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.64). Codeine was more closely associated with dermal reactions and patients were given antihistamines (2.5% vs. 1.3%; RR = 1.88; 95% CI 1.46-2.41) more frequently. Cardiovascular side effects, ataxia, and headache occurred equally between the groups. Both drugs had a wide array of reported side effects, but the overall incidence of serious outcomes was low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The comparison of anxiety and depression rate between medical staff of infertility centers and obstetrics and gynecology centers of Yazd, Shiraz, Isfahan and Kerman hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pourmovahed, Zahra; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghasemi, Mojdeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Regarding the close and continuous interaction of infertility staff with hopeless infertile couples and in the contrary the atmosphere of happiness especially in obstetric wards make a sense that considering anxiety and depression it would be a difference between these two wards. Objective: The objective of this study is the comparison of the rate of depression and anxiety between the two wards of infertility and obstetrics and gynecology. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-correlation study based on cross-sectional method. 199 individuals who were the staff of infertility and obstetrics and gynecology wards in four provinces enrolled in this study through stratified sampling. Data collection was done by demographic questionnaire, Spiel Berger and Beck depression inventory tests. Data were analyzed by SPSS software using ANOVA test. Results: The result showed the rate of anxiety in obstetrics and gynecology staff of Isfahan center (54.69±13.58) and depression rate had increased level in infertility staff of Shiraz center (14.94±10.87). Overall, there was significant correlation between anxiety, depression and work place (p=0.047, 0.008 respectively). According to ANOVA test, the mean value of anxiety level was higher in the staff of four obstetrics and gynecology centers and one infertility center Conclusion: As long as we know that infertile couples have little chance for success rate and obstetrics and gynecology wards patients have little risk of failure in treatment, it could be mentioned that the anxiety and depression in the staff are not correlated with the client illness. PMID:24799878

  5. Detector design studies for Turkish Accelerator Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksu, Burçin; Piliçer, Ercan

    2017-02-01

    The proposed Particle Factory detector at Turkish Accelerator Center (TAC-PF) aims to search for charm physics, CP violation and mixing of D0 mesons as well as new physics effects by investigating head-on collisions of 1 GeV electron from Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with 3.56 GeV positrons from synchrotron storage ring. In this work, we constructed the TAC-PF detector design by using a recently developed framework namely Detector Description for High Energy Physics (DD4hep). The baseline TAC-PF detector design and its qualifications were summarized, followed by a general description.

  6. A Comparison of Physical Medicine Departments in Vocational vs. Physical Restoration Oriented Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James D.; Egerman, Karl

    To compare the physical medicine departments of selected vocationally oriented rehabilitation centers with each other and with centers that are primarily oriented toward physical restoration, six facilities were studied. Conclusions were as follow: nearly all physical medicine departments have staffing problems; quality of service appears…

  7. The Location of Community Mental Health Centers in Texas: Some Descriptions and Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdez, Ramiro

    Part of a series of studies designed to lead to policy recommendations to improve mental health services to Mexican Americans in Texas, this monograph explores the availability and accessibility of community mental health centers (CMHCs) throughout the state. In hopes of explaining the underutilization of the centers statewide, the locations of…

  8. Reducing between scanner differences in multi-center PET studies.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Aniket; Koeppe, Robert A; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2009-05-15

    This work is part of the multi-center Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a large multi-site study of dementia, including patients having mild cognitive impairment (MCI), probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), as well as healthy elderly controls. A major portion of ADNI involves the use of [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) with positron emission tomography (PET). The objective of this paper is the reduction of inter-scanner differences in the FDG-PET scans obtained from the 50 participating PET centers having fifteen different scanner models. In spite of a standardized imaging protocol, systematic inter-scanner variability in PET images from various sites is observed primarily due to differences in scanner resolution, reconstruction techniques, and different implementations of scatter and attenuation corrections. Two correction steps were developed by comparison of 3-D Hoffman brain phantom scans with the 'gold standard' digital 3-D Hoffman brain phantom: i) high frequency correction; where a smoothing kernel for each scanner model was estimated to smooth all images to a common resolution and ii) low frequency correction; where smooth affine correction factors were obtained to reduce the attenuation and scatter correction errors. For the phantom data, the high frequency correction reduced the variability by 20%-50% and the low frequency correction further reduced the differences by another 20%-25%. Correction factors obtained from phantom studies were applied to 95 scans from normal control subjects obtained from the participating sites. The high frequency correction reduced differences similar to the phantom studies. However, the low frequency correction did not further reduce differences; hence further refinement of the procedure is necessary.

  9. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (stages 3-5) in comparison with age- and sex-matched controls: A study from Kashmir Valley Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Najar, M Saleem; Mir, Mohamad Muzzafer; Muzamil, Mudasir

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a range of metabolic bone diseases. Fracture rates are higher in CKD patients than age-matched controls throughout all the five stages of CKD. Dialysis patients have 4 times as many hip fractures as expected for their age. CKD forms an independent risk factor for osteoporosis, even in the absence of traditional risk factors. This study was carried out at the nephrology unit in a tertiary care center of Kashmir to know the prevalence of osteoporosis in CKD patients having glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min (stages 3-5). Among the 151 cases studied, the average estimated GFR was 16.78 ± 10.714 mL/min. There were 98 males (64.9%) and 53 females (35.1%). Their mean age was 51.01 ± 14.138 years. Osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score was seen in 31 patients (31.6%) while 43 patients (28.5%) had osteoporosis at L1, L2 lumbar vertebrae. The prevalence of osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score as well as osteopenia was highest in stage-5 CKD. In our study, the body mass index (BMI) had a positive correlation with osteoporosis; low BMI patients were at higher risk for osteoporosis (P = 0.014). In the Kashmir valley, the prevalence of osteoporosis was 31.8% in CKD patients against 22% in controls. Thus, CKD forms an important risk factor for osteoporosis even in the absence of traditional risk factors. We recommend early screening, detection, and management of osteoporosis to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality in this subset of patients.

  10. Center Hill Reservoir Fishery Study--Water Level Effects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    WORDS (Continue on reverse aide It noc.esr anidmt ntby block mbi’) Center Hill Lake, TN, Water Levels, Fisheries, Water Quality, Trends. 12A4, C -gvr...Nashville District Center Hill Reservoir Fishery Study- Water Level Effects in 0 DTI ELECTEI D DTSTRIDu’rJoN STATEMENT A 8 3 Approved fo. public ,relea0 D...ORGANIZATION NAMIE AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK Center for the Management, Utiliaation and Hydropower Studies, Protection of Water Resources

  11. [Comparison of low- and high-concentration (270 and 320 mg I/ml) iso-osmolar iodinated contrast media in coronary CT angiography: a randomized prospective single-center blinded study].

    PubMed

    Sinitsyn, V E; Komarova, M A; Mershina, E A

    2014-01-01

    To compare the image quality at coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) using low-dose and low-iodine protocol study in comparison with the standard protocol. In study included 60 patients undergoing coronary computed tomography angiography. All examinations were performed with 64-row MDCT using prospective ECG-gating and ASIR 40%. 30 patients were examined using a low-concentration (Iodixanol, 270 mg I/ml) iodinated contrast medium and low tube voltage (80 kV) (group 1), 30 patients--using of high-concentration (Iodixanol, 320 mg I/ml) iodinated contrast medium and standard tube voltage (120 kV) (group 2). Image quality of coronary arteries was evaluated using a four-point grading scale, images were randomised. Intra-arterial density was measured for the proximal and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD) and right coronary artery (RCA). Age, heart rate, BMI and scan parameters were not statistically different between the two groups. Analysis of coronaries visualization revealed the same image quality for group 1 and group 2 (image quality scores were 1.28 ± 0.28 vs. 1.34 ± 0.29, p = 0.4). There was no significant difference between mean enhancement values in the distal segments of RCA and LAD for the two groups. Intraarterial density for proximal LAD and proximal RCA for the nazpyara, umepamuenas group 2 were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those values for the group 1. Conclusion. Theuse of low-dose and low-iodine protocol can be beneficial for patient safety and or image quality ithout loss of diag- stic information.

  12. The efficacy of rabbit antithymocyte globulin with cyclosporine in comparison to horse antithymocyte globulin as a first-line treatment in adult patients with severe aplastic anemia: a single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Jae-Ho; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Sung; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hee-Je; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Lee, Jong Wook

    2013-06-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is the drug of choice for immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) ineligible for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Recently, rabbit ATG with cyclosporine A has been used as a first-line IST regimen in patients with SAA because of unavailability of horse ATG. We retrospectively analyzed adult SAA patients who were treated with horse ATG (n=46) or rabbit ATG (n=53) between Feb 2001 and May 2010 to compare hematologic response and survival. Overall response rates at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months were similar in both the horse and rabbit ATG groups: 28.3 versus 35.8 % (P=0.421), 39.1 versus 45.3 % (P=0.537), 45.7 versus 49.1 % (P=0.735), and 47.8 versus 50.9 % (P=0.757), respectively. The complete response (CR) rate at 6 months in the horse ATG was significantly superior in comparison with the rabbit ATG (13.0 versus 1.9 %, P=0.031). But CR rates became similar in both groups after 6 months: 17.4 versus 11.3 % (P=0.387) at 12 months and 21.7 versus 22.6 % (P=0.914) at 18 months. Lymphocyte depletion after ATG was more profound and protracted in the rabbit ATG group compared to the horse ATG group. Overall survival (P=0.460) and failure-free survival (P=0.911) were not significantly different between the two groups. Our retrospective study demonstrated that the efficacy of first-line IST with rabbit ATG is similar to that with horse ATG. However, the time from treatment to CR was longer with rabbit ATG than with horse ATG, partly due to more profound and protracted lymphocyte depletion.

  13. Precision in weighing: a comparison of scales found in physician offices, fitness centers, and weight loss centers.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Risa J.; Haddock, C. Keith; Poston, Walker S. C.; Catanese, Dana; Spertus, John A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Weight assessment is a critical aid in patient care. It is particularly important in monitoring progression of pregnancies, heart failure status, and when adjusting medications. Although weight is generally determined using a scale, few studies have evaluated the precision of non-household scales. The objective of this study was to assess scale precision across a variety of settings. METHODS: An evaluation of scales from randomly selected primary care clinics (n=30), diabetology/endocrinology clinics (n=7), weight loss facilities (n=25), and fitness centers (n=30) was performed. Assessments were completed on a total of 223 scales: 94 from primary care clinics, 32 from diabetology/endocrinology clinics, 39 from weight loss centers, and 58 from fitness centers. Scales were assessed for condition, location in facility, resting surface, commercial designation, and calibration history. Scale precision was validated using 100 lb. (45.5 kg), 150 lb. (68.3 kg), 200 lb. (90.9 kg), and 250 lb. (113.6 kg) certified weights. RESULTS: Overall, scales demonstrated decreased precision with increased weight. At higher weights, more than 15% of scales were off by more than 6 lbs. (2.3 kg), approximately 1 Body Mass Index (BMI) unit. While facility type was not significant, condition, location in facility, resting surface, commercial designation, and calibration history were significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that many scales used to measure body weight are imprecise and that scales in health care settings are no more precise than those in other facilities. Clinical decisions based on scales that are imprecise have the potential to cause iatrogenic complications in patient care. PMID:16134566

  14. Precision in weighing: a comparison of scales found in physician offices, fitness centers, and weight loss centers.

    PubMed

    Stein, Risa J; Haddock, C Keith; Poston, Walker S C; Catanese, Dana; Spertus, John A

    2005-01-01

    Weight assessment is a critical aid in patient care. It is particularly important in monitoring progression of pregnancies, heart failure status, and when adjusting medications. Although weight is generally determined using a scale, few studies have evaluated the precision of non-household scales. The objective of this study was to assess scale precision across a variety of settings. An evaluation of scales from randomly selected primary care clinics (n=30), diabetology/endocrinology clinics (n=7), weight loss facilities (n=25), and fitness centers (n=30) was performed. Assessments were completed on a total of 223 scales: 94 from primary care clinics, 32 from diabetology/endocrinology clinics, 39 from weight loss centers, and 58 from fitness centers. Scales were assessed for condition, location in facility, resting surface, commercial designation, and calibration history. Scale precision was validated using 100 lb. (45.5 kg), 150 lb. (68.3 kg), 200 lb. (90.9 kg), and 250 lb. (113.6 kg) certified weights. Overall, scales demonstrated decreased precision with increased weight. At higher weights, more than 15% of scales were off by more than 6 lbs. (2.3 kg), approximately 1 Body Mass Index (BMI) unit. While facility type was not significant, condition, location in facility, resting surface, commercial designation, and calibration history were significant. This study demonstrates that many scales used to measure body weight are imprecise and that scales in health care settings are no more precise than those in other facilities. Clinical decisions based on scales that are imprecise have the potential to cause iatrogenic complications in patient care.

  15. Media Comparison Studies: Problems and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Burbules, Nicholas C.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: Media comparison studies aim to compare the relative effectiveness of different media at promoting educational outcomes. While these types of studies remain popular, they have been under attack for more than two decades. Critics of media comparison studies claim that continued studies are unhelpful because a great number of…

  16. A comparison of health behaviors of women in centering pregnancy and traditional prenatal care.

    PubMed

    Shakespear, Kaylynn; Waite, Phillip J; Gast, Julie

    2010-03-01

    Researchers sought to determine the difference in health behaviors between women who receive prenatal care via the Centering Pregnancy approach and those involved in traditional prenatal care. Using a cross-sectional design, adult pregnant women (n = 125) were surveyed from at least 28 weeks gestation to delivery. The sample was comprised of primarily white low income women. Using multiple linear regression it was determined that women in Centering Pregnancy had significantly lower index health behavior scores compared with the traditional care group showing that those in Centering Pregnancy reported engaging in fewer health promoting behaviors. Furthermore, no differences were observed for smoking or weight gain behaviors between groups. Additionally, those in Centering Pregnancy reported a lower perceived value of prenatal care. The results of this study suggest that Centering Pregnancy is not adequately aiding its patients in adopting healthy behaviors during pregnancy.

  17. A study of health centers in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Mansour, A A; al-Osimy, M

    1996-06-01

    Saudi Arabia is a developing country with a tremendous potential for growth and development. In an attempt to endorse Primary Health Care (PHC) concepts, it abolished all its former dispensaries and maternal and child health centers, and amalgamated their services into health centers that deliver PHC services. This expansion in centers development created a need for evaluation to assess the extent at which the new objectives are being achieved. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resources available in three large health centers in Saudi Arabia, and determine consumers' satisfaction with the services provided. The study was conducted in the City of Riyadh. Three centers were chosen purposefully and the consumers of the respective centers were interviewed as to their satisfaction with the services provided. The results show that there was a discrepancy between the findings obtained from the centers' resources evaluation and those derived from the satisfaction portion. It is recommended that the Saudi Ministry of Health would upgrade its centers' resources, and that more studies would be conducted in the other centers of the country.

  18. Case-Mix Adjustment and the Comparison of Community Health Center Performance on Patient Experience Measures

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. Data Sources A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007–2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. Study Design We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Principal Findings Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. Conclusions To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately. PMID:20337738

  19. Center for the Study of Writing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Writing, Berkeley, CA.

    This final report from the Center for the Study of Writing, which, over the past 5 years, has engaged in a program of research aimed at understanding how written language is acquired and how it can best be taught, is in three main sections. The first section (Executive Summary) summarizes the Center's major findings related to each problem area…

  20. Evaluation Study of Day-Care Centers in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korazim, Malka; Trachtenberg, Silvia

    In recent years, day-care centers for the elderly have been playing an increasingly important role in the community service system for the elderly in Israel. ESHEL, one of the leading agencies in developing day-care services in Israel initiated a comprehensive evaluation study of day-care centers to identify variations among different types of…

  1. A Descriptive Study of Three Typical "Quality" Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drezek, Wendy

    This paper describes a study designed to collect quantified observational data on the behavior of children and teachers throughout the day at three typical quality day care centers. From 50 to 55 hours of observation were completed on five randomly-chosen 3-year-olds in each setting. While the number of subjects and centers was limited, the…

  2. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    An update of information first compiled by the Children's Foundation in 1991 and updated in 1993, this 1994 day care licensing study presents the results of a survey of the regulatory offices of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Following a summary of results in question-answer format, the entries for…

  3. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The information contained in this report was compiled by The Children's Foundation in fall 1995 and reflects data provided by the regulatory offices in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order of the states and territories. The requirements, regulations, and policies…

  4. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The information contained in this report was compiled by The Children's Foundation in fall 1995 and reflects data provided by the regulatory offices in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order of the states and territories. The requirements, regulations, and policies…

  5. Adult Skills Training Center: Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skalski, John M.; Baratta, Anthony N.

    A 4-phase project, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a bilingual vocational skill training program for out-of-school youth and adults of the Perth Amboy Hispanic community. Sampled were 494 out-of-school youth and adults in the area. Findings include: (1) There is a significant need for an adult vocational skills training…

  6. 34 CFR 413.33 - What substantive studies must the National Center or Centers conduct and submit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CENTER OR CENTERS FOR RESEARCH IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION What Conditions Must Be Met After an Award? § 413... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What substantive studies must the National Center or Centers conduct and submit? 413.33 Section 413.33 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  7. Primary breast lymphoma: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Cao, Caineng; Zhu, Yuan; Liu, Peng; Liu, Luying; Lu, Ke; Luo, Jialin; Zhou, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to summarize the clinical characteristics of primary breast lymphoma (PBL) and evaluate its management approaches. A total of 29 patients newly diagnosed with PBL, and treated between April 2006 and May 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. The median survival follow-up time for all patients was 66.8 (range, 25.4–110.0) months. The results of the follow-up revealed 22 living lymphoma-free patients and 7 patients who had succumbed to PBL. Of the 7 deceased patients, 6 had succumbed to lymphoma and 1 to chemotherapy-associated hepatic failure. In total, 1 patient who presented with bilateral breast lymphoma developed left breast relapse following lumpectomy and chemotherapy, 2 patients developed a bone marrow relapse, 1 patient developed lung and mediastinal lymph node relapses, and 1 patient developed a skin relapse. The Kaplan-Meier estimator predicted 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates for all patients of 74.4 and 74.6%, respectively. PBL appears to be a rare disease with a good overall prognosis and low incidence of local relapse, following chemotherapy alone or in combination with other treatments. Further studies investigating the development of effective agents for use in treatment-resistant patients are required.

  8. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  9. Does Family-Centered Out-of-Home Care Work? Comparison of a Family-Centered Approach and Traditional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Cathleen A.; Pierce, Lois

    2004-01-01

    This research assessed the effectiveness of a family-centered approach to out-of-home care in reunifying children with their families by comparing differential exit rates of children whose families received family-centered services with children whose families received routine child welfare services. The sample included 472 children who were in…

  10. Comparison of quality control for trauma management between Western and Eastern European trauma center.

    PubMed

    Calderale, Stefano Massimiliano; Sandru, Raluca; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone; Beuran, Mircea; Ribaldi, Sergio; Coletti, Massimo; Gambale, Giorgio; Paun, Sorin; Russo, Livio; Baldoni, Franco

    2008-11-19

    Quality control of trauma care is essential to define the effectiveness of trauma center and trauma system. To identify the troublesome issues of the system is the first step for validation of the focused customized solutions. This is a comparative study of two level I trauma centers in Italy and Romania and it has been designed to give an overview of the entire trauma care program adopted in these two countries. This study was aimed to use the results as the basis for recommending and planning changes in the two trauma systems for a better trauma care. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 182 major trauma patients treated in the two hospitals included in the study, between January and June 2002. Every case was analyzed according to the recommended minimal audit filters for trauma quality assurance by The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACSCOT). Satisfactory yields have been reached in both centers for the management of head and abdominal trauma, airway management, Emergency Department length of stay and early diagnosis and treatment. The main significant differences between the two centers were in the patients' transfers, the leadership of trauma team and the patients' outcome. The main concerns have been in the surgical treatment of fractures, the outcome and the lacking of documentation. The analyzed hospitals are classified as Level I trauma center and are within the group of the highest quality level centers in their own countries. Nevertheless, both of them experience major lacks and for few audit filters do not reach the mmum standard requirements of ACS Audit Filters. The differences between the western and the eastern European center were slight. The parameters not reaching the minimum requirements are probably occurring even more often in suburban settings.

  11. Fair comparison of complexity between a multi-band CAP and DMT for data center interconnects.

    PubMed

    Wei, J L; Sanchez, C; Giacoumidis, E

    2017-10-01

    We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first known detailed analysis and fair comparison of complexity of a 56 Gb/s multi-band carrierless amplitude and phase (CAP) and discrete multi-tone (DMT) over 80 km dispersion compensation fiber-free single-mode fiber links based on intensity modulation and direct detection for data center interconnects. We show that the matched finite impulse response filters and inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT)/FFT take the majority of the complexity of the multi-band CAP and DMT, respectively. The choice of the multi-band CAP sub-band count and the DMT IFFT/FFT size makes significant impact on the system complexity or performance, and trade-off must be considered.

  12. [Severe neonatal acidosis: comparison and analysis of obstetrical practices in two French perinatal centers].

    PubMed

    Pommereau-Lathelize, J; Maisonneuve, E; Jousse, M; Guilbaud, L; Carbonne, B; Pierre, F

    2014-04-01

    To identify and compare risk factors for severe neonatal acidosis, defined by an umbilical artery pH inferior to 7.00, and clinical practices in two different perinatal centers. In a retrospective study, from 2003 to 2008, in two university perinatal centers (Poitiers and Saint-Antoine in Paris) on all term pregnancies complicated by severe neonatal acidosis (umbilical artery pH<7.00), we elected to compare the following risk factors: maternal characteristics, medical and obstetrical histories, progress of pregnancy, labour and delivery as well as the neonatal status. Among 23,508 births, 177 term newborns had severe neonatal acidosis. The rate was similar for both perinatal centers of Poitiers and Saint-Antoine (0.92% and 0.77% respectively). Factors associated with severe neonatal acidosis were similar in both centers: maternal age, thick meconium, prior cesarean section. There were differences in obstetrical practices between the two centers: there were more caesarean sections and assisted vaginal deliveries in Paris and more inductions of labour in Poitiers. Severe neonatal acidosis is associated with the geographical origin, the progress of labour and the mode of delivery. It seems that severe neonatal acidosis is unrelated to cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Task-Values across Subject Domains: A Gender Comparison Using a Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Angela; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2011-01-01

    This study examined what kinds of groups can be identified according to students' task-values across four subject domains (languages, math and science, social sciences, practical subjects) and the related gender differences using a person-centered approach. Latent class analysis was applied to classify 638 students (mean age = 15) into four…

  14. Task-Values across Subject Domains: A Gender Comparison Using a Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Angela; Salmela-Aro, Katariina

    2011-01-01

    This study examined what kinds of groups can be identified according to students' task-values across four subject domains (languages, math and science, social sciences, practical subjects) and the related gender differences using a person-centered approach. Latent class analysis was applied to classify 638 students (mean age = 15) into four…

  15. Service outcomes in physical and sexual abuse cases: a comparison of child advocacy center-based and standard services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel W; Witte, Tricia H; Fricker-Elhai, Adrienne E

    2006-11-01

    Child Advocacy Centers (CACs) were developed to improve on child abuse investigative services provided by child protective service (CPS) agencies. However, until very recently, there has been little research comparing CAC-based procedures and outcomes to those in CPS investigations not based in CACs. The current study tracked 76 child abuse cases that were reported to authorities and investigated through either a private, not-for-profit CAC or typical CPS services in a mid-south rural county. Comparisons between CAC and CPS cases were made in terms of involvement of local law enforcement in the investigation, provision of medical exams, abuse substantiation rates, mental health referrals, prosecution referrals, and conviction rates. Analyses revealed higher rates of law enforcement involvement, medical examinations, and case substantiation in the CAC-based cases compared to the CPS cases. Despite limitations due to sample size and non-randomization, this study found preliminary support for the assumptions underlying the establishment of CACs.

  16. Use of time by stroke patients: a comparison of four European rehabilitation centers.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Liesbet; Putman, Koen; Dejaeger, Eddy; Baert, Ilse; Berman, Peter; Bogaerts, Kris; Brinkmann, Nadine; Connell, Louise; Feys, Hilde; Jenni, Walter; Kaske, Christiane; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Leys, Mark; Lincoln, Nadina; Louckx, Fred; Schuback, Birgit; Schupp, Wilfried; Smith, Bozena; De Weerdt, Willy

    2005-09-01

    Differences exist between European countries in the proportion of patients who die or become dependent after stroke. The aim of the present study was to identify differences in the use of time by stroke patients in 4 rehabilitation centers in 4 European countries. In each of the 4 centers, 60 randomly selected stroke patients were observed at 10-minute intervals using behavioral mapping. Observations took place on 30 weekdays selected at random, on equal numbers of morning, afternoon, and evening sessions. A logistic generalized estimating equation model with correction for differences in case mix and multiple testing was used for the analysis. Overall time available from different professions was the highest in the United Kingdom, but patients in the United Kingdom spent on average only 1 hour per day in therapy. This was significantly less than patients in Belgium and Germany, who spent approximately 2 hours, and patients in Switzerland who spent approximately 3 hours per day in therapy. In all centers, patients spent less than half their time in interactions and >72% of the time in nontherapeutic activities. Important differences in the use of time were established, which appeared dependent on management decisions rather than the number of staff available. Patients in the Swiss and German centers spent more time in therapy, possibly because of the structured organization of rehabilitation. Further studies will verify whether this has an effect on outcome.

  17. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  18. The Center for Coastal Studies: Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollervides, F.; Farrell, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present The School for Field Studies-Center for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) as a success story in sustainable development education. This success is based on a unique academic model, which incorporates sustainable development opportunities and challenges faced by the local community into the program…

  19. Center for Advanced Technology Training (CATT) Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque Technical Vocational Inst., NM.

    A study of the feasibility of establishing a Center for Advanced Technology Training (CATT) at the Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute (TVI Community College, New Mexico) was conducted by members of the Albuquerque business community, government representatives, and college administrators. Phase 1 of the study was an examination of the…

  20. The Center for Coastal Studies: Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ollervides, F.; Farrell, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present The School for Field Studies-Center for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) as a success story in sustainable development education. This success is based on a unique academic model, which incorporates sustainable development opportunities and challenges faced by the local community into the program…

  1. Case Studies in Managing School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel; Morris, Jacqueline

    Thirty-two case studies illustrating problem areas and situations that develop in the modern environment of the electronic school library media program are presented for use by library science students and library/media center managers. Based on input from practicing librarians at the elementary and secondary levels, the studies are designed to…

  2. Center of Discovery I Study Guide. Education 302.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Robert B.; And Others

    This study guide contains the objectives, design, and evaluation in plan for Center of Discovery I, and lists topics, directives, and basic readings and in-depth references and the self-tests for an 11-week program of independent study within the first of four education courses in a 2-year program. The major part of the guide is devoted to a…

  3. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of structural magnetic resonance imaging data in a two-center study.

    PubMed

    Chalavi, Sima; Simmons, Andrew; Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Barker, Gareth J; Reinders, A A T Simone

    2012-08-06

    Multi-center magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies present an opportunity to advance research by pooling data. However, brain measurements derived from MR-images are susceptible to differences in MR-sequence parameters. It is therefore necessary to determine whether there is an interaction between the sequence parameters and the effect of interest, and to minimise any such interaction by careful choice of acquisition parameters. As an exemplar of the issues involved in multi-center studies, we present data from a study in which we aimed to optimize a set of volumetric MRI-protocols to define a protocol giving data that are consistent and reproducible across two centers and over time. Optimization was achieved based on data quality and quantitative measures, in our case using FreeSurfer and Voxel Based Morphometry approaches. Our approach consisted of a series of five comparisons. Firstly, a single-center dataset was collected, using a range of candidate pulse-sequences and parameters chosen on the basis of previous literature. Based on initial results, a number of minor changes were implemented to optimize the pulse-sequences, and a second single-center dataset was collected. FreeSurfer data quality measures were compared between datasets in order to determine the best performing sequence(s), which were taken forward to the next stage of testing. We subsequently acquired short-term and long-term two-center reproducibility data, and quantitative measures were again assessed to determine the protocol with the highest reproducibility across centers. Effects of a scanner software and hardware upgrade on the reproducibility of the protocols at one of the centers were also evaluated. Assessing the quality measures from the first two datasets allowed us to define artefact-free protocols, all with high image quality as assessed by FreeSurfer. Comparing the quantitative test and retest measures, we found high within-center reproducibility for all protocols, but lower

  4. [Space for the new. Archive - library - study center].

    PubMed

    Weber, Danny

    2014-01-01

    This article features a short outline of both the architectural history and the inventories of Leopoldina's archive and library. Moreover, the article presents the construction plans that will--when implemented in the near future--generate and provide outstanding working facilities in the form of a building ensemble consisting of an archive, library and study center. The future infrastructure of these Leopoldina buildings, located in the area of Emil-Abderhalden-/August-Bebel-Strasse, will sustainably foster and support the establishment of research projects at the Leopoldina Study Center.

  5. Comparison between doppler ultrasound resistive index, serum creatinine, and histopathologic changes in patients with kidney transplant dysfunction in early posttransplantation period: A single center study with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kajal N; Patel, Nitin A; Gandhi, Shruti P

    2016-05-01

    To determine the relationship between resistive index (RI) measured by Doppler ultrasound, serum creatinine (SCr), and histopathological changes on biopsy during kidney trans- plant dysfunction in early postoperative period, we studied 47 kidney transplant patients; 61% of the patients had acute transplant rejection, 19% had acute tubular necrosis, 4% had calcineurin inhibitor toxicity, 11% had normal morphology in biopsy, and 5% had changes compatible with pyelonephritis. None of the study patients had interstitial fibrosis or tubular atrophy on biopsy. We found that the sensitivity and specificity of RI in diagnosing transplant dysfunction was highly variable depending on the selected cutoff value. Sensitivity of RI decreased and its specificity increased with increasing the RI thresholds. Using an RI threshold of 0.7 resulted in a high sensitivity of 78% at a cost of very low specificity 40%, whereas using an RI threshold of 0.9 resulted in 100% specificity at a cost of very low sensitivity 16%. Acceptable specificity was only achieved at the expense of very low sensitivity, resulting in poor utility of RI as a screening tool for dysfunction. We found that there were no significant differences in the mean RI value between patients with and without biopsy-proven transplant dysfunction. However, we found a significant correlation between SCr value and RI of 0.383, P = 0.007.

  6. Online version of the self-administered food frequency questionnaire for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation (JPHC-NEXT) protocol: Relative validity, usability, and comparison with a printed questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kato, Erika; Takachi, Ribeka; Ishihara, Junko; Ishii, Yuri; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Shinozawa, Yurie; Umezawa, Jun; Tanaka, Junta; Yokoyama, Yuta; Kitamura, Kaori; Nakamura, Kazutoshi; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-09-01

    Online dietary assessment tools offer advantages over printed questionnaires, such as the automatic and direct data storage of answers, and have the potential to become valuable research methods. We developed an online survey system (web-FFQ) for the existing printed FFQ used in the JPHC-NEXT protocol, the platform of a large-scale genetic cohort study. Here, we examined the validity of ranking individuals according to dietary intake using this web-FFQ and its usability compared with the printed questionnaire (print-FFQ) for combined usage. We included 237 men and women aged 40-74 years from five areas specified in the JPHC-NEXT protocol. From 2012 to 2013, participants were asked to provide 12-day weighed food records (12d-WFR) as the reference intake and to respond to the print- and web-FFQs. Spearman's correlation coefficients (CCs) between estimates using the web-FFQ and 12d-WFR were calculated. Cross-classification of intakes was compared with those using the print-FFQ. Most participants (83%) answered that completing the web-FFQ was comparable to or easier than completing the printed questionnaire. The median value of CCs across energy and 53 nutrients for men and women was 0.47 (range, 0.10-0.86) and 0.46 (range, 0.16-0.69), respectively. CCs for individual nutrient intakes were closely similar to those based on the print-FFQ, irrespective of response location. Cross-classification by quintile of intake based on two FFQs was reasonably accurate for many nutrients and food groups. This online survey system is a reasonably valid measure for ranking individuals by intake for many nutrients, like the printed FFQ. Mixing of two FFQs for exposure assessments in epidemiological studies appears acceptable. Copyright © 2017. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Comparison of effectiveness and safety between conbercept and ranibizumab for treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. A retrospective case-controlled non-inferiority multiple center study.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Sun, D; Lu, H; Dai, R; Xing, L; Dong, H; Wang, L; Wei, D; Jiang, B; Jiao, Y; Jablonski, M M; Charles, S; Gu, W; Chen, H

    2017-09-22

    PurposeTo compare the efficacy and safety of conbercept and ranibizumab when administered according to a treat-and-extend (TREX) protocol for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in China.Patients and methodsBetween May 2014 and May 2015, 180 patients were treated in a 1 : 1 ratio using conbercept or ranibizumab from four hospitals. Patients received either conbercept 0.5 mg or ranibizumab 0.5 mg intravitreal injections. Follow-up time was 1 year and treated based on a TREX approach. Main outcomes and measures include best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), using Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS); number of injections; central retinal thickness (CRT); and leakage of choroidal neovascularization before and after the treatment was analyzed by fluorescein fundus angiography and indocyanine green angiography.ResultsThe 1-year visit was completed by 168 (93.3%) of patients. Mean BCVA was equivalent between two cohorts, and were improved by 12.7±7.770 and 12.3±7.269 letters in the conbercept and ranibizumab cohorts, respectively (P=0.624). There was no significant difference in measured CRT, with a mean decrease of 191.5 μm for conbercept and 187.8 μm for ranibizumab (P=0.773). There was a statistically significant difference (P=0.001) between the drugs regarding the number of treatments: 7.4 for conbercept and 8.7 for ranibizumab. The difference in the distribution of injection intervals was statistically significant between two groups (P=0.011). During the study, there were no cases of endophthalmitis or intraocular inflammation.ConclusionBoth drugs had equivalent effects in visual and anatomic gains at 1 year when administered. In the conbercept group, longer treatment intervals were achieved with more patients.Eye advance online publication, 22 September 2017; doi:10.1038/eye.2017.187.

  8. Assessing the Value of Team Science A Study Comparing Center- and Investigator-Initiated Grants

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kara L.; Stokols, Daniel; Stipelman, Brooke A.; Vogel, Amanda L.; Feng, Annie; Masimore, Beth; Morgan, Glen; Moser, Richard P.; Marcus, Stephen E.; Berrigan, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Large cross-disciplinary scientific teams are becoming increasingly prominent in the conduct of research. Purpose This paper reports on a quasi-experimental longitudinal study conducted to compare bibliometric indicators of scientific collaboration, productivity, and impact of center-based transdisciplinary team science initiatives and traditional investigator-initiated grants in the same field. Methods All grants began between 1994 and 2004 and up to 10 years of publication data were collected for each grant. Publication information was compiled and analyzed during the spring and summer of 2010. Results Following an initial lag period, the transdisciplinary research center grants had higher overall publication rates than the investigator-initiated R01 (NIH Research Project Grant Program) grants. There were relatively uniform publication rates across the research center grants compared to dramatically dispersed publication rates among the R01 grants. On average, publications produced by the research center grants had greater numbers of coauthors but similar journal impact factors compared with publications produced by the R01 grants. Conclusions The lag in productivity among the transdisciplinary center grants was offset by their overall higher publication rates and average number of coauthors per publication, relative to investigator-initiated grants, over the 10-year comparison period. The findings suggest that transdisciplinary center grants create benefits for both scientific productivity and collaboration. (Am J Prev Med 2012;42(2):157–163) Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine PMID:22261212

  9. A Comparison of the Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Adult Patients with Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza A or B during the 2011–2012 Influenza Season in Korea: A Multi-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Seong-Heon; So, Byung Hak; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Seo, Yu Bin; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Noh, Ji Yun; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jin Soo; Kim, Hyo Youl; Kim, Young Keun; Choi, Won Suk; Lee, Jacob; Jeong, Hye Won; Kim, Woo Joo

    2013-01-01

    Background During the 2011/2012 winter influenza season in the Republic of Korea, influenza A (H3N2) was the predominant virus in the first peak period of influenza activity during the second half of January 2012. On the other hand, influenza B was the predominant virus in the second peak period of influenza activity during the second half of March 2012. The objectives of this study were to compare the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza A or influenza B. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed data from 2,129 adult patients with influenza-like illnesses who visited the emergency rooms of seven university hospitals in Korea from October 2011 to May 2012. Of 850 patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza, 656 (77.2%) had influenza A (H3N2), and 194 (22.8%) influenza B. Age, and the frequencies of cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, hypertension were significantly higher in patients with influenza A (H3N2) (P<0.05). The frequencies of leukopenia or thrombocytopenia in patients with influenza B at initial presentation were statistically higher than those in patients with influenza A (H3N2) (P<0.05). The rate of hospitalization, and length of hospital stay were statistically higher in patients with influenza A (H3N2) (P<0.05), and of the 79 hospitalized patients, the frequency of diabetes, hypertension, cases having at least one of the comorbid conditions, and the proportion of elderly were significantly higher in patients with influenza A (H3N2) (P<0.05). Conclusions The proportion of males to females and elderly population were significantly higher for influenza A (H3N2) patients group compared with influenza B group. Hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung diseases, cardiovascular disorders, and neuromuscular diseases were independently associated with hospitalization due to influenza. Physicians should assess and treat the underlying comorbid conditions as well as influenza viral infections for the

  10. Comparison of poisonings managed at military and Veterans Administration hospitals reported to Texas poison centers.

    PubMed

    Forrester, M B

    2017-01-01

    There is little information on poisonings managed at military and Veterans Administration (VA) hospitals. This investigation described and compared poisonings reported to Texas poison centers that were managed at military and VA hospitals. Retrospective analysis of poison centre data. Cases were poisonings among patients aged 18 years or more reported to Texas poison centers during 2000-2015 where management occurred at a military or VA hospital. The distribution of exposures for various demographic and clinical factors was determined for military and veterans hospitals and comparisons were made between the two groups. There were 4353 and 1676 poisonings managed at military and VA hospitals, resepctively. Males accounted for 50.5% of the military hospital patients and 84.9% of the VA hospital patients. The mean age for military hospital patients was 31 years and for VA hospital patients was 50 years. The proportion of poisonings managed at military hospitals and VA hospitals, respectively, were intentional (70.0% vs 64.1%), particularly suspected attempted suicide (57.3% vs 47.7%), and unintentional (25.0% vs 30.5%). More than one substance was reported in 37.7% of military and 33.2% of VA hospital poisonings. The most commonly reported substance categories for poisonings managed at military and VA hospitals, respectively, were analgesics (28.4% vs 19.7%), sedatives/hypnotics/antipsychotics (24.7% vs 23.4%), antidepressants (18.7% vs 19.7%) and alcohol (11.3% vs 10.6%). A number of differences were observed between poisonings managed at military and VA hospitals. These differing patterns of poisonings may need to be taken into account in the education, prevention and treatment of poisonings at these hospitals and among the populations they serve. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  12. Serum perfluoroalkyl substances and cardiometabolic consequences in adolescents exposed to the World Trade Center disaster and a matched comparison group.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Tony T; Attina, Teresa M; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Gilbert, Joseph; Burdine, Lauren K; Marmor, Michael; Honda, Masato; Chu, Dinh Binh; Han, Xiaoxia; Shao, Yongzhao; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Urbina, Elaine M; Trasande, Leonardo

    2017-09-07

    Large amounts of various chemical contaminants, including perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), were released at the time of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Thousands of children who lived and/or attended school near the disaster site were exposed to these substances but few studies have examined the possible consequences related to these exposures. To examine the relationship of PFASs serum levels with cardiometabolic profile in children and adolescents enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) and a matched comparison group. We evaluated WTCHR enrollees who resided in New York City and were born between September 11, 1993 and September 10, 2001, and a matched comparison group consisting of individuals who were ineligible for WTCHR participation upon distance of their home, school or work from the WTC and lack of participation in rescue and recovery activities. Matching was based on date of birth, sex, race, ethnicity, and income. We assessed exposure to PFASs, as measured by serum levels and association with cardiometabolic profile as measured by arterial wall stiffness, body mass index, insulin resistance, fasting total cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides. A total of 402 participants completed the study and serum samples were analyzed from 308 participants, 123 in the WTCHR group and 185 in the comparison group. In multivariable regression analysis, after adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a significant, positive association of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with triglycerides (beta coefficient=0.14, 95% CI: 0.02, 0.27, 15.1% change), total cholesterol (beta coefficient=0.09, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.14, 9.2% change), and LDL cholesterol (beta coefficient=0.11, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.19, 11.5% change). Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid levels were associated with decreased insulin resistance (beta coefficient=-0.09, 95% CI: -0.18, -0.003, -8.6% change); PFOA and perfluorononanoic acid were associated with increased brachial artery distensibility

  13. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 3rd Grade - Grassflat Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade three prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area.…

  14. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 6th Grade - River Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade six prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  15. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 4th Grade - Mangrove Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade four prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  16. Group Time in Early Childhood Centers: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAfee, Oralie

    To investigate the current status of group time in early childhood centers, a small-scale exploratory study was designed and executed. Results of interviews with 35 teachers and observations in five classrooms serving children ages 2 1/2 through kindergarten revealed that all classrooms had at least one group time or circle time, usually in the…

  17. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  18. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 5th Grade - Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade five prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  19. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 1st Grade - Habitats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade one prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. This…

  20. Social Work Information Center 2.0: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, F. Grace

    2009-01-01

    The social work library at USC provides a case study of an academic library's transition to an information center service model. Analysis of the collection, user community, Web 2.0 applications, and Web usage data demonstrates how the changes facilitated library services and information literacy instruction. (Contains 6 tables and 3 figures.)

  1. ACLCP Periodical Storage Center: Feasibility Study, September 1974-April 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cieslicki, Dorothy

    A study of alternative models for establishing a cooperative storage center for little used library materials by the members of the Area College Libraries of Central Pennsylvania (ACLCP) focused on periodicals. Considerations discussed include advantages--lower cost; space for growth and better access to holdings retained in active collections;…

  2. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 8th Grade - Beach Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with secondary children in grade eight prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  3. The University of Illinois Film Center Collection Use Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Terry R.

    This report describes a study which used computer analyses of the center's film booking records for fiscal year 1981 to identify those subject areas in the collection for which holdings did not seem to accurately reflect the clientele's levels of interest, as indicated by their use of the collection. Results identified 60 subject areas which met…

  4. Usability Studies and User-Centered Design in Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Digital libraries continue to flourish. At the same time, the principles of user-centered design and the practice of usability testing have been growing in popularity, spreading their influence into the library sphere. This article explores the confluence of these two trends by surveying the current literature on usability studies of digital…

  5. Comparison of baseline data between chronic kidney disease patients starting hemodialysis who live near and far from the dialysis center.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paulo Roberto; Arcanjo, Cecília Costa; Aragão, Sânkia Maria Lopes; Ponte Neto, Fernando Lopes; Ximenes, Antônio Robson Gomes; Tapeti, Janaína Teixeira Pereira Carneiro; Mendes, Hyngridd Soares; Vieira, Luise Vasconcelos; Prado, Rita de Cássia Parente; Lima, Marcela Lopes; Adeodato, Wirvig Dionnas Cassemiro; de Menezes, Ivo Antônio Mendes; Moreira, Mairla Maracaba; de Oliveira, Estevam Nelson Moura; Ehrich, Thais Costa

    2014-01-01

    The treatment offered to chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before starting hemodialysis (HD) impacts prognosis. We seek differences among incident HD patients according to the distance between home and the dialysis center. We included 179 CKD patients undergoing HD. Patients were stratified in two groups: "living near the dialysis center" (patients whose hometown was in cities up to 100 km from the dialysis center) or as "living far from the dialysis center" (patients whose hometown was more than 100 km from the dialysis center). Socioeconomic status, laboratory results, awareness of CKD before starting HD, consultation with nephrologist before the first HD session, and type of vascular access when starting HD were compared between the two groups. Comparisons of continuous and categorical variables were performed using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test, respectively. Ninety (50.3%) patients were classified as "living near the dialysis center" and 89 (49.7%) as "living far from the dialysis center". Patients living near the dialysis center were more likely to know about their condition of CKD than those living far from the dialysis center, respectively 46.6% versus 28.0% (p = 0.015). Although without statistical significance, patients living near the dialysis center had more frequent previous consultation with nephrologists (55.5% versus 42.6%; p = 0.116) and first HD by fistula (30.0% versus 19.1%; p = 0.128) than those living far from the dialysis center. There are potential advantages of CKD awareness, referral to nephrologists and starting HD through fistula among patients living near the dialysis center.

  6. [Clinical safety audits for primary care centers. A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Sánchez, Míriam; Borrell-Carrió, Francisco; Ortodó Parra, Cristina; Fernàndez I Danés, Neus; Fité Gallego, Anna

    2013-01-01

    To identify organizational processes, violations of rules, or professional performances that pose clinical levels of insecurity. Descriptive cross-sectional survey with customized externally-behavioral verification and comparison of sources, conducted from June 2008 to February 2010. Thirteen of the 53 primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalonian Health Institute (ICS Costa de Ponent, Barcelona). Employees of 13 PCT classified into: director, nurse director, customer care administrators, and general practitioners. Non-random selection, teaching (TC)/non-teaching, urban (UC)/rural and small/large (LC) health care centers (HCC). A total of 33 indicators were evaluated; 15 of procedures, 9 of attitude, 3 of training, and 6 of communication. Level of uncertainty: <50% positive answers for each indicator. no collaboration. A total of 55 professionals participated (84.6% UC, 46.2% LC and 76.9% TC). Rank distribution: 13 customer care administrators, 13 nurse directors, 13 HCC directors, and 16 general practitioners. Levels of insecurity emerged from the following areas: reception of new medical professionals, injections administration, nursing weekend home calls, urgent consultations to specialists, aggressive patients, critical incidents over the agenda of the doctors, communication barriers with patients about treatment plans, and with immigrants. Clinical safety is on the agenda of the health centers. Identified areas of uncertainty are easily approachable, and are considered in the future system of accreditation of the Catalonian Government. General practitioners are more critical than directors, and teaching health care centers, rural and small HCC had a better sense of security. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Facilitating donor compliance with strategies to prevent vasovagal reactions: comparison of web-based and in-center approaches.

    PubMed

    Thijsen, Amanda; Fisher, Jenny; Gemelli, Carley N; Bell, Barbara; Davison, Tanya E; Masser, Barbara M

    2017-10-01

    Research has documented beneficial effects of water loading (WL) and applied muscle tension (AMT) on reducing self-reported vasovagal reactions (VVRs) in whole blood (WB) donors. However, the optimal approach to reducing VVRs using these strategies in routine blood collection practice is not known. This study evaluated the effectiveness of embedding newly developed web-based and on-site donor education materials to increase the use of these two prevention techniques during blood collection. Two studies were conducted with WB donors. In Study 1, donors (n = 375) were randomly allocated to evaluate one of three forms of educational materials (video, webpage, card) in an online questionnaire. In Study 2, donors (n = 598) were randomly assigned to view either off-site web-based or in-center educational materials and were surveyed after donation to assess compliance to the VVR prevention procedure and to self-report VVR. In Study 1, donors rated the video as having the highest message appeal and indicated greater likelihood to use AMT compared to the webpage and card. No differences were found in likelihood to use WL. In contrast, in Study 2, greater adherence to VVR prevention strategies was observed in donors who received the in-center instruction card in comparison to those who received the web-based materials. Examination of viewing data indicated that only a small number of donors had seen the web-based materials. No significant effects of the techniques were found on self-reported VVRs. Providing on-site instructions is the most effective method to increase donor compliance to VVR prevention techniques. © 2017 AABB.

  8. Photosynthetic reaction center of green sulfur bacteria studied by EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, W.; Rutherford, A.W. ); Fieler, U. )

    1990-04-24

    Membrane preparations of two species of the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium have been studied be EPR. Three signals were detected which were attributed to iron-sulfur centers acting as electron acceptors in the photosynthetic reaction center. (1) A signal from a center designated F{sub B}, was photoinduced at 4K. (2) A similar signal, F{sub A}, was photoinduced in addition to the F{sub B} signal upon a short period of illumination at 200 K. (3) Further illumination at 200 K resulted in the appearance of a broad feature at g=1.78. This is attributed to the g{sub x} component of an iron-sulfur center designated F{sub X}. The designations of these signals as F{sub B}, F{sub A}, and F{sub X} are based on their spectroscopic similarities to signals in photosystem I (PS I). The orientation dependence of these EPR signals in ordered Chlorobium membrane multilayers is remarkably similar to that of their PS I homologues. A magnetic interaction between the reduced forms of F{sub B} and F{sub A} occurs, which is also very similar to that seen in PS I. The triplet state of P{sub 840}, the primary electron donor, could be photoinduced at 4 K in samples which had been preincubated with sodium dithionite and methyl viologen and then preilluminated at 200 K. The preillumination reduces the iron-sulfur centers while the preincubation is thought to result in the inactivation of an earlier electron acceptor. Orientation studies of the triplet signal in ordered multilayers indicate that the bacteriochlorophylls which act as the primary electron donor in Chlorobium are arranged with a structural geometry almost identical with that of the special pair in purple bacteria. The Chlorobium reaction center appears to be similar in some respects to both PS I and to the purple bacterial reaction center. This is discussed with regard to the evolution of the different types of reaction centers from a common ancestor.

  9. Development of the Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Jenkins, Brenda W.; Addison, Clifton C.; Young, Lavon; Anugu, Pramod; Wilson, Gregory; Sarpong, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The public health burden caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to adversely affect individuals in terms of cost, life expectancy, medical, pharmaceutical and hospital care. This burden has been excessive in the case of African Americans. The objective of this paper is to chronicle the procedures and processes that were implemented in the development of the Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is a population-based investigation of traditional and emerging risk factors that predict progression to CVD among African Americans. In response to the struggle against CVD, the Jackson Heart Study has convened a professional, technical, and administrative staff with specific competence in the operation of a coordinating center to handle the wide variety of areas related to CVD studies. The Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center (JHSCC) was created to assure validity of the JHS findings and provide the resources necessary to meet comprehensive statistical needs (planning, implementing and monitoring data analysis); data management (designing, implementing and managing data collection and quality control), and administrative support. The JHSCC began with a commitment to support study functions in order to increase participant recruitment, retention and safety, meet regulatory requirements, prepare progress reports, and facilitate effective communication with the community and between all JHS centers. The JHSCC facilitates the efforts of the JHS scientists through the development and implementation of the study protocol. The efforts of the JHSCC have resulted in the successful preparation of scientific reports and manuscripts for publication and presentation of study findings and results. In summary, the JHSCC has emerged as an effective research mechanism that serves as the driving force behind the Jackson Heart Study activities. PMID:19543408

  10. Development of the Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Jenkins, Brenda W; Addison, Clifton C; Young, Lavon; Anugu, Pramod; Wilson, Gregory; Sarpong, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    The public health burden caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD) continues to adversely affect individuals in terms of cost, life expectancy, medical, pharmaceutical and hospital care. This burden has been excessive in the case of African Americans. The objective of this paper is to chronicle the procedures and processes that were implemented in the development of the Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center. The Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is a population-based investigation of traditional and emerging risk factors that predict progression to CVD among African Americans. In response to the struggle against CVD, the Jackson Heart Study has convened a professional, technical, and administrative staff with specific competence in the operation of a coordinating center to handle the wide variety of areas related to CVD studies. The Jackson Heart Study Coordinating Center (JHSCC) was created to assure validity of the JHS findings and provide the resources necessary to meet comprehensive statistical needs (planning, implementing and monitoring data analysis); data management (designing, implementing and managing data collection and quality control), and administrative support. The JHSCC began with a commitment to support study functions in order to increase participant recruitment, retention and safety, meet regulatory requirements, prepare progress reports, and facilitate effective communication with the community and between all JHS centers. The JHSCC facilitates the efforts of the JHS scientists through the development and implementation of the study protocol. The efforts of the JHSCC have resulted in the successful preparation of scientific reports and manuscripts for publication and presentation of study findings and results. In summary, the JHSCC has emerged as an effective research mechanism that serves as the driving force behind the Jackson Heart Study activities.

  11. The NASA Lewis Research Center: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), established in 1941, is one of ten NASA research centers in the country. It is situated on 350 acres of land in Cuyahoga County and occupies more than 140 buildings and over 500 specialized research and test facilities. Most of LeRC's facilities are located in the City of Cleveland; some are located within the boundaries of the cities of Fairview Park and Brookpark. LeRC is a lead center for NASA's research, technology, and development in the areas of aeropropulsion and selected space applications. It is a center of excellence for turbomachinery, microgravity fluid and combustion research, and commercial communication. The base research and technology disciplines which serve both aeronautics and space areas include materials and structures, instrumentation and controls, fluid physics, electronics, and computational fluid dynamics. This study investigates LeRC's economic impact on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures LeRC's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. To fully explain LeRC's overall impact on the region, its contributions in the areas of technology transfer and education are also examined. The study uses a highly credible and widely accepted research methodology. First, regional economic multipliers based on input-output models were used to estimate the effect of LERC spending on the Northeast Ohio economy. Second, the economic models were complemented by interviews with industrial, civic, and university leaders to qualitatively assess LeRC's impact in the areas of technology transfer and education.

  12. SAID Partial Wave Analyses from CNS DAC (Center for Nuclear Studies Data Analysis Center)

    DOE Data Explorer

    George Washington University (GW) has one of the largest university-based nuclear-physics groups in the nation. Many of the current and future projects are geared to Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) at Newport News, VA. JLab is the world's premier electron accelerator for nuclear physics, and GW is one of the charter members of the governing body of JLab, the Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA). The George Washington Data Analysis Center (DAC) was created in 1998 by an agreement among the Department of Energy, Jefferson Lab, and the GW Center for Nuclear Studies.The activities of the DAC fall into four distinct categories: 1) Performing partial-wave analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions; 2) Maintenance of databases associated with these reactions; 3) Development of software to disseminate DAC results (as well as the results of competing model-independent analyses and potential approaches); and 4) Phenomenological and theoretical investigations which bridge the gap between theory and experiment; in particular, the extraction of N* and D * hadronic and electromagnetic couplings. Partial Wave Analyses (and the associated databases) available at GW are: Pion-Nucleon, Kaon-Nucleon, Nucleon-Nucleon, Pion Photoproduction, Pion Electroproduction, Kaon Photoproduction, Eta Photoproduction, Eta-Prime Photoproduction, Pion-Deuteron (elastic), and Pion-Deuteron to Proton+Proton. [Taken from http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm">http://www.gwu.edu/~ndl/dac.htm

  13. A comparison study of hair examination methodologies.

    PubMed

    Kolowski, Jason C; Petraco, Nicholas; Wallace, Margaret M; De Forest, Peter R; Prinz, Mechthild

    2004-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the accuracy between two methods of hair analysis: PCR-STR DNA analysis and microscopic comparison analysis. Standard sets of pubic hairs were collected from volunteers, and unknown sets were generated from these samples. Three out of five (60%) of the hairs analyzed produced full DNA profiles that were correctly matched to the standard sets. DNA analysis was inconclusive (partial or no DNA profile) for two out of five (40%) of the samples. In contrast, the microscopic comparison analysis correctly matched four out of five (80%) of the samples to the standard sets but mis-identified one out of five (20%) of the samples. These results reinforce the practice of preliminary microscopic hair examination in narrowing down a set of hairs for DNA analysis. Microscopic comparison analysis is sufficiently reliable to remain a rapid and inexpensive method for forensic hair analysis.

  14. Using unfolding case studies in a subject-centered classroom.

    PubMed

    Day, Lisa

    2011-08-01

    The recently published report of the Carnegie Foundation's National Study of Nursing Education points out significant problems with classroom teaching in schools of nursing. This article suggests Palmer's idea of the subject-centered classroom as a way to transform nursing school classrooms into collaborative learning communities. For Palmer, the subject is the big idea of nursing practice-the nurse-patient/client/family/community relationship-that should take the lead in stimulating inquiry and discussion. The article goes on to describe how teachers can develop and use unfolding case studies to bring the subject to the center of the classroom. By doing so, the classroom becomes a place where students learn a sense of salience, develop their clinical imagination, and begin their formation as professional nurses.

  15. Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies 2007 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies,2058 Maluhia Road,Honolulu,HI,96815 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...improv- ing what we contribute have worked diligently to transform systems to meet needs and expectations. 2007 has been a year of refocusing...development of a collaborative international institutional and leadership capacity, and willingness, to addresses complex security-related systems in

  16. Microcomputer Productivity Study for the Naval Training Systems Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    rctt sd a uiu, art" 88 1 Technical Report 86-028 percent said it benefited them personally . The personal computer was rated by 97 percent of the finance ...IU.0 I~ 1.5U-. 1111 .0 X/? ZK . . % %. NAVAL TRAINING SYSTEMS CENTER ORLANDO. FLORIDA 00T UI FI LE COW" TECHNICAL REPORT 86-028 MICROCOMPUTER...ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Appreciation is expressed to the following persons for their contributions to this study: Thomas 0. Peeples for his assistance in

  17. Reactivation study for NASA Lewis Research Center's Hypersonic Tunnel Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Jeffrey E.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Lewis Research Center's Plum Brook Station is a blowdown, free-jet, nonvitiated propulsion facility capable of Mach 5, 6, and 7 with true temperature, altitude, and air composition simulation. The facility has been in a deactivated status for 13 years. Discussed are the capabilities of HTF, and the results of a deactivation study recently conducted to determine the cost, schedule, and technical effort required to restore HTF to its original design operating capabilities are summarized.

  18. Reactivation study for NASA Lewis Research Center's hypersonic tunnel facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Jeffrey E.

    1987-01-01

    The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Lewis Research Center's Plum Brook Station is a blowdown, free-jet, nonvitiated propulsion facility capable of Mach 5, 6, and 7 with true temperature, altitude, and air composition simulation. The facility has been in a deactivated status for 13 years. Discussed are the capabilities of HTF, and the results of a deactivation study recently conducted to determine the cost, schedule, and technical effort required to restore HTF to its original design operating capabilities are summarized.

  19. Case-mix adjustment and the comparison of community health center performance on patient experience measures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007-2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately.

  20. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  1. Liver resection for early hepatocellular cancer: Comparison of centers in 3 different countries

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Linda L; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Kawano, Yoichi; Tang, Zhao-You; Ji, Jun-Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare patients who underwent resection of early stage hepatocellular cancer (HCC) in three different countries. METHODS This retrospective study characterizes 573 stage I/II HCC patients treated with liver resection in 3 tertiary-referral centers: Tokyo (n = 250), Honolulu (n = 146) and Shanghai (n = 177). RESULTS Shanghai patients were younger, predominantly male, hepatitis-B seropositive (94%) and cirrhotic (93%). Tokyo patients were older and more likely to have hepatitis-C (67%), smaller tumors, low albumin, and normal alpha-fetoprotein. The Honolulu cohort had the largest tumors and 30% had no viral hepatitis. Age-adjusted mortality at 1 and 5-years were lower in the Tokyo cohort compared to Honolulu and there was no difference in mortality between Shanghai and Honolulu cohorts. Elevated alpha-fetoprotein, low albumin and tumor > 5 cm were associated with increased 1-year mortality. These factors and cirrhosis were independently associated with increased 5-year mortality. Independent risk factors of survival varied when examined separately by center. CONCLUSION The profile of early-stage HCC patients is strikingly different across countries and likely contributes to survival differences. Underlying differences in patient populations including risk factors/comorbidities influencing disease progression may also account for variation in outcomes. PMID:27872684

  2. Hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, J. L.; Johnston, P. J.; Cubbage, J. M.; Dillon, J. L.; Richie, C. B.; Marcum, D. C., Jr.; Carlson, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    The design and performance of several tactical and strategic hypersonic airbreathing missile concepts under study at the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed from an evolutionary perspective. A mid- and chin inlet missile design, constrained to the Navy's vertical box launcher, was investigated; a performance comparison is presented that is favorable to the mid-inlet approach. Parasol wing, confined flow field, and spatula-like cruise missile configurations were examined with strategic applications in mind. The preliminary results are encouraging with respect to aerodynamic and volumetric efficiency and choice of engine integration schemes.

  3. Spin state transition in the active center of the hemoglobin molecule: DFT + DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    An ab initio study of electronic and spin configurations of the iron ion in the active center of the human hemoglobin molecule is presented. With a combination of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and the Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) approach, the spin state transition description in the iron ion during the oxidation process is significantly improved in comparison with previous attempts. It was found that the origin of the iron ion local moment behavior both for the high-spin and for the low-spin states in the hemoglobin molecule is caused by the presence of a mixture of several atomic states with comparable statistical probability.

  4. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  5. Space Shuttle orbiter trimmed center-of-gravity extension study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scallion, W. I.; Phillips, W. P.

    1985-01-01

    Aerodynamic, heat transfer, and system design studies to determine removable modifications for the Space Shuttle orbiter that would extend its forward center-of-gravity triom capability are summarized. Wind-tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0.25 to 20.3 to determine the most effective aerodynamic modifications. Heat transfer and system design studies determined the impact of the modifications on the thermal protection system and structural weight of the vehicle. The most effective modifications were in-fillet canards or a forward extension of the existing forward wing fillet.

  6. Vegetation studies, National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1997-09-01

    During the spring of 1992, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted surveys of the Avawatz and Granite mountains springs for the National Training Center (NTC) to evaluate the occurrence of sensitive plant species in these areas. PNNL also conducted a survey of the eastern outwash of the Paradise Range for the occurrence of Lane Mountain milk vetch (Astragalus jaegerianus). In spring of 1993, PNNL conducted an additional study of Lane Mountain milk vetch on the NTC to determine habitat characteristics for this plant and to develop a method for predicting its potential occurrence, based on simple habitat attributes. The results of these studies are itemized.

  7. Femtosecond photodichroism studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Wiederrecht, G P; Seibert, M; Govindjee; Wasielewski, M R

    1994-09-13

    Photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical potential begins in reaction center protein complexes, where rapid charge separation occurs with nearly unit quantum efficiency. Primary charge separation was studied in isolated photosystem II reaction centers from spinach containing 6 chlorophyll a, 2 pheophytin a (Pheo), 1 cytochrome b559, and 2 beta-carotene molecules. Time-resolved pump-probe kinetic spectroscopy was carried out with 105-fs time resolution and with the pump laser polarized parallel, perpendicular, and at the magic angle (54.7 degrees) relative to the polarized probe beam. The time evolution of the transient absorption changes due to the formation of the oxidized primary electron donor P680+ and the reduced primary electron acceptor Pheo- were measured at 820 nm and 545 nm, respectively. In addition, kinetics were obtained at 680 nm, the wavelength ascribed to the Qy transition of the primary electron donor P680 in the reaction center. At each measured probe wavelength the kinetics of the transient absorption changes can be fit to two major kinetic components. The relative amplitudes of these components are strongly dependent on the polarization of the pump beam relative to that of the probe. At the magic angle, where no photoselection occurs, the amplitude of the 3-ps component, which is indicative of the charge separation, dominates. When the primary electron acceptor Pheo is reduced prior to P680 excitation, the 3-ps component is eliminated.

  8. Femtosecond photodischroism studies of isolated photosystem II reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Wasielewski, M.R.; Siebert, M.; Govindjee

    1994-09-13

    Photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical potential begins in reaction center protein complexes, where rapid charge separation occurs with nearly unit quantum efficiency. Primary charge separation was studied in isolated photosystem II reaction centers from spinach containing 6 chlorophyll a, 2 pheophytin a (Pheo), 1 cytochrome b{sub 559}, and 2 {beta}-carotene molecules. Time-resolved pump-probe kinetic spectroscopy was carried out with 105-fs time resolution and with the pump laser polarized parallel, perpendicular, and at the magic angle (54.7{degrees}) relative to the polarized probe beam. The time evolution of the oxidized primary electron donor P680{sup +} and the reduced primary electron acceptor Pheo{sup {minus}} were measured at 820 nm and 545 nm, respectively. In addition, kinetics were obtained at 680 nm, the wavelength ascribed to the Q{sub y} transition of the primary electron donor P680 in the reaction center. At each measured probe wavelength the kinetics of the transient absorption changes can be fit to two major kinetic components. The relative amplitudes of these components are strongly dependent on the polarization of the pump beam relative to that of the probe. At the magic angle, where no photoselection occurs, the amplitude of the 3-ps component, which is indicative of the charge separation, dominates. When the primary electron acceptor Pheo is reduced prior to P680 excitation, the 3-ps component is eliminated. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A Systematic Comparison of Vertical GPS Time Series Calculated by Five Processing Centers for Detecting Climatic-Induced Crustal Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setti Junior, P. D. T.; Wdowinski, S.

    2016-12-01

    Vertical crustal movements, as observed by continuous GPS measurements, are sensitive to load changes induced by atmospheric and hydrological processes, as lake level fluctuations, ice melt, groundwater depletion, or drought. These movements are often dominated by a seasonal signal but also by year-to-year changes, which reflect a long-term climatic signal. Recently, we developed a new technique that extracts the climatic signal by removing the seasonal signal from vertical GPS time series (Wdowinski et al., 2016). However, the method's results, which are the climatic signals, are very sensitive to the quality of the time series and the choice of reference frame (RF). In this study, we conduct a systematic comparison between eight vertical GPS time series calculated by five processing centers and evaluate their suitability to extract the climatic signal. We use the solutions produced by Central Washington University (CWU), New Mexico Institute of Technology (NMT), Nevada Geodetic Laboratory (NGL), Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), as well as combined solution calculated by the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) and GPS Explorer. We use the solutions constrained in the IGS08 RF and in the case of NGL, we also use the NA12 solutions. Three of the processing centers, CWU, NGL and JPL use the GIPSY software, whereas the other two, NMT and SOPAC, use GAMIT. Both combined solutions integrate between GIPSY and GAMIT solutions. We conducted our comparative analysis in two study areas, one in western US taking advantage of the two decades long time series of the Basin and Range network, and the other in eastern U.S. and Canada (Washington DC area, Newfoundland, and Ottawa area). Preliminary results suggest that the three GIPSY solutions (CWU, NGL and JPL) are more consistent between one another compared with the GAMIT solutions. The GIPSY solutions also yield climatic signal that is more consistent with regional climatic

  10. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.R.; Abou-Sayed, I.S.; Moschovidis, Z.; Parker, C.

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  11. [Fetal bradycardia: a retrospective study in 9 Spanish centers].

    PubMed

    Perin, F; Rodríguez Vázquez del Rey, M M; Deiros Bronte, L; Ferrer Menduiña, Q; Rueda Nuñez, F; Zabala Arguelles, J I; García de la Calzada, D; Teodoro Marin, S; Centeno Malfaz, F; Galindo Izquierdo, A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to review the current management and outcomes of fetal bradycardia in 9 Spanish centers. Retrospective multicenter study: analysis of all fetuses with bradycardia diagnosed between January 2008 and September 2010. Underlying mechanisms of fetal bradyarrhythmias were studied with echocardiography. A total of 37 cases were registered: 3 sinus bradycardia, 15 blocked atrial bigeminy, and 19 high grade atrioventricular blocks. Sinus bradycardia: 3 cases (100%) were associated with serious diseases. Blocked atrial bigeminy had an excellent outcome, except for one case with post-natal tachyarrhythmia. Of the atrioventricular blocks, 16% were related to congenital heart defects with isomerism, 63% related to the presence of maternal SSA/Ro antibodies, and 21% had unclear etiology. Overall mortality was 20% (37%, if terminations of pregnancy are taken into account). Risk factors for mortality were congenital heart disease, hydrops and/or ventricular dysfunction. Management strategies differed among centers. Steroids were administrated in 73% of immune-mediated atrioventricular blocks, including the only immune-mediated IInd grade block. More than half (58%) of atrioventricular blocks had a pacemaker implanted in a follow-up of 18 months. Sustained fetal bradycardia requires a comprehensive study in all cases, including those with sinus bradycardia. Blocked atrial bigeminy has a good prognosis, but tachyarrhythmias may develop. Heart block has significant mortality and morbidity rates, and its management is still highly controversial. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Case study: a data warehouse for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, J S; Scully, K W; Pates, R D; Schubart, J R; Reynolds, R E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical data repository (CDR) is a frequently updated relational data warehouse that provides users with direct access to detailed, flexible, and rapid retrospective views of clinical, administrative, and financial patient data for the University of Virginia Health System. This article presents a case study of the CDR, detailing its five-year history and focusing on the unique role of data warehousing in an academic medical center. Specifically, the CDR must support multiple missions, including research and education, in addition to administration and management. Users include not only analysts and administrators but clinicians, researchers, and students.

  13. A case study in working with cell-centered data

    SciTech Connect

    CROSSNO,PATRICIA J.

    2000-03-30

    This case study provides examples of how some simple decisions the authors made in structuring their algorithms for handling cell-centered data can dramatically influence the results. Although they all know that these decisions produce variations in results, they think that they underestimate the potential magnitude of the differences. More importantly, the users of the codes may not be aware that these choices have been made or what they mean to the resulting visualizations of their data. This raises the question of whether or not these decisions are inadvertently distorting user interpretations of data sets.

  14. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH.

  15. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  16. NASA-Langley Research Center's participation in a round-robin comparison between some current crack-propagation prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Lewis, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A round-robin study was conducted which evaluated and compared different methods currently in practice for predicting crack growth in surface-cracked specimens. This report describes the prediction methods used by the Fracture Mechanics Engineering Section, at NASA-Langley Research Center, and presents a comparison between predicted crack growth and crack growth observed in laboratory experiments. For tests at higher stress levels, the correlation between predicted and experimentally determined crack growth was generally quite good. For tests at lower stress levels, the predicted number of cycles to reach a given crack length was consistently higher than the experimentally determined number of cycles. This consistent overestimation of the number of cycles could have resulted from a lack of definition of crack-growth data at low values of the stress intensity range. Generally, the predicted critical flaw sizes were smaller than the experimentally determined critical flaw sizes. This underestimation probably resulted from using plane-strain fracture toughness values to predict failure rather than the more appropriate values based on maximum load.

  17. Comparison of Sofia Legionella FIA and BinaxNOW® Legionella urinary antigen card in two national reference centers.

    PubMed

    Beraud, L; Gervasoni, K; Freydiere, A M; Descours, G; Ranc, A G; Vandenesch, F; Lina, G; Gaia, V; Jarraud, S

    2015-09-01

    The Sofia Legionella Fluorescence Immunoassay (FIA; Quidel) is a recently introduced rapid immunochromatographic diagnostic test for Legionnaires' disease using immunofluorescence technology designed to enhance its sensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate its performance for the detection of urinary antigens for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 in two National Reference Centers for Legionella. The sensitivity and specificity of the Sofia Legionella FIA test were determined in concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples, before and after boiling, in comparison with the BinaxNOW® Legionella Urinary Antigen Card (UAC; Alere). Compared with BinaxNOW® Legionella UAC, the sensitivity of the Sofia Legionella test was slightly higher in nonconcentrated urine samples and was identical in concentrated urine samples. The specificity of the Sofia Legionella FIA test was highly reduced by the concentration of urine samples. In nonconcentrated samples, a lack of specificity was observed in 2.3 % of samples, all of them resolved by heat treatment. The Sofia Legionella FIA is a sensitive test for detecting Legionella urinary antigens with no previous urine concentration. However, all positive samples have to be re-tested after boiling to reach a high specificity. The reading is automatized on the Sofia analyzer, which can be connected to laboratory information systems, facilitating accurate and rapid reporting of results.

  18. Comparison of motor and cognitive performance of children attending public and private day care centers

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mariana M.; Corsi, Carolina; Marques, Luisa A. P.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Given that environmental factors, such as the school environment, can influence child development, more attention should be paid to the development of children attending day care centers. Objective Todetermine whether there are differences in the gross motor, fine motor, or cognitive performances of children between 1 and3 years-old of similar socioeconomic status attending public and private day care centers full time. Method Participants were divided into 2 groups, 1 of children attending public day care centers (69 children) and another of children attending private day care centers (47 children). All children were healthy and regularly attended day care full time for over 4 months. To assess cognitive, gross and fine motor performance, the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was used. The Mann-Whitney test was used for comparative analyses between groups of children between 13 and 24 months, 25 and 41 months, and 13 and 41 months. Results Children in public day care centers exhibited lower scores on the cognitive development scale beginning at 13 months old. The fine and gross motor performance scores were lower in children over the age of 25 months attending public centers. Maternal education was not related to the performance of children in either group. Conclusion The scores of cognitive performance as well as fine and gross motor performance of children of similar socioeconomic status who attend public day care centers are lower than children attending private daycare centers. PMID:24346293

  19. Comparison of Service Centers and Document Data Bases--A User's View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donohue, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of five commercial service centers and various data bases is presented. A current awareness profile covering both chemical and botanical fields was sent to each service center. The responses were evaluated on the basis of promptness, interaction with the user, and physical format of the listing, among other things. (Author/NH)

  20. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  1. Tattooing behavior in adolescence. A comparison study.

    PubMed

    Farrow, J A; Schwartz, R H; Vanderleeuw, J

    1991-02-01

    We characterize associations with and motivations for tattooing in adolescents through data from a controlled, three-group comparison of adolescents from a substance abuse treatment program, detention center, and private pediatric practice. We surveyed 474 adolescents (12 to 18 years old) with tattoos (12%) and without tattoos (88%). The private pediatric practice was the control site. A 34-item questionnaire was used to profile the three groups and their primary associations with tattooing with respect to race, drug use, school attendance, school grades, parental marital status, family income, tattooing by family members, criminal activity, and involvement with satanic rituals. Tattooing was significantly (P less than .005) associated with all of these variables in the ways described, as was knowledge of its association with human immunodeficiency virus infection. No interventions were made. Tattooing is common in adolescents and is associated with low self-esteem, delinquency, drug abuse, family and peer modeling, and participation in satanic rituals. Addressing the behavior as a health problem is discussed.

  2. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  3. Community Involvement: A Case Study of the Education Resource Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Stephen; And Others

    The Education Resource Center (ERC) is a community-based teachers' resource center located in Chicago (Illinois). Its conceptual base is broader than that of a typical teachers center as ERC represents a community-based social movement with a wider orientation than teacher training. ERC's policy board reflects community organizations and the…

  4. Cast Study: National Naval Medical Center, A Graduate Management Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    of Health Sciences), the Naval Medical Research Institute (now the Naval Medical Research Center), and the Naval Dental School (now the National...Naval Dental Center) (History, 2000). The NNMC mission became regional on January 1, 1973 with the establishment of the National Naval Medical Center...General Surgery Material Management Inpatient Surgery Postal Operations Ophthalmology Oerations Service Oral & Maxillo- Bahelor Housing facial/ Dental

  5. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Power demand, load center assessment and transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.; Thaik, A.; Pingel, P.

    1982-02-01

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramification of constructing a nuclear energy center in an arid western region. In this phase of the study. The projected power demands and load center locations were reviewed and assessed. Alternative transmission systems were analysed and a conceptual transmission for bulk power transportation is proposed with potential line routes. Environmental impacts of the proposed transmission were also identified.

  6. Center of pressure trajectory during gait: a comparison of four foot positions.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-09-01

    Knowledge of the center of pressure (COP) trajectory during stance can elucidate possible foot pathology, provide comparative effectiveness of foot orthotics, and allow for appropriate calculation of balance control and joint kinetics during gait. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the COP movement when walking at self-selected speeds with plantigrade, equinus, inverted, and everted foot positions. A total of 13 healthy subjects were asked to walk barefoot across an 8-m walkway with embedded force plates. The COP was computed for each stance limb using the ground reaction forces and moments collected from three force plates. Results demonstrated that the COP excursion was 83% of the foot length and 27% of the foot width in the anterior-posterior and medial lateral directions for plantigrade walking, respectively. Regression equations explained 94% and 44% of the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral COP variability during plantigrade walking, respectively. While the range of motion and COP velocity were similar for inverted and everted walking, the COP remained on the lateral and medial aspects of the foot for these two walking conditions, respectively. A reduced anterior-posterior COP range of motion and velocity were demonstrated during equinus walking. Ankle joint motion in the frontal and sagittal planes supported this COP movement, with increased inversion and plantar flexion demonstrated during inverted and equinus conditions, respectively. Results from this study demonstrated the COP kinematics during simulated pathological gait conditions, with the COP trajectory providing an additional tool for the evaluation of patients with pathology.

  7. Nutritional support practices in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers: A nationwide comparison.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Annic; Bargetzi, Mario; Bargetzi, Annika; Zueger, Noemi; Medinger, Micheal; Passweg, Jakob; Schanz, Urs; Samaras, Panagiotis; Chalandon, Yves; Pichard, Claude; Limonta, Alessandro; Wannesson, Luciano; Pabst, Thomas; Duchosal, Michel A; Hess, Urs; Stanga, Zeno; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    In 2009, international nutritional societies published practice guidelines on screening and nutritional support for patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Little is known about how these guidelines are implemented in clinical practice. We performed a nationwide survey with the aim of understanding current practice patterns, differences between clinical practice, and international recommendations as well as barriers to the use of nutritional therapy. We performed a qualitative survey including all centers across Switzerland offering allogeneic (n = 3) or autologous (n = 7) stem cell transplantation. We focused on in-house protocols pertaining to malnutrition screening, indications for nutritional support, types of nutritional therapy available and provided, and recommendations regarding neutropenic diets. All centers offering allogeneic, and most of the centers offering autologous transplantation, had a malnutrition screening tool, mainly the nutritional risk score (NRS 2002) method. Only one center does not provide nutritional support. There is wide variation regarding start and stop of nutritional therapy as well as route of delivery, with five centers recommending parenteral nutrition and five centers recommending enteral nutrition as a first step. Although all centers offering allogeneic transplantation, and approximately every other autologous transplant center, used a neutropenic diet, specific recommendations regarding the type of food and food handling showed significant variation. This Swiss survey found wide variation in the use of nutritional therapy in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, with low adherence overall to current practice guidelines. Understanding and reducing barriers to guideline implementation in clinical practice may improve clinical outcomes. Close collaboration of centers will facilitate future research needed to improve current practice and ensure high quality of treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 2 - Case Studies on TwoCo-location Network Data Centers (No. 18 and 19)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-08-01

    Two data centers in this study were within a co-location facility located on the sixth floor of a multi-story building in downtown Los Angeles, California. The facility had 37,758 gross square feet floor area with 2-foot raised-floors in the data services area. The two data centers were designated as the west data center (DC No.18) and the east data center (DC No.19). The study found that 56% of the overall electric power was consumed by sixth floor critical loads in both data centers, 33% of the power was consumed by HVAC systems, 3% of the power was consumed by UPS units, 3% of the power was for generator losses, and the remaining 5% was used by lighting and miscellaneous loads in the building. The power density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the two data centers was 20 W/ft{sup 2} and 56 W/ft{sup 2}, respectively. The power density was relatively lower in DC No.18 compared to other data centers previously studied. In addition, HVAC to IT power demand ratio was 0.6 in DC No.18 in this study, and was 0.4 in DC No.19. Two out of three chillers were running at a low partial load, making the operation very energy inefficient. The operation and control of the chillers and air-handling units should be optimized while providing sufficient cooling to the data centers. Although arranging hot aisle/cold aisle design to separate airflow streams would be difficult in such a co-location data center, optimizing air distribution should be pursued. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the design, operation, and control of mechanical systems serving the data centers with various critical loads in place. This includes chiller operation, chilled water system, AHUs, airflow management and control in data centers. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

  9. Comparison of method of conception in fetuses undergoing echocardiography at a tertiary referral center.

    PubMed

    Votava-Smith, Jodie K; Glickstein, Julie S; Simpson, Lynn L; Williams, Ismee A

    2014-05-01

    We compared the proportion of conception with and without in vitro fertilization (IVF) in fetuses with and without congenital heart disease (CHD). This was a retrospective review of fetal echocardiograms at Columbia University from 2007 to 2010, to identify the mode of conception. Echocardiography was performed on 2828 fetuses, and 2761 (97.6%) had the method of conception documented. CHD was diagnosed in 22.4%, consisting predominantly of complex CHD. The proportion of IVF conception was lower in fetuses with CHD (6.9% CHD vs 10.3% no CHD, OR = 0.65 [95% CI 0.46-0.92], p = 0.01). IVF fetuses were conceived by elder mothers and were more likely part of a multiple gestation than those without IVF. In a multivariate model controlling for maternal age and multiple gestation, IVF was not associated with CHD diagnosis (OR = 1.1 [95% CI 0.77-1.7], p = 0.51). At a tertiary referral center, fetuses with CHD were not more likely to be conceived by IVF after controlling for maternal age and multiple gestation. These results differ from those of several previous reports, which may be related to our study population, and the exclusion of isolated atrial shunts and patent ductus arteriosus, which are normal fetal findings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Comparison between transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Abu Akr, Firas; Bitran, Daniel; Almagor, Yaron; Balkin, Jonathan; Tauber, Rachel; Merin, Ofer

    2013-07-01

    A comparison was made of the outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in high-risk patients. All patients aged > 75 years that underwent a procedure for severe aortic stenosis with or without coronary revascularization at the authors' institution were included in the study; thus, 64 patients underwent TAVI and 188 underwent AVR. Patients in the TAVI group were older (mean age 84 +/- 5 versus 80 +/- 4 years; p < 0.0001) and had a higher logistic EuroSCORE (p = 0.004). Six patients (9%) died during the procedure in the TAVI group, and 23 (12%) died in the AVR group (p = 0.5). Predictors for mortality were: age (p < 0.0001), female gender (p = 0.02), and surgical valve replacement (p = 0.01). Gradients across the implanted valves at one to three months postoperatively were lower in the TAVI group (p < 0.0001). Actuarial survival at one, two and three years was 78%, 64% and 64%, respectively, for TAVI, and 83%, 78% and 75%, respectively, for AVR (p = 0.4). Age was the only predictor for late mortality (p < 0.0001). TAVI patients were older and posed a higher predicted surgical risk. Procedural mortality was lower in the TAVI group, but mid-term survival was similar to that in patients undergoing surgical AVR. Age was the only predictor for late survival. These data support the referral of high-risk patients for TAVI.

  11. Deep levels of vacancy-hydrogen centers in silicon studied by Laplace DLTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde Nielsen, K.; Dobaczewski, L.; Goscinski, K.; Bendesen, R.; Andersen, Ole; Bech Nielsen, B.

    1999-12-01

    We identify the acceptor levels (-/0) of the VH and V2H defects in silicon from comparison of DLTS and EPR annealing data. The levels are very close to each other and close to the acceptor level of the PV defect (the E-center) as well. In order to separate them, we have applied the high-resolution technique of Laplace DLTS and compared the formation and annealing properties of defects generated by implantation of hydrogen or helium. We further applied Laplace DLTS in combination with uniaxial stress to study the acceptor level at Ec-Et=0.31 eV previously assigned to a vacancy-hydrogen-oxygen defect. We find, in accordance with recent EPR measurements, that the defect displays orthorhombic-I symmetry and rule out that it contains two hydrogen atoms. The defect can be understood as a single hydrogen atom bound inside the A-center, the well-known VO defect of silicon, and we denote it VOH accordingly. The observed orthorhombic-I symmetry arises because the hydrogen atom (at T=160 K) swiftly jumps among two equivalent sites across the (1 1 0) plane that contains the Si-O-Si bond. Previous studies have shown that hydrogenation of oxygen-rich electron-irradiated samples leads to the formation of VOH with simultaneous depletion of the A-center. Our structural data are in accordance with this dynamic behavior.

  12. Open versus minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion: a multi-center comparison of perioperative measures and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is an under diagnosed source of low back pain due in part to lack of visible pathology on radiographs and symptoms mimicking other back-related disorders. Open SI joint fusion has been performed since the 1920s. This technique has fallen out of favor with the introduction of minimally invasive options. To date there has been no direct comparison between open and MIS SI joint fusion. Methods We conducted a multi-center, retrospective comparative cohort study of patients who underwent SI joint fusion using either an open surgical (OS) technique using a combination of screws and cages or a minimally invasive surgical (MIS) technique with a series of titanium plasma spray (TPS) coated triangular implants. Operative measures including surgical operating time, length of hospitalization and estimated blood loss (EBL) were collected along with demographics and medical history, surgical complications, and 12- and 24-month pain scores. Improvements in pain were compared after matching for age and gender and controlling for a history of lumbar spine fusion using repeated measures analysis of variance. Results Data were available for 263 patients treated by 7 surgeons; 149 patients treated with OS and 114 treated with MIS SI joint fusion. Compared to OS patients, MIS patients were on average 10 years older (mean age 57 vs. 46) and 69% of all patients were female. MIS operative measures of EBL, operating time and length of hospitalization were significantly lower than open surgery (p < 0.001). Pain relief, measured as change from baseline to 12 months in VAS pain rating, was 3.5 points lower in the MIS vs. OS group (-6.2 vs. -2.7 points, p < 0.001). When matched for age, gender and a history of prior lumbar spinal fusion, postoperative pain scores were on average 3.0 points (95% CI 2.1 – 4.0) lower in MIS vs. OS (rANOVA p < 0.001). Conclusions In this multi-center comparative study, patients who underwent either OS or MIS SI

  13. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  14. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  15. 40 CFR 761.326 - Conducting the comparison study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conducting the comparison study. 761...-liquid PCB Remediation Waste Samples § 761.326 Conducting the comparison study. Extract or analyze the comparison study samples using the alternative method. For an alternative extraction method or alternative...

  16. [Ambient noise comparison in 2 intensive care units in a tertiary care center].

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Zárate-Coronado, Olivia; Gaxiola-González, Fabiola; Neyoy-Sombra, Venigna

    2017-04-03

    The World Health Organization has established a maximum noise level of 40 decibels (dB) for an intensive care unit. The aim of this study was to compare the noise level in 2 different intensive care units at a tertiary care center. In an cross-sectional design, the maximum noise level was analyzed within the intensive coronary care unit and intensive care unit with a digital meter. A measurement in 4 different points of each room with 5minute intervals for a period of 60minutes were performed at 7:30, 14:30 and 20:30. Average of the observations were compared with descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U. An analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to average noise. The noise observed in the intensive care unit had an average of 64.77±3.33dB (P=.08); something analogous happened in the coronary intensive care room with an average of 60.20±1.58dB (P=.129). 25% or more of the measurements exceeded up to 20 points the level recommended by the World Health Organization. Noise levels in intensive care wards that were studied exceed the maximum recommended level for a hospital. It is necessary to design and implement actions for greater participation of health personnel in the reduction of ambient noise. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Center on Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah System Approach to Individualized Learning Project.

    Classroom areas organized into centers for specific study purposes are discussed. These centers are used for individual or small group work. The physical arrangement of the area used for a study center is described, including the organization of furniture, materials, and preferred locations. Suggestions are made for the management and stocking of…

  18. 75 FR 67999 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Completion: Anthropological Studies Center, Archaeological Collections Facility, Sonoma State University... completion of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the Anthropological Studies Center.... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by the Anthropological Studies...

  19. [Science and society. Guidelines for the Leopoldina Study Center].

    PubMed

    Hacker, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    In order to adequately perform its many diverse tasks as a scholars' society and as the German National Academy of Sciences, the Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher Leopoldina needs to view itself in a historical context. This can only happen as part of a culture of remembrance which fosters the memory of the Leopoldina's past and subjects this to a critical analysis in the context of the history of science and academies. The newly founded Leopoldina Study Center for the History of Science and Science Academies is to be a forum that pursues established forms of historical research at the Leopoldina, organizes new scientific projects, and presents its findings to the public. The aim is to involve as many Leopoldina members as possible from all of its disciplines, as well as to collaborate with national and international partners.

  20. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  1. Comparability of ophthalmic diagnoses by clinical and Reading Center examiners in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Sperduto, R D; Hiller, R; Podgor, M J; Palmberg, P; Ferris, F L; Wentworth, D

    1986-12-01

    Technologic advances in ophthalmic equipment offer the possibility of replacing direct clinical examinations with Reading Center evaluations of data recorded in epidemiologic studies. Clinical and Reading Center examiners made independent ophthalmic diagnoses of 133 right and 132 left eyes of 138 adults in the Visual Acuity Impairment Survey Pilot Study, carried out in three US cities, Boston, Detroit, and Minneapolis, in August 1981-December 1982. The Reading Center diagnosed eye conditions using only photographic and visual field data collected at the time of the clinical examination. In the comparisons of clinical and Reading Center evaluations reported here, only eyes judged by the examiners to have pathology severe enough to reduce visual acuity to 6/9 or worse were classified as having pathology. (No visual acuity criterion was required for the diagnosis of glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy.) There was agreement in diagnostic assessments between clinical and Reading Center examiners in about 80% of eyes. The kappa statistic, which adjusts for chance agreement, was in the fair to good range: 0.60 for 133 right eyes and 0.62 for 132 left eyes. When the Reading Center examiners were provided with additional information on medical history, refractive error and best corrected visual acuity, the agreement between clinical and Reading Center assessments among the subset of eyes with 6/9 or worse vision again was in the fair to good range, with kappas of 0.61 for 45 right eyes and 0.68 for 48 left eyes. Inter-observer agreement between Reading Center examiners in diagnosing pathology was in the good to excellent range. Use of Reading Centers in future epidemiologic studies should be considered, but elimination of the clinical examinations is not recommended until modifications in the protocol described here have been made and shown to improve levels of agreement between clinical and Reading Center examiners.

  2. Alternate Propulsion Subsystem Concepts Tripropellant Comparison Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levack, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted under MSFC contract NAS8-39210 to compare tripropellant and bipropellant engine configurations for the SSTO mission. The objective was to produce an 'apples-to-apples' comparison to isolate the effects of design implementation, designing company, year of design, or technologies included from the basic tripropellant/bipropellant comparison. Consequently, identical technologies were included (e.g., jet pumps) and the same design groundrules and practices were used. Engine power cycles were examined as were turbomachinery/preburner arrangements for each cycle. The bipropellant approach and two tripropellant approaches were separately optimized in terms of operating parameters: exit pressures, mixture ratios, thrust splits, etc. This briefing presents the results of the study including engine weights for both tripropellant and bipropellant engines; dry vehicle weight performance for a range of engine chamber pressures; discusses the basis for the results; examines vehicle performance due to engine cycles and the margin characteristics of various cycles; and identifies technologies with significant payoffs for this application.

  3. Microwave versus Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Comparison of Efficacy at a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Potretzke, Theodora A; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Hinshaw, J Louis; Lubner, Meghan G; Wells, Shane A; Brace, Christopher L; Agarwal, Parul; Lee, Fred T

    2016-05-01

    To compare efficacy and major complication rates of radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) ablation for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This retrospective single-center study included 69 tumors in 55 patients treated by RF ablation and 136 tumors in 99 patients treated by MW ablation between 2001 and 2013. RF and MW ablation devices included straight 17-gauge applicators. Overall survival and rates of local tumor progression (LTP) were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier techniques with Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) models and competing risk regression of LTP. RF and MW cohorts were similar in age (P = .22), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score (P = .24), and tumor size (mean 2.4 cm [range, 0.6-4.5 cm] and 2.2 cm [0.5-4.2 cm], P = .09). Median length of follow-up was 31 months for RF and 24 months for MW. Rate of LTP was 17.7% with RF and 8.8% with MW. Corresponding HR from Cox and competing risk models was 2.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-4.50; P = 0.04) and 2.01 (95% CI, 0.95-4.26; P = .07), respectively. There was improved survival for patients treated with MW ablation, although this was not statistically significant (Cox HR, 1.59 [95% CI, 0.91-2.77; P = .103]). There were few major (≥ grade C) complications (2 for RF, 1 for MW; P = .28). Treating HCC percutaneously with RF or MW ablation was associated with high primary efficacy and durable response, with lower rates of LTP after MW ablation. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Pediatric and Adult Ophthalmology Consultations in an Urban Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal H; Park, Sunju; Rosenberg, Jamie B

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare pediatric and adult ophthalmology consultations in an urban academic center. A retrospective chart review of patients evaluated by the ophthalmology consultation service from January through June 2014 was conducted. A total of 751 inpatients and emergency department patients were evaluated by the ophthalmology consultation service, of whom 152 (20.4%) were children and 598 (79.6%) were adults. The emergency department requested most of these consultations (42.8%), followed by internal medicine (39.1%) and pediatrics (18.4%) inpatients. More adult patients (94.5%) than children (76.5%) had abnormal findings on examination (P < .001). Altering management was recommended at a similar rate: 51.6% of pediatric patients and 54.3% of adult patients (P = .59). All children were initially seen by residents; children (38.6%) were more likely than adults (9.0%) to be seen with an attending physician (P < .001). Children (54.9%) were also more likely than adults (42.7%) to attend their recommended outpatient appointments (P = .027). The authors identified several interesting differences between the pediatric and adult consultation services. Although adult patients were more likely to have abnormal findings, the ophthalmology team recommended a change in management for more than half of each group. These rates of intervention suggest that it is equally important that children be considered for an ophthalmology consultation and examined as soon as possible. In addition, residents may need particular guidance in evaluating pediatric inpatients. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabimus. 2017;54(1):17-21.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Comparison of Performance Achievement Award Recognition With Primary Stroke Center Certification for Acute Ischemic Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Liang, Li; Smith, Eric E.; Reeves, Mathew J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Xian, Ying; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Peterson, Eric D.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital certification and recognition programs represent 2 independent but commonly used systems to distinguish hospitals, yet they have not been directly compared. This study assessed acute ischemic stroke quality of care measure conformity by hospitals receiving Primary Stroke Center (PSC) certification and those receiving the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines‐Stroke (GWTG‐Stroke) Performance Achievement Award (PAA) recognition. Methods and Results The patient and hospital characteristics as well as performance/quality measures for acute ischemic stroke from 1356 hospitals participating in the GWTG‐Stroke Program 2010–2012 were compared. Hospitals were classified as PAA+/PSC+ (hospitals n=410, patients n=169 302), PAA+/PSC− (n=415, n=129 454), PAA−/PSC+ (n=88, n=26 386), and PAA−/PSC− (n=443, n=75 565). A comprehensive set of stroke measures were compared with adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics. Patient characteristics were similar by PAA and PSC status but PAA−/PSC− hospitals were more likely to be smaller and nonteaching. Measure conformity was highest for PAA+/PSC+ and PAA+/PSC− hospitals, intermediate for PAA−/PSC+ hospitals, and lowest for PAA−/PSC− hospitals (all‐or‐none care measure 91.2%, 91.2%, 84.3%, and 76.9%, respectively). After adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics, PAA+/PSC+, PAA+/PSC−, and PAA−/PSC+ hospitals had 3.15 (95% CIs 2.86 to 3.47); 3.23 (2.93 to 3.56) and 1.72 (1.47 to 2.00), higher odds for providing all indicated stroke performance measures to patients compared with PAA−/PSC− hospitals. Conclusions While both PSC certification and GWTG‐Stroke PAA recognition identified hospitals providing higher conformity with care measures for patients hospitalized with acute ischemic stroke, PAA recognition was a more robust identifier of hospitals with better performance. PMID:24125846

  6. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the Qb semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the Qa site.

    PubMed

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I; Narasimhulu, Kupala V; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2011-04-13

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (Q(A)) and secondary (Q(B)) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the Q(A) and Q(B) sites, using samples of (15)N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe(2+) exchanged for diamagnetic Zn(2+), prepared in (1)H(2)O and (2)H(2)O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the Q(A) SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J.2007, 92, 671-682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6-5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the Q(B) SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T ≈ 5.2, 3.7 MHz and T ≈ 1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the Q(B) site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the Q(B) SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T = 5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 N(δ)H···O(4) (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T = 3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the Q(B) site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the Q(A) site, consistent with available experimental data for (13)C and (17)O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for Q

  7. Hydrogen bonding and spin density distribution in the QB semiquinone of bacterial reaction centers and comparison with the QA site

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Erik; Samoilova, Rimma I.; Narasimhulu, Kupala V.; Lin, Tzu-Jen; O’Malley, Patrick J.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.

    2011-01-01

    In the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors are both ubiquinone-10, but with very different properties and functions. To investigate the protein environment that imparts these functional differences, we have applied X-band HYSCORE, a 2D pulsed EPR technique, to characterize the exchangeable protons around the semiquinone (SQ) in the QA and QB sites, using samples of 15N-labeled reaction centers, with the native high spin Fe2+ exchanged for diamagnetic Zn2+, prepared in 1H2O and 2H2O solvent. The powder HYSCORE method is first validated against the orientation-selected Q-band ENDOR study of the QA SQ by Flores et al. (Biophys. J. 2007, 92, 671–682), with good agreement for two exchangeable protons with anisotropic hyperfine tensor components, T, both in the range 4.6–5.4 MHz. HYSCORE was then applied to the QB SQ where we found proton lines corresponding to T~5.2, 3.7 MHz and T~1.9 MHz. Density functional-based quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, employing a model of the QB site, were used to assign the observed couplings to specific hydrogen bonding interactions with the QB SQ. These calculations allow us to assign the T=5.2 MHz proton to the His-L190 NδH…O4 (carbonyl) hydrogen bonding interaction. The T =3.7 MHz spectral feature most likely results from hydrogen bonding interactions of O1 (carbonyl) with both Gly-L225 peptide NH and Ser-L223 hydroxyl OH, which possess calculated couplings very close to this value. The smaller 1.9 MHz coupling is assigned to a weakly bound peptide NH proton of Ile-L224. The calculations performed with this structural model of the QB site show less asymmetric distribution of unpaired spin density over the SQ than seen for the QA site, consistent with available experimental data for 13C and 17O carbonyl hyperfine couplings. The implications of these interactions for QB function and comparisons with the QA site are discussed

  8. Adjuvant versus neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in distal rectal cancer: Comparison of two decades in a single center.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Baha; Uslu, Adam; Adıbelli, Zehra; Yetiş, Halit; Cengiz, Fevzi; Aykas, Ahmet; Şimşek, Cenk; Akpınar, Göksever; Eliyatkın, Nuket; Duran, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Standard surgery alone was not able to decrease local recurrence (LR) rate below 20% in rectal cancer treatment. Thus, many centers administered neoadjuvant radiotherapy (preopRTx) with or without concomitant chemotherapy for the prevention of LR. In this study, the results of 164 consecutive patients with mid- and distal rectal cancer who received surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group NA) followed by surgery are presented. The staging system used in this study is that of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), also known as the TNM system. Eligible patients were required to have radiologically assessed stage 1 (only T2N0M0) to stage 3C (T4bN1-2M0) tumor with pathologically confirmed R0 resection. The surgical method was total mesorectal excision (TME). Radiotherapy was applied with daily 180 cGy fractions for 28 consecutive days. Chemo-therapy comprised 5-fluorouracil (450 mg/m(2)/d) and leucovorin (20 mg/m(2)/d) bolus at days 1-5 and 29-33. Nine patients (13%) in Group NA achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). In Group NA and Group A, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6.7% and 30.8%, (p<0.001), the mean LR-free survival was 190.0±7.3 months and 148.0±11.7 months (p=0.002) and the mean overall survival (OS) was 119.2±15.3 months and 103.0±9.4 months (p=0.23), respectively. A significant difference with regard to LR has been obtained with a statistical power of 0.92. Secondary outcome measures (DFS and OS) have not been met. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with TME is an efficient treatment protocol, particularly for the treatment of magnetic resonance imaging-staged 2A to 3C patients with two or three distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Given that a considerable proportion of patients with cT2N0M0 would develop pCR, this method of treatment can be considered for further studies.

  9. Adjuvant versus neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in distal rectal cancer: Comparison of two decades in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Zengel, Baha; Uslu, Adam; Adıbelli, Zehra; Yetiş, Halit; Cengiz, Fevzi; Aykas, Ahmet; Şimşek, Cenk; Akpınar, Göksever; Eliyatkın, Nuket; Duran, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Standard surgery alone was not able to decrease local recurrence (LR) rate below 20% in rectal cancer treatment. Thus, many centers administered neoadjuvant radiotherapy (preopRTx) with or without concomitant chemotherapy for the prevention of LR. In this study, the results of 164 consecutive patients with mid- and distal rectal cancer who received surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group A) or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (Group NA) followed by surgery are presented. Material and Methods: The staging system used in this study is that of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC), also known as the TNM system. Eligible patients were required to have radiologically assessed stage 1 (only T2N0M0) to stage 3C (T4bN1-2M0) tumor with pathologically confirmed R0 resection. The surgical method was total mesorectal excision (TME). Radiotherapy was applied with daily 180 cGy fractions for 28 consecutive days. Chemo-therapy comprised 5-fluorouracil (450 mg/m2/d) and leucovorin (20 mg/m2/d) bolus at days 1–5 and 29–33. Results: Nine patients (13%) in Group NA achieved pathologic complete response (pCR). In Group NA and Group A, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates were 6.7% and 30.8%, (p<0.001), the mean LR-free survival was 190.0±7.3 months and 148.0±11.7 months (p=0.002) and the mean overall survival (OS) was 119.2±15.3 months and 103.0±9.4 months (p=0.23), respectively. A significant difference with regard to LR has been obtained with a statistical power of 0.92. Secondary outcome measures (DFS and OS) have not been met. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with TME is an efficient treatment protocol, particularly for the treatment of magnetic resonance imaging-staged 2A to 3C patients with two or three distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Given that a considerable proportion of patients with cT2N0M0 would develop pCR, this method of treatment can be considered for further studies. PMID:26668530

  10. The BirthPlace collaborative practice model: results from the San Diego Birth Center Study.

    PubMed

    Swartz; Jackson; Lang; Ecker; Ganiats; Dickinson; Nguyen

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The search for quality, cost-effective health care programs in the United States is now a major focus in the era of health care reform. New programs need to be evaluated as alternatives are developed in the health care system. The BirthPlace program provides comprehensive perinatal services with certified nurse-midwives and obstetricians working together in an integrated collaborative practice serving a primarily low-income population. Low-risk women are delivered by nurse-midwives in a freestanding birth center (The BirthPlace), which is one component of a larger integrated health network. All others are delivered by team obstetricians at the affiliated tertiary hospital. Wellness, preventive measures, early intervention, and family involvement are emphasized. The San Diego Birth Center Study is a 4-year research project funded by the U.S. Federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (#R01-HS07161) to evaluate this program. The National Birth Center Study (NEJM, 1989; 321(26): 1801-11) described the advantages and safety of freestanding birth centers. However, a prospective cohort study with a concurrent comparison group of comparable risk had not been conducted on a collaborative practice-freestanding birth center model to address questions of safety, cost, and patient satisfaction.Methods: The specific aims of this study are to compare this collaborative practice model to the traditional model of perinatal health care (physician providers and hospital delivery). A prospective cohort study comparing these two health care models was conducted with a final expected sample size of approximately 2,000 birth center and 1,350 traditional care subjects. Women were recruited from both the birth center and traditional care programs (private physicians offices and hospital based clinics) at the beginning of prenatal care and followed through the end of the perinatal period. Prenatal, intrapartum, postpartum and infant morbidity and mortality are being

  11. The Micro Revolution and Information Analysis Centers: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfuderer, H. A.; Allison, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Recounts experiences of the Carbon Dioxide Information Center, a technical information analysis center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which has utilized a microcomputer for exchange of automated bibliographic references. Procedures and problems in adding microcomputer information to mainframe databases are noted and other microcomputer…

  12. A Planning Study for the Billerica Human Service Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA.

    This document discusses the development and implementation of a multiservice center that could offer a variety of human social services in a single location. The paper focuses on seven components of the center's operation: governance, organizational structure, core services, joint funding, joint planning, joint programming, and evaluation. The…

  13. Case Study of a Hypothetical Higher Education Library Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reppert, James E.

    This paper describes the organizational scope, structure, and financial approach of a mock university higher education library media center (i.e., an instructional technology center which functions primarily as a curriculum or training support agency). The paper is organized according to objectives in four main categories. The first category is a…

  14. The Micro Revolution and Information Analysis Centers: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfuderer, H. A.; Allison, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Recounts experiences of the Carbon Dioxide Information Center, a technical information analysis center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which has utilized a microcomputer for exchange of automated bibliographic references. Procedures and problems in adding microcomputer information to mainframe databases are noted and other microcomputer…

  15. A Comparison of Jungian, Person-Centered, and Gestalt Approaches to Personal Growth Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Bryon; Matthes, William

    1992-01-01

    Compares Jungian approach to personal growth groups to Person-centered and Gestalt approaches. Notes similarities, though Jungian approach adds dimension of "cognitive map" not found in other two. Notes that cognitive map uses constructs from Jung's theory of individuation process, hypothesizing that integration of these constructs into…

  16. Student-Centered Learning: A Comparison of Two Different Methods of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slunt, Kelli M.; Giancarlo, Leanna C.

    2004-01-01

    The two student centered learning methods, concept checks and just-in-time teaching were tested. While both the methods were found to be valuable for active participation of the student in his or her education, just-in-time was perhaps more effective from the point of view of getting the student to prepare ahead of the next lecture and in the…

  17. A Comparison of Client and Counselor Judgments about Intake Variables at a University Counseling Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, John B.; Sharf, Richard S.

    1995-01-01

    In comparisons of intake judgments, counselors viewed clients as being more anxious, less likely to change, less motivated to solve their problems, and less likely to be satisfied with counseling than did the clients themselves. Clients judged their personal and vocational problems to be more severe than did the counselors. (Author/RJM)

  18. Studies of deep level transient spectroscopy of DX centers in GaAlAs: Te under uniaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming-Fu |; Yu, Y.P. |; Weber, E.R.; Haller, E.E. |; Hansen, W.L.; Bauser, E.

    1991-11-01

    DX centers in Al{sub 0.38}Ga{sub 0.62}As doped with Te have been studied by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) as a function of uniaxial stress. No splitting nor broadening of the DLTS peaks were observed. However, the peak positions and heights depend on the stress and its directions. The results have been analyzed by comparison with existing models and hydrostatic pressure measurements.

  19. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  20. Recovering Physical Activity Missing Data Measured by Accelerometers: A Comparison of Individual and Group-Centered Recovery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Chao; Jin, Jing; Zhu, Zheng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which method, individual information-centered (IIC) or group information-centered (GIC), is more efficient in recovering missing physical activity (PA) data. Method: A total of 2,758 Chinese children and youth aged 9 to 17 years old (1,438 boys and 1,320 girls) wore ActiGraph GT3X/GT3X+…

  1. Data Information for Global Change Studies: NASA's Distributed Active Archive Centers and Cooperating Data Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is an integral part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). ESE is a long-term global change research program designed to improve our understanding of the Earth's interrelated processes involving the atmosphere, oceans, land surfaces, and polar regions. Data from EOS instruments and other Earth science measurement systems are useful in understanding the causes and processes of global climate change and the consequences of human activities. The EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) provides a structure for data management and user services for products derived from EOS satellite instruments and other NASA Earth science data. Within the EOSDIS framework, the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) have been established to provide expertise in one or more Earth science disciplines. The DAACs and cooperating data centers provide data and information services to support the global change research community. Much of the development of the DAACs has been in anticipation of the enormous amount of data expected from EOS instruments to be launched within the next two decades. Terra, the EOS flagship launched in December 1999, is the first of a series of EOS satellites to carry several instruments with multispectral capabilities. Some data products from these instruments are now available from several of the DAACs. These and other data products can be ordered through the EOS Data Gateway (EDG) and DAAC-specific online ordering systems.

  2. Self-centering seismic retrofit scheme for reinforced concrete frame structures: SDOF system study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study of self-centering seismic retrofit schemes for reinforced concrete (RC) frame buildings. The self-centering retrofit system features flag-shaped hysteresis and minimal residual deformation. For comparison purpose, an alternate seismic retrofit scheme that uses a bilinear-hysteresis retrofit system such as buckling-restrained braces (BRB) is also considered in this paper. The parametric study was carried out in a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system framework since a multi-story building structure may be idealized as an equivalent SDOF system and investigation of the performance of this equivalent SDOF system can provide insight into the seismic response of the multi-story building. A peak-oriented hysteresis model which can consider the strength and stiffness degradation is used to describe the hysteretic behavior of RC structures. The parametric study involves two key parameters — the strength ratio and elastic stiffness ratio between the seismic retrofit system and the original RC frame. An ensemble of 172 earthquake ground motion records scaled to the design basis earthquake in California with a probability of exceedance of 10% in 50 years was constructed for the simulation-based parametric study. The effectiveness of the two seismic retrofit schemes considered in this study is evaluated in terms of peak displacement ratio, peak acceleration ratio, energy dissipation demand ratio and residual displacement ratio between the SDOF systems with and without retrofit. It is found from this parametric study that RC structures retrofitted with the self-centering retrofit scheme (SCRS) can achieve a seismic performance level comparable to the bilinear-hysteresis retrofit scheme (BHRS) in terms of peak displacement and energy dissipation demand ratio while having negligible residual displacement after earthquake.

  3. Cross-cultural comparison of fertility specific quality of life in German, Hungarian and Jordanian couples attending a fertility center.

    PubMed

    Sexty, Réka E; Hamadneh, Jehan; Rösner, Sabine; Strowitzki, Thomas; Ditzen, Beate; Toth, Bettina; Wischmann, Tewes

    2016-02-24

    Only a few studies have reported cross-cultural comparisons regarding psychosocial consequences of infertility. Differences between societies with different cultural backgrounds were revealed and seemed to be based on the importance of pronatalism. Our aim was to measure cross-cultural differences in fertility specific quality of life of infertile couples in Germany, Hungary and Jordan who attend a fertility center in a cross-sectional study. A cross-sectional study was conducted in one fertility clinic in Germany, in five fertility clinics in Hungary and in one fertility clinic in Jordan. Overall 750 couples (252 couples in Jordan, 246 couples in Germany and 252 couples in Hungary) attending the first medical infertility consultation were asked to fill out our questionnaire set. Fertility specific quality of life (FertiQoL) and sociodemographic differences were measured between couples from three countries. Jordanian couples had the shortest relationship (5.8 ± 4.3 yrs.), though they reported the longest duration of child wish (4.2 ± 3.6 yrs.) and fertility treatments (3.0 ± 3.3 yrs.). The proportion of high education was considerably higher in Jordanian women and men (60 % and 66 %, respectively) compared to the other two samples. First, marked cross-country differences were obtained on Emotional, Mind/Body and Relational subscales of the FertiQoL, indicating that Jordanian couples reported poorer fertility-related quality of life than Germans and Hungarians (p < 0.001). After controlling for the sociodemographic and medical variables, a significant difference only in the Emotional domain was observed (p < 0.001). The study revealed only a few cultural based differences in fertility specific quality of life between the couples of the three countries. Thus, infertility counselors should pay attention to psychosocial problems rooted in individual sociocultural aspects of the infertile couple regardless of cultural stereotypes. Further studies should identify

  4. Penn/VA center for studies of addiction.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Charles P; McLellan, A Thomas; Childress, Anna Rose; Woody, George E

    2009-01-01

    The Penn/VA Center was founded in 1971 because of great concern over the number of Vietnam veterans returning home addicted to heroin. At that time little was known about the science of addiction, so our program from the very beginning was designed to gather data about the nature of addiction and measure the effects of available treatments. In other words, the goals were always a combination of treatment and research. This combination has continued to the present day. A human laboratory for the study of addiction phenomena such as conditioned responses was also founded in 1971. The key clinician investigators in this group have remained in the Center since the 1970s with most of the research staff continuing to work together. Important new investigators have been added over the years. Treatment was empirically based with randomized, controlled clinical trials as the gold standard for determining evidence-based treatment. The patients coming to treatment do not distinguish between abuse of alcohol and other drugs, so the treatment and research programs have always focused on all drugs including ethyl alcohol and the combination of ethyl alcohol with other drugs such as cocaine and opioids. Most of the patients coming for treatment also suffered from additional psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Thus, the addiction treatment program in 1980 absorbed the rest of the VA Psychiatry Service into the Substance Abuse Program forming a new Behavioral Health Service with responsibility for over 9000 patients. The integration of substance abuse treatment with overall mental health care was the most efficient way to handle patients with complicated combinations of disorders. While this continues to be the best way to treat patients, it has proven difficult in practice. The main reason for this difficulty is that most mental health therapists whether they are psychiatrists, psychologists or social workers feel very inadequate

  5. A Comparison of Center/TRACON Automation System and Airline Time of Arrival Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heere, Karen R.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    2000-01-01

    Benefits from information sharing between an air traffic service provider and a major air carrier are evaluated. Aircraft arrival time schedules generated by the NASA/FAA Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) were provided to the American Airlines System Operations Control Center in Fort Worth, Texas, during a field trial of a specialized CTAS display. A statistical analysis indicates that the CTAS schedules, based on aircraft trajectories predicted from real-time radar and weather data, are substantially more accurate than the traditional airline arrival time estimates, constructed from flight plans and en route crew updates. The improvement offered by CTAS is especially advantageous during periods of heavy traffic and substantial terminal area delay, allowing the airline to avoid large predictive errors with serious impact on the efficiency and profitability of flight operations.

  6. Monitoring Research at the Center for Seismic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-27

    57 Comparison of regional Pn travel-time curves for different geological provinces ........ 62 Transportability of a Pn Travel-Time Curve for...61 34. Comparison of regional Pn travel-time curves for different geological provinces with the reference Pn travel...and Kevin Jones at Blacknest, Eric Fielding at Cornell University, Ithaca, Raoul Titus at IRWS/DMC, and Manfred Henger at the German Geological

  7. Cross-sectional study of the neural ossification centers of vertebrae C1-S5 in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Szpinda, Michał; Baumgart, Mariusz; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna

    2013-10-01

    An understanding of the normal evolution of the spine is of great relevance in the prenatal detection of spinal abnormalities. This study was carried out to estimate the length, width, cross-sectional area and volume of the neural ossification centers of vertebrae C1-S5 in the human fetus. Using the methods of CT (Biograph mCT), digital-image analysis (Osirix 3.9) and statistics (the one-way ANOVA test for paired data, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Levene's test, Student's t test, the one-way ANOVA test for unpaired data with post hoc RIR Tukey comparisons) the size for the neural ossification centers throughout the spine in 55 spontaneously aborted human fetuses (27 males, 28 females) at ages of 17-30 weeks was studied. The neural ossification centers were visualized in the whole pre-sacral spine, in 74.5 % for S1, in 61.8 % for S2, in 52.7 % for S3, and in 12.7 % for S4. Neither male-female nor right-left significant differences in the size of neural ossification centers were found. The neural ossification centers were the longest within the cervical spine. The maximum values referred to the axis on the right, and to C5 vertebra on the left. There was a gradual decrease in length for the neural ossification centers of T1-S4 vertebrae. The neural ossification centers were the widest within the proximal thoracic spine and narrowed bi-directionally. The growth dynamics for CSA of neural ossification centers were found to parallel that of volume. The largest CSAs and volumes of neural ossification centers were found in the C3 vertebra, and decreased in the distal direction. The neural ossification centers show neither male-female nor right-left differences. The neural ossification centers are characterized by the maximum length for C2-C6 vertebrae, the maximum width for the proximal thoracic spine, and both the maximum cross-sectional area and volume for C3 vertebra. There is a sharp decrease in size of the neural ossification centers along the sacral spine. A

  8. Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kostelnik; Keith Perry

    2007-07-01

    Twenty-first century energy challenges include demand growth, national energy security, and global climate protection. The Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) is a public/private partnership between the State of Idaho and its academic research institutions, the federal government through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) managed by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). CAES serves to advance energy security for our nation by expanding the educational opportunities at the Idaho universities in energy-related areas, creating new capabilities within its member institutions, and delivering technological innovations leading to technology-based economic development for the intermountain region. CAES has developed this strategic plan based on the Balanced Scorecard approach. A Strategy Map (Section 7) summarizes the CAES vision, mission, customers, and strategic objectives. Identified strategic objectives encompass specific outcomes related to three main areas: Research, Education, and Policy. Technical capabilities and critical enablers needed to support these objectives are also identified. This CAES strategic plan aligns with and supports the strategic objectives of the four CAES institutions. Implementation actions are also presented which will be used to monitor progress towards fulfilling these objectives.

  9. Biosphere 2 Center as a unique tool for environmental studies.

    PubMed

    Walter, Achim; Lambrecht, Susanne Carmen

    2004-04-01

    The Biosphere 2 Laboratory of Biosphere 2 Center, Arizona, is a unique, self-contained glasshouse fostering several mesocosms of tropical and subtropical regions on an area of 12,700 m2. It was constructed around 1990 to test whether human life is possible in this completely sealed, self-sustaining artificial ecosystem. Mainly due to overly rich organic soils, the initial mission failed in a spectacular manner that raised enormous disbelief in the scientific seriousness of the project. From 1995 to 2003, the facility had been operated by Columbia University under a completely new scientific management. The aim of the project had then been to conduct research in the field of 'experimental climate change science'. Climatic conditions within the mesocosms can be precisely controlled. In studies with elevated CO2, altered temperature and irrigation regimes performed in the rainforest, coral reef and agriforestry mesocosm, the facility had proven to be a valuable tool for global climate change research. Upon submission of this manuscript, Columbia University is relinquishing the management of this facility now although there was a contract to operate the facility until 2010, leaving it with an unclear destiny that might bring about anything from complete abandonment to a new flowering phase with a new destination.

  10. The IMS Satellite Situation Center. [International Magnetospheric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Vette, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Following a brief historical review of the SSC (Satellite Situation Center), created by the U.S. for the IMS (International Magnetospheric Study), its main functions are discussed. The services of the SSC include the accurate orbit determination of the satellites, 12-18 months in advance and the coordination of simultaneous observations by a multispacecraft system, which are essential for the optimization of the scientific gains from experiments conducted with limited resources. For 1976 SSC generated plots of the satellites Vela 5B, Vela 6A, Vela 6B, Hawkeye 1, Imp H (7), Imp J (8) by computing certain projections of the solar ecliptic, solar magnetospheric, and solar magnetic coordinate systems. The SSC system was automated by the addition of a computer system capable of interactive graphics. The SSC can also provide the ground-based campaigns with a graphical or tabular information about the position low-altitude satellites in any coordinate system. The possible participation of the SSC in future Electrodynamics Explorer mission, Space Shuttle programs is also being explored.

  11. Comparison of Mortality and Costs at Trauma and Nontrauma Centers for Minor and Moderately Severe Injuries in California.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, Mark S; Hsia, Renee Y; Carr, Brendan G; Sarani, Babak; Pines, Jesse M

    2016-01-01

    We examine differences in inpatient mortality and hospitalization costs at trauma and nontrauma centers for injuries of minor and moderate severity. Inpatient data sets from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development were analyzed for 2009 to 2011. The study population included patients younger than 85 years and admitted to general, acute care hospitals with a primary diagnosis of a minor or moderate injury. Minor injuries were defined as having a New Injury Severity Score less than 5 and moderate injuries as having a score of 5 to 15. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear model with log-link and γ distribution were used to estimate differences in adjusted inpatient mortality and costs. A total of 126,103 admissions with minor or moderate injury were included in the study population. The unadjusted mortality rate was 6.4 per 1,000 admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.9 to 6.8). There was no significant difference found in mortality between trauma and nontrauma centers in unadjusted (odds ratio 1.2; 95% CI 0.97 to 1.48) or adjusted models (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.57). The average cost of a hospitalization was $13,465 (95% CI $12,733 to $14,198) and, after adjustment, was 33.1% higher at trauma centers compared with nontrauma centers (95% CI 16.9% to 51.6%). For patients admitted to hospitals for minor and moderate injuries, hospitalization costs in this study population were higher at trauma centers than nontrauma centers, after adjustments for patient clinical-, demographic-, and hospital-level characteristics. Mortality was a rare event in the study population and did not significantly differ between trauma and nontrauma centers. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of CEUS in characterization of superficial lymph nodes: a single center prospective study

    PubMed Central

    de Stefano, Giorgio; Scognamiglio, Umberto; Di Martino, Filomena; Parrella, Roberto; Scarano, Francesco; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Farella, Nunzia

    2016-01-01

    Accurate lymph node characterization is important in a large number of clinical settings. We evaluated the usefulness of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) in distinguishing between benign and malignant lymph nodes compared with conventional ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of superficial lymphadenopathy. We present our experience for 111 patients enrolled in a single center. 111 superficial lymph nodes were selected and only 1 lymph node per patient underwent CEUS. A definitive diagnosis for all lymph nodes was obtained by ultrasonographically guided biopsy and/or excision biopsy. The size of the lymph nodes, the site (neck, axilla, inguinal region) being easily accessible for biopsy, and the US and color Doppler US characteristics guided us in selecting the nodes to be evaluated by CEUS. In our study we identified different enhancement patterns in benign and malignant lymph nodes, with a high degree of diagnostic accuracy for superficial lymphadenopathy in comparison with conventional US. PMID:27191746

  13. Manatí Medical Center Sepsis Management Epidemiological Study.

    PubMed

    Morales Serrano, Tamara; Ramos, Shirley; Lara Gonzalez, Yanira; Torres Colberg, Heileene; Vera Quiñones, Alexis; Miranda Santiago, Roberto; Amill, Samuel; Otero, Marielys; Cintron, Vielka; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the combination of infection and physiological changes known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There have been improvements in mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients based on "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" guidelines. Current management of sepsis at our Institution follows no specific mandatory protocols. This study aimed to verify the incidence and outcome of sepsis in Manati Medical Center, Puerto Rico. An observational retrospective study was conducted. All the Emergency Department admissions from May 1/ to October 31/ 2013 were screened for sepsis per ICD-9 code. For all included patients, demographic and clinical data at ED admission were collected. During this period 8931 patients were admitted and 148 met criteria for sepsis and related conditions. The overall mortality rate was 43.91%. Mortality increased with age, from 10.52% among ≤ 44 years old to 68.75% in those ≥ 85 years old. The main infection sources were respiratory (32.66%) and urinary tract (24.62%). Mean age among non-survivors was 10.8 years higher than the survivor group (95% Cl 5.2-1 6.5, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed an increased fatality rate associated to severity of sepsis (HR 1.33; 95% Cl; 1.03-1.72, p = 0.02) and the APACHE2 score (HR 1.05; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.09 p = 0.03). Our data suggests that sepsis is an important problem to consider. We strongly encourage an institutional standardized protocol to diminish the mortality impact. Our results will allow adequate preventive strategies to improve early diagnosis, mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients.

  14. Method Comparison (Agreement) Studies: Myths and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2017-01-01

    Unprecedented technological growth in the last quarter of twentieth century has resulted in improved health care and opened new domains of health care research. This technological leap also facilitated the paradigm shift from hospital care to home care through development of ‘point of care’ devices. As early diagnoses and timely referral is a key to health management, these devices play an important role in improving health. Validation of the new technology in different settings is necessary before adopting it to practice. For a binary result like pregnancy test, it is trivial to use statistical tools like sensitivity, specificity etc. For a continuous variable like blood glucose level the analysis is not straightforward. Many of us misinterpret ‘association’ as ‘agreement’. This misinterpretation is reflected in studies which have compared two different technologies. The findings of well conducted studies do not contribute to the evidence base just because of wrong analysis strategy. We delineate on finer nuances of analysis and interpretation of method comparison studies. PMID:28273982

  15. Comparison of particulate verification techniques study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Rachel

    2006-08-01

    The efficacy of five particulate verification techniques on four types of materials was studied. Statistical Analysis Software/JMP 6.0 was used to create a statistically valid design of experiments. In doing so, 35 witness coupons consisting of the four types of materials being studied, were intentionally contaminated with particulate fallout. Image Analysis was used to characterize the extent of particulate fallout on the coupons and was used to establish a baseline, or basis of comparison, against the five techniques that were studied. The five particulate verification techniques were the Tapelift, the Particulate Solvent Rinse, the GelPak lift, an in-line vacuum filtration probe, and the Infinity Focusing Microscope (IFM). The four types of materials consisted of magnesium flouride (MgF II) coated mirrors, composite coated silver aluminum (CCAg), Z93 and NS43G coated aluminum, and silicon (si) wafers. The vacuum probe was determined to be most effective for Z93, the tapelift or vacuum probe for MgF2, and the GelPak Lift for CCAg and si substrates. A margin of error for each technique, based on experimental data from two experiments, for si wafer substrates, yielded the following: Tapelift - 67%, Solvent Rinse - 58%, GelPak- 26%, Vacuum Probe - 93%, IFM-to be determined.

  16. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  17. Comparison of Orion Vision Navigation Sensor Performance from STS-134 and the Space Operations Simulation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A.; Patangan, Mogi; Hinkel, Heather; Chevray, Keiko; Brazzel, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is a new spacecraft being designed by NASA and Lockheed Martin for future crewed exploration missions. The Vision Navigation Sensor is a Flash LIDAR that will be the primary relative navigation sensor for this vehicle. To obtain a better understanding of this sensor's performance, the Orion relative navigation team has performed both flight tests and ground tests. This paper summarizes and compares the performance results from the STS-134 flight test, called the Sensor Test for Orion RelNav Risk Mitigation (STORRM) Development Test Objective, and the ground tests at the Space Operations Simulation Center.

  18. Making the Change: From a Teacher-Centered to a Learner-Centered Environment--A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roof, Patty L.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing education is calling for transformation in teaching practices which includes learner-centered environments. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore 15 nursing faculty life experiences as they relate to the choice of a learning environment. Participants expressed their life experiences through interview…

  19. A Study to Determine a Methodology for Establishing a Center of Excellence Program at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-10

    69 D. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN CARDIOLOGY ............................ 74 E...FITZSIMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN CARDIOLOGY ................... 76 1 A Study to Determine a Methodology for...prioritized according to average government cost for 27 different diagnostic medical specialties to include adverse reaction, allergy, cardiology

  20. Identifying the Local Impacts of National ATE Centers on Their Host Institutions: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Charles; Fynewever, Herb; Petcovic, Heather; Bierema, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the local impacts of national advanced technological education (ATE) centers on their host institutions. A sample of three mature, national ATE centers are chosen, with each center serving as a case for a mixed-methods, collective case study research design. Results, drawn from interviews and surveys,…

  1. Identifying the Local Impacts of National ATE Centers on Their Host Institutions: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Charles; Fynewever, Herb; Petcovic, Heather; Bierema, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the local impacts of national advanced technological education (ATE) centers on their host institutions. A sample of three mature, national ATE centers are chosen, with each center serving as a case for a mixed-methods, collective case study research design. Results, drawn from interviews and surveys,…

  2. Meeting the Expectations of the Social Studies Teacher at a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schober, Helen

    1984-01-01

    Teacher centers respond to a teacher's own defined needs by offering assistance, instruction, and materials to help enrich classroom learning experiences. Services provided social studies educators by the Teacher Center in Humboldt County, California, are described. (RM)

  3. Comparison of air-driven vs electric torque control motors on canal centering ability by ProTaper NiTi rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Erfanian, Mahdi; Lomee, Mahdi; Afkhami, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Cleaning and shaping is one of the most important phases in root canal therapy. Various rotary NiTi systems minimize accidents and facilitate the shaping process. Todays NiTi files are used with air-driven and electric handpieces. This study compared the canal centering after instrumentation using the ProTaper system using Endo IT, electric torque-control motor, and NSK air-driven handpiece. This ex vivo randomized controlled trial study involved 26 mesial mandibular root canals with 10 to 35° curvature. The roots were randomly divided into 2 groups of 13 canals each. The roots were mounted in an endodontic cube with acrylic resin, sectioned horizontally at 2, 6 and 10 mm from the apex and then reassembled. The canals were instrumented according to the manufacturer's instructions using ProTaper rotary files and electric torque-control motors (group 1) or air-driven handpieces (group 2). Photographs of the cross-sections included shots before and after instrumentation, and image analysis was performed using Photoshop software. The centering ability and canal transportation was also evaluated. Repeated measurement and independent t-test provided statistical analysis of canal transportation. The comparison of the rate of transportation toward internal or external walls between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.62). Comparison of the rate of transportation of sections within one group was not significant (p = 0.28). Use of rotary NiTi file with either electric torquecontrol motor or air-driven handpiece had no effect on canal centering. NiTi rotary instruments can be used with air-driven motors without any considerable changes in root canal anatomy, however it needs the clinician to be expert.

  4. A comparison of two experimental design approaches in applying conjoint analysis in patient-centered outcomes research: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kinter, Elizabeth T; Prior, Thomas J; Carswell, Christopher I; Bridges, John F P

    2012-01-01

    While the application of conjoint analysis and discrete-choice experiments in health are now widely accepted, a healthy debate exists around competing approaches to experimental design. There remains, however, a paucity of experimental evidence comparing competing design approaches and their impact on the application of these methods in patient-centered outcomes research. Our objectives were to directly compare the choice-model parameters and predictions of an orthogonal and a D-efficient experimental design using a randomized trial (i.e., an experiment on experiments) within an application of conjoint analysis studying patient-centered outcomes among outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia in Germany. Outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia were surveyed and randomized to receive choice tasks developed using either an orthogonal or a D-efficient experimental design. The choice tasks elicited judgments from the respondents as to which of two patient profiles (varying across seven outcomes and process attributes) was preferable from their own perspective. The results from the two survey designs were analyzed using the multinomial logit model, and the resulting parameter estimates and their robust standard errors were compared across the two arms of the study (i.e., the orthogonal and D-efficient designs). The predictive performances of the two resulting models were also compared by computing their percentage of survey responses classified correctly, and the potential for variation in scale between the two designs of the experiments was tested statistically and explored graphically. The results of the two models were statistically identical. No difference was found using an overall chi-squared test of equality for the seven parameters (p = 0.69) or via uncorrected pairwise comparisons of the parameter estimates (p-values ranged from 0.30 to 0.98). The D-efficient design resulted in directionally smaller standard errors for six of the seven parameters, of which

  5. Comparison of institutional costs for laparoscopic preperitoneal inguinal hernia versus open repair and its reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Morrison, John E

    2008-02-01

    To compare institutional costs for open versus laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair and its relationship to reimbursement in an ambulatory surgery center in the United States. Analysis of institutional costs in US$ of 2006 for all nonreusables used in a laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair using a polyester mesh compared with open hernia repair using polypropylene mesh. A comparison of the institution's disposable costs related to reimbursement at an ambulatory surgery center in Southeastern United States was performed to identify the most cost-effective procedure for the outpatient facility. As fixed and indirect costs of the ambulatory surgery center are similar for both procedures, a cost difference can only be found in direct disposable costs with that being US$ 235.57 for the procedure-specific disposables in the laparoscopic hernia repair as compared with US$ 117.15 for the open hernia repair. Cost for identical disposables used in both procedures amounted to US$ 32.57. Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair has a higher cost for procedure related disposables versus the open hernia repair at +US$ 118.42 mainly being due to the more costly polyester mesh. A flat rate reimbursement of US$ 1800 for a laparoscopic procedure compared with only US$ 950 for the open procedure minus all disposable cost results in a higher institutional income of +US&$ 731.58 (US$ 1531.86 vs. US$ 800.28), from which other institutional costs can be paid. Despite marginally higher procedure-related disposable costs for laparoscopic TEP hernia repair, the institutional income is remarkably higher owing to a better reimbursement for this procedure in ambulatory surgery centers. From the institution's point of view, laparoscopic hernia repair is by far the more cost-effective procedure when compared with an open hernia procedure at the present time.

  6. Center of mass velocity during diffusion: Comparisons of fluid and kinetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, Erik; Yin, Lin; Taitano, William; Molvig, Kim; Albright, B. J.

    2016-11-01

    We examine the diffusion process between two ideal gases mixing across an initial discontinuity by comparing fluid and kinetic model results and find several similarities between ideal gases and plasma transport. Binary diffusion requires a net zero species mass flux in the Lagrange frame to assure momentum conservation in collisions. Diffusion between ideal gases is often assumed to be isobaric and isothermal which requires constant molar density. We show this condition exists only in the lab frame at late times (many collision times) after a pressure transient relaxes. The sum of molar flux across an initial discontinuity is non-zero for species of differing atomic masses resulting in a pressure perturbation. The results show three phases of mixing: a pressure discontinuity forms across the initial interface (times of a few collisions), pressure perturbations propagate away from the mix region (time scales of an acoustic transit) and at late times characteristic of the diffusion process, the pressure relaxes leaving a non-zero center of mass flow velocity. The center of mass velocity associated with the outward propagating pressure waves is required to conserve momentum in the rest frame. Implications are considered in multi-species diffusion numerics and in applications. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  7. A comparison of the Shuttle remote manipulator system and the Space Station Freedom mobile servicing center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edith C.; Ross, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The Shuttle Remote Manipulator System is a mature system which has successfully completed 18 flights. Its primary functional design driver was the capability to deploy and retrieve payloads from the Orbiter cargo bay. The Space Station Freedom Mobile Servicing Center is still in the requirements definition and early design stage. Its primary function design drivers are the capabilities: to support Space Station construction and assembly tasks; to provide external transportation about the Space Station; to provide handling capabilities for the Orbiter, free flyers, and payloads; to support attached payload servicing in the extravehicular environment; and to perform scheduled and un-scheduled maintenance on the Space Station. The differences between the two systems in the area of geometric configuration, mobility, sensor capabilities, control stations, control algorithms, handling performance, end effector dexterity, and fault tolerance are discussed.

  8. Modelling Simulation and Comparison of Refractory Corrosion at RHI's Technology Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, Dean; Ressler, Angelika; Franzkowiak, Anna; Spanring, Alfred

    In order to determine the most suitable refractory products and improve the lining lifetime for the diverse furnaces used in the nonferrous metal industry, corrosion tests are performed at RHF's Technology Center. The practical facilities include the cup test, induction furnace, rotary kiln, and drip slag test described in this paper, which enable a comprehensive understanding of the chemo-thermal brick wear on a pilot scale. The corrosion trials are performed with actual slags generated during operations at a customer's plant. To determine the highest influencing wear parameter, every single test is combined with a detailed mineralogical investigation and thermochemical calculations performed using FactSage. Based on the results, tailored refractory solutions for the nonferrous metal industry can be provided in combination with trials conducted at the customer's site.

  9. Comparison and alignment of an academic medical center's strategic goals with ASHP initiatives.

    PubMed

    Engels, Melanie J; Chaffee, Bruce W; Clark, John S

    2015-12-01

    An academic medical center's strategic goals were compared and aligned with the 2015 ASHP Health-System Pharmacy Initiative and the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI). The department's pharmacy practice model steering committee identified potential solutions to narrow prioritized gaps using a modified nominal group technique and a multivoting dot technique. Five priority solutions were identified and assigned to work groups to develop business plans, which included admission medication history and reconciliation for high-risk patients and those with complex medication regimens, pharmacist provision of discharge counseling to high-risk patients and those with complex medication regimens, improved measurement and reporting of the impact of PPMI programs on patient outcomes, implementation of a departmentwide formalized peer review and evaluation process, and the greeting of every patient at some time during his or her visit by a pharmacy team member. Stakeholders evaluated the business plans based on feasibility, financial return on investment, and anticipated safety enhancements. The solution that received the highest priority ranking and was subsequently implemented was "improved measurement and reporting of the impact of PPMI programs on patient outcomes." A defined process was followed for identifying gaps among current practices at an academic medical center and the 2015 ASHP Health-System Pharmacy Initiative and the PPMI. A key priority to better document the impact of pharmacists on patient care was identified for our department by using a nominal group technique brainstorming process and a multivoting dot technique and creating standardized business plans for five potential priority projects. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Case Study: Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, W. Va.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, West Virginia, received a grant in 1997 for a project that was part of the High Schools That Work (HSTW) initiative to improve academic skills of career-bound students. The superintendent and faculty knew that improving achievement meant reaching out to the three home high schools to bring them…

  11. Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies Annual Report 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    reducing system interdiction risks, and educa- tional technology upgrades permeate all learning spaces within the Center, as well as at the condominium ...analy- ses – in some cases reducing cycle- times from days to minutes. EKMS will be comprised of a suite of modern software applications that will

  12. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  13. Really Useful Knowledge: A Cultural Studies Agenda for Writing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marilyn M.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that writing centers have the essential function of critiquing institutions and creating knowledge about writing. Explains how this function has clear implications for what tutors should know and how they should be trained. Enlists Antonio Gramsci's theory of culture to analyze traditional composition teaching and research. (HB)

  14. Language-Centered Social Studies: A Natural Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rosalinda B.; Aleman, Magdalena

    1983-01-01

    Described is a newspaper project in which elementary students report life as it was in the Middle Ages. Students are involved in a variety of language-centered activities. For example, they gather and evaluate information about medieval times and write, edit, and proofread articles for the newspaper. (RM)

  15. Centers for Catholic Studies and the Public Voice of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This article explores debates about the public role of religion in a secular context. Drawing on the work of critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas, this article claims that the United States requires a viable public sphere in which religious and secular voices can learn from each other. Highlighting the work of the Lane Center for Catholic Studies…

  16. Centers for Catholic Studies and the Public Voice of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigham, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This article explores debates about the public role of religion in a secular context. Drawing on the work of critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas, this article claims that the United States requires a viable public sphere in which religious and secular voices can learn from each other. Highlighting the work of the Lane Center for Catholic Studies…

  17. Really Useful Knowledge: A Cultural Studies Agenda for Writing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marilyn M.

    1994-01-01

    Argues that writing centers have the essential function of critiquing institutions and creating knowledge about writing. Explains how this function has clear implications for what tutors should know and how they should be trained. Enlists Antonio Gramsci's theory of culture to analyze traditional composition teaching and research. (HB)

  18. Evaluative Study of the Neighborhood Information Center Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Hardy R.; Summers, F. William

    The 1972-1974 Neighborhood Information Center (NIC) Project was undertaken in Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, and Queens Borough to demonstrate that urban public libraries could be a vital force in daily living by providing free information and referrals to low income communities, and by adapting in non-traditional ways to meet neighborhood…

  19. Language-Centered Social Studies: A Natural Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Rosalinda B.; Aleman, Magdalena

    1983-01-01

    Described is a newspaper project in which elementary students report life as it was in the Middle Ages. Students are involved in a variety of language-centered activities. For example, they gather and evaluate information about medieval times and write, edit, and proofread articles for the newspaper. (RM)

  20. Evaluative Study of the Neighborhood Information Center Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Hardy R.; Summers, F. William

    The 1972-1974 Neighborhood Information Center (NIC) Project was undertaken in Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Houston, and Queens Borough to demonstrate that urban public libraries could be a vital force in daily living by providing free information and referrals to low income communities, and by adapting in non-traditional ways to meet neighborhood…

  1. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  2. Feasibility Study for the Establishment of Experimental Field Study Centers (Beachhead Colleges). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antioch Coll., Yellow Springs, OH.

    The Union for Research and Experimentation in Higher Education, a consortium of 10 colleges, initiated an experimental study of a new model for off-campus education in selected problematic areas. The model places students and faculty members in Field Study Centers-- or Beachhead Colleges --to help solve local problems through interaction between…

  3. Health Information Security: A Case Study of Three Selected Medical Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients’ electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. Methods This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts’ points of view. Results and discussion Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of “verification and system design, user access management, access control system”, Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of “access management and network access control” and Amin Hospital in “equipment safety and system design”. In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place. PMID:23572861

  4. Health information security: a case study of three selected medical centers in iran.

    PubMed

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients' electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts' points of view. Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of "verification and system design, user access management, access control system", Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of "access management and network access control" and Amin Hospital in "equipment safety and system design". In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place.

  5. Comparison of Civilian and Military Overhead Spending: Three Case Studies. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-17

    aDesignations used by the Defense Housing Management Systems Office. TABLE 4 CIVILIAN HOUSING MAINTENANCE SPENDING VS. AGEa (Single unit, owner occupied...I-t9 ONCOMlPARISON OF CIVILIRN iND MILITARY OVERHEAD SPENDING : ,l THREE CASE STUDIES.. (U) CENTER FOR NAVAL ANALYSES RLEXADRIA YR NAVAL PLRNNING RND...ftFL RESEARCH MEMORANDUM 0 COMPARISON OF CIVILIAN AND MILITARY OVERHEAD SPENDING : I THREE CASE STUDIES Daniel B. Levine Colin P. Hammon DTIC ELECTE K

  6. A Center for Environmental Communication and Education Studies. Periodic Report: 1968-1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center for Environmental Communications and Education Studies.

    This report summarizes the role of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Center for Environmental Communication and Education Studies (CECES) in helping to foster teaching, research, and public service programs. Included in the first section are program highlights (1968-1982), Center organization, and lists of Center personnel (executive…

  7. The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbois, Judith A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the background and activities of the Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions at Indiana University. Maintains that the center's programs focus on topics such as ethics and the professions, medical ethics, research ethics, and religion and the morality of professions. Provides a list of center publications. (CFR)

  8. The Story of the Hawaiian Studies Center on the Brigham Young University-Hawaii Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, Maenette K. P.

    2002-01-01

    With an advisory committee of native community members, elders, educators, and students, the Center for Hawaiian Language and Cultural Studies has successfully founded, within a mainstream institution with strong religious foundations, a cultural center that teaches native values and language. The center creates cultural/educational projects that…

  9. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  10. The Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granbois, Judith A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the background and activities of the Poynter Center for the Study of Ethics and American Institutions at Indiana University. Maintains that the center's programs focus on topics such as ethics and the professions, medical ethics, research ethics, and religion and the morality of professions. Provides a list of center publications. (CFR)

  11. 2 Centers for International Studies Fight To Survive Without Federal Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Amy Magaro

    1997-01-01

    The East-West Center (Hawaii) and North-South Center (Florida) for hemisphere-oriented international studies have lost most federal funding and have had to trim staff, cut programs, and begin solicitation of private support. While lawmakers admit the centers do important work, they feel they are unnecessary and the work could be done elsewhere.…

  12. THE ENGLISH PROGRAM OF THE USOE CURRICULUM STUDY AND DEMONSTRATION CENTER MATERIALS CURRENTLY AVAILABLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    AFTER FIVE YEARS OF FEDERALLY-SUPPORTED CURRICULUM RESEARCH IN ENGLISH, 14 STUDY CENTERS AND FIVE DEMONSTRATION CENTERS ARE NOW MAKING THE RESULTS OF THEIR WORK AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC. THIS PAMPHLET LISTS TITLES OF REPORTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS PREPARED BY THE FOLLOWING CENTERS--(1) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY, (2) TEACHERS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA…

  13. The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Arthur N.; Morris, Vernon R.

    1997-01-01

    The Center for the Study of Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Atmospheres (CSTEA) was established in 1992. The center began with 14 active Principal Investigators (PI's). The research of the Center's PIs has, for the most part, continued in the same four areas as presented in the original proposal: Remote Sensing, Atmospheric Chemistry, Sensors and Detectors, and Spacecraft Dynamics.

  14. The Minnesota Project English Center: Selected Materials. Unit 701: Introduction to the Study of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Curriculum Development in English.

    This Minnesota Curriculum Center report recounts the development of teaching materials on the nature and uses of language for grades 7-12 and presents the first of five seventh-grade units. A description of the origins, purposes, and personnel of the Center is followed by brief discussions of (1) the Center's underlying assumption that a study of…

  15. A Comparison of Innovative Training Techniques at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Research Report 1426.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Brian J.

    A study evaluated the comparative training effectiveness of three language instruction methods: (1) suggestopedia, (2) the standard methodology used at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center, a functional skill-building approach, and (3) a flexible-scheduling version of the standard methodology, with pacing based on group…

  16. Quantitative comparison between Z1/2 center and carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Koutarou; Thang Trinh, Xuan; Tien Son, Nguyen; Janzén, Erik; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2014-04-01

    In this study, to reveal the origin of the Z1/2 center, a lifetime killer in n-type 4H-SiC, the concentrations of the Z1/2 center and point defects are compared in the same samples, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The Z1/2 concentration in the samples is varied by irradiation with 250 keV electrons with various fluences. The concentration of a single carbon vacancy (VC) measured by EPR under light illumination can well be explained with the Z1/2 concentration derived from C-V and DLTS irrespective of the doping concentration and the electron fluence, indicating that the Z1/2 center originates from a single VC.

  17. Quantitative comparison between Z{sub 1∕2} center and carbon vacancy in 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Koutarou Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu; Thang Trinh, Xuan; Tien Son, Nguyen; Janzén, Erik

    2014-04-14

    In this study, to reveal the origin of the Z{sub 1∕2} center, a lifetime killer in n-type 4H-SiC, the concentrations of the Z{sub 1∕2} center and point defects are compared in the same samples, using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The Z{sub 1∕2} concentration in the samples is varied by irradiation with 250 keV electrons with various fluences. The concentration of a single carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) measured by EPR under light illumination can well be explained with the Z{sub 1∕2} concentration derived from C-V and DLTS irrespective of the doping concentration and the electron fluence, indicating that the Z{sub 1∕2} center originates from a single V{sub C}.

  18. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  19. Comparison of clinical features in pathologically confirmed PSP and MSA patients followed at a tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Kang, Un J; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Poulopoulos, Markos; Greene, Paul; Fahn, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) remains challenging due to heterogeneity of the diseases. Here we compared the clinical features of PSP and MSA to gain insight into their diagnosis and prognosis, particularly the prognostic value of down-gaze palsy latency in PSP progression. We reviewed clinical features of pathologically confirmed 10 PSP and 13 MSA patients, incidentally matched in age-at-onset, gender, and disease duration, followed at Columbia University Medical Center during 1994-2009. The final antemortem diagnosis was incorrect in 30% of PSP (all lacking down-gaze palsy) and 23% of MSA patients. Falls in the first year of the disease, pyramidal involvement and freezing of gait during the course were similar between PSP and MSA. Ataxia and apraxia were in 50% of the PSP patients. Parkinsonism responsive to levodopa treatment was in 30% of the PSP (all with resting tremor) and 50% of the MSA patients. Dysautonomia in MSA could occur as early as 3 years preceding the motor symptoms, with 46% within the first year of the motor onset, but 15% did not have dysautonomia in life. The latency of down-gaze palsy and urogenital dysfunction and MMSE scores at first visit in PSP, and the latency of falls and wheelchair confinement in MSA were all associated with the disease progression. We confirmed most of the previously published characterizations, and identified for the first time the prognostic value of down-gaze palsy latency in PSP progression.

  20. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care. PMID:27402986

  1. A study of the remote neighborhood office center concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The substitution of communications for commuting to work is examined from several aspects. Attention is focused on the possibility of certain groups of white collar workers conducting their business affairs through a network of Remote Neighborhood Office Centers (RNOC's) located near their homes. Typically, employees would communicate with their headquarters organizations by means of voice and digital circuits. Although current technology is readily able to support such an RNOC network, the main problems confronting would-be implementers center around the need for demonstrating that a sufficient number of business operations can be carried out in such a decentralized configuration as efficiently as they are under more conventional circumstances. The description of a pilot program is presented which is intended to identify pacing issues that must be settled before firm conclusions can be reached on whether the concept is operationally viable.

  2. Research and Development Support for the Center for Seismic Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-15

    Terminal Description (RST) *6.0 Input Data Sources 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Data from Regional Seismic Test Network ( RSTN ) 6.3 Waveform Data from Global...objectives for which it was designed. These accomplishments are summarized below. (1) The signals received at the Center from the five RSTN stations were...presented in Appendix B. 4P Types of help information to be provided with each item: Description (purpose) of item (executive overview) How to access

  3. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  4. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  5. Center for Dielectric Studies at the Pennsylvania State University,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    its response, there is a need to introduce heterogeneity either by mixing phases on a grain-by-grain basis , between grain and boundary phases, or by...but the coefficients are sufficiently different to introduce S thermal anisotropy into a multilayer system. For directions parallel to the electrodes...contract, a major effort has been made to establish a sound basis for industrial participation in the Center program. Planning for this function was much

  6. Study of Residential Vocational Technical Center(s) in Maryland: Part II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManis Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Part 1 of the project aimed at determining unmet vocational-technical education needs in the State of Maryland which might be met through residential education; Part 2 was designed to study the possible alternatives for meeting the needs discovered and to make recommendations regarding how these could best be met. A summary of Part 1 of the…

  7. The Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Munsat, T.; Poppe, A. R.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Shu, A. J.; Sternovsky, Z.; Wang, X.; Ccldas Team

    2010-12-01

    The Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) is a member of the NASA Lunar Science Institute, focused on experimental and theoretical investigations of the lunar surface, including dusty plasma and impact processes, the origins of the lunar atmosphere, and the development of new instrument concepts, with a complementary program of education and community development. The tenuous lunar atmosphere is a surface-bound exosphere (SBE) similar to that found throughout the solar system, for example on Mercury, various icy satellites, over the rings of Saturn, on large asteroids, and on Kuiper Belt objects. Its time-dependent constituents arise from a dynamic balance between sources that may be sporadic (solar wind, sputtering, micrometeoroid impacts, outgassing) and loss mechanisms (escape, ionization), creating a natural dusty plasma laboratory. CCLDAS supports a diverse experimental program, performed in conjunction with theory and simulation, to investigate the near-surface lunar plasma environment, dust charging and mobilization, and the effects of micrometeoroids. The flagship device at CCLDAS is a dust accelerator, currently under construction, which will allow simulation of micrometeoroid impacts at speeds relevant to the lunar environment. The accelerator will be available for direct science investigation as well as instrument calibration; in addition to our own research program, the experimental facilities are open to the lunar and space physics community. One use will be to support the calibration of the Lunar Dust EXperiment (LDEX) instrument, scheduled for launch in 2013 onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft. LDEX will measure the density and temporal variation of micron and submicron sized dust particles released from the lunar surface and elevated to > 30 km altitude by micrometeoroid bombardment and/or electrostatic forces. The new Lunar Environment and Impact Laboratory (LEIL) at CCLDAS

  8. Miami-Dade Community College 1984 Institutional Self-Study. Volume VIII: Medical Center Campus Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL.

    Part of a systematic, in-depth assessment of Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) educational programs, student support systems, and selected campus-level activities, this volume of the college's institutional self-study report examines the impact and effectiveness of the Medical Center Campus. The report contains the results of a campus study…

  9. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions. PMID:27856550

  10. A Case Study Documenting the Process by Which Biology Instructors Transition from Teacher-Centered to Learner-Centered Teaching.

    PubMed

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Hunt Rietschel, Carly

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we used a case study approach to obtain an in-depth understanding of the change process of two university instructors who were involved with redesigning a biology course. Given the hesitancy of many biology instructors to adopt evidence-based, learner-centered teaching methods, there is a critical need to understand how biology instructors transition from teacher-centered (i.e., lecture-based) instruction to teaching that focuses on the students. Using the innovation-decision model for change, we explored the motivation, decision-making, and reflective processes of the two instructors through two consecutive, large-enrollment biology course offerings. Our data reveal that the change process is somewhat unpredictable, requiring patience and persistence during inevitable challenges that arise for instructors and students. For example, the change process requires instructors to adopt a teacher-facilitator role as opposed to an expert role, to cover fewer course topics in greater depth, and to give students a degree of control over their own learning. Students must adjust to taking responsibility for their own learning, working collaboratively, and relinquishing the anonymity afforded by lecture-based teaching. We suggest implications for instructors wishing to change their teaching and administrators wishing to encourage adoption of learner-centered teaching at their institutions.

  11. Helium ions at the heidelberg ion beam therapy center: comparisons between FLUKA Monte Carlo code predictions and dosimetric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessonnier, T.; Mairani, A.; Brons, S.; Sala, P.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Haberer, T.; Debus, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-08-01

    In the field of particle therapy helium ion beams could offer an alternative for radiotherapy treatments, owing to their interesting physical and biological properties intermediate between protons and carbon ions. We present in this work the comparisons and validations of the Monte Carlo FLUKA code against in-depth dosimetric measurements acquired at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Depth dose distributions in water with and without ripple filter, lateral profiles at different depths in water and a spread-out Bragg peak were investigated. After experimentally-driven tuning of the less known initial beam characteristics in vacuum (beam lateral size and momentum spread) and simulation parameters (water ionization potential), comparisons of depth dose distributions were performed between simulations and measurements, which showed overall good agreement with range differences below 0.1 mm and dose-weighted average dose-differences below 2.3% throughout the entire energy range. Comparisons of lateral dose profiles showed differences in full-width-half-maximum lower than 0.7 mm. Measurements of the spread-out Bragg peak indicated differences with simulations below 1% in the high dose regions and 3% in all other regions, with a range difference less than 0.5 mm. Despite the promising results, some discrepancies between simulations and measurements were observed, particularly at high energies. These differences were attributed to an underestimation of dose contributions from secondary particles at large angles, as seen in a triple Gaussian parametrization of the lateral profiles along the depth. However, the results allowed us to validate FLUKA simulations against measurements, confirming its suitability for 4He ion beam modeling in preparation of clinical establishment at HIT. Future activities building on this work will include treatment plan comparisons using validated biological models between proton and helium ions, either within a Monte Carlo

  12. Helium ions at the heidelberg ion beam therapy center: comparisons between FLUKA Monte Carlo code predictions and dosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Tessonnier, T; Mairani, A; Brons, S; Sala, P; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Haberer, T; Debus, J; Parodi, K

    2017-08-01

    In the field of particle therapy helium ion beams could offer an alternative for radiotherapy treatments, owing to their interesting physical and biological properties intermediate between protons and carbon ions. We present in this work the comparisons and validations of the Monte Carlo FLUKA code against in-depth dosimetric measurements acquired at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Depth dose distributions in water with and without ripple filter, lateral profiles at different depths in water and a spread-out Bragg peak were investigated. After experimentally-driven tuning of the less known initial beam characteristics in vacuum (beam lateral size and momentum spread) and simulation parameters (water ionization potential), comparisons of depth dose distributions were performed between simulations and measurements, which showed overall good agreement with range differences below 0.1 mm and dose-weighted average dose-differences below 2.3% throughout the entire energy range. Comparisons of lateral dose profiles showed differences in full-width-half-maximum lower than 0.7 mm. Measurements of the spread-out Bragg peak indicated differences with simulations below 1% in the high dose regions and 3% in all other regions, with a range difference less than 0.5 mm. Despite the promising results, some discrepancies between simulations and measurements were observed, particularly at high energies. These differences were attributed to an underestimation of dose contributions from secondary particles at large angles, as seen in a triple Gaussian parametrization of the lateral profiles along the depth. However, the results allowed us to validate FLUKA simulations against measurements, confirming its suitability for (4)He ion beam modeling in preparation of clinical establishment at HIT. Future activities building on this work will include treatment plan comparisons using validated biological models between proton and helium ions, either within a Monte Carlo

  13. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  14. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, May G; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P

    2008-01-01

    Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted.

  15. Medication wrong route administration: a poisons center-based study.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Teitelbaum, Alexandra; Lüde, Saskia; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Russmann, Stefan; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    To describe clinical effects, circumstances of occurrence, management and outcomes of cases of inadvertent administration of medications by an incorrect parenteral route. Retrospective single-center consecutive review of parenteral route errors of medications, reported to our center between January 2006 and June 2010. We collected demographic data and information on medications, route and time of administration, severity of symptoms/signs, treatment, and outcome. Seventy-eight cases (68 adults, 10 children) were available for analysis. The following wrong administration routes were recorded: paravenous (51%), intravenous (33%), subcutaneous (8%), and others (8%). Medications most frequently involved were iodinated x-ray contrast media (11%) and iron infusions (9%). Twenty-eight percent of the patients were asymptomatic and 54% showed mild symptoms; moderate and severe symptoms were observed in 9% and 7.7%, respectively, and were mostly due to intravenous administration errors. There was no fatal outcome. In most symptomatic cases local nonspecific treatment was performed. Enquiries concerning administration of medicines by an incorrect parenteral route were rare, and mainly involved iodinated x-ray contrast media and iron infusions. Most events occurred in adults and showed a benign clinical course. Although the majority of exposures concerned the paravenous route, the occasional severe cases were observed mainly after inadvertent intravenous administration.

  16. User-centered semantic harmonization: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Gennari, John H; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2007-06-01

    Semantic interoperability is one of the great challenges in biomedical informatics. Methods such as ontology alignment or use of metadata neither scale nor fundamentally alleviate semantic heterogeneity among information sources. In the context of the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid program, the Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) has been making an ambitious effort to harmonize existing information models for clinical research from a variety of sources and modeling agreed-upon semantics shared by the technical harmonization committee and the developers of these models. This paper provides some observations on this user-centered semantic harmonization effort and its inherent technical and social challenges. The authors also compare BRIDG with related efforts to achieve semantic interoperability in healthcare, including UMLS, InterMed, the Semantic Web, and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations initiative. The BRIDG project demonstrates the feasibility of user-centered collaborative domain modeling as an approach to semantic harmonization, but also highlights a number of technology gaps in support of collaborative semantic harmonization that remain to be filled.

  17. Restless Leg Syndrome in Different Types of Demyelinating Neuropathies: A Single-Center Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Methods: Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Results: Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). Conclusions: our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy. Citation: Luigetti M; Del Grande A; Testani E; Bisogni G; Losurdo A; Giannantoni NM; Mazza S; Sabatelli M; Della Marca G. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(9):945-949. PMID:23997707

  18. The Teaching of Afro-Asian Literature: A Comparison between the Nonconventional Learner-Centered and the Conventional Teacher-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel O.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, nonconventional learner-centered (NLC) trends in ELT have emerged amidst the current and probably dominant conventional teacher-centered (CTC) approaches used by majority of private and public schools in the Philippines. With the implementation of the K-12 curriculum, Afro-Asian literature remained the focus of the eighth…

  19. Comparison of academic and nonacademic sites in multi-center clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Pencina, Michael J; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2012-02-01

    The selection of appropriate subjects is a critical element of successful clinical trials. Failure to properly identify, select, and retain subjects in clinical trials of antidepressant medications may affect the ability to show separation from placebo. Little is known about which type of site, academic or nonacademic, is superior in selecting and retaining appropriate subjects. In the present investigation, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis comparing the performance of academic and nonacademic sites in selecting and retaining appropriate subjects in a recently completed multi-site clinical study of aripiprazole augmentation. The authors used a set of operationalized criteria called the SAFER to identify appropriate study subjects. No significant differences were found in rates of SAFER interview passing, study completion, and clinical outcomes between academic and nonacademic sites. Our findings suggest that academic and nonacademic sites are equally effective in their ability to identify and retain appropriate study participants.

  20. Reference charts for height and weight of school children from west malaysia in comparison with the United States centers for disease control and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bong, Yb; Shariff, Aa; Majid, Am; Merican, Af

    2012-01-01

    Reference charts are widely used in healthcare as a screening tool. This study aimed to produce reference growth charts for school children from West Malaysia in comparison with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chart. A total of 14,360 school children ranging from 7 to 17 years old from six states in West Malaysia were collected. A two-stage stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit the subjects. Curves were adjusted using Cole's LMS method. The LOWESS method was used to smooth the data. The means and standard deviations for height and weight for both genders are presented. The results showed good agreement with growth patterns in other countries, i.e., males tend to be taller and heavier than females for most age groups. Height and weight of females reached a plateau at 17 years of age; however, males were still growing at this age. The growth charts for West Malaysian school children were compared with the CDC 2000 growth charts for school children in the United States. The height and weight for males and females at the start of school-going ages were almost similar. The comparison between the growth charts from this study and the CDC 2000 growth charts indicated that the growth patterns of West Malaysian school children have improved, although the height and weight of American school children were higher than those for West Malaysian school children.

  1. Reference Charts for Height and Weight of School Children from West Malaysia in Comparison with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Bong, YB; Shariff, AA; Majid, AM; Merican, AF

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reference charts are widely used in healthcare as a screening tool. This study aimed to produce reference growth charts for school children from West Malaysia in comparison with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) chart. Methods: A total of 14,360 school children ranging from 7 to 17 years old from six states in West Malaysia were collected. A two-stage stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit the subjects. Curves were adjusted using Cole’s LMS method. The LOWESS method was used to smooth the data. Results: The means and standard deviations for height and weight for both genders are presented. The results showed good agreement with growth patterns in other countries, i.e., males tend to be taller and heavier than females for most age groups. Height and weight of females reached a plateau at 17 years of age; however, males were still growing at this age. The growth charts for West Malaysian school children were compared with the CDC 2000 growth charts for school children in the United States. Conclusion: The height and weight for males and females at the start of school-going ages were almost similar. The comparison between the growth charts from this study and the CDC 2000 growth charts indicated that the growth patterns of West Malaysian school children have improved, although the height and weight of American school children were higher than those for West Malaysian school children. PMID:23113132

  2. Center-of-pressure regularity as a marker for attentional investment in postural control: a comparison between sitting and standing postures.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Hlavackova, Petra; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2011-04-01

    Postural control is a highly automatized basic activity that requires limited attentional investments. These investments have been shown to increase from balancing experts to controls, and from controls to persons with impaired postural control. Such between-subject comparisons led to a proposed direct relation between the regularity of center-of-pressure (COP) fluctuations and the amount of attention invested in posture. This study aims to expand this relation to a within-subject comparison of conditions that differ in balance demands. Specifically, more regular COP fluctuations were expected for standing than sitting, as stimulus-response reaction-time studies showed that the required attentional demands are lower for sitting than standing. COP registrations were made for fifteen healthy young adults in seated and standing postures. COP regularity was quantified with sample entropy. As expected, COP fluctuations were found to be more regular for standing than sitting, as evidenced by significantly lower sample entropy values. These findings expand the relation between COP regularity and the amount of attention invested in posture to postural tasks that vary in balance demands. An assessment of COP regularity may thus not only be instrumental in the examination of attentional investment in posture in between-subject designs, but also for different postures in within-subjects designs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural studies of iron and manganese in photosynthetic reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, A.E.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) were used to characterize components involved in the light reactions of photosynthetic reaction centers from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp.: center X, the low electron potential acceptor in Photosystem I (PS I) and the Mn complex involved in water oxidation and oxygen evolution. The dependence of its EPR amplitude on microwave power and temperature indicate an Orbach spin relaxation mechanism involving an excited state at 40 cm/sup -1/. This low energy contributes to its unusually anisotropic g-tensor. XAS of iron in PS I preparations containing ferredoxins A, B and X are consistent with a model with (4Fe-4S) ferredoxins, which are presumably centers A and B and (2Fe-2S) ferredoxins, which would be X. Illumination of dark-adapted Synechococcus PS II samples at 220 to 240 K results in the formation of the multiline EPR signal previously assigned as a Mn S/sub 2/ species, and g = 1.8 and 1.9 signals of Fe/sup 2 +/ Q/sub A//sup -/. In contrast to spinach, illumination at 110 to 160 K produces only a new EPR signal at g = 1.6 which we assign to another configuration of Fe/sup 2+ - Q/sup -/. Following illumination of a S/sub 1/ sample at 140 K or 215 K, the Mn x-ray absorption edge inflection energy changes from 6550 eV to 6551 eV, indicating an oxidation of Mn, and average valences greater than Mn(II). Concomitant changes in the shape of the pre-edge spectrum indicate oxidation of Mn(III) to Mn(IV). The Mn EXAFS spectrum of PS II from Synechococcus is similar in the S/sub 1/ and S/sub 2/ states, indicating O or N ligands at 1.75 +- 0.05 A, transition metal neighbor(s) at 2.75 +- 0.05 A, and N and O ligands at 2.2 A with heterogeneous bond lengths; these data demonstrate the presence of a di-..mu..-oxo bridged Mn structure. 202 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Referring heroin users from compulsory detoxification centers to community methadone maintenance treatment: a comparison of three models.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Liu, Enwu; McGoogan, Jennifer M; Duan, Song; Wu, Li-Tzy; Comulada, Scott; Wu, Zunyou

    2013-08-13

    Both compulsory detoxification treatment and community-based methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) exist for heroin addicts in China. We aim to examine the effectiveness of three intervention models for referring heroin addicts released from compulsory detoxification centers to community methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinics in Dehong prefecture, Yunnan province, China. Using a quasi-experimental study design, three different referral models were assigned to four detoxification centers. Heroin addicts were enrolled based on their fulfillment to eligibility criteria and provision of informed consent. Two months prior to their release, information on demographic characteristics, history of heroin use, and prior participation in intervention programs was collected via a survey, and blood samples were obtained for HIV testing. All subjects were followed for six months after release from detoxification centers. Multi-level logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors predicting successful referrals to MMT clinics. Of the 226 participants who were released and followed, 9.7% were successfully referred to MMT(16.2% of HIV-positive participants and 7.0% of HIV-negative participants). A higher proportion of successful referrals was observed among participants who received both referral cards and MMT treatment while still in detoxification centers (25.8%) as compared to those who received both referral cards and police-assisted MMT enrollment (5.4%) and those who received referral cards only (0%). Furthermore, those who received referral cards and MMT treatment while still in detoxification had increased odds of successful referral to an MMT clinic (adjusted OR = 1.2, CI = 1.1-1.3). Having participated in an MMT program prior to detention (OR = 1.5, CI = 1.3-1.6) was the only baseline covariate associated with increased odds of successful referral. Findings suggest that providing MMT within detoxification centers promotes successful

  5. Strict vs lenient criteria for elution testing: comparison of yields between two tertiary care medical centers.

    PubMed

    Veeraputhiran, Muthu K; Pesek, Gina A; Blackall, Douglas P

    2011-09-01

    In this study, 2 patient populations, using different elution strategies, were compared to evaluate eluate yields under more and less restrictive conditions. An informative eluate was defined as one in which an antibody that could be clinically significant was detected in the eluate but was not detectable in the plasma at the time of elution testing. The results for 160 direct antiglobulin tests (DATs) and 160 elution studies were evaluated in 71 patients at the adult hospital (lenient criteria). The results for 372 DATs and 43 elution studies were evaluated in 123 patients at the pediatric hospital (strict criteria). The yields from these eluates were 0.6% at the adult hospital (C antibody) vs 2.3% at the pediatric hospital (Jk(a) antibody). Thus, the yield of information from eluate testing is low regardless of the stringency applied to testing. However, considering the cost and time required for testing, more stringent criteria are advised.

  6. A Comparison of Innovative Training Techniques at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Considering how I studied Russian, I can honestly say that I.... a. did as much work as the next person b. will pass on the basis of sheer luck or...intelligence, because I did very little work c. worked very hard to learn Russian d. [Not applicable--we were not required to study outside of class.] 49. If my...ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK U.S. Army Research Institute Field Unit at the AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Presidio of Monterey 2Q263743A794 PO Box 5787, Presidio of

  7. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the shuttle remote manipulator system (SRMS)-aided space operations center (SOC)/orbiter berthing was evaluated to determine: (1) whether the initial rates between the SOC and the orbiter can be removed by the arm; (2) what is the best strategy to be used; (3) whether the post-capture and maneuvering loads are within the capability of the SRMS; (4) can the SOC berthing port be brought in the immediate proximity of the orbiter berthing port; and (5) what is the best way to remove the residual relative motions. Various notational conventions are established and various important locations on the orbiter and SOC structures are defined. Reference frames are defined together with the mass properties of both the SOC and the orbiter.

  8. Space operations center: Shuttle interaction study extension, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Operations Center (SOC) is conceived as a permanent facility in low Earth orbit incorporating capabilities for space systems construction; space vehicle assembly, launching, recovery and servicing; and the servicing of co-orbiting satellites. The Shuttle Transportation System is an integral element of the SOC concept. It will transport the various elements of the SOC into space and support the assembly operation. Subsequently, it will regularly service the SOC with crew rotations, crew supplies, construction materials, construction equipment and components, space vehicle elements, and propellants and spare parts. The implications to the SOC as a consequence of the Shuttle supporting operations are analyzed. Programmatic influences associated with propellant deliveries, spacecraft servicing, and total shuttle flight operations are addressed.

  9. Utilities Cost Comparison Analysis between a Public Work Center and the Non-DoD Sector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    construction, consider innovative financing and 14 management arrangements (e.g. cost-sharing, public-private venture, leasing). Integrate...and services by financing all incurred costs. 27 Cash is put back into the working capital fund when customers pay cash from their O&M,N funds for the...firms, and other significantly sized business firms. The actual participants of the study may or may not be included in this listing. Disneyland was

  10. A comparison of speciated atmospheric mercury at an urban center and an upwind rural location.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew P; Schauer, James J; Lough, Glynis C; Snyder, David C; Kolb, Catherine J; Von Klooster, Sara; Rudolf, Todd; Manolopoulos, Helen; Olson, Mark L

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate mercury (PHg) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured every other hour at a rural location in south central Wisconsin (Devil's Lake State Park, WI, USA) between April 2003 and March 2004, and at a predominantly downwind urban site in southeastern Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI, USA) between June 2004 and May 2005. Annual averages of GEM, PHg, and RGM at the urban site were statistically higher than those measured at the rural site. Pollution roses of GEM and reactive mercury (RM; sum of PHg and RGM) at the rural and urban sites revealed the influences of point source emissions in surrounding counties that were consistent with the US EPA 1999 National Emission Inventory and the 2003-2005 US EPA Toxics Release Inventory. Source-receptor relationships at both sites were studied by quantifying the impacts of point sources on mercury concentrations. Time series of GEM, PHg, and RGM concentrations were sorted into two categories; time periods dominated by impacts from point sources, and time periods dominated by mercury from non-point sources. The analysis revealed average point source contributions to GEM, PHg, and RGM concentration measurements to be significant over the year long studies. At the rural site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (2%; 0.04 ng m(-3)); and, RM (48%; 5.7 pg m(-3)). At the urban site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (33%; 0.81 ng m(-3)); and, RM (64%; 13.8 pg m(-3)).

  11. Comparison of foodservice management performance level between dietitians and non-dietitians in senior centers using IPA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Kyoung

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the management importance and performance level of foodservice managers at senior centers. Using the survey, perceived importance and performance levels of seven foodservice management areas were evaluated and analyzed. Data showed the foodservice facilities were being managed by dietitians (61.6%) or non-dietitians (38.9%). The result indicated that overall importance level (3.43) was higher than performance level (3.02) (p<.01). As of the IPA result, dietitians and non-dietitians had different perspectives in terms of managing the eight categories of foodservice areas. The differences in the IPA results between the two groups may reflect bias attributable to the respondents' degrees of knowledge and professional preparation. The research findings could enhance our understanding of importance of hiring professional dietitians to operate foodservice at senior centers and find out which management area should be concentrated for more effective foodservice management. PMID:20016702

  12. A Multi-center Comparison of the Safety of Oral versus Intravenous Acetylcysteine for Treatment of Acetaminophen Overdose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Oral and intravenous (IV) acetylcysteine are used for treatment of acetaminophen poisoning. The objective of this multi-center study was to compare the safety of these two routes of administration. METHODS We conducted a multi-center chart review of all patients treated with acetylcysteine for acetaminophen poisoning. The primary safety outcome was the percentage of patients with of acetylcysteine-related adverse events. RESULTS A total of 503 subjects were included in the safety analysis (306 IV only, 145 oral only and 52 both routes).There were no serious adverse events related to acetylcysteine for either route. Nausea and vomiting were the most common related adverse events and were more common with oral treatment (23% vs 9%). Anaphylactoid reactions were more common with IV administration (6% vs 2%). Conclusions Intravenous and oral acetylcysteine are both associated with minimal side effects and are safe for treatment of acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:20524832

  13. A comparison of speciated atmospheric mercury at an urban center and an upwind rural location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutter, A.P.; Schauer, J.J.; Lough, G.C.; Snyder, D.C.; Kolb, C.J.; Von Klooster, S.; Rudolf, T.; Manolopoulos, H.; Olson, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate mercury (PHg) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) were measured every other hour at a rural location in south central Wisconsin (Devil's Lake State Park, WI, USA) between April 2003 and March 2004, and at a predominantly downwind urban site in southeastern Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI, USA) between June 2004 and May 2005. Annual averages of GEM, PHg, and RGM at the urban site were statistically higher than those measured at the rural site. Pollution roses of GEM and reactive mercury (RM; sum of PHg and RGM) at the rural and urban sites revealed the influences of point source emissions in surrounding counties that were consistent with the US EPA 1999 National Emission Inventory and the 2003-2005 US EPA Toxics Release Inventory. Source-receptor relationships at both sites were studied by quantifying the impacts of point sources on mercury concentrations. Time series of GEM, PHg, and RGM concentrations were sorted into two categories; time periods dominated by impacts from point sources, and time periods dominated by mercury from non-point sources. The analysis revealed average point source contributions to GEM, PHg, and RGM concentration measurements to be significant over the year long studies. At the rural site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (2%; 0.04 ng m-3); and, RM (48%; 5.7 pg m-3). At the urban site, contributions to annual average concentrations were: GEM (33%; 0.81 ng m-3); and, RM (64%; 13.8 pg m-3). ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located near Houston, including 22,000 acres; the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center (Metro), and a Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Included within the program for each village are schools and commercial activities, as well as employment activities. The Woodlands is planned to be developed over a 26-year period (commenced in 1972) with an ultimate population of 150,000. Following a summary chapter, Chapter II presents background material on The Woodlands and results of the study are summarized. Chapter III describes the project team and its organizational structure. Chapter IV outlines and documents the methodology that was employed in developing, analyzing, and evaluating the case study. The next chapter describes and analyzes the conventional plan, documents the process by which energy-conserving methods were selected, and evaluates the application of these methods to the Metro Center Study area. Chapter VI discusses constraints to implementation and is followed by a final chapter that presents the general conclusions from the case study and suggests directions for further investigation.

  15. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sara E; Decker, Anna; Hubbard, Alan; Callcut, Rachael A; Fox, Erin E; Del Junco, Deborah J; Holcomb, John B; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Wade, Charles E; Schreiber, Martin A; Alarcon, Louis H; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Cotton, Bryan A; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G; Phelan, Herb A; Cohen, Mitchell J

    2015-01-01

    Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated). We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating on parameters that

  16. Statistical Machines for Trauma Hospital Outcomes Research: Application to the PRospective, Observational, Multi-Center Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Alan; Callcut, Rachael A.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Wade, Charles E.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; Phelan, Herb A.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the treatment of trauma, a leading cause of death worldwide, is of great clinical and public health interest. This analysis introduces flexible statistical methods for estimating center-level effects on individual outcomes in the context of highly variable patient populations, such as those of the PRospective, Observational, Multi-center Major Trauma Transfusion study. Ten US level I trauma centers enrolled a total of 1,245 trauma patients who survived at least 30 minutes after admission and received at least one unit of red blood cells. Outcomes included death, multiple organ failure, substantial bleeding, and transfusion of blood products. The centers involved were classified as either large or small-volume based on the number of massive transfusion patients enrolled during the study period. We focused on estimation of parameters inspired by causal inference, specifically estimated impacts on patient outcomes related to the volume of the trauma hospital that treated them. We defined this association as the change in mean outcomes of interest that would be observed if, contrary to fact, subjects from large-volume sites were treated at small-volume sites (the effect of treatment among the treated). We estimated this parameter using three different methods, some of which use data-adaptive machine learning tools to derive the outcome models, minimizing residual confounding by reducing model misspecification. Differences between unadjusted and adjusted estimators sometimes differed dramatically, demonstrating the need to account for differences in patient characteristics in clinic comparisons. In addition, the estimators based on robust adjustment methods showed potential impacts of hospital volume. For instance, we estimated a survival benefit for patients who were treated at large-volume sites, which was not apparent in simpler, unadjusted comparisons. By removing arbitrary modeling decisions from the estimation process and concentrating on parameters that

  17. Comparison of the Current World Trade Center Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program and the World Trade Center Health Program Proposed by Title I of H.R. 847

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-02

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 02 SEP 2010 2...Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program (MMTP), financed through discretionary appropriations to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...members 4,405 Total 57,262 Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Number of

  18. Planetary size comparisons: A photographic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Over the past two decades NASA spacecraft missions obtained photographs permitting accurate size measurements of the planets and moons, and their surface features. Planetary global views are displayed at the same scale, in each picture to allow visual size comparisons. Additionally, special geographical features on some of the planets are compared with selected Earth areas, again at the same scale. Artist renderings and estimated sizes are used for worlds not yet reached by spacecraft. Included with each picture is number designation for use in ordering copies of the photos.

  19. A comparison of manual versus hydrostatic reduction in children with intussusception: single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ocal, Servet; Cevik, Muazez; Boleken, Mehmet Emin; Karakas, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    In recent years several techniques have been recommended for intussusception treatment. In this study, an evaluation was made of intussusception cases that presented at our clinic and had reduction applied together with saline under ultrasonography (USG) and cases, which were surgically treated. A retrospective evaluation was made of the records of 72 cases treated for a diagnosis of intussusception between January 2010 and July 2012. Patients were evaluated demographics, clinical presentation, management strategy, during the hospitalisation and outcome. A total of 72 cases which consists of 44 male and 28 female with age range between 5 and 132 months were treated with a diagnosis of intussusception. USG was applied to all cases on initial presentation. As treatment, hydrostatic reduction (HR) together with USG was applied to 47 cases. Of these, the HR was unsuccessful in 13 cases. Surgical treatment was applied to 38 cases. Of these cases, ileocolic intussusception was observed in 30 cases, ileoileal in seven cases and colocolic in one case. Meckel diverticulum was determined in five of these cases, polyps in two cases, lymphoma in two cases, lymph nodule in one case and 28 cases were observed to be idiopathic. There was no mortality in any case. HR together with USG is a safe technique in the treatment of intussusception, which also shortens the duration of hospitalisation and significantly reduces the treatment costs.

  20. Comparison of Early and Delayed Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis: Experience from A Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Rouf; Dar, Rayees Ahmad; Sheikh, Riyaz Ahmad; Salroo, Nazir Ahmad; Matoo, Adnan Rashid; Wani, Sabiya Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones is mainly performed after the acute cholecystitis episode settles because of the fear of higher morbidity and conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy during acute cholecystitis. Aims: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis and to compare the results with delayed cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective and randomized study. For patients assigned to early group, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed as soon as possible within 72 hours of admission. Patients in the delayed group were treated conservatively and discharged as soon as the acute attack subsided. They were subsequently readmitted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy 6-12 weeks later. Results: There was no significant difference in the conversion rates, postoperative analgesia requirements, or postoperative complications. However, the early group had significantly more blood loss, more operating time, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusion: Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy within 72 hours of onset of symptoms has both medical as well as socioeconomic benefits and should be the preferred approach for patients managed by surgeons with adequate experience in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24020050

  1. Fiscal Year 1988 program report: Maine Environmental Studies Center

    SciTech Connect

    White, G.K.

    1989-07-01

    Groundwater protection continues to be a primary water resource issue in Maine. Concerns have developed as a result of numerous cases of groundwater contamination from hazardous waste sites, underground fuel tanks, and other sources. Maine is seeking new methods of aquifer classification and protection. Geographic information systems appear to be capable of making a significant contribution, by offering improved handling of a variety of geographically oriented information, to the efforts of both State and local governments in dealing with groundwater issues. Radon was a priority research issue for the Center in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Because of the state's bedrock geology, radon levels in well water and in household air are high enough in some Maine homes to entail significant health risks. Maine is unique among the lower forty-eight states in having so many lakes and ponds and so many miles of undeveloped rivers and streams. Numerous conflicts have arisen because of increasing development pressure as well as other factors such as intensified forestry practices, expanding recreational use of inland waters, and more stringent federal drinking water standards.

  2. Evaluation of Participant Needs in a Regional Center for Security Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Oliver E., III.

    2009-01-01

    This research study was implemented within the subject headquarters of a regional center, an organization responsible for security cooperation in Europe and Eurasia. The focus of the study was the center's program of security education. This program was designed to support evolving security objectives of foreign countries in order to increase the…

  3. A Management Model for Establishing a Graduate Center of Cross-Cultural Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    This model is an abstraction of a content and process model proposed and partially implemented at Southern Connecticut State College for establishing a Graduate Center of Cross-Cultural Studies. Outlined in the model are: (1) major objectives for the Graduate Center of Cross-Cultural Studies; (2) college inputs (organization, resources to be…

  4. Evaluation of Participant Needs in a Regional Center for Security Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmoker, Oliver E., III.

    2009-01-01

    This research study was implemented within the subject headquarters of a regional center, an organization responsible for security cooperation in Europe and Eurasia. The focus of the study was the center's program of security education. This program was designed to support evolving security objectives of foreign countries in order to increase the…

  5. Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient in English: A psychometric evaluation study in long-term care settings.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ju Young; Roberts, Tonya; Grau, Bruce; Edvardsson, David

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that person-centered care improves nursing home residents' quality of life. Despite the clear focus of person-centered care on enhancing care for residents and engaging residents in care, there are few options available for measuring person-centered care from the perspective of the elder residents. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the English version of the Person-centered Climate Questionnaire-Patient (PCQ-P) in U.S. long-term care settings. A total of 189 older adults from six nursing homes in the Midwestern United States were included. Convergent validity and known-group comparison were examined for construct validity. Exploratory factor analysis and second-order confirmatory factor analysis were utilized to examine the factor structure. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha values for internal consistency. This study demonstrated a substantial convergent validity of the PCQ-P in English as higher scores correlated significantly with higher resident life satisfaction (r=0.459), and the satisfactory construct validity as evidenced by a significantly higher mean PCQ-P score from residents in higher quality nursing homes. Factor analysis demonstrated that the PCQ-P had three factors (hospitality, safety, and everydayness) in U.S. nursing home residents. The PCQ-P showed satisfactory internal consistency reliability (α=0.89). The English version of the PCQ-P is a valid and reliable tool to directly measure the perceptions of the person-centered climate in the U.S nursing homes. The simple and straightforward PCQ-P items are easy to administer to nursing home residents. Consequently, clinical staff can utilize the PCQ-P to assess the unit climate, and evaluate outcomes of person-centered interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Traces of Tritium at the World Trade Center

    SciTech Connect

    Semkow, T M; Hafner, S R; Parekh, P P; Wozniak, G J; Haines, D K; Husain, L; Rabun, R L; Williams, P G

    2002-10-01

    Traces of tritiated water (HTO) were detected at the World Trade Center (WTC) ground zero after the 9/11/01 terrorist attack. A water sample from the WTC sewer, collected on 9/13/01, contained 0.164 {+-} 0.074 (2 {sigma}) nCi/L of HTO. A split water sample, collected on 9/21/01 from the basement of WTC Building 6, contained 3.53 {+-} 0.17 and 2.83 {+-} 0.15 nCi/L, respectively. These results are well below the levels of concern to human exposure. Several water and vegetation samples were analyzed from sites outside ground zero, located in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Kensico and Croton Reservoirs. No HTO above the background was found in those samples. Tritium radioluminescent (RL) devices were investigated as possible sources of the traces of tritium at ground zero. It was determined that the two Boeing 767 aircraft that hit the Twin Towers contained a combined 34 Ci of tritium at the time of impact in their emergency exit signs. There is also evidence that many weapons from law enforcement were present and destroyed at WTC. Such weaponry contains by design tritium sights. The fate and removal of tritium from ground zero were investigated, taking into consideration tritium chemistry and water flow originating from the fire fighting, rain, as well as leaks from the Hudson River and broken mains. A box model was developed to describe the above scenario. The model is consistent with instantaneous oxidation of the airplane tritium in the jet-fuel explosion, deposition of a small fraction of HTO at ground zero, and water-flow controlled removal of HTO from the debris. The model also suggests that tritium from the weapons would be released and oxidized to HTO at a much slower rate in the lingering fires at ground zero.

  7. Stockbridge Munsee Community Health and Wellness Center and the Mohican Family Center Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    DeRocher, Andy; Barrnett, Michael

    2014-03-14

    The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Health and Wellness Center (HWC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the HWC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the HWC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the HWC performs in the lowest 8 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with paybacks of less than five years to yield an estimated 25-percent decrease in annual energyconsumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated to save $26,800 per year with an implementation cost of just $4,650 (0.2 year payback). For the Mohican Family Center document: The results of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study of Stockbridge Munsee Community’s Mohican Family Center (MFC) indicate that a variety of renewable energy options and energy conservation measures (ECMs) exist for the facility. A requirement of the Request for Proposal for this study was to assess renewable energy options that could offset 30 to 100 percent of the MFC’s energy use. This study identifies that a geothermal system is the most cost effective renewable energy option available to decrease the MFC’s energy consumption by 30 to 100 percent. Currently the MFC performs better than 80 percent of buildings in its building category, as scored in the EPA portfolio manager benchmarking tool. Multiple ECM opportunities have been identified with short term paybacks to yield an estimated 13-percent decrease in energy consumption. The ECMs within this payback period are estimated

  8. Economic analysis of centralized vs. decentralized electronic data capture in multi-center clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Walden, Anita; Nahm, Meredith; Barnett, M Edwina; Conde, Jose G; Dent, Andrew; Fadiel, Ahmed; Perry, Theresa; Tolk, Chris; Tcheng, James E; Eisenstein, Eric L

    2011-01-01

    New data management models are emerging in multi-center clinical studies. We evaluated the incremental costs associated with decentralized vs. centralized models. We developed clinical research network economic models to evaluate three data management models: centralized, decentralized with local software, and decentralized with shared database. Descriptive information from three clinical research studies served as inputs for these models. The primary outcome was total data management costs. Secondary outcomes included: data management costs for sites, local data centers, and central coordinating centers. Both decentralized models were more costly than the centralized model for each clinical research study: the decentralized with local software model was the most expensive. Decreasing the number of local data centers and case book pages reduced cost differentials between models. Decentralized vs. centralized data management in multi-center clinical research studies is associated with increases in data management costs.

  9. African Studies Centers' Students of Arabic and of Swahili.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Patricia S.

    A study examined beliefs about language learning held by students of Arabic and Swahili in six African studies programs. A survey administered to 134 students gathered demographic information and student attitudes about 47 statements concerning language learning strategies, ability, usefulness, and skill difficulty, multilingualism, and reasons…

  10. Data and spatial studies of the USGS Texas Water Science Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burley, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrologists, geographers, geophysicists, and geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TXWSC) work in the USGS Water Mission Area on a diverse range of projects built on a foundation of spatial data. The TXWSC has developed sophisticated data and spatial-studies-related capabilities that are an integral part of the projects undertaken by the Center.

  11. Ancillary Pilot Study for the Educational Policy Research Center Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson Inst., Croton-on-Hudson, NY.

    The role of the Hudson Institute in the policy research center program was to build on and adapt current studies of the future for the purpose of assisting the Office of Education and its five pilot centers. Part 1 of this report comments briefly on some methodological and substantive issues that arose during the pilot phase and suggests how…

  12. Academic Skills Center Program: Peer Tutoring, Study Skills Classes, Academic Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Betty Marie; And Others

    The Academic Skills Center at Black Hills State University provides a peer assistance program comprising both individual tutoring in classes offered in each academic division and credit classes in study skills. The goal of the Center is to respond effectively and quickly to individual educational needs of students and faculty through a…

  13. Off-Campus Study Centers for Federal Employees, Fiscal Year 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Training.

    One of three major training and educational resource publications from the Civil Service Commission, this directory provides information on individual off campus study centers for Federal Employees. Numbers of centers and participants are tabulated by agency and by state or other geographic location. Cooperating institutions, programs or course…

  14. The Organization and Governance of Academic Health Centers: Report of a Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Douglas A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Selected data from an Association of Academic Health Centers study of academic health center organization and governance is discussed. Administrative roles and responsibilities, areas of concern (such as resource and space allocation), and anticipated conditions (e.g., accreditation, promotion and tenure) are reported. (MLW)

  15. Postdoctoral study in a multidisciplinary research center: an alternative to more traditional nurse fellowships.

    PubMed

    Blank, D M

    1993-01-01

    This article examines postdoctoral study in a multidisciplinary research setting. The author describes the offerings of one particular multidisciplinary center, the Monell Chemical Senses Center, and highlights the advantages and disadvantages of a fellowship in such a setting. The relevance of this option for nursing is discussed.

  16. Environmental contaminant studies by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Stickel, W.H.; Stickel, L.F.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of environmental contaminants on wildlife is geared to interpreting events in the field, especially population effects, and both field and laboratory studies are planned for this purpose; procedures are adapted to specific problems and therefore do not include strict protocols or routine testing. Field evaluations include measurements of cholinesterase inhibition in brain or blood, search for dead or disabled animals, study of nesting success of birds, and general ecological observations. Residue analyses are used in evaluating organochlorine chemicals; samples may include whole bodies for determining level of exposure, brains for mortality diagnosis, whole blood for certain special studies, and eggs to help in evaluation of possible reproductive effects. Bird counts, singing-male census counts, small mamrnal trapping, and cage-in-field tests have proven to be ineffective or misleading and are not considered suitable for field evaluations under most circumstances. Usefulness of simulated field trials is limited to very special situations. Experimental studies that help predict and interpret field effects include determinations of lethal diagnostic levels, comparative lethal dietary toxicity tests, tests of secondary poisoning measurement of residue loss rates, measurement of blood enzymes, tests of behavioral effects, and studies of reproductive effects.

  17. Comparison Among Methods of Retinopathy Assessment (CAMRA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Martha E.; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Prathiba, Vijayaraghavan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Ranjani, Harish; Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Olsen, Timothy W.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Ward, Laura A.; Lynn, Michael J.; Hendrick, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared smartphone fundus photography, nonmydriatic fundus photography, and 7-field mydriatic fundus photography for their abilities to detect and grade diabetic retinopathy (DR). Design This was a prospective, comparative study of 3 photography modalities. Participants Diabetic patients (n = 300) were recruited at the ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary diabetes care center in Chennai, India. Methods Patients underwent photography by all 3 modalities, and photographs were evaluated by 2 retina specialists. Main Outcome Measures The sensitivity and specificity in the detection of DR for both smartphone and nonmydriatic photography were determined by comparison with the standard method, 7-field mydriatic fundus photography. Results The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography, compared with 7-field mydriatic fundus photography, for the detection of any DR were 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43–56) and 94% (95% CI, 92–97), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 81% (95% CI, 75–86) and 94% (95% CI, 92–96%), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of smartphone fundus photography for the detection of vision-threatening DR were 59% (95% CI, 46–72) and 100% (95% CI, 99–100), respectively, and of nonmydriatic fundus photography were 54% (95% CI, 40–67) and 99% (95% CI, 98–100), respectively. Conclusions Smartphone and nonmydriatic fundus photography are each able to detect DR and sight-threatening disease. However, the nonmydriatic camera is more sensitive at detecting DR than the smartphone. At this time, the benefits of the smartphone (connectivity, portability, and reduced cost) are not offset by the lack of sufficient sensitivity for detection of DR in most clinical circumstances. PMID:26189190

  18. Problem-Centered Social Studies Instruction. Approaches to Reflective Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Richard E., Ed.; Muessig, Raymond H., Ed.

    The plea of this bulletin, the second and full revision of The Problems Approach and the Social Studies copyrighted in 1955 and 1960, is for teachers to do more with the reflective method in their classrooms. It draws upon the latest and most pertinent insights distilled from research, theory, and practice associated with reflective thinking;…

  19. Developmental Growth at Woodhaven Center: An Eight Year Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spreat, Scott; Hill, Jane

    1987-01-01

    Developmental growth of residents of a university operated institution was studied over an eight-year period of time. Long-term residents received decreasing benefits over time, although shorter term residents evidenced only linear growth. The ideal duration of services was estimated as approximately three to four years. (Author)

  20. [Use of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in an urban health center. Comparison with the current evidence].

    PubMed

    Yagüe-Sebastián, M M; Coscollar-Escartín, I; Muñoz-Albadalejo, P; López-Canales, M C; Villaverde-Royo, M V; Gutiérrez-Moreno, F

    2013-09-01

    To describe the prescribing of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in an urban health center (Zaragoza, Spain). A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on subjects who belonged to an urban center and were studied during the year 2010. The sample size with a confidence level of 95%, was calculated, a total of 843 prescriptions were analyzed. The sample was single random, and 150 cases were selected. The prevalence and confidence intervals were calculated. The statistical package STATA 9.1 was used for the calculations. The most used drug was diclofenac, in 27.33% (95% CI: 20.65-34.88). NSAIDs were most used in females. In 18% of the cases the area of application was the knee, followed by the 15% in the lower back area (95% CI: 10,22-21,78). There were no adverse reactions. Frequent use is made of topical NSAIDs in a basic health area. Current recommendations support the use in the knee and in the hand, but not in the back, where its use is common. The use of topical NSAIDs decreases side effects and drug interactions, therefore their use is recommended in patients on multiple drug therapy and in the elderly. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Initial thin film penetration studies at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, A. J.; Collette, A.; Drake, K. J.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Kempf, S.; Munsat, T.; Northway, P.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies

    2011-12-01

    Initial studies of damage caused by hypervelocity impacts of various micrometeorite materials into a range of targets are being performed at the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS). Cratering studies are initially focused on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) films in order to characterize the crater dependencies on impactor mass, size, and speed, and to better understand its capabilities as a dust detector. Additional cratering studies include optical glass, and geological samples as targets. These studies will lead to a better understanding of damage to spacecraft windows and instruments, and space weathering on airless bodies. In parallel, penetration studies will be conducted to determine how hole sizes in thin film materials depend on the properties of the film and the projectile. These thin film penetration studies will be critical to the design of dust detectors similar to that used on NASA's Stardust and New Horizons spacecraft, and in the design of solar sails. Thin film detectors can also be used to characterize beam profiles of laboratory dust accelerators. These studies are being performed at the 3MV hypervelocity dust accelerator at CCLDAS. The facility can accelerate dust particles up to 10's of km/s with user control over the velocity and mass ranges of particles reaching the target chamber. Complementary studies will be conducted at the Johnson Space Center Light Gas Gun using the same target and particle properties. These parallel studies will allow us to cover an extended range of acceleration parameters as well as better understand the similarities and differences between electrostatic accelerators and light gas guns.

  2. Monitoring of fungal loads in seabird rehabilitation centers with comparisons to natural seabird environments in northern California.

    PubMed

    Burco, Julia D; Massey, J Gregory; Byrne, Barbara A; Tell, Lisa; Clemons, Karl V; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    Aspergillosis remains a major cause of mortality in captive and rehabilitated seabirds. To date, there has been poor documentation of fungal (particularly Aspergillus spp.) burdens in natural seabird loafing and roosting sites compared with fungal numbers in rehabilitation or captive settings and the various microenvironments that seabirds are exposed to during the rehabilitation process. This study compares fungal, particularly Aspergillus spp., burdens potentially encountered by seabirds in natural and rehabilitation environments. Differences among the various microenvironments in the rehabilitation facility were evaluated to determine the risk of infection when seabirds are experiencing high stress and poor immune function. Aspergillus spp. counts were quantified in three wildlife rehabilitation centers and five natural seabird loafing and roosting sites in northern California using a handheld impact air sampler and a water filtration system. Wildlife rehabilitation centers demonstrated an increase in numbers of conidia of Aspergillus spp. and Aspergillus fumigatus in air and water samples from select aquatic bird rehabilitation centers compared with natural seabird environments in northern California. Various microenvironments in the rehabilitation facility were identified as having higher numbers of conidia of Aspergillus spp. These results suggest that periodic monitoring of multiple local areas, where the birds spend time in a rehabilitation facility, should be done to identify "high risk" sites, where birds should spend minimal time, or sites that should be cleaned more frequently or have improved air flow to reduce exposure to fungal conidia. Overall, these results suggest that seabirds may be more likely to encounter Aspergillus spp. in various microenvironments in captivity, compared with their native habitats, which could increase their risk of developing disease when in a debilitated state.

  3. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies. PMID:27698566

  4. Nuclear Monitoring Research at the Center for Seismic Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-13

    Pachelmsky aula -’ . - d approximately 100 km to the south-east of OBN (Belyaevsky,1974). I- ,r,:ssion is traced to t-,e south-ea, 0. approximately 700...contributes to its poor backazimuth estimation. These results, combipred with those described in the section on polarization characteris- tics , confirm...ARCESS, using polarization characteris- tics as predictors. The attributes studied in the section on polarization (with the exception of azimuth) are

  5. Space Operations Center, shuttle interaction study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The implication of using the Shuttle with the SOC, including constraints that the Shuttle places upon the SOC design is studied. The considerations involved in the use of the Shuttle as a part of the SOC concept, and the constraints to the SOC imposed by the Shuttle in its interactions with the SOC, and on the design or technical solutions which allow satisfactory accomplishment of the interactions are identified.

  6. Occupational risk for Crohn's disease: A two-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Xiuwen; Feng, Min; Song, Peng; Ren, Jianan; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-11-01

    Occupational factors have been suggested as possible elements in the etiology of Crohn's disease, although evidences have not been fully obtained. This study is to investigate possible associations between occupation and development of Crohn's disease. This prospective study was carried out in two major hospitals during January 2010 and December 2014. Demographic and clinical data were collected for the calculation of standard incidence ratios and 95% confidence intervals by occupation. A total of 401 patients with Crohn's disease were recruited into this study. Participants were distributed into 8 major occupational groups, among which "professionists" (17.7%), "service and sales" (18.7%) and "unclassified individuals" (mainly students) (20.2%) took up the most proportions. Increased standard incidence ratios were found in "service and sales" (2.526±0.135, 95% CI: 1.939-3.290), "professionists" (4.216±0.142, 95% CI: 3.194-5.565), and most significantly, in "administrative staffs" (5.476±0.170, 95% CI: 3.926-7.639). In contrast, decreased standard incidence ratios for Crohn's disease were observed in the category of "workers in agriculture, forestry, animal husbandry, fishery and water conservancy" (0.088±0.146, 95% CIs: 0.066-0.117). Occupational elements are implicated in the likelihood of development of Crohn's disease. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A single-center retrospective study of pediatric hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Weiling; Tang, Suoqin; Chen, Liping; Yi, You; Zhang, Pinwei; Liu, Aiping; Zhi, Tian; Huang, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a malignant liver tumor generally diagnosed in infants and children <3 years old. The current retrospective study aimed to investigate the associations of tumor stage, pathological type, metastasis and chemotherapy with clinical outcomes. In the current study, a total of 102 patients with hepatoblastoma were enrolled between September 2006 and June 2014. Clinical records and follow-up information for each of patient were obtained to conduct a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test. The median age of the subjects was 1.5 years, and 98 patients had stage III or IV hepatoblastoma. Complete or partial remittance occurred in 72 subjects, and 91 underwent surgical operation. The survival rate differed significantly among patients with different tumor stages (P=0.015, χ2=8.359). The mortality rate of stage IV subjects with intrahepatic metastasis was significantly higher than that of those without (P=0.004). Among the 45 subjects with relapsed hepatoblastoma, the mortality rate was higher in the subjects that abandoned chemotherapy than in patients who continued regular chemotherapy. In total, 27 of 45 subjects with relapsed hepatoblastoma succumbed to the disease; 20 of them abandoned chemotherapy treatment; and the remaining 7 patients underwent regular chemotherapy and succumbed to the disease by the end of follow-up. The present study indicates that the increased mortality rate was associated with postoperative residual-induced intrahepatic metastasis and relapsed hepatoblastoma; and that regular chemotherapy is necessary for patient to achieve complete or partial remission following surgical operation. PMID:27895749

  8. Comparison of Open, Laparoscopic, and Robotic Colectomies Using a Large National Database: Outcomes and Trends Related to Surgery Center Volume.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Heather L; Isaacs, Abby J; Abelson, Jonathan S; Milsom, Jeffrey W; Sedrakyan, Art

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that high-volume centers and laparoscopic techniques improve outcomes of colectomy. These evidence-based measures have been slow to be accepted, and current trends are unknown. In addition, the current rates and outcomes of robotic surgery are unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine current national trends in the use of minimally invasive surgery and to evaluate hospital volume trends over time. This was a retrospective study. This study was conducted in a tertiary referral hospital. Using the National Inpatient Sample, we evaluated trends in patients undergoing elective open, laparoscopic, and robotic colectomies from 2009 to 2012. Patient and institutional characteristics were evaluated and outcomes compared between groups using multivariate hierarchical-logistic regression and nonparametric tests. The National Inpatient Sample includes patient and hospital demographics, admission and treating diagnoses, inpatient procedures, in-hospital mortality, length of hospital stay, hospital charges, and discharge status. In-hospital mortality and postoperative complications of surgery were measured. A total of 509,029 patients underwent elective colectomy from 2009 to 2012. Of those 266,263 (52.3%) were open, 235,080 (46.2%) laparoscopic, and 7686 (1.5%) robotic colectomies. The majority of minimal access surgery is still being performed at high-volume compared with low-volume centers (37.5% vs 28.0% and 44.0% vs 23.0%; p < 0.001). A total of 36% of colectomies were for cancer. The number of robotic colectomies has quadrupled from 702 in 2009 to 3390 (1.1%) in 2012. After adjustment, the rate of iatrogenic complications was higher for robotic surgery (OR = 1.73 (95% CI, 1.20-2.47)), and the median cost of robotic surgery was higher, at $15,649 (interquartile range, $11,840-$20,183) vs $12,071 (interquartile range, $9338-$16,203; p < 0.001 for laparoscopic). This study may be limited by selection bias by surgeons regarding the choice

  9. Manufacturing Differences Affect Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Characteristics and Function: Comparison of Production Methods and Products from Multiple Centers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shutong; de Castro, Luis F.; Jin, Ping; Civini, Sara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Reems, Jo-Anna; Cancelas, Jose; Nayak, Ramesh; Shaw, Georgina; O’Brien, Timothy; McKenna, David H.; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Gee, Adrian P.; Hei, Derek J.; Hematti, Peiman; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Robey, Pamela G.; Stroncek, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are manufactured using many different methods, but little is known about the spectrum of manufacturing methods used and their effects on BMSC characteristics and function. Seven centers using, and one developing, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) processes were surveyed as to their production methods. Among the seven centers, all used marrow aspirates as the starting material, but no two centers used the same manufacturing methods. Two to four BMSC lots from each center were compared using global gene expression. Among the twenty-four BMSC lots from the eight centers intra-center transcriptome variability was low and similar among centers. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis separated all the lots from five centers into five distinct clusters. BMSCs from six of the eight centers were tested for their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis by in vivo transplantation (defining features of BMSCs). Those from all six centers tested formed bone, but the quantity formed was highly variable and BMSCs from only three centers supported hematopoiesis. These results show that differences in manufacturing resulted in variable BMSC characteristics including their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis. PMID:28447618

  10. Manufacturing Differences Affect Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Characteristics and Function: Comparison of Production Methods and Products from Multiple Centers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutong; de Castro, Luis F; Jin, Ping; Civini, Sara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Reems, Jo-Anna; Cancelas, Jose; Nayak, Ramesh; Shaw, Georgina; O'Brien, Timothy; McKenna, David H; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Gee, Adrian P; Hei, Derek J; Hematti, Peiman; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Robey, Pamela G; Stroncek, David F

    2017-04-27

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are manufactured using many different methods, but little is known about the spectrum of manufacturing methods used and their effects on BMSC characteristics and function. Seven centers using, and one developing, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) processes were surveyed as to their production methods. Among the seven centers, all used marrow aspirates as the starting material, but no two centers used the same manufacturing methods. Two to four BMSC lots from each center were compared using global gene expression. Among the twenty-four BMSC lots from the eight centers intra-center transcriptome variability was low and similar among centers. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis separated all the lots from five centers into five distinct clusters. BMSCs from six of the eight centers were tested for their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis by in vivo transplantation (defining features of BMSCs). Those from all six centers tested formed bone, but the quantity formed was highly variable and BMSCs from only three centers supported hematopoiesis. These results show that differences in manufacturing resulted in variable BMSC characteristics including their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis.

  11. Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson Study Group (PSG) centers performing deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Fayad, Sarah M; Hastings, Erin M; Moro, Elena; Nestor, Kelsey; Ward, Herbert; York, Michele; Okun, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS), and dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome (DAWS) have been reported commonly in Parkinson's disease (PD) populations. The treatment approaches may be widely variable and there is not much information on these syndromes in the setting of deep brain stimulation (DBS). To evaluate (1) ICDs, DAWS and DDS pre- and post DBS in PD and (2) to investigate pre-DBS treatment strategies regarding these behaviors among Parkinson Study Group (PSG) centers. Forty-eight PSG centers were surveyed on ICDs, DAWS and DDS, as well as on potential relationships to DBS and treatment approaches. Sixty-seven percent of PSG centers reported that they served a population of over 500 PD patients per year, and 94% of centers performed DBS surgery. Most centers (92%) reported screening for ICDs, DAWS and DDS. Of the centers screening for these symptoms, 13% reported always employing a formal battery of pre-operative tests, 46% of sites inconsistently used a formal battery, while 23% of sites reported never using a formal battery to screen for these symptoms. The estimated numbers of centers observing ICDs, DAWS and DDS pre-operatively in individuals with PD were 71%, 69%, and 69%, respectively. PSG DBS centers observing at least one case of a new de novo occurrence of an ICD, DAWS or DDS after DBS surgery were 67%, 65% and 65%, respectively. The results suggest that addiction-like syndromes and withdrawal syndromes are prevalent in expert PSG centers performing DBS. Most centers reported screening for these issues without the use of a formal battery, and there were a large number of centers reporting ICDs, DAWS and DDS post-DBS. A single treatment strategy did not emerge.

  12. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    PubMed

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Study of Refractory Status Epilepticus from a Tertiary Care Center.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Sahil; Pasangulapati, Suresh Babu; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Rynjah, Gideon Lyngsyun; Prabhakar, A T; Aaron, Sanjith; Alexander, Mathew; Mathew, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    To determine the proportion of refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and super-RSE (SRSE) among patients with status epilepticus (SE) and to analyze RSE and non-RSE (NRSE) in terms of etiology and predictors for RSE. Patients were identified from discharge summaries database with keywords of SE and records of the portable electroencephalogram (EEG) machine from January 2011 to March 2016. Two hundred and eighteen events were included in the study with 114 (52.3%) males, bimodal age preponderance age <5 years 30%, and second peak in age 15-65 years 52.8%, preexisting seizures were present in 34.4% (n = 75). Nearly 77.1% had NRSE (n = 168) and 22.9% had RSE (n = 50). This included 17 patients with SRSE (n = 17, 7.8% of all SE). Central nervous system (CNS) infection was a single largest etiological group in SE (69/218, 31.7%). In RSE, autoimmune encephalitis (17/50) and CNS infection (13/50) were the largest groups. De novo seizures (P = 0.007), low sensorium at admission (P = 0.001), low albumin at admission (P = 0.002), and first EEG being abnormal (P = 0.001) were risk factors on bivariate analysis. An unfavorable status epilepticus severity score (STESS) was predictive for RSE (P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures (P = 0.009) and abnormal EEG at admission (P = 0.03) were predictive for RSE. Fifty patients had RSE (22.9%), of which 17 went on to become SRSE (7.8%). Unfavorable STESS score was predictive for RSE on bivariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, de novo seizures and abnormal initial EEG were predictors of RSE.

  14. Key success factors of health research centers: A mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    Tofighi, Shahram; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Heydari, Majid

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to achieve success in future goals and activities, health research centers are required to identify their key success factors. Objective This study aimed to extract and rank the factors affecting the success of research centers at one of the medical universities in Iran. Methods This study is a mixed method (qualitative-quantitative) study, which was conducted between May to October in 2016. The study setting was 22 health research centers. In qualitative phase, we extracted the factors affecting the success in research centers through purposeful interviews with 10 experts of centers, and classified them into themes and sub-themes. In the quantitative phase, we prepared a questionnaire and scored and ranked the factors recognized by 54 of the study samples by Friedman test. Results Nine themes and 42 sub-themes were identified. Themes included: strategic orientation, management, human capital, support, projects, infrastructure, communications and collaboration, paradigm and innovation and they were rated respectively as components of success in research centers. Among the 42 identified factors, 10 factors were ranked respectively as the key factors of success, and included: science and technology road map, strategic plan, evaluation indexes, committed human resources, scientific evaluation of members and centers, innovation in research and implementation, financial support, capable researchers, equipment infrastructure and teamwork. Conclusion According to the results, the strategic orientation was the most important component in the success of research centers. Therefore, managers and authorities of research centers should pay more attention to strategic areas in future planning, including the science and technology road map and strategic plan.

  15. Highlighting High Performance: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College’s Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials

  16. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  17. Malignancies and anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a single-center observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Berghen, Nathalie; Teuwen, Laure-Anne; Westhovens, Rene; Verschueren, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Inhibitors of tumor necrosing factor alpha (TNF-a) have proven to be highly effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concerns, however, are raised about the possible association between these treatments and an increased development of malignancies. The objective of this paper was to compare the risk of hematologic and solid malignancies in patients treated for RA with anti-TNF therapy, with the risk in the general population. From January 2000 until January 2012, all RA patients that started treatment with anti-TNF agents were included in this single-center cohort study. The primary outcome of this study was the incidence of malignancy after starting anti-TNF treatment. In our cohort of 365 patients, 34 malignancies were discovered in 30 patients after the start of anti-TNF treatment; 20 patients developed a solid malignancy, 6 a hematologic, 2 a solid and a hematologic malignancy, and 2 patients developed 2 solid malignancies. The overall incidence rate (IR) of malignancy was 1379.1 per 100.000 patient years. The risk or standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of solid malignancy, calculated by comparison with the age-adjusted population in Flanders, was 120.1 in female and 136.7 in male patients. The calculated SIR of hematologic malignancy was 450.8 for women and 473.9 for men. Some immune modulation-related lymphoproliferative disorders regressed spontaneously when stopping TNF blockers. Overall, the malignancy risk in our rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with anti-TNF therapy was slightly higher than in the normal population; the risk of hematologic malignancies was more important.

  18. Restless leg syndrome in different types of demyelinating neuropathies: a single-center pilot study.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, Marco; Del Grande, Alessandra; Testani, Elisa; Bisogni, Giulia; Losurdo, Anna; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Mazza, Salvatore; Sabatelli, Mario; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-09-15

    to determine the prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a cohort of patients with demyelinating neuropathies. Patients were retrospectively recruited from our cohort of different forms of demyelinating neuropathies, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (CIDP), Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) referred to our Department of Neurology in a 10-year period. The validated 4-item RLS questionnaire was used for diagnosis of RLS. All patients with RLS who fulfilled criteria underwent a suggested immobilization test to confirm the diagnosis. A group of outpatients referred to the sleep disorders unit and data from published literature were used as controls. Prevalence of RLS in demyelinating neuropathy group was higher than prevalence observed in control population (p = 0.0142) or in the literature data (p = 0.0007). In particular, in comparison with both control population and literature data, prevalence of RLS was higher in CIDP group (p = 0.0266 and p = 0.0063, respectively) and in CMT1A group (p = 0.0312 and p = 0.0105, respectively), but not in HNPP (p = 1.000 and p = 0.9320, respectively). our study confirms a high prevalence of RLS in inflammatory neuropathies as CIDP and, among inherited neuropathies, in CMT1A but not in HNPP. Considering that this is only a small cohort from a single-center retrospective experience, the link between RLS and neuropathy remains uncertain, and larger multicenter studies are probably needed to clarify the real meaning of the association between RLS and neuropathy.

  19. A study on confidential unit exclusion at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kasraian, Leila; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Confidential unit exclusion (CUE) system has been designed to enhance transfusion safety as an extra additive approach. Aims: This study was designed to survey demographic characteristics, prevalence of serologic markers, and reasons of opting CUE. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was performed at Shiraz Blood Transfusion Center (Southern Iran). CUE is used for all individuals who refer for blood donation, and donors can choose their blood not to be used if they have any doubt about their blood suitability for transfusion. The prevalence rate of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) was compared between the blood donors who opted into and out of CUE. Then, the donors were contacted to give another blood sample and the reasons of deferral. Researchers also determined whether their reasons were logical or not. Data were analyzed using comparison of proportions in MedCalc software 7. Results: Out of all the donors, 2365 ones (2.3%) opted for CUE. CUE was more frequent among men, singles, donors with low education levels, between 18 and 25 years old, and with history of previous donation (P < 0.05). The prevalence rate of HCV was higher among the donors who opted for CUE (P < 0.05), but it was not the case regarding HBV and HIV (P>0.05). Furthermore, 91.5% of the donors had opted for CUE by mistake and only 8% had chosen CUE logically. Conclusion: It is necessary to review the process of CUE, make some changes both in procedure and design, and then survey its effectiveness in blood safety. PMID:27605850

  20. Western Fisheries Research Center--Forage fish studies in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Western Fisheries Research Center are working with other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Centers to better understand the interconnected roles of forage fishes throughout the ecosystem of Puget Sound, Washington. Support for these studies primarily is from the USGS Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound (CHIPS) program, which supports studies of the nearshore areas of Puget Sound. Human perturbations in the nearshore area such as shoreline armoring or urban development can affect the nearshore habitats critical to forage fish.

  1. Variation in Structure and Process of Care in Traumatic Brain Injury: Provider Profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers Participating in the CENTER-TBI Study

    PubMed Central

    Cnossen, Maryse C.; Polinder, Suzanne; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I. R.; Menon, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map the existing variation. The aim of current study is to quantify variation in general structural and process characteristics among centers participating in the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. Methods We designed a set of 11 provider profiling questionnaires with 321 questions about various aspects of TBI care, chosen based on literature and expert opinion. After pilot testing, questionnaires were disseminated to 71 centers from 20 countries participating in the CENTER-TBI study. Reliability of questionnaires was estimated by calculating a concordance rate among 5% duplicate questions. Results All 71 centers completed the questionnaires. Median concordance rate among duplicate questions was 0.85. The majority of centers were academic hospitals (n = 65, 92%), designated as a level I trauma center (n = 48, 68%) and situated in an urban location (n = 70, 99%). The availability of facilities for neuro-trauma care varied across centers; e.g. 40 (57%) had a dedicated neuro-intensive care unit (ICU), 36 (51%) had an in-hospital rehabilitation unit and the organization of the ICU was closed in 64% (n = 45) of the centers. In addition, we found wide variation in processes of care, such as the ICU admission policy and intracranial pressure monitoring policy among centers. Conclusion Even among high-volume, specialized neurotrauma centers there is substantial variation in structures and processes of TBI care. This variation provides an opportunity to study effectiveness of specific aspects of TBI care and to identify best practices with CER approaches. PMID:27571205

  2. A Study of Flood Evacuation Center Using GIS and Remote Sensing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, A. A.; Rosli, M. F.; Abustan, M. S.; Adib, R.; Rosli, M. I.; Masiri, K.; Saifullizan, B.

    2016-07-01

    This research demonstrated the use of Remote Sensing technique and GIS to determine the suitability of an evacuation center. This study was conducted in Batu Pahat areas that always hit by a series of flood. The data of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was obtained by ASTER database that has been used to delineate extract contour line and elevation. Landsat 8 image was used for classification purposes such as land use map. Remote Sensing incorporate with GIS techniques was used to determined the suitability location of the evacuation center from contour map of flood affected areas in Batu Pahat. GIS will calculate the elevation of the area and information about the country of the area, the road access and percentage of the affected area. The flood affected area map may provide the suitability of the flood evacuation center during the several levels of flood. The suitability of evacuation centers can be determined based on several criteria and the existing data of the evacuation center will be analysed. From the analysis among 16 evacuation center listed, there are only 8 evacuation center suitable for the usage during emergency situation. The suitability analysis was based on the location and the road access of the evacuation center toward the flood affected area. There are 10 new locations with suitable criteria of evacuation center proposed on the study area to facilitate the process of rescue and evacuating flood victims to much safer and suitable locations. The results of this study will help in decision making processes and indirectly will help organization such as fire-fighter and the Department of Social Welfare in their work. Thus, this study can contribute more towards the society.

  3. Comparison of U.K. Meteorological Office and U.S. National Meteorological Center Stratospheric Analyses During Northern and Southern Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Swinbank, R.; Massie, S. T.; Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Nagatani, R.; ONeill, A. O.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Meteorological data from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO), produced using a data assimilation system, and the U.S. National Meteorological Center (NMC), produced using an objective analysis procedure, are compared for dynamically active periods during the Arctic and Antarctic winters of 1992. The differences seen during these periods are generally similar to those seen during other winter periods. Both UKMO and NMC analyses capture the large-scale evolution of the stratospheric circulation during northern hemisphere (NH) and southern hemisphere (SH) winters. Stronger vertical and horizontal temperature gradients develop in the UKMO than in the NMC data during stratospheric warmings; comparison with satellite measurements with better vertical resolution suggests that the stronger vertical temperature gradients are more realistic. The NH polar vortex is slightly stronger in the UKMO analyses than in the NMC in the middle and upper stratosphere, and midstratospheric temperatures are slightly lower. The SH polar vortex as represented in the UKMO analyses is stronger and colder in the midstratosphere than its representation in the NMC analyses. The UKMO analyses on occasion exhibit some difficulties in representing cross-polar flow or changes in curvature of the wind field at very high latitudes. In addition to the above study of two wintertime periods, a more detailed comparison of lower-stratospheric temperatures is done for all Arctic and Antarctic winter periods since the launch of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. In the NH lower stratosphere during winter, NMC temperatures are consistently lower than UKMO temperatures and closer to radiosonde temperatures than are UKMO temperatures. Conversely, in the SH lower stratosphere during winter, UKMO temperatures are typically lower than NMC and are closer to radiosonde temperature observations.

  4. Willingness to pay and willingness to accept in a patient-centered blood pressure control study.

    PubMed

    Gleason-Comstock, Julie; Streater, Alicia; Goodman, Allen; Janisse, James; Brody, Aaron; Mango, LynnMarie; Dawood, Rachelle; Levy, Phillip

    2017-08-07

    Elevated blood pressure is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke but patients often discount recommended behavioral changes and prescribed medications. While effective interventions to promote adherence have been developed, cost-effectiveness from the patient's perspective, has not been well studied. The valuation of patient time and out of pocket expenses should be included while performing cost effectiveness evaluation. The Achieve BP study uses the contingent valuation method to assess willingness to accept (WTA) and willingness to pay (WTP) among patients with a history of uncontrolled blood pressure discharged from an urban emergency department and enrolled in a larger randomized controlled trial. WTA and WTP were assessed by asking patients a series of questions about time and travel costs and time value related to their study participation. A survey was conducted during the final study visit with patients to investigate the effectiveness of a kiosk-based educational intervention on blood pressure control. All study patients, regardless of study arm, received the same clinical protocol of commonly prescribed antihypertensive medication and met with research clinicians four times as part of the study procedures. Thirty-eight patients were offered the opportunity to participate in the cost-effectiveness study and all completed the survey. Statistical comparisons revealed these 38 patients were similar in representation to the entire RCT study population. All 38 (100.0%) were African-American, with an average age of 49.1 years; 55.3% were male, 21.1% were married, 78.9% had a high school or higher education, and 44.7% were working. 55.9% did not have a primary care provider and 50.0% did not have health insurance. Time price linear regression analysis was performed to estimate predictors of WTA and WTP. WTP and WTA may generate different results, and the elasticities were proportional to the estimated coefficients, with WTP about twice as

  5. Do environmental influences alter motor abilities acquisition? A comparison among children from day-care centers and private schools.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Karla Mônica F T; Fragoso, Andreza Gusmão Câmara; de Oliveira, Andréa Lemos Bezerra; Cabral Filho, José Eulálio; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2003-06-01

    Development occurs in a proper rhythm as result of genetic inheritance and environment factors. This study had the aim to identify some environmental risk factors for the motor development in two groups of healthy children. 100 pre-school aged (five years children) from two day-care centers and a private school were evaluated, in Recife-PE. All the children underwent to a motor skills assessment and their parents answered a questionnaire. The children from the public nursery remained behind in fine motor skills. The results showed that the biologically healthy children development can suffer negative influence of the environmental risk factors. In this research these factors were: the father absence, improper toys use to the correct age, the place were the child was kept in the early childhood, the lack of pedagogical guidance and extra-parental socialization and low familiar socioeconomic status.

  6. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  7. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  8. The neural correlates of object-centered processing in reading: a lesion study of neglect dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Ptak, Radek; Di Pietro, Marie; Schnider, Armin

    2012-05-01

    Neglect dyslexia--a peripheral reading disorder generally associated with left spatial neglect--is characterized by omissions or substitutions of the initial letters of words. Several observations suggest that neglect dyslexia errors are independent of viewer-centered coordinates; the disorder is therefore thought to reflect impairment at the level of object-centered representations. This hypothesis is indirectly supported by lesion studies connecting object-centered neglect errors with damage to posterior cortical regions lying in the ventral visual stream. Here, we performed a lesion-symptom mapping study of 40 patients with spatial neglect asked to read words presented at different positions relative to a viewer-centered coordinate frame. We found that the frequency of object-centered reading errors was constant across horizontal positions, whereas the frequency of entirely neglected words (reflecting a page-centered deficit) linearly increased from right to left. Damage to the intraparietal sulcus and the angular and middle temporal gyri was the best predictor of object-centered errors. We discuss these findings with reference to a role of the posterior parietal lobe in adapting the size of the attentional focus and biasing object representations elaborated in the ventral visual stream. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An Anatomic Study on Whether the Immature Patella is Centered on an Anteroposterior Radiograph.

    PubMed

    Kyriakedes, James C; Liu, Raymond W

    2017-03-01

    In the operating room, after first obtaining a proper lateral radiograph with the condyles superimposed, a 90-degree rotation of the intraoperative fluoroscopy unit does not always produce an anteroposterior (AP) image with the patella centered. The orthogonality of these 2 views has not been well determined in children. This study was comprised of a radiographic group (35 knees) and a cadaveric group (59 knees). Both cadaveric and clinical images were obtained by resting or positioning the femur with the posterior condyles overlapped, and then taking an orthogonal AP image. Centering of the patella was calculated and multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the relationship between patellar centering and age, sex, ethnicity, mechanical lateral distal femoral angle (mLDFA), medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA), and contralateral centering. Mean patellar centering, expressed as the lateral position of the patella with respect to the total condylar width, was 0.08±0.10 in the radiographic group and 0.06±0.03 in the cadaveric group. Positive (lateral) patellar centering in 1 knee had a statistically significant correlation with positive patellar centering in the contralateral knee in both the radiographs and the cadavers. In the radiographic group, there was a statistically significant correlation between femoral varus and valgus deformities and positive patellar centering. In the cadaveric group, there was a statistically significant correlation between tibial valgus and negative (medial) patellar centering. The patella in an immature knee is rarely perfectly centered on a true AP image, and is usually seated slightly laterally within the femoral condyles. Obtaining a true AP intraoperative radiograph is critical to analyzing and correcting valgus and varus deformities, and in the proper placement of implants. When addressing knee deformity one should consider obtaining an AP view orthogonal either to a perfect lateral of the knee or orthogonal to the

  10. Progress in Evaluation Study. Third Annual Report of the Center for the Study of Evaluation of Instructional Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for the Study of Evaluation.

    This report covers the activities of the Center for the Study of Evaluation (CSE) from October 1, 1967 through October 31, 1968, and indicates the major efforts projected for the future. Included in the report are descriptions of the Center's projects and activities, the new CSE approach, administrative functions and supporting services, its staff…

  11. The US LC Technology Comparison Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Gerald

    2004-05-01

    At the request of the United States Linear Collider Steering Group (USLCSG), a study has been carried out to evaluate two options for a high-energy electron-positron linear collider sited in the United States. One option is based on normal-conducting X-band rf technology, similar to the design of the GLC/NLC Collaboration. The other option is based on superconducting L-band rf technology, similar to the design of the TESLA Collaboration. The reference designs for both options satisfy the physics-based machine requirements specified by the Physics/Detector Subcommittee of the USLCSG. Both options were developed in concert, using, as much as possible, similar approaches in technical design for similar accelerator systems, and a common approach to cost and schedule estimation, reliability design and evaluation, and project risk assessments. This talk will present the results of the study.

  12. Mathematics Comparison Study = Etude Comporative Portant Sur les Mathematiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    At the request of the Council of Ministries of Education, Canada (CMEC), Alberta Learning conducted this Mathematics Comparison Study. The focus of this study is from Kindergarten to Grade 12. All provinces and territories were invited to participate, and only the Quebec region declined. Participating regions were invited to send a representative…

  13. Mathematics Comparison Study = Etude Comporative Portant Sur les Mathematiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    At the request of the Council of Ministries of Education, Canada (CMEC), Alberta Learning conducted this Mathematics Comparison Study. The focus of this study is from Kindergarten to Grade 12. All provinces and territories were invited to participate, and only the Quebec region declined. Participating regions were invited to send a representative…

  14. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Independent Peer Review Draft document presents a case study of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs); it focuses on the specific example of MWCNTs as used in flame-retardant coatings applied to upholstery textiles. This case study is organized around the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework, which structures available information pertaining to the product life cycle, environmental transport and fate, exposure-dose in receptors (i.e., humans, ecological populations, and the environment), and potential impacts in these receptors. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks, or present an exhaustive review of the literature. Rather, it was used in an independent peer review to provide feedback on revisions that EPA made to the external review draft of the document based on public comments and the CEA process to identify research gaps for MWCNTs. This document seeks to identify what is known and unknown related to assessing the health and environmental implications of a nanomaterial; in this case multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) used in flame-retardant coatings applied to textiles.

  15. Delayed ICD lead cardiac perforation: comparison of small versus standard-diameter leads implanted in a single center.

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Roberto; Canevese, Fabio; Vicentini, Alessandro; Petracci, Barbara; Savastano, Simone; Sanzo, Antonio; Gandolfi, Edoardo; Dore, Roberto; Landolina, Maurizio

    2011-04-01

    An increased risk of delayed cardiac perforation (DCP) with active-fixation small-diameter ICD leads has recently been reported, especially with regard to the St. Jude Riata lead (St. Jude Medical, Sylmar, CA, USA). Few data on the risk of DCP in small versus standard-diameter leads implanted in a single high-volume center are available. Moreover, no data on the performances of St. Jude's new small-diameter Durata lead are as yet available. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of DCP in small versus standard-diameter leads implanted in our center. Between January 2003 and October 2009, 437 small-diameter leads (190 Medtronic Sprint Fidelis [Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA], 196 Riata, 51 Durata) and 421 standard-diameter (>8 Fr) leads were implanted. After a median follow-up of 421 days seven of 858 (0.8%) patients experienced DCP. The incidence of DCP was higher in patients with small-diameter leads than in those with standard-diameter leads (1.6% vs 0%, P = 0.01). No cases of DCP occurred among 371 passive-fixation leads versus 1.4% of events among active-fixation leads (P = 0.02). The incidence of DCP was 2.5% in Riata, 1% in Sprint Fidelis, 0% in Durata, and 0% in standard-diameter leads (P < 0.01 for Riata vs standard-diameter leads). Small-diameter active-fixation ICD leads are at increased risk of DCP, a finding mostly due to the higher incidence of events in the Riata family. By contrast, passive-fixation small-diameter leads and standard-diameter leads appear to be safe enough regarding the risk of DCP. Our preliminary data suggest that the new Durata lead is not associated with an increased risk of DCP. ©2010, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparison of mean climate trends in the Northern Hemisphere between National Centers for Environmental Prediction and two atmosphere-ocean model forced runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Russell, Gary L.

    2002-08-01

    Results are presented for two greenhouse gas experiments of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies atmosphere-ocean model (AOM). The computed trends of surface pressure; surface temperature; 850, 500, and 200 mbar geopotential heights; and related temperatures of the model for the time frame 1960-2000 are compared with those obtained from the National Centers for Enviromental Prediction (NCEP) observations. The domain of interest is the Northern Hemisphere because of the higher reliability of both the model results and the observations. A spatial correlation analysis and a mean value comparison are performed, showing good agreement in terms of statistical significance for most of the variables considered in the winter and annual means. However, the 850 mbar temperature trends do not show significant positive correlation, and the surface pressure and 850 mbar geopotential height mean trends confidence intervals do not overlap. A brief general discussion about the statistics of trend detection is presented. The accuracy that this AOM has in describing the regional and NH mean climate trends inferred from NCEP through the atmosphere suggests that it may be reliable in forecasting future climate changes.

  17. A Comparison of Student-Centered versus Traditional Methods of Teaching Basic Nursing Skills in a Learning Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Pamela R.; Rew, Sandy; Cramer, Joni M.

    2002-01-01

    To learn surgical asepsis content, 70 nursing students used a student-centered interactive lab and 50 used textbooks, videotapes, and lecture-demonstrations. There were no differences in cognitive gains or ability to demonstrate the skills learned. The student-centered group was significantly more satisfied with their learning. (SK)

  18. Centering prayer for women receiving chemotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mary E; Dose, Ann M; Pipe, Teri Britt; Petersen, Wesley O; Huschka, Mashele; Gallenberg, Mary M; Peethambaram, Prema; Sloan, Jeff; Frost, Marlene H

    2009-07-01

    To explore the feasibility of implementing centering prayer in chemotherapy treatment and assess its influence on mood, spiritual well-being, and quality of life in women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Descriptive pilot study. Outpatient chemotherapy treatment suite in a large cancer center in the midwestern United States. A convenience sample of 10 women receiving outpatient chemotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. A centering prayer teacher led participants through three one-hour sessions over nine weeks. Data were collected prior to the first session, at the conclusion of the final session, and at three and six months after the final session. Feasibility and influence of centering prayer on mood, spiritual well-being, and quality of life. Most participants identified centering prayer as beneficial. Emotional well-being, anxiety, depression, and faith scores showed improvement. Centering prayer can potentially benefit women with recurrent ovarian cancer. Additional research is needed to assess its feasibility and effectiveness. Nurses may promote or suggest centering prayer as a feasible intervention for the psychological and spiritual adjustment of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

  19. Comparison of Ramadan-specific education level in patients with diabetes seen at a Primary and a Tertiary care center of Karachi-Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Masood, Shabeen Naz; Alvi, Syed Faraz Danish; Ahmedani, Muhammad Yakoob; Kiran, Shazia; Zeeshan, Nimra Fatima; Basit, Abdul; Shera, A Samad

    2014-01-01

    To compare Ramadan-specific education level in fasting patients with diabetes at a Primary and a Tertiary care center. An observational study was conducted in the Outpatient departments of a Primary care center and a Tertiary care center in Karachi-Pakistan. Recruitment of patients started at the end of Ramadan 2011 and continued till three months after Ramadan 2011. All patients with diabetes who observed fast during the month of Ramadan 2011 were included in the study. In Primary care center, patients were attended by physicians only, while at Tertiary care center patients were seen by physicians, diabetes educator and dietician. For data collection, standardized questionnaire based interview was conducted on one to one basis by trained healthcare professionals. Same questionnaire was used at both the centers. A total of 392 and 199 patients with diabetes recruited at Primary and Tertiary care centers, respectively. Ramadan-specific diabetes education received by 213 (55%) and 123 (61.80%) patients with diabetes at Primary and Tertiary care centers, respectively. Compared to Primary care center, patients at Tertiary care centers were more aware about components of Ramadan-specific diabetes education such as signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, dose of medicines/insulin during Ramadan fasting, dose of medicines/insulin when not fasting, self-monitoring of blood glucose, dietary modifications, physical activity, adequate nutrition and adequate hydration during Ramadan (p<0.05). It was observed that Ramadan-specific education level of patients at Tertiary care center was significantly better compared to patients at Primary care center. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intra-individual head-to-head comparison of Sirolimus®- and Paclitaxel®-eluting stents for coronary revascularization. A randomized, multi-center trial.

    PubMed

    Kollum, M; Heitzer, T; Schmoor, C; Brunner, M; Witzenbichler, B; Wiemer, M; Hoffmann, R; Gutleben, K J; Schultheiss, H P; Horstkotte, D; Brachmann, J; Meinertz, T; Bode, Ch; Zehender, M

    2013-08-20

    Despite the known effects of drug-eluting stents (DES), other cofactors attributed to patient characteristics affect their success. Interest focused on designing a study minimizing these factors to answer continuing concerns on the heterogeneity of response to different DESs. The study's aim was to investigate the feasibility and impact of an intra-individual comparison design in patients (pts) with two coronary artery stenosis treated with a Sirolimus- (SES) and a Paclitaxel- (PES) eluting stent. The study was conducted as a prospective, randomized, multi-center trial in 112 pts who consented to treatment with a SES and a PES. Pts were eligible if they suffered from the presence of two single primary target lesions in two different native coronary arteries. Lesions were randomized to either SES or PES treatment. The primary endpoint was in-stent luminal late loss (LLL), as determined by quantitative angiography at 8 months; clinical follow up was obtained at 1, 8, and 12 months additionally. The LLL (0.13 ± 0.28 mm SES vs. 0.26 ± 0.35 mm PES, p=0.011) showed less neointima in SES. With a predefined cut-off criterion of 0.2mm difference in LLL, 53/87 pts SES and PES were similar effective. 34/87 pts had a divergent result, 26 pts had greater benefit from SES while 8 pts had greater benefit from PES. Overall, MACE (MI, TLR, and death) occurred in 19 (17%) pts. Based on lesion analysis of 108 lesions treated with SES and 110 lesions treated with PES, 5 (4.6%) lesions with SES and 3 (2.7%) lesions with PES required repeated TLR. An intra-individual comparison design to assess differences in efficacy of different DESs is feasible, safe and achieves similar results to inter-individual studies. This study is among the first to show that failure of one DES does not necessarily implicate failure of another DES and vice versa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  2. The Effects of Policy Changes on the Educational Opportunity Centers: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain-Ellis, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the programmatic changes that occurred in the Educational Opportunity Centers (EOC) and how those changes influenced educational opportunities for adults. A case study design was used for this investigation. The directors of three EOCs were selected and interviewed for the study. These directors combined…

  3. Using a Pattern-Centered Approach to Assess Sexual Risk-Taking in Study Abroad Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcantonio, Tiffany; Angelone, D. J.; Sledjeski, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of several potential factors related to sexually risky behaviors in study abroad students. The authors utilized a pattern-centered analysis to identify specific groups that can be targeted for intervention. Participants: The sample consisted of 173 students who studied abroad in a…

  4. Head Start Evaluation and Research Center. Progress Report of Research Studies, 1966-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimiles, Herbert; Horton, Donald

    The studies which comprise this report are as follows: (a) Document 1, Development of the Matrix Test by Herbert Zimiles and Harvery Asch (PS 001 072); (b) Document 2, Studies of the Social Organization of Head Start Centers by Donald Horton and others (PS 001 073); (c) Document 3, An Experimental Approach to Studying Non-Verbal Representation in…

  5. An exploratory study of alternative configurations of governing boards of substance abuse treatment centers

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Terry C.; Roman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Boards of directors are the ultimate governing authorities for most organizations providing substance abuse treatment. A governing board may establish policies, monitor and improve operations, and represent a treatment organization to the public. This paper explores alternative configurations of governing boards in a national sample of 500 substance abuse treatment centers. The study proceeds from the premise that boards may be configured with varying levels of engagement in five aspects of internal management and external connections in treatment center operating environments. Based on interviews with treatment center administrative directors, four clusters emerge, describing boards that are: (1) active and balanced across internal and external domains; (2) active boundary spanners concentrating primarily on external relationships; (3) focused primarily on internal organizational management; and (4) relatively inactive. In post hoc analysis, we found that placement in these clusters is associated with treatment center attributes such as rate of growth and financial results, use of evidence based practices and provision of integrated care. PMID:21489737

  6. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  7. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: a survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Maryse C; Huijben, Jilske A; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Volovici, Victor; van Essen, Thomas; Polinder, Suzanne; Nelson, David; Ercole, Ari; Stocchetti, Nino; Citerio, Giuseppe; Peul, Wilco C; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Lingsma, Hester F

    2017-09-06

    No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP) management strategies, resulting in practice variation. The aim of this study was to examine variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in patients with TBI. A 29-item survey on ICP monitoring and treatment was developed on the basis of literature and expert opinion, and it was pilot-tested in 16 centers. The questionnaire was sent to 68 neurotrauma centers participating in the Collaborative European Neurotrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. The survey was completed by 66 centers (97% response rate). Centers were mainly academic hospitals (n = 60, 91%) and designated level I trauma centers (n = 44, 67%). The Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines were used in 49 (74%) centers. Approximately 90% of the participants (n = 58) indicated placing an ICP monitor in patients with severe TBI and computed tomographic abnormalities. There was no consensus on other indications or on peri-insertion precautions. We found wide variation in the use of first- and second-tier treatments for elevated ICP. Approximately half of the centers were classified as using a relatively aggressive approach to ICP monitoring and treatment (n = 32, 48%), whereas the others were considered more conservative (n = 34, 52%). Substantial variation was found regarding monitoring and treatment policies in patients with TBI and intracranial hypertension. The results of this survey indicate a lack of consensus between European neurotrauma centers and provide an opportunity and necessity for comparative effectiveness research.

  8. Current prevention strategies against cytomegalovirus in the studies in pediatric liver transplantation (SPLIT) centers.

    PubMed

    Danziger-Isakov, L; Bucavalas, J

    2014-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) continues to be a significant posttransplant infectious complication after pediatric liver transplant (PLT). The optimal prevention strategy is not currently known. To assess current CMV prevention practices, a web-based survey was conducted within the North American Studies in Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT) network. Twenty-nine of the 31 centers (94%) surveyed responded. Only seven centers reported evidence-based development of protocols. For most at-risk (donor or recipient CMV seropositive) PLT recipients, a prophylactic strategy predominates current practice. For high-risk (D+/R-), only three centers used nonprophylaxis-based protocols: one preemptive and two sequential/hybrid. Duration of prophylaxis ranged from 84 to 730 days with 14 centers using around 100 days and nine centers using around 200 days. Initial therapy with ganciclovir followed by valganciclovir was the most common strategy. For lower-risk recipients (CMV D-/R-), more centers (10/29) employed a preemptive strategy while the remainder described prophylaxis (15) and sequential/hybrid (3) strategies. Prophylaxis predominates current CMV prevention strategies for at-risk recipients within SPLIT. The variation in duration of therapy provides the opportunity to perform comparative effectiveness studies within SPLIT. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. EPR study of Fe3+ in α-quartz: Further lithium-compensated centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Deok; Weil, John A.

    1990-12-01

    Fe3+ (S=52) centers in synthetic α-quartz, designated by S'1 and S''1 by previous workers, which are very similar to the previously studied center [FeO4/Li]0α (called S1), have been examined at temperatures around 35 K via an X-band electron-paramagnetic-resonance study. Hyperfine signals due to the Li7 nucleus were detected for both centers, establishing their alkali-metal-ion content. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters were determined, allowing for anisotropy of the g factor as well as [g,D,A(Li7), P(Li7)]-matrix noncoaxiality, and including high-spin terms of the form S4. Evaluation of the results indicates that the lithium 1+ ion is present interstitially near to the substitutional Fe3+ ion (located at a Si4+ site) on the same crystal twofold axis, for all three centers: S1, S'1 and S''1. The designations [FeO4/Li]0α' are proposed for the centers S'1 and S''1, respectively. The relative concentrations of these centers appear to depend sensitively on the growth regions within each crystal.

  10. Awareness of Social Comparison Interest and Motivations: A Developmental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Nina S.; Ruble, Diane N.

    1977-01-01

    Students' interest in comparing their work to their peers' work was studied at different grade levels and in different motivating situations. The importance of the situational variables differed in two experiments on social comparison interest; awareness of the situational influences on motivation appear to increase with age. (GDC)

  11. THE NORTH AMERICAN MERCURY MODEL INTER-COMPARISON STUDY (NAMMIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the North American Mercury Model Inter-comparison Study (NAMMIS). The NAMMIS is an effort to apply atmospheric Hg models in a tightly constrained testing environment with a focus on North America. With each model using the same input data sets for initial co...

  12. Does Matching Quality Matter in Mode Comparison Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Ji; Yin, Ping; Shedden, Kerby A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three matching approaches in forming comparable groups for a study comparing test administration modes (i.e., computer-based tests [CBT] and paper-and-pencil tests [PPT]): (a) a propensity score matching approach proposed in this article, (b) the propensity score matching approach used by…

  13. 1976-77 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1976-1977 were compared to 1975 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from a similar 1974-1975 study. Based on a sample of 212,263 applicants, findings include the following: during 1976-1977, 70.7 percent of all…

  14. 1979-80 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1979-1980 were compared to 1978 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from similar 1974-1975 and 1976-1977 studies. Based on a sample of 407,596 applicants, findings include the following: between 1976-1977 and…

  15. Does Matching Quality Matter in Mode Comparison Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Ji; Yin, Ping; Shedden, Kerby A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview and comparison of three matching approaches in forming comparable groups for a study comparing test administration modes (i.e., computer-based tests [CBT] and paper-and-pencil tests [PPT]): (a) a propensity score matching approach proposed in this article, (b) the propensity score matching approach used by…

  16. International Comparisons of Teachers' Salaries: An Exploratory Study. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barro, Steven M.; Suter, Larry

    This paper, the final product of a study, "International Comparison of Teachers' Salaries," on an exploratory effort to compare salaries of elementary and secondary school teachers in the United States with those in other economically advanced countries. Data was obtained from Canada, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy, Japan,…

  17. The management approach to the NASA space station definition studies at the Manned Spacecraft Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heberlig, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The overall management approach to the NASA Phase B definition studies for space stations, which were initiated in September 1969 and completed in July 1972, is reviewed with particular emphasis placed on the management approach used by the Manned Spacecraft Center. The internal working organizations of the Manned Spacecraft Center and its prime contractor, North American Rockwell, are delineated along with the interfacing techniques used for the joint Government and industry study. Working interfaces with other NASA centers, industry, and Government agencies are briefly highlighted. The controlling documentation for the study (such as guidelines and constraints, bibliography, and key personnel) is reviewed. The historical background and content of the experiment program prepared for use in this Phase B study are outlined and management concepts that may be considered for future programs are proposed.

  18. The NASA Lewis Research Center's Expendable Launch Vehicle Program: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of the Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) Expendable Launch Vehicle Program (ELVP) on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures ELVP's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they "ripple" throughout the economy. The study uses regional economic multipliers based on input-output models to estimate the effect of ELVP spending on the Northeast Ohio economy.

  19. The NASA Lewis Research Center's Expendable Launch Vehicle Program: An Economic Impact Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austrian, Ziona

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates the economic impact of the Lewis Research Center's (LeRC) Expendable Launch Vehicle Program (ELVP) on Northeast Ohio's economy. It was conducted by The Urban Center's Economic Development Program in Cleveland State University's Levin College of Urban Affairs. The study measures ELVP's direct impact on the local economy in terms of jobs, output, payroll, and taxes, as well as the indirect impact of these economic activities when they 'ripple' throughout the economy. The study uses regional economic multipliers based on input-output models to estimate the effect of ELVP spending on the Northeast Ohio economy.

  20. Analysis on productivity of clinical studies across -- Asian countries a case comparison.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Sengoku, S; Kimura, H

    2007-08-01

    In an era of increasing global competition and an increased interest in global clinical studies Japan has been concerned with the risk of losing its attractiveness due to perceived longer execution times and higher cost structure. In contrast, other Asian countries particularly China and Singapore are widely recognized as potential key centers for fast conduction of global clinical studies. We conducted a case comparison based on two clinical studies performed by a multinational pharmaceutical company in order to measure the productivity of clinical studies by region and country. We focused on the site-related study cost which constituted the largest portion of the cost breakdown and also impacted both time and quality management. For investigation of the productivity we propose a breakdown model with two Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), enrollment efficiency and site-related cost efficiency, for the comparison of the number of enrolled subject per site and cost, respectively. Through the comparative analysis we found that the Asian countries (excluding Japan) on average achieved higher efficiency than Japan in both indicators. In the Asian group, China and Singapore stood out as the most efficient on both speed and site-related cost. However, when the site-related cost efficiency was adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) the cost advantage in China disappeared, implying the price level was critical for productivity management. Although quality aspects remain to be investigated we postulate that introducing a comparative approach based on a productivity framework would be useful for an accurate productivity comparison.

  1. The Impact of Introducing Centering Pregnancy in a Community Health Setting: A Qualitative Study of Experiences and Perspectives of Health Center Clinical and Support Staff.

    PubMed

    Kania-Richmond, Ania; Hetherington, Erin; McNeil, Deborah; Bayrampour, Hamideh; Tough, Suzanne; Metcalfe, Amy

    2017-01-12

    Objectives Introducing new programming into an existing setting may be challenging. Understanding how staff and clinicians who are not directly involved in program delivery view the program can help support program implementation. This study aimed to understand how peripheral staff and clinicians perceived a newly implemented Centering Pregnancy group prenatal care program in a community-based health center and its impact on clinic operations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members at a community-based health center. The interview guide covered topics such as perceptions of Centering Pregnancy and how the program impacted their work. An interpretive description approach was used to analyze the interview data. A coding framework was developed iteratively and all interview data were analyzed independently by multiple researchers. Results Staff had overall positive perceptions of Centering Pregnancy, but the level of understanding about the program varied widely. Most respondents viewed the Centering Pregnancy program as separate from other programs offered by the clinic, which created both opportunities and challenges. Opportunities included increased cross-referrals between established services and Centering Pregnancy. Challenges included a lack of communication about responsibilities of staff in relation to Centering Pregnancy patients. Impact on staff and overall clinic operations was perceived to be minimal to moderate, and most tensions related to roles and expectations were resolved. Conclusions for Practice Clear communication regarding fit within clinic structures and processes and expectations of staff in relation to the program was critical to the integration of Centering Pregnancy program into an established health center.

  2. Comparison of Conflict of Interest Policies and Reported Practices in Academic Medical Centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dinan, Michaela A.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Friedman, Joëlle Y.; Allsbrook, Jennifer S.; Gottlieb, Julie; Schulman, Kevin A.; Hall, Mark A.; Dhillon, Jatinder K.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the level of consistency between academic medical centers’ conflict of interest policies and reported practices. Method The authors reviewed the written conflict of interest policies of 9 academic medical centers in the United States and interviewed members of the institutional review boards (IRBs) and conflict of interest committees (COICs) at those institutions. Topics of interest included communication between IRBs and COICs, processes for reporting and managing conflicts of interest, and disclosure of conflicts of interest to potential research participants. Results Reported relationships between IRBs and COICs varied, but only 2 institutions had written policies governing these relationships. Many institutions used processes for reporting and managing conflicts of interest that were more decentralized than the processes described in their formal policies. Policies and practices regarding disclosure of conflicts of interest also varied. At most institutions, no clear and comprehensive policy existed to guide investigators regarding disclosure of financial conflicts of interest to potential research participants. Conclusions This study confirms the need to ensure that institutions’ practices match their policies. Considerable differences in understanding of conflict of interest policies were observed between IRB and COIC officials, suggesting that clear, comprehensive, and well-disseminated policies may lead to more consistent practice within institutions. PMID:17849643

  3. A Comparison of Vertical Stiffness Values Calculated from Different Measures of Center of Mass Displacement in Single-Leg Hopping.

    PubMed

    Mudie, Kurt L; Gupta, Amitabh; Green, Simon; Hobara, Hiroaki; Clothier, Peter J

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the agreement between Kvert calculated from 4 different methods of estimating vertical displacement of the center of mass (COM) during single-leg hopping. Healthy participants (N = 38) completed a 10-s single-leg hopping effort on a force plate, with 3D motion of the lower limb, pelvis, and trunk captured. Derived variables were calculated for a total of 753 hop cycles using 4 methods, including: double integration of the vertical ground reaction force, law of falling bodies, a marker cluster on the sacrum, and a segmental analysis method. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that Kvert calculated using segmental analysis and double integration methods have a relatively small bias (0.93 kN⋅m(-1)) and 95% limits of agreement (-1.89 to 3.75 kN⋅m(-1)). In contrast, a greater bias was revealed between sacral marker cluster and segmental analysis (-2.32 kN⋅m(-1)), sacral marker cluster and double integration (-3.25 kN⋅m(-1)), and the law of falling bodies compared with all methods (17.26-20.52 kN⋅m(-1)). These findings suggest the segmental analysis and double integration methods can be used interchangeably for the calculation of Kvert during single-leg hopping. The authors propose the segmental analysis method to be considered the gold standard for the calculation of Kvert during single-leg, on-the-spot hopping.

  4. User-centered design improves the usability of drug-drug interaction alerts: Experimental comparison of interfaces.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel R; Rizzato Lede, Daniel A; Otero, Carlos M; Risk, Marcelo R; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2017-02-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems can alert health professionals about drug interactions when they prescribe medications. The Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires in Argentina developed an electronic health record with drug-drug interaction alerts, using traditional software engineering techniques and requirements. Despite enhancing the drug-drug interaction knowledge database, the alert override rate of this system was very high. We redesigned the alert system using user-centered design (UCD) and participatory design techniques to enhance the drug-drug interaction alert interface. This paper describes the methodology of our UCD. We used crossover method with realistic, clinical vignettes to compare usability of the standard and new software versions in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction. Our study showed that, compared to the traditional alert system, the UCD alert system was more efficient (alerts faster resolution), more effective (tasks completed with fewer errors), and more satisfying. These results indicate that UCD techniques that follow ISO 9241-210 can generate more usable alerts than traditional design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical and hemodynamic profiles of elderly patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a single center, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ozpelit, Ebru; Akdeniz, Bahri; Sezgin, Dilek; Sevinc, Can; Tertemiz, Kemal Can; Ozpelit, Mehmet Emre; Baris, Mustafa; Baris, Nezihi

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was previously considered an illness that affects mostly the young, but now it is also increasingly recognized in the elderly. The aim of this study was to compare the features of elderly versus younger patients diagnosed with PAH, and to define the prognostic factors which affect their long-term survival. Methods In this prospective, single center study, the clinical, echocardiographic, hemodynamic characteristics, and the outcomes of younger (18–65 years) and elderly (≥ 65 years) patients with definitive diagnosis of precapillary PAH were compared. Results A total of 119 patients were analyzed in this study; 43 were elderly (mean age: 71.5 ± 5.5 years), while 76 were non-elderly (mean age 44.5 ± 15.2 years). During the mean follow-up duration of 26.8 ± 25.0 months, 43 deaths occurred, 17 of which were among the elderly group, with 28 among non-elderly group. Comparison of baseline parameters showed that 6 min walking distance, hemoglobin levels, pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance were significantly lower; and estimated glomerular filtration rate, body mass index, E/e' and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure were significantly higher in the elderly group than in the younger group. Survival analysis demonstrated that the independent predictors of death were tricuspid plane annular systolic excursion (TAPSE; HR: 1.272, 95% CI: 1.079–1.499, P = 0.004) and uric acid (HR: 1.291, 95% CI: 1.042–1.600, P = 0.019) in the elderly group. In contrast, in the non-elderly group, higher brain natriuretic peptide (HR: 1.002, 95% CI: 1.001–1.004, P < 0.001) and higher right atrial pressure (HR: 1.128, 95% CI: 1.026–1.241, P = 0.013) values were the only parameters associated with mortality. Conclusions Our data suggest that elderly PAH patients have a unique clinical and hemodynamic profile, with totally different prognostic markers compared to younger PAH patients. PMID:28270838

  6. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are studied: one conventional multidetector CT (MDCT), two digital flat panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices. Technical considerations, ease of use, image characteristics, and integration with image guidance are presented for each device. All three scanners provide good quality images. Intraoperative scanning can be used to update the image guidance system in real time. The conventional MDCT is unique in its ability to resolve soft tissue. The flat panel CBCT scanners generally emit lower levels of radiation and have less metal artifact effect. In this series, intraoperative CT scanning was technically feasible and deemed useful in surgical decision-making in 75% of patients. Intraoperative portable CT scanning has significant utility in complex skull base surgery. This technology informs the surgeon of the precise extent of dissection and updates intraoperative stereotactic navigation. PMID:22470270

  7. Parameter identification studies on the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckavitt, Thomas P., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results of an aircraft parameters identification study conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) in conjunction with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics are given. The ACFS is a commercial airline simulator with a design based on future technology. The simulator is used as a laboratory for human factors research and engineering as applied to the commercial airline industry. Parametric areas examined were engine pressure ratio (EPR), optimum long range cruise Mach number, flap reference speed, and critical take-off speeds. Results were compared with corresponding parameters of the Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft. This comparison identified two areas where improvements can be made: (1) low maximum lift coefficients (on the order of 20-25 percent less than those of a 757); and (2) low optimum cruise Mach numbers. Recommendations were made to those anticipated with the application of future technologies.

  8. Barriers to utilization of childbirth services of a rural birthing center in Nepal: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Khadka Narayan; Homer, Caroline S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity are public health problems in Nepal. In rural communities, many women give birth at home without the support of a skilled birth attendant, despite the existence of rural birthing centers. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers and provide pragmatic recommendations for better service delivery and use of rural birthing centers. Methods We conducted 26 in-depth interviews with service users and providers, and three focus group discussions with community key informants in a rural community of Rukum district. We used the Adithya Cattamanchi logic model as a guiding framework for data analysis. Results Irregular and poor quality services, inadequate human and capital resources, and poor governance were health system challenges which prevented service delivery. Contextual barriers including difficult geography, poor birth preparedness practices, harmful culture practices and traditions and low level of trust were also found to contribute to underutilization of the birthing center. Conclusion The rural birthing center was not providing quality services when women were in need, which meant women did not use the available services properly because of systematic and contextual barriers. Approaches such as awareness-raising activities, local resource mobilization, ensuring access to skilled providers and equipment and other long-term infrastructure development works could improve the quality and utilization of childbirth services in the rural birthing center. This has resonance for other centers in Nepal and similar countries. PMID:28493987

  9. Comparison of survival at adult versus pediatric treatment centers for rare pediatric tumors in an adolescent and young adult (AYA) population in the State of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Ward, Kevin C; Mertens, Ann C; Rapkin, Louis

    2015-03-01

    The type of treatment center where 15-21-year-old adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with rare pediatric tumors achieve their best clinical outcome is unknown. We performed a retrospective analysis using the Georgia Cancer Registry (GCR) of 15-21-year old patients with a malignant, rare pediatric tumor diagnosed during the period from 2000-2009. Patients were identified as being treated at one of five Georgia pediatric cancer centers or at an adult center. Data were analyzed for 10 year overall survival, patient characteristics associated with death, and patient characteristics present at diagnosis associated with choice of treatment center. There was a total of 479 patients in our final study population, of which 379 (79.1%) were treated at an adult center and 100 (20.9%) were treated at a pediatric center. Patients treated at an adult center had a 10 year overall survival of 86% compared to 85% for patients treated at a pediatric center (P = 0.31). Race and poverty were not significantly associated with death. Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (OR = 7.38; 95% CI = 2.30-23.75) and 'other carcinomas' (OR = 2.64; 95% CI = 1.25-5.60) were more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Patients with higher-stage disease (OR = 4.24; 95% CI = 1.71-10.52) and higher poverty (OR = 2.32; 95% CI = 1.23-4.37) were also more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Our data suggest that there is no difference in survival for 15-21-year old patients with rare pediatric tumors when treated at an adult or pediatric center. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Comparison of Survival at Adult versus Pediatric Treatment Centers for Rare Pediatric Tumors in an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Population in the State of Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Thomas; Qayed, Muna; Ward, Kevin C.; Mertens, Ann C.; Rapkin, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Background The type of treatment center where 15-21-year-old adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with rare pediatric tumors achieve their best clinical outcome is unknown. Procedure We performed a retrospective analysis using the Georgia Cancer Registry (GCR) of 15-21-year-old patients with a malignant, rare pediatric tumor diagnosed during the period from 2000-2009. Patients were identified as being treated at one of five Georgia pediatric cancer centers or at an adult center. Data were analyzed for 10-year overall survival, patient characteristics associated with death, and patient characteristics present at diagnosis associated with choice of treatment center. Results There was a total of 479 patients in our final study population, of which 379 (79.1%) were treated at an adult center and 100 (20.9%) were treated at a pediatric center. Patients treated at an adult center had a 10-year overall survival of 86% compared to 85% for patients treated at a pediatric center (p= 0.31). Race and poverty were not significantly associated with death. Patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (OR=7.38; 95% CI=2.30 – 23.75) and ‘other carcinomas’ (OR=2.64; 95% CI=1.25 – 5.60) were more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Patients with higher-stage disease (OR=4.24; 95% CI=1.71 – 10.52) and higher poverty (OR=2.32; 95% CI=1.23 – 4.37) were also more likely to be treated at a pediatric center. Conclusion Our data suggest that there is no difference in survival for 15-21-year-old patients with rare pediatric tumors when treated at an adult or pediatric center. PMID:25393593

  11. An analytical and experimental study of crack extension in center-notched composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The normal stress ratio theory for crack extension in anisotropic materials is studied analytically and experimentally. The theory is applied within a microscopic-level analysis of a single center notch of arbitrary orientation in a unidirectional composite material. The bulk of the analytical work of this study applies an elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center line to obtain critical stress and crack growth direction predictions. An elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center elliptical flaw is also used to obtain qualitative predictions of the location of crack initiation on the border of a rounded notch tip. The analytical portion of the study includes the formulation of a new crack growth theory that includes local shear stress. Normal stress ratio theory predictions are obtained for notched unidirectional tensile coupons and unidirectional Iosipescu shear specimens. These predictions are subsequently compared to experimental results.

  12. Usability of patient-centered health IT: mixed-methods usability study of ePill.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Kraepelin, Manuel; Dehling, Tobias; Sunyaev, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate use of patient-centered health IT applications in everyday life, a high degree of usability is required. Based on the example of a patient-centered web application, we propose a usability study design enabling developers and researchers to assess usability of patient-centered health IT applications and derive implications for their improvement. Our study design integrates tasks that subjects have to process, an associated questionnaire based on Perceived Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Attitude Toward Using, and Behavioral Intention to Use, a System Usability Scale questionnaire, and focus groups. Application of the usability study design demonstrates its feasibility and provides insights for assessment of usability in related projects in research and practice.

  13. Five hydrologic studies conducted by or in cooperation with the Center for Forested Wetlands Research

    Treesearch

    Devendra M. Amatya; Carl C. Trettin; R. Wayne Skaggs; Marianne K. Burke; T.J. Callahan; Ge Sun; J.E. Nettles; J.E. Parsons; M. Miwa

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Center for Forested Wetlands Research has conducted or cooperated in studies designed to improve understanding of fundamental hydrologic and biogeochemical processes that link aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Five of these studies are discussed here. The first is based on observations made on long-term experimental...

  14. A Case Study of Spirituality in Senior Center Education: Qualitative Research in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demarse, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study on the role of spirituality in adult education at a suburban senior center located in the southeast region of the country. The purpose of the case study was to understand the deeply personal role of spirituality in adult education as seen through teaching seniors and examine the personal manifestation of…

  15. A Patient Learning Center for an Army MEDDAC - A Feasibility Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucha, Deloros H.

    A feasibility study was conducted to examine in detail, analyze, and describe the development and operation (system effectiveness and efficiency) of a patient learning center in a MEDDAC, and to provide such information to the Surgeon General for use in planning future health care delivery to military-care eligible beneficiaries. Study objectives…

  16. Patterns for Voluntary Cooperation. Self-Study Report of the College Center of the Finger Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Center of the Finger Lakes, Corning, NY.

    This final self-study report of the College Center of the Finger Lakes (CCFL) represents 8 months of investigation in which over 500 faculty members, administrative officers and students from the 9 member colleges participated. The objectives of the study were to (1) identify the collective resources of the 9 member colleges and universities; (2)…

  17. Keldysh research center's experimental facility for studying of thermal control systems with two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednov, Sergey M.; Vezhnevets, Petr D.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Tsikhotsky, Yury M.; Prokhorov, Yury. M.; Kopiatkevich, R.; Gorbenko, Gennady; Diev, M.

    1997-01-01

    This Paper presents a brief description of the experimental facility which was developed in the Keldysh Research Center (KeRC) for studying and working out the thermal control system (TCS) for the Russian segment of the International space station ``Alpha'' (ISSA). The list of scientific and design problems which will be studied during ground testing is given.

  18. Faculty Members' Perceptions of Community College Centers for Teaching and Learning: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore faculty members' perceptions of community college Centers for Teaching and Learning (CTLs); whose main purpose is to promote, facilitate, and honor excellence in teaching and learning through the support of full-time and adjunct faculty, at all career stages. A generic qualitative study with a grounded…

  19. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  20. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  1. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  2. A Case Study: An ACT Stress Management Group in a University Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daltry, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) stress management group in a college counseling center setting. This study explored (a) the effectiveness of ACT in increasing participants' ability to tolerate distress, which directly affects their ability to function in a stressful college…

  3. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Managers' Experiences and Perceptions Regarding Outsourced Data Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Eric Justin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perceptions and experiences of IT Managers in publicly traded companies within the San Antonio, Texas area about outsourced data centers. Narrative data was collected using open-ended questions and face-to-face interviews within semi-structured environments. The research questions guided the study: (1)…

  4. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Managers' Experiences and Perceptions Regarding Outsourced Data Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Eric Justin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perceptions and experiences of IT Managers in publicly traded companies within the San Antonio, Texas area about outsourced data centers. Narrative data was collected using open-ended questions and face-to-face interviews within semi-structured environments. The research questions guided the study: (1)…

  5. Multiple comparisons in drug efficacy studies: scientific or marketing principles?

    PubMed

    Leo, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    When researchers design an experiment to compare a given medication to another medication, a behavioral therapy, or a placebo, the experiment often involves numerous comparisons. For instance, there may be several different evaluation methods, raters, and time points. Although scientifically justified, such comparisons can be abused in the interests of drug marketing. This article provides two recent examples of such questionable practices. The first involves the case of the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex), where the study lasted 12 months but the authors only presented 6 months of data. The second case involves the NIMH Multimodal Treatment Study (MTA) study evaluating the efficacy of stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder where ratings made by several groups are reported in contradictory fashion. The MTA authors have not clarified the confusion, at least in print, suggesting that the actual findings of the study may have played little role in the authors' reported conclusions.

  6. A descriptive comparison of alcohol-related presentations at a large urban hospital center from 1902 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Shy, Bradley D; Hoffman, Robert S

    2012-09-01

    Although alcohol use has long been a significant cause of hospital presentations, little is published regarding the long-term demographic changes that have occurred at a single hospital site. To address this deficit, we prospectively studied all acute alcohol-related presentations to Bellevue Hospital Center (New York, NY) and compared this contemporary data set with one from the same institution from 1902 to 1935. We prospectively identified all patients presenting to the emergency department because of acute alcohol use over an 8-week period in 2009. We described the basic attributes of patients presenting currently because of alcohol and compared these data to those previously described between 1902 and 1935. We also compared our census data with contemporaneous data from all patients presenting to this hospital site. During the study period, 560 patients presented because of acute alcohol use which extrapolated to an estimated 3,800 patients over the calendar year. This compares to 7,600 presentations recorded annually early in the twentieth century. Twelve percent of patients in 2009 were female as compared to 18 % of patients between 1934 and 1935. Patients with alcohol-related presentations in 2009 were more likely to be admitted than contemporaneous patients without an alcohol-related presentation (30 vs. 19 % admitted; p < 0.001). Since first measured 110 years ago at one large New York City hospital, alcohol-related presentations remain common representing 5 % of all emergency department visits. This demonstrates alcoholism's continuing toll on society's limited medical resources and on public health as a whole.

  7. Poststroke Rehabilitation and Restorative Care Utilization: A Comparison Between VA Community Living Centers and VA-contracted Community Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Bates, Barbara E; Vogel, W Bruce; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Wang, Xinping; Hoffman, Nannette

    2016-03-01

    Effective poststroke rehabilitation care can speed patient recovery and minimize patient functional disabilities. Veterans affairs (VA) community living centers (CLCs) and VA-contracted community nursing homes (CNHs) are the 2 major sources of institutional long-term care for Veterans with stroke receiving care under VA auspices. This study compares rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care among Veterans residing in VA CLCs versus those Veterans in VA-contracted CNHs. Retrospective observational. All Veterans diagnosed with stroke, newly admitted to the CLCs or CNHs during the study period who completed at least 2 Minimum Data Set assessments postadmission. The outcomes were numbers of days for rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care received by the Veterans during their stays in CLCs or CNHs as documented in the Minimum Data Set databases. For rehabilitation therapy, the CLC Veterans had lower user rates (75.2% vs. 76.4%, P=0.078) and fewer observed therapy days (4.9 vs. 6.4, P<0.001) than CNH Veterans. However, the CLC Veterans had higher adjusted odds for therapy (odds ratio=1.16, P=0.033), although they had fewer average therapy days (coefficient=-1.53±0.11, P<0.001). For restorative nursing care, CLC Veterans had higher user rates (33.5% vs. 30.6%, P<0.001), more observed average care days (9.4 vs. 5.9, P<0.001), higher adjusted odds (odds ratio=2.28, P<0.001), and more adjusted days for restorative nursing care (coefficient=5.48±0.37, P<0.001). Compared with their counterparts at VA-contracted CNHs, Veterans at VA CLCs had fewer average rehabilitation therapy days (both unadjusted and adjusted), but they were significantly more likely to receive restorative nursing care both before and after risk adjustment.

  8. A STUDY OF THE INTEGRATION OF SERVICES OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL DEPARTMENTS AND A REHABILITATION CENTER. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCQUILLEN, ANITA; AND OTHERS

    THIS IS A DEMONSTRATION PROJECT OF COOPERATION BETWEEN A REHABILITATION CENTER AND THREE LARGE INDUSTRIAL COMPANIES. OVER A 3-YEAR PERIOD, 56 WORKERS WHO HAD BEEN INJURED ON THE JOB AND HOSPITALIZED WERE ADMITTED TO THE REHABILITATION CENTER. OF THE 50 WORKERS STUDIED, THE AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY IN THE CENTER WAS 36 DAYS. A FOLLOWUP STUDY,…

  9. Interindividual uniformity and variety of the "Writing center": a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Genichi; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Sugishita, Morihiro

    2006-10-01

    Our aim is to investigate the neural substrates for writing using fMRI (twenty right-handed subjects). We assumed that common areas involved in both writing with right and left hands are crucial to the central process of writing. We employed Japanese phonograms (Kana), in which phoneme-grapheme conversion would be extremely simple. Brain activation was examined under three conditions: (1) written naming with the right hand (WR), (2) written naming with the left hand (WL), and (3) naming silently (NA). While the comparison of WR to NA (WR>NA) exhibited activation only in the left frontoparietal area, the WL>NA comparison exhibited broader activation than the WR>NA comparison, i.e., the left frontoparietal area except the motor and sensory areas and the right frontoparietal area. A conjunction analysis in SPM2 revealed common areas of activation across the WR>NA and WL>NA comparisons, which are assumed to be crucial to writing. In the group analysis, three areas were found to be activated: the posterior end of the left superior frontal gyrus, which is superior and posterior to Exner's center; the anterior part of the left superior parietal lobule; and the lower part of the anterior limb of the left supramarginal gyrus. In the single-subject analysis, whereas the first two of the above three areas were found to be crucial for writing in all individuals, an interindividual inconsistency of involvement with writing was observed in three areas: the lower part of the anterior limb of the left supramarginal gyrus (60% involved); the right frontal region (47%); and the right intraparietal sulcus (47%).

  10. Multiple Comparisons in Genetic Association Studies: A Hierarchical Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically ‘significant’ effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/). PMID:24259248

  11. Multiple comparisons in genetic association studies: a hierarchical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2014-02-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically "significant" effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/).

  12. Case-control study of lung function in World Trade Center Health Registry area residents and workers.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Stephen M; Maslow, Carey B; Reibman, Joan; Pillai, Parul S; Goldring, Roberta M; Farfel, Mark R; Stellman, Steven D; Berger, Kenneth I

    2011-09-01

    Residents and area workers who inhaled dust and fumes from the World Trade Center disaster reported lower respiratory symptoms in two World Trade Center Health Registry surveys (2003-2004 and 2006-2007), but lung function data were lacking. To examine the relationship between persistent respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in a nested case-control study of exposed adult residents and area workers 7-8 years after September 11, 2001. Registrants reporting post September 11th onset of a lower respiratory symptom in the first survey and the same symptom in the second survey were solicited as potential cases. Registrants without lower respiratory symptoms in either Registry survey were solicited as potential control subjects. Final case-control status was determined by lower respiratory symptoms at a third interview (the study), when spirometry and impulse oscillometry were also performed. We identified 180 cases and 473 control subjects. Cases were more likely than control subjects to have abnormal spirometry (19% vs. 11%; P < 0.05), and impulse oscillometry measurements of elevated airway resistance (R5; 68% vs. 27%; P < 0.0001) and frequency dependence of resistance (R₅₋₂₀; 36% vs. 7%; P < 0.0001). When spirometry was normal, cases were more likely than control subjects to have elevated R₅ and R₅₋₂₀ (62% vs. 25% and 27% vs. 6%, respectively; both P < 0.0001). Associations between symptoms and oscillometry held when factors significant in bivariate comparisons (body mass index, spirometry, and exposures) were analyzed using logistic regression. This study links persistent respiratory symptoms and oscillometric abnormalities in World Trade Center-exposed residents and area workers. Elevated R₅ and R₅₋₂₀ in cases despite normal spirometry suggested distal airway dysfunction as a mechanism for symptoms.

  13. Comparison between Experimental and Numerical Studies of a Reflex Triode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a comparison of experimental and simulated results of a reflex triode driven by a compact Marx system. The experimental setup...consists of a Marx system and a reflex triode together with a short output waveguide. A parametric study has been performed. The diagnostics used include...particle-in-cell simulation code MAGIC is used to numerically study the system described above. A 1D model of the Marx system has been designed and this is

  14. Family-centered rounds in theory and practice: an ethnographic case study.

    PubMed

    Subramony, Anupama; Hametz, Patricia A; Balmer, Dorene

    2014-01-01

    Family-centered rounds (FCR) seek to incorporate principles of family-centered care-including clear and open information sharing, respect, participation and collaboration-into inpatient settings. Although potential models designed to translate these principles into everyday clinical practice have been reported, few studies explore how FCR practices align with principles of family-centered care. We conducted an ethnographic study, observing over 200 hours of FCR on a general pediatrics inpatient service from January to August 2010 (185 distinct rounding events). To complement observation, we conducted interviews with 6 family members. Qualitative analysis entailed applying codes to data from observation and interviews and deriving themes using the principles of family-centered care as an interpretive lens. Four themes emerged that suggested incomplete alignment between FCR practices and principles of family-centered care. 1) FCR provided a forum for information sharing; nonetheless, medical jargon sometimes limited communication. 2) Medical teams approached families with practices intended to demonstrated respect, but contextual factors served to undermine this intent. 3) FCR gave family members the opportunity to participate in care but did not guarantee their involvement. 4) FCR were a starting point for collaboration around plan making, but did not guarantee that collaboration occurred. Although FCR practices may set the stage for family-centered care, they do not necessarily ensure that the principles of family-centered care are upheld. Efforts to more effectively deliver FCR should consider physical, organizational, and cultural factors that influence both patient/family and medical team behavior. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of pelvic inflammatory disease by primary care physicians. A comparison with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hessol, N A; Priddy, F H; Bolan, G; Baumrind, N; Vittinghoff, E; Reingold, A L; Padian, N S

    1996-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published recommendations for clinicians on the management of pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is unknown if providers are aware of the guidelines or follow them. To compare pelvic inflammatory disease screening, diagnosis, treatment, and reporting practices among primary care physicians with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. A weighted random sample of California primary care physicians surveyed in November 1992 and January 1993. Of the 1,165 physicians surveyed, 553 (48%) returned completed questionnaires. Among respondents, 302 (55%) reported having treated a case of pelvic inflammatory disease during the last 12 months, and of these, 52% answered that they were unsure of or do not follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease. Pediatricians and those with more years since residency were less likely to deviate from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pelvic inflammatory disease, and family practitioners were more likely to deviate from the guidelines. Pelvic inflammatory disease is commonly encountered by primary care physicians in California. Training and experience were important predictors of compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations; however, substantial divergence from the guidelines occurs.

  16. Comparison study and thoron interference test of different radon monitors.

    PubMed

    Sumesh, C G; Kumar, A Vinod; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2013-03-01

    A comparison study and thoron interference test for different continuous radon monitors were carried out. The comparison study includes three passive diffusion monitors [one pulse ionisation chamber based-Alpha Guard and two silicon semi-conductor based-Radon Scout Plus (RSP)] and one silicon semi-conductor-based active radon thoron discriminating monitor--RAD 7. Radon emanation standard, supplied by National Institute of Science and Technology, has been utilised for the comparison study to qualify the calibration of the continuous radon monitors. All the instruments showed good agreement with the estimated radon concentration using (226)Ra/(222)Rn emanation standard. It was found that the active radon monitoring system is having a higher initial response towards the transient radon concentration than the passive radon monitors studied. The instruments measuring radon concentration without energy discrimination are likely to have some sensitivity towards the thoron concentration. Thus, thoron interference study was carried out in the above monitors. Nine percent interference in measured radon concentration in the Alpha Guard monitor and 4 % interference in the semi-conductor-based RSP monitors was observed. Study indicates that the interference of thoron in radon monitors depends on the area of diffusion of gas, volume of detection and sensitivity factor.

  17. Building America Case Study: New Town Builders' Power of Zero Energy Center, Denver, Colorado (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    New Town Builders, a builder of energy efficient homes in Denver, Colorado, offers a zero energy option for all the homes it builds. To attract a wide range of potential homebuyers to its energy efficient homes, New Town Builders created a 'Power of Zero Energy Center' linked to its model home in the Stapleton community of Denver. This case study presents New Town Builders' marketing approach, which is targeted to appeal to homebuyers' emotions rather than overwhelming homebuyers with scientific details about the technology. The exhibits in the Power of Zero Energy Center focus on reduced energy expenses for the homeowner, improved occupant comfort, the reputation of the builder, and the lack of sacrificing the homebuyers' desired design features to achieve zero net energy in the home. The case study also contains customer and realtor testimonials related to the effectiveness of the Center in influencing homebuyers to purchase a zero energy home.

  18. Rotational Spectroscopy of Reactive Species at the Center for Astrochemical Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, Valerio; Spezzano, Silvia; Caselli, Paola

    2017-06-01

    The Center for Astrochemical Studies at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, is a recently established group which collects scientists with very diverse backgrounds. In the same group observers, theoreticians, chemists and molecular astrophysicists join their efforts with the ultimate goal of properly interpreting observations with the new generation telescopes and unveiling our astrochemical/physical heritage. Among these tasks, the gas-phase spectroscopic characterisation of molecular species of astrophysical relevance is one of the main goals of the laboratory sub-group. This talk will mainly focus on the first experiment built in our center, the CASAC (CAS Absorption Cell) spectrometer: this experiment has been optimised on the production and probe of small molecular ions and radicals. The main laboratory techniques along with the more prominent outcomes of recent studies will be presented. Finally, a brief update on the status of the other instruments available in our center will be given, including their planned upgrades.

  19. Experimental parametric study of servers cooling management in data centers buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, S. A.; Elfeky, K. E.; Attia, Ali M. A.; Alshaer, W. G.

    2017-01-01

    A parametric study of air flow and cooling management of data centers servers is experimentally conducted for different design conditions. A physical scale model of data center accommodating one rack of four servers was designed and constructed for testing purposes. Front and rear rack and server's temperatures distributions and supply/return heat indices (SHI/RHI) are used to evaluate data center thermal performance. Experiments were conducted to parametrically study the effects of perforated tiles opening ratio, servers power load variation and rack power density. The results showed that (1) perforated tile of 25% opening ratio provides the best results among the other opening ratios, (2) optimum benefit of cold air in servers cooling is obtained at uniformly power loading of servers (3) increasing power density decrease air re-circulation but increase air bypass and servers temperature. The present results are compared with previous experimental and CFD results and fair agreement was found.

  20. Experimental parametric study of servers cooling management in data centers buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, S. A.; Elfeky, K. E.; Attia, Ali M. A.; Alshaer, W. G.

    2017-06-01

    A parametric study of air flow and cooling management of data centers servers is experimentally conducted for different design conditions. A physical scale model of data center accommodating one rack of four servers was designed and constructed for testing purposes. Front and rear rack and server's temperatures distributions and supply/return heat indices (SHI/RHI) are used to evaluate data center thermal performance. Experiments were conducted to parametrically study the effects of perforated tiles opening ratio, servers power load variation and rack power density. The results showed that (1) perforated tile of 25% opening ratio provides the best results among the other opening ratios, (2) optimum benefit of cold air in servers cooling is obtained at uniformly power loading of servers (3) increasing power density decrease air re-circulation but increase air bypass and servers temperature. The present results are compared with previous experimental and CFD results and fair agreement was found.

  1. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  2. A Study on the Tool Sharing Policy in FMS with Tool Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Fujii, Susumu; Kaihara, Toshiya

    In this paper we examine the issue of tool management in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS). A tool center storing all tools for jobs is introduced and all tools can be shared by the machining centers through tool change between the machining centers and the tool center. Two tool-change methods, “Augmented Magazine Method (AMM)” and “Magazine Carrier Method (MCM)”, are proposed and evaluated using the methods for the allocation of tools and jobs proposed in this study. A job in this study is defined as a sequence of processing operations and is thus processed by a single machining center. We propose a two-stage method to integrate tool planning and the allocation of tools and jobs. The method in the second stage for the allocation of tools and jobs is proposed on the basis of an auction method including a dispatching rule. For the tool planning with AMM at the first stage, we propose a greedy search method to decide the total number of tools. By simulation, we investigate the characteristics and effectiveness of the proposed two-stage method and the tool-change methods together with the effectiveness of several dispatching rules.

  3. Comparison of diagnostic reliability of out-of-center sleep tests for obstructive sleep apnea between adults and children.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masaaki; Furukawa, Taiji; Sugimoto, Akira; Kotani, Ryosuke; Hosogaya, Rika

    2017-03-01

    Sleep studies for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children are laborious, expensive, inconvenient, and often not readily available. Out-of-center sleep test (OCST) devices have been studied for diagnosing OSA in adults, but few OCST studies have been done in children. The purpose of this study was to clarify the diagnostic reliability of OCST devices for children. OCSTs using pulse oximetry and in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) were performed separately in 686 adults and 119 children. For each apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured with PSG, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratio (PLR/NLR), and positive/negative predictive value (PPV/NPV) were calculated for several cutoff values of 3% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) measured with OCST and analyzed. For definitive diagnosis in adults, the specificity, PLR, and PPV with a cutoff value of OCST-ODI 20/h were 98.3%, 29.26, and 97.4%, respectively, to detect PSG-AHI ≥20/h. Corresponding values with a cutoff value of OCST-ODI 15/h were 99%, 46.19, and 99.6% to detect an AHI ≥5/h. For exclusive diagnosis (screening) in adults, sensitivity, NLR, and NPV with a cutoff value of OCST-ODI 5/h were 96.4%, 0.068, and 91.9% to detect PSG-AHI <20/h and 84.1%, 0.21, and 45.9% to detect PSG-AHI <5/h. or definitive diagnosis in children, the corresponding values with a cutoff value of OCST-ODI 25/h were 98.6%, 16.0, and 90.9% to detect PSG-AHI ≥10/h and 98.1%, 8.281, and 90.9% for PSG-AHI ≥5/h. For exclusive diagnosis in children, with a cutoff of OCST-ODI 10/h, the corresponding values were 62.2%, 0.446, and 78.2% to detect PSG-AHI <10/h, 45.3%, 0.674, and 55.1% for PSG-AHI <5/h, and 34.0%, 0.908, and 10.3% for PSG-AHI <1/h. Statistical data of preschool children tended to be worse than those of school age children. In adults, OCST is reliable for the definitive diagnosis of AHI ≥20/h or ≥5/h and the exclusive diagnosis of AHI <20/h. However, in children, OCST should not be used

  4. Comparison of three Parse method studies on feeling very tired.

    PubMed

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2003-10-01

    This article compares three human becoming studies on feeling very tired. The studies were conducted by Dr. Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, Dr. Mary H. Huch and Dr. Debra A. Bournes, and Dr. Steven Baumann. The comparison is conducted through the lens of the following questions: What have we learned about feeling very tired from these studies? What are similarities in the three studies? What are differences in the three studies? And, what new questions can be posed concerning feeling very tired? Unique knowledge for nursing is explicated on feeling very tired as a universal lived experience of health.

  5. A comparison of paper documentation to electronic documentation for trauma resuscitations at a level I pediatric trauma center.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Carla; Wurster, Lee Ann; Groner, Jonathan; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Hendren, Valerie; Nuss, Kathy; Haley, Kathy; Gerberick, Julie; Malehorn, Beth; Covert, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Although the electronic medical record reduces errors and improves patient safety, most emergency departments continue to use paper documentation for trauma resuscitations. The purpose of this study was to compare the completeness of paper documentation with that of electronic documentation for trauma resuscitations. The setting was a level I pediatric trauma center where 100% electronic documentation was achieved in August 2012. A random sample of trauma resuscitations documented by paper (n=200) was compared with a random sample of trauma resuscitations documented electronically (n=200) to identify the presence or absence of the documentation of 11 key data elements for each trauma resuscitation. The electronic documentation more frequently captured 5 data elements: time of team activation (100% vs 85%, P<.00), primary assessment (94% vs 88%, P<.036), arrival time of attending physician (98% vs 93.5%, P<.026), intravenous fluid volume in the emergency department (94% vs 88%, P<.036), and disposition (100% vs 89.5%, P<.00). The paper documentation more often recorded one data element: volume of intravenous fluids administered prior to arrival (92.5% vs 100%, P<.00). No statistical difference in documentation rates was found for 5 data elements: vital signs, treatment by emergency medical personnel, arrival time in the emergency department, and level of trauma alert activation. Electronic documentation produced superior records of pediatric trauma resuscitations compared with paper documentation. Because the electronic medical record improves patient safety, it should be adopted as the standard documentation method for all trauma resuscitations. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of peritonitis rates and patient survival in automated and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a 10-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    El-Reshaid, Wael; Al-Disawy, Hanan; Nassef, Hossameldeen; Alhelaly, Usama

    2016-09-01

    Peritonitis is a common complication in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and automated peritoneal dialysis (APD). In this retrospective study, peritonitis rates and patient survival of 180 patients on CAPD and 128 patients on APD were compared in the period from January 2005 to December 2014 at Al-Nafisi Center in Kuwait. All patients had prophylactic topical mupirocin at catheter exit site. Patients on CAPD had twin bag system with Y transfer set. The peritonitis rates were 1 in 29 months in CAPD and 1 in 38 months in APD (p < 0.05). Percentage of peritonitis free patients over 10-year period in CAPD and APD were 49 and 60%, respectively (p < 0.05). Time to develop peritonitis was 10.25 ± 3.1 months in CAPD compared to 16.1 ± 4 months in APD (p < 0.001). Relapse and recurrence rates were similar in both groups. Median patient survival in CAPD and APD groups with peritonitis was 13.1 ± 1 and 14 ± 1.4 months respectively (p = 0.3) whereas in peritonitis free patients it was 15 ± 1.4 months in CAPD and 23 ± 3.1 months in APD (p = 0.025). APD had lower incidence rate of peritonitis than CAPD. Patient survival was better in APD than CAPD in peritonitis free patients but was similar in patients who had peritonitis.

  7. A Comparison of Quality of Community Health Services Between Public and Private Community Health Centers in Urban China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoxv; Gong, Yanhong; Yang, Chen; Tu, Xiaochen; Liu, Wei; Cao, Shiyi; Yang, Huajie; Lu, Zuxun

    2015-10-01

    This study was the first of its kind to evaluate and compare the quality of private and public community health centers (CHCs) in urban China. A total of 2501 CHCs in 35 cities were chosen in 2011 using a multistage sampling method, and data on human resources, medical equipment and drug inventory were collected. A subset of 422 CHCs was randomly selected and 100 prescriptions from each CHCs were reviewed to evaluate prescribing practice. In total, 12,386 patients who visited the selected 422 CHCs were interviewed to assess patient satisfaction and payments. Controlling for population covered per CHC and geographic regions, private CHCs were higher than public CHCs in average building area (2310.96 vs. 2000.92 square meters), average number of medical equipment (6.42 vs. 6.14), average number of physicians and nurses per 10,000 population (4.86 vs. 3.81 and 3.38 vs. 2.62), and average number of medicines in stock (435.08 vs. 375.83), but lower in average percentage of medicines on the national essential medicines list (67.29% vs. 77.55%). Prescriptions from private CHCs had significantly higher number of drugs per prescription (2.38 vs. 2.24), higher percentage of prescriptions with injections (36.44% vs. 30.50%), and higher percentage of prescriptions with antibiotics (37.17% vs. 30.14%). Patient satisfaction was similar between the 2 groups, and patient payments per visit were lower in private CHCs after controlling for patients' sociodemographic characteristics. Private CHCs are better equipped and better staffed than public CHCs but are less compliant with national policy on essential medicines and have poorer prescribing quality in China, warranting more rigorous government supervision.

  8. Comparison of condition specific indicators among illegal induced abortion: septic and non-septic abortion in Songkla Center Hospital.

    PubMed

    Phaumvichit, Tatpong; Chandeying, Verapol

    2012-05-01

    Determine the clinical indications of illegal induced abortion, comparison between septic and non-septic abortion. The present retrospective descriptive study was conducted among pregnant women who were admitted in the hospital with the illegal induced abortion. The demographic data, gestational age, the method used, and personnel performing were gathered, as well as symptomatology, basic laboratory, condition progression, and medical and surgical intervention. There were 92 patients with illegal induced abortion between March 2009 and December 2010. The three main induced methods for termination of pregnancy was vaginal suppository, likely to be misoprostol-a synthetic prostaglandin E, analog (43.5%), oral Thai herbal medicine (19.6%) and combined medication (16.3%), respectively. Of septic/non-septic abortion, the first visit body temperature of 38.0 degrees Celsius or more (74.1/12.3%), heart rate of 100 per minutes or more (74.1/12.3%), fever index 3 degree-hours or more in the first 24 hours (81.5/12.3%) and fever index 5 degree-hours or more in the first 24 hours (59.3/1.5%), were statistically significant (all p-values of < 0.001). Overall, the most common type of termination of induced abortion was incomplete abortion 68 in 92 cases (73.9%). The first visit body temperature of 38.0 degrees C or more, heart rate of 100 per minutes or more and fever index of 3 and 5 degree-hours, are clinically helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment of septic abortion.

  9. Comparison of acute lobar nephronia and acute pyelonephritis in children: a single-center clinical analysis in southern taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ling; Huang, I-Fei; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Chen, Yao-Shen; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Tang, Chia-Wan; Chien, Jen-Hung; Chiou, Yee-Hsuan; Cheng, Ming-Fang

    2015-06-01

    Patients with acute lobar nephronia (ALN) require a longer duration of antimicrobial treatment than those with acute pyelonephritis (APN), and ALN is associated with renal scarring. The aim of this study was to provide an understanding of ALN by comparing the clinical features of pediatric patients with ALN and APN. We enrolled all of the patients with ALN (confirmed by computed tomography) admitted to our hospital from 1999 to 2012 in the ALN group. In addition, each patient diagnosed with APN who was matched for sex, age, and admission date to each ALN patient was enrolled in the APN group. The medical charts of patients in these two groups were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed for comparison. The fever duration after hospitalization in the ALN group and the APN group were 4.85 ± 2.33 days and 2.30 ± 1.47 days respectively. The microbiological distributions and the majority of susceptibilities were similar in the ALN and APN groups. The majority of clinical manifestations are nonspecific and unreliable for the differentiation of ALN and APN. The patients with ALN were febrile for longer after antimicrobial treatment, had more nausea/vomiting symptoms, higher neutrophil count, bandemia, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and lower platelet count (all p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, initial CRP levels, nausea/vomiting symptoms, and fever duration after admission were independent variables with statistical significance to predict ALN. Severe nephromegaly occurred significantly more in the ALN group than in the APN group (p = 0.022). The majority of clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and microbiological features are similar between patients with ALN and APN. Clinicians should keep a high index of suspicion regarding ALN, particularly for those with ultrasonographic nephromegaly, initial higher CRP, nausea/vomiting, and fever for > 5 days after antimicrobial treatment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Alcohol use disorder in elderly suicide attempters: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Morin, Johanna; Wiktorsson, Stefan; Marlow, Thomas; Olesen, Pernille J; Skoog, Ingmar; Waern, Margda

    2013-02-01

    To compare lifetime prevalence of alcohol use disorder (AUD) in older adults who were hospitalized in connection with a suicide attempt and in a population comparison group, as well as to compare previous suicidal behavior in attempters with and without AUD. Case-comparison. Five hospitals in Western Sweden. Persons 70 years or older, who were treated in a hospital because of a suicide attempt during 2003-2006 were recruited. Of 133 eligible participants, 103 participants were enrolled (47 men, 56 women, mean age 80 years, response rate 77%). Four comparison subjects per case were randomly selected among participants in our late-life population studies. Lifetime history of AUD in accordance with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, was discerned on the basis of interview data, case record review, and the hospital discharge register. Depression symptoms were rated using the Montgomery-Åsberg Rating Scale. AUD was observed in 26% of the cases and in 4% of the comparison group (odds ratio [OR]: 10.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.9-22.5). Associations were noted in men (OR: 9.5; 95% CI: 4.0-22.8) and women (OR: 12.0; 95% CI: 2.4-59.5). More than half of the cases with AUD and a third of those without AUD had made at least one prior suicide attempt. In these, AUD was associated with a longer interval between the first attempt and the index attempt. A strong association between AUD and hospital-treated suicide attempts was noted in both sexes in this northern European setting. Given the high rates of suicide worldwide in this fast-growing and vulnerable group, comparison studies in other settings are needed. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Patient-centered innovation in health care organizations: a conceptual framework and case study application.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Susan E; Conrad, Douglas A; Marcus-Smith, Miriam S; Reed, Peter; Watts, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered innovation is spreading at the federal and state levels. A conceptual framework can help frame real-world examples and extract systematic learning from an array of innovative applications currently underway. The statutory, economic, and political environment in Washington State offers a special contextual laboratory for observing the interplay of these factors. We propose a framework for understanding the process of initiating patient-centered innovations-particularly innovations addressing patient-centered goals of improved access, continuity, communication and coordination, cultural competency, and family- and person-focused care over time. The framework to a case study of a provider organization in Washington State actively engaged in such innovations was applied in this article. We conducted a selective review of peer-reviewed evidence and theory regarding determinants of organizational change. On the basis of the literature review and the particular examples of patient-centric innovation, we developed a conceptual framework. Semistructured key informant interviews were conducted to illustrate the framework with concrete examples of patient-centered innovation. The primary determinants of initiating patient-centered innovation are (a) effective leadership, with the necessary technical and professional expertise and creative skills; (b) strong internal and external motivation to change; (c) clear and internally consistent organizational mission; (d) aligned organizational strategy; (e) robust organizational capability; and (f) continuous feedback and organizational learning. The internal hierarchy of actors is important in shaping patient-centered innovation. External financial incentives and government regulations also significantly shape innovation. Patient-centered care innovation is a complex process. A general framework that could help managers and executives organize their thoughts around innovation within their organization is presented.

  12. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  13. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  14. Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Dixis Figueroa; de Menezes, Tarciana Nobre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To obtain an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Data source: A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. Data synthesis: It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Conclusions: Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. PMID:26553574

  15. [Characterization of anthropometric assessment studies of Brazilian children attending daycare centers].

    PubMed

    Figueroa Pedraza, Dixis; Menezes, Tarciana Nobre de

    2016-06-01

    To obatin an overview of available information on the anthropometric assessment of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. A literature search was carried out in the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases of studies published from 1990 to 2013 in Portuguese and English languages. The following search strategy was used: (nutritional status OR anthropometrics OR malnutrition OR overweight) AND daycare centers, as well as the equivalent terms in Portuguese. In the case of MEDLINE search, the descriptor Brazil was also used. It was verified that the 33 studies included in the review were comparable from a methodological point of view. The studies, in general, were characterized by their restrictive nature, geographical concentration and dispersion of results in relation to time. Considering the studies published from 2010 onwards, low prevalence of acute malnutrition and significant rates of stunting and overweight were observed. Despite the limitations, considering the most recent studies that used the WHO growth curves (2006), it is suggested that the anthropometric profile of Brazilian children attending daycare centers is characterized by a nutritional transition process, with significant prevalence of overweight and short stature. We emphasize the need to develop a multicenter survey that will more accurately define the current anthropometric nutritional status of Brazilian children attending daycare centers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network 2. Cross-Sensor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud to ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed from space by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), MAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. MAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range and are found to be asymmetric with standard deviation increasing roughly as r 2 . Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant improvements in correlation with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash density at hourly, daily, monthly, and climatological timescales (up to 50% over uncorrected source densities using an exponential-in-range correction factor with 40-50 km e-folding scale).

  17. A Diagnostic Analysis of the Kennedy Space Center LDAR Network. 2; Cross-Sensor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, D. J.; Heckman, S.; Goodman, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Range dependencies in total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning observed by the Kennedy Space Center Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network are established through cross-comparison with other lightning sensors. Using total lightning observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), LDAR flash detection efficiency is shown to remain above 90% out to 90-100 km range, and to be below 25% at 200 km range. LDAR VHF source location error distributions are also determined as a function of range, and are found to be asymmetric with first moments increasing roughly as range squared. Range normalization schemes for total VHF source density are tested and shown to yield significant (up to 50%) skill improvements over uncorrected data, when compared with National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) ground flash counts at hourly, daily, monthly and climatological time scales.

  18. Validation for global solar wind prediction using Ulysses comparison: Multiple coronal and heliospheric models installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, we have quantitatively assessed the models' capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs. The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  19. Validation for Global Solar Wind Prediction Using Ulysses Comparison: Multiple Coronal and Heliospheric Models Installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, wehave quantitatively assessed the models capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs.The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  20. Validation for Global Solar Wind Prediction Using Ulysses Comparison: Multiple Coronal and Heliospheric Models Installed at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, L. K.; MacNeice, P. J.; Mays, M. L.; Taktakishvili, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Jackson, B.; Yu, H.-S.; Riley, P.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of the background global solar wind is a necessary part of space weather forecasting. Several coronal and heliospheric models have been installed and/or recently upgraded at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), including the Wang-Sheely-Arge (WSA)-Enlil model, MHD-Around-a-Sphere (MAS)-Enlil model, Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF), and Heliospheric tomography using interplanetary scintillation data. Ulysses recorded the last fast latitudinal scan from southern to northern poles in 2007. By comparing the modeling results with Ulysses observations over seven Carrington rotations, we have extended our third-party validation from the previous near-Earth solar wind to middle to high latitudes, in the same late declining phase of solar cycle 23. Besides visual comparison, wehave quantitatively assessed the models capabilities in reproducing the time series, statistics, and latitudinal variations of solar wind parameters for a specific range of model parameter settings, inputs, and grid configurations available at CCMC. The WSA-Enlil model results vary with three different magnetogram inputs.The MAS-Enlil model captures the solar wind parameters well, despite its underestimation of the speed at middle to high latitudes. The new version of SWMF misses many solar wind variations probably because it uses lower grid resolution than other models. The interplanetary scintillation-tomography cannot capture the latitudinal variations of solar wind well yet. Because the model performance varies with parameter settings which are optimized for different epochs or flow states, the performance metric study provided here can serve as a template that researchers can use to validate the models for the time periods and conditions of interest to them.

  1. A plea for centralized care for ureteroscopy: results from a comparative study under different conditions within the same center.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Jorge; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Sodha, Hiren; Suwijn, Sven; Laguna, Pilar; de la Rosette, Jean

    2011-03-01

    We stratified factors that affect treatment morbidity, compared the outcomes of ureteroscopy procedures from a single department under different conditions, and provided evidence of treatment benefits when ureteroscopy is performed in an expert setting. Since the department became a dedicated endourologic center in 2002, we grouped all ureteroscopy procedures into those performed before 2002 (group A) and after 2002 (group B). The modified Clavien classification was used to score morbidity. Independent variables with an influence on postoperative outcomes were studied, including operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and hospitalization time. Of the 248 ureteroscopy procedures performed, 62 comprised group A and 186 comprised group B. Statistical preoperative differences were in the American Society of Anesthesiologists score, patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and the use of anticoagulants; and the perioperative differences were seen in operative time, hospital stay, and the number of eventful procedures. Group A had a significantly longer operative time and a longer hospital stay compared with group B. The number of failed and eventful procedures are also higher in group A compared with group B. Stone-free rates were similar in both groups. The dedicated setting for ureteroscopy at our center resulted in decreased operative time, more uneventful procedures, and decreased hospitalization time. The modified Clavien morbidity score is a reliable tool for more objective comparisons of morbidity after ureteroscopic stone treatment.

  2. Comparative study of Treponemal and non-Treponemal test for screening of blood donated at a blood center

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Narinder Kaur; Bharucha, Z. S.; Sonawane, Vandana; Ahmed, Imran

    2012-01-01

    The non-Treponemal tests such as Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR) or the Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory test are the most commonly used test for screening of syphilis in the blood centers in India. Now, with the availability of Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Immunochromatographic assays in the market, we decided to evaluate these assays in comparison with Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination Assay (TPHA) which was considered as a gold standard for this study. A total of 8 685 samples of voluntary blood donors were tested on Trepolisa 3.0 and then the initially reactive samples were retested in duplicate on the same assay as well as on Omega Pathozyme, RPR, RAPHA (Rapid Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay), and TPHA. Of the 158 initially reactive samples, 104 were repeatedly reactive on the same assay, 85 were reactive with RPR, 77 were reactive with RAPHA, 60 were reactive on Omega, and 53 were confirmed reactive on TPHA. 48 (56.4%) of the results on RPR were biological false positive, while 21.9% of results were false negative on RPR. We evaluated that Omega Pathozyme was quite in agreement with TPHA as compared with Trepolisa 3.0, RAPHA, and RPR. We concluded that Omega Pathozyme (ELISA) can be considered as a suitable test for screening of syphilis in a blood center. PMID:22623840

  3. Comparative study of Treponemal and non-Treponemal test for screening of blood donated at a blood center.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Narinder Kaur; Bharucha, Z S; Sonawane, Vandana; Ahmed, Imran

    2012-01-01

    The non-Treponemal tests such as Rapid Plasma Reagin test (RPR) or the Venereal Disease Reference Laboratory test are the most commonly used test for screening of syphilis in the blood centers in India. Now, with the availability of Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Immunochromatographic assays in the market, we decided to evaluate these assays in comparison with Treponema pallidum Haemagglutination Assay (TPHA) which was considered as a gold standard for this study. A total of 8 685 samples of voluntary blood donors were tested on Trepolisa 3.0 and then the initially reactive samples were retested in duplicate on the same assay as well as on Omega Pathozyme, RPR, RAPHA (Rapid Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay), and TPHA. Of the 158 initially reactive samples, 104 were repeatedly reactive on the same assay, 85 were reactive with RPR, 77 were reactive with RAPHA, 60 were reactive on Omega, and 53 were confirmed reactive on TPHA. 48 (56.4%) of the results on RPR were biological false positive, while 21.9% of results were false negative on RPR. We evaluated that Omega Pathozyme was quite in agreement with TPHA as compared with Trepolisa 3.0, RAPHA, and RPR. We concluded that Omega Pathozyme (ELISA) can be considered as a suitable test for screening of syphilis in a blood center.

  4. Customer Satisfaction: A Comparison of Community College and Employment Security Commission Joblink Career Centers in North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deese, Stephanie

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 provided states with a great amount of flexibility in the implementation of a system-wide approach to job training and workforce development. The legislation consolidated employment and training services into a one-stop system that is known as JobLink Career Centers in North Carolina. This document presents…

  5. Stereogenic Centers and Axes: A Comparison of the Chiral Topologies Available to Cabcd and AbC=C=Ccd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd-Williams, Paul; Giralt, Ernest

    2005-01-01

    A clarification of concepts and a comparative analysis of chirality as a consequence of stereogenic center and axes are provided by considering the different possibilities for the archetypical molecule Cabcd. The key difference between Cabcd and abC=C=Ccd and, by extension, between molecules incorporating a stereogenic axis, is in the number of…

  6. Learner-Centered Assessment: A Comparison of Faculty Practices in US Colleges and Universities 1993 to 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Tschepikow, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Over a decade ago, Barr and Tagg (1995) declared that a shift had occurred in higher education from an instruction paradigm to a learning paradigm. A central element in this new paradigm is learner-centered assessment. While a growing body of literature suggests that this approach to assessment is a best practice in higher education pedagogy, it…

  7. Neonatal intensive care unit discharge of infants with cardiorespiratory events: Tri-country comparison of academic centers.

    PubMed

    Carlos, C; Hageman, J; Pellerite, M; McEntire, B; Cóté, A; Raoux, A; Franco, P; Rusciolelli, C; Consenstein, L; Kelly, D

    2015-01-01

    Compare how NICUs within academic centers in Canada, France, and the United States make discharge decisions regarding cardiorespiratory recordings and home use of apnea monitors, oximeters and caffeine. An anonymous survey was sent to neonatologists through the member listserv of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Perinatal Pediatrics, the Canadian Fellowship Program Directory, and to Level 3 NICUs in France. The response rates were 89% , 83% , and 79% for US, Canada and France respectively. In Canada, 45% perform pre-discharge recordings vs. 38% in France and 24% in the US. Apnea free days prior to discharge were required in 100% of centers in Canada, 96% in France, and 92% in the US. In Canada and France, 65% and 68% of units discharge patients on monitors vs. 99% in the US. 64% of the US centers sometimes use home caffeine compared to 40% in Canada and 34% in France. Over 60% of the centers in Canada and France wait until at least 40 weeks post menstrual age to discharge patients, whereas only about 33% of the US wait that late to discharge patients. Discharge practices from NICUs are not well standardized across institutions or countries. Canada and France keep infants in the hospital longer and are less likely than the US to use home monitoring and home caffeine.

  8. Oxidative addition of methane and benzene C--H bonds to rhodium center: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Zhu, Shufen

    2006-11-01

    A density functional theory study on mechanisms of the oxidative addition of methane and benzene C-H bonds to the rhodium center containing Cp and PMe 3 ligands has been performed. Our calculated results confirm that the C-H bond cleavage from a sigma complex to a hydride alkyl complex is the rate-determining step. Compared with the case of methane C-H bond, the oxidative addition of benzene C-H bond is more favorable kinetically and thermodynamically. Stronger backdonation from metal center to the σ ∗ antibonding orbital of benzene C-H bond is responsible for the observations.

  9. Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

  10. Connecting teens to caring adults in a school-based health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Blacksin, Beth A; Kelly, Patricia J

    2015-01-01

    The traditional medical care system is generally unable to provide the broad health and wellness services needed by many adolescents, especially those from low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities. Using a theoretical framework adapted from Bronfenbrenner's ecological model of multiple influencers, this case study examined how a school-based health center was able to provide a network of connections for adolescents to caring adults within the school and the local community. Contributors to this network were the creation of a student-centered community with access to adolescent-friendly services, providers acting as connectors, and care of the whole adolescent.

  11. Comparison of Bailout and Planned Rotational Atherectomy for Heavily Calcified Coronary Lesions: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Allali, Abdelhakim; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Sulimov, Dmitriy S; Jose, John; Geist, Volker; Kassner, Guido; Richardt, Gert; Toelg, Ralph

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare outcomes of bailout and planned rotational atherectomy (RA) in the treatment of calcified coronary lesions. Current guidelines recommend RA as a bailout procedure for calcified or fibrotic lesions that cannot be adequately dilated before stenting. Nonetheless, planned RA is sometimes performed in certain challenging anatomies. Data of patients treated with RA between 2002 and 2014 at a single-center registry were retrospectively analyzed. The bailout RA group included patients where RA was employed after failure of balloon dilatation or stent delivery. Planned RA included patients where RA was employed electively without previous device failure. The study comprised 204 patients (221 lesions) and 308 patients (338 lesions) treated with bailout or planned RA, respectively. Angiographic success was achieved in the majority of cases, but was lower in the bailout RA group (93.7% vs. 97.6%, P = 0.02). Coronary dissections occurred more frequently in the bailout RA group (8.6% vs. 4.4%, P = 0.04), mean contrast amount was higher (279 ± 135 mL vs. 202 ± 92 mL, P < 0.001), and fluoroscopy time and procedural duration were longer in that group (32 min [IQR 21-51] vs. 18 min [IQR 14-28], P < 0.001 and 111 ± 50 min vs. 76 ± 35 min, P < 0.001, respectively). In-hospital death and myocardial infarction were not significantly different between the groups (2.9% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.21 and 6.9% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.19). In-hospital major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were higher in the bailout RA group (10.3% vs. 5.5%, P = 0.04). The 2-year estimated rates of MACE (25.2% vs. 28.7%, log rank P = 0.52) and its components death, myocardial infarction, and target vessel revascularization were not significantly different between the groups. Equivalence of 2-year MACE rates was also seen in all examined subgroups. Shortened procedural duration and reduction of coronary dissections were observed

  12. Validating the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa; Scorza, Pamela; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah; Mushashi, Christina; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Binagwaho, Agnes; Stulac, Sara; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) as a screen for depression in Rwandan children and adolescents. Although the CES-DC is widely used for depression screening in high-income countries, its validity in low-income and culturally diverse settings, including sub-Saharan…

  13. Qualitative Delphi Study of Factors Influencing Data Center Investment in Eco-Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, M. Bennett

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative investigation explored the diffusion of eco-innovations within the U.S. data center industry from 2007 to 2015 whose adoption was intended to decouple digital economy growth from environmental impact. Using diffusion of innovation theory to inform the study, and synthesizing subject matter expert input from a Delphi panel…

  14. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    2002-11-01

    Oberlin College's Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies is a high-performance building featuring an expansive photovoltaic system and a closed-loop groundwater heat pump system. Designers incorporated energy-efficient components and materials that are local, non-toxic, and durable.

  15. Periodical Utilization Study: Saint Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center, School of Nursing Library, Youngstown, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Holly

    The Saint Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center School of Nursing Library has a strong collection of nursing and nursing management journals. With the rising subscription costs of periodicals, it was necessary to evaluate the collection of periodicals. This study was done to evaluate the periodicals that the library has in paper form. The study…

  16. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 7th Grade - Spoil Island Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with secondary students in grade seven prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  17. The Center for Study of Educational Innovations: A Statement of Intent; Current and Future Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dwight W.; Sinclair, Robert L.

    The Center for Study of Educational Innovations (CSEI), University of Massachusetts, through working relationships with different types of field testing schools, will experiment with research, development, and implementation in four areas: institutional structures, curriculum development, instructional strategies, and teacher education. High…

  18. An Overview of Hydrologic Studies at Center for Forested Wetlands Research, USDA Forest Service

    Treesearch

    Devendra M. Amatya; Carl C. Trettin; R. Wayne Skaggs; Timothy J. Callahan; Marianne K. Burke; Ge Sun; Masato Miwa; John E. Parsons

    2004-01-01

    Managing forested wetland landscapes for water quality improvement and productivity requires a detailed understanding of functional linkages between ecohydrological processes and management practices. Studies are being conducted at Center for Forested Wetlands Research (CFWR), USDA Forest Service to understand the fundamental hydrologic and biogeochemical processes...

  19. A Case Study of the Ann Sullivan Center in Lima, Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noto, Lori A.

    2005-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to describe and explain the educational program at the Ann Sullivan Center, a nationally and internationally recognized program for individuals with disabilities in Peru. The program provides educational programming to individuals with autism, severe disabilities and challenging behaviors across the lifespan. A…

  20. Qualitative Delphi Study of Factors Influencing Data Center Investment in Eco-Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, M. Bennett

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative investigation explored the diffusion of eco-innovations within the U.S. data center industry from 2007 to 2015 whose adoption was intended to decouple digital economy growth from environmental impact. Using diffusion of innovation theory to inform the study, and synthesizing subject matter expert input from a Delphi panel…

  1. Evolving a University Center to a Branch Campus: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Steven C.; Plumb, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is now expected to respond to community demands that include fueling economic development and addressing the needs of a wider range of students. Colleges and universities have responded to these demands using a variety of delivery models. A study was conducted by the Ardmore Higher Education Center to identify the advantages and…

  2. A Study of Client Reactions: Lifelong Learning Center, the Free Library of Philadelphia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William

    A study was conducted to assess client reaction to key activities of the Lifelong Learning Center (LLC) of the Free Library of Philadelphia and to identify particular patterns of client interest. A survey was developed to determine (1) clients' satisfaction with accessibility of services, quality of interaction with staff, and information…

  3. High Tech Centers for Students with Disabilities in the California Community Colleges: A Program Outputs Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. High-Tech Center for the Disabled.

    This document overviews a descriptive study conducted by the High-Tech Training Unit (HTCU) at the request of the California Community College Chancellor's Office. The mission of the 114 High Tech Centers (HTCs) at California Community Colleges is to train disabled students in the use of access technologies as a method of mainstreaming them into…

  4. Recruitment Challenges: Lessons from Senior Centers and Older African-American Participants in a Literacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne W.; Stewart, Merry

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the challenges encountered in the recruitment of urban older African-Americans in a study to explore the effects of interactive educational intervention on functional health literacy and diabetes knowledge. Our methods included identification of challenges related to the individual characteristics of seniors' centers that…

  5. Reflections and Recommendations Based on a Migrant Health Center's Participation in a CDC Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolon, Anne K.; O'Barr, James

    Hudson Valley Migrant Health (HVMH) (a Public Health Service program) collaborated with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) on a study of the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among migrant farmworkers in the mid-Hudson region of New York. CDC research personnel…

  6. Recruitment Challenges: Lessons from Senior Centers and Older African-American Participants in a Literacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne W.; Stewart, Merry

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the challenges encountered in the recruitment of urban older African-Americans in a study to explore the effects of interactive educational intervention on functional health literacy and diabetes knowledge. Our methods included identification of challenges related to the individual characteristics of seniors' centers that…

  7. Technostress in Libraries and Media Centers: Case Studies and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Kate D., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses technostress--i.e., stress brought on by changes in technology--in libraries and media centers. Case studies are presented that show stress in community college libraries caused by the rapid implementation of new technologies; coping strategies for librarians and media specialists are discussed; and strategies for managers are suggested.…

  8. Embodying Authentic Leadership through Popular Education at Highlander Research and Education Center: A Qualitative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glowacki-Dudka, Michelle; Griswold, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    In 2013 and 2014, workshops were held at Highlander Research and Education Center that explored the topics of authentic leadership and popular education. The participants shared their experiences through reflective writing upon completion of the workshops and approximately a year following. These reflections were developed into a case study. This…

  9. Restrictive Access to Books in School Library Media Centers in Georgia. Research Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPree, Vi

    This study sought to determine the extent of restrictive access to books in Georgia school library media centers and to discover by whose authority and for what reason these books might be placed on restrictive shelves. Questionnaires were completed and received from a stratified random sampling of 119 media specialists in high schools, middle or…

  10. Validating the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children in Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betancourt, Theresa; Scorza, Pamela; Meyers-Ohki, Sarah; Mushashi, Christina; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Binagwaho, Agnes; Stulac, Sara; Beardslee, William R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the validity of the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) as a screen for depression in Rwandan children and adolescents. Although the CES-DC is widely used for depression screening in high-income countries, its validity in low-income and culturally diverse settings, including sub-Saharan…

  11. A Case Study Using Child-Centered Play Therapy Approach to Treat Enuresis and Encopresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy-Casey, Maria

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates an alternative method (nondirective child-centered therapy) in treating enuresis and encopresis resulting from emotional disturbances. Examines various etiologies and approaches to treating these conditions. Provides a case study example. Claims that professionals must differentiate between primary and secondary occurrences of these…

  12. Growing up Active: A Study into Physical Activity in Long Day Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashmore, Aaron W.; Jones, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The child care center is an ideal setting in which to implement strategies to promote physical activity and healthy weight, but there is a paucity of empirical evidence on factors that influence physical activity in these settings. The current study gathered initial qualitative data to explore these factors. Child care workers from five long day…

  13. Technostress in Libraries and Media Centers: Case Studies and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickey, Kate D., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses technostress--i.e., stress brought on by changes in technology--in libraries and media centers. Case studies are presented that show stress in community college libraries caused by the rapid implementation of new technologies; coping strategies for librarians and media specialists are discussed; and strategies for managers are suggested.…

  14. A Case Study in Teacher-Centered Curriculum Development: The Process in Walpole Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Jane

    In this case study illustrating teacher-centered curriculum development, teachers in the Walpole (Massachusetts) public school system were asked to select a reading program for use in grades K-8. Twenty-five teachers served on two teams over a two-year period. They used developmental learning kits at the kindergarten level, basal reading series…

  15. The Industry Information Center within an Academic Library: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Lisa G.; Grealy, Deborah S.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of cooperation between academic and corporate libraries focuses on a case study of the library at the Colorado School of Mines where an industry information center was established. Issues in planning an industry-academic partnership are explored, including feasibility, funding, staffing, terms of agreement, and authority structures.…

  16. Six Ways to Beat the Study Hall Syndrome in Your Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses six ways to prevent the school media center from becoming a study hall recreation area: (1) schedule learning activities; (2) add technology to work areas; (3) share space with adults; (4) minimize rules; (5) provide alternative activities; and (6) change the school climate. (Author/AEF)

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of Fe3+ in α-quartz: Hydrogen-compensated center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mombourquette, M. J.; Minge, J.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Weil, J. A.; Halliburton, L. E.

    1989-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and proton electron-nuclear double-resonance studies of a hydrogen-compensated Fe3+ (S=(5/2) center in synthetic iron-doped α-quartz have been carried out at 20 and 15 K, respectively. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters were determined, allowing anisotropy of the g matrix as well as [g,D,A(1H)]-matrix noncoaxiality, and including high-spin terms of the form S4. Evaluation of the results gives strong evidence that the center (called S2 by some workers) consists of a Fe3+ ion occurring substitutionally at a Si4+ site, charge compensated by an interstitial hydrogen ion. The label [FeO4/H+]0 is proposed for the center.

  18. [Comparison study between biological vision and computer vision].

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Yuan, X G; Yang, C X; Liu, Z Q; Wang, R

    2001-08-01

    The development and bearing of biology vision in structure and mechanism were discussed, especially on the aspects including anatomical structure of biological vision, tentative classification of reception field, parallel processing of visual information, feedback and conformity effect of visual cortical, and so on. The new advance in the field was introduced through the study of the morphology of biological vision. Besides, comparison between biological vision and computer vision was made, and their similarities and differences were pointed out.

  19. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Updated information is given pertaining to Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) clients who are those that receive/use information as disseminated by the center. The client information is presented as a continuation of client data as set forth in the center's previous annual report.

  20. Does Frequency of Visits to the Writing Center Increase Student Satisfaction? A Statistical Correlation Study--or Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carino, Peter; Enders, Doug

    2001-01-01

    Presents a correlation study of student satisfaction with Writing Center services based on the number of visits students made to the Center during two different semesters. Tells a story of how the writing center staff learned to stop fearing numbers and love the interpretation of them. Finds no statistically significant correlation between number…