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Sample records for center health registry

  1. Translating research into action: An evaluation of the World Trade Center Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Alice E; Debchoudhury, Indira; Jordan, Hannah T; Petrsoric, Lysa J; Farfel, Mark R; Cone, James E

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the design, implementation and evaluation of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program (TRP), created to respond to enrollees’ self-reported 9/11-related physical and mental health needs and promote the use of WTC-specific health care. In 2009–2011, the TRP conducted personalized outreach, including an individualized educational mailing and telephone follow-up to 7,518 selected enrollees who resided in New York City, did not participate in rescue/recovery work, and reported symptoms of 9/11-related physical conditions or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on their most recently completed Registry survey. TRP staff spoke with enrollees to address barriers to care and schedule appointments at the WTC Environmental Health Center for those eligible. We assessed three nested outcomes: TRP participation (e.g., contact with TRP staff), scheduling appointments, and keeping scheduled appointments. A total of 1,232 (16.4%) eligible enrollees participated in the TRP; 32% of them scheduled a first-time appointment. We reached 84% of participants who scheduled appointments; 79.4% reported having kept the appointment. Scheduling an appointment, but not keeping it, was associated with self-reported unmet health care need, PTSD, and poor functioning (≥14 days of poor physical or mental health in the past 30 days) (P < 0.05). Neither scheduling nor keeping an appointment was associated with demographic characteristics. Successful outreach to disaster-exposed populations may require a sustained effort that employs a variety of methods in order to encourage and facilitate use of post-disaster services. Findings from this evaluation can inform outreach to the population exposed to 9/11 being conducted by other organizations. PMID:28229004

  2. Translating research into action: An evaluation of the World Trade Center Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program.

    PubMed

    Welch, Alice E; Debchoudhury, Indira; Jordan, Hannah T; Petrsoric, Lysa J; Farfel, Mark R; Cone, James E

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the design, implementation and evaluation of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program (TRP), created to respond to enrollees' self-reported 9/11-related physical and mental health needs and promote the use of WTC-specific health care. In 2009-2011, the TRP conducted personalized outreach, including an individualized educational mailing and telephone follow-up to 7,518 selected enrollees who resided in New York City, did not participate in rescue/recovery work, and reported symptoms of 9/11-related physical conditions or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on their most recently completed Registry survey. TRP staff spoke with enrollees to address barriers to care and schedule appointments at the WTC Environmental Health Center for those eligible. We assessed three nested outcomes: TRP participation (e.g., contact with TRP staff), scheduling appointments, and keeping scheduled appointments. A total of 1,232 (16.4%) eligible enrollees participated in the TRP; 32% of them scheduled a first-time appointment. We reached 84% of participants who scheduled appointments; 79.4% reported having kept the appointment. Scheduling an appointment, but not keeping it, was associated with self-reported unmet health care need, PTSD, and poor functioning (≥14 days of poor physical or mental health in the past 30 days) (P < 0.05). Neither scheduling nor keeping an appointment was associated with demographic characteristics. Successful outreach to disaster-exposed populations may require a sustained effort that employs a variety of methods in order to encourage and facilitate use of post-disaster services. Findings from this evaluation can inform outreach to the population exposed to 9/11 being conducted by other organizations.

  3. An Overview of 9/11 Experiences and Respiratory and Mental Health Conditions among World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    DiGrande, Laura; Brackbill, Robert; Prann, Angela; Cone, James; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J.; Pezeshki, Grant; Thomas, Pauline; Galea, Sandro; Williamson, David; Frieden, Thomas R.; Thorpe, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health outcomes 2–3 years post-9/11. Results are extrapolated to the estimated universe of people eligible to enroll in the WTCHR to determine magnitude of impact. Building occupants, persons on the street or in transit in lower Manhattan on 9/11, local residents, rescue and recovery workers/volunteers, and area school children and staff were interviewed and enrolled in the WTCHR between September 2003 and November 2004. A total of 71,437 people enrolled in the WTCHR, for 17.4% coverage of the estimated eligible exposed population (nearly 410,000); 30% were recruited from lists, and 70% were self-identified. Many reported being in the dust cloud from the collapsing WTC Towers (51%), witnessing traumatic events (70%), or sustaining an injury (13%). After 9/11, 67% of adult enrollees reported new or worsening respiratory symptoms, 3% reported newly diagnosed asthma, 16% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 8% for serious psychological distress (SPD). Newly diagnosed asthma was most common among rescue and recovery workers who worked on the debris pile (4.1%). PTSD was higher among those who reported Hispanic ethnicity (30%), household income <$25,000 (31%), or being injured (35%). Using previously published estimates of the total number of exposed people per WTCHR eligibility criteria, we estimate between 3,800 and 12,600 adults experienced newly diagnosed asthma and 34,600–70,200 adults experienced PTSD following the attacks, suggesting extensive adverse health impacts beyond the immediate deaths and injuries from the acute event. PMID:18785012

  4. An overview of 9/11 experiences and respiratory and mental health conditions among World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Mark; DiGrande, Laura; Brackbill, Robert; Prann, Angela; Cone, James; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J; Pezeshki, Grant; Thomas, Pauline; Galea, Sandro; Williamson, David; Frieden, Thomas R; Thorpe, Lorna

    2008-11-01

    To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health outcomes 2-3 years post-9/11. Results are extrapolated to the estimated universe of people eligible to enroll in the WTCHR to determine magnitude of impact. Building occupants, persons on the street or in transit in lower Manhattan on 9/11, local residents, rescue and recovery workers/volunteers, and area school children and staff were interviewed and enrolled in the WTCHR between September 2003 and November 2004. A total of 71,437 people enrolled in the WTCHR, for 17.4% coverage of the estimated eligible exposed population (nearly 410,000); 30% were recruited from lists, and 70% were self-identified. Many reported being in the dust cloud from the collapsing WTC Towers (51%), witnessing traumatic events (70%), or sustaining an injury (13%). After 9/11, 67% of adult enrollees reported new or worsening respiratory symptoms, 3% reported newly diagnosed asthma, 16% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 8% for serious psychological distress (SPD). Newly diagnosed asthma was most common among rescue and recovery workers who worked on the debris pile (4.1%). PTSD was higher among those who reported Hispanic ethnicity (30%), household income < $25,000 (31%), or being injured (35%). Using previously published estimates of the total number of exposed people per WTCHR eligibility criteria, we estimate between 3,800 and 12,600 adults experienced newly diagnosed asthma and 34,600-70,200 adults experienced PTSD following the attacks, suggesting extensive adverse health impacts beyond the immediate deaths and injuries from the acute event.

  5. Quality of Life of Persons Injured on 9/11: Qualitative Analysis from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Gargano, Lisa M.; Gershon, Robyn R.; Brackbill, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A number of studies published by the World Trade Center Health Registry (Registry) document the prevalence of injuries sustained by victims of the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD) on 9/11. Injury occurrence during or in the immediate aftermath of this event has been shown to be a risk factor for long-term adverse physical and mental health status. More recent reports of ongoing physical health and mental health problems and overall poor quality of life among survivors led us to undertake this qualitative study to explore the long-term impact of having both disaster-related injuries and peri-event traumatic exposure on quality of life in disaster survivors.  Methods: Semi-structured, in-depth individual telephone interviews were conducted with 33 Registry enrollees who reported being injured on 9/11/01. Topics included: extent and circumstance of the injury(ies), description of medical treatment for injury, current health and functional status, and lifestyle changes resulting from the WTCD. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and inductively open-coded for thematic analysis. Results: Six themes emerged with respect to long term recovery and quality of life: concurrent experience of injury with exposure to peri-event traumatic exposure (e.g., witnessing death or destruction, perceived life threat, etc.); sub-optimal quality and timeliness of short- and long-term medical care for the injury reported and mental health care; poor ongoing health status, functional limitations, and disabilities; adverse impact on lifestyle; lack of social support; and adverse economic impact. Many study participants, especially those reporting more serious injuries, also reported self-imposed social isolation, an inability to participate in or take enjoyment from previously enjoyable leisure and social activities and greatly diminished overall quality of life. Discussion: This study provided unique insight into the long-term impact of disasters on survivors. Long

  6. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  7. 9/11-Related Experiences and Tasks of Landfill and Barge Workers: Qualitative Analysis from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the experiences of individuals who participated in the recovery and cleanup efforts at the World Trade Center Recovery Operation at Fresh Kills Landfill, on debris loading piers, and on transport barges after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of workers and volunteers from the World Trade Center Health Registry. Qualitative methods were used to analyze the narratives. Results Twenty workers and volunteers were interviewed. They described the transport of debris to the Landfill via barges, the tasks and responsibilities associated with their post-9/11 work at the Landfill, and their reflections on their post-9/11 experiences. Tasks included sorting through debris, recovering human remains, searching for evidence from the terrorist attacks, and providing food and counseling services. Exposures mentioned included dust, fumes, and odors. Eight years after the World Trade Center disaster, workers expressed frustration about poor risk communication during recovery and cleanup work. Though proud of their contributions in the months after 9/11, some participants were concerned about long-term health outcomes. Conclusions This qualitative study provided unique insight into the experiences, exposures, and concerns of understudied groups of 9/11 recovery and cleanup workers. The findings are being used to inform the development of subsequent World Trade Center Health Registry exposure and health assessments. PMID:21575237

  8. Unmet mental health care need 10–11 years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks: 2011–2012 results from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little current information about the unmet mental health care need (UMHCN) and reasons for it among those exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) terrorist attacks. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of UMHCN among symptomatic individuals enrolled in the WTC Health Registry (WTCHR) in 2011–2012, and to analyze the relationship between UMHCN due to attitudinal, cost, and access factors and mental health symptom severity, mental health care utilization, health insurance availability, and social support. Methods The WTCHR is a prospective cohort study of individuals with reported exposure to the 2001 WTC attacks. This study used data from 9,803 adults who completed the 2003–2004 (Wave 1) and 2011–2012 (Wave 3) surveys and had posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression in 2011–2012. We estimated logistic regression models relating perceived attitudinal, cost and access barriers to symptom severity, health care utilization, a lack of health insurance, and social support after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results Slightly more than one-third (34.2%) of study participants reported an UMHCN. Symptom severity was a strong predictor of UMHCN due to attitudinal and perceived cost and access reasons. Attitudinal UMHCN was common among those not using mental health services, particularly those with relatively severe mental health symptoms. Cost-related UMHCN was significantly associated with a lack of health insurance but not service usage. Access-related barriers were significantly more common among those who did not use any mental health services. A higher level of social support served as an important buffer against cost and access UMHCN. Conclusions A significant proportion of individuals exposed to the WTC attacks with depression or PTSD 10 years later reported an UMHCN, and individuals with more severe and disabling conditions, those who lacked health insurance, and those with low levels of social

  9. Imaging Registries and Single-Center Series.

    PubMed

    Hachamovitch, Rory; Peña, Jessica M; Xie, Joe; Shaw, Leslee J; Min, James K

    2017-03-01

    Randomized controlled trials are often regarded as the pinnacle of research designs, valued for their rigor and internal validity. However, their high costs and selected patient populations limit their applicability, and complementary study designs are needed to guide evidence. In the realm of cardiovascular imaging, research designs using single-center series and registries have contributed key foundational insights into diagnosis, resource use and cost patterns, and prognosis as derived from practical, "real-world" settings. This review highlights the strengths and limitations of these study designs, provides notable examples, and indicates future directions for research.

  10. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  11. Comorbidity of 9/11-related PTSD and depression in the World Trade Center Health Registry 10-11 years postdisaster.

    PubMed

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M; Liao, Tim; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report elevated prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among persons exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster compared to those unexposed; few have evaluated long-term PTSD with comorbid depression. We examined prevalence and risk factors for probable PTSD, probable depression, and both conditions 10-11 years post-9/11 among 29,486 World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees who completed surveys at Wave 1 (2003-2004), Wave 2 (2006-2007), and Wave 3 (2011-2012). Enrollees reporting physician diagnosed pre-9/11 PTSD or depression were excluded. PTSD was defined as scoring ≥ 44 on the PTSD Checklist and depression as scoring ≥ 10 on the 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire. We examined 4 groups: comorbid PTSD and depression, PTSD only, depression only, and neither. Among enrollees, 15.2% reported symptoms indicative of PTSD at Wave 3, 14.9% of depression, and 10.1% of both. Comorbid PTSD and depression was associated with high 9/11 exposures, low social integration, health-related unemployment, and experiencing ≥ 1 traumatic life event post-9/11. Comorbid persons experienced poorer outcomes on all PTSD-related impairment measures, life satisfaction, overall health, and unmet mental health care need compared to those with only a single condition. These findings highlight the importance of ongoing screening and treatment for both conditions, particularly among those at risk for mental health comorbidity.

  12. 76 FR 9578 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council. The National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical... an action agenda for strengthening the nation's approach to protecting the public's health from... National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures, visit this Web site:...

  13. 75 FR 41505 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Meeting Time and Date: 1 p.m.-5 p.m. EDT... National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council, which is convened by... protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides...

  14. 75 FR 16488 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council, which is convened by RESOLVE, a non-profit independent facilitator. The National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical... public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides overall guidance to...

  15. 75 FR 59727 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... sixth meeting of the National Conversation on Public ] Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council... approach to protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides... agenda. For additional information on the National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical...

  16. 75 FR 75474 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... seventh meeting of the National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council... approach to protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides... agenda. For additional information on the National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical...

  17. 77 FR 37678 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: Notice of Charter... Substances and Disease Registry, Department of Health and Human Services, has been renewed for a 2-year... Registry, Department of Health and Human Services, 4770 Buford Highway Mailstop F61, Chamblee,...

  18. 77 FR 58557 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: September 17, 2012. Elaine L. Baker, Director,...

  19. 77 FR 24720 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: April...

  20. 76 FR 24031 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: April 21, 2011. Elaine L....

  1. Staffing and Training Requirements for Tumor Registry Centers in the State of Louisiana. Technical Report 69-101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, C. Dennis

    An exploratory study was conducted to obtain information regarding staff requirements in small tumor registry centers, involving a brief analysis of existing tumor registry centers and exploration of training and organizational factors that might be associated with establishing new centers. Activities performed by tumor registry personnel were…

  2. The Trace Center International Hardware/Software Registry: Programs for Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary

    1982-01-01

    The Trace Center (University of Wisconsin) has assembled a registry of hardware/software programs and adaptations for the handicapped user. The registry contains information on augmentative devices for motoric, sensory, or cognitive skills; special inputs that provide access to standard software; and other programs with speech output. (CL)

  3. Health technology assessment in Australia: a role for clinical registries?

    PubMed

    Scott, Anna Mae

    2016-03-31

    Objective Health technology assessment (HTA) is a process of assessing evidence to inform policy decisions about public subsidy of new drugs and medical procedures. Where evidence is uncertain but the technology itself is promising, funders may recommend funding on an interim basis. It is unknown whether evidence from clinical registries is used to resolve uncertainties identified in interim-funded decisions made by Australian HTA bodies. Therefore, the present study evaluated the role of evidence from clinical registries in resolving evidence uncertainties identified by the Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC).Methods All HTAs considered by MSAC between 1998 and 2015 were reviewed and assessments that recommended interim funding were identified. The MSAC website was searched to identify reassessments of these recommendations and sources of evidence used to resolve the uncertainties were identified.Results Of 173 HTA reports considered by MSAC, 17 (10%) contained an interim funding recommendation. Eight recommendations cited uncertainty around safety, 15 cited uncertainty around clinical effectiveness and 13 cited uncertainty around economics (cost-effectiveness and/or budget impact). Of the 17 interim funding recommendations, 11 (65%) have been reassessed. Only two reassessments relied on clinical registry evidence to resolve evidence gaps identified at the time of the interim funding recommendation.Conclusions Clinical registries are underused as a source of evidence for resolving uncertainties around promising new health technologies in Australia. An open dialogue between stakeholders on the role of registries in this context is needed.What is known about the topic? HTA is a process of assessing the evidence to inform policy decisions about public subsidy of new health technologies (e.g. pharmaceuticals, diagnostic tests, medical procedures). Where evidence is uncertain but the technology under evaluation is promising, funders may recommend the funding of

  4. Pregnancy registries in epilepsy: a consensus statement on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J; Pennell, P B; Harden, C L; Gordon, J C; Tomson, T; Kaplan, P W; Holmes, G L; French, J A; Hauser, W A; Wells, P G; Cramer, J A

    2008-09-30

    Most pregnant women with epilepsy require antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. Present guidelines recommend optimizing treatment prior to conception, choosing the most effective AED for seizure type and syndrome, using monotherapy and lowest effective dose, and supplementing with folate. The Epilepsy Therapy Project established the international Health Outcomes in Pregnancy and Epilepsy (HOPE) forum to learn more about the impact of AEDs on the developing fetus, particularly the role of pregnancy registries in studying AED teratogenicity. The primary outcome of interest in these registries is the occurrence of major congenital malformations, with some data collected on minor malformations. Cognitive and behavioral outcomes are often beyond the timeframe for follow-up of these registries and require independent study. The HOPE consensus report describes the current state of knowledge and the limitations to interpretations of information from the various sources. Data regarding specific risks for both older and newer AEDs need to be analyzed carefully, considering study designs and confounding factors. There is a critical need for investigations to delineate the underlying mechanisms and explain the variance seen in outcomes across AEDs and within a single AED.

  5. Distribution of indications and procedures within the framework of centers participating in the WAA apheresis registry.

    PubMed

    Stegmayr, B; Mörtzell Henriksson, M; Newman, E; Witt, V; Derfler, K; Leitner, G; Eloot, S; Dhondt, A; Deeren, D; Rock, G; Ptak, J; Blaha, M; Lanska, M; Gasova, Z; Bhuiyan-Ludvikova, Z; Hrdlickova, R; Ramlow, W; Prophet, H; Liumbruno, G; Mori, E; Griskevicius, A; Audzijoniene, J; Vrielink, H; Rombout-Sestrienkova, E; Aandahl, A; Sikole, A; Tomaz, J; Lalic, K; Bojanic, I; Strineholm, V; Brink, B; Berlin, G; Dykes, J; Toss, F; Nilsson, T; Knutson, F; Ramsauer, B; Wahlstrom, A

    2017-01-04

    The WAA apheresis registry was established in 2003 and an increasing number of centers have since then included their experience and data of their procedures. The registry now contains data of more than 74,000 apheresis procedures in more than 10,000 patients. This report shows that the indications for apheresis procedures are changing towards more oncological diagnoses and stem cell collections from patients and donors and less therapeutic apheresis procedures. In centers that continue to register, the total extent of apheresis procedures and patients treated have expanded during the latest years.

  6. Psychological Distress in Parents and School-Functioning of Adolescents: Results from the World Trade Center Registry.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Dechen, Tenzin; Cone, James E; Stellman, Steven D; Brackbill, Robert M

    2017-03-20

    Poor school-functioning can be indicative of parent and adolescent mental health and adolescent behavior problems. This study examined 472 adolescents enrolled in the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry, with a two-step path analysis, using regression-based models, to unravel the relationships between parent and adolescent mental health, adolescent behavior problems, and adolescent unmet healthcare need (UHCN) on the outcome school-functioning. WTC exposure was associated with UHCN and parental mental health was a significant mediator. There was no evidence that family WTC exposure was associated with UHCN independent of its effect on parental mental health. For the second path, after accounting for the effects of adolescent mental health, behavioral problems, and UHCN, there remained a significant association between parental mental health and school-functioning. Interventions for poor school-functioning should have multiple components which address UHCN, mental health, and behavioral problems, as efforts to address any of these alone may not be sufficient.

  7. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  8. Vision for a Global Registry of Anticipated Public Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bernard C.K.; Frank, John; Mindell, Jennifer S.; Orlova, Anna; Lin, Vivian; Vaillancourt, Alain D.M.G.; Puska, Pekka; Pang, Tikki; Skinner, Harvey A.; Marsh, Marsha; Mokdad, Ali H.; Yu, Shun-Zhang; Lindner, M. Cristina; Sherman, Gregory; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Green, Lawrence W.; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Sainsbury, Peter; Yan, Yongping; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Zevallos, Juan C.; Ho, Suzanne C.; de Salazar, Ligia M.

    2007-01-01

    In public health, the generation, management, and transfer of knowledge all need major improvement. Problems in generating knowledge include an imbalance in research funding, publication bias, unnecessary studies, adherence to fashion, and undue interest in novel and immediate issues. Impaired generation of knowledge, combined with a dated and inadequate process for managing knowledge and an inefficient system for transferring knowledge, mean a distorted body of evidence available for decisionmaking in public health. This article hopes to stimulate discussion by proposing a Global Registry of Anticipated Public Health Studies. This prospective, comprehensive system for tracking research in public health could help enhance collaboration and improve efficiency. Practical problems must be discussed before such a vision can be further developed. PMID:17413073

  9. [What can and cannot be achieved by registries : Perspective of the registry working group of the German Network of Health Services Research].

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, E A M; Stausberg, J

    2016-06-01

    In addition to clinical trials, registries and cohort studies are the fundamental basis of patient-orientated research. The importance of registries is increasing because more questions involving patient care under routine conditions (real world data) need to be answered. This article supplies answers to the questions: what can be achieved with registries and what are the limitations? Starting with a consensus definition of a registry from the German Network of Health Services Research (DNVF), the question of existing registries was examined and it was concluded that there was a lack of transparency. Consequently, a registry of registries similar to clinical trials registries is urgently needed as well as an evaluation of the quality of existing registries. Criteria are deduced that allow an assessment of the quality of a registry and which comprehensive possibilities registries can provide are discussed in eight different areas of interest to clinicians. The limitations of registries compared to randomized clinical trials and cohort studies are emphasized and discussed in this article. In the future, the use of registry-based randomized clinical trials (RRCT) will allow data related to efficacy as well as to effectiveness to be collated.

  10. Tumor Registry Follow-Up at Army Medical Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    Government Printing Office, May 1982), p. 1-8. 1 2Wayne W. Daniel, Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences, 2d ed. (New York: John ...20330 ATTN: PCRE-RL Fort Benjamin Harrison, IN 46249 Personnel Records Division The Adjutant General’s Ofc. 5’. Army Locator 3511 S Carlyn Spring Road...Guidelines for Cancer Care, undated. Daniel, Wayne W. Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analsis in the Health Sciences. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978

  11. Electronic Public Health Registry of Extensively Drug-Resistant Organisms, Illinois, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael Y.; Cheng-Leidig, Robynn; Driscoll, Mary; Tang, Angela S.; Gao, Wei; Runningdeer, Erica; Arwady, M. Allison; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    In response to clusters of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in Illinois, USA, the Illinois Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chicago Prevention Epicenter launched a statewide Web-based registry designed for bidirectional data exchange among health care facilities. CRE occurrences are entered and searchable in the system, enabling interfacility communication of patient information. For rapid notification of facilities, admission feeds are automated. During the first 12 months of implementation (November 1, 2013–October 31, 2014), 1,557 CRE reports (≈4.3/day) were submitted from 115 acute care hospitals, 5 long-term acute care hospitals, 46 long-term care facilities, and 7 reference laboratories. Guided by a state and local public health task force of infection prevention specialists and microbiologists and a nonprofit informatics entity, Illinois Department of Public Health deployed a statewide registry of extensively drug-resistant organisms. The legal, technical, and collaborative underpinnings of the system enable rapid incorporation of other emerging organisms. PMID:26402744

  12. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hall. Staffed by health care workers like nurses and doctors, school-based health centers provide a ... including mental health care. Centers may even have nurse practitioners, medical students, doctors, social workers, drug counselors, ...

  13. California’s Parkinson’s Disease Registry Pilot Project - Coordination Center and Northern California Ascertainment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Parkinsonism , and another 12% reported multiple diagnoses of Parkinson’s disease and Parkinsonism . Table 2 below lists the cases by county. 15. Assessment...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0261 TITLE: California’s Parkinson’s Disease ...NUMBER California’s Parkinson’s Disease Registry Pilot Project – Coordination Center and Northern California Ascertainment 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH

  14. A population-based registry as a source of health indicators for rare diseases: the ten-year experience of the Veneto Region’s rare diseases registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although rare diseases have become a major public health issue, there is a paucity of population-based data on rare diseases. The aim of this epidemiological study was to provide descriptive figures referring to a sizable group of unrelated rare diseases. Methods Data from the rare diseases registry established in the Veneto Region of north-east Italy (population 4,900,000), referring to the years from 2002 to 2012, were analyzed. The registry is based on a web-based system accessed by different users. Cases are enrolled by two different sources: clinicians working at Centers of expertise officially designated to diagnose and care patients with rare diseases and health professionals working in the local health districts. Deaths of patients are monitored by Death Registry. Results So far, 19,547 patients with rare diseases have been registered, and 23% of them are pediatric cases. The overall raw prevalence of the rare diseases monitored in the population under study is 33.09 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 32.56-33.62), whilst the overall incidence is 3.85 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 3.67-4.03). The most commonly-recorded diagnoses belong to the following nosological groups: congenital malformations (Prevalence: 5.45/10,000), hematological diseases (4.83/10,000), ocular disorders (4.47/10,000), diseases of the nervous system (3.51/10,000), and metabolic disorders (2,95/10,000). Most of the deaths in the study population occur among pediatric patients with congenital malformations, and among adult cases with neurological diseases. Rare diseases of the central nervous system carry the highest fatality rate (71.36/1,000). Rare diseases explain 4.2% of general population Years of Life Lost (YLLs), comparing to 1.2% attributable to infectious diseases and 2.6% to diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Our estimates of the burden of rare diseases at population level confirm that these conditions are a relevant public health issue. Our snapshot of their epidemiology

  15. The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry: a multi-national, community-based registry of pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research (Global Network) supports and conducts clinical trials in resource-limited countries by pairing foreign and U.S. investigators, with the goal of evaluating low-cost, sustainable interventions to improve the health of women and children. Accurate reporting of births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, maternal mortality, and measures of obstetric and neonatal care is critical to efforts to discover strategies for improving pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. Because most of the sites in the Global Network have weak registration within their health care systems, the Global Network developed the Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR), a prospective, population-based registry of pregnancies at the Global Network sites to provide precise data on health outcomes and measures of care. Methods Pregnant women are enrolled in the MNHR if they reside in or receive healthcare in designated groups of communities within sites in the Global Network. For each woman, demographic, health characteristics and major outcomes of pregnancy are recorded. Data are recorded at enrollment, the time of delivery and at 42 days postpartum. Results From 2010 through 2013 Global Network sites were located in Argentina, Guatemala, Belgaum and Nagpur, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Zambia. During this period, 283,496 pregnant women were enrolled in the MNHR; this number represented 98.8% of all eligible women. Delivery data were collected for 98.8% of women and 42-day follow-up data for 98.4% of those enrolled. In this supplement, there are a series of manuscripts that use data gathered through the MNHR to report outcomes of these pregnancies. Conclusions Developing public policy and improving public health in countries with poor perinatal outcomes is, in part, dependent upon understanding the outcome of every pregnancy. Because the worst pregnancy outcomes typically occur in countries with limited health registration

  16. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  17. The impact of electronic health record usage on cancer registry systems in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Colquitt, Shannon; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2012-01-01

    As the use of information technology within the healthcare setting increases, the impact of bridging registry data with electronic health records (EHRs) must be addressed. Current EHR implementation may create benefits as well as challenges to cancer registries in areas such as policies and regulations, data quality, reporting, management, staffing, and training. The purpose of this study was to assess 1) the status of EHR usage in cancer registries, 2) the impact of EHR usage on cancer registries, and 3) the benefits and challenges of EHR usage for cancer registries in Alabama. The study method consisted of a voluntary survey provided to participants at the Alabama Cancer Registry Association 2009 annual conference. Forty-three respondents completed the survey. Data indicated that the major benefits of EHR use for the cancer registry included more complete treatment information available to clinicians and researchers, more time for retrieving and analyzing data for clinicians and researchers, and better tracking of patient follow-up. The major challenges included lack of adequate resources, lack of medical staff support, and changing data standards. The conclusion of the study indicates that understanding the impacts and challenges of EHR usage within cancer registries has implications for public health data management, data reporting, and policy issues.

  18. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  19. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  20. Evaluating trauma center process performance in an integrated trauma system with registry data

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lynne; Lavoie, André; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Amini, Rachid; Belcaïd, Amina; Sampalis, John S

    2013-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of trauma center performance implies the use of indicators that evaluate clinical processes. Despite the availability of routinely collected clinical data in most trauma systems, quality improvement efforts are often limited to hospital-based audit of adverse patient outcomes. Objective: To identify and evaluate a series of process performance indicators (PPI) that can be calculated using routinely collected trauma registry data. Materials and Methods: PPI were identified using a review of published literature, trauma system documentation, and expert consensus. Data from the 59 trauma centers of the Quebec trauma system (1999, 2006; N = 99,444) were used to calculate estimates of conformity to each PPI for each trauma center. Outliers were identified by comparing each center to the global mean. PPI were evaluated in terms of discrimination (between-center variance), construct validity (correlation with designation level and patient volume), and forecasting (correlation over time). Results: Fifteen PPI were retained. Global proportions of conformity ranged between 6% for reduction of a major dislocation within 1 h and 97% for therapeutic laparotomy. Between-center variance was statistically significant for 13 PPI. Five PPI were significantly associated with designation level, 7 were associated with volume, and 11 were correlated over time. Conclusion: In our trauma system, results suggest that a series of 15 PPI supported by literature review or expert opinion can be calculated using routinely collected trauma registry data. We have provided evidence of their discrimination, construct validity, and forecasting properties. The between-center variance observed in this study highlights the importance of evaluating process performance in integrated trauma systems. PMID:23723617

  1. Connecting Communities to Health Research: Development of the Project CONNECT Minority Research Registry

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Kim, Mimi M.; Barber, Sharrelle; Odulana, Abedowale A.; Godley, Paul A.; Howard, Daniel L.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prevention and treatment standards are based on evidence obtained in behavioral and clinical research. However, racial and ethnic minorities remain relatively absent from the science that develops these standards. While investigators have successfully recruited participants for individual studies using tailored recruitment methods, these strategies require considerable time and resources. Research registries, typically developed around a disease or condition, serve as a promising model for a targeted recruitment method to increase minority participation in health research. This study assessed the tailored recruitment methods used to populate a health research registry targeting African-American community members. Methods We describe six recruitment methods applied between September 2004 and October 2008 to recruit members into a health research registry. Recruitment included direct (existing studies, public databases, community outreach) and indirect methods (radio, internet, and email) targeting the general population, local universities, and African American communities. We conducted retrospective analysis of the recruitment by method using descriptive statistics, frequencies, and chi-square statistics. Results During the recruitment period, 608 individuals enrolled in the research registry. The majority of enrollees were African American, female, and in good health. Direct and indirect methods were identified as successful strategies for subgroups. Findings suggest significant associations between recruitment methods and age, presence of existing health condition, prior research participation, and motivation to join the registry. Conclusions A health research registry can be a successful tool to increase minority awareness of research opportunities. Multi-pronged recruitment approaches are needed to reach diverse subpopulations. PMID:23340183

  2. Oceans and Human Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ocean and human health science can help prevent disease outbreaks and improve public health through a deeper understanding of the causes ... our Center and the field of oceans and human health science. More Research Learn about the research ...

  3. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to navigation Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion health.gov healthfinder.gov healthypeople.gov health .gov ... by ODPHP. NHIC supports public health education and promotion by maintaining a calendar of National Health Observances. ...

  4. National Center for Farmworker Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data Migrant Health Centers Population Estimates Resources Performance Management & Governance Tool Box > Administrative Governance Human Resources Needs Assessment Service Delivery Emergency Preparedness Call for ...

  5. Compliance of clinical trial registries with the World Health Organization minimum data set: a survey

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo P; Moschetti, Ivan; Nurbhai, Munira; Compagnoni, Anna; Liberati, Alessandro; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Chan, An-Wen; Dickersin, Kay; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela; Moher, David; Sim, Ida; Volmink, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    Background Since September 2005 the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors has required that trials be registered in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) minimum dataset, in order to be considered for publication. The objective is to evaluate registries' and individual trial records' compliance with the 2006 version of the WHO minimum data set. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 21 online clinical trial registries (international, national, specialty, pharmaceutical industry and local) from April 2005 to February 2007 and a cross-sectional evaluation of a stratified random sample of 610 trial records from the 21 registries. Results Among 11 registries that provided guidelines for registration, the median compliance with the WHO criteria were 14 out of 20 items (range 6 to 20). In the period April 2005–February 2007, six registries increased their compliance by six data items, on average. None of the local registry websites published guidelines on the trial data items required for registration. Slightly more than half (330/610; 54.1%, 95% CI 50.1% – 58.1%) of trial records completed the contact details criteria while 29.7% (181/610, 95% CI 26.1% – 33.5%) completed the key clinical and methodological data fields. Conclusion While the launch of the WHO minimum data set seemed to positively influence registries with better standardisation of approaches, individual registry entries are largely incomplete. Initiatives to ensure quality assurance of registries and trial data should be encouraged. Peer reviewers and editors should scrutinise clinical trial registration records to ensure consistency with WHO's core content requirements when considering trial-related publications. PMID:19624821

  6. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  7. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... has a health center by contacting your child's teacher or the school office. Most school-based health ...

  8. [EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH: DATA FROM THE PARIS SUDDEN DEATH EXPERTISE CENTER REGISTRY].

    PubMed

    Jouven, Xavier; Bougouin, Wulfran; Karam, Nicole; Marijon, Eloi

    2015-09-01

    Sudden cardiac death is an unexpected cardiac arrest without obvious extra-cardiac cause. Epidemiology of sudden cardiac death has been poorly documented in France, mainly because of challenging requirement in order to capture all cases in a specific area. The Parisian registry (Sudden Death Expertise Center, European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Paris) was initiated in May 2011 and analyzed data of all sudden death in Paris and suburbs (6.6 millions inhabitants). Over 3 years, the annual incidence estimated to 50-70 per 100,000. Those occurred mainly in men (69%), with a mean age of 65 year, and at home (75%). The event was witnessed in 80% of cases, but bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated in only half of cases. Initial cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation in 25%. Survival to hospital discharge remains low (8%).

  9. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  10. [The Murcia Twin Registry. A resource for research on health-related behaviour].

    PubMed

    Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez Romera, Juan F; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Carrillo, Eduvigis; González-Javier, Francisca; Madrid-Valero, Juan J; Morosoli-García, José J; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco; Martínez-Selva, José M

    2017-03-08

    Genetically informative designs and, in particular, twin studies, are the most widely used methodology to analyse the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to inter-individual variability. These studies basically compare the degree of phenotypical similarity between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. In addition to the traditional estimate of heritability, this kind of registry enables a wide variety of analyses which are unique due to the characteristics of the sample. The Murcia Twin Registry is population-based and focused on the analysis of health-related behaviour. The observed prevalence of health problems is comparable to that of other regional and national reference samples, which guarantees its representativeness. Overall, the characteristics of the Registry facilitate developing various types of research as well as genetically informative designs, and collaboration with different initiatives and consortia.

  11. Establishing a harmonized haemophilia registry for countries with developing health care systems.

    PubMed

    Alzoebie, A; Belhani, M; Eshghi, P; Kupesiz, A O; Ozelo, M; Pompa, M T; Potgieter, J; Smith, M

    2013-09-01

    Over recent decades tremendous progress has been made in diagnosing and treating haemophilia and, in resource-rich countries, life expectancy of people with haemophilia (PWH) is now close to that of a healthy person. However, an estimated 70% of PWH are not diagnosed or are undertreated; the majority of whom live in countries with developing health care systems. In these countries, designated registries for people with haemophilia are often limited and comprehensive information on the natural history of the disease and treatment outcomes is lacking. Taken together, this means that planning efforts for future treatment and care of affected individuals is constrained in countries where it is most needed. Establishment of standardized national registries in these countries would be a step towards obtaining reliable sociodemographic and clinical data for an entire country. A series of consensus meetings with experts from widely differing countries with different health care systems took place to discuss concerns specific to countries with developing health care systems. As a result of these discussions, recommendations are made on parameters to include when establishing and harmonizing national registries. Such recommendations should enable countries with developing health care systems to establish standardized national haemophilia registries. Although not a primary objective, the recommendations should also help standardized data collation on an international level, enabling treatment and health care trends to be monitored across groups of countries and providing data for advocacy purposes. Greater standardization of data collation should have implications for optimizing resources for haemophilia care both nationally and internationally.

  12. RHYTHM-AF: design of an international registry on cardioversion of atrial fibrillation and characteristics of participating centers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation is a serious public health problem posing a considerable burden to not only patients, but the healthcare environment due to high rates of morbidity, mortality, and medical resource utilization. There are limited data on the variation in treatment practice patterns across different countries, healthcare settings and the associated health outcomes. Methods/design RHYTHM-AF was a prospective observational multinational study of management of recent onset atrial fibrillation patients considered for cardioversion designed to collect data on international treatment patterns and short term outcomes related to cardioversion. We present data collected in 10 countries between May 2010 and June 2011. Enrollment was ongoing in Italy and Brazil at the time of data analysis. Data were collected at the time of atrial fibrillation episode in all countries (Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom), and cumulative follow-up data were collected at day 60 (±10) in all but Spain. Information on center characteristics, enrollment data, patient demographics, detail of atrial fibrillation episode, medical history, diagnostic procedures, acute treatment of atrial fibrillation, discharge information and the follow-up data on major events and rehospitalizations up to day 60 were collected. Discussion A total of 3940 patients were enrolled from 175 acute care centers. 70.5% of the centers were either academic (44%) or teaching (26%) hospitals with an overall median capacity of 510 beds. The sites were mostly specialized with anticoagulation clinics (65.9%), heart failure (75.1%) and hypertension clinics (60.1%) available. The RHYTHM-AF registry will provide insight into regional variability of antiarrhythmic and antithrombotic treatment of atrial fibrillation, the appropriateness of such treatments with respect to outcomes, and their cost-efficacy. Observations will help inform strategies to improve

  13. School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining student health, safety, and welfare is a primary goal for any K-12 school system. If a child becomes sick, is injured, or seems in any other way incapacitated at school, it is the understood responsibility that the school will provide care and, if necessary, contact the parents and direct the child to outside treatment. Beyond that…

  14. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  15. Immunization registries can be building blocks for national health information systems.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Alan R; Ross, David A

    2010-04-01

    Electronic health records and health information exchanges are necessary components of the information infrastructure to support a reformed health care system. However, they are not sufficient by themselves. Merely summing data from electronic health records together will not provide a comprehensive picture of the population, which is essential for tracking disease trends and treatment outcomes. Public health information systems such as immunization registries are an essential component of the information infrastructure and will allow assessment of the impact of changes in health care on the population as a whole.

  16. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  17. Veterans Health Administration multiple sclerosis surveillance registry: The problem of case-finding from administrative databases.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Ehrmantraut, Mary; Wallin, Mitchell T; Flannery, Kathleen; Bradham, Douglas D

    2006-01-01

    Establishment of a national multiple sclerosis (MS) surveillance registry (MSSR) is a primary goal of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) MS Center of Excellence. The initial query of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) databases identified 25,712 patients (labeled "VHA MS User Cohort") from fiscal years 1998 to 2002 based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code; service-connection for MS; and/or disease-modifying agent (DMA) use. Because of ICD-9-CM limitations, the initial query was overinclusive and resulted in many non-MS cases. Thus, we needed a more rigorous case-finding method. Our gold standard was chart review of the Computerized Patient Record System for the mid-Atlantic VA medical centers. After chart review, we classified patients as not having MS or having MS/possible MS. We also applied a statistical algorithm to classify cases based on service-connection for MS, DMA use, and/or at least one healthcare encounter a year with MS coded as the primary diagnosis. We completed two analyses with kappa coefficient and sensitivity analysis. The first analysis (efficacy) was limited to cases with a definitive classification based on chart review (n = 600). The kappa coefficient was 0.85, sensitivity was 0.93, and specificity was 0.92. The second analysis (effectiveness) included unknown cases that were classified as MS/possible MS (N = 682). The kappa coefficient was 0.82, sensitivity was 0.93, and specificity was 0.90. These findings suggest that the database algorithm reliably eliminated non-MS cases from the initial MSSR population and is a reasonable case-finding method at this intermediate stage of MSSR development.

  18. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  19. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  20. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Area Primary Health Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  1. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  2. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  3. The Generalizability of a Participant Registry for Minority Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Effective strategies to recruit minority elders into health research (e.g., through churches, partnering with community gatekeepers) often involve nonrandom sampling methods. The current study has two aims: (a) to examine some new practices in recruitment of African American elders and (b) to determine the similarities and differences of…

  4. Department of Defense Kuwait oil fire health risk assessment. (The 'Persian Gulf Veterans' registry'). Background paper

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Second report prepared in response to P.L. 102-585--the Persian Gulf War Veterans' Health Status Act. (First report focused on the VA 'Persian Gulf War Veterans' Health Registry.') Assesses whether DoD's response 'meets the provisions of the law under which it was mandated,' assesses its 'potential utility ... for scientific study and assessment of the intermediate and long-term health consequences of military service in the Persian Gulf theater of operations during the Persian Gulf War,' and addresses some other related questions.

  5. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Cornerstone Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  6. The Illinois Women’s Health Registry: advancing women’s health research and education in Illinois, USA

    PubMed Central

    Bristol-Gould, Sarah; Desjardins, Michelle; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2010-01-01

    To achieve the goal of personalized medicine, we must first improve our understanding of the differences in health and illness between men and women. The purpose of the Illinois Women’s Health Registry (USA) is to provide a research and education tool that advances scientific knowledge of sex- and gender-based differences in health and disease. Specifically, the Registry is a confidential 30-min health and lifestyle survey for female residents of Illinois over the age of 18 years. The survey includes questions regarding health, environment, health-related behaviors, symptoms and illnesses or conditions that a participant may have now or has had in the past. By enrolling in the Registry, women throughout the state are provided with information and access to clinical research studies that they may be eligible for, based on their self-reported health information. The Registry not only serves as a platform for recruitment into pivotal research studies, but also represents the beginning of a state-wide database that enables researchers to examine the collective de-identified health information provided by women living in Illinois. Ultimately, a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of these data will help to clarify the issues that women themselves identify as their main health concerns. In response to these concerns, specific research studies can be designed and launched, allowing us to eventually deliver tailored treatment and prevention options to women. Finally, by creating a reliable state-focused research tool, developed by staff that are trained in women’s health research, we can compare health issues across the state and apply strategies for improvement where it is needed most. This article will provide examples of sex differences in disease, the lack of federal enforcement for inclusion of women in studies, researcher-perceived burdens and sex-based reasons as to why recruitment of women is considered to be more challenging. In addition, this article

  7. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  8. Registry and health insurance claims data in vascular research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Heidemann, Franziska; Rieß, Henrik Christian; Stoberock, Konstanze; Debus, Sebastian Eike

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of procedures in multidisciplinary vascular medicine has sparked a controversy regarding measures of quality improvement. In addition to primary registries, the use of health insurance claims data is becoming of increasing importance. However, due to the fact that health insurance claims data are not collected for scientific evaluation but rather for reimbursement purposes, meticulous validation is necessary before and during usage in research and quality improvement matters. This review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of such data sources. A recent comprehensive expert opinion panel examined the use of health insurance claims data and other administrative data sources in medicine. Results from several studies concerning the validity of administrative data varied significantly. Validity of these data sources depends on the clinical relevance of the diagnoses considered. The rate of implausible information was 0.04 %, while the validity of the considered diagnoses varied between 80 and 97 % across multiple validation studies. A matching study between health insurance claims data of the third-largest German health insurance provider, DAK-Gesundheit, and a prospective primary registry of the German Society for Vascular Surgery demonstrated a good level of validity regarding the mortality of endovascular and open surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in German hospitals. In addition, a large-scale international comparison of administrative data for the same disorder presented important results in treatment reality, which differed from those from earlier randomized controlled trials. The importance of administrative data for research and quality improvement will continue to increase in the future. When discussing the internal and external validity of this data source, one has to distinguish not only between its intended usage (research vs. quality improvement), but also between the included diseases and/or treatment procedures

  9. Center for the Advancement of Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... YouTube CFAH PARTNERS Alliance for Quality Psychosocial Cancer Care Kellogg Health Scholars Program KP Burch Leadership Program Diversity Data Place, Migration & Health Network * The Center for ...

  10. National Center for Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Asthma Carbon Monoxide Clean Water for Health Climate and Public Health Environmental Noise Exposure and Health ... Overviews Asthma Control Built Environment and Health Initiative Climate and Health Environmental Health Laboratory Environmental Health Services ...

  11. Malaysian Cardiothoracic Surgery Registry--a patient registry to evaluate the health outcomes of patients undergoing surgery for cardiothoracic diseases in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Anas, R; Rahman, I; Jahizah, H; Hassan, A; Ezani, T; Jong, Y H; Norzalina, E; Ziyadi, G; Balan, S; Ramadan, J; Lim, T O; Jamaiyah, H; Hidayah, H

    2008-09-01

    The formulation of the Cardiothoracic Registry. Cardiothoracic surgery is the field of medicine involved in surgical treatment of diseases affecting organs inside the thorax (the chest). It is a general treatment of conditions of the heart (heart disease) and lungs (lung disease). In Malaysia, due to lack of data collection we do not have estimates of number and outcome of such procedure in the country. Western figures are often used as our reference values and this may not accurately reflect our Malaysian population. The Malaysian Cardiothoracic Surgery Registry (MyCARE) by the Ministry of Health will be a valuable tool to provide timely and robust data of cardiology practice, its safety and cost effectiveness and most importantly the outcome of these patients in the Malaysian setting.

  12. Issues faced by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Grover, Jane

    2009-05-01

    Federally qualified health centers face numerous issues with regard to marketplace competition, staffing, and reimbursement streams that assure financial viability. Positioning the dental department of a health center to a high community profile strengthens the health center in professional educational development leading to a pipeline of workforce members, effective dental directors, and innovative fund-raising. A new dental team member developed by the American Dental Association can be utilized in health centers to make all traditional auxiliaries more productive.

  13. Reinventing the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives.

  14. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...-53702] [FR Doc No: 2010-21836] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Non-competitive Replacement Awards to Sunset Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health...

  15. A method to map heterogeneity between near but non-equivalent semantic attributes in multiple health data registries.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Nadine; Leszczynski, Agnieszka

    2008-03-01

    Health registries from multiple jurisdictions often include terms that are assumed to be semantically equivalent (e.g. fetal death and stillbirth). Closer examination reveals that such attributes have near--but non-equivalent--semantics. Thus their degree of semantic heterogeneity is an important indicator of uncertainty associated with data integration between registries. We build an OWL-encoded ontology which formalizes the relationships between similar perinatal concepts found in different databases. We also introduce the concept of ontology-based metadata as a means of contextualizing such terms and linking context to the attribute data. This extended metadata are exported as XML from the health registries, and it--along with the OWL ontology--is interfaced via a web-based GUI accessible to health researchers. The GUI mapping serves as the basis for making ad hoc comparison and integration decisions. Uncertainty is addressed by precisely mapping semantic heterogeneity between fields.

  16. Result Publication of Chinese Trials in World Health Organization Primary Registries

    PubMed Central

    Xuemei, Liu; Youping, Li; Senlin, Yin; Shangqi, Song

    2010-01-01

    Background Result publication is the key step to improve the transparency of clinical trials. Objective To investigate the result publication rate of Chinese trials registered in World Health Organization (WHO) primary registries. Method We searched 11 WHO primary registries for Chinese trials records. The progress of each trial was analyzed. We searched for the full texts of result publications cited in the registration records. For completed trials without citations, we searched PubMed, Embase, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (Chinese), China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database, and Chinese Science and Technology Periodicals Database for result publications. The search was conducted on July 14, 2009. We also called the investigators of completed trials to ask about results publication. Results We identified 1294 Chinese trials records (428 in ChiCTR,743 in clinicaltrials.gov,55 in ISRCTN, 21 in ACTRN). A total of 443 trials had been completed. The publication rate of the Chinese trials in WHO primary registries is 35.2%(156/443).The publication rate of Chinese trials in clinicaltrials.gov, ChiCTR, ISRCTN, and ACRTN was 36.5% (53/145), 36.3% (89/245), 26.0%(9/44), and 55.6%(5/9), respectively. The publication rate of trials sponsored by industry(23.8%) was lower than that of sponsored by central and local government(31.7%), hospital(35.1%), and universities (40.7%). The publication rate for randomized trials was higher than that of cohort study and case-control study (33.2% versus 16.7%, 22.2%). The publication rate for interventional studies and observational studies was similar(33.4% versus 33.3%). Conclusion The publication rate of the registered Chinese trials was low, with no significant difference between ChiCTR and clinicaltrials.gov. An effective mechanism is needed to promote publication of results for registered trials in China. PMID:20856888

  17. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  18. EHR-based disease registries to support integrated care in a health neighbourhood: an ontology-based methodology.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Taggart, Jane; Yu, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Disease registries derived from Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are widely used for chronic disease management. We approached registries from the perspective of integrated care in a health neighbourhood, considering data quality issues such as semantic interoperability (consistency), accuracy, completeness and duplication. Our proposition is that a realist ontological approach is required to accurately identify patients in an EHR or data repository, assess data quality and fitness for use by the multidisciplinary integrated care team. We report on this approach with routinely collected data in a practice based research network in Australia.

  19. National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact us | Site Map | Staff Only About the Clinical Center Search the Studies Patient Information Education & Training ... Events Staff Directory Dr. John I. Gallin Director, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health Welcome to the ...

  20. National Center for Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services Healthy Homes Healthy Places – Community Design Lead Poisoning Prevention Vessel Sanitation Environmental Hazards and Health Effects ... Program Overviews Built Environment and Health Initiative Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Climate and Health Environmental Health Laboratory ...

  1. Harnessing Electronic Healthcare Data for Wound Care Research: Standards for Reporting Observational Registry Data Obtained Directly from Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Fife, Caroline E; Eckert, Kristen A

    2017-04-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration will consider the expansion of coverage indications for some drugs and devices based on real-world data. Real-world data accrual in patient registries has historically been via manual data entry from the medical chart at a time distant from patient care, which is fraught with systematic error. The efficient automated transmission of data directly from electronic health records is replacing this labor-intensive paradigm. However, real-world data collection is unfamiliar. The potential sources of bias arising from the source of data and data accrual, documentation, and aggregation have not been well defined. Furthermore, the technological aspects of data acquisition and transmission are less transparent. We explore opportunities for harnessing direct-from-electronic health record registry reporting and propose the ABCs of Registries (Analysis of Bias Criteria of Registries), which are an evaluation framework for publications to minimize potential bias of real-world data obtained directly from an electronic health record method. These standards are based on a point-of-care data documentation process using a common definitional framework and data dictionaries. By way of example, we describe a wound registry obtained directly from electronic health records. This qualified clinical data registry minimizes bias by ensuring complete and accurate point-of-care data capture, standardizes usual care linked to quality reporting, and prevents post-hoc vetting of outcomes. The resulting data are of high quality and integrity and can be used for comparative effectiveness research in wound care. In this way, the effort needed to succeed with the Quality Payment System is leveraged to obtain the real-world data needed for comparative effectiveness research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs.

  3. Health Wellness and Hospital Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Bonnie; And Others

    This paper describes activities conducted by an early childhood classroom in its health play center. A major purpose of this play center was to reduce children's fears and anxieties about medical personnel and emergency vehicles, and to raise awareness of the many aspects of health and wellness. The classroom environment contained a variety of…

  4. Interschool Relationships in Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1981-01-01

    Within academic health centers there exists a well-established "pecking order" influencing daily life and reflecting fundamental relationships between medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health. Relationships between individual professionals and between schools within a center are examined for clues to possible change. (MSE)

  5. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future.

  6. National Center for Health Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Data and Tools Publications News and Events Population Surveys National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey National Health Interview Survey National Survey of Family Growth Vital Records National Vital Statistics System National Death ...

  7. Art and community health: lessons from an urban health center.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Wilma Bulkin; Bartley, Mary Anne

    2004-01-01

    Staff at a nurse-managed urban health center conducted a series of art sessions to benefit the community. The authors believe the program's success clearly communicated the relationship between art and community health. As a result of the success of the sessions, plans are in the works to make art a permanent part of the health center's services.

  8. Meta-Analysis of Survival Curve Data Using Distributed Health Data Networks: Application to Hip Arthroplasty Studies of the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafri, Guy; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art; Paxton, Liz; Furnes, Ove; Graves, Stephen; Marinac-Dabic, Danica

    2015-01-01

    The motivating example for this paper comes from a distributed health data network, the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries (ICOR), which aims to examine risk factors for orthopedic device failure for registries around the world. Unfortunately, regulatory, privacy, and propriety concerns made sharing of raw data impossible, even if…

  9. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  10. The NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research Patient Registry Standard: A Report from the University of New Mexico’s Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvari, Shamsi; Youssof, Sarah; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries remove barriers to performing research by assembling patient cohorts and data in a systematic, efficient, and proactive manner. Consequently, registries are a valuable strategy for facilitating research and scientific discovery. Registries for rare diseases are arguably even more valuable since there is difficulty in assembling cohorts of adequate size for study. Recently, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research created a rare disease registry Standard to facilitate research across multiple registries. We implemented the Standard for the Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy patient registry created at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. We performed a data element analysis for each Common Data Element defined in the Standard. Problems included the use of previous HL7 versions, non-structured data types, and a recent update to the Standard. Overall, the Standard is an excellent first step toward standardizing patient registries to facilitate work on broader questions and promote novel interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:24551336

  11. Department of Defense, Deployment Health Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... DCOE Psychological Health Webinar: Outreach and Support to Military Families: Ethnic/Cultural Considerations - April 27, 2017; 1-2: ... M.B.A. Director, Center for Families Director, Military Family Research Institute Professor, Human Development and Family Studies ...

  12. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-07-15

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center".

  13. Computer Simulation of Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Gary B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes an ongoing research project designed to develop a computer model capable of simulating the service delivery activities of community mental health care centers and human service agencies. The goal and methodology of the project are described. (NB)

  14. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and health outcomes: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Kumari, Varuni; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Romero, Lorena; Evans, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many developed countries have regional and national clinical registries aimed at improving health outcomes of patients diagnosed with particular diseases or cared for in particular healthcare settings. Clinical quality registries (CQRs) are clinical registries established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care and providing feedback to improve health outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to understand the impact of CQRs on (1) mortality/survival; (2) measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of healthcare; (3) healthcare utilisation and (4) costs. Methods and analysis The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard strategy using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data abstraction tools will be followed. A search of the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and CINAHL will be undertaken, in addition to Google Scholar and grey literature, to identify studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2014. Case–control, cohort, randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials which describe the registry as an intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Narrative synthesis of study findings will be conducted, guided by a conceptual framework developed to analyse the outcome measure of the registry using defined criteria. If sufficient studies are identified with a similar outcome of interest and measure using the same comparator and time of interval, results will be pooled for random-effects meta-analysis. Test for heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis will be conducted. To identify reporting bias, forest plots and funnel plots will be created and, if required, Egger's test will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. Review results will be published as a part of thesis, peer-reviewed journal and conferences. Trial registration number CRD

  15. In-stent Anchoring Facilitating Side-branch Balloon Delivery for Final Kissing: A Prospective, Single-center Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu; Xiao, Han; Wang, Yu-Qing; Liu, Huan-Yun; Bao, Pang; Song, Yao-Ming; Azzalini, Lorenzo; Huang, Lan; Zhao, Xiao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recrossing the compromised side branch (SB) with a balloon is sometimes technically challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether in-stent anchoring (ISA) is safe and effective to facilitate SB balloon delivery for final kissing. Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine consecutive patients were included (166 bifurcation lesions) in this prospective, single-center registry. ISA was used as a bailout method after unsuccessful SB crossing using conventional techniques, including low-profile balloons. Technique success was defined as SB balloon delivery and final kissing. Results: Kissing-balloon delivery was successfully performed with conventional strategies in 149 of 166 lesions (89.8%). In the remaining 17 lesions (10.2%), recrossing of the main vessel stent strut was not successful; therefore, ISA was attempted. The balloon successfully crossed the stent struts, and final kissing was achieved in 15 of 17 lesions (88.2%). Total final kissing was achieved in 164 of 166 lesions (98.8%), with success rates of 100% in the single-stent group and 97.6% in the two-stent group. Two cases without balloon delivery had complex bifurcation lesions with severe calcification. There was no vessel dissection in the anchoring zone. Conclusions: ISA is safe and effective for recrossing stent struts when conventional low-profile balloons have failed. However, large-scale trials are warranted for further evaluation. PMID:27823997

  16. The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carty, Lee; Burley, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is the nation's leading legal advocate for the rights of adults and children with mental disabilities. The Center uses a coordinated strategy of federal policy advocacy, legal support for a nationwide network of advocates, and creation of educational materials to help families, professionals,…

  17. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will transfer... (ARRA), originally awarded to Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. (HUCAC) to Upper Room AIDS... Grantee of Record: Harlem United Community AIDS Center, Inc. Original Period of Grant Support: March...

  18. A Web-Based Interactive Diabetes Registry for Health Care Management and Planning in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Amira M; Subhani, Shazia N; Ahmad, Najlaa A; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H; Ibrahim, Heba M

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, eHealth is a rapidly growing technology. It provides good quality health services at lower cost and increased availability. Diabetes has reached an epidemic stage in Saudi Arabia and has a medical and economic impact at a countrywide level. Data are greatly needed to better understand and plan to prevent and manage this medical problem. Objective The Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) is an electronic medical file supported by clinical, investigational, and management data. It functions as a monitoring tool for medical, social, and cultural bases for primary and secondary prevention programs. Economic impact, in the form of direct or indirect cost, is part of the registry’s scope. The registry’s geographic information system (GIS) produces a variety of maps for diabetes and associated diseases. In addition to availability and distribution of health facilities in the Kingdom, GIS data provide health planners with the necessary information to make informed decisions. The electronic data bank serves as a research tool to help researchers for both prospective and retrospective studies. Methods A Web-based interactive GIS system was designed to serve as an electronic medical file for diabetic patients retrieving data from medical files by trained registrars. Data was audited and cleaned before it was archived in the electronic filing system. It was then used to produce epidemiologic, economic, and geographic reports. A total of 84,942 patients were registered from 2000 to 2012, growing by 10% annually. Results The SNDR reporting system for epidemiology data gives better understanding of the disease pattern, types, and gender characteristics. Part of the reporting system is to assess quality of health care using different parameters, such as HbA1c, that gives an impression of good diabetes control for each institute. Economic reports give accurate cost estimation of different services given to diabetic patients, such as the annual insulin

  19. [Communication center in public health].

    PubMed

    George, W; Grimminger, F; Krause, B

    2002-06-01

    The Communications Center's portfolio covers areas such as marketing, contacts, distribution of information, sales activities and collection of bills by telephone (encashment). A special emphasis is Customer Care Management (Customer Relationship Management) to the patient and his caregivers (relatives), the customers, especially the physicians who send their patients to the hospital and the hospital doctor. By providing communication centers, the hospital would be able to improve the communication with the G.P.s, and identify the wishes and requirements more accurately and easily from the beginning. Dealing effectively with information and communication is already also of special importance for hospital doctors today. One can assume that the demands on doctors in this respect will become even more complex in the future. Doctors who are involved in scientific research are of course fully aware of the growing importance of the Internet with its new information and communication channels. Therefore analysing the current situation, the demands on a future information management system can be formulated: A system that will help doctors to avoid dealing with little goal-oriented information and thus setting up effective communication channels; an information system which is multi-media oriented towards the interests and needs of the patients and patient's relatives and which is further developed continually and directly by those involved.

  20. National down syndrome patient database: Insights from the development of a multi-center registry study.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jenifer; Sharr, Christianne; Ozonoff, Al; Prock, Lisa Albers; Baumer, Nicole; Brasington, Campbell; Cannon, Sheila; Crissman, Blythe; Davidson, Emily; Florez, Jose C; Kishnani, Priya; Lombardo, Angela; Lyerly, Jordan; McCannon, Jessica B; McDonough, Mary Ellen; Schwartz, Alison; Berrier, Kathryn L; Sparks, Susan; Stock-Guild, Kara; Toler, Tomi L; Vellody, Kishore; Voelz, Lauren; Skotko, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    The Down Syndrome Study Group (DSSG) was founded in 2012 as a voluntary, collaborative effort with the goal of supporting evidenced-based health care guidelines for individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Since then, 5 DS specialty clinics have collected prospective, longitudinal data on medical conditions that co-occur with DS. Data were entered by clinical staff or trained designees into the National Down Syndrome Patient Database, which we created using REDCap software. In our pilot year, we enrolled 663 participants across the U.S., ages 36 days to 70 years, from multiple racial and ethnic backgrounds. Here we report: (i) the demographic distribution of participants enrolled, (ii) a detailed account of our database infrastructure, and (iii) lessons learned during our pilot year to assist future researchers with similar goals for other patient populations.

  1. 75 FR 43172 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR): Notice... October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific Counselors, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry... management activities, for both CDC and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Dated: July...

  2. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  3. [Role of cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Schaffer, P

    1995-05-01

    The first Cancer Registries were created in 1975 in France. Their ulterior development and their scientific production have been furthered by the apparition from 1986 under the aegis of the Health Ministry and of the INSERM, of a National Population Registry Committee. Cancer Registries have seriously contributed to a better knowledge of the cancer problem in our country and to describe the french specificities, in particular the importance of the mouth and pharynx cancers. They insure both a monitoring and an alert role; they also contribute to the medical supervision of the Chernobyl accident effects. French registries play a very active role concerning clinical research. They participate to many European studies of health care evaluation. In other respects, many etiological studies have been realized about professional risks of cancer, risks linked with nutritional habits, and on the etiologic role of the Tamoxifen. Finally, certain registries have created DNA banks. If nowadays their role in health planning remains modest, they very actively contribute in evaluating screening actions of breast, cervix and large bowel cancers. They also attracted the attention of Health Authorities on the cervix cancer screening's incoherencies. They evaluate the pilot project of the breast cancer and the registry of the Côte d'Or country evaluates the efficacity of a randomized colo rectal mass screening study. The main difficulties met by the registries are linked with the development of laws protecting more and more the individual freedoms, making it harder and harder the registration exhaustive character.

  4. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  5. The Occupational Safety of Health Professionals Working at Community and Family Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Havva; Babacan, Elif

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals encounter many medical risks while providing healthcare services to individuals and the community. Thus, occupational safety studies are very important in health care organizations. They involve studies performed to establish legal, technical, and medical measures that must be taken to prevent employees from sustaining physical or mental damage because of work hazards. Objectives: This study was conducted to determine if the occupational safety of health personnel at community and family health centers (CHC and FHC) has been achieved. Martials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study comprised 507 nurses, 199 physicians, and 237 other medical personnel working at a total of 18 family health centers (FHC) and community health centers (CHC) in Trabzon, Turkey. The sample consisted of a total of 418 nurses, 156 physicians, and 123 other medical personnel. Sampling method was not used, and the researchers tried to reach the whole population. Data were gathered with the Occupational Safety Scale (OSS) and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and occupational safety. Results: According to the evaluations of all the medical personnel, the mean ± SD of total score of the OSS was 3.57 ± 0.98; of the OSS’s subscales, the mean ± SD of the health screening and registry systems was 2.76 ± 1.44, of occupational diseases and problems was 3.04 ± 1.3 and critical fields control was 3.12 ± 1.62. In addition, occupational safety was found more insufficient by nurses (F = 14.18; P < 0.001). Conclusions: All healthcare personnel, particularly nurses working in CHCs and FHCs found occupational safety to be insufficient as related to protective and supportive activities. PMID:25558383

  6. [Health centers: history and future prospects.].

    PubMed

    Colin, Marie-Pierre; Acker, Dominique

    2009-03-29

    Health houses and health centers are often hailed as specifically modern forms of medical practice in mobile healthcare provision. Yet the concept of health center emerged in the seventeenth century. The founding principles of these institutions were to promote access to good-quality universal healthcare and to practice a form of healthcare that treated patients in their globality (i.e. within their social and environmental context) based on public healthcare measures. Though they constitute a response to a specific healthcare project, healthcare centers face a number of specific difficulties that pose a challenge to their durability and development. Payment per consultation is ill-adapted to the remuneration of their services, and methods of remuneration that may be applicable to independent medical practitioners do not apply in the context of health centers, which may struggle to survive without the support of territorial collectivities (i.e. regional and local authorities) or associations. Health houses face similar difficulties in terms of their structural expenses. Expectations are high for trying out new methods of remuneration. The perspective and experience of healthcare centers will likely prove to be essential in this context. Their future needs to be envisaged alongside health houses and medical hubs. The growth of precarity and the increasing difficulties affecting access to healthcare provision need to be taken into account. The choice of the specific type of structure will depend on local realities, on the political will of regional authorities and on the specific projects of healthcare professionals. Yet whatever solution is envisaged, it will not be possible without public funding.

  7. Quality measurement indicators for Iranian Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefi Manesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, quality is a serious concern in development of organizations. There are various indicators to assess quality and the purpose of this study was to identify the main indicators for quality measurement of Iranian health centers. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in three stages: first, review of the literature was performed to identify different indicators for quality measurement in health centers; second, a tworound Delphi process was used with participation of 18 experts in both rounds; third, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method was applied to give weights to each indicator. Results: Twenty-seven indicators were identified from the literature review stage. The Delphi method reduced the list to 4 indicators. Developing a quality plan in the health center had the highest weight (38%) and percentage of followed complaints the lowest (12%). The consistency rate was 7.2% indicating appropriateness of the data. Conclusion: This list of indicators can be used as a template for measuring quality of health centers in Iran and possibly in other developing countries. PMID:26034730

  8. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  9. 2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM PASSAGE BEHIND COURTHOUSE, CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. - Lancaster County Center, Health Center Office, 4845 Cedar Avenue, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Pregnancy, Birth, and Infant Health Outcomes from the National Smallpox Health Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry, 2003-2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    delivery, low birth weight , and other birth problems after exposure to smallpox vaccine in pregnancy have not been defined. Potential adverse effects on...preterm births (10.7%) among registry births, the average birth weight of singleton registry infants (3320 g), and the percentage of infants with low... birth weight (9.1%) may be compared with national data shown in table 2 [42]. Nearly half (47.9%) of all infants born to women in the Smallpox Vaccine in

  11. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  12. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES...

  13. Approaching Health Disparities from a Population Perspective: The NIH Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addressing health disparities has been a national challenge for decades. The NIH-sponsored Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHDs) represent the first federal initiative to support transdisciplinary multilevel research on the determinants of health disparities. Using preliminar...

  14. Health services at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

  15. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. VI. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Fay, M; Donohue, J M; De Rosa, C

    1999-12-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (also known as DEHP, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, or BEHP; CAS Registry Number 117-81-7) is a widely-used plasticizer. It is found in numerous plastic articles, such as paints, inks, floor tiles, upholstery, shower curtains, footwear, plastic bags, food-packaging materials, toys, and medical tubing. Not surprisingly, DEHP appears at many waste sites. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals that are of greatest public health concern at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priority List (NPL) sites. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of the bulk of ATSDR's profile for DEHP (ATSDR, 1993) into the mainstream scientific literature. An extensive listing of human and animal health effects, organized by route, duration, and endpoint, is presented. Toxicological information on toxicokinetics, biomarkers, interactions, sensitive subpopulations, reducing toxicity after exposure, and relevance to public health is also included. Environmental information encompasses physical properties, production and use, environmental fate, levels seen in the environment, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations. ATSDR, at the behest of Congress and therefore the citizenry, prepares these profiles to inform the public about site contaminants.

  16. Poison Center Data for Public Health Surveillance: Poison Center and Public Health Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Law, Royal K.; Schier, Josh; Schauben, Jay; Wheeler, Katherine; Mulay, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the use of poison center data for public health surveillance from the poison center, local, state, and federal public health perspectives and to generate meaningful discussion on how to address the challenges to collaboration. Introduction Since 2008, poisoning has become the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States (US); since 1980, the poisoning-related fatality rate in the US has almost tripled.1 Many poison-related injuries and deaths are reported to regional poison centers (PCs) which receive about 2.4 million reports of human chemical and poison exposures annually.2 Federal, state, and local public health (PH) agencies often collaborate with poison centers and use PC data for public health surveillance of poisoning-related health issues. Many state and local PH agencies have partnerships with regional PCs for direct access to local PC data which help them perform this function. At the national level, CDC conducts public health surveillance for exposures and illnesses of public health significance using the National Poison Data System (NPDS), the national PC reporting database. Though most PC and PH officials agree that PC data play an important role in PH practice and surveillance, collaboration between PH agencies and PCs has been hindered by numerous challenges. To address these challenges and bolster collaboration, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations Community of Practice (CoP) was created in 2010 by CDC as a means to share experiences, identify best practices, and facilitate relationships among federal, state and local public health agencies and PCs. To date, the Poison Center and Public Health Collaborations CoP includes over 200 members from state and local public health, regional PCs, CDC, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A leadership team was created with representatives of the many stakeholders of the community to drive its

  17. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services...

  18. Observations Illustrating the Use of Health Informatics to Link Public Health Immunization Registries and Pharmacies to Increase Adult Immunization Rates and Improve Population Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Michael; Altstadter, Brandy; Popovich, Lara Hargraves

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act encourages health information exchange between clinical care and public health through Meaningful Use measures. Meaningful Use specifically identifies objectives to support a number of public health programs including immunizations, cancer registries, syndromic surveillance, and disease case reports. The objective is to improve public and population health. Stage 2 of Meaningful Use focused on compliance to sending of information to public health. The next phase focuses on bi-directional information exchange to support immunization intelligence and to empower providers, pharmacists, and the consumer. The HITECH Act Stage 2 initiative provided incentive and motivation for healthcare providers to encourage their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) vendors to implement data exchanges with public health, with the expected result being timely awareness of health risks. The empowerment nugget in the HITECH Act is not in the compliance reporting to public health. The nugget is the ability for a provider to receive relevant information on the patient or consumer currently in front of them or to those they will connect to through their outreach efforts. The ability for public health to retain current immunization records of individuals from a variety of providers supports their program goals to increase immunization rates and mitigate the risk of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). The ability for providers to receive at the point of service more complete immunization histories integrated with decision support enhances their delivery of care, thereby reducing the risk of VPD to their patients. Indirectly payers benefit through healthcare cost savings and when the focus is expanded from a health model to a business model, there are significant return on investment (ROI) opportunities that exponentially increase the value of a bi-directional immunization data exchange. This paper will provide

  19. Observations Illustrating the Use of Health Informatics to Link Public Health Immunization Registries and Pharmacies to Increase Adult Immunization Rates and Improve Population Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Altstadter, Brandy; Popovich, Lara Hargraves

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act encourages health information exchange between clinical care and public health through Meaningful Use measures. Meaningful Use specifically identifies objectives to support a number of public health programs including immunizations, cancer registries, syndromic surveillance, and disease case reports. The objective is to improve public and population health. Stage 2 of Meaningful Use focused on compliance to sending of information to public health. The next phase focuses on bi-directional information exchange to support immunization intelligence and to empower providers, pharmacists, and the consumer. The HITECH Act Stage 2 initiative provided incentive and motivation for healthcare providers to encourage their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) vendors to implement data exchanges with public health, with the expected result being timely awareness of health risks. The empowerment nugget in the HITECH Act is not in the compliance reporting to public health. The nugget is the ability for a provider to receive relevant information on the patient or consumer currently in front of them or to those they will connect to through their outreach efforts. The ability for public health to retain current immunization records of individuals from a variety of providers supports their program goals to increase immunization rates and mitigate the risk of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). The ability for providers to receive at the point of service more complete immunization histories integrated with decision support enhances their delivery of care, thereby reducing the risk of VPD to their patients. Indirectly payers benefit through healthcare cost savings and when the focus is expanded from a health model to a business model, there are significant return on investment (ROI) opportunities that exponentially increase the value of a bi-directional immunization data exchange. This paper will provide

  20. Empowering patients and researchers through a common health information registry: a case example of adrenocortical carcinoma patients and researchers.

    PubMed

    Allwes, Deborah; Popovich, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Adrenocortical Carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor that forms in the outer layer of tissue of the adrenal gland, which is a small gland situated on the anteriosuperior aspect of the kidneys. These glands produce steroid hormones, adrenaline, and noradrenaline that control heart rate, blood pressure, and other body functions. Because this cancer affects a limited number of patients, it is referred to as an Orphan disease, which is defined as a condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people nationwide. Internationally, there are 5,000-8,000 such diseases affecting an estimated 55 million people. There is often limited medical intervention for many of these conditions. With a small number of patients, and a correspondingly small number of providers and researches, this disease is a candidate for establishing a shareable information system that is used by the patient, provider, and researcher. This resource empowers the patient to support their care and treatment while allowing medical providers and researches to have valuable and broad access to patient activities and behaviors that may impact their treatment. Orphan disease registries are prime candidates for establishing health information resources that support communications between patients, providers, and researchers. As a resource, this information can be used to facilitate treatment protocols to include biomarker identification, testing and monitoring of new drugs. By empowering a common community of individuals that share a common disease, the potential to accelerate research and identify improved treatment options may also increase. This paper presents a strategic plan and design for implementing Orphan disease registries within an e-health environment that specifically links patients and providers with researchers. The Adrenocortical Carcinoma Registry will be used to demonstrate the implementation and potential of these systems.

  1. Rethinking the Health Center: Assessing Your Health Center and Setting Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Nancy S.

    2001-01-01

    Camp health center management begins with assessing the population served, camp areas impacted, and the contract of care with parents. That information is used to plan the size of the center; its location in the camp; the type of equipment; and considerations such as medication management, infectious disease control, size of in- and out-patient…

  2. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Richard, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) will provide a collaborative and virtual forum to integrate all disciplines of the human system to address spaceflight, aviation, and terrestrial human health and performance topics and issues. The NHHPC will serve a vital role as integrator, convening members to share information and capture a diverse knowledge base, while allowing the parties to collaborate to address the most important human health and performance topics of interest to members. The Center and its member organizations will address high-priority risk reduction strategies, including research and technology development, improved medical and environmental health diagnostics and therapeutics, and state-of-the art design approaches for human factors and habitability. Once full established in 2011, the NHHPC will focus on a number of collaborative projects focused on human health and performance, including workshops, education and outreach, information sharing and knowledge management, and research and technology development projects, to advance the study of the human system for spaceflight and other national and international priorities.

  3. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC.

  4. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  5. A Barrett's esophagus registry of over 1000 patients from a specialist center highlights greater risk of progression than population-based registries and high risk of low grade dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Picardo, S L; O'Brien, M P; Feighery, R; O'Toole, D; Ravi, N; O'Farrell, N J; O'Sullivan, J N; Reynolds, J V

    2015-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) arising from chronic gastro-oesophageal reflux (GERD) is the main pathologic precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). The risk of progression to high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and EAC is unclear, and recent population studies from Denmark and Northern Ireland suggest that this has been overestimated in the past. No data exist from the Republic of Ireland. A detailed clinical, endoscopic, and pathologic database was established in one center as a proposed pilot for a national registry, and initial and follow-up data were abstracted by a data manager. One thousand ninety-three patients were registered, 60 patients with HGD were excluded, leaving 1033, with a median age of 59 and 2 : 1 male to female ratio, and 3599 person-years of follow-up. The overall incidence of HGD/EAC was 1.33% per year overall, 0.85% if the first year is excluded. Within the first year after index endoscopy, 18 cases of HGD or EAC were identified, and 30 following the first year. Low-grade dysplasia (LGD) on index endoscopy was associated with an incidence of progression of 6.5% per year, and 3.1% when tertiary referrals were excluded. These data provide important demographic and clinical information on the population of Irish patients with BE, with incidence rates of progression higher than recently published population-based registry series, perhaps relating to sampling and pathological assessment. Low-grade dysplasia on initial biopsy is a significant proxy marker of risk of progression.

  6. Genetic Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Reference Desk Genetic Testing Registry (National Center for Biotechnology Information) Genomics and Health Impact Update (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Glossary (National Center for Biotechnology Information) Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms (National Human ...

  7. Global Challenges in People-Centered E-Health.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Safran, Charles

    2015-01-01

    People-centered health care seeks an active role for the patient while empowering all other members of the health care team. By promoting greater patient responsibility and optimal usage, patient-centered health care leads to improved health outcomes, quality of life and optimal value for health care investment. This paper reviews some definitions of people-centered health care and various e-health approaches around the world used to implement this vision. The barriers and enablers to implementation this type of approach are explored. This paper provides a proposed research agenda for future implementations of people-centered e-health.

  8. Regional Cancer Registries – 20 Years and Growing

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI, Center for Global Health (CGH), the University of California at Irvine, the Middle East Cancer Consortium, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer partnered in support of the training course, held in Ankara, Turkey this past October, on The Uses of Cancer Registry Data in Cancer Control Research.

  9. Community health centers at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Proser, Michelle; Bysshe, Tyler; Weaver, Donald; Yee, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In response to increased demand for primary care services under the Affordable Care Act, the national network of community health centers (CHCs) will play an increasingly prominent role. CHCs have a broad staffing model that includes extensive use of physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and certified nurse midwives (CNMs). Between 2007 and 2012, the number of PAs, NPs, and CNMs at CHCs increased by 61%, compared with 31% for physicians. However, several policy and payment issues jeopardize CHCs' ability to expand their workforce and meet the current and rising demand for care. PMID:25802941

  10. Whither academic health centers? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D E

    1996-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) currently face the greatest challenge of their entire existence. Managed care, increased competition for research funding, and inefficiency all contribute to the present vulnerability of AHCs in the cost competitiveness of today's health care marketplace. The increased reliance of medical schools on clinical income to subsidize undergraduate and graduate education and biomedical research now jeopardizes the success of their missions, since clinical income is declining. While AHCs must make significant changes to adapt to the new environment, left on their own in the marketplace, many will not survive. Additionally, the biomedical research advances and high technology medical care that we have come to expect in this country will also likely suffer. A national approach designed to preserve responsive AHCs is needed.

  11. 75 FR 48853 - National Health Center Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Proclamation 8545--National Health Center Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal...;The President ] Proclamation 8545 of August 5, 2010 National Health Center Week, 2010 By the President... preventive care. During National Health Center Week, we recognize the important work of community...

  12. 78 FR 49357 - National Health Center Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Center Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Community health... Health Center Week, we recognize health centers' significant contributions to keeping America healthy... week, we celebrate these valuable services and extend our thanks to the women and men who...

  13. 76 FR 49645 - National Health Center Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... August 10, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8698--National Health Center Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Health Center Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across our..., advice, and critical services that keep them healthy. Throughout National Health Center Week, we...

  14. Toward a statewide health information technology center (abbreviated version).

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Joe, John C

    2010-11-01

    With the passage of The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 that includes the Health Care Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health Act, the opportunity for states to develop a Health Information Technology Center (THITC) has emerged. The Center provides the intellectual, financial, and technical leadership along with the governance and oversight for all health information technology-related activities in the state. This Center would be a free-standing, not-for-profit, public-private partnership that would be responsible for operating one or more (in large states) Regional Health Information Technology Extension Centers (Extension Centers) along with several Regional Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) and one or more Regional Health Information Data Centers (Data Centers). We believe that if these features and functions could be developed, deployed, and integrated statewide, the health and welfare of the citizens of the state could be improved while simultaneously reducing the costs associated with the provision of care.

  15. US Hemophilia Treatment Center population trends 1990-2010: patient diagnoses, demographics, health services utilization.

    PubMed

    Baker, J R; Riske, B; Drake, J H; Forsberg, A D; Atwood, R; Voutsis, M; Shearer, R

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, US government agencies have partially supported regional networks of Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC). HTC multidisciplinary teams provide comprehensive and coordinated diagnosis, treatment, prevention, education, outreach and surveillance services to improve the health of people with genetic bleeding disorders. However, national data are scarce on HTC-patient population trends and services. The aim of the study was to examine national trends over the past 20 years in patient diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization among the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-supported HTC network. Diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization data from 1990 to 2010 were aggregated from all HTCs using the Hemophilia Data Set (HDS). From 1990 to 2010, the HTC population grew 90% from 17 177 to 32 612. HTC patients with von Willebrand's disease increased by 148%, females by 346%, Hispanic patients by 236% and African Americans by 104%. Four thousand and seventy-five deaths were reported. From 2002 to 2010, annual comprehensive evaluations grew 38%, and persons with severe haemophilia on a home intravenous therapy programme rose 37%. In 2010, 46% of patients were less than 18 years vs. 24% for the general US population. The Hemophilia Data Set documents the growth and diversity of the US Hemophilia Treatment Center Network's patient population and services. Despite disproportionate deaths due to HIV, the HTC patient base grew faster than the general US population. The HDS is a vital national public health registry for this rare-disorder population.

  16. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  18. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  20. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  1. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee...

  2. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  3. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry).

    PubMed

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-04-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran's Ministry of Health and Education.

  4. Development of a Health Occupations Continuing Education Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joyce; Latshaw, Lois L.

    The final report summarized the development of a health occupations continuing education center. The project was designed to assess the needs of selected health occupations at the vocational level and to develop guidelines for the establishment of a model for a health occupations continuing education center. The learning needs of licensed…

  5. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  6. South African National Cancer Registry: Effect of withheld data from private health systems on cancer incidence estimates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, E; Underwood, J M; Nattey, C; Babb, C; Sengayi, M; Kellett, P

    2015-01-01

    Background The National Cancer Registry (NCR) was established as a pathology-based cancer reporting system. From 2005 to 2007, private health laboratories withheld cancer reports owing to concerns regarding voluntary sharing of patient data. Objectives To estimate the impact of under-reported cancer data from private health laboratories. Methods A linear regression analysis was conducted to project expected cancer cases for 2005 – 2007. Differences between actual and projected figures were calculated to estimate percentage under-reporting. Results The projected NCR case total varied from 53 407 (3.8% net increase from actual cases reported) in 2005 to 54 823 (3.7% net increase) in 2007. The projected number of reported cases from private laboratories in 2005 was 26 359 (19.7% net increase from actual cases reported), 27 012 (18.8% net increase) in 2006 and 27 666 (28.4% net increase) in 2007. Conclusion While private healthcare reporting decreased by 28% from 2005 to 2007, this represented a minimal impact on overall cancer reporting (net decrease of <4%). PMID:26242527

  7. 75 FR 9421 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities...

  8. 76 FR 38913 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for Enrollment, Appeals, Certification of Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... July 1, 2011 Part VI Department of Health and Human Services 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health... Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 RIN 0920-AA44 World Trade Center... Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) by adding Title XXXIII, which establishes the World Trade Center...

  9. Promoting Ecological Health Resilience for Minority Youth: Enhancing Health Care Access through the School Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the demographic realities of children of color in the U.S., with a focus on health care needs and access issues that have an enormous influence on health status. An ecologic model is presented that incorporates cultural values and community structures into the school health center. (Contains 50 references.) (GCP)

  10. Kennedy Space Center Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Joanne W.

    1997-01-01

    Topic considered include: environmental health services; health physics; ionizing radiation; pollution control; contamination investigations; natural resources; surface water; health hazard evaluations; combustion gas; launch support; asbestos; hazardous noise; and ventilation.

  11. 77 FR 47765 - National Health Center Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8847 of August 6, 2012 National Health Center Week, 2012 By the President of... emphasizing preventive care that helps people lead healthier lives. During National Health Center Week, we... our communities and our country. This week, we celebrate their many contributions to our public...

  12. Experiential Learning: A Review of College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaney, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study was conducted using a descriptive design and examined the use of college health centers for academic internships and clinical rotations. In addition, the study examined the relationship among health center director and school characteristics and the presence of academic internships or clinical rotations and the directors'…

  13. Conference report: community health centers and vulnerable workers.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    A one-day conference in Washington brought together leaders of community health centers and worker advocates to discuss collaboration. They agreed that health centers could help protect vulnerable workers. They agreed on use of electronic medical records; access to workers compensation; Medical-Legal Partnerships; better understanding of work settings in their communities; and educating clinicians on work and jobs.

  14. School-Based Health Centers and Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This report describes school-based health centers and their degree of coordination with managed care providers. Although the investigation focuses on adolescents, many ideas discussed here are germane to elementary school-based health centers as well. Information was gathered through an extensive literature review, relevant legislation, and 88…

  15. Community perceptions and utilization of a consumer health center*

    PubMed Central

    Ports, Katie A.; Ayers, Antoinette; Crocker, Wayne; Hart, Alton; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Rafie, Carlin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand factors that may affect the usage of a consumer health center located in a public library. More specifically, the authors wanted to know what health resources are of interest to the community, what patrons' perceptions of their experience at the center are, and finally, how staff can increase utilization of the center. In general, perceptions of the center were positive. The findings support that participants appreciate efforts to provide health information in the public library setting and that utilization could be improved through marketing and outreach. PMID:25552943

  16. Toward Teen Health. The Ounce of Prevention Fund School-Based Adolescent Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Rebecca

    Sponsored by the Ounce of Prevention Fund, this report presents a comprehensive look at three Toward Teen Health high school-based, adolescent health centers in Chicago, Illinois. Following a brief introduction, the report provides the rationale for opening adolescent health centers and outlines the principles that guide the centers. Next, a…

  17. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  18. Eligibility for mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke: A phase IV multi-center screening log registry.

    PubMed

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Goyal, Nitin; Mikulik, Robert; Sharma, Vijay K; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Zand, Ramin; Paliwal, Prakash R; Roussopoulou, Andromachi; Volny, Ondrej; Pandhi, Abhi; Zompola, Christina; Elijovich, Lucas; Safouris, Apostolos; Chang, Jason; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Alexandrov, Anne W

    2016-12-15

    No eligibility screening logs were kept in recent mechanical thrombectomy (MT) RCTs establishing safety and efficacy of endovascular reperfusion therapies for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We sought to evaluate the potential eligibility for MT among consecutive AIS patients in a prospective international multicenter study. We prospectively evaluated consecutive AIS patients admitted in four tertiary-care stroke centers during a twelve-month period. Potential eligibility for MT was evaluated using inclusion criteria from MR CLEAN & REVASCAT. Our study population consisted of 1464 AIS patients (mean age 67±14years, 56% men, median admission NIHSS-score: 5, IQR: 3-10). A total of 123 (8%, 95% CI: 7%-10%) and 82 (6%, 95% CI: 5%-7%) patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria for MR CLEAN&REVASCAT respectively. No evidence of heterogeneity (p>0.100) was found in the eligibility for MT across the participating centers. Absence of proximal intracranial occlusion (69%) and hospital arrival outside the eligible time window (38% for MR CLEAN & 35% for REVASCAT) were the two most common reasons for ineligibility for MT. Our everyday clinical practice experience suggests that approximately one out of thirteen to seventeen consecutive AIS may be eligible for MT if inclusion criteria for MR CLEAN and REVASCAT are strictly adhered to.

  19. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures and Risk Factors in a Quality Registry: A Basis for More Patient-Centered Diabetes Care in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Sixten; Palaszewski, Bo; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Ödegaard, Fredrik; Roos, Pontus; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is one of the chronic diseases that constitute the greatest disease burden in the world. The Swedish National Diabetes Register is an essential part of the diabetes care system. Currently it mainly records clinical outcomes, but here we describe how it has started to collect patient-reported outcome measures, complementing the standard registry data on clinical outcomes as a basis for evaluating diabetes care. Our aims were to develop a questionnaire to measure patient abilities and judgments of their experience of diabetes care, to describe a Swedish diabetes patient sample in terms of their abilities, judgments, and risk factors, and to characterize groups of patients with a need for improvement. Patient abilities and judgments were estimated using item response theory. Analyzing them together with standard risk factors for diabetes comorbidities showed that the different types of data describe different aspects of a patient’s situation. These aspects occasionally overlap, but not in any particularly useful way. They both provide important information to decision makers, and neither is necessarily more relevant than the other. Both should therefore be considered, to achieve a more complete evaluation of diabetes care and to promote person-centered care. PMID:25431875

  1. Patient-reported outcome measures and risk factors in a quality registry: a basis for more patient-centered diabetes care in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Borg, Sixten; Palaszewski, Bo; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Fredrik, Odegaard; Roos, Pontus; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2014-11-26

    Diabetes is one of the chronic diseases that constitute the greatest disease burden in the world. The Swedish National Diabetes Register is an essential part of the diabetes care system. Currently it mainly records clinical outcomes, but here we describe how it has started to collect patient-reported outcome measures, complementing the standard registry data on clinical outcomes as a basis for evaluating diabetes care. Our aims were to develop a questionnaire to measure patient abilities and judgments of their experience of diabetes care, to describe a Swedish diabetes patient sample in terms of their abilities, judgments, and risk factors, and to characterize groups of patients with a need for improvement. Patient abilities and judgments were estimated using item response theory. Analyzing them together with standard risk factors for diabetes comorbidities showed that the different types of data describe different aspects of a patient's situation. These aspects occasionally overlap, but not in any particularly useful way. They both provide important information to decision makers, and neither is necessarily more relevant than the other. Both should therefore be considered, to achieve a more complete evaluation of diabetes care and to promote person-centered care.

  2. NIMH Prototype Management Information System for Community Mental Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Cecil R.; Goodman, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Various approaches to centralized support of computer applications in health care are described. The NIMH project to develop a prototype Management Information System (MIS) for community mental health centers is presented and discussed as a centralized development of an automated data processing system for multiple user organizations. The NIMH program is summarized, the prototype MIS is characterized, and steps taken to provide for the differing needs of the mental health centers are highlighted.

  3. NHRC (Naval Health Research Center) Report 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    is located on Point Loma in San Diego and occupies, in tenant status, six of the Naval Ocean Systems Center’s "barracks" buildings , and spaces at the...9. Public Works Center provides maintenance and public works functions, transportation and building custodial services on a reimbursable basis. % 10...working conditions or materials and advises the CO on command safety matters. f. ADP Committee Reviews requests for ADP hardware and software. Evaluates the

  4. One of a kind--the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry, a regional registry for Africa.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Amber L

    2011-01-01

    The 2004 Ministerial Summit on Health Research called on the World Health Organization to to establish a registry network with the intention of providing a single access point to identify trials. In 2007 the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors amended their support of this initiative stating that only trials registered prospectively on a member registry of the WHO's Network of Primary Registers would be published. The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (www.pactr.org), was established in early 2007 as the AIDS, TB and Malaria (ATM) Clinical Trials Registry with the aim of piloting the concept of a registry that would cater to the specific needs of African trialists. In 2009 the ATM Registry expanded its remit to include all diseases for all regions of Africa; The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry became the first and is presently the only African member of the World Health Organization's Network of Primary Registers.

  5. [European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-EuReg protocol): The first results of Russian centers].

    PubMed

    Bordin, D S; Yanova, O B; Abdulkhakov, R A; Tsukanov, V V; Livzan, M A; Burkov, S G; Zakharova, N V; Plotnikova, E Yu; Osipenko, M F; Tarasova, L V; Maev, I V; Kucheryavyi, Yu A; Butov, M A; Sablin, O A; Kolbasnikov, S V; Voinovan, I N; Abdulkhakov, S R; Vasyutin, A V; Lyalyukova, E A; Golubev, N N; Savilova, I V; Grigoryeva, L V; Kononova, A G; O'Morain, Colm; Ramas, Mercedes; Mcnicholl, Adrian G; Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-01-01

    Резюме Цель исследования. Оценка клинической практики диагностики и лечения больных с инфекцией Helicobacter pylori и сопоставление этой практики с международными рекомендациями в Европейском регистре (European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, протокол: «Hp-EuReg») — наблюдательном многоцентровом проспективном исследовании, инициированном Европейской группой по изучению H. pylori и микробиоты (EHMSG). Материалы и методы. Проведен анализ данных 813 больных, инфицированных H. pylori и внесенных в регистр Российскими центрами исследования «Hp-EuReg» в 2013—2015 гг. Результаты. Наиболее распространенными методами первичной диагностики инфекции H. pylori являются гистологический (40,3%), быстрый уреазный тест (35,7%) и серологический (17,2%). Длительность антихеликобактерной терапии в 18% случаев составила 7 дней, в 49,3% — 10 дней, в 25,1% — 14 дней. Для контроля эффективности лечения используются гистологический метод (34%), уреазный дыхательный тест (27,3%), антиген H. pylori в кале (22,8%), быстрый уреазный тест (16,3%). В 2,5% случаев использовался серологический метод. У 13,5% больных контроль не проводился. Средняя эффективность эрадикации

  6. Design and Development of a Web-Based Saudi National Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Subhani, Shazia; Khalid, Al-Rubeaan

    2010-01-01

    Background Given that diabetes is an extremely common disorder in Saudi Arabia, the National Diabetes Registry was designed by King Saud University Hospital Diabetes Center in collaboration with King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in the year 2001. The aim of the registry is to identify risk factors related to diabetes and to provide statistics to public health programs and health care professionals for use in planning and evaluation. The registry was designed to provide information on the extent and nature of specific types of diabetes, diabetes complications, and treatment of diabetes in the Kingdom. The registry has been available since 2001, with major collaborations from 26 hospitals as part of Phase I in which 100,000 patient data is to be collected on a regional level from Ar-Riyadh before extending the program to other regions of Saudi Arabia. Methods The web application was designed using relational database techniques along with on-line help topics to assist users to get acquainted with application functionalities. All Internet forms were designed with validation checks and appropriate messages to ensure quality of data. The security measures established within the application ensure that only authorized users can gain access to the functionalities of the registry at allowed times. Administrative features were designed to manage the registry-related operations easily. Results The diabetes registry has been in operation for almost 10 years, and around 67,000 patients have been registered to date. The Web-application offers an anytime-anywhere access to the registry’s data, removing geographical boundaries and allowing the national registry to provide real-time data entry, updates, reporting, and mapping functionalities more easily. Conclusion Merging related information in the form of databases can provide improved health care operations through instant access to data, ease of managing complex data structures, and

  7. 42 CFR 405.2462 - Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this chapter. (6) Payment for treatment of mental psychoneurotic or personality disorders is subject to... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services. 405.2462 Section 405.2462 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE &...

  8. Oral Health Care Availability in Health Centers of Mangalore Taluk, India

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K; Rao, Ashwini; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Shenoy, Ramya; Pai, Mithun B

    2014-01-01

    Background: Community-oriented oral health programs are seldom found in India. When primary health care systems were in the 1980s, dentistry was not adequately included. This has left oral health far behind other health services. Objectives: To find the availability of dental professionals, infrastructure, equipment, and treatments provided in health centers of Mangalore taluk. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical officers and dentists working in all the health centers of Mangalore taluk, using an interview schedule, the oral health care availability inventory (ORAI). Results: Among 23 health centers of Mangalore taluk, dental services were available at six health centers (26%) [two community health centers (CHCs) and four primary health centers (PHCs)]. Mouth mirrors, dental explorers, and extraction instruments were available at six health centers [two CHCs (100%) and four PHCs (19%)]. No health centers provided orthodontic tooth corrections, removal of impacted teeth, oral biopsies, and fabrication of removable dentures. Conclusions: Availability of dental services was limited in the health centers, and a vast majority of the rural population in Mangalore taluk did not have access to dental care. PMID:25364145

  9. Strategies for expanding colorectal cancer screening at community health centers.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Doroshenk, Mary; Hotz, James; Brooks, Durado; Hayashi, Seiji; Davis, Terry C; Joseph, Djenaba; Stevens, David; Weaver, Donald L; Potter, Michael B; Wender, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers are uniquely positioned to address disparities in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening as they have addressed other disparities. In 2012, the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, which is the funding agency for the health center program, added a requirement that health centers report CRC screening rates as a standard performance measure. These annually reported, publically available data are a major strategic opportunity to improve screening rates for CRC. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act enacted provisions to expand the capacity of the federal health center program. The recent report of the Institute of Medicine on integrating public health and primary care included an entire section devoted to CRC screening as a target for joint work. These developments make this the ideal time to integrate lifesaving CRC screening into the preventive care already offered by health centers. This article offers 5 strategies that address the challenges health centers face in increasing CRC screening rates. The first 2 strategies focus on improving the processes of primary care. The third emphasizes working productively with other medical providers and institutions. The fourth strategy is about aligning leadership. The final strategy is focused on using tools that have been derived from models that work.

  10. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health. PMID:6419276

  11. The Swiss Orthopaedic Registry.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; El-Kerdi, A; Frigg, A; Kolling, C; Staub, L P; Bach, B; Müller, U

    2005-01-01

    Following the tradition of the IDES European Hip Registry inaugurated by M. E. Müller in the 1960s, the Institute for Evaluative Research in Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bern started a new era of data collection using internet technology (www.memdoc.org). With support of the Swiss Orthopaedic Society, the pilot of the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was conducted, and in cooperation with different academic and non-academic centers the practicability of integrating the various data collection instruments into the daily clinical workflow was evaluated. Three different sizes of hip and knee questionnaires were compiled, covering the individual demands of the participating hospitals whereby the smaller questionnaires always represent a subset of the next larger one. Different types of data collection instruments are available: the online interface, optical mark reader paper questionnaires, and barcode sheets. Precise implant tracking is implemented by scanning the implant barcodes directly in the operating theaters and linking them to the clinical data set via a central server. In addition, radiographic information can be linked with the clinical data set. The pilot clinics suggested enhancements to the user interface and additional features for data management. Also, recommendations were made to simplify content in some instances and diversify in others. With a new software release and adapted questionnaires the Swiss Orthopaedic Registry was officially launched in Summer 2005.

  12. 76 FR 31618 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Minority Health and... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  13. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  14. International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: Annual report 2010.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Robert M; Suri, Rita S; Moist, Louise M; Garg, Amit X; Cuerden, Meaghan; Langford, Sarah; Hakim, Raymond; Ofsthun, Norma J; McDonald, Stephen P; Hawley, Carmel; Caskey, Ferqus J; Couchoud, Cecile; Awaraji, Christian; Nesrallah, Gihad E

    2011-01-01

    The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry (IQDR) is a global initiative designed to study practices and outcomes associated with the use of hemodialysis (HD) regimens of increased frequency and/or duration. The IQDR grew out of the initiative that lead to the randomized prospective studies of nocturnal HD and short hours daily dialysis vs. conventional thrice weekly HD that are conducted by the Frequent Hemodialysis Network sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. These 2 separate studies are drawing to a close and the first results are expected to be reported later this year. These studies use surrogate outcomes for their primary endpoints as they are not powered to look at outcomes of mortality and hospitalization. The IQDR attempts to aggregate long-term follow-up data from centers utilizing alternative HD regimens worldwide and will have adequate statistical power to examine those important outcomes. To date, the IQDR has enrolled patients from Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and France and has linked with commercial databases and national registries. This sixth annual report of the IQDR describes: (1) An update on the governance structure; (2) The recommendations made at the first general meetings of the IQDR Scientific Committee and Advisory Board; (3) The status of those recommendations; (4) A summary of current data sources and participating registries; (5) The status of recruitment to date; (6) The creation of a specific Canadian IQDR data set and; (7) The current research agenda.

  15. Health Center Professional Programs and Primary Care Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Aysola, Jaya; Groves, DaShawn; Hicks, LeRoi S

    2016-01-01

    Background Current policy promotes health center professional training and pipeline programs as solutions to bolster primary care workforce in shortage areas, despite the paucity of evidence. Methods We analyzed data from US health centers we surveyed from March to June 2010, merged with federal health center data, to estimate associations between health center training and pipeline programs and provider recruitment and retention. Results Of the 976 surveyed, 391 health centers responded. Health centers with career ladder programs compared to those without had higher adjusted rates of no/minimal difficulty in recruitment of primary care providers. (17.6% vs. 10.6%; p=.01) and close to double the adjusted rates of reporting no/minimal difficulty in retention of primary care providers (39.4% vs. 21.2%; p=.0001). Discussion There remains a need for further evaluation of health professional programs in order to expand models, such as career ladder programs, that demonstrate effectiveness in improving the primary care workforce in shortage areas. PMID:27891532

  16. Planning for the Mercy Center for Breast Health.

    PubMed

    Olivares, V Ed

    2002-01-01

    During the last months of 2000, administrators at the Mercy San Juan Medical Center in Carmichael, Calif., convened a steering committee to plan the Mercy Center for Breast Health. The Steering Committee was composed of the director of ancillary and support services, the oncology clinical nurse specialist, the RN manager of the oncology nursing unit, the RN surgery center manager, and me, the manager of imaging services. The committee was responsible for creating a new business with five specific objectives: to position the Center as a comprehensive diagnostic and resource center for women; to generate physician referrals to the Breast Center through various vehicles; to create awareness of the Breast Center's capabilities among area radiologists; to create awareness of the Breast Center among employees of six sister facilities; to create "brand awareness" for the Mercy Center for Breast Health among referring physicians and patients who could use competing centers in the area. The Steering Committee's charter was to design a center with a feminine touch and ambience and to provide a "one-stop shopping" experience for patients. A major component of the Breast Center is the Dianne Haselwood Resource Center, which provides patients with educational support and information. The Steering Committee brought its diverse experience and interests to bear on arranging for equipment acquisition, information and clerical systems, staffing, clinic office design, patient care and marketing. Planning the Mercy Center for Breast Health has been a positive challenge that brought together many elements of the organization and people from different departments and specialties to create a new business venture. Our charge now is to grow and to live up to our vision of offering complete breast diagnostic, education and support services in one location.

  17. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  18. Health Literacy Innovations in California Community College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Joanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is a national public health problem contributing to adverse health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. Both health and educational systems are intervention points for improvement; however, there is paucity in empirical research regarding the role of educational systems. This needs assessment study explored health…

  19. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery.

  20. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER DISASTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) created an acute environmental disaster of enormous magnitude. This study characterizes the environmental exposures resulting from destruction of the WTC and assesses their effects on health. Methods include ambient air sampling; analyse...

  1. Center for Global Health announces grants to support portable technologies

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Center for Global Health announced grants that will support the development and validation of low-cost, portable technologies. These technologies have the potential to improve early detection, diagnosis, and non-invasive or minimally invasive treatm

  2. Ask Dr. Sue: Center Directors Express These Health Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1991-01-01

    A physician addresses three health concerns of child care center directors. She provides information about the increasing number of children with asthma problems, the exclusion of ill children from child care settings, and the increasing concern about lead poisoning. (GLR)

  3. The Oklahoma Health Information Technology Regional Extension Center.

    PubMed

    Bratzler, Dale W

    2010-09-01

    With the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) the government has created a network of Health Information Technology Regional Extension Centers to provide direct technical assistance to primary care providers in small practices to adopt and meaningfully use electronic health records (EHR). Regional Extension Centers will work directly with practitioner offices to identify effective strategies to select, implement, and meaningfully use certified EHR technology. The Oklahoma Foundation for Medical Quality (OFMQ) was awarded the cooperative agreement to serve as the Regional Extension Center for the state, and is actively recruiting practices to provide support on implementation of an EHR. There is some urgency for physician practices to consider work with the Regional Extension Center since the federal matching funding for the program will be substantially reduced beginning in 2012, and because the incentive funds for a practice that adopts and meaningfully uses an EHR are reduced beginning in 2013.

  4. Meta-analysis of survival curve data using distributed health data networks: application to hip arthroplasty studies of the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries.

    PubMed

    Cafri, Guy; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art; Paxton, Liz; Furnes, Ove; Graves, Stephen; Marinac-Dabic, Danica

    2015-12-01

    The motivating example for this paper comes from a distributed health data network, the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries (ICOR), which aims to examine risk factors for orthopedic device failure for registries around the world. Unfortunately, regulatory, privacy, and propriety concerns made sharing of raw data impossible, even if de-identified. Therefore, this article describes an approach to extraction and analysis of aggregate time-to-event data from ICOR. Data extraction is based on obtaining a survival probability and variance estimate for each unique combination of the explanatory variables at each distinct event time for each registry. The extraction procedure allows for a great deal of flexibility; models can be specified after the data have been collected, for example, modeling of interaction effects and selection of subgroups of patients based on their values on the explanatory variables. Our analysis models are adapted from models presented elsewhere--but allowing for censoring in the calculation of the correlation between serial survival probabilities and using the square root of the covariance matrix to transform the data to avoid computational problems in model estimation. Simulations and a real-data example are provided with strengths and limitations of the approach discussed.

  5. Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets (PRIM).

    PubMed

    Strassberg, Melissa; Peters, Katherine; Marazita, Mary; Ganger, Jennifer; Watt-Morse, Margaret; Murrelle, Lenn; Tarter, Ralph; Vanyukov, Michael

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets (PRIM; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the results of pilot research conducted in this registry, and the plans for future studies. The main focus of the registry is on psychological development and the risk for behavioral disorders. Particularly, characteristics associated with antisociality and the risk for substance use disorders (e.g., aggressivity, hyperactivity/impulsivity), as well as language development and other traits (e.g., dental health) are among the research targets.

  6. The Brazilian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Oliveira, Vinicius C; Junqueira, Daniela R; Cisneros, Lígia C; Ferreira, Lucas C; Murphy, Kate; Ordoñana, Juan R; Hopper, John L; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2016-12-01

    The Brazilian Twin Registry (BTR) was established in 2013 and has impelled twin research in South America. The main aim of the initiative was to create a resource that would be accessible to the Brazilian scientific community as well as international researchers interested in the investigation of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of common diseases, phenotypes, and human behavior traits. The BTR is a joint effort between academic and governmental institutions from Brazil and Australia. The collaboration includes the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) in Brazil, the University of Sydney and University of Melbourne in Australia, the Australian Twin Registry, as well as the research foundations CNPq and CAPES in Brazil. The BTR is a member of the International Network of Twin Registries. Recruitment strategies used to register twins have been through participation in a longitudinal study investigating genetic and environmental factors for low back pain occurrence, and from a variety of sources including media campaigns and social networking. Currently, 291 twins are registered in the BTR, with data on demographics, zygosity, anthropometrics, and health history having been collected from 151 twins using a standardized self-reported questionnaire. Future BTR plans include the registration of thousands of Brazilian twins identified from different sources and collaborate nationally and internationally with other research groups interested on twin studies.

  7. Provision of telemedicine services by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica; Jacobs, Feygele

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the use of telemedicine services at community health centers. A national survey was distributed to all federally qualified health centers to gather data on their use of health information technology, including telemedicine services. Over a third of responding health centers (37%) provided some type of telemedicine service while 63% provided no telemedicine services. A further analysis that employed ANOVA and chi-square tests to assess differences by the provision of telemedicine services (provided no telemedicine services, provided one telemedicine service, and provided two or more telemedicine services) found that the groups differed by Meaningful Use compliance, location, percentage of elderly patients, mid-level provider, medical, and mental health staffing ratios, the percentage of patients with diabetes with good blood sugar control, and state and local funds per patient and per uninsured patient. This article presents the first national estimate of the use of telemedicine services at community health centers. Further study is needed to determine how to address factors, such as reimbursement and provider shortages, that may serve as obstacles to further expansion of telemedicine services use by community health centers.

  8. Multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence and later mental health disorders: a population-based registry study of Norwegian youth: the NAAHS cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Eckhoff, Christian; Straume, Bjørn; Kvernmo, Siv

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence and mental health disorders in young adulthood. Design and setting Data were obtained from a linkage between the Norwegian Patient Registry (2008–2012) and the Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study, a school-based survey conducted among 10th grade students in North Norway (2003–2005). Participants In total, 3987 (68%) of all 5877 invited participants consented to the registry linkage. Outcome measures Mental healthcare use and disorders from age 18–20 to 23–25 years (5 years). Methods Musculoskeletal pain was measured by the number of musculoskeletal pain sites. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore the association with later mental healthcare use and disorders. Results Multisite adolescent musculoskeletal pain was significantly associated with an increase in mental healthcare use and mental health disorders in young adulthood. The relationship was stronger for anxiety and mood disorders, in both genders. Overall, the association between musculoskeletal pain and later mental health problems was attenuated after controlling for adolescent psychosocial and mental health problems, not by physical or sedentary activity. This could be due to confounding or mediation. However, when examining different mental health disorders, we found musculoskeletal pain to be significantly associated with anxiety disorders, and showing a strong trend in mood disorders, when adjusted for the adolescent factors. Conclusions Physicians should be aware that multisite adolescent pain is associated with mental health problems in adolescence, and that these adolescents are at increased risk of mental health disorders in young adulthood. As youth troubled by mental health problems commonly present physical symptoms it is important to examine for psychosocial problems in order to offer early interventions. PMID:28188150

  9. Are cancer registries a viable tool for cancer survivor outreach? A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Melissa Y.; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Savas, Lara S.; Bartholomew, L. Kay; Melhado, Trisha V.; Coan, Sharon P.; Argenbright, Keith E.; Vernon, Sally W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about cancer survivors’ receptivity to being contacted through cancer registries for research and health promotion efforts. We sought to: (1) determine breast and colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors’ responsiveness to a mailed survey using an academic medical center’s cancer registry; (2) assess whether responsiveness varied according to sociodemographic characteristics and medical history; and (3) examine the prevalence and correlates of respondents’ awareness and willingness to be contacted through the state cancer registry for future research studies. Methods Stage 0–III breast and CRC survivors diagnosed between January 2004 and December 2009 were identified from an academic medical center cancer registry. Survivors were mailed an invitation letter with an opt-out option, along with a survey assessing sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, and follow-up cancer care access and utilization. Results A total of 452 (31.4%) breast and 53 (22.2%) CRC survivors responded. Willingness to be contacted through the state cancer registry was high among both breast (74%) and CRC (64%) respondents even though few were aware of the registry and even fewer knew that their information was in the registry. In multivariable analyses, tumor stage I and not having a family history of cancer were associated with willingness among breast and CRC survivors, respectively. Conclusions Our findings support the use of state cancer registries to contact survivors for participation in research studies. Implications for cancer survivors Survivors would benefit from partnerships between researchers and cancer registries that are focused on health promotion interventions. PMID:23247719

  10. Attitudes toward Potential Participant Registries.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Holbrook, Andrew; Pierce, Aimee; Hoang, Dan; Gillen, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Difficult participant recruitment is a consistent barrier to successful medical research. Potential participant registries represent an increasingly common intervention to overcome this barrier. A variety of models for registries exist, but few data are available to instruct their design and implementation. To provide such data, we surveyed 110 cognitively normal research participants enrolled in a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. Seventy-four (67%) individuals participated in the study. Most (78%, CI: 0.67, 0.87) participants were likely to enroll in a registry. Willingness to participate was reduced for registries that required enrollment through the Internet using a password (26%, CI: 0.16, 0.36) or through email (38%, CI: 0.27, 0.49). Respondents acknowledged their expectations that researchers share information about their health and risk for disease and their concerns that their data could be shared with for-profit companies. We found no difference in respondent preferences for registries that shared contact information with researchers, compared to honest broker models that take extra precautions to protect registrant confidentiality (28% versus 30%; p = 0.46). Compared to those preferring a shared information model, respondents who preferred the honest broker model or who lacked model preference voiced increased concerns about sharing registrant data, especially with for-profit organizations. These results suggest that the design of potential participant registries may impact the population enrolled, and hence the population that will eventually be enrolled in clinical studies. Investigators operating registries may need to offer particular assurances about data security to maximize registry enrollment but also must carefully manage participant expectations.

  11. 75 FR 53975 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Minority Health...

  12. 75 FR 28262 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council on Minority Health...

  13. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  14. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  15. A Model for a Health Career Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, John G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    One part of a model health career information center was a toll-free health careers hotline which provided information to high school and college students, parents, counselors, and teachers. Evaluation of the hotline indicates that it fills a need, is considered useful by callers, and is of relatively small cost. (Author/CT)

  16. Options for Sustaining School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swider, Susan M.; Valukas, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Several methods exist for financing and sustaining operations of school-based health centers (SBHCs). Promising sources of funds include private grants, federal grants, and state funding. Recently, federal regulation changes mandated that federal funding specifically for SBHCs go only to SBHCs affiliated with a Federally Qualified Health Center…

  17. Development of a Health Occupations Continuing Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latshaw, Lois L.

    The project was designed to assess the learning needs of selected health occupations at the vocational level and to develop guidelines for the establishment and administration of a model for a health occupations continuing education center based upon these needs. Licensed practical nurses, nurses aides, and operating room technicians employed in…

  18. Spokane Community Mental Health Center--Elderly Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raschko, Raymond

    This document describes services for the elderly provided by the Spokane Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) in Spokane, Washington. It begins by stating several reasons that the elderly are often unserved or underserved by health and social service agencies and by noting the need for community efforts to identify and locate the subpopulation of…

  19. National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinic Research Institute Careers Contact Us Patient Rights Privacy Location Our System Marshfield Clinic Marshfield Clinic Division of Education Marshfield Labs Security Health Plan Family Health Center Our Partners ... Website Privacy | Terms of Use | Non-discrimination Statement Copyright © 2012 - ...

  20. Lost Dollars Threaten Research in Public Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Henry R; Vermillion, Eric B

    2017-03-01

    The decrease of federal and state support threatens long-term sustainability of research in publicly supported academic health centers. In weathering these financial threats, research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has undergone 3 substantial changes: institutional salary support goes preferentially to senior faculty, whereas the young increasingly depend on grants; private and government support for research grows apace in clinical departments but declines in basic science departments; and research is judged more on its quantity (numbers of investigators and federal and private dollars) than on its goals, achievements, or scientific quality. We propose specific measures to alleviate these problems. Other large public academic health centers probably confront similar issues, but-except for UCSF-such centers have not been subjected to detailed public analysis.-Bourne, H. R., Vermillion, E. B. Lost dollars threaten research in public academic health centers.

  1. Use of registry employees can pose legal problems.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S F

    1994-07-01

    In view of the potential legal liability to which a recipient entity can be exposed when using registry employees, some care must be taken in drafting registry contract services and in modulating the recipient entity's behavior towards the registry personnel. The following steps should generally be taken by health care establishments purchasing registry services to minimize such exposure: (1) Ensure that the registry treats its personnel as employees and complies with all applicable employment law obligations, including state and federal employment tax requirements, workers' compensation laws, and any state law wage and hour requirements in the recipient's state. (2) If using an out-of-state registry, make sure that the registry also has workers' compensation insurance in the recipient's state and complies with that state workers' compensation laws. (3) Make sure that termination decisions regarding registry employees are not made for reasons that violate any federal anti-discrimination laws. (4) Provide in the registry agreement for full indemnification by the registry to the recipient. (5) Ensure that the registry is solvent and has adequate insurance to honor its indemnification obligation. (6) Obtain a warranty from the registry that it carefully screens all of its employees before hiring them. (7) Expressly state in the registry agreement that the registry has the right to discipline and supervise the personnel it refers. (8) Do not reject registry personnel for reasons that would be improper with respect to the facility's own employees, e.g., race, sex, age, religion, disability, etc.

  2. [Creating a European registry of patient registries--a service oriented approach].

    PubMed

    Pajić, Vanja; Pristas, Ivan; Meglic, Matic

    2013-06-01

    Healthcare registries in European countries are producing a large amount of data that are difficult to share and which, for the lack of interoperability, do not meet the real needs of data users, i.e. various groups of researchers, professionals and patients. Also, data gathered from healthcare registries are usually considered as isolated islands of information, which makes the task of approaching these data an arduous one. The suggested solution to these problems lies in the service approach to health registries and the data contained within them. Applying the service approach to registries, the healthcare data can escape the narrow confines of health registries in which they reside by transforming them into packages of predefined services in accordance with the end-user needs, which introduces the concept of metadata registries as service catalogues. Such a model of a service-oriented metadata registry as a catalog of services is discussed here as a real possibility and a dire need. The purpose of such a metadata registry is the collection of relevant data from the service provider and delivery of a predefined and reusable set of services to the service consumer. Interoperability thus achieved transcends the traditional problems of data exchange because it comes to grips with the services intended for and defined by the end-user, and not relying solely on data as a final deliverable. At the European Union level, such a metadata registry is currently under development, with the working title PARENT (Patient Registry Initiative) 'Registry of registries'. The mission of this metadata registry is to combine all the relevant European patient registries into such a service-oriented model.

  3. 78 FR 48163 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section... Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of...

  4. Role of preliminary registry data in development of a clinical trial for an innovative device: a small but integral piece of a health policy initiative

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Donald R.; de Vries, Joost; Blanc, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Establishing a national health policy at a macro level involves the integration of a series of health initiatives across a spectrum of activities, including clinical care. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a new medical device ultimately evolves to testing in humans. The pathway to a formal prospective clinical trial includes a stepwise appreciation of pre-clinical data and detailed analysis of data obtained from preliminary registries, where information about appropriate patient selection and use of the device is obtained. Evaluation of procedural and follow-up efficacy and safety data in a preliminary series of cases, chosen to simulate published data, allows the design and conduct of clinical trials that are required to verify preliminary observations, closing the loop on one aspect of modifying health policy decisions. PMID:28321285

  5. County workforce, reimbursement, and organizational factors associated with behavioral health capacity in health centers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily; Ku, Leighton; Smith, Shelagh; Lardiere, Michael

    2014-04-01

    This study describes on-site behavioral health treatment capacity in health centers in 2007 and examines whether capacity was associated with health center characteristics, county-level behavioral health workforce, and same-day billing restrictions. Cross-sectional data from the 2007 Area Resource File and Uniform Data System were linked with data on Medicaid same-day billing restrictions. Mental health treatment capacity was common; almost four in five health centers provided on-site mental health services. Additional services such as crisis counseling (20 %), treatment from a psychiatrist (29 %), and substance abuse treatment were offered by fewer health centers (51 % provide on-site services and only 20 % employ substance abuse specialists). In multivariate analysis, larger health centers, health centers located in counties with a larger behavioral health workforce per capita, and those located in the West and Northeast were more likely to have behavioral health capacity. Same-day billing restrictions were associated with lower odds of substance use treatment capacity and providing 24 hr crisis counseling services.

  6. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  7. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  8. Transforming a family medicine center and residency program into a federally qualified health center.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Flores, Hector; Cheng, Scott; Gates, Jerry D; Douglas, James H; Clute, Gerald B; Coan, Carl E

    2013-05-01

    The authors describe a family medicine center before and after a merger between the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, the California Hospital Medical Center, and the Eisner Pediatric and Family Medical Center in 2012. The merger provided new opportunities to stabilize the financial base of a clinical practice struggling financially and to enhance the training of residents and other health professionals in primary care, which motivated the partners to consider this new model. After 18 months of negotiations, they were able to convert the family medicine center and residency program into a new federally qualified health center. The benefits to this new model include an increase in both patient volume and the quality of education, supporting residency accreditation; a greater number of residents from U.S. medical schools; enhanced education and preparation of primary care physicians for practice in medically underserved communities; enhanced reimbursements and new opportunities for state, local, and federal grants; and quality improvement and new information technology. The partners overcame academic, administrative, legal, and regulatory obstacles, communication barriers, and differences in culture and expectations to achieve this merger. Keys to their success include the commitment of the leaders at the three institutions to the goals of the merger, a dedicated project manager and consultants, opportunities for new revenue sources and reimbursements, and support from a pioneering charitable foundation. The authors conclude by discussing the implications of using community health centers as the focal point for training primary care clinicians and addressing workforce shortages.

  9. Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

  10. Policies and procedures for establishing a national registry of persons exposed to hazardous substances (National Exposure Registry)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In the document, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) procedures for meeting the statutory mandate for a registry of persons exposed to hazardous substances are described. The rationale for and purpose of the Exposure Registry is to address health issues at hazardous waste sites and emergency chemical spills. The registry activity specifically addresses long-term health issues related to the exposures of hazardous substances and/or mixtures of hazardous substances. The creation of the registry is meant to provide--through the creation of large, valid data files--information needed by researchers to elucidate the presence or absence of the long-term health effects.

  11. Teaching health centers: a new paradigm in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Candice; Chen, Frederick; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2012-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program to provide graduate medical education (GME) funding directly to community-based health centers that expand or establish new primary care residency programs. The THCGME program was the legislation's only new investment in GME, and it represents a significant departure from the Medicare GME funding system. It provides payments to ambulatory care centers for both direct and indirect GME expenses, and mandates a level of reporting from recipients that is not required for Medicare GME support. This initial look at the 11 inaugural teaching health centers (THCs) shows that they are training primary care residents in relevant delivery models (e.g., interprofessional teams, patient-centered medical homes), developing educational initiatives that address primary care practice in underserved areas, and transforming organizational and funding structures to support community-based training. The THCs plan to evaluate and report resident performance, patient quality of care, and graduate outcomes. The work of the first THCs has implications for primary care training, the GME system, and future policies and legislation aimed at strengthening the health care workforce.

  12. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  13. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  14. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  15. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  16. 42 CFR 483.156 - Registry of nurse aides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Registry of nurse aides. 483.156 Section 483.156... That Must Be Met by States and State Agencies: Nurse Aide Training and Competency Evaluation, and Paid Feeding Assistants § 483.156 Registry of nurse aides. (a) Establishment of registry. The State...

  17. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver.

  18. User-centered design and interactive health technologies for patients.

    PubMed

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A; Mc Curry, Kenneth R; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design is an approach that involves end users throughout the development process so that technologies support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this article, we provide an overview of user-centered design and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes.

  19. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two recent major reports on the health of the oceans in the United States have warned that coastal development and population pressures are responsible for the dramatic degradation of U.S. ocean and coastal environments. The significant consequences of this increased population density, particularly in sub/tropical coastal regions, can be seen in recent weather events: Hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, and Katrina in the US Gulf of Mexico states, and the Tsunami in Southeast Asia in December 2004, all causing significant deaths and destruction. Microbial contamination, man-made chemicals, and a variety of harmful algal blooms and their toxins are increasingly affecting the health of coastal human populations via the seafood supply, as well as the commercial and recreational use of coastal marine waters. At the same time, there has been the realization that the oceans are a source of unexplored biological diversity able to provide medicinal, as well as nutritional, benefits. Therefore, the exploration and preservation of the earth's oceans have significant worldwide public health implications for current and future generations. The NSF/NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health Center (COHH) at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and its collaborators builds on several decades of collaborative and interdisciplinary research, education, and training to address the NIEHS-NSF research initiative in Oceans and Human Health. The COHH focuses on issues relevant to the Southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as global Sub/Tropical areas worldwide, to integrate interdisciplinary research between biomedical and oceanographic scientists. The Center includes three Research Projects: (1) research into the application of toxic algal culture, toxin analysis, remote sensing, oceanography, and genomics to subtropical/tropical Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) organism and toxin distribution; (2) exploring the interaction between functional genomics and oceanography of the subtropical

  20. Overview of the American College of Rheumatology's Electronic Health Record-Enabled Registry: The Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Melissa; Johansson, Tracy; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2016-01-01

    The Rheumatology Informatics System for Effectiveness (RISE) Registry was developed by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) to serve US rheumatologists for the significant challenges of a rapidly changing healthcare environment. More than 400 rheumatologists have sent data from more than 3 million encounters of more than 650,000 patients as of August 11, 2016, through their electronic medical records (EMRs), with no additional work or interference with workflow on the part of the rheumatologists. RISE includes patients with all diagnoses seen by participating rheumatologists, at no cost to the rheumatologist.

  1. 76 FR 38937 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the Addition of New WTC-Related Health Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... July 1, 2011 Part VII Department of Health and Human Services 42 CFR Part 88 World Trade Center Health... SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 RIN 0920-AA45 World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the Addition of... amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health...

  2. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  3. New Counselors' Experiences of Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freadling, Amy H.; Foss-Kelly, Louisa L.

    2014-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored 6 new counselors' experiences working in community mental health centers and their experiences of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs-accredited training received in preparation for such work. Three themes from the interviews were identified to provide implications…

  4. Domestic violence intervention in an urban Indian health center.

    PubMed

    Norton, I M; Manson, S M

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a domestic violence program in an urban Indian health center. The failure of office-based interventions and the importance of developing interventions that are sensitive to the needs of this population are discussed. Successful interventions including home visits and a domestic violence group that incorporated American Indian traditions and values are presented.

  5. The Evolving Academic Health Center: Challenges and Opportunities for Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirin, Steven; Summergrad, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regardless of the outcome of current efforts at healthcare reform, the resources that academic health centers need--to provide care for increasingly complex patient populations, support clinical innovation, grow the clinical enterprise, and carry out their research and teaching missions--are in jeopardy. This article examines the value…

  6. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  7. Implementing a new model of integrated women's health in academic health centers: lessons learned from the National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, V M; Strauss, J F; Milliken, N; Donoghue, G D

    2000-11-01

    The National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health Program (CoE) represents a new model for women's health in academic health centers that unites women's health research, teaching, clinical care, public education and outreach, and career advancement for women in the health sciences. Lessons learned from the first 3 years of implementation indicate that this type of model requires a transformation from the traditionally fragmented set of activities in academic health centers to an integrated system united around the goal of advancing women's health. The transformation requires institutional commitment, dedicated players, and an ability to build on existing resources and bring added value to the institution. Challenges and strategies to link women's health activities and increase collaboration are also discussed.

  8. Identifying multiple myeloma patients using data from the French health insurance databases: Validation using a cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Palmaro, Aurore; Gauthier, Martin; Conte, Cécile; Grosclaude, Pascale; Despas, Fabien; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the performance of several algorithms based on hospital diagnoses and the long-term diseases scheme to identify multiple myeloma patients.Potential multiple myeloma patients in 2010 to 2013 were identified using the presence of hospital records with at least 1 main diagnosis code for multiple myeloma (ICD-10 "C90"). Alternative algorithms also considered related and associated diagnoses, combination with long-term conditions, or at least 2 diagnoses. Incident patients were those with no previous "C90" codes in the past 24 or 12 months. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPVs and NPVs) were computed, using a French cancer registry for the corresponding area and period as the criterion standard.Long-term conditions data extracted concerned 11,559 patients (21,846 for hospital data). The registry contained 125 cases of multiple myeloma. Sensitivity was 70% when using only main hospital diagnoses (specificity 100%, PPV 79%), 76% when also considering related diagnoses (specificity 100%, PPV 74%), and 90% with associated diagnoses included (100% specificity, 64% PPV).In relation with their good performance, selected algorithms can be used to study the benefit and risk of drugs in treated multiple myeloma patients.

  9. Stennis Space Center observes 2009 Safety and Health Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Sue Smith, a medical clinic employee at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, takes the temperature of colleague Karen Badon during 2009 Safety and Health Day activities Oct. 22. Safety Day activities included speakers, informational sessions and a number of displays on safety and health issues. Astronaut Dominic Gorie also visited the south Mississippi rocket engine testing facility during the day to address employees and present several Silver Snoopy awards for outstanding contributions to flight safety and mission success. The activities were part of an ongoing safety and health emphasis at Stennis.

  10. Chronic Physical Health Consequences of Being Injured During the Terrorist Attacks on World Trade Center on September 11, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Brackbill, Robert M.; Cone, James E.; Farfel, Mark R.; Stellman, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have focused on injuries from the World Trade Center disaster on September 11, 2001. Severe injury has health consequences, including an increased mortality risk 10 years after injury and the risk of mental health problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The World Trade Center Health Registry identified 14,087 persons with none of a selected group of preexisting chronic conditions before 2002 who were present during and soon after the World Trade Center attacks, 1,980 of whom reported sustaining 1 or more types of injury (e.g., a broken bone or burn). Survey data obtained during 2003−2004 and 2006−2007 were used to assess the odds of reporting a diagnosis of chronic conditions (heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer) up to 5–6 years after the attacks. Number of injury types and probable PTSD were significantly associated with having any chronic conditions diagnosed in 2002–2007. Persons with multiple injuries and PTSD had a 3-fold higher risk of heart disease than did those with no injury and no PTSD, and persons with multiple injuries and with no PTSD had a 2-fold higher risk of respiratory diseases. The present study shows that injured persons with or without comorbid PTSD have a higher risk of developing chronic diseases. Clinicians should be aware of the heightened risk of chronic heart and respiratory conditions among injured persons. PMID:24561992

  11. Building diversity in a complex academic health center.

    PubMed

    South-Paul, Jeannette E; Roth, Loren; Davis, Paula K; Chen, Terence; Roman, Anna; Murrell, Audrey; Pettigrew, Chenits; Castleberry-Singleton, Candi; Schuman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    For 30 years, the many diversity-related health sciences programs targeting the University of Pittsburgh undergraduate campus, school of medicine, schools of the health sciences, clinical practice plan, and medical center were run independently and remained separate within the academic health center (AHC). This lack of coordination hampered their overall effectiveness in promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2007, a group of faculty and administrators from the university and the medical center recognized the need to improve institutional diversity and to better address local health disparities. In this article, the authors describe the process of linking the efforts of these institutions in a way that would be successful locally and applicable to other academic environments. First, they engaged an independent consultant to conduct a study of the AHC's diversity climate, interviewing current and former faculty and trainees to define the problem and identify areas for improvement. Next, they created the Physician Inclusion Council to address the findings of this study and to coordinate future efforts with institutional leaders. Finally, they formed four working committees to address (1) communications and outreach, (2) cultural competency, (3) recruitment, and (4) mentoring and retention. These committees oversaw the strategic development and implementation of all diversity and inclusion efforts. Together these steps led to structural changes within the AHC and the improved allocation of resources that have positioned the University of Pittsburgh to achieve not only diversity but also inclusion and to continue to address the health disparities in the Pittsburgh community.

  12. Adolescent Health Care in School-Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2008

    2008-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are considered one of the most effective strategies for delivering preventive care, including reproductive and mental health care services, to adolescents--a population long considered difficult to reach. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies to assure…

  13. School-Based Health Centers: On the Front Line for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2011

    2011-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are the "ideal location" for primary care and mental health staff to "collaboratively address students' physical and mental health needs"--leading to greater success in school and in life. This brief document provides key facts that support this argument.

  14. Extending Medical Center Computer Application to Rural Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Gottfredson, Douglas K.

    1983-01-01

    A paper entitled “A COMPUTER DATA BASE FOR CLINICIANS, MANAGERS AND RESEARCHERS,” presented during the 1981 SCAMC, described the Salt Lake VA Medical Center computer system. Since that time, two Rural Health Clinics each about 150 miles from Salt Lake City were established by the SL VAMC to reduce traveling distances and improve services for Veterans. Although many existing computer applications were available with no modifications, additional software was needed to support unique needs of the clinics. The Rural Health package of software was designed to gather and store demographic and clinical information on each Veteran, determine the types of services provided, track services over time, monitor services provided by local hospitals and clinical laboratories which are paid for by the VA, determine total clinic costs, etc. These computer applications may be of interest to Medical Centers with separate clinics or outreach programs and individuals or groups in private practice with programs similar to the VA Rural Health Clinics.

  15. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, Nouf; Afify, Ayman AM; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting. Objective To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data. Results A total 123 health care workers (45.6%) experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5%) and nonphysical violence (99.2%), including verbal violence (94.3%) and intimidation (22.0%). Offenders were patients (71.5%) in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%), or both (3.3%). Almost half (48.0%) of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence. Conclusion Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care workers, efficient reporting system, and zero tolerance policies need to be implemented to minimize workplace violence against health workers. PMID:27330300

  16. Next-generation registries: fusion of data for care, and research.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Kenneth D; Edge, Stephen; Malone, Chad; Marsolo, Keith; Natter, Marc D

    2013-01-01

    Disease-based registries are a critical tool for electronic data capture of high-quality, gold standard data for clinical research as well as for population management in clinical care. Yet, a legacy of significant operational costs, resource requirements, and poor data liquidity have limited their use. Research registries have engendered more than $3 Billion in HHS investment over the past 17 years. Health delivery systems and Accountable Care Organizations are investing heavily in registries to track care quality and follow-up of patient panels. Despite the investment, regulatory and financial models have often enforced a "single purpose" limitation on each registry, restricting the use of data to a pre-defined set of protocols. The need for cost effective, multi-sourced, and widely shareable registry data sets has never been greater, and requires next-generation platforms to robustly support multi-center studies, comparative effectiveness research, post-marketing surveillance and disease management. This panel explores diverse registry efforts, both academic and commercial, that have been implemented in leading-edge clinical, research, and hybrid use cases. Panelists present their experience in these areas as well as lessons learned, challenges addressed, and near innovations and advances.

  17. A Novel Conceptual Architecture for Person-Centered Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Schleyer, Titus; King, Zachary; Miled, Zina Ben

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records available to patients today suffer from multiple limitations, such as information fragmentation, a one-size-fits-all approach and a focus on data gathered over time and by institution rather than health conditions. This makes it difficult for patients to effectively manage their health, for these data to be enriched with relevant information from external sources and for clinicians to support them in that endeavor. We propose a novel conceptual architecture for person-centered health record information systems that transcends many of these limitations and capitalizes on the emerging trend of socially-driven information systems. Our proposed personal health record system is personalized on demand to the conditions of each individual patient; organized to facilitate the tracking and review of the patient’s conditions; and able to support patient-community interactions, thereby promoting community engagement in scientific studies, facilitating preventive medicine, and accelerating the translation of research findings. PMID:28269906

  18. 78 FR 45543 - Center for Mental Health Services; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) National...). Committee Name: SAMHSA's Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council. Date/Time/Type:...

  19. Mental Health Characteristics and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Adolescent School-Based Health Center Users and Nonusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Gorette; Geierstanger, Sara; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the mental health risk profile and health utilization behaviors of adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users and nonusers and discuss the role that SBHCs can play in addressing adolescent health needs. Methods: The sample included 4640 students in grades 9 and 11 who completed the…

  20. 77 FR 24628 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the Addition of New WTC-Related Health Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 RIN 0920-AA45 World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the... amended the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act) to establish the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program... Advisor, World Trade Center Health Program, Office of the Director, National Institute for...

  1. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed.

  2. Patient-Centered Mental Health Care for Female Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Kimerling, Rachel; Bastian, Lori A.; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne A.; Bucossi, Meggan M.; Carney, Diane V.; Goldstein, Karen M.; Phibbs, Ciaran S.; Pomernacki, Alyssa; Sadler, Anne G.; Yano, Elizabeth M.; Frayne, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mental health services for women vary widely across the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system, without consensus on the need for, or organization of, specialized services for women. Understanding women’s needs and priorities is essential to guide the implementation of patient-centered behavioral health services. Methods In a cross-sectional, multisite survey of female veterans using primary care, potential stakeholders were identified for VHA mental health services by assessing perceived or observed need for mental health services. These stakeholders (N=484) ranked priorities for mental health care among a wide range of possible services. The investigators then quantified the importance of having designated women’s mental health services for each of the mental health services that emerged as key priorities. Results Treatment for depression, pain management, coping with chronic general medical conditions, sleep problems, weight management, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) emerged as women’s key priorities. Having mental health services specialized for women was rated as extremely important to substantial proportions of women for each of the six prioritized services. Preference for primary care colocation was strongly associated with higher importance ratings for designated women’s mental health services. For specific types of services, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, PTSD symptoms, and psychiatric comorbidity were also associated with higher importance ratings for designated women’s services. Conclusions Female veterans are a diverse population whose needs and preferences for mental health services vary along demographic and clinical factors. These stakeholder perspectives can help prioritize structural and clinical aspects of designated women’s mental health care in the VHA. PMID:25642611

  3. Aged care in Indonesia: information needs of health care professionals in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Sakti, G M; Boldy, D P

    1998-01-01

    This study assessed the usefulness and relevance of the information, which had been provided by the Ministry of Health for use in community health centers. Furthermore, this identified the needs of health professionals in terms of relevant information for providing health care to the elderly in the community health centers. A total of 105 questionnaires were administered to 35 doctors and 70 health care workers. The overall response rate of the 105 questionnaires sent out was 80%. Findings revealed that the overall opinion expressed by the health professionals was that the information leaflets, in general, were good. However, some gaps existed between the information provided by the Ministry of Health and the information needs perceived by health professionals working in community health centers for providing health care to the elderly. The majority commented that pertinent information on health problems related to hypertension, arthritis, and heart disease needed to be added. Furthermore, effective pre-testing of the prepared information materials with the target groups before their production and distribution may lessen such gaps or deficiencies. Recommendations to ensure appropriate information are also given and presented in this article.

  4. Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.

    PubMed

    Carter, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs.

  5. Linkages between community mental health centers and public mental hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worley, N K; Lowery, B J

    1991-01-01

    Directors of community mental health centers and superintendents of public mental health hospitals in one state were surveyed to gather data on interagency linkages. Implementation of affiliation agreements, exchange of staff training, and exchange of patient information were investigated. Affiliation agreements tended to be implemented with little difficulty and there was more interagency cooperation than that reported in earlier research. However, exchange of training and staff were still areas of minimal interaction. Geographic proximity was found to have a positive influence and competition a negative influence on cooperation. Further attempts at interagency linkages in the interest of continuity of patient care are recommended.

  6. Aggregate/community-centered undergraduate community health nursing clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Flick, L H; Reese, C; Harris, A

    1996-02-01

    Debate continues about the appropriateness of clinical experiences targeting aggregates in undergraduate community health nursing education. This paper describes a practical model to teach, through experience, the concepts of aggregate/community-centered practice at the baccalaureate level. As a voluntary alternative to the usual community assessment paper, groups of students worked in partnership with community groups to define health needs and to address one need. Sequential student groups focused the assessment and implemented a plan. The required time for each project varied. One project is described to illustrate the model. While independent community-centered practice is not expected of the B.S.N. graduate, the model described here develops comprehension of the concepts and process of such practice.

  7. The Breast Health Center at Women & Infants Hospital: origin, philosophy, and features.

    PubMed

    Falkenberry, S S; Chung, M; Legare, R; Strenger, R; Wallace, D; Phillips, G; Morry, S; Marchant, D J; Cady, B

    2000-04-01

    The Breast Health Center, a component of the program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital, is a multidisciplinary center devoted to the treatment and study of benign and malignant breast diseases. The philosophy, structure, and function of The Breast Health Center are described along with its specific components. The Breast Health Center's three fundamental missions of patient care, education, and research are discussed.

  8. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part 2: Clinical Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-11-04

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Clinical registries contain secondary data on patients with a specific diagnosis or procedure. The data are typically used for patient outcome surveillance to improve patient safety and health-care quality. Registries used in orthopaedic research exist at the regional, national, and international levels, and many were designed to specifically collect outcomes relevant to orthopaedics, such as short-term surgical complications, longer-term outcomes (implant survival or reoperations), and patient-reported outcomes. Although heterogeneous, clinical registries-in contrast to claims data-typically have a more robust list of variables, with relatively precise prospective data input, management infrastructure, and reporting systems. Some weaknesses of clinical registries include a smaller number of patients, inconstant follow-up duration, and use of sampling methods that may limit generalizability. Within the U.S., national joint registry adoption has lagged international joint registries. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that clinical registries will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health-care policy in the future.

  9. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice Regarding Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP):...

  10. Health Status and Health Care Experiences among Homeless Patients in Federally Supported Health Centers: Findings from the 2009 Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A; Baggett, Travis P; Jenkins, Darlene M; Sripipatana, Alek; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A Seiji; Daly, Charles A; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine health status and health care experiences of homeless patients in health centers and to compare them with their nonhomeless counterparts. Data Sources/Study Setting Nationally representative data from the 2009 Health Center Patient Survey. Study Design Cross-sectional analyses were limited to adults (n = 2,683). We compared sociodemographic characteristics, health conditions, access to health care, and utilization of services among homeless and nonhomeless patients. We also examined the independent effect of homelessness on health care access and utilization, as well as factors that influenced homeless patients' health care experiences. Data Collection Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with health center patients. Principal Findings Homeless patients had worse health status—lifetime burden of chronic conditions, mental health problems, and substance use problems—compared with housed respondents. In adjusted analyses, homeless patients had twice the odds as housed patients of having unmet medical care needs in the past year (OR = 1.98, 95 percent CI: 1.24–3.16) and twice the odds of having an ED visit in the past year (OR = 2.00, 95 percent CI: 1.37–2.92). Conclusions There is an ongoing need to focus on the health issues that disproportionately affect homeless populations. Among health center patients, homelessness is an independent risk factor for unmet medical needs and ED use. PMID:23134588

  11. 76 FR 18566 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special...-Sharp, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health...

  12. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services My Administration is committed to building a high...) provided $2 billion for health centers, including $500 million to expand health centers' services to over 2... health information technology and electronic health records. One of the key benefits health...

  13. The Great Lakes Center's health hazard evaluation program: promoting community environmental health through partnerships between academic and public health departments.

    PubMed

    Cali, Salvatore; Scheff, Peter; Mucha, Amy; Nickels, Leslie; Oliynyk, Irene; Hryhorczuk, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The Great Lakes Center of Excellence in Environmental Health (GLCEEH), an innovative capacity-building component of the University of Illinois, performs health hazard evaluations in collaboration with the Illinois Department of Public Health and local health departments. GLCEEH has provided state and local health departments with faculty, industrial-hygiene expertise, and research expertise to help them investigate a variety of environmental health issues. This article describes health hazard evaluations performed with support from the National Center for Environmental Health, lessons learned, and recommendations for successful collaboration between academic and public health departments. From the academic perspective, health hazard evaluations are beneficial because they provide faculty and students with the opportunity to engage in public health practice and encounter new issues that advance the science of environmental health through research. From the perspective of a public health department, health hazard evaluations are beneficial because they address priority environmental health concerns and build the capacity of department personnel to conduct health hazard evaluations with internal resources. A collaborative health hazard evaluation program increases public health capacity by developing new approaches to environmental health problems and by sharing limited resources.

  14. A new conceptual framework for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Mushlin, Alvin I; Gordon, Jonathan E; Leiman, Joan M; Pardes, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Led by the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. health care system is undergoing a transformative shift toward greater accountability for quality and efficiency. Academic health centers (AHCs), whose triple mission of clinical care, research, and education serves a critical role in the country's health care system, must adapt to this evolving environment. Doing so successfully, however, requires a broader understanding of the wide-ranging roles of the AHC. This article proposes a conceptual framework through which the triple mission is expanded along four new dimensions: health, innovation, community, and policy. Examples within the conceptual framework categories, such as the AHCs' safety net function, their contributions to local economies, and their role in right-sizing the health care workforce, illustrate how each of these dimensions provides a more robust picture of the modern AHC and demonstrates the value added by AHCs. This conceptual framework also offers a basis for developing new performance metrics by which AHCs, both individually and as a group, can be held accountable, and that can inform policy decisions affecting them. This closer examination of the myriad activities of modern AHCs clarifies their essential role in our health care system and will enable these institutions to evolve, improve, be held accountable for, and more fully serve the health of the nation.

  15. Focus on: SUNY Health Center at Brooklyn Scientific & Medical Instrumentation Center.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, S

    1988-01-01

    The Scientific and Medical Instrumentation Center (SMIC) is the clinical engineering program serving the State University of New York's Health Science Center at Brooklyn. SMIC is a separate department within the center's 354-bed University Hospital, and provides many instrumentation support services for the hospital and the center's Basic Sciences Division. Now in its 24th year, SMIC developed the nation's first mandatory initial checkout program for patient care equipment, and in 1973 published the results of a funded pilot preventive maintenance program; this served as a model for the start-up of other PM programs in hospitals across the country and overseas. Today, this 35-person department is primarily responsible for some 7,000 units used in over 60 University Hospital departments and clinics. With its interdisciplinary expertise, SMIC also provides the hospital with many other instrumentation services, including prepurchase evaluation and review, and on-site emergency instrumentation service. SMIC also develops unique devices and instruments for the center's researchers, from the prototype stage through to final construction, and may modify instruments for increased safety and efficacy.

  16. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign.

  17. Adult Day Health Center Participation and Health-Related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Eva M.; Sands, Laura P.; Weiss, Sara; Dowling, Glenna; Covinsky, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the association between Adult Day Health Center (ADHC) participation and health-related quality of life. Design and Methods: Case-controlled prospective study utilizing the Medical Outcomes Survey Form 36 (SF-36) to compare newly enrolled participants from 16 ADHC programs with comparable…

  18. Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: Trend or Major Thrust in Health Care Delivery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Cheryl M.

    2007-01-01

    In this reaction article to the Major Contribution, the merits and challenges of implementing patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, or cultural competence plus, are explicated. Three themes are addressed: separate but equal?, factoring in mental health, and sharing the load. The need to refine the conceptualization of the two…

  19. Health and Social Needs of Women Farmworkers Receiving Maternity Care at a Migrant Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Elizabeth L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Presents results of a 1982 descriptive study of female farmworkers receiving prenatal care at Tri-County Community Health Center in North Carolina. Recommends patient advocacy, minimum wage ensurance, improved housing, access to tax-supported public assistance, and social service programs to improve health status. (SA)

  20. Logic-centered architecture for ubiquitous health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Jacek; Arochena, Hisbel E; Naguib, Raouf N G; Chao, Kuo-Ming; Garcia-Perez, Alexeis

    2014-09-01

    One of the key points to maintain and boost research and development in the area of smart wearable systems (SWS) is the development of integrated architectures for intelligent services, as well as wearable systems and devices for health and wellness management. This paper presents such a generic architecture for multiparametric, intelligent and ubiquitous wireless sensing platforms. It is a transparent, smartphone-based sensing framework with customizable wireless interfaces and plug'n'play capability to easily interconnect third party sensor devices. It caters to wireless body, personal, and near-me area networks. A pivotal part of the platform is the integrated inference engine/runtime environment that allows the mobile device to serve as a user-adaptable personal health assistant. The novelty of this system lays in a rapid visual development and remote deployment model. The complementary visual Inference Engine Editor that comes with the package enables artificial intelligence specialists, alongside with medical experts, to build data processing models by assembling different components and instantly deploying them (remotely) on patient mobile devices. In this paper, the new logic-centered software architecture for ubiquitous health monitoring applications is described, followed by a discussion as to how it helps to shift focus from software and hardware development, to medical and health process-centered design of new SWS applications.

  1. New registry and tracking system for renal transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, K; Takahara, S; Kanmochi, T; Takahashi, K; Teraoka, S

    2010-12-01

    Following The Declaration of Istanbul 2008, a registration committees of The Japan Society for Transplantation and The Japanese Society for Clinical Renal Transplantation planned to establish a new registry and tracking system for renal transplant recipients and donors supported by a Health Labor Sciences Research Grant by The Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare. In place of the previous paper-based system, we established the new registry and tracking system, JARTRE (Japan Renal Transplantation Registry), using USB memory in 2009. Recipient and donor data were inputted into the USB memory at the transplantation centers. The memory was reviewed a yearly by committees. The recipient and donor registration included details from both. The tracking is performed centrally 3 months, 1 year, and every year after the operation. The advantages of this system are the ease of input, adequacy of the data, and rapid statistical processing. In 2009, we registered 97.9% of new renal transplantation recipients and donors; in 2008 it was more than 81.9% of all past renal transplantation recipients in Japan.

  2. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N.

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise. PMID:26958297

  3. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise.

  4. Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Omid; Gozdyra, Peter; Misic, Bratislav; Moola, Faisal; Palmer, Lyle J.; Paus, Tomáš; Berman, Marc G.

    2015-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

  5. Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center.

    PubMed

    Kardan, Omid; Gozdyra, Peter; Misic, Bratislav; Moola, Faisal; Palmer, Lyle J; Paus, Tomáš; Berman, Marc G

    2015-07-09

    Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

  6. Implications of the World Trade Center Attack for the Public Health and Health Care Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Susan; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    The September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center had profound effects on the well-being of New York City. The authors describe and assess the strengths and weaknesses of the city’s response to the public health, environmental/ occupational health, and mental health dimensions of the attack in the first 6 months after the event. They also examine the impact on the city’s health care and social service system. The authors suggest lessons that can inform the development of a post–September 11th agenda for strengthening urban health infrastructures. PMID:12604481

  7. Implications of the World Trade Center attack for the public health and health care infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Klitzman, Susan; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    The September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center had profound effects on the well-being of New York City. The authors describe and assess the strengths and weaknesses of the city's response to the public health, environmental/ occupational health, and mental health dimensions of the attack in the first 6 months after the event. They also examine the impact on the city's health care and social service system. The authors suggest lessons that can inform the development of a post-September 11th agenda for strengthening urban health infrastructures.

  8. Comparison of cancer diagnoses between the US solid organ transplant registry and linked central cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Nogueira, Leticia M; Koch, Lori; Copeland, Glenn; Lynch, Charles F; Pawlish, Karen S; Finch, Jack L; Kahn, Amy R; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Segev, Dorry L; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Snyder, Jon J; Kasiske, Bertram L; Engels, Eric A

    2016-04-07

    US transplant centers are required to report cancers in transplant recipients to the transplant network. The accuracy and completeness of these data, collected in the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), are unknown. We compared diagnoses in the SRTR and 15 linked cancer registries, for colorectal, liver, lung, breast, prostate, and kidney cancers, melanoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Among 187,384 transplants, 9323 cancers were documented in the SRTR or cancer registries. Only 36.8% of cancers were in both, with 47.5% and 15.7% of cases additionally documented solely in cancer registries or the SRTR, respectively. Agreement between the SRTR and cancer registries varied (kappa: 0.28 for liver cancer, 0.52-0.66 for lung, prostate, kidney, colorectum and breast cancers). Upon evaluation, some NHLs documented only in cancer registries were identified in the SRTR as another type of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Some SRTR-only cases were explained by miscoding (colorectal cancer instead of anal cancer, metastases as lung or liver cancers) or missed matches with cancer registries, partly due to out-migration from their catchment areas. Estimated sensitivity for identifying cancer was 52.5% for the SRTR and 84.3% for cancer registries. In conclusion, SRTR cancer data are substantially incomplete, limiting their usefulness for surveillance and research. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Information on new drugs at market entry: retrospective analysis of health technology assessment reports versus regulatory reports, journal publications, and registry reports

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Michael; Haag, Susanne; Biester, Katharina; Brockhaus, Anne Catharina; McGauran, Natalie; Grouven, Ulrich; Kölsch, Heike; Seay, Ulrike; Hörn, Helmut; Moritz, Gregor; Staeck, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Background When a new drug becomes available, patients and doctors require information on its benefits and harms. In 2011, Germany introduced the early benefit assessment of new drugs through the act on the reform of the market for medicinal products (AMNOG). At market entry, the pharmaceutical company responsible must submit a standardised dossier containing all available evidence of the drug’s added benefit over an appropriate comparator treatment. The added benefit is mainly determined using patient relevant outcomes. The “dossier assessment” is generally performed by the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) and then published online. It contains all relevant study information, including data from unpublished clinical study reports contained in the dossiers. The dossier assessment refers to the patient population for which the new drug is approved according to the summary of product characteristics. This patient population may comprise either the total populations investigated in the studies submitted to regulatory authorities in the drug approval process, or the specific subpopulations defined in the summary of product characteristics (“approved subpopulations”). Objective To determine the information gain from AMNOG documents compared with non-AMNOG documents for methods and results of studies available at market entry of new drugs. AMNOG documents comprise dossier assessments done by IQWiG and publicly available modules of company dossiers; non-AMNOG documents comprise conventional, publicly available sources—that is, European public assessment reports, journal publications, and registry reports. The analysis focused on the approved patient populations. Design Retrospective analysis. Data sources All dossier assessments conducted by IQWiG between 1 January 2011 and 28 February 2013 in which the dossiers contained suitable studies allowing for a full early benefit assessment. We also considered all European public assessment

  10. [Prescribing and drug utilization at community health centers].

    PubMed

    Diawara, A; Sangho, H; Maiga, D; Kone, A B D; Maiga, M D; Simaga, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The rationalization of the prescription and the good use of the drugs generally constitute a major problem in the health facilities. The present survey led in November 2002 in Mali assessed the practices of prescription and the use of the drugs by the populations. The indicators of drugs use rational have been measured from 600 drawn prescriptions randomly select at the level of 20 community health center (CSCOM) retained at random in the regions of Ségou, Sikasso, Mopti and the District of Bamako. The means of drugs by order (2.8), the percentages of prescription with antibiotic (61.6%) and injectable drugs (35%) are raised in relation to the normative values of WHO (Wold Health Organization). The rate of conformity to the treatments standardized estimated on exploitation of consultations registers in the centers is estimated to 0.5% for the simple diarrhoea, 13.5% for the acute respiratory infections (ARI) without pneumonia and 60.5% for the pneumonia. On 293 patients in the households our survey permitted to estimate to 84.6% the observance of the treatment by the persons having bought the prescribed drugs totality. The percentage of antibiotics prescription and injectable drugs, and the big insufficiency in the non respect of the treatment standard constitutes some practices potentially to high risk justifying the necessity of an urgent training to the rational prescription.

  11. HIV testing practices among New England college health centers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to increase among certain populations including young men who have sex with men (MSM). College campuses represent a potential setting to engage young adults and institute prevention interventions including HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate testing practices for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on college campuses. Methods Medical directors at four-year residential baccalaureate college health centers in New England were surveyed from June, 2011 to September, 2011. Thirty-one interviews were completed regarding experiences with HIV testing, acute HIV infection, other STI testing, and outreach efforts targeting specific at-risk groups such as MSM. Results Among schools that responded to the survey, less than five percent of students were tested for HIV at their local college health center in the past academic year (2010–2011). Significant barriers to HIV testing included cost and availability of rapid antibody testing. One-third of college health medical directors reported that their practitioners may not feel comfortable recognizing acute HIV infection. Conclusions Improved HIV testing practices are needed on college campuses. Programs should focus on outreach efforts targeting MSM and other at-risk populations. PMID:23496891

  12. DISCOVERING STRATEGY: A KEY CHALLENGE FOR ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTERS

    PubMed Central

    LEE, THOMAS H.

    2016-01-01

    The health care marketplace is increasingly being driven by competition on value for patients — that is, meeting their needs as efficiently as possible. Academic medical centers must adapt to this shift through the development of true strategies aimed at creating value, as opposed to trying to deflect the pressures of competition through tactics such as merging with competitors. True strategies require clarity on what the organization is trying to do for whom, and how the organization is going to be different from its competitors. Six key questions are described and discussed: 1) What is our goal? 2) What businesses are we in? 3) What set of conditions shall we compete in? 4) How will we be different? 5) What synergies can be created across our sites? and 6) What is our appropriate density and scope? Academic medical centers have been the crown jewel of health care for the United States and, indeed, the rest of the world. Their research, teaching, and patient care missions all command respect, and their halls are filled with representatives of industry interested in scientific advances; trainees seeking expertise; and patients hoping for relief of their suffering — or at least peace of mind that all opportunities for improvement of health have been exhausted. PMID:28066066

  13. 75 FR 71449 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special...: Maryline Laude-Sharp, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and...

  14. The USGS National Wildlife Health Center: Advancing wildlife and ecosystem health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moede Rogall, Gail; Sleeman, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-11

    In 1975, the Federal government responded to the need for establishing national expertise in wildlife health by creating the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC), a facility within the Department of the Interior; the NWHC is the only national center dedicated to wildlife disease detection, control, and prevention. Its mission is to provide national leadership to safeguard wildlife and ecosystem health through active partnerships and exceptional science. Comparisons are often made between the NWHC, which strives to protect the health of our Nation’s wildlife, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which strive to protect public health. The NWHC, a science center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with specialized laboratories, works to safeguard the Nation’s wildlife from diseases by studying the causes and drivers of these threats, and by developing strategies to prevent and manage them. In addition to the main campus, located in Madison, Wisconsin, the NWHC also operates the Honolulu Field Station that addresses wildlife health issues in Hawaii and the Pacific Region.

  15. Promoting one health: the University of Missouri Research Center for Human/Animal Interaction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    The University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is home to the Research Center for Human-Animal Interaction. This center uniquely addresses a growing area of research that focuses on how the human-animal bond impacts health in people and animals. This article highlights the One Health basis for the center, several research projects, and future goals for the center.

  16. System Integration and Network Planning in the Academic Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Marcia A.; Spackman, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer of information within the academic health center is complicated by the complex nature of the institution's multi-dimensional role. The diverse functions of patient care, administration, education and research result in a complex web of information exchange which requires an integrated approach to system management. System integration involves a thorough assessment of “end user” needs in terms of hardware and software as well as specification of the communications network architecture. The network will consist of a series of end user nodes which capture, process, archive and display information. This paper will consider some requirements of these nodes, also called intelligent workstations, relating to their management and integration into a total health care network.

  17. Pattern of care and effectiveness of treatment for glioblastoma patients in the real world: Results from a prospective population-based registry. Could survival differ in a high-volume center?

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Tosoni, Alicia; Albani, Fiorenzo; Depenni, Roberta; Faedi, Marina; Pisanello, Anna; Crisi, Girolamo; Urbini, Benedetta; Dazzi, Claudio; Cavanna, Luigi; Mucciarini, Claudia; Pasini, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Stefania; Marucci, Gianluca; Morandi, Luca; Zunarelli, Elena; Cerasoli, Serenella; Gardini, Giorgio; Lanza, Giovanni; Silini, Enrico Maria; Cavuto, Silvio; Baruzzi, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Background As yet, no population-based prospective studies have been conducted to investigate the incidence and clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) or the diffusion and impact of the current standard therapeutic approach in newly diagnosed patients younger than aged 70 years. Methods Data on all new cases of primary brain tumors observed from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, in adults residing within the Emilia-Romagna region were recorded in a prospective registry in the Project of Emilia Romagna on Neuro-Oncology (PERNO). Based on the data from this registry, a prospective evaluation was made of the treatment efficacy and outcome in GBM patients. Results Two hundred sixty-seven GBM patients (median age, 64 y; range, 29–84 y) were enrolled. The median overall survival (OS) was 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.2–12.4). The 139 patients ≤aged 70 years who were given standard temozolomide treatment concomitant with and adjuvant to radiotherapy had a median OS of 16.4 months (95% CI, 14.0–18.5). With multivariate analysis, OS correlated significantly with KPS (HR = 0.458; 95% CI, 0.248–0.847; P = .0127), MGMT methylation status (HR = 0.612; 95% CI, 0.388–0.966; P = .0350), and treatment received in a high versus low-volume center (HR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.328–0.986; P = .0446). Conclusions The median OS following standard temozolomide treatment concurrent with and adjuvant to radiotherapy given to (72.8% of) patients aged ≤70 years is consistent with findings reported from randomized phase III trials. The volume and expertise of the treatment center should be further investigated as a prognostic factor. PMID:26034628

  18. 78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory... Health and Human Services. The CDC is soliciting nominations for membership on the World Trade...

  19. 78 FR 18855 - World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 88 RIN 0920-AA48 World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements... Title XXXIII, which establishes the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program. The WTC Health Program is... Two of the World Trade Center Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC), Vol. I, Day...

  20. 78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... name of the Committee should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical...

  1. The Potential of School-Linked Centers To Promote Adolescent Health and Development. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    The future of school-linked adolescent health centers cannot be determined without further evaluation. The recent development of school-linked health centers stems from concerns about the special health needs of adolescents. Currently there are 125 school-based and school-linked centers in operation. Characteristics include the following: (1) most…

  2. Strategies for developing biostatistics resources in an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Welty, Leah J; Carter, Rickey E; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Harrell, Frank E; Lindsell, Christopher J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Mazumdar, Madhu; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Roberson, Paula K; Ware, James H

    2013-04-01

    Biostatistics--the application of statistics to understanding health and biology-provides powerful tools for developing research questions, designing studies, refining measurements, analyzing data, and interpreting findings. Biostatistics plays an important role in health-related research, yet biostatistics resources are often fragmented, ad hoc, or oversubscribed within academic health centers (AHCs). Given the increasing complexity and quantity of health-related data, the emphasis on accelerating clinical and translational science, and the importance of conducting reproducible research, the need for the thoughtful development of biostatistics resources within AHCs is growing.In this article, the authors identify strategies for developing biostatistics resources in three areas: (1) recruiting and retaining biostatisticians, (2) efficiently using biostatistics resources, and (3) improving biostatistical contributions to science. AHCs should consider these three domains in building strong biostatistics resources, which they can leverage to support a broad spectrum of research. For each of the three domains, the authors describe the advantages and disadvantages of AHCs creating centralized biostatistics units rather than dispersing such resources across clinical departments or other research units. They also address the challenges that biostatisticians face in contributing to research without sacrificing their individual professional growth or the trajectory of their research teams. The authors ultimately recommend that AHCs create centralized biostatistics units because this approach offers distinct advantages both to investigators who collaborate with biostatisticians as well as to the biostatisticians themselves, and it is better suited to accomplish the research and education missions of AHCs.

  3. Building Global Health Through a Center-Without-Walls: The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Vermund, Sten H.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health. PMID:18303361

  4. Entrepreneurship and state/mental health center relationships.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Zelman, W N

    1987-01-01

    An effective Community Mental Health Center (CMHC) program in entrepreneurship--the provision of services in the marketplace at a profit to subsidize other programs--requires the support and encouragement of the state-level mental health authority. This paper discusses potential financial, programmatic, political, and managerial risks and rewards to CMHCs and to state authorities from such efforts. As each party faces certain risks as well as rewards from such efforts, it is important that they participate in a process of mutual risk reduction involving: Documenting and legitimizing the entrepreneurship program; Separating funding for seed monies and working capital for ventures, Restructuring the Centers' finances and/or corporate structure to reduce the problems of funds diversion and comingling, Negotiating in advance how the proceeds of the ventures will be used to benefit programs, and Providing technical assistance to enhance the probabilities of success in such ventures. For these steps to work the state authorities must be willing to give up some financial and programmatic control to motivate entrepreneurship on the part of CMHCs.

  5. Glycemic control in diabetic patients served by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, Neil A; Shaw, Beryl; Hendry, Khati

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Center Network measured the prevalence of glycemic control in diabetic patients at 7 community health centers as part of its clinical quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a random sample of 1817 diabetic patients having 1 or more encounters from October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001. Computerized laboratory results for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests were available for half the sample. Manual review of medical charts was carried out for the rest. The proportion of diabetic patients with 1 or more HbA1c tests in the measurement year was 91% (CI95%: 90-93%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 9%) occurred in 27% (CIM%: 25-30%). The mean of the most recent test was 7.8%. The frequency of testing varied significantly by clinic from 79% to 94% and increased with the number of encounters. Poor glycemic control also varied significantly by clinic (17-48%) and was significantly better in females and older patients. Measures of glycemic control were not associated with ethnicity or insurance status in multivariate analyses. A high proportion of diabetic patients received appropriate care, and this care was not associated with ethnicity or insurance status. The data warehouse was an essential tool for the clinical quality improvement program.

  6. Retrivability in The Danish National Hospital Registry of HIV and hepatitis B and C coinfection diagnoses of patients managed in HIV centers 1995–2004

    PubMed Central

    Obel, Niels; Reinholdt, Hanne; Omland, Lars H; Engsig, Frederik; Sørensen, Henrik T; Hansen, Ann-Brit E

    2008-01-01

    Background Hospital-based discharge registries are used increasingly for longitudinal epidemiological studies of HIV. We examined completeness of registration of HIV infections and of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) coinfections in the Danish National Hospital Registry (DNHR) covering all Danish hospitals. Methods The Danish HIV Cohort Study (DHCS) encompasses all HIV-infected patients treated in Danish HIV clinics since 1 January 1995. All 2,033 Danish patients in DHCS diagnosed with HIV-1 during the 10-year period from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2004 were included in the current analysis. We used the DHCS as a reference to examine the completeness of HIV and of HBV and HCV coinfections recorded in DNHR. Cox regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios of time to diagnosis of HIV in DNHR compared to DHCS. Results Of the 2,033 HIV patients in DHCS, a total of 2,006 (99%) were registered with HIV in DNHR. Of these, 1,888 (93%) were registered in DNHR within one year of their first positive HIV test. A CD4 < 200 cells/μl, a viral load >= 100,000 copies/ml and being diagnosed after 1 January 2000, were associated with earlier registration in DNHR, both in crude and adjusted analyses. Thirty (23%) HIV patients registered with chronic HBV (n = 129) in DHCS and 126 (48%) of HIV patients with HCV (n = 264) in DHCS were registered with these diagnoses in the DNHR. Further 17 and 8 patients were registered with HBV and HCV respectively in DNHR, but not in DHCS. The positive predictive values of being registered with HBV and HCV in DHCS were thereby estimated to 0.88 and 0.97 and in DNHR to 0.32 and 0.54. Conclusion The study demonstrates that secondary data from national hospital databases may be reliable for identification of patients diagnosed with HIV infection. However, the predictive value of co-morbidity data may be low. PMID:18439245

  7. Data available from birth and death registries and cancer registries in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.L. |; Houser, A.R.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, cancer registries have been compiling data for decades, and state vital statistics offices have been compiling birth and death data for nearly a century. Although this information has been well used for disease surveillance and various studies, it could be better exploited by making it more readily available, reducing the duplication of effort that occurs when researchers at the private, city, county, state, and federal levels work separately on their data collection and disease investigations. This report summarizes the nationwide availability of birth and death records and cancer registry data, with particular emphasis on subcounty geographic detail, such as zip code and census tract. Birth and death data are available at the county level for the entire United States from the National Center for Health Statistics. However, county level data are inadequate for small area studies of potential environmental hazards. Hazards of current interest to the Department of Energy (DOE) include DOE facilities, nuclear power plants, and sources of electromagnetic radiation such as broadcasting towers and power lines.

  8. Changing roles of population-based cancer registries in Australia.

    PubMed

    Roder, David; Creighton, Nicola; Baker, Deborah; Walton, Richard; Aranda, Sanchia; Currow, David

    2015-09-01

    Registries have key roles in cancer incidence, mortality and survival monitoring and in showing disparities across the population. Incidence monitoring began in New South Wales in 1972 and other jurisdictions soon followed. Registry data are used to evaluate outcomes of preventive, screening, treatment and support services. They have shown decreases in cancer incidence following interventions and have been used for workforce and other infrastructure planning. Crude markers of optimal radiotherapy and chemotherapy exist and registry data are used to show shortfalls against these markers. The data are also used to investigate cancer clusters and environmental concerns. Survival data are used to assess service performance and interval cancer data are used in screening accreditation. Registries enable determination of risk of multiple primary cancers. Clinical quality registries are used for clinical quality improvement. Population-based cancer registries and linked administrative data complement clinical registries by providing high-level system-wide data. The USA Commission on Cancer has long used registries for quality assurance and service accreditation. Increasingly population-based registry data in Australia are linked with administrative data on service delivery to assess system performance. Addition oftumour stage and otherprognostic indicators is important forthese analyses and is facilitated by the roll-out of structured pathology reporting. Data linkage with administrative data, following checks on the quality of these data, enables assessment of patterns of care and other performance indicators for health-system monitoring. Australian cancer registries have evolved and increasingly are contributing to broader information networks for health system management.

  9. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center

    PubMed Central

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to “wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity” before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of “gum disease”. Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers’ response in relation to their specific job. Conclusion: The special health care workers in the disabled children’s center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices. PMID:25878636

  10. Public-private partnerships in community health centers: addressing the needs of underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leiyu; Collins, Patricia B

    2007-01-01

    Community health centers have provided high quality, cost-effective primary healthcare to underserved populations for over four decades. From the beginning, collaboration has been a central component of the community health center model of care. This article begins with an overview of community health center achievements and the drive for increased private-public partnerships in public health. The historic and current role of public-private partnerships within community health centers is described, with a particular focus on the Bureau of Primary Health Care initiatives (that is, the Health Disparities Collaborative and the Healthy Communities Access Program). Community health centers' establishment of partnerships in response to Hurricane Katrina and Medicare Part D is discussed. Finally, this article considers the continuing role of community health center public-private partnerships in the context of political and healthcare market shifts.

  11. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khatib, Issam A. Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-15

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  12. Providing Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: A Formative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Herman, Keith C.; Ferdinand, Lisa A.; Bailey, Tamika R.; Lopez, Manuel Thomas; Beato, Cristina; Adams, Diane; Cooper, Leslie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the literature-based, testable, formative Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care Model that explains the associations between patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, health-promoting treatment behaviors, and health outcomes and statuses. An intervention program based on the model and its foundational…

  13. 78 FR 58385 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System for Federally Qualified Health Centers; Changes to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... when mental health, diabetes self-management/medical nutrition therapy (DSMT/MNT), or the IPPE are... that we have not considered, particularly in regards to mental health services, and we would reconsider.... They include community health centers (section 330(e) of the PHS Act), migrant health centers...

  14. 76 FR 40384 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special.... Contact Person: Robert Nettey, M.D., Chief, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on...

  15. 77 FR 50519 - Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS); Amendment of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... of meeting agenda, date change, and participant link change for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA), Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council (CMHS...

  16. Contributions of physical function and satisfaction with social roles to emotional distress in chronic pain: a Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR) study.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, John A; Dixon, Eric A; Darnall, Beth D; Mackey, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with chronic pain show greater vulnerability to depression or anger than those without chronic pain, and also show greater interpersonal difficulties and physical disability. The present study examined data from 675 individuals with chronic pain during their initial visits to a tertiary care pain clinic using assessments from Stanford University's Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR). Using a path modeling analysis, the mediating roles of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) Physical Function and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities were tested between pain intensity and PROMIS Depression and Anger. Pain intensity significantly predicted both depression and anger, and both physical function and satisfaction with social roles mediated these relationships when modeled in separate 1-mediator models. Notably, however, when modeled together, ratings of satisfaction with social roles mediated the relationship between physical function and both anger and depression. Our results suggest that the process by which chronic pain disrupts emotional well-being involves both physical function and disrupted social functioning. However, the more salient factor in determining pain-related emotional distress seems to be disruption of social relationships, than global physical impairment. These results highlight the particular importance of social factors to pain-related distress, and highlight social functioning as an important target for clinical intervention in chronic pain.

  17. Effect of chemotherapy on health-related quality of life among early-stage ovarian cancer survivors: a study from the population-based PROFILES registry

    PubMed Central

    Bhugwandass, C.S.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.; Pijlman, B.; Ezendam, N.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is wide variation in the application of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Our aim was to assess differences in health-related quality of life (hrqol) between patients with early-stage ovarian cancer who did or did not receive chemotherapy as adjuvant treatment. Methods All patients diagnosed with early-stage ovarian cancer between 2000 and 2010 within the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry (n = 191) were enrolled in this study. Patients were requested to complete questionnaires, including the cancer-specific (qlq-C30) and ovarian cancer-specific (qlq-OV28) quality of life measures from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Primary outcome measures were the generic-and cancer-specific domain scores for hrqol in ovarian cancer survivors. Results Of the 107 patients (56%) who returned the questionnaires, 57 (53.3%) had received adjuvant chemotherapy and 50 (46.7%) had been treated with surgery alone. Significant differences in hrqol between those groups were found in the symptom scales for peripheral neuropathy, attitude toward sickness, and financial situation, with worse scores in the chemotherapy group. Conclusions Results of our study show that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy have a significantly worse score for 3 aspects of hrqol. Efforts should be made to reduce use of adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage ovarian cancer. Moreover, preventive strategies to improve long-term quality of life for those who need adjuvant chemotherapy should be explored. PMID:28050144

  18. Integrating the environment, the economy, and community health: a Community Health Center's initiative to link health benefits to smart growth.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Peter V; Driscoll, Mary Beth; Gramling, Benjamin J

    2004-04-01

    The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC) in Milwaukee, Wis, is making a difference in the livability of surrounding neighborhoods and the overall health of the families it serves. SSCHC is going beyond traditional health care provider models and working to link the environment, the economy, and community health through urban brownfield redevelopment and sustainable land-use planning. In 1997, SSCHC recognized that restoration of local air and water quality and other environmental conditions, coupled with restoring family-supporting jobs in the neighborhood, could have a substantial impact on the overall health of families. Recent events indicate that SSCHC's pursuit of smart growth strategies has begun to pay off.

  19. Holistic Health Care for the Medically Uninsured: The Church Health Center of Memphis.

    PubMed

    Morris, G Scott

    2015-11-05

    The Church Health Center (CHC) in Memphis was founded in 1987 to provide quality, affordable health care for working, uninsured people and their families. With numerous, dedicated financial supporters and health care volunteers, CHC has become the largest faith-based health care organization of its type nationally, serving >61,000 patients. CHC embraces a holistic approach to health by promoting wellness in every dimension of life. It offers on-site services including medical care, dentistry, optometry, counseling, social work, and nutrition and fitness education, to promote wellness in every dimension of life. A 2012 economic analysis estimated that a $1 contribution to the CHC provided roughly $8 in health services. The CHC has trained >1200 Congregational Health Promoters to be health leaders and is conducting research on the effectiveness of faith community nurses partnering with congregations to assist in home care for patients recently discharged from Memphis hospitals. The MEMPHIS Plan, CHC's employer-sponsored health care plan for small business and the self-employed, offers uninsured people in lower-wage jobs access to quality, affordable health care. The CHC also conducts replications workshops several times a year to share their model with leaders in other communities. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) recently completed a case study that concluded: "The CHC is one of a very few organizations successfully embodying all three components of the IHI Triple Aim by improving population health outcomes, enhancing the individual's health care experience, and controlling costs. All three have been part of the Center's DNA since its inception, and as a transforming force in the community, the model is well worth national attention."

  20. Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets (PRIM): an update.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Elizabeth A; Maher, Brion S; Marazita, Mary L; Tarter, Ralph E; Ganger, Jennifer B; Watt-Morse, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M

    2006-12-01

    This article is an updated review of the Pittsburgh Registry of Infant Multiplets including recruitment methods, data collection, and results of pilot studies conducted in this registry. The main goal of the registry is to study psychological development. The risk for behavior disorders including substance use disorders, as well as language development and dental health are among research targets. Pilot data on the heritability of minor physical anomalies and neuropsychological characteristics (Continuous Performance Test) are reported.

  1. Managing Academic Health Centers: Meeting the Challenges of the New Health Care World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report focuses on strategies documented by the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers (AHCs) concerning AHCs' management of patient care and research missions. Whatever challenges AHCs face in the future, their ability to respond effectively will be determined by the quality of their governance and management. To improve…

  2. Mental Health Services for Children; Focus: The Community Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Center for Studies of Child and Family Mental Health.

    The need to help the emotionally disturbed is discussed with a focus on community mental health centers. Psychiatric services described are diagnosis, inpatient care, day care, outpatient care, emergency care, continuity of care and services, and care adjusted to age groupings ranging from infancy to adolescence. Aspects of the community goal of…

  3. A public health training center experience: professional continuing education at schools of public health.

    PubMed

    Potter, Margaret A; Fertman, Carl I; Eggleston, Molly M; Holtzhauer, Frank; Pearsol, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The Public Health Training Center (PHTC) national program was first established at accredited schools of public health in 2000. The PHTC program used the US Health Resources and Services Administration's grants to build workforce development programs, attracting schools as training providers and the workforce as training clients. This article is a reflection on the experience of two schools, whose partnership supported one of the PHTCs, for the purpose of opening a conversation about the future of continuing education throughout schools and degree programs of public health. This partnership, the Pennsylvania & Ohio Public Health Training Center (POPHTC), concentrated its funding on more intensive training of public healthcare workers through a relatively narrow inventory of courses that were delivered typically in-person rather than by distance-learning technologies. This approach responded to the assessed needs and preferences of the POPHTC's workforce population. POPHTC's experience may not be typical among the PHTCs nationally, but the collective experience of all PHTCs is instructive to schools of public health as they work to meet an increasing demand for continuing education from the public health workforce.

  4. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach.

  5. [Local planning: the speech of basic health care center manager].

    PubMed

    Cubas, Márcia Regina

    2005-01-01

    As planning is understood as a management tool, this article offers an argument through the speech framework of Basic Health Care Center Managers in the city of Curitiba-PR, by means of the Collective Subject Speech Methodology on local planning aspects. Its purpose is to bring local managers to a reflection concerning their styles, practices and experiences, as well as to collaborate with central level leading teams towards building their planning processes in an upward, participatory, communicative and strategic way. Considerations of the speeches built from central ideas are presented: planning methodology; inter-sectoriality; territorial basis; team and community participation; training, autonomy and particular profile of local managers; the manager's agenda; and institutional culture.

  6. Viewpoint: professionalism and humanism beyond the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Swick, Herbert M

    2007-11-01

    Medical professionalism and humanism have long been integral to the practice of medicine, and they will continue to shape practice in the 21st century. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the nature of medical professionalism and in efforts to teach and assess professional values and behaviors. As more and more teaching of both medical students and residents occurs in settings outside of academic medical centers, it is critically important that community physicians demonstrate behaviors that resonate professionalism and humanism. As teachers, they must be committed to being role models for what physicians should be. Activities that are designed to promote and advance professionalism, then, must take place not only in academic settings but also in clinical practice sites that are beyond the academic health center. The author argues that professionalism and humanism share common values and that each can enrich the other. Because the cauldron of practice threatens to erode traditional values of professionalism, not only for individual physicians but also for the medical profession, practicing physicians must incorporate into practice settings activities that are explicitly designed to exemplify those values, not only with students and patients, but also within their communities. The author cites a number of examples of ways in which professionalism and humanism can be fostered by individual physicians as well as professional organizations.

  7. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Amy J; White Hat, Emily R; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-12-22

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years.

  8. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Amy J.; White Hat, Emily R.; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E.; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years. PMID:26703683

  9. Assessment of oral health attitudes and behavior among students of Kuwait University Health Sciences Center

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to assess attitudes and behavior of oral health maintenance among students in four faculties (Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Allied Health) and to compare oral health attitudes and behavior of all students at Kuwait University Health Sciences Center (KUHSC) based on their academic level. Materials and Methods: Students enrolled in the Faculties of Dentistry, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Allied Health at KUHSC were evaluated regarding their oral health attitudes and behavior by an e-mail invitation with a link to the Hiroshima University Dental Behavior Inventory survey that was sent to all 1802 students with Kuwait University Health Sciences Center e-mail addresses. The data were analyzed for frequency distributions, and differences among the groups were assessed using the Mann–Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Kruskal–Wallis test. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Results: The results of this study indicated that dental students achieved better oral health attitudes and behavior than that of their nondental professional fellow students (P < 0.05). Students in advanced academic levels and female students demonstrated better oral health attitudes and behavior. Conclusion: Dental students and students who were in advanced levels of their training along with female students demonstrated better oral health practices and perceptions than students in lower academic levels and male students, respectively. Additional studies for investigating the effectiveness and identifying areas requiring modification within the dental curriculum at KUHSC may be warranted. PMID:27891310

  10. Public health surveillance of automated external defibrillators in the USA: protocol for the dynamic automated external defibrillator registry study

    PubMed Central

    Elrod, JoAnn Broeckel; Merchant, Raina; Daya, Mohamud; Youngquist, Scott; Salcido, David; Valenzuela, Terence; Nichol, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Lay use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) before the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) providers on scene increases survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). AEDs have been placed in public locations may be not ready for use when needed. We describe a protocol for AED surveillance that tracks these devices through time and space to improve public health, and survival as well as facilitate research. Methods and analysis Included AEDs are installed in public locations for use by laypersons to treat patients with OHCA before the arrival of EMS providers on scene. Included cases of OHCA are patients evaluated by organised EMS personnel and treated for OHCA. Enrolment of 10 000 AEDs annually will yield precision of 0.4% in the estimate of readiness for use. Enrolment of 2500 patients annually will yield precision of 1.9% in the estimate of survival to hospital discharge. Recruitment began on 21 Mar 2014 and is ongoing. AEDs are found by using multiple methods. Each AED is then tagged with a label which is a unique two-dimensional (2D) matrix code; the 2D matrix code is recorded and the location and status of the AED tracked using a smartphone; these elements are automatically passed via the internet to a secure and confidential database in real time. Whenever the 2D matrix code is rescanned for any non-clinical or clinical use of an AED, the user is queried to answer a finite set of questions about the device status. The primary outcome of any clinical use of an AED is survival to hospital discharge. Results are summarised descriptively. Ethics and dissemination These activities are conducted under a grant of authority for public health surveillance from the Food and Drug Administration. Results are provided periodically to participating sites and sponsors to improve public health and quality of care. PMID:28360255

  11. The Danish Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Ingeman, Annette; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager; Schaarup, Susanne Zielke; Gyllenborg, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Stroke Registry is to monitor and improve the quality of care among all patients with acute stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) treated at Danish hospitals. Study population All patients with acute stroke (from 2003) or TIA (from 2013) treated at Danish hospitals. Reporting is mandatory by law for all hospital departments treating these patients. The registry included >130,000 events by the end of 2014, including 10,822 strokes and 4,227 TIAs registered in 2014. Main variables The registry holds prospectively collected data on key processes of care, mainly covering the early phase after stroke, including data on time of delivery of the processes and the eligibility of the individual patients for each process. The data are used for assessing 18 process indicators reflecting recommendations in the national clinical guidelines for patients with acute stroke and TIA. Patient outcomes are currently monitored using 30-day mortality, unplanned readmission, and for patients receiving revascularization therapy, also functional level at 3 months poststroke. Descriptive data Sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors with potential prognostic impact are registered. Conclusion The Danish Stroke Registry is a well-established clinical registry which plays a key role for monitoring and improving stroke and TIA care in Denmark. In addition, the registry is increasingly used for research. PMID:27843349

  12. 76 FR 27648 - World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program... establishment of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee. The WTC... WTC Program Administrator. For information, contact Larry Elliott, Designated Federal Officer,...

  13. 78 FR 78966 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease...

  14. Predictors of consumer satisfaction in community mental health center services.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Minji; Barrett, Hope; Talbert, Jeffery

    2014-11-01

    Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities conducted a survey to evaluate consumers' satisfaction with services delivered at the Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) in Kentucky. The survey was administered at outpatient clinics operated by fourteen CMHCs in 2010. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that predict whether clients will respond that they were "generally satisfied" with services received from CMHCs. A logistic regression model was developed using respondents' characteristics and their responses to survey questions. Survey questions were grouped into seven core domains: general satisfaction, access, quality, participation in treatment planning, outcomes, functioning, and social connectedness. In result, responses to domains of access, quality and participation in treatment planning significantly affected clients' perception of general satisfaction. Respondents who positively assessed those domains of services were more likely to answer that they were generally satisfied with services. Based on the analysis in this report, improvement in certain domains of services, especially access, quality and participation in treatment planning could increase the level of positive responses in general satisfaction.

  15. Case study of the integration of a local health department and a community health center.

    PubMed

    Lambrew, J M; Ricketts, T C; Morrissey, J P

    1993-01-01

    As rural communities struggle to sustain health services locally, innovative alternatives to traditional programs are being developed. A significant adaptation is the rural health network or alliance that links local health departments and community health centers. The authors describe how a rural local health department and community health center, the core organizations in publicly sponsored primary care, came to share a building and administrative and service activities. Both the details of this alliance and its development are examined. The case history reveals that circumstance and State involvement were the catalysts for service integration, more so than the need for or the benefits of the arrangement. The closure of a county-owned hospital created a situation in which State officials were able to broker a cooperative agreement between the two agencies. This case study suggests two hypotheses: that need for integrated services alone may not be sufficient to catalyze the development of primary care alliances and that strong policy support may override any local and internal resistance to integration.

  16. Transdisciplinary cardiovascular and cancer health disparities training: experiences of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Ferketich, Amy; Boyington, Josephine; Dugan, Sheila; Garroutte, Eva; Kaufmann, Peter G; Krok, Jessica; Kuo, Alice; Ortega, Alexander N; Purnell, Tanjala; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2015-07-01

    The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities program promotes multilevel and multifactorial health equity research and the building of research teams that are transdisciplinary. We summarized 5 areas of scientific training for empowering the next generation of health disparities investigators with research methods and skills that are needed to solve disparities and inequalities in cancer and cardiovascular disease. These areas include social epidemiology, multilevel modeling, health care systems or health care delivery, community-based participatory research, and implementation science. We reviewed the acquisition of the skill sets described in the training components; these skill sets will position trainees to become leaders capable of effecting significant change because they provide tools that can be used to address the complexities of issues that promote health disparities.

  17. 77 FR 51545 - Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS); Revised as of August 21, 2012; Amendment of Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA), Center for Mental...

  18. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  19. Systematic Review of Cerebral Palsy Registries/Surveillance Groups: Relationships between Registry Characteristics and Knowledge Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Donna S; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J; Pavone, Larissa; Mutlu, Akmer; Dewald, Julius PA; Msall, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive summary of the body of research disseminated by Cerebral Palsy (CP) registries and surveillance programs from January 2009 through May 2014 in order to describe the influence their results have on our overall understanding of CP. Secondly, registries/surveillance programs and the work they produced were evaluated and grouped using standardized definitions and classification systems. Method A systematic review search in PubMed, CINAH and Embase for original articles published from 1 January 2009 to 20 May 2014 originating from or supported by population based CP registries and surveillance programs or population based national registries including CP were included. Articles were grouped by 2009 World CP Registry Congress aim, registry/surveillance program classification, geographical region, and the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) domain. Registry variables were assessed using the ICF-CY classification. Results Literature searches returned 177 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The majority (69%) of registry/surveillance program productivity was related to contributions as a Resource for CP Research. Prevention (23%) and Surveillance (22%) articles were other areas of achievement, but fewer articles were published in the areas of Planning (17%) and Raising the Profile of CP (2%). There was a range of registry/surveillance program classifications contributing to this productivity, and representation from multiple areas of the globe, although most of the articles originated in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The domains of the ICF that were primarily covered included body structures and function at the early stages of life. Encouragingly, a variety of CP registry/surveillance program initiatives included additional ICF domains of participation and environmental and personal factors. Interpretation CP registries and surveillance programs, including novel non-traditional ones

  20. What roles should population-based cancer registries be playing in the 21st century? Reflections on the Asian Cancer Registry Forum, Bangkok, February 2014.

    PubMed

    Roder, David

    2014-01-01

    Cancer registries have fundamental roles in cancer surveillance, research, and health services planning, monitoring and evaluation. Many are now assuming a broader role by contributing data for health-service management, alongside data inputs from other registries and administrative data sets. These data are being integrated into de-identified databases using privacy-protecting data linkage practices. Structured pathology reporting is increasing registry access to staging and other prognostic descriptors. Registry directions need to vary, depending on local need, barriers and opportunities. Flexibility and adaptability will be essential to optimize registry contributions to cancer control.

  1. Academic health centers and community health centers partnering to build a system of care for vulnerable patients: lessons from Carolina Health Net.

    PubMed

    Denham, Amy C; Hay, Sherry S; Steiner, Beat D; Newton, Warren P

    2013-05-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are challenged to meet their core missions in a time of strain on the health care system from rising costs, an aging population, increased rates of chronic disease, and growing numbers of uninsured patients. AHCs should be leaders in developing creative solutions to these challenges and training future leaders in new models of care. The authors present a case study describing the development, implementation, and early results of Carolina Health Net, a partnership between an AHC and a community health center to manage the most vulnerable uninsured by providing access to primary care medical homes and care management systems. This partnership was formed in 2008 to help transform the delivery of health care for the uninsured. As a result, 4,400 uninsured patients have been connected to primary care services. Emergency department use by enrolled patients has decreased. Patients have begun accessing subspecialty care within the medical home. More than 2,200 uninsured patients have been assisted to enroll in Medicaid. The experience of Carolina Health Net demonstrates that developing a system of care with primary care and wrap-around services such as pharmacy and case management can improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of care, thereby helping AHCs meet their broader missions. This project can serve as a model for other AHCs looking to partner with community-based providers to improve care and control costs for underserved populations.

  2. National Area Health Education Center Program: External Assessment Design. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggar, Benjamin; And Others

    The AHEC (Area Health Education Center) program is designed to demonstrate the ways in which a university health science center (often including a medical school) can improve the supply, distribution, quality, efficiency, and utilization of health care personnel in medically underserved areas through establishment of satellite educational…

  3. Intention and Usage of Computer Based Information Systems in Primary Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosizah; Kuntoro; Basuki N., Hari

    2016-01-01

    The computer-based information system (CBIS) is adopted by almost all of in health care setting, including the primary health center in East Java Province Indonesia. Some of softwares available were SIMPUS, SIMPUSTRONIK, SIKDA Generik, e-puskesmas. Unfortunately they were most of the primary health center did not successfully implemented. This…

  4. 75 FR 55588 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Florida Family-to-Family Health Information Center (F2F HIC) grant (H84MC00006) from the Florida Institute of Family Involvement (FIFI) to...

  5. 3 CFR 8698 - Proclamation 8698 of August 5, 2011. National Health Center Week, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... recognize the critical role community health centers play in our health-care system. Every day, men, women... the results among Medicaid beneficiaries—those receiving care from a health center are less likely to... Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Affordable Care Act, new funding has been committed to...

  6. 78 FR 74163 - Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System Bremerton, Washington; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System... Adjustment Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Harrison Medical Center,...

  7. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  8. Supply-side barriers to maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There exist several barriers to maternal health service utilization in developing countries. Most of the previous studies conducted in India have focused on demand-side barriers, while only a few have touched upon supply-side barriers. None of the previous studies in India have investigated the factors that affect maternal health care utilization at health sub-centers (HSCs) in India, despite the fact that these institutions, which are the geographically closest available public health care facilities in rural areas, play a significant role in providing affordable maternal health care. Therefore, this study aims to examine the supply-side determinants of maternal service utilization at HSCs in rural India. Data and Methods This study uses health facility data from the nationally representative District-Level Household Survey, which was administered in 2007–2008 to examine the effect of supply-side variables on the utilization of maternal health care services across HSCs in rural India. Since the dependent variables (the number of antenatal registrations, in-facility deliveries, and postnatal care services) are count variables and exhibit considerable variability, the data were analyzed using negative binomial regression instead of Poisson regression. Results The results show that those HSCs run by a contractual auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM) are likely to offer a lower volume of services when compared to those run by a permanent ANM. The availability of obstetric drugs, weighing scales, and blood pressure equipment is associated with the increased utilization of antenatal and postnatal services. The unavailability of a labor/examination table and bed screen is associated with a reduction in the number of deliveries and postnatal services. The utilization of services is expected to increase if essential facilities, such as water, telephones, toilets, and electricity, are available at the HSCs. Monitoring of ANM’s work by Village Health and Sanitation

  9. School-Based Health Centers and Childhood Obesity: "An Ideal Location to Address a Complex Issue"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    One of today's most pressing public health problems is the rise in childhood overweight and obesity. School-based health centers (SBHCs)--the convergence of public health, primary care, and mental health in schools--represent an important element in the public health toolbox for combating the challenging epidemic. When working side-by-side in a…

  10. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA-93-802-2338, National Centers for Environmental Health, Stamford, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Buchta, T.M.

    1993-07-01

    In response to a request from the National Centers for Environmental Health, technical assistance was rendered in assessing airborne concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MtBE), benzene, xylene, and toluene at maintenance facilities for motor vehicles where workers were exposed to gasoline and exhaust emissions. Sites included automobile dealerships, auto repair shops, and municipal agencies. Bulk samples of fuel were collected from sites dispensing gasoline. Monitoring of the air quality was also performed for workers at these sites.

  11. Using Health Information Technology and Data to Improve Chronic Disease Outcomes in Federally Qualified Health Centers in Maryland.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erica A; Lapinski, Judy; Lichty-Hess, Judy; Pier, Kristi

    2016-12-29

    Federally Qualified Health Centers provide health care services to underserved communities and vulnerable populations. In Maryland, the burden of chronic disease is high among Federally Qualified Health Center patients. Electronic health records (EHRs) are becoming more widely used, and effective use of EHR data may improve chronic disease outcomes. This article describes the process of developing a data aggregation and analytics platform to support health centers in using population health data based on standardized clinical quality measures. This data warehouse, capable of aggregating EHR data across multiple health centers, provides opportunities for benchmarking and elicits a discussion of quality improvement, including identifying and sharing clinical best practices. Phase 1 of the project involved the strategic engagement of health center leadership and staff to get buy-in and to assess readiness. Phase 2 established the technological infrastructure and processes to support data warehouse implementation and began the process of information sharing and collaboration among 4 early adopters. Phase 3 will expand the project to additional health centers and continue quality improvement efforts. The health information technology marketplace is rapidly changing, and staying current will be a priority so that the data warehouse remains a useful quality improvement tool that continues to meet the demands of Maryland health centers. Ongoing efforts will also focus on ways to further add value to the system, such as incorporating new metrics to better inform health center decision making and allocation of resources. The data warehouse can inform and transform the quality of health care delivered to Maryland's most vulnerable populations, and future research should focus on the ability of health centers to translate this potential into actual improvements.

  12. Using Health Information Technology and Data to Improve Chronic Disease Outcomes in Federally Qualified Health Centers in Maryland

    PubMed Central

    Lapinski, Judy; Lichty-Hess, Judy; Pier, Kristi

    2016-01-01

    Federally Qualified Health Centers provide health care services to underserved communities and vulnerable populations. In Maryland, the burden of chronic disease is high among Federally Qualified Health Center patients. Electronic health records (EHRs) are becoming more widely used, and effective use of EHR data may improve chronic disease outcomes. This article describes the process of developing a data aggregation and analytics platform to support health centers in using population health data based on standardized clinical quality measures. This data warehouse, capable of aggregating EHR data across multiple health centers, provides opportunities for benchmarking and elicits a discussion of quality improvement, including identifying and sharing clinical best practices. Phase 1 of the project involved the strategic engagement of health center leadership and staff to get buy-in and to assess readiness. Phase 2 established the technological infrastructure and processes to support data warehouse implementation and began the process of information sharing and collaboration among 4 early adopters. Phase 3 will expand the project to additional health centers and continue quality improvement efforts. The health information technology marketplace is rapidly changing, and staying current will be a priority so that the data warehouse remains a useful quality improvement tool that continues to meet the demands of Maryland health centers. Ongoing efforts will also focus on ways to further add value to the system, such as incorporating new metrics to better inform health center decision making and allocation of resources. The data warehouse can inform and transform the quality of health care delivered to Maryland’s most vulnerable populations, and future research should focus on the ability of health centers to translate this potential into actual improvements. PMID:28033091

  13. Building Research Infrastructure in Community Health Centers: A Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN) Report

    PubMed Central

    Likumahuwa, Sonja; Song, Hui; Singal, Robbie; Weir, Rosy Chang; Crane, Heidi; Muench, John; Sim, Shao-Chee; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces the Community Health Applied Research Network (CHARN), a practice-based research network of community health centers (CHCs). Established by the Health Resources and Services Administration in 2010, CHARN is a network of 4 community research nodes, each with multiple affiliated CHCs and an academic center. The four nodes (18 individual CHCs and 4 academic partners in 9 states) are supported by a data coordinating center. Here we provide case studies detailing how CHARN is building research infrastructure and capacity in CHCs, with a particular focus on how community practice-academic partnerships were facilitated by the CHARN structure. The examples provided by the CHARN nodes include many of the building blocks of research capacity: communication capacity and “matchmaking” between providers and researchers; technology transfer; research methods tailored to community practice settings; and community institutional review board infrastructure to enable community oversight. We draw lessons learned from these case studies that we hope will serve as examples for other networks, with special relevance for community-based networks seeking to build research infrastructure in primary care settings. PMID:24004710

  14. The Health IT Regional Extension Center Program: Evolution and Lessons for Health Care Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Kimberly; Kendall, Mat; Shanks, Katherine; Haque, Ahmed; Jones, Emily; Wanis, Maggie G; Furukawa, Michael; Mostashari, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the Regional Extension Center (REC) program’s progress toward its goal of supporting over 100,000 providers in small, rural, and underserved practices to achieve meaningful use (MU) of an electronic health record (EHR). Data Sources/Study Setting Data collected January 2010 through June 2013 via monitoring and evaluation of the 4-year REC program. Study Design Descriptive study of 62 REC programs. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Primary data collected from RECs were merged with nine other datasets, and descriptive statistics of progress by practice setting and penetration of targeted providers were calculated. Principal Findings RECs recruited almost 134,000 primary care providers (PCPs), or 44 percent of the nation’s PCPs; 86 percent of these were using an EHR with advanced functionality and almost half (48 percent) have demonstrated MU. Eighty-three percent of Federally Qualified Health Centers and 78 percent of the nation’s Critical Access Hospitals were participating with an REC. Conclusions RECs have made substantial progress in assisting PCPs with adoption and MU of EHRs. This infrastructure supports small practices, community health centers, and rural and public hospitals to use technology for care delivery transformation and improvement. PMID:24359032

  15. Health and environmental consequences of the world trade center disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, Philip J; Lioy, Paul J; Thurston, George; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Chen, L C; Chillrud, Steven N; Gavett, Stephen H; Georgopoulos, Panos G; Geyh, Alison S; Levin, Stephen; Perera, Frederica; Rappaport, Stephen M; Small, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) created an acute environmental disaster of enormous magnitude. This study characterizes the environmental exposures resulting from destruction of the WTC and assesses their effects on health. Methods include ambient air sampling; analyses of outdoor and indoor settled dust; high-altitude imaging and modeling of the atmospheric plume; inhalation studies of WTC dust in mice; and clinical examinations, community surveys, and prospective epidemiologic studies of exposed populations. WTC dust was found to consist predominantly (95%) of coarse particles and contained pulverized cement, glass fibers, asbestos, lead, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated furans and dioxins. Airborne particulate levels were highest immediately after the attack and declined thereafter. Particulate levels decreased sharply with distance from the WTC. Dust pH was highly alkaline (pH 9.0-11.0). Mice exposed to WTC dust showed only moderate pulmonary inflammation but marked bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 10,116 firefighters showed exposure-related increases in cough and bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 183 cleanup workers showed new-onset cough (33%), wheeze (18%), and phlegm production (24%). Increased frequency of new-onset cough, wheeze, and shortness of breath were also observed in community residents. Follow-up of 182 pregnant women who were either inside or near the WTC on 11 September showed a 2-fold increase in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. In summary, environmental exposures after the WTC disaster were associated with significant adverse effects on health. The high alkalinity of WTC dust produced bronchial hyperreactivity, persistent cough, and increased risk of asthma. Plausible causes of the observed increase in SGA infants include maternal exposures to PAH and particulates. Future risk of mesothelioma may be increased, particularly among workers and

  16. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    PubMed

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  17. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coverage of rural health clinic and federally... clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or benchmark... otherwise, to rural health clinic services and FQHC services as defined in subparagraphs (B) and (C)...

  18. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  19. Prospective multi-center registry to evaluate efficacy and safety of the newly developed diamond-like carbon-coated cobalt-chromium coronary stent system.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kenji; Ishii, Katsuhisa; Tada, Eiji; Kataoka, Kazuaki; Hirohata, Atsushi; Goto, Kenji; Kobayashi, Katsuyuki; Tsutsui, Hiroshi; Nakahama, Makoto; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Uchikawa, Shinichiroh; Kanda, Junji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Yajima, Junji; Kitabayashi, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Shumpei; Nakanishi, Keita; Inoue, Naoto; Noike, Hirofumi; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Sato, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Masao; Kimura, Takeshi

    2016-07-22

    The purpose of this multi-center, non-randomized, and open-label clinical trial was to determine the non-inferiority of diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated cobalt-chromium coronary stent, the MOMO DLC coronary stent, relative to commercially available bare-metal stents (MULTI-LINK VISION(®)). Nineteen centers in Japan participated. The study cohort consisted of 99 patients from 19 Japanese centers with single or double native coronary vessel disease with de novo and restenosis lesions who met the study eligibility criteria. This cohort formed the safety analysis set. The efficacy analysis set consisted of 98 patients (one case was excluded for violating the eligibility criteria). The primary endpoint was target vessel failure (TVF) rate at 9 months after stent placement. Of the 98 efficacy analysis set patients, TVF occurred in 11 patients (11.2 %, 95 % confidence interval 5.7-19.2 %) at 9 months after the index stent implantation. The upper 95 % confidence interval for TVF of the study stent was lower than that previously reported for the commercially available MULTI-LINK VISION(®) (19.6 %), demonstrating non-inferiority of the study stent to MULTI-LINK VISION(®). All the TVF cases were related to target vascular revascularization. None of the cases developed in-stent thrombosis or myocardial infarction. The average in-stent late loss and binary restenosis rate at the 6-month follow-up angiography were 0.69 mm and 10.5 %, respectively, which are lower than the reported values for commercially available bare-metal stents. In conclusion, the current pivotal clinical study evaluating the new MOMO DLC-coated coronary stent suggested its low rates of TVF and angiographic binary restenosis, and small in-stent late loss, although the data were considered preliminary considering the small sample size and single arm study design.

  20. [Conditions of dental extractions in areas health centers of Senegal].

    PubMed

    Faye, D; Tine, S D; Cisse, D; Lo, C M; Mbodj, El B; Diouf, M; Diallo, P D

    2009-12-01

    Dental extraction is a surgical act frequently carried out in the African dental structures. It requires the rigorous respect of the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis. Equipments and anaesthetic and avulsional products must be also sufficient. Our study undertaken among 46 dental services in areas health centers of Senegal aimed to determine the conditions under which dental extractions are carried out. The principle results of our study showed that 93% of dental practitioners wore sterilized gloves. 49% of the dentist's care activity consisted in dental extractions. 50% of the practitioners re-use anaesthetic needles, 2% re-use anaesthetic carpules. We noticed that the dental structures were facing a deficit of materials and products of extraction. Face to the outbreak of serious illnesses as infections of HIV and Hepatitis B, the practitioner and his team must be sensitized and trained to struggle against the transmissible infections and to carry out the dental extraction only if the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis are joined together. A pleading towards the medical authorities must be done to support the services in equipments and periodic renewals of the materials and products of extractions.

  1. School-Based Health Centers in an Era of Health Care Reform: Building on History

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D.

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs’ impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths’ academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation’s youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons

  2. School-based health centers in an era of health care reform: building on history.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D

    2012-07-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs' impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths' academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation's youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons learned

  3. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Investigator Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...2. Developing an identification protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called...of parkinsonism among Alaska Natives. Status: Complete 3. Developing a secure Alaska Native parkinsonism registry database. Status: The database

  4. [At the Savar center, primary health care (PHC) evolves with the health conditions].

    PubMed

    Chirac, P

    1989-01-01

    A war hospital installed close to the front by a group of young Bangladeshi doctors during the 1971 war of liberation from Pakistan was the origin of the new "Gonoshasthaya Kendra" (GK), or people's health center, 40 km north of Dhaka in Savar. At the new center, as in the hospital, trained paramedics furnish basic health care for the population. The center at Savar was applying the principles of primary health care 6 years before they were recognized at the Alma Ata conference. Today, GK has integrated programs to fight poverty into its health activities, with educational, nutrition, and employment programs. The paramedics have a long training course, working under the supervision of a senior paramedic for a year and receiving theoretical training in the evenings. They do not become senior paramedics for several years. The work of the paramedics is oriented toward health education, prevention, and demoepidemiologic surveillance and registration. Each paramedic is responsible for 2 or 3 villages with about 3 thousand inhabitants. The paramedics visit and motivate the population, register births and deaths, identify and care for pregnant women, and vaccinate children and pregnant women. They provide health and nutrition education, treat diarrhea and instruct mothers in use of oral rehydration therapy, and provide family planning information and supplies. Persons in need are referred to "clinic days" held regularly in the larger villages. The paramedics maintain records for each family which allow calculation of vital rates and epidemiologic data. In the region of Savar served by the paramedics, the rates of general mortality and infant mortality are 12/1000 and 85/1000 respectively, vs. 17 and 124/1000 in Bangladesh as a whole. The GK has a new goal of reducing infant mortality to 60/1000. The paramedics have been taught to recognize 2 new symptoms, convulsions and respiratory distress, and to refer infants showing these symptoms to doctors. The GK doctors believe

  5. Business and faith: key community partnerships for school-based health centers.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, L; Moody, J K; Vega-Matos, C

    1998-12-01

    School-based health centers need to form partnerships with organizations in the community. These relationships are essential to the viability of the centers because they can provide support and resources. However, benefits should be accrued by all partners, not just the health centers. Although there are many communities for school-based health centers to connect to, this article focuses on two integral ones--communities of business and faith. Key findings from a project formed to develop communication strategies and to generate support from the business community are reviewed. Recommendations for school-based health centers in approaching the business community are provided. Similarities and differences between communities of faith and strategies of develop relationships with these communities are presented. School-based health centers are encouraged to understand the characteristics and priorities of their partners in communities of business and faith, and to pursue strong relationships with both communities.

  6. NIEHS/EPA Children’s Environmental Health Centers: Lifecourse Exposures & Diet: Epigenetics, Maturation & Metabolic Syndrome

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  7. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Center - Dartmouth College

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  8. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health - Columbia University

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health (CCCEH) at Columbia University studies long-term health of urban pollutants on children raised in minority neighborhoods in inner-city communities.

  9. 77 FR 48524 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Center for Health Statistics; Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Health Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Times and...

  10. Global Health: The Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health: Vision and Mission, Programs, and Accomplishments

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Joel G.; Bridbord, Kenneth; Kupfer, Linda E.; Glass, Roger I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Fogarty International Center (FIC) of the U.S. National Institutes of Health has supported long-term (>6 months) basic, clinical and applied research training and research for over 3,600 future leaders in science and public health from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); tens of thousands more persons have received short-term training. FIC started these programs in 1988 with the flagship HIV/AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) in response to the global pandemic. More than 23 extramural training and research programs plus an intramural program are now operating – all in collaboration with other Institutes and Centers at NIH, U.S. government agencies, foundations, and partner institutions in LMICs and the U.S. While infectious diseases still reign mightily in Sub-Saharan African and South East Asian countries, non-communicable diseases are emerging globally, including in LMICs. Newer FIC training programs are addressing chronic, non-communicable diseases and strengthening the quality of medical schools and health care provider training, in addition to expanding expertise in infectious diseases. The model for successful training is based on long-term commitments, institutional strengthening, “twinning” of research centers, focus on local problems, and active mentoring. Trainees from Africa, Asia, and Latin America have made notable scientific contributions to global health, attained leadership positions, and received special recognition nationally and internationally. As the FIC programs are institutional-strengthening partnerships and candidates are carefully selected and mentored, close to 90% of FIC trainees return to their countries of origin. After returning home the FIC-trained leaders have continued to mentor and train thousands of individuals in their home countries. PMID:21896356

  11. An examination of the integration of certified peer specialists into community mental health centers.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emily A; Reinhart, Chrystal; Wituk, Scott; Meissen, Greg

    2012-08-01

    The formal role of Certified Peer Specialist (CPS) is a recent addition to the mental health field. CPSs are people in recovery employed within the mental health system, mostly by community mental health centers, to provide support through sharing life experiences with those working toward recovery from mental illness. This brief report examines participant's experiences being a CPS, responsibilities and activities as a CPS, and integration into community mental health centers. Findings suggest that CPSs demonstrate high levels of communal orientation, job satisfaction, workplace integration and organizational support and are well received in mental health centers.

  12. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Institute and the National Oral Health Conference. Resource Highlights: Nutrition and Oral Health This collection of selected resources offers key facts and high-quality information about ...

  13. Measuring the success of implementation of information system for health center.

    PubMed

    Chae, Y M; Kim, S I; Lee, B H; Choi, S H; Kim, I S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of the Health Management Information System (HMIS) on the productivity and adoption process of health center staff as well as the satisfaction with the services provided by the Kwonsun health center located in Suwon city as a study subject. Three surveys were conducted to measure the changes in productivity and adoption process (knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation, and confirmation) of health center staffs over time. In addition, the effects of HMIS on the level of satisfaction with the services perceived by the visitors were also measured by comparing the satisfaction level between the study health center and a similar health center as a control group. The results suggest that HMIS increased productivity and satisfaction of staffs but did not increase persuasion and decision level, and that it succeeded in increasing the satisfaction with the services for the visitors.

  14. Multicenter Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Fleissner, Elizabeth; Bascom, George; Yiee, Kevin; Copur, Mehmet; Crow, Kate; Rooney, James; Mateen, Zubeena; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Gleason, Michael; Kinarsky, Leo; Silva-Lopez, Edibaldo; Edney, James; Reed, Elizabeth; Berger, Ann; Cowan, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Breast Cancer Collaborative Registry (BCCR) is a multicenter web-based system that efficiently collects and manages a variety of data on breast cancer (BC) patients and BC survivors. This registry is designed as a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java Servlet/JSP technology and has an Oracle 11g database as a back-end. The BCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in breast cancer research and healthcare. By harmonizing the controlled vocabulary with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT), the BCCR provides a standardized approach to data collection and reporting. The BCCR has been recently certified by the National Cancer Institute’s Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (NCI CBIIT) as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG®) Bronze Compatible product. The BCCR is aimed at facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against breast cancer. Currently, seven cancer institutions are participating in the BCCR that contains data on almost 900 subjects (BC patients and survivors, as well as individuals at high risk of getting BC). PMID:21918596

  15. Health Care Use and Spending for Medicaid Enrollees in Federally Qualified Health Centers Versus Other Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nocon, Robert S.; Lee, Sang Mee; Sharma, Ravi; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Mukamel, Dana B.; Gao, Yue; White, Laura M.; Shi, Leiyu; Chin, Marshall H.; Laiteerapong, Neda; Huang, Elbert S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care use and spending of Medicaid enrollees seen at federally qualified health centers versus non–health center settings in a context of significant growth. Methods Using fee-for-service Medicaid claims from 13 states in 2009, we compared patients receiving the majority of their primary care in federally qualified health centers with propensity score–matched comparison groups receiving primary care in other settings. Results We found that health center patients had lower use and spending than did non–health center patients across all services, with 22% fewer visits and 33% lower spending on specialty care and 25% fewer admissions and 27% lower spending on inpatient care. Total spending was 24% lower for health center patients. Conclusions Our analysis of 2009 Medicaid claims, which includes the largest sample of states and more recent data than do previous multistate claims studies, demonstrates that the health center program has provided a cost-efficient setting for primary care for Medicaid enrollees. PMID:27631748

  16. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K.; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs…

  17. Oregon School-Based Health Centers, 1992-1994 Services Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Robert J.

    This report describes the activities of Oregon's 25 high school-based health centers between 1992 and 1994. Information is provided on funding sources, services offered (including general medical services and reproductive health, mental health, health promotion services, and hours of operation), staffing (including levels of staffing and…

  18. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  19. American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center: Challenges of a Health Equity Quest

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Neil; Carson, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    American Indians are classified by the federal government as a “health disparities population” with significant excess morbidity and mortality caused by diabetes and its many complications. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health has created a national program titled “Centers of Excellence” whose primary goal is the elimination of health disparities. This article describes the American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Public Health, in terms of its intellectual foundations rooted in a biocultural analytic model and operationalized by an interdisciplinary functioning staff. Challenges are described in terms of the monumental task of impacting health disparity conditions and in the exigencies of research collaborations with American Indian Nations located in rural areas remote to the University's health sciences urban-based hub. PMID:26294900

  20. Organizational scope of practice: assessing the primary care and public health activities of health centers and health departments in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Wright, Brad; Ugwi, Patience; Nice, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to understand how Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and local health departments (LHDs) address their shared mission of improving population health by determining the scope of primary care and public health activities each provides in their community. A brief mail survey was designed and fielded among executive directors at all 14 FQHCs in Iowa, and 13 LHDs in Iowa representing counties with and without an FQHC. This survey contained a mixture of questions adapted from previously validated primary care and public health survey instruments. Using survey responses, each FQHC and LHD was given 2 scores (each ranging from 0-100) measuring the extent of their primary care and public health activities, respectively. The overall response rate was 85.2%; the response rate was 78.6% within FQHCs and 91.7% within LHDs. Overall, FQHCs had higher scores (73.8%) compared to LHDs (27.3%) on total primary care services, while both LHDs (79.3%) and FQHCs (70.9%) performed particularly well on public health services. FQHCs and LHDs in Iowa address a variety of public health and primary care issues, including but not limited to screening for chronic diseases, nutrition counseling, immunizations, and behavioral health. However, FQHCs provide a higher amount of primary care services and nearly as many public health services when compared to LHDs. In a value-based health care delivery system, integrating to improve population health is a wise strategy to maximize efficiency, but this will require maximizing coordination and minimizing duplication of services across different types of safety net providers.

  1. The Center for Health Care Law: the legal muscle of home care and hospice.

    PubMed

    Dombi, Bill

    2006-10-01

    The Center for Health Care Law is a unique offering for a trade association. Operating as a law firm within NAHC, the Center has strengthened NAHC's advocacy efforts on all fronts. The law provides a useful structure and a rational system for behavior, provided that the law is understood. The Center brings the necessary understanding of the law to home care and hospice.

  2. 76 FR 9019 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register on... announcements of meetings and other committee management activities, for both the Centers for Disease...

  3. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  4. Implementation of Language Assessments for Staff Interpreters in Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    de Jaimes, Fatima Nunez; Batts, Felicia; Noguera, Christine; Guerrero, Lourdes; Moreno, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bilingual staff is used to provide interpreter services in community health centers. Little is known about the language proficiency of dual-role staff interpreters. Golden Valley Health Centers implemented a formal language assessment program to improve the number of qualified dual-role staff interpreters and ultimately improve the quality of patient care. PMID:23974375

  5. THE MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER--THE WORLD OF STEPHEN SHAKER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint Board of Education, MI.

    THE C.S. MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER WAS BUILT TO SERVE CHILDREN OF THOSE BORDERLINE FAMILIES WHOSE INCOMES PROHIBIT PRIVATE MEDICAL CARE YET MAKE THEM INELIGIBLE FOR DIRECT RELIEF OF ANY KIND. THE NEED FOR SUCH A CENTER WAS PROVED BY THE CHILDREN'S 18,000 VISITS ANNUALLY FOR HEALTH CARE. WHILE PROVIDING CARE FOR CHILDREN WAS THE MAIN…

  6. Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol Use in College Health Centers: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seigers, Danielle K. L.; Carey, Kate B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a critical review of the efficacy of brief interventions for alcohol use in college health centers. Methods: Studies were included if (a) they examined brief intervention trials that were conducted in college- or university-based student health centers or emergency departments, and (b) they provided pre-post data to estimate…

  7. 75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...-2009-N-0576] Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability...) is announcing the availability of a Web site where the Center for Devices and Radiological Health... to all reporters (Sec. 803.21(b)). FDA is announcing the availability of a Web site that will...

  8. Community Health Centers and the Rural Economy: The Struggle for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rural Health Association, Kansas City, MO.

    The intent of this project was to determine the financial impact of the rural economic crisis on rural community health centers. A 1986-87 survey reported changes in accounts receivable, bad debt, and sliding fee use, and the effect such changes may have on the cash position of rural community health centers. Of 284 rural community and migrant…

  9. Secure Cloud-Based Solutions for Different eHealth Services in Spanish Rural Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The combination of eHealth applications and/or services with cloud technology provides health care staff—with sufficient mobility and accessibility for them—to be able to transparently check any data they may need without having to worry about its physical location. Objective The main aim of this paper is to put forward secure cloud-based solutions for a range of eHealth services such as electronic health records (EHRs), telecardiology, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis. Methods The scenario chosen for introducing the services is a set of four rural health centers located within the same Spanish region. iCanCloud software was used to perform simulations in the proposed scenario. We chose online traffic and the cost per unit in terms of time as the parameters for choosing the secure solution on the most optimum cloud for each service. Results We suggest that load balancers always be fitted for all solutions in communication together with several Internet service providers and that smartcards be used to maintain identity to an appropriate extent. The solutions offered via private cloud for EHRs, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis services require a volume of online traffic calculated at being able to reach 2 Gbps per consultation. This may entail an average cost of €500/month. Conclusions The security solutions put forward for each eHealth service constitute an attempt to centralize all information on the cloud, thus offering greater accessibility to medical information in the case of EHRs alongside more reliable diagnoses and treatment for telecardiology, telediagnosis, and teleconsultation services. Therefore, better health care for the rural patient can be obtained at a reasonable cost. PMID:26215155

  10. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  11. Using a registry to improve immunization delivery.

    PubMed

    Kairys, Steven W; Gubernick, Ruth S; Millican, Adrienne; Adams, William G

    2006-07-01

    The NJIPSP was successful in encouraging a group of small urban practices to adopt the use of immunization registry and to transform immunization delivery from a mechanistic well-child service to a visible, monitored process of care. The project represents a unique combination of technology, public-private collaboration, and well-established quality improvement techniques. The change process involved the whole office as a team in adopting new immunization delivery roles and services. The greatest barrier to acceptance of the registry was (and continues to be) the need for manual data entry as the primary source of data collection, rather than electronic data transfer from other systems. The manual entry of data was labor intensive for participating practices and affected data measurement. Despite this barrier, however, the majority of practices substantially improved the quality of their immunization delivery practices in multiple areas. The rapid movement of primary care practices toward some form of electronic record may reduce this barrier and increase the percentage of practices willing to use a community registry. Practices that engaged collectively in the change process gained momentum from the group effort. Equally important was the public health partnership that helped identify and reduce improvement obstacles. Sustainability of practice-based immunization changes will rely, in part, on the registry's ease of use and the continued visibility of public health at the practice level. Active practice level collaboration by public health adds great value to change efforts. We believe that the best possible immunization delivery relies on both technology (registries and the EMR) and effective office systems. Projects like the NJIPSP are models for systems that integrate technology, practice change, and quality improvement, and their success has the potential to foster the spread of this approach to other primary care practices (especially in New Jersey). The

  12. Primary Care and Public Health Activities in Select US Health Centers: Documenting Successes, Barriers, and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu; Chowdhury, Joya; Sripipatana, Alek; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A. Seiji; Daly, Charles A.; Tomoyasu, Naomi; Nair, Suma; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary care and public health activities among federally funded health centers, to better understand their successes, the barriers encountered, and the lessons learned. Methods. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data from 9 health centers, stratified by administrative division, urban–rural location, and race/ethnicity of patients served. Descriptive data on patient and institutional characteristics came from the Uniform Data System, which collects data from all health centers annually. We administered questionnaires and conducted phone interviews with key informants. Results. Health centers performed well on primary care coordination and community orientation scales and reported conducting many essential public health activities. We identified specific needs for integrating primary care and public health: (1) more funding for collaborations and for addressing the social determinants of health, (2) strong leadership to champion collaborations, (3) trust building among partners, with shared missions and clear expectations of responsibilities, and (4) alignment and standardization of data collection, analysis, and exchange. Conclusions. Lessons learned from health centers should inform strategies to better integrate public health with primary care. PMID:22690975

  13. Louisiana School-Based Health Centers: Annual Services Report, 1996-1997. Adolescent School Health Initiative Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Office of Public Health, New Orleans. Dept. of Health and Hospitals.

    Since 1991, 23 school health centers have been established to serve children and families through locally sponsored health and education partnerships to improve the health and learning potential of Louisiana's public school students. This report presents information on the program operation in 1996-97. Section 1 of the report describes the growth…

  14. Success Stories: How School Health Centers Make a Difference. A Special Report of the National Health and Education Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Christopher A.

    This booklet provides examples of how students have been helped through the provision of school-based health care. The stories, submitted by principals, school nurses, nurse practitioners, doctors, health center directors, and students, illustrate the pressing health problems faced by students today. The problems addressed in these personal…

  15. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  16. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluoride varnish, including materials and organizations. Promoting Oral Health During Pregnancy The latest update on programs, policy, ... the release of the national consensus statement on oral health care during pregnancy . Fluoride Vanish Resource Highlights A ...

  17. School-Based Health Centers and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Poor academic outcomes and high dropout rates are major concerns of educators, policy makers, and parents alike--and poor health severely limits a child's motivation and ability to learn. Recent research confirms that "health disparities affect educational achievement". Improving students' health is integral to education reform.…

  18. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  19. The Impact of Introducing Centering Pregnancy in a Community Health Setting: A Qualitative Study of Experiences and Perspectives of Health Center Clinical and Support Staff.

    PubMed

    Kania-Richmond, Ania; Hetherington, Erin; McNeil, Deborah; Bayrampour, Hamideh; Tough, Suzanne; Metcalfe, Amy

    2017-01-12

    Objectives Introducing new programming into an existing setting may be challenging. Understanding how staff and clinicians who are not directly involved in program delivery view the program can help support program implementation. This study aimed to understand how peripheral staff and clinicians perceived a newly implemented Centering Pregnancy group prenatal care program in a community-based health center and its impact on clinic operations. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members at a community-based health center. The interview guide covered topics such as perceptions of Centering Pregnancy and how the program impacted their work. An interpretive description approach was used to analyze the interview data. A coding framework was developed iteratively and all interview data were analyzed independently by multiple researchers. Results Staff had overall positive perceptions of Centering Pregnancy, but the level of understanding about the program varied widely. Most respondents viewed the Centering Pregnancy program as separate from other programs offered by the clinic, which created both opportunities and challenges. Opportunities included increased cross-referrals between established services and Centering Pregnancy. Challenges included a lack of communication about responsibilities of staff in relation to Centering Pregnancy patients. Impact on staff and overall clinic operations was perceived to be minimal to moderate, and most tensions related to roles and expectations were resolved. Conclusions for Practice Clear communication regarding fit within clinic structures and processes and expectations of staff in relation to the program was critical to the integration of Centering Pregnancy program into an established health center.

  20. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Questionable 0 DK f. seborrheic dermatitis 0 Yes 0 No 0 Questionable 0 DK Exclusion criteria O Prominent postural instability in the first 3...4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...the Alaska Native Medical Center. B. Body The intent of this proposal is to establish a registry of parkinsonism cases among Alaska native

  1. The evolution of an operative registry--a commentary.

    PubMed

    Buck, A S; Reeder, J; Holzman, R; Burger, L M

    1989-03-01

    The Operative Registry, also known as DA Form 4108, constitutes the basic, geographically focused, sequential log of operative activities for any given Army Medical Treatment Facility. The information provided for the Registry, with specific refinements, constitutes an essential data base for quality assurance and utilization review. The experience at Madigan Army Medical Center in developing the structure and function of this computerized data base is summarized.

  2. NASA Specialized Center for Research and Training (NSCORT) in space environmental health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, Thomas W.; Utell, Mark J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; Eberhardt, Ralph; Rabin, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Activities of the Center for Space Environmental Health (CSEH), one of several NSCORTs supported by NASA in order to advance knowledge in environmental health in space habitats, are reviewed. Research in environmental health will define the standards or requirements needed to protect human health. This information will affect mission plans and the design of space habitats. This reseach will study unique contaminant stresses and lead to risk models for human health and performance.

  3. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  4. School-Based Health Centers: A Funder's View Of Effective Grant Making.

    PubMed

    Sprigg, Susan M; Wolgin, Francie; Chubinski, Jennifer; Keller, Kathryn

    2017-04-01

    Health status and academic achievement have been found to be linked: When students have poor health status, they are at increased risk for poor academic outcomes. The school-based health center is a delivery model that supports improved access to health care, as well as healthy behaviors and outcomes, for students. Interact for Health is a private foundation that has provided funding to open school-based health centers in the Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area since 1999. This article outlines grant-making strategies and effective policies that the foundation has identified as most conducive to creating sustainable school-based health centers. These include identification of the right partners, development of a business plan, and guidelines and policies that support long-term financial sustainability.

  5. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease.

    PubMed

    DeFranco, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  6. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  7. Use of qualitative methods and user-centered design to develop customized health information technology tools within federally qualified health centers to keep children insured.

    PubMed

    DeVoe, Jennifer; Angier, Heather; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Hall, Jennifer; Nelson, Christine; Dickerson, Kay; Keller, Sara; Burdick, Tim; Cohen, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Lack of health insurance negatively impacts children's health. Despite federal initiatives to expand children's coverage and accelerate state outreach efforts, millions of US children remain uninsured or experience frequent gaps in coverage. Most current efforts to enroll and retain eligible children in public insurance programs take place outside of the health care system. This study is a partnership between patients' families, medical informaticists, federally qualified health center (FQHC) staff, and researchers to build and test information technology tools to help FQHCs reach uninsured children and those at risk for losing coverage.

  8. 76 FR 54777 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance... Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process at 35 Years''; Public Meeting; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug... Devices and the Public's Health, The FDA 510(k) Clearance Process at 35 Years.' '' The document...

  9. Reflections and Recommendations Based on a Migrant Health Center's Participation in a CDC Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolon, Anne K.; O'Barr, James

    Hudson Valley Migrant Health (HVMH) (a Public Health Service program) collaborated with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) on a study of the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among migrant farmworkers in the mid-Hudson region of New York. CDC research personnel…

  10. Oregon School-Based Health Centers 1996-1997 Services Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Tammis; Nystrom, Robert J.; Spitz, Lauren

    School based health centers (SBHC) are effective providers of health services and education because they are easy for students to access, they take an integrated and developmentally appropriate approach to meeting health needs, and they are prevention-oriented. This report describes the 1996-1997 services provided in 15 of 19 state-supported…

  11. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  12. 3 CFR 8545 - Proclamation 8545 of August 5, 2010. National Health Center Week, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... health information technology systems, and meet their critical care needs. The reforms in the landmark... A Proclamation America’s community health centers are a vital component of our health care system, providing underserved communities access to coordinated primary and preventive care. During National...

  13. Investigation of the Feasibility of Establishing Health Technology Demonstration Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Carol

    This investigation studied the feasibility of establishing a network of centers to demonstrate model programs in the health technologies. It was necessary to: 1)identify colleges with multiple health-related programs; 2) identify campus health-related programs which have recognizable strengths; 3)further define "recognizable strengths" through…

  14. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  15. Differences in Access to Care among Students Using School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Sarika Rane; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform has changed the landscape for the nation's health safety net, and school-based health centers (SBHCs) remain an important part of this system. However, few large-scale studies have been conducted to assess their impact on access to care. This study investigated differences in access among a nationally representative sample of…

  16. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Vermont Family-to-Family Health... Family Network, Inc. (VFN) in Williston, due to an organizational merger involving these entities and...

  17. 3 CFR 9002 - Proclamation 9002 of August 9, 2013. National Health Center Week, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... preventive and primary health care to millions of Americans. From urban centers to rural towns, they offer... partners in our efforts to reduce health disparities. From coast to coast, they coordinate care and build professional, compassionate health care teams focused on improving patient outcomes. My Administration...

  18. Louisiana School-Based Health Centers: Annual Service Report, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Office of Public Health, New Orleans. Dept. of Health and Hospitals.

    Louisiana's School-Based Health Center (SBHC) Program, the Adolescent School Health Initiative, has reached its fifth year of full program implementation. This report aims to educate community leaders, service providers, and the general public on the variety of roles SBHCs perform and the contribution they make to the health and well-being of the…

  19. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  20. 78 FR 39670 - World Trade Center Health Program; Addition of Prostate Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Cancer to the List of WTC-Related Health Conditions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.... Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... 1986 for the purpose of monitoring disease status in prostate cancer, and in 1994 for the detection...

  1. A buying center approach to understanding health care marketing.

    PubMed

    Boughton, P D; Jacquin, E V

    1994-01-01

    Decision-making regarding health care treatment is often a complex process involving a number of constituents. For health care providers, defining these constituents and their influences is critical to successful marketing. This article describes the concept of a Decision Making Unit (DMU), and provides an illustration of how it applies to the marketing of a Physical Rehabilitation Facility.

  2. Military Health System Utilization Management Program at Medical Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    adjunctive dental care, cataract removals, mental health, MRIs, and pregnancy excluding active labor and cesarean section . However, these procedures may not...cataracts, - mental health, and - pregnancy excluding active labor or scheduled cesarean section . In addition, the prospective reviews are required for...i Section A: General Information ................................................. I B ackground

  3. Need for a roadmap for development of a coordinated national registry programme.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, S; Best, R L; Evans, S M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical quality registries are an overlooked and under-funded arm of clinical research in Australia. Registries are databases for patients with a particular disease, or who undergo a procedure, or use a health resource. Registries, where properly funded and universally adopted, have provided substantial benefits to the quality of healthcare and, in some cases, have had demonstrable effect in reducing costs. There is a lack of a coordinated programme for both funding and development of registries in Australia. A coordinated effort is required to address key gaps in registry coverage and ensure registries comply with appropriate technical and operating principles, and target areas where registries can add value to the health system. This will ensure that Australia is competitive with its international peers in this dynamic environment.

  4. Penn Center for Community Health Workers: Step-by-Step Approach to Sustain an Evidence-Based Community Health Worker Intervention at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Anna U; Grande, David T; Carter, Tamala; Long, Judith A; Kangovi, Shreya

    2016-11-01

    Community-engaged researchers who work with low-income communities can be reliant on grant funding. We use the illustrative case of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers (PCCHW) to describe a step-by-step framework for achieving financial sustainability for community-engaged research interventions. PCCHW began as a small grant-funded research project but followed an 8-step framework to engage both low-income patients and funders, determine outcomes, and calculate return on investment. PCCHW is now fully funded by Penn Medicine and delivers the Individualized Management for Patient-Centered Targets (IMPaCT) community health worker intervention to 2000 patients annually.

  5. Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers: supporting the workforce for national health security.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Alyson L; Sobelson, Robyn K; Cioffi, Joan P

    2014-01-01

    The importance of a competent and prepared national public health workforce, ready to respond to threats to the public's health, has been acknowledged in numerous publications since the 1980s. The Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) were funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 2010 to continue to build upon a decade of focused activities in public health workforce preparedness development initiated under the Centers for Public Health Preparedness program (http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/cphp/). All 14 PERLCs were located within Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) accredited schools of public health. These centers aimed to improve workforce readiness and competence through the development, delivery, and evaluation of targeted learning programs designed to meet specific requirements of state, local, and tribal partners. The PERLCs supported organizational and community readiness locally, regionally, or nationally through the provision of technical consultation and dissemination of specific, practical tools aligned with national preparedness competency frameworks and public health preparedness capabilities. Public health agencies strive to address growing public needs and a continuous stream of current and emerging public health threats. The PERLC network represented a flexible, scalable, and experienced national learning system linking academia with practice. This system improved national health security by enhancing individual, organizational, and community performance through the application of public health science and learning technologies to frontline practice.

  6. Assessing readiness for establishing a farmers' market at a community health center.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Darcy A; Whiteside, Y Omar; Brandt, Heather M; Young, Vicki; Friedman, Daniela B; Hébert, James R

    2012-02-01

    Farmers' markets are community health promotion interventions that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. As farmers' markets continue to develop, it is important to strategically locate them in settings that are accessible to populations disparately affected by health disparities. One potential setting is a community health center. The goal of this analysis is to extend existing research on community readiness to identify indicators of preparedness among community health centers for establishing onsite farmers' markets. The sampling frame for the readiness assessment included all community health centers in South Carolina (N = 20) representing 163 practice sites. Data collection included two brief online surveys, in-depth key informant interviews, and secondary analysis of contextual data. Five themes related to readiness for establishing a farmers market at a community health center were identified: capacity, social capital, awareness of health problems and solutions, logistical factors, and sustainability. Findings from this study provide guidance to researchers and community health center staff as they explore the development of environmental interventions focused on reducing diet-related health conditions by improving access to healthy foods.

  7. 78 FR 55731 - Health Workforce Research Center Cooperative Agreement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... effectiveness in care delivery. Suggested topics for study included novel health care roles, team-based care.... With this in mind, BHPr intends to fund two HWRCs in the concentration area ``flexible use of...

  8. Centers of Excellence on Environmental Health Disparities Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    collaborative effort that encourages basic, biological, clinical, epidemiological, behavioral, and/or social scientific investigations of disease conditions that are known to be a significant burden in low socioeconomic and health disparate populations

  9. [History of the cancer registry in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Allende-López, Aldo; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    A cancer registry is to record the data which let us to know the epidemiology of neoplasm, but led us take a decision in medical policy about this health problem that benefit patients. In this paper we did a brief historical review about models and attempts for having a cancer registry in Mexico. However, since 1940 "the fight against cancer" was declared, we have not had a confident cancer registry today validated and built with data from whole the country. In 1982, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was created. The design and validation of a registration card in four hospitals were the main results. In 1988, the Registro Nacional del Cancer was reinforced with a computerized system for facilitation the data capture. In 1994, it was signed the first interinstitutional agreement that led to Registro Histopatol6gico de Neoplasias Malignas. In 1996, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social established a cancer registry in children in Mexico with the intention to have data from this population.

  10. Determinants of puberty health among female adolescents residing in boarding welfare centers in Tehran: An application of health belief model

    PubMed Central

    Shirzadi, Shayesteh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Nadrian, Haidar; Mahmoodi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a critical stage of growth and development. That is associated with changes in body shape and appearance. Issues such as irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea, and menstrual cycle are major issues in women's health. The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of physical puberty health based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) among female adolescents. Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted in welfare boarding centers in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected in 2011 by a structured and valid questionnaire. Total 61 female adolescents (age range: 12-19 yrs) participated in this study from welfare boarding centers in Iran, Tehran, by using convenience sampling method. The questionnaire consisted of demographic characteristics, health belief model constructs and physical puberty health behaviors gathered by using interview. A series of univariate general linear models were used to assess the relationship between puberty health and health belief model constructs. Results: According to the results of this study there were positive significant relationships between perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action and increased puberty health in female adolescents (p<0.05). Perceived benefits, perceived barriers and cues to action were predictors of physical puberty health behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study to improve the physical Puberty health behaviors of female adolescents should make them aware of the benefits of health behaviors, and remove or reform the perceived barriers of health behaviors. Also, the appropriate information resources should be introduced for obtaining information about puberty health. PMID:28210597

  11. Determinants of puberty health among female adolescents residing in boarding welfare centers in Tehran: An application of health belief model.

    PubMed

    Shirzadi, Shayesteh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Nadrian, Haidar; Mahmoodi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a critical stage of growth and development. That is associated with changes in body shape and appearance. Issues such as irregular menstrual periods, amenorrhea, and menstrual cycle are major issues in women's health. The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of physical puberty health based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) among female adolescents. Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted in welfare boarding centers in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected in 2011 by a structured and valid questionnaire. Total 61 female adolescents (age range: 12-19 yrs) participated in this study from welfare boarding centers in Iran, Tehran, by using convenience sampling method. The questionnaire consisted of demographic characteristics, health belief model constructs and physical puberty health behaviors gathered by using interview. A series of univariate general linear models were used to assess the relationship between puberty health and health belief model constructs. Results: According to the results of this study there were positive significant relationships between perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, cues to action and increased puberty health in female adolescents (p<0.05). Perceived benefits, perceived barriers and cues to action were predictors of physical puberty health behaviors. Conclusion: Based on the results of the study to improve the physical Puberty health behaviors of female adolescents should make them aware of the benefits of health behaviors, and remove or reform the perceived barriers of health behaviors. Also, the appropriate information resources should be introduced for obtaining information about puberty health.

  12. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Montie T; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges.

  13. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed

    Panko, W B; Wilson, W

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach.

  14. Reflections from a Year at the Center for Global Health

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Research Training Award (CRTA) Fellowship is a one-year fellowship, where a laboratory, a Center or a Division within the National Cancer Institute takes in a post baccalaureate trainee for a year. This trainee is typically someone who has completed their Bachelor’s degree and is ready to put their knowledge into useful action as they chart out their career and future education. After a year, CRTA Fellow, Tulika Singh reflects on her year of service.

  15. Center Director Bridges opens Super Safety and Health Day at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges opens the second Super Safety and Health Day at Kennedy Space Center, an entire day when most normal work activities are suspended to allow personnel to attend safety- and health-related activities. The theme, 'Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand,' emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space- related resources first and foremost. Events included a keynote address, a panel session about related issues, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television.

  16. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    PubMed Central

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  17. 78 FR 48438 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Times and Dates: 11:00...

  18. 78 FR 17411 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Times and Dates: 11:00...

  19. NIEHS/EPA Children’s Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center at Dartmouth

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The overall goals of this center are to better understand the impact of arsenic in drinking water and food on children's health, inform the public of how to minimize those risks and develop and strengthen ties with local communities to reduce the risk of e

  20. Patient-Centered Communication and Health Assessment with Youth

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Michelle L.; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia S.; Ronis, David L.; Villarruel, Antonia M.; Pardee, Michelle; Faleer, Hannah; Fava, Nicole M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-centered communication is the hallmark of care that incorporates the perspective of patients to provide tailored care that meets their needs and desires. However, at this time there has been limited evaluation of patient-provider communication involving youth. Objectives This manuscript will report on results from secondary analysis of data obtained during a participatory research-based randomized control trial designed to test a sexual risk event history calendar intervention with youth to address the following research questions: (a) Based on the event history calendar’s (EHC) inclusion of contextual factors, does the EHC demonstrate improved communication outcomes (i.e., amount, satisfaction, mutuality, client involvement, client satisfaction, patient-provider interaction, and patient-centeredness) when compared to the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) tool? and (b) How do patients and providers describe the characteristics of each tool in regards to patient-centered communication? Method This report will utilize a sequential explanatory mixed methods approach to evaluate communication. A split plot design with one between factor (i.e., communication structure between EHC and GAPS) and one within factor (i.e., time between pretest and posttest) was used for analyses of data collection from male and female youth (n=186) and providers (n=9). Quantitative analysis of survey data evaluated changes in communication from pre-test to post-test. Qualitative data collected from open-ended questions, audio-taped visits, and exit interviews was employed to enhance interpretation of quantitative findings. Results Patient-centered communication using assessment tools (EHC and GAPS) with youth demonstrated improved communication outcomes both quantitatively and qualitatively. Additional analyses with subgroups of males and Arab-Americans demonstrated better post-intervention scores among the EHC group in certain aspects of communication

  1. A Guide to the Computerized Medical Data Resources of the Naval Health Research Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-09

    Naval Health Research Center. The mission of the Naval Health Research Center, as assigned by the Secretary of the Navy, and two of the functions to be...performance, and to perform such other functions or tasks as may be directed by higher authority. As directed by the Commanding Officer, Naval Medical...indicated that risks of serious injury varied widely as a function of seniority, duty status, external cause of accident, time in assignment, and type

  2. National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology 2007 and 2008.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel Nogueira; Bonhorst, Daniel; de Sousa, João

    2009-11-01

    Clinical electrophysiology remains one of the most dynamic areas of cardiology, with continuing developments in equipping centers with more modern mapping and navigation systems. This has enabled an increase in the number and variety of interventions, resulting in significant improvements in results of therapeutic ablation of arrhythmias and prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this phase of transition towards implementation of a computerized national registry with nationwide data transmitted via the internet, publication of the registry in its previous form, although requiring more work, still seems justified, in order to appraise and disseminate qualitative and quantitative developments in this activity and enable comparisons with what is being done internationally, assess the centers' training capacity and inform national and European health authorities of the activities and real needs in this sector. The authors analyze the number and type of procedures performed during 2007 and 2008 based on a survey sent to centers performing diagnostic and interventional electrophysiology (16 centers in 2007 and 2008) and/or implanting cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) (19 centers in 2007 and 21 in 2008). Compared to 2006, one more center began interventional electrophysiology in 2007 and two centers began implanting ICDs in 2008. In the years under review, 2060 electrophysiological studies were performed in 2007 and 2007 were performed in 2008, of which 74 and 79.5% respectively were followed by therapeutic ablation, making totals of 1523 and 1596 ablations (increases of 10.7 and 4.6% from previous years). Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was the main indication for ablation (28.4 and 28.7%), followed by accessory pathways (26.8 and 25.4%), atrial flutter (20.8 and 19.7%), atrial fibrillation (13.9 and 14.6%), ventricular tachycardia (4.7 and 5.1%), atrial tachycardia (2.8 and 2.6%) and atrioventricular junction ablation (2.7 and 3.9%). Regarding ICDs, a

  3. Provision of emergency contraceptive pills at college and university student health centers in Florida.

    PubMed

    Hemmick, Rob S; McCarthy, Susan K

    2007-01-01

    Provision of emergency contraceptive (EC) pills at Florida university and college student health centers was examined. Practices related to dosages, pill brands, advance prescriptions, restrictions, written policy, printed materials, routine contraceptive counseling, and publicity were identified. Barriers for centers not providing EC pills and practices were also determined.

  4. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  5. Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We Moving Forward?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotze, Geri M.; Bellin, Melissa H.; Oswald, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) is widely acknowledged as supporting positive outcomes in children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and their parents. The intent of this mixed-method research was to enhance understanding of family-centered behaviors in professionals who had received specialty training in the principles of FCC and to explore…

  6. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  7. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome...characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form of PS... parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management System (RPMS), but the protocol will

  8. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    W81XWH-07-1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a...syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form...protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management

  9. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking...2011. The aims of this project are: Specific Aim 1: Identify cases of parkinsonism among Alaska Native people and populate a secure electronic...registry database. Specific Aim 2: Provide education on parkinsonism and its treatment to primary care physicians and other health care providers

  10. Tackling NCD in LMIC: Achievements and Lessons Learned From the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Engelgau, Michael M; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Smith, Richard; Miranda, Jaime; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Belis, Deshiree; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Effectively tackling the growing noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is a major challenge. To address research needs in this setting for NCDs, in 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and UnitedHealth Group (UHG) engaged in a public-private partnership that supported a network of 11 LMIC-based research centers and created the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence (COE) Program. The Program's overall goal was to contribute to reducing the cardiovascular and lung disease burdens by catalyzing in-country research institutions to develop a global network of biomedical research centers. Key elements of the Program included team science and collaborative approaches, developing research and training platforms for future investigators, and creating a data commons. This Program embraced a strategic approach for tackling NCDs in LMICs and will provide capacity for locally driven research efforts that can identify and address priority health issues in specific countries' settings.

  11. The Danish Heart Registry

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Flensted Lassen, Jens; von Kappelgaard, Lene Mia; Mortensen, Poul Erik; Gislason, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. Study population All adult (≥15 years) patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. Main variables The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR and WDHR). For each type of procedure, up to 70 variables are registered in the DHR. Since 2010, the data quality protocol encompasses fulfillment of web-based validation rules of daily-submitted records and yearly approval of the data by the EDHR and WDHR. Descriptive data The data collection on procedure has been complete for PCI and surgery since 2000, and for CAG as of 2006. From 2000 to 2014, the number of CAG, PCI, and surgical procedures changed by 231%, 193%, and 99%, respectively. Until the end of 2014, a total of 357,476 CAG, 131,309 PCI, and 60,831 surgical procedures had been performed, corresponding to 249,445, 100,609, and 55,539 first-time patients, respectively. The DHR generally has a high level of completeness (1–missing) of each procedure (>90%) when compared to the National Patient Registry. Variables important for assessing the quality of care have a high level of completeness for surgery since 2000, and for CAG and PCI since 2010. Conclusion The DHR contains valuable data on cardiac invasive procedures, which makes it an important national monitoring and quality system and at the same time serves as a platform for research projects in the cardiovascular field. PMID:27822091

  12. Health workers' perceptions of Italian female adolescents: a qualitative study about sexuality, contraception, and caring practices in family health centers.

    PubMed

    Olivari, Maria Giulia; Santoro, Elena; Stagni Brenca, Elisa; Confalonieri, Emanuela; Di Blasio, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to explore health workers' perceptions of providing sexuality and contraception care for female adolescents within family health centers. We interviewed 26 volunteer health workers and analyzed the interviews using thematic analysis. We identified three main themes: (a) "adolescents and sexuality," with the subthemes "initiation rite," "me like the others," and "just for fun"; (b) "adolescents and contraception," with the subthemes "omnipotent adolescents," "aware adolescents," and "women's responsibility"; and

  13. Unified performance evaluation of health centers with integrated model of data envelopment analysis and bargaining game.

    PubMed

    Jahangoshai Rezaee, Mustafa; Moini, Alireza; Haji-Ali Asgari, Fatema

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces a new integrated approach to measure unified efficiency of the healthcare systems. Health centers as an important part of the healthcare systems are considered for evaluation. For this purpose, we define two categories of inputs to measure performance of health centers based on medical human resources and characteristics of spatial information by using geographic information system (GIS). Catching the balance in the spatial distribution of populations and services is one of the main problems in health centers evaluation. On the other hand, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is widely applied for measuring efficiency of the healthcare systems. But, the conventional DEA models may fail to integrated several categories of measures. In this paper, DEA and bargaining game model are integrated for evaluation of health centers. In other words, two categories of measures are used to measure unified efficiency for each health center in the competitive environment. Two models according to constant return to scale (CRS) and variable return to scale (VRS) assumptions are developed. The case study of health centers under supervising of Tehran university of medical sciences (TMUS) is presented to show the abilities of the proposed approach.

  14. Commentary: the role of mental health services in preadjudicated juvenile detention centers.

    PubMed

    Migdole, Scott; Robbins, Judith P

    2007-01-01

    The role of preadjudicated juvenile detention centers (JDCs) in treating children and adolescents with mental health needs has continued to receive national attention. Legal actions mandating improved health care services over the past decade, coupled with a national focus on detainees' mental health needs, have led to the increased presence of mental health professionals in JDCs. In this context, we must build on the current "call to action" and develop innovative blueprints for the provision of mental health services for detained youth. Although operationalizing this movement is complicated, we must be prepared to sustain its effects by developing effective communication and planning among correctional health care organizations, universities, municipalities, and other stakeholders.

  15. Building a health sciences center: a design primer.

    PubMed

    Wollaber, Debra B

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on the nursing shortage, many academic institutions are constructing or renovating facilities to meet the needs of growing enrollment. The author provides practical suggestions to assist those engaged in planning and constructing a health sciences and/or nursing facility.

  16. Metabolic Networks Integrative Cardiac Health Project (ICHP) - Center of Excellence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    molecular, physiological, biochemical, immunological and environmental basis of CV health and disease and to use that understanding to develop improved...Diabetes 2012;61:401-408. 36. Viardot A, Lord RV, Samaras K. The effects of weight loss and gastric banding on the innate and adaptive immune system in

  17. Linkage between the Danish National Health Service Prescription Database, the Danish Fetal Medicine Database, and other Danish registries as a tool for the study of drug safety in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Lars H; Petersen, Olav B; Nørgaard, Mette; Ekelund, Charlotte; Pedersen, Lars; Tabor, Ann; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-01-01

    A linked population-based database is being created in Denmark for research on drug safety during pregnancy. It combines information from the Danish National Health Service Prescription Database (with information on all prescriptions reimbursed in Denmark since 2004), the Danish Fetal Medicine Database, the Danish National Registry of Patients, and the Medical Birth Registry. The new linked database will provide validated information on malformations diagnosed both prenatally and postnatally. The cohort from 2008 to 2014 will comprise 589,000 pregnancies with information on 424,000 pregnancies resulting in live-born children, ∼420,000 pregnancies undergoing prenatal ultrasound scans, 65,000 miscarriages, and 92,000 terminations. It will be updated yearly with information on ∼80,000 pregnancies. The cohort will enable identification of drug exposures associated with severe malformations, not only based on malformations diagnosed after birth but also including those having led to termination of pregnancy or miscarriage. Such combined data will provide a unique source of information for research on the safety of medications used during pregnancy. PMID:27274312

  18. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.; Wilson, W.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach. PMID:1336413

  19. [Attendance at a health center by clandestine prostitutes in Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Philippon, M; Saada, M; Kamil, M A; Houmed, H M

    1997-01-01

    The extent of clandestine prostitution in Djibouti is difficult to evaluate. Due to the secrecy of the prostitutes and often their low level of education, the follow-up of these patients is also difficult. A sexually transmitted disease clinic specialized in the treatment of prostitutes and their customers has been established in Djibouti since 1963. We tried to evaluate the available data on the clandestine prostitutes attendance at the center. The population was young with a mean age of 23 years. Fifty percent had children and 60% were divorced or separated. Ninety-one percent were Ethiopian and 73% lived in the same district of the city of Djibouti. Almost half of them were HIV positive. The duration of residence in Djibouti before the first visit to the clinic varied widely with a median of 12 months. However, the total duration of prostitution before the first visit was shorter with a median of 3 months. The complaint at the first visit was most often minor. Among the prostitutes who first came to the center in 1993, half of them came only once. The overall duration of follow-up was 8 months, for an average of 3.7 visits per patient. Alternatively, 20 patients had more than 10 consultations and this represented one third of the consultations given to previous patients. This last group is the only one which tended to respect the monthly visits proposed to each patient at the first consultation. The other patients seemed to come only when they felt ill. The routine statistical activities which separately counted the new and previous patients gave an optimistic but faulty impression: these showed an increase in the total number of patients and also an increase in the percentage of previous patients visiting (from 42 to 69% between 1988 and 1994). It is difficult to evaluate the follow-up of such a mobile population. The few patients known for their fidelity contrasted with the fact that half of the patients had visited the center only once. This low frequency of

  20. Scientific collaboration and team science: a social network analysis of the centers for population health and health disparities.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Janet

    2015-03-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic shifts in the way that scientific research is conducted as networks, consortia, and large research centers are funded as transdisciplinary, team-based enterprises to tackle complex scientific questions. Key investigators (N = 167) involved in ten health disparities research centers completed a baseline social network and collaboration readiness survey. Collaborative ties existed primarily between investigators from the same center, with just 7 % of ties occurring across different centers. Grants and work groups were the most common types of ties between investigators, with shared presentations the most common tie across different centers. Transdisciplinary research orientation was associated with network position and reciprocity. Center directors/leaders were significantly more likely to form ties with investigators in other roles, such as statisticians and trainees. Understanding research collaboration networks can help to more effectively design and manage future team-based research, as well as pinpoint potential issues and continuous evaluation of existing efforts.

  1. The New ADL Registry. ADL Registry Web Portal Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    Approaches 18 19 Primary ADL Registry Contributors Contributor Records Entry Date Navy eLearning (US Navy) 2,086 08/05/2008 Joint Knowledge Development...ADL Registry  http://adlregistry.adlnet.gov/  Navy eLearning Content Team  https://www.netc.navy.mil/ile  Joint Knowledge Online  http

  2. Hypertension Health Promotion via Text Messaging at a Community Health Center in South Africa: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, Hanne J; Brittain, Kirsty; Lau, Yan Kwan; Cassidy, Tali; Heap, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile phones to deliver health care (mHealth) is increasing in popularity due to the high prevalence of mobile phone penetration. This is seen in developing countries, where mHealth may be particularly useful in overcoming traditional access barriers. Non-communicable diseases may be particularly amenable to mHealth interventions, and hypertension is one with an escalating burden in the developing world. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether the dissemination of health information via a short message service (SMS) led to improvements in health knowledge and self-reported health-related behaviors. Methods A mixed methods study was carried out among a cohort of 223 hypertension clinic patients, in a resource-poor setting in Cape Town, South Africa, in 2012. Hypertensive outpatients were recruited at the clinic and administered a baseline questionnaire to establish existing knowledge of hypertension. Participants were then randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The intervention group received 90 SMSes over a period of 17 weeks. Thereafter, the baseline questionnaire was readministered to both groups to gauge if any improvements in health knowledge had occurred. Those who received SMSes were asked additional questions about health-related behavior changes. A focus group was then conducted to obtain in-depth feedback about participants’ experience with, and response to, the SMS campaign. Results No statistically significant changes in overall health knowledge were observed between the control and intervention groups. The intervention group had positive increases in self-reported behavior changes. These were reaffirmed by the focus groups, which also revealed a strong preference for the SMS campaign and the belief that the SMSes acted as a reminder to change, as opposed to providing new information. Conclusions Although the content of the SMSes was not new, and did not improve health knowledge, SMSes were

  3. The National Osteopathic Research Center at the University of North Texas Health Science Center: inception, growth, and future.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Scott T; McCormick, Justin; Degenhardt, Brian F; Hahn, Marc B

    2009-06-01

    The osteopathic profession has long recognized the need to carry out research in order to improve clinical care. Osteopathic physicians have a particular obligation to carry out research in areas, such as osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM), that are unique to osteopathic medicine. OMM is similar to manual therapy that is performed by other types of practitioners, but it has some distinctive characteristics. Osteopathic doctors also use OMM to treat infectious disease-not just musculoskeletal disorders.In 2001, several osteopathic professional organizations agreed to jointly fund a national osteopathic research center at one of the osteopathic medical colleges. Five osteopathic colleges submitted research proposals in response to a request for applications. The University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) was chosen to be the site for the Osteopathic Research Center (ORC) and was funded for four years with $1.1M. Between 2002 and 2007, the ORC received an additional $11M in research support from multiple sources including federal funds. With this support, it has made substantive contributions to science. These include oversight of the recently completed four-year, $1.5M multicenter study on the efficacy of OMM as a treatment for pneumonia in the elderly and a three-year, $1.9M National Institutes of Health-funded developmental research center to perform mechanistic studies of some OMM actions.The authors discuss the long-term costs, benefits, and sustainability of the national ORC at UNTHSC in the contexts of research accomplished, the training of new medical osteopathic researchers, and an effort to develop other successful regional osteopathic research centers.

  4. The compliance of licensed US child care centers with national health and safety performance standards.

    PubMed Central

    Addiss, D G; Sacks, J J; Kresnow, M J; O'Neil, J; Ryan, G W

    1994-01-01

    The American Public Health Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics recently published health and safety guidelines for child care centers. A survey was conducted to determine the extent to which practices in US child care centers are reflective of these guidelines. Compliance with 16 guidelines ranged from 19.5% to 98.6%, varied considerably by state, and was not consistently associated with selected center characteristics. Prevention efforts should focus on practices for which compliance is low and on those that have the greatest disease- and injury-reducing potential. PMID:8017546

  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the Newsletter Conversations in Equity Blog CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities Report Strategies, 2016 Strategies, 2014 CHDIR, 2011 Executive ... forums and activities More Public Health Practice CDC Health Disparities & Inequalities ... Orders & Initiatives Resources Health Equity Matters ...

  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Minority Health Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... devoted to increasing awareness of health inequities. More Minority Health Events Upcoming Minority Health summits, forums and ...

  7. Mental health services provided through the National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health: do they reach rural women?

    PubMed

    Hillemeier, Marianne M; Weisman, Carol S; Baker, Katie; Primavera, Kaitlin

    2005-01-01

    The National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health (CoEs) were established in part to provide integrated, comprehensive health care including mental health services to women. The purpose of this study was to identify mental health services currently provided by each of the 19 CoEs throughout the United States and to assess the extent to which these services are targeted to and utilized by rural women. Methods included both website review and semistructured interviews with knowledgeable informants in the CoEs. Center websites varied widely in mental health services mentioned: one CoE described services for nine different types of mental health issues, while one-fourth of the CoEs included no mention of any specific mental health services. Only four websites indicated that rural women were part of the CoE target population. Knowledgeable informant interviews indicated that seven of the CoEs had mental health staff onsite providing mental and behavioral health services. These services most often included treatment for depression and other mood disorders and for stress, as well as counseling for domestic violence issues. None of the CoEs offered mental or behavioral health services specifically targeted to rural women. We conclude that although they have not done so to date, the CoEs would be good sites in which to develop and test mental health outreach services for rural women.

  8. BIREME: Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Information Center.

    PubMed Central

    Bonham, M D

    1990-01-01

    In the twenty years of its existence, BIREME has grown and evolved to meet the increasing information needs of health professionals in Latin America and the Caribbean. Recent emphasis has been on the adoption of new methods based on information technologies (including microcomputers, CD-ROMs, and advanced telecommunications) to improve and enhance services. Services discussed are bibliographic control, bibliographic searches, document delivery, selective dissemination of information (SDI), training, and publications. PMID:2183902

  9. [Ten years experience in Mali community health centers].

    PubMed

    Balique, H; Ouattara, O; Iknane, A A

    2001-03-01

    At the end of 10 years' existence, the community health centres of Mali show a way of organisation which meets the public health requirements and demands of financial viability of any health establishment. Their originality lays in several factors: their legal personality, their private status, their financial support of the medical staff, their management by a users association and the public utilities agreement they have signed with the department. In spite of their success which makes their numbers reach 350, they suffer from great deficiencies, which are resulted by the lack of democratic traditions within the associations, a inappropriate transparency of their accounts and an inefficient supervision from the part of the department. The main questions posed by this new experience concern the limits of the concept of community, the importance of citizenship in the development dynamics, the participation of private institutions in the accomplishment of public utilities, the jacobin and authoritarian attitude of the department representatives, the contradictions between multiplication of centres to improve geographic access and the requirements of financial viability.

  10. Educational Specifications for the Health Occupations Education Center, Peralta Junior College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. System, Oakland, CA.

    Educational specifications are presented for the development of a health occupations education center that would provide coordinated instruction in health-related occupations. Detailed descriptions are presented of the activities, space allocations, spatial relationships, equipment, and special environmental conditions for each of the ten sections…

  11. Outpatient Services for Mentally Ill Retarded Clients in a Community Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Arthur Stephenson, Jr.

    Although Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) are mandated to serve all clients requiring mental health services including those who are mentally retarded, it appears that many CMHCs have no programs designed to address the needs of the retarded. This paper describes a financially sound outpatient program which provides psychological and…

  12. The Complementary Roles of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Baszler, Rita; Wright, Janet

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the unique combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) facilitate positive health outcomes for students. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is responsible for management of the daily health…

  13. 76 FR 63623 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and..., cooperate with, and assist other appropriate public authorities, scientific institutions, and scientists in... local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice and guidance to the Secretary,...

  14. The Centers For Medicare And Medicaid Services Electronic Health Records for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brett

    2012-06-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Electronic Health Records (EHR) incentive program for hospitals is described with respect to the requirements to receive the incentive payments, how to calculate the amount, and the pertinent time frames. Comparisons between the CMS EHR and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are presented. The hallmarks of successful computerized health records are reviewed.

  15. 40 Steps to Better Physician Recruitment and Retention: A Guidebook for Community and Migrant Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Health Federation, Sacramento.

    This guide presents methods for community and migrant health centers to attract and keep competent physicians. Strategies for recruiting physicians include planning the recruitment and choosing the right physician. Compensation arrangements should attract and retain competent health providers, provide incentives for productivity and professional…

  16. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Dubbin, Leslie A.; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. PMID:23906128

  17. 75 FR 6402 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Marketing (BSC, NCHM)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Center for Health Marketing (BSC, NCHM) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... communications and marketing at CDC; and a discussion of focus areas and new ideas to implement and expand health marketing science at CDC. Agenda items are subject to change as priorities dictate. Contact Person for...

  18. The Role of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bannister, Ann; Kelts, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses holds the position that a combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) can facilitate positive health outcomes for students. SBHC services complement the work of the school nurses, who are responsible for the entire population of students, by providing a referral site for…

  19. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Guam School of Nursing. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)'s Bureau of... University of Guam School of Nursing, an Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program grantee, to coordinate the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) Nursing Program Capacity Strengthening and...

  20. School-Based Health Centers: National Census School Year 2007-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strozer, Jan; Juszczak, Linda; Ammerman, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care's (NASBHC) 2007-2008 Census is the 11th request for data from school-based health centers (SBHCs) since 1986. The Census: (1) provides a better understanding of the role of SBHCs in meeting the needs of underserved children and adolescents; (2) collects relevant trend data on demographics,…

  1. Mental Health Center Services for the Elderly: The Impact of Coordination with Area Agencies on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebowitz, Barry D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined coordination between community mental health centers (CMHCs) and Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) through survey of 281 CMHCs. Found affiliation with AAA associated with more indirect services of all types; more sites where mental health programs were offered to elderly; and more provision of direct services, such as Alzheimer's disease…

  2. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Berkeley/Stanford Children's Environment Health Center - UC Berkeley

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The goal of this Center is to better understand the effects of exposure in the womb to air pollutants and airborne bacteria on newborn health, immune system health during childhood, and to understand the relationship of these early-life exposures to asthma

  3. Characteristics of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Received Services through Community Mental Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Stephanie A.; Corrigan, Susan K.; McDonald, Thomas P.; Holmes, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Despite the presence of significant psychiatric comorbidity among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), little research exists on those who receive community-based mental health services. This project examined one year (2004) of data from the database maintained by 26 community mental health centers (CMHCs) in the Midwestern US state of…

  4. School-Based Health Centers in Oregon: Adolescents Report Their Needs, Use, Behaviors, and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J.; Riddell, Cathy

    This study investigated the patterns of student use of school-based health centers (SBHCs) in Oregon. The study explored adolescents' health care needs and use of services, the reasons students use SBHCs for care, and the type of students who use SBHCs; the study also assessed the relationships between use of SBHC services and student risk…

  5. Barriers to Addressing Adolescent Substance Use: Perceptions of New York School-Based Health Center Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Brett; Shaw, Benjamin; Lawson, Hal; Sherman, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescent substance use is associated with chronic health conditions, accidents, injury, and school-related problems, including dropping out. Schools have the potential to provide students with substance use prevention and intervention services, albeit with confidentiality challenges. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide…

  6. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  7. School-Based Health Centers: National Census School Year 2004-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juszczak, Linda; Schlitt, John; Moore, Aisha

    2007-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care conducted the 2004-05 Census, the tenth count of school-based health centers (SBHCs) since 1986, to: (1) provide a better understanding of the role of SBHCs in meeting the needs of underserved children and adolescents; (2) collect up-to-date data on demographics, staffing services, operations,…

  8. High School Students' Experiences of Bullying and Victimization and the Association with School Health Center Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of…

  9. Mental Health Technician Training Program, Desert Willow Training Center, March 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    Founded in 1971, the program was designed to allow Indian Health Service (IHS) trainees to take as little or as much training as they needed to fill their agency's requirements and their own career ambitions. A full complement of courses leading to an associate degree in Mental Health Technology was developed for the Center and accredited through…

  10. 75 FR 20913 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health; New Address Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ...--MAMMOGRAPHY 0 24. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 900 continues to read as follows: Authority: 21 U.S.C... address: Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Division of Mammography... Radiological Health, Director, Division of Mammography Quality and Radiation Programs, 10903 New Hampshire...

  11. Applying Systems Engineering to Implement an Evidence-based Intervention at a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shin-Ping; Feng, Sherry; Storch, Richard; Yip, Mei-Po; Sohng, HeeYon; Fu, Mingang; Chun, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Impressive results in patient care and cost reduction have increased the demand for systems-engineering methodologies in large health care systems. This Report from the Field describes the feasibility of applying systems-engineering techniques at a community health center currently lacking the dedicated expertise and resources to perform these activities. PMID:23698657

  12. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  13. 3 CFR 8847 - Proclamation 8847 of August 6, 2012. National Health Center Week, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accessible, affordable health care. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of... A Proclamation For nearly half a century, health centers have helped make primary care services... patients by not only providing treatment for those in need, but also emphasizing preventive care that...

  14. Medication Adherence among Adolescents in a School-Based Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mears, Cynthia J.; Charlebois, Nicole M.; Holl, Jane L.

    2006-01-01

    School-based health centers are an integral part of the health care delivery system for low-income children. Medication adherence for these patients may be challenging because the student is often responsible for bringing home the prescription and receiving the instructions. This study assesses medication fill, initiation, and adherence rates…

  15. Quality Improvement Initiative in School-Based Health Centers across New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, John M.; Schluter, Janette A.; Carrillo, Kris; McGrath, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement principles have been applied extensively to health care organizations, but implementation of quality improvement methods in school-based health centers (SBHCs) remains in a developmental stage with demonstration projects under way in individual states and nationally. Rural areas, such as New Mexico, benefit from the…

  16. Developing an interdisciplinary collaboration center in an academic Health Sciences Library.

    PubMed

    Moore, Margaret E; Vaughan, K T L; Hayes, Barrie E; McLendon, Wallace

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the Health Sciences Library's plans for an interdisciplinary, technology-enhanced collaboration center, from a technology-driven space to one with a vision of support for peer-to-peer learning and research. The center offers an exciting opportunity to be an essential partner in collaborative and interdisciplinary programs such as the new Carolina Center for Exploratory Genetic Analysis. The Library is a centrally located and neutral place, which helps minimize geographical and territorial obstacles to effective collaboration. The collaboration center raises the Library's visibility and allows staff to demonstrate the value of knowledge resources, services, technology expertise, infrastructure, and facilities for group study and collaboration.

  17. Portland Feminist Women's Health Center v. Advocates for Life.

    PubMed

    1988-03-04

    The plaintiffs sought an injunction prohibiting demonstrations by right to life groups at a health facility where abortions were performed. Among the claims for relief were two federal claims alleging conspiracy to deprive pregnant women of their constitutional right to choose abortion. The U.S. District Court ruled that the conspiracy charge was actionable under federal law only upon showing of state action, and that a private conspiracy by right to life groups was not actionable. Having dismissed the federal claims, the court decided to retain jurisdiction over the case rather than remand it to the state court where it had originally been filed for trial.

  18. Structural Health Monitoring Sensor Development at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Wu, M. C.; Allison, S. G.; DeHaven, S. L.; Ghoshal, A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is applying considerable effort on the development of sensor technology for structural health monitoring (SHM). This research is targeted toward increasing the safety and reliability of aerospace vehicles, while reducing operating and maintenance costs. Research programs are focused on applications to both aircraft and space vehicles. Sensor technologies under development span a wide range including fiber-optic sensing, active and passive acoustic sensors, electromagnetic sensors, wireless sensing systems, MEMS, and nanosensors. Because of their numerous advantages for aerospace applications, fiber-optic sensors are one of the leading candidates and are the major focus of this presentation. In addition, recent advances in active and passive acoustic sensing will also be discussed.

  19. Community health centers: a promising venue for supplemental nutrition assistance program education in the Central Valley.

    PubMed

    MkNelly, Barbara; Nishio, Stephanie; Peshek, Cynthia; Oppen, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers could help achieve the necessary shift to healthful eating and active living; however, lack of coverage or reimbursement, lack of time, and limited information about appropriate interventions are some of the documented barriers. This report highlights the potential for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) implementation in the relatively nontraditional setting of Federally Qualified Health Centers based on the experience of the Central Valley Health Network's Nutrition Education Demonstration Project. The report provides a brief overview of the primary prevention role(s) suggested for health care providers, relevant SNAP-Ed policies, how SNAP-Ed has been implemented in Federally Qualified Health Center settings, and recommendations for similar efforts.

  20. [A registry of registries and cohorts: recommendations for metadata and policies].

    PubMed

    Stausberg, J; Semler, S; Neugebauer, E A M

    2014-12-01

    Registries and cohort studies play a central role in patient-oriented medical research, in particular in health services research. In order to increase the transparency about ongoing registries and cohort studies in Germany, and to promote communication and cooperation between the drivers in the field a so-called register portal should be established. Metadata are characteristics that are used to describe registries and cohort studies in the register portal. A limited set of characteristics, the core set, should correctly describe the projects on the one hand while reducing workload for data capture and data administration on the other hand. The core set consists of 26 data elements that had been defined in a Delphi-consensus process involving experts from the working group registries of the German Network for Health Services Research (DNVF) and the working group IT infrastructure and quality management of the Technology, Methods, and Infrastructure for Networked Medical Research (TMF). Transparent policies are required to guarantee traceability and reliability of the portal's services. Six so-called top-level-tasks and 37 use cases were defined in an interim report so far. The metadata have been agreed upon by most of the member associations of the DNVF. Metadata and rules of procedures are the starting point for the practical implementation of the register portal in the next future.

  1. 78 FR 6853 - Agency Information Collection (Agent Orange Registry Code Sheet) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... required to organize and update the information contained in AOR to be able to notify Vietnam era veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam of any increased health risks resulting from exposure to dioxin... VA that is similar to the Persian Gulf War Veterans Health Registry. Registry examinations...

  2. Addiction treatment centers' progress in preparing for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Molfenter, Todd D

    2014-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is expected to significantly alter addiction treatment service delivery. Researchers designed the Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) for addiction treatment organizations to assess their readiness for the PPACA. Four-hundred twenty-seven organizations completed the HRRI throughout a 3-year period, using a four-point scale to rank their readiness on 13 conditions. HRRI results completed during two different time periods (between 10/1/2010-6/30/2011 and 9/1/2011-9/30/2012) were analyzed and compared. Most respondents self-assessed as being in the early stages of preparation for 9 of the 13 conditions. Survey results showed that organizations with annual budgets < $5 million (n=295) were less likely to be prepared for the PPACA than organizations with annual budgets > $5 million (n=132). The HRRI results suggest that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, is not preparing adequately for health care reform; organizations that are making preparations are making only modest gains.

  3. Academic affiliated training centers in humanitarian health, Part I: program characteristics and professionalization preferences of centers in North America.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M; Walls, Alexa E; Heck, Joan P; Sorensen, Brian S; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Johnson, Kirsten; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Cahill, Brendan; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The collaborative London based non-governmental organization network ELRHA (Enhancing Learning and Research for Humanitarian Assistance) supports partnerships between higher education institutions and humanitarian organizations worldwide with the objective to enhance the professionalization of the humanitarian sector. While coordination and control of the humanitarian sector has plagued the response to every major crisis, concerns highlighted by the 2010 Haitian earthquake response further catalyzed and accelerated the need to ensure competency-based professionalization of the humanitarian health care work force. The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative sponsored an independent survey of established academically affiliated training centers in North America that train humanitarian health care workers to determine their individual training center characteristics and preferences in the potential professionalization process. The survey revealed that a common thread of profession-specific skills and core humanitarian competencies were being offered in both residential and online programs with additional programs offering opportunities for field simulation experiences and more advanced degree programs. This study supports the potential for the development of like-minded academic affiliated and competency-based humanitarian health programs to organize themselves under ELRHA's regional "consultation hubs" worldwide that can assist and advocate for improved education and training opportunities in less served developing countries.

  4. Predictable And SuStainable Implementation Of National Cardiovascular Registries Infrastructure: A Think Tank Report from MDEpiNet

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Emily P.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.; Drozda, Joseph P.; Kessler, Larry G.; Kirtane, Ajay J.; Kong, David F.; Laschinger, John; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Morice, Marie-Claude; Reed, Terrie; Sedrakyan, Art; Stein, Kenneth M.; Tcheng, James; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Device Epidemiological Network Initiative (MDEpiNet) is a public-private partnership between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and participating partners. The Predictable and SuStainable Implementation of National Cardiovascular Registries (PASSION) program is an MDEpiNet-sponsored program which aims to demonstrate the goals of MDEpiNet by using cardiovascular medical device registries to bridge evidence gaps across the medical device total product life cycle (TPLC). To this end, a PASSION Think Tank meeting took place in October 2014 in Silver Spring, MD, to facilitate discussion between stakeholders about the successes, challenges, and future novel applications of medical device registries, with particular emphasis on identifying pilot projects. Participants spanned a broad range of groups including patients, device manufacturers, regulators, physicians/academicians, professional societies, providers, and payers. The meeting focus included four areas of cardiovascular medicine intended to cultivate interest in four MDEpiNet Disease Specific/Device Specific Working Groups: coronary intervention, electrophysiology, valvular disease, and peripheral vascular disease. In addition, more general issues applying to registry-based infrastructure and analytical methodologies for assessing device benefit/risk were considered to provide context for the Working Groups as PASSION programs going forward. This article summarizes the discussions at the meeting and the future directions of the PASSION program. PMID:26699602

  5. Understanding and Predicting Social Media Use Among Community Health Center Patients: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of social media by health care organizations is growing and provides Web-based tools to connect patients, caregivers, and providers. Objective The aim was to determine the use and factors predicting the use of social media for health care–related purposes among medically underserved primary care patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 444 patients of a federally qualified community health center. Results Community health center patients preferred that their providers use email, cell phones for texting, and Facebook and cell phone apps for sharing health information. Significantly more Hispanic than white patients believed their providers should use Facebook (P=.001), YouTube (P=.01), and Twitter (P=.04) for sharing health information. Use and intentions to use social media for health-related purposes were significantly higher for those patients with higher subjective norm scores. Conclusions Understanding use and factors predicting use can increase adoption and utilization of social media for health care–related purposes among underserved patients in community health centers. PMID:25427823

  6. A New Use for Your Cancer Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The following article describes the development of a new data use for cancer registry information. The registry in Hartford Hospital recently participated in a summer program for high school students interested in the field of health care. After an introduction to the registry and its core data elements, a research topic was assigned to the students. Using de-identified registry data consisting of 101 non-small cell lung cancer patients who were diagnosed in 2015, 4 students in the oncology work group (Zirui Hao, Princess Harmon, Nathaniel Nicholson and Kajal Shah) from the Academy of Aerospace and Engineering in Windsor, Connecticut were charged with analyzing and drawing conclusions from the data. The students focused on what correlations could be made between patients with the same comorbidity factors using staging as a designator.

  7. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries.

  8. Background, Structure and Priorities of the 2013 Geneva Declaration on Person-centered Health Research.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Cloninger, C Robert; Thornicroft, Amalia; Mezzich, Juan E

    Declarations are relevant tools to frame new areas in health care, to raise awareness and to facilitate knowledge-to-action. The International College on Person Centered Medicine (ICPCM) is seeking to extend the impact of the ICPCM Conference Series by producing a declaration on every main topic. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of the 2013 Geneva Declaration on Person-centered Health Research and to provide additional information on the research priority areas identified during this iterative process. There is a need for more PCM research and for the incorporation of the PCM approach into general health research. Main areas of research focus include: Conceptual, terminological, and ontological issues; research to enhance the empirical evidence of PCM main components such as PCM informed clinical communication; PCM-based diagnostic models; person-centered care and interventions; and people-centered care, research on training and curriculum development. Dissemination and implementation of PCM knowledge-base is integral to Person-centered Health Research and shall engage currently available scientific and translational dissemination tools such journals, events and eHealth.

  9. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-12-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs receive reimbursement from local, state, and private funding sources and their viability depends on the demonstration of outcomes. Using the Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) assessment tool, an SBHC-university nursing partnership evaluated the use of preventive health services by fifth and sixth grade students (n = 690). Findings suggest that the vast majority of early adolescents needed a referral for a physical exam, nutrition, mental health, or health education services. This article describes key components for a successful SBHC-university nursing partnership that can evaluate and improve existing school health programs.

  10. Patient-Centered Participatory Research in Three Health Clinics: Benefits, Challenges, and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Fava, Nicole M; Munro-Kramer, Michelle L; Felicetti, Irene L; Darling-Fisher, Cynthia S; Pardee, Michelle; Helman, Abigail; Trucco, Elisa M; Martyn, Kristy K

    2016-06-23

    Research informed by individuals' lived experiences is a critical component of participatory research and nursing interventions for health promotion. Yet, few examples of participatory research in primary care settings with adolescents and young adults exist, especially with respect to their sexual health and health-risk behaviors. Therefore, we implemented a validated patient-centered clinical assessment tool to improve the quality of communication between youth patients and providers, sexual risk assessment, and youths' health-risk perception to promote sexual health and reduce health-risk behaviors among adolescents and young adults in three community health clinic settings, consistent with national recommendations as best practices in adolescent health care. We describe guiding principles, benefits, challenges, and lessons learned from our experience. Improving clinical translation of participatory research requires consideration of the needs and desires of key stakeholders (e.g., providers, patients, and researchers) while retaining flexibility to successfully navigate imperfect, real-world conditions.

  11. Mobile Health Insurance System and Associated Costs: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Primary Health Centers in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Lalit; Eze, Godson

    2016-01-01

    Background Nigeria contributes only 2% to the world’s population, accounts for 10% of the global maternal death burden. Health care at primary health centers, the lowest level of public health care, is far below optimal in quality and grossly inadequate in coverage. Private primary health facilities attempt to fill this gap but at additional costs to the client. More than 65% Nigerians still pay out of pocket for health services. Meanwhile, the use of mobile phones and related services has risen geometrically in recent years in Nigeria, and their adoption into health care is an enterprise worth exploring. Objective The purpose of this study was to document costs associated with a mobile technology–supported, community-based health insurance scheme. Methods This analytic cross-sectional survey used a hybrid of mixed methods stakeholder interviews coupled with prototype throw-away software development to gather data from 50 public primary health facilities and 50 private primary care centers in Abuja, Nigeria. Data gathered documents costs relevant for a reliable and sustainable mobile-supported health insurance system. Clients and health workers were interviewed using structured questionnaires on services provided and cost of those services. Trained interviewers conducted the structured interviews, and 1 client and 1 health worker were interviewed per health facility. Clinic expenditure was analyzed to include personnel, fixed equipment, medical consumables, and operation costs. Key informant interviews included a midmanagement staff of a health-management organization, an officer-level staff member of a mobile network operator, and a mobile money agent. Results All the 200 respondents indicated willingness to use the proposed system. Differences in the cost of services between public and private facilities were analyzed at 95% confidence level (P<.001). This indicates that average out-of-pocket cost of services at private health care facilities is significantly

  12. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients: collecting, analyzing, and reporting data on transplantation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Leppke, Susan; Leighton, Tabitha; Zaun, David; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Skeans, Melissa; Israni, Ajay K; Snyder, Jon J; Kasiske, Bertram L

    2013-04-01

    Founded in 1987, the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) operates under a contract from the US government administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). SRTR maintains a database of comprehensive information on all solid organ transplantation in the US. The registry supports the ongoing evaluation of the clinical status of solid organ transplantation, including kidney, heart, liver, lung, intestine, pancreas, and multi-organ transplants. Data in the registry are from multiple sources, but most are collected by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) from hospitals, organ procurement organizations, and immunology laboratories. The data include information on current and past organ donors, transplant candidates, transplant recipients, transplant outcomes, and outcomes of living donors. SRTR uses these data to create reports and analyses for HRSA, OPTN committees that make organ allocation policy, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to carry out quality assurance surveillance activities; SRTR also creates standard analysis files for scientific investigators. In addition, SRTR and OPTN produce an Annual Data Report and provide information upon request for the general public. Thus, SRTR supports the transplant community with information services and statistical analyses to improve patient access to and outcomes of organ transplant.

  13. Implementing the obesity care model at a community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity.

    PubMed

    Okihiro, May; Pillen, Michelle; Ancog, Cristeta; Inda, Christy; Sehgal, Vija

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, the most common chronic disease of childhood, is prevalent among economically disadvantaged children. The Chronic Care and Obesity Care Models are comprehensive health care strategies to improve outcomes by linking primary care best practices and community-based programs. Pediatric providers and community health centers are well positioned to design and implement coordinated and synergistic programs to address childhood health disparities. This article describes a comprehensive project based on the Obesity Care Model initiated at a rural community health center in Hawaii to address childhood obesity including: (1) the health care delivery changes constituting the quality improvement project; (2) capacity and team-building activities; (3) use of the project community level data to strengthen community engagement and investment; and (4) the academic-community partnership providing the project framework. We anticipate that these efforts will contribute to the long-term goal of reducing the prevalence of obesity and obesity associated morbidity in the community.

  14. Using a patient-centered approach for health and social care integration.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Mikaela; Papakonstantinou, Despoina; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    The drive in using health and social care resources more effectively has resulted in undertaking various efforts towards better coordination in order to improve patient-centered and personalized care for the individuals. This requires horizontal integration in terms of processes among health and social care organizations existing information systems (ISs) and personal health records (PHRs) in order to enable integrated patient information sharing among all the health and social care staff and individuals involved. Service-oriented and business process management (BPM) technologies are considered most appropriate for achieving such integration especially when is required to change existing processes and to integrate diverse information systems. On these grounds, a patient-centered approach is proposed for redesigning health and social care processes and for integrating diverse ISs and PHRs with the objective to meet holistic care goals.

  15. Disseminating maternal health information to rural women: a user centered design framework.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vikram

    2010-11-13

    The delivery of primary health information to rural women is a considerable challenge for government and private sectors in rural India. This paper illustrates how by applying the proposed user centered framework dissemination of maternal health information to rural women can be improved. First, the paper presents baseline study to obtain existing knowledge level of women and design requirements for a Primary Health Information System (PHIS). Second, the paper presents a brief description of the PHIS system which was deployed in a village for sixteen months in rural India. Third, the paper explains longitudinal study conducted post intervention of PHIS to measure the impact of PHIS on the knowledge level and health behaviour of rural women in comparison to the baseline study. The results indicate that by following the proposed user centered approach to design the PHIS, a significant improvement in knowledge level of rural women and positive changes in health practices are achieved.

  16. Spaceflight Radiation Health program at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. Steve; Badhwar, Gautam D.; Golightly, Michael J.; Hardy, Alva C.; Konradi, Andrei; Yang, Tracy Chui-Hsu

    1993-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center leads the research and development activities that address the health effects of space radiation exposure to astronaut crews. Increased knowledge of the composition of the environment and of the biological effects of space radiation is required to assess health risks to astronaut crews. The activities at the Johnson Space Center range from quantification of astronaut exposures to fundamental research into the biological effects resulting from exposure to high energy particle radiation. The Spaceflight Radiation Health Program seeks to balance the requirements for operational flexibility with the requirement to minimize crew radiation exposures. The components of the space radiation environment are characterized. Current and future radiation monitoring instrumentation is described. Radiation health risk activities are described for current Shuttle operations and for research development program activities to shape future analysis of health risk.

  17. Social support factors and health among a senior center population in southern Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Tanya R; Gitelson, Richard J; Andereck, Kathleen L; Mesbur, Ellen Sue

    2005-01-01

    Past research on senior centers has mainly focused on utilization, frequency, duration of attendance, participation or various activities and services. This study strives to go beyond previous research by examining social support factors and their relationship to mental and physical health across a senior center population in southern Ontario, Canada. Data were collected at two large senior centers in the Kitchener, Waterloo area. We used a self-administered survey among a sample of older participants (n=186). One-way ANOVA with post-hoc Duncan's multiple range tests, t-tests, and linear regression analyses were used to examine the influence of social support (friendship, caregiving and advice) on mental and physical health. The results indicated that caregiving is significantly related to physical health, how respondents feel in general, and happiness with personal life. Advice from others is significantly related to perceptions of having a life full of interesting things. Additionally, respondents who are volunteers perceive better health and social support than non-volunteers, those who eat at the center perceive better health and caregiving support, and those that started a new activity perceived better health and social support from friendships. Implications for social work practice, policy and future research are discussed.

  18. Mental health status and its predictors among call center employees: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunjin; Park, Heyeon; Boo, Sunjoo

    2017-03-15

    In this study, we assessed the mental health of Korean call center employees and investigated the potential predictors of their mental health status. A cross-sectional study using self-completing questionnaire was conducted for employees working for a credit card call center. A total of 306 call center employees completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Emotion Labor Scale, and the Korean Occupational Stress Scale. The results showed that more than half of the participants reported high levels of depression, anxiety, and stress. A multiple regression analysis indicated that the total scores on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were predicted by perceived health, job satisfaction, job demands, organizational injustice, and emotional dissonance suggesting that, in the interest of improving the mental health of call center employees, their job demands and emotional dissonance should be reduced and the work environment be improved. Consideration should be given to providing routine assessments of mental health, including depression, anxiety, and stress, and the corresponding need for the development of an intervention program and other work-related policies that would protect employees from the risk of poor mental health outcomes.

  19. Integrating Health Care for the Most Vulnerable: Bridging the Differences in Organizational Cultures Between US Hospitals and Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Julia; Bindman, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers have increasingly promoted health services integration to improve quality and efficiency. The US health care safety net, which comprises providers of health care to uninsured, Medicaid, and other vulnerable patients, remains a largely fragmented collection of providers. We interviewed leadership from safety net hospitals and community health centers in 5 US cities (Boston, MA; Denver, CO; Los Angeles, CA; Minneapolis, MN; and San Francisco, CA) throughout 2013 on their experiences with service integration. We identify conflicts in organizational mission, identity, and consumer orientation that have fostered reluctance to enter into collaborative arrangements. We describe how smaller scale initiatives, such as capitated model for targeted populations, health information exchange, and quality improvements led by health plans, can help bridge cultural differences to lay the groundwork for developing integrated care programs. PMID:26509286

  20. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory.

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, Issam A; Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-01

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank--Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m(3) (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.