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Sample records for center health registry

  1. An Overview of 9/11 Experiences and Respiratory and Mental Health Conditions among World Trade Center Health Registry Enrollees

    PubMed Central

    DiGrande, Laura; Brackbill, Robert; Prann, Angela; Cone, James; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J.; Pezeshki, Grant; Thomas, Pauline; Galea, Sandro; Williamson, David; Frieden, Thomas R.; Thorpe, Lorna

    2008-01-01

    To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health outcomes 2–3 years post-9/11. Results are extrapolated to the estimated universe of people eligible to enroll in the WTCHR to determine magnitude of impact. Building occupants, persons on the street or in transit in lower Manhattan on 9/11, local residents, rescue and recovery workers/volunteers, and area school children and staff were interviewed and enrolled in the WTCHR between September 2003 and November 2004. A total of 71,437 people enrolled in the WTCHR, for 17.4% coverage of the estimated eligible exposed population (nearly 410,000); 30% were recruited from lists, and 70% were self-identified. Many reported being in the dust cloud from the collapsing WTC Towers (51%), witnessing traumatic events (70%), or sustaining an injury (13%). After 9/11, 67% of adult enrollees reported new or worsening respiratory symptoms, 3% reported newly diagnosed asthma, 16% screened positive for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and 8% for serious psychological distress (SPD). Newly diagnosed asthma was most common among rescue and recovery workers who worked on the debris pile (4.1%). PTSD was higher among those who reported Hispanic ethnicity (30%), household income <$25,000 (31%), or being injured (35%). Using previously published estimates of the total number of exposed people per WTCHR eligibility criteria, we estimate between 3,800 and 12,600 adults experienced newly diagnosed asthma and 34,600–70,200 adults experienced PTSD following the attacks, suggesting extensive adverse health impacts beyond the immediate deaths and injuries from the acute event. PMID:18785012

  2. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  3. 9/11-Related Experiences and Tasks of Landfill and Barge Workers: Qualitative Analysis from the World Trade Center Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have documented the experiences of individuals who participated in the recovery and cleanup efforts at the World Trade Center Recovery Operation at Fresh Kills Landfill, on debris loading piers, and on transport barges after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of workers and volunteers from the World Trade Center Health Registry. Qualitative methods were used to analyze the narratives. Results Twenty workers and volunteers were interviewed. They described the transport of debris to the Landfill via barges, the tasks and responsibilities associated with their post-9/11 work at the Landfill, and their reflections on their post-9/11 experiences. Tasks included sorting through debris, recovering human remains, searching for evidence from the terrorist attacks, and providing food and counseling services. Exposures mentioned included dust, fumes, and odors. Eight years after the World Trade Center disaster, workers expressed frustration about poor risk communication during recovery and cleanup work. Though proud of their contributions in the months after 9/11, some participants were concerned about long-term health outcomes. Conclusions This qualitative study provided unique insight into the experiences, exposures, and concerns of understudied groups of 9/11 recovery and cleanup workers. The findings are being used to inform the development of subsequent World Trade Center Health Registry exposure and health assessments. PMID:21575237

  4. Evaluation and implementation of public health registries.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D J; Henry, R C; Hogan, J G; Van Amburg, G H; Taylor, J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid proliferation of registries has occurred during the last 20 years. Given the long-term commitment of resources associated with registries and limited public health funding, proposals for new registries should be carefully considered before being funded. A registry is defined as a data base of identifiable persons containing a clearly defined set of health and demographic data collected for a specific public health purpose. Criteria for evaluating whether a registry is needed, feasible, or the most effective and efficient means of collecting a specific set of health data are presented. They include an evaluation of the stated purpose; a review of the function, duration, and scope of the registry; consideration of existing alternative data sources; an assessment of the practical feasibility of the registry; the likelihood of sufficient start-up and long-term funding; and an evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the registry. Creating a public health registry is a complex process. A range of technical and organizational skills is required for a registry to be successfully implemented. Eight requirements are identified as crucial for the successful development of a new registry. They include an implementation plan, adequate documentation, quality control procedures, case definition and case-finding (ascertainment) procedures, determination of data elements, data collection and processing procedures, data access policy, and a framework for dissemination of registry data and findings. PMID:1902306

  5. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  6. Comorbidity of 9/11-related PTSD and depression in the World Trade Center Health Registry 10-11 years postdisaster.

    PubMed

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M; Liao, Tim; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report elevated prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among persons exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster compared to those unexposed; few have evaluated long-term PTSD with comorbid depression. We examined prevalence and risk factors for probable PTSD, probable depression, and both conditions 10-11 years post-9/11 among 29,486 World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees who completed surveys at Wave 1 (2003-2004), Wave 2 (2006-2007), and Wave 3 (2011-2012). Enrollees reporting physician diagnosed pre-9/11 PTSD or depression were excluded. PTSD was defined as scoring ≥ 44 on the PTSD Checklist and depression as scoring ≥ 10 on the 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire. We examined 4 groups: comorbid PTSD and depression, PTSD only, depression only, and neither. Among enrollees, 15.2% reported symptoms indicative of PTSD at Wave 3, 14.9% of depression, and 10.1% of both. Comorbid PTSD and depression was associated with high 9/11 exposures, low social integration, health-related unemployment, and experiencing ≥ 1 traumatic life event post-9/11. Comorbid persons experienced poorer outcomes on all PTSD-related impairment measures, life satisfaction, overall health, and unmet mental health care need compared to those with only a single condition. These findings highlight the importance of ongoing screening and treatment for both conditions, particularly among those at risk for mental health comorbidity.

  7. Comorbidity of 9/11-related PTSD and depression in the World Trade Center Health Registry 10-11 years postdisaster.

    PubMed

    Caramanica, Kimberly; Brackbill, Robert M; Liao, Tim; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-12-01

    Many studies report elevated prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among persons exposed to the September 11, 2001 (9/11) disaster compared to those unexposed; few have evaluated long-term PTSD with comorbid depression. We examined prevalence and risk factors for probable PTSD, probable depression, and both conditions 10-11 years post-9/11 among 29,486 World Trade Center Health Registry enrollees who completed surveys at Wave 1 (2003-2004), Wave 2 (2006-2007), and Wave 3 (2011-2012). Enrollees reporting physician diagnosed pre-9/11 PTSD or depression were excluded. PTSD was defined as scoring ≥ 44 on the PTSD Checklist and depression as scoring ≥ 10 on the 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire. We examined 4 groups: comorbid PTSD and depression, PTSD only, depression only, and neither. Among enrollees, 15.2% reported symptoms indicative of PTSD at Wave 3, 14.9% of depression, and 10.1% of both. Comorbid PTSD and depression was associated with high 9/11 exposures, low social integration, health-related unemployment, and experiencing ≥ 1 traumatic life event post-9/11. Comorbid persons experienced poorer outcomes on all PTSD-related impairment measures, life satisfaction, overall health, and unmet mental health care need compared to those with only a single condition. These findings highlight the importance of ongoing screening and treatment for both conditions, particularly among those at risk for mental health comorbidity. PMID:25470556

  8. 75 FR 16488 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Conference Call Time and Date: 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. EDT... National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council, which is convened by... public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides overall guidance to...

  9. 75 FR 59727 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Meeting Time and Date: 9 a.m.--5 p.m. EDT, Tuesday... sixth meeting of the National Conversation on Public ] Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council... approach to protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council...

  10. 75 FR 41505 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Meeting Time and Date: 1 p.m.-5 p.m. EDT... National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council, which is convened by... protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides...

  11. 75 FR 75474 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Meeting Time and Date: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. EST, Wednesday... seventh meeting of the National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council... approach to protecting the public's health from harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council...

  12. 76 FR 9578 - National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council Meeting Time and Date: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday, March... Health and Chemical Exposures Leadership Council. The National Conversation on Public Health and Chemical... harmful chemical exposures. The Leadership Council provides overall guidance to the National...

  13. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports. PMID:19227671

  14. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports.

  15. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  16. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP Dietary Guidelines Physical Activity Guidelines Health Literacy and Communication Health Care Quality and Patient Safety Healthy People healthfinder health.gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health ...

  17. Staffing and Training Requirements for Tumor Registry Centers in the State of Louisiana. Technical Report 69-101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, C. Dennis

    An exploratory study was conducted to obtain information regarding staff requirements in small tumor registry centers, involving a brief analysis of existing tumor registry centers and exploration of training and organizational factors that might be associated with establishing new centers. Activities performed by tumor registry personnel were…

  18. The Trace Center International Hardware/Software Registry: Programs for Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary

    1982-01-01

    The Trace Center (University of Wisconsin) has assembled a registry of hardware/software programs and adaptations for the handicapped user. The registry contains information on augmentative devices for motoric, sensory, or cognitive skills; special inputs that provide access to standard software; and other programs with speech output. (CL)

  19. A comprehensive stroke center patient registry: advantages, limitations, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Dorsey, Adrianne M.; Monlezun, Dominique J.; George, Alex J.; Shaban, Amir; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Albright, Karen C.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of a medical data registry allows institutions to effectively manage information for many different investigations related to the registry, as well as evaluate patient's trends over time, with the ultimate goal of recognizing trends that may improve outcomes in a particular patient population. Methods The purpose of this article is to illustrate our experience with a stroke patient registry at a comprehensive stroke center and highlight advantages, disadvantages, and lessons learned in the process of designing, implementing, and maintaining a stroke registry. We detail the process of stroke registry methodology, common data element (CDE) definitions, the generation of manuscripts from a registry, and the limitations. Advantages The largest advantage of a registry is the ability to prospectively add patients, while allowing investigators to go back and collect information retrospectively if needed. The continuous addition of new patients increases the sample size of studies from year to year, and it also allows reflection on clinical practices from previous years and the ability to investigate trends in patient management over time. Limitations The greatest limitation in this registry pertains to our single-entry technique where multiple sites of data entry and transfer may generate errors within the registry. Lessons Learned To reduce the potential for errors and maximize the accuracy and efficiency of the registry, we invest significant time in training competent registry users and project leaders. With effective training and transition of leadership positions, which are continuous and evolving processes, we have attempted to optimize our clinical research registry for knowledge gain and quality improvement at our center. PMID:26913217

  20. Linking a population biobank with national health registries-the estonian experience.

    PubMed

    Leitsalu, Liis; Alavere, Helene; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Leego, Erkki; Metspalu, Andres

    2015-04-16

    The Estonian population-based biobank, with 52,000 participants' genetic and health data, is the largest epidemiological cohort in the Baltic region. Participants were recruited through a network of medical professionals throughout Estonia (population 1.34 million). Unique legislation as well as a broad consent form give the Estonian Genome Center, a research institute of the University of Tartu, permission to re-contact participants and to retrieve participants' data from national registries and databases. In addition to two re-contacting projects to update the health data of participants, extensive clinical characterizations have been retrieved from national registries and hospital databases regularly since 2010. Acquiring data from electronic health records and registries has provided a means to update and enhance the database of the Genome Center in a timely manner and at low cost. The resulting database allows a wide spectrum of genomic and epidemiological research to be conducted with the aim of benefitting public health. Future plans include linking the genome center database with the national health information system through X-road and exchanging data in real time, as well as using the genetic data and the technical infrastructure available for piloting personalized medicine in Estonia.

  1. Clinical Cancer Registries - Are They Up for Health Services Research?

    PubMed

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical cancer registries are a valuable data source for health services research (HSR). HSR is in need of high quality routine care data for its evaluations. However, the secondary use of routine data - such as documented cancer cases in a disease registry - poses new challenges in terms of data quality, IT-management, documentation processes and data privacy. In the clinical cancer registry Heilbronn-Franken, real-world data from the Giessen Tumor Documentation System (GTDS) was utilized for analyses of patients' disease processes and guideline adherence in follow-up care. A process was developed to map disease state definitions to fields of the GTDS database and extract patients' disease progress information. Thus, the disease process of sub-cohorts could be compared to each other, e.g., comparison of disease free survival of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-positive and -negative women who were treated with Trastuzumab, a targeted therapy applied in breast cancer. In principle, such comparisons are feasible and of great value for HSR as they depict a routine care setting of a diverse patient cohort. Yet, local documentation practice, missing flow of information from external health care providers or small sub-cohorts impede the analyses of clinical cancer registries data bases and usage for HSR. PMID:27577380

  2. [The contribution of cancer registries in environmental health studies].

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Fazzo, L; Fusco, M; Benedetti, M; Pirastu, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    Cancer incidence is an outcome of interest in studies assessing the health impact of polluted sites, for which an example is represented by SENTIERI Project. Incidence data are characterized by better diagnostic quality and are not influenced by survival factors, furthermore they allow the investigation of high-survival neoplasms (i.e. childhood cancer) and rare malignancies. Furthermore, the study of incidence is more informative than mortality for non-lethal tumours, therefore it represents an advancement in respect to the study of mortality completed in SENTIERI Project. In the last decade in Italy some environmental epidemiology studies used cancer register data, for example the Biancavilla (Sicily) investigation on fluoro-edenite related mesothelioma and the study in an area of Naples Province where hazardous waste was extensively dumped. In this frame, ISS planned some collaborative studies with Siracusa, Mantua and Ferrara cancer Registries, where three major polluted sites are located. Following these pilot studies an ISS-AIRTUM (Italian Association of Cancer Registries) collaborative study has been planned. For a description of SENTIERI, refer to the 2010 supplement of Epidemiology & Prevention, devoted to the Project.

  3. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  4. Electronic Public Health Registry of Extensively Drug-Resistant Organisms, Illinois, USA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michael Y.; Cheng-Leidig, Robynn; Driscoll, Mary; Tang, Angela S.; Gao, Wei; Runningdeer, Erica; Arwady, M. Allison; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    In response to clusters of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in Illinois, USA, the Illinois Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chicago Prevention Epicenter launched a statewide Web-based registry designed for bidirectional data exchange among health care facilities. CRE occurrences are entered and searchable in the system, enabling interfacility communication of patient information. For rapid notification of facilities, admission feeds are automated. During the first 12 months of implementation (November 1, 2013–October 31, 2014), 1,557 CRE reports (≈4.3/day) were submitted from 115 acute care hospitals, 5 long-term acute care hospitals, 46 long-term care facilities, and 7 reference laboratories. Guided by a state and local public health task force of infection prevention specialists and microbiologists and a nonprofit informatics entity, Illinois Department of Public Health deployed a statewide registry of extensively drug-resistant organisms. The legal, technical, and collaborative underpinnings of the system enable rapid incorporation of other emerging organisms. PMID:26402744

  5. Electronic Public Health Registry of Extensively Drug-Resistant Organisms, Illinois, USA.

    PubMed

    Trick, William E; Lin, Michael Y; Cheng-Leidig, Robynn; Driscoll, Mary; Tang, Angela S; Gao, Wei; Runningdeer, Erica; Arwady, M Allison; Weinstein, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    In response to clusters of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in Illinois, USA, the Illinois Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chicago Prevention Epicenter launched a statewide Web-based registry designed for bidirectional data exchange among health care facilities. CRE occurrences are entered and searchable in the system, enabling interfacility communication of patient information. For rapid notification of facilities, admission feeds are automated. During the first 12 months of implementation (November 1, 2013-October 31, 2014), 1,557 CRE reports (≈4.3/day) were submitted from 115 acute care hospitals, 5 long-term acute care hospitals, 46 long-term care facilities, and 7 reference laboratories. Guided by a state and local public health task force of infection prevention specialists and microbiologists and a nonprofit informatics entity, Illinois Department of Public Health deployed a statewide registry of extensively drug-resistant organisms. The legal, technical, and collaborative underpinnings of the system enable rapid incorporation of other emerging organisms.

  6. The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry: a multi-national, community-based registry of pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research (Global Network) supports and conducts clinical trials in resource-limited countries by pairing foreign and U.S. investigators, with the goal of evaluating low-cost, sustainable interventions to improve the health of women and children. Accurate reporting of births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, maternal mortality, and measures of obstetric and neonatal care is critical to efforts to discover strategies for improving pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. Because most of the sites in the Global Network have weak registration within their health care systems, the Global Network developed the Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR), a prospective, population-based registry of pregnancies at the Global Network sites to provide precise data on health outcomes and measures of care. Methods Pregnant women are enrolled in the MNHR if they reside in or receive healthcare in designated groups of communities within sites in the Global Network. For each woman, demographic, health characteristics and major outcomes of pregnancy are recorded. Data are recorded at enrollment, the time of delivery and at 42 days postpartum. Results From 2010 through 2013 Global Network sites were located in Argentina, Guatemala, Belgaum and Nagpur, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Zambia. During this period, 283,496 pregnant women were enrolled in the MNHR; this number represented 98.8% of all eligible women. Delivery data were collected for 98.8% of women and 42-day follow-up data for 98.4% of those enrolled. In this supplement, there are a series of manuscripts that use data gathered through the MNHR to report outcomes of these pregnancies. Conclusions Developing public policy and improving public health in countries with poor perinatal outcomes is, in part, dependent upon understanding the outcome of every pregnancy. Because the worst pregnancy outcomes typically occur in countries with limited health registration

  7. A population-based registry as a source of health indicators for rare diseases: the ten-year experience of the Veneto Region’s rare diseases registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although rare diseases have become a major public health issue, there is a paucity of population-based data on rare diseases. The aim of this epidemiological study was to provide descriptive figures referring to a sizable group of unrelated rare diseases. Methods Data from the rare diseases registry established in the Veneto Region of north-east Italy (population 4,900,000), referring to the years from 2002 to 2012, were analyzed. The registry is based on a web-based system accessed by different users. Cases are enrolled by two different sources: clinicians working at Centers of expertise officially designated to diagnose and care patients with rare diseases and health professionals working in the local health districts. Deaths of patients are monitored by Death Registry. Results So far, 19,547 patients with rare diseases have been registered, and 23% of them are pediatric cases. The overall raw prevalence of the rare diseases monitored in the population under study is 33.09 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 32.56-33.62), whilst the overall incidence is 3.85 per 10,000 inhabitants (95% CI 3.67-4.03). The most commonly-recorded diagnoses belong to the following nosological groups: congenital malformations (Prevalence: 5.45/10,000), hematological diseases (4.83/10,000), ocular disorders (4.47/10,000), diseases of the nervous system (3.51/10,000), and metabolic disorders (2,95/10,000). Most of the deaths in the study population occur among pediatric patients with congenital malformations, and among adult cases with neurological diseases. Rare diseases of the central nervous system carry the highest fatality rate (71.36/1,000). Rare diseases explain 4.2% of general population Years of Life Lost (YLLs), comparing to 1.2% attributable to infectious diseases and 2.6% to diabetes mellitus. Conclusions Our estimates of the burden of rare diseases at population level confirm that these conditions are a relevant public health issue. Our snapshot of their epidemiology

  8. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  9. Connecting Communities to Health Research: Development of the Project CONNECT Minority Research Registry

    PubMed Central

    Green, Melissa A.; Kim, Mimi M.; Barber, Sharrelle; Odulana, Abedowale A.; Godley, Paul A.; Howard, Daniel L.; Corbie-Smith, Giselle M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prevention and treatment standards are based on evidence obtained in behavioral and clinical research. However, racial and ethnic minorities remain relatively absent from the science that develops these standards. While investigators have successfully recruited participants for individual studies using tailored recruitment methods, these strategies require considerable time and resources. Research registries, typically developed around a disease or condition, serve as a promising model for a targeted recruitment method to increase minority participation in health research. This study assessed the tailored recruitment methods used to populate a health research registry targeting African-American community members. Methods We describe six recruitment methods applied between September 2004 and October 2008 to recruit members into a health research registry. Recruitment included direct (existing studies, public databases, community outreach) and indirect methods (radio, internet, and email) targeting the general population, local universities, and African American communities. We conducted retrospective analysis of the recruitment by method using descriptive statistics, frequencies, and chi-square statistics. Results During the recruitment period, 608 individuals enrolled in the research registry. The majority of enrollees were African American, female, and in good health. Direct and indirect methods were identified as successful strategies for subgroups. Findings suggest significant associations between recruitment methods and age, presence of existing health condition, prior research participation, and motivation to join the registry. Conclusions A health research registry can be a successful tool to increase minority awareness of research opportunities. Multi-pronged recruitment approaches are needed to reach diverse subpopulations. PMID:23340183

  10. Evaluating trauma center process performance in an integrated trauma system with registry data

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lynne; Lavoie, André; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Amini, Rachid; Belcaïd, Amina; Sampalis, John S

    2013-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of trauma center performance implies the use of indicators that evaluate clinical processes. Despite the availability of routinely collected clinical data in most trauma systems, quality improvement efforts are often limited to hospital-based audit of adverse patient outcomes. Objective: To identify and evaluate a series of process performance indicators (PPI) that can be calculated using routinely collected trauma registry data. Materials and Methods: PPI were identified using a review of published literature, trauma system documentation, and expert consensus. Data from the 59 trauma centers of the Quebec trauma system (1999, 2006; N = 99,444) were used to calculate estimates of conformity to each PPI for each trauma center. Outliers were identified by comparing each center to the global mean. PPI were evaluated in terms of discrimination (between-center variance), construct validity (correlation with designation level and patient volume), and forecasting (correlation over time). Results: Fifteen PPI were retained. Global proportions of conformity ranged between 6% for reduction of a major dislocation within 1 h and 97% for therapeutic laparotomy. Between-center variance was statistically significant for 13 PPI. Five PPI were significantly associated with designation level, 7 were associated with volume, and 11 were correlated over time. Conclusion: In our trauma system, results suggest that a series of 15 PPI supported by literature review or expert opinion can be calculated using routinely collected trauma registry data. We have provided evidence of their discrimination, construct validity, and forecasting properties. The between-center variance observed in this study highlights the importance of evaluating process performance in integrated trauma systems. PMID:23723617

  11. 78 FR 1825 - Notice of Establishment of an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Stakeholder Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Establishment of an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Stakeholder Registry AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION..., Acting Administrator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. BILLING CODE 3410-34-P...

  12. 77 FR 37678 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry: Notice of Charter..., that the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for...

  13. Compliance of clinical trial registries with the World Health Organization minimum data set: a survey

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo P; Moschetti, Ivan; Nurbhai, Munira; Compagnoni, Anna; Liberati, Alessandro; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Chan, An-Wen; Dickersin, Kay; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela; Moher, David; Sim, Ida; Volmink, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    Background Since September 2005 the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors has required that trials be registered in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) minimum dataset, in order to be considered for publication. The objective is to evaluate registries' and individual trial records' compliance with the 2006 version of the WHO minimum data set. Methods A retrospective evaluation of 21 online clinical trial registries (international, national, specialty, pharmaceutical industry and local) from April 2005 to February 2007 and a cross-sectional evaluation of a stratified random sample of 610 trial records from the 21 registries. Results Among 11 registries that provided guidelines for registration, the median compliance with the WHO criteria were 14 out of 20 items (range 6 to 20). In the period April 2005–February 2007, six registries increased their compliance by six data items, on average. None of the local registry websites published guidelines on the trial data items required for registration. Slightly more than half (330/610; 54.1%, 95% CI 50.1% – 58.1%) of trial records completed the contact details criteria while 29.7% (181/610, 95% CI 26.1% – 33.5%) completed the key clinical and methodological data fields. Conclusion While the launch of the WHO minimum data set seemed to positively influence registries with better standardisation of approaches, individual registry entries are largely incomplete. Initiatives to ensure quality assurance of registries and trial data should be encouraged. Peer reviewers and editors should scrutinise clinical trial registration records to ensure consistency with WHO's core content requirements when considering trial-related publications. PMID:19624821

  14. Integration of site-specific health information: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry health assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, A.M.; Siegel, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry is required to conduct a health assessment of any site that is listed on or proposed for the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List. Sixteen US Department of Energy (DOE) sites currently fall into this category. Health assessments contain a qualitative description of impacts to public health and the environment from hazardous waste sites, as well as recommendations for actions to mitigate or eliminate risk. Because these recommendations may have major impacts on compliance activities at DOE facilities, the health assessments are an important source of information for the monitoring activities of DOE's Office of Environmental Compliance (OEC). This report provides an overview of the activities involved in preparing the health assessment, its role in environmental management, and its key elements.

  15. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  16. Oceans and Human Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ocean and human health science can help prevent disease outbreaks and improve public health through a deeper understanding of the causes ... our Center and the field of oceans and human health science. More Research Learn about the research ...

  17. [EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH: DATA FROM THE PARIS SUDDEN DEATH EXPERTISE CENTER REGISTRY].

    PubMed

    Jouven, Xavier; Bougouin, Wulfran; Karam, Nicole; Marijon, Eloi

    2015-09-01

    Sudden cardiac death is an unexpected cardiac arrest without obvious extra-cardiac cause. Epidemiology of sudden cardiac death has been poorly documented in France, mainly because of challenging requirement in order to capture all cases in a specific area. The Parisian registry (Sudden Death Expertise Center, European Georges Pompidou Hospital, Paris) was initiated in May 2011 and analyzed data of all sudden death in Paris and suburbs (6.6 millions inhabitants). Over 3 years, the annual incidence estimated to 50-70 per 100,000. Those occurred mainly in men (69%), with a mean age of 65 year, and at home (75%). The event was witnessed in 80% of cases, but bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated in only half of cases. Initial cardiac rhythm was ventricular fibrillation in 25%. Survival to hospital discharge remains low (8%).

  18. A distributed health data network analysis of survival outcomes: the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries perspective.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samprit; Cafri, Guy; Isaacs, Abby J; Graves, Stephen; Paxton, Elizabeth; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-12-17

    The International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries is a multinational initiative established by the United States Food and Drug Administration to develop a health data network aimed at providing a robust infrastructure to facilitate evidence-based decision-making on performance of medical devices. Through the International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries, individual data holders have complete control of their data and can choose to participate in studies of their choice. In this article, we present an overview of the data extraction process and the analytic strategy employed to answer several device performance-related questions in total hip arthroplasty and total knee arthroplasty. In the process, we discuss some nuances pertinent to International Consortium for Orthopaedic Registries data that pose certain statistical challenges, and we briefly suggest strategies to be adopted to address them. PMID:25520413

  19. [The (German) Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Wolf, U; Barnes, B; Bertz, J; Haberland, J; Laudi, A; Stöcker, M; Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K; Kurth, B-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancer represents the second most common cause of death in Germany. The country's federal states operate regional population-based cancer registries that collect and analyze data on cancer patients. This provides an essential basis for describing the cancer burden in the German population. In order to obtain valid and reliable information on cancer incidence at the national level, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) set up the Federal Cancer Surveillance Unit in 1983 as a central institution for evaluating this cancer registry data. In August 2009, when the Federal Cancer Registry Data Act (BKRG) came into force, the Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the RKI took over the work of the Cancer Surveillance Unit with a broader remit. In the future, it will also regularly publish findings on survival, prevalence, and tumor stage distribution. A newly established record linkage process will help identify multiple submissions from the federal states. Further innovations and new tasks of the ZfKD include expanding an interactive Internet platform and encouraging a more intensive use of cancer registry data for epidemiological research by providing datasets to external scientists. The range of information available to the interested public is also to be expanded. PMID:22015795

  20. [The (German) Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) in Berlin].

    PubMed

    Wolf, U; Barnes, B; Bertz, J; Haberland, J; Laudi, A; Stöcker, M; Schönfeld, I; Kraywinkel, K; Kurth, B-M

    2011-11-01

    Cancer represents the second most common cause of death in Germany. The country's federal states operate regional population-based cancer registries that collect and analyze data on cancer patients. This provides an essential basis for describing the cancer burden in the German population. In order to obtain valid and reliable information on cancer incidence at the national level, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) set up the Federal Cancer Surveillance Unit in 1983 as a central institution for evaluating this cancer registry data. In August 2009, when the Federal Cancer Registry Data Act (BKRG) came into force, the Center for Cancer Registry Data (ZfKD) at the RKI took over the work of the Cancer Surveillance Unit with a broader remit. In the future, it will also regularly publish findings on survival, prevalence, and tumor stage distribution. A newly established record linkage process will help identify multiple submissions from the federal states. Further innovations and new tasks of the ZfKD include expanding an interactive Internet platform and encouraging a more intensive use of cancer registry data for epidemiological research by providing datasets to external scientists. The range of information available to the interested public is also to be expanded.

  1. Medical Toxicology and Public Health-Update on Research and Activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry : Environmental Exposures among Arctic Populations: The Maternal Organics Monitoring Study in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mehruba; Ridpath, Alison; Berner, James; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that in-utero exposure to environmental chemicals, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), heavy metals, and radionuclides, that might bioaccumulate in the mother may increase a newborn's risk of adverse developmental, neurological, and immunologic effects. Chemical contamination of bodies of water and strong ocean currents worldwide can drive these chemicals from lower latitudes to Arctic waters where they accumulate in common traditional subsistence foods. In response to concerns of the people from Alaska of the effects of bio-accumulated chemicals on their children, the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study(MOMS) was developed. The objective of the study was to assess the risks and benefits associated with the population's subsistence diet. Data analysis of biological samples at the CDC's NCEH laboratory and maternal questionnaires is ongoing. Results will be provided to Alaska Native communities to help support public health actions and inform future interventions and research. PMID:27379884

  2. Medical Toxicology and Public Health-Update on Research and Activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry : Environmental Exposures among Arctic Populations: The Maternal Organics Monitoring Study in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mehruba; Ridpath, Alison; Berner, James; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that in-utero exposure to environmental chemicals, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), heavy metals, and radionuclides, that might bioaccumulate in the mother may increase a newborn's risk of adverse developmental, neurological, and immunologic effects. Chemical contamination of bodies of water and strong ocean currents worldwide can drive these chemicals from lower latitudes to Arctic waters where they accumulate in common traditional subsistence foods. In response to concerns of the people from Alaska of the effects of bio-accumulated chemicals on their children, the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study(MOMS) was developed. The objective of the study was to assess the risks and benefits associated with the population's subsistence diet. Data analysis of biological samples at the CDC's NCEH laboratory and maternal questionnaires is ongoing. Results will be provided to Alaska Native communities to help support public health actions and inform future interventions and research.

  3. 76 FR 63623 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... health and well being; and (3) train state and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR... items for the BSC Meeting on November 3-4, 2011, will include NCEH/ATSDR Office of the Director...

  4. 78 FR 32657 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... being; and (3) train state and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice and... fulfill its mission in protecting America's health. Matters To Be Discussed: The agenda items for the...

  5. 76 FR 24031 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... being; and (3) train state and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice and... fulfill its mission in protecting America's health. Matters To Be Discussed: The agenda items for the...

  6. 77 FR 24720 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... being; and (3) train state and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice and... fulfill its mission in protecting America's health. Matters to be Discussed: The agenda items for the...

  7. 77 FR 58557 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR) In... being; and (3) train state and local personnel in health work. The BSC, NCEH/ATSDR provides advice and... fulfill its mission in protecting America's health. Matters To Be Discussed: The agenda items for the...

  8. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  9. New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Stroke Registry II. Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wityk, RJ; Pazdera, L; Chang, H-M; Pessin, MS; DeWitt, LD

    2005-01-01

    Among 407 New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Registry (NEMC-PCR) patients, the extracranial (ECVA) and intracranial vertebral arteries (ICVA) were the commonest sites of severe occlusive disease followed by the basilar artery (BA). Severe occlusive lesions were found in >1 large artery in 148 patients; 134 had unilateral or bilateral severe disease at one arterial location. Single arterial site occlusive disease occurred most often in the ECVA (52 patients, 15 bilateral) followed by the ICVA (40 patients, 12 bilateral) and the BA (46 patients). Involvement of the ICVAs and the BA was very common and some patients also had ECVA lesions. Hypertension, smoking, and coronary and peripheral vascular disease were most prevalent in patients with extracranial disease while diabetes and hyperlipidemia were more common when occlusive lesions were only intracranial. Intra-arterial embolism was the most common mechanism of brain infarction in patients with ECVA and ICVA occlusive disease. ICVA occlusive lesions infrequently caused infarction limited to the proximal territory (medulla and posterior inferior cerebellum). BA lesions most often caused infarcts limited to the middle posterior circulation territory (pons and anterior inferior cerebellum). Posterior cerebral artery occlusive lesions were predominantly embolic. Penetrating artery disease caused mostly pontine and thalamic infarcts. Prognosis was poorest in patients with BA disease. The best prognosis surprisingly was in patients who had multiple arterial occlusive lesions; they often had position-sensitive transient ischemic attacks during months or years. PMID:20396470

  10. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center For Clinicians resources, publications Publications for Your Office Resources for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies Mood Disorders ...

  11. A COLLEGE HEALTH CENTER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRAD, BERNARD

    THIS REPORT CONSIDERS PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS RELATED TO THE DESIGN AND ESTABLISHMENT OF COLLEGE HEALTH FACILITIES. THIS INCLUDES THE RESULTS OF A STUDY INVOLVING COLORADO, KNOX, AND WITTENBERG COLLEGES IN WHICH PERSONAL VISITS AND EXPERT TESTIMONY CONCLUDED THAT THE HEALTH SERVICES OF SMALL COLLEGES IN THE CENTRAL AND WESTERN STATES WERE SERIOUSLY…

  12. A College Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bard, Bernard

    This report considers problems and solutions related to the design and establishment of college health facilities. This includes the results of a study involving Colorado, Knox, and Wittenberg Colleges in which personal visits and expert testimony concluded that the health services of small colleges in the central and western states were seriously…

  13. The Generalizability of a Participant Registry for Minority Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Effective strategies to recruit minority elders into health research (e.g., through churches, partnering with community gatekeepers) often involve nonrandom sampling methods. The current study has two aims: (a) to examine some new practices in recruitment of African American elders and (b) to determine the similarities and differences of…

  14. School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining student health, safety, and welfare is a primary goal for any K-12 school system. If a child becomes sick, is injured, or seems in any other way incapacitated at school, it is the understood responsibility that the school will provide care and, if necessary, contact the parents and direct the child to outside treatment. Beyond that…

  15. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  16. [Trauma registries: a health priority, a strategic project for the SEMICYUC].

    PubMed

    Chico Fernández, M; García Fuentes, C; Guerrero López, F

    2013-05-01

    The most efficient approach to traumatologic disease is prevention, but physicians also must supervise care of the victims. An operational and effective trauma registry requires financial support, adequate software, a well-defined population, personnel committed to training, and a detailed process for data collection, reporting, validation and the maintenance of confidentiality. Above all, however, motivation is required. Registries can offer many benefits in relation to these highly prevalent disorders, with an impact in terms of health promotion and even advantages in the form of cost reductions, as well as relief from the suffering caused by trauma (mortality, disability)-contributing to improve the efficiency and quality of critical trauma care. The SEMICYUC has demonstrated its ability to establish and maintain records of national interest, and this should become a priority project.

  17. The Illinois Women’s Health Registry: advancing women’s health research and education in Illinois, USA

    PubMed Central

    Bristol-Gould, Sarah; Desjardins, Michelle; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2010-01-01

    To achieve the goal of personalized medicine, we must first improve our understanding of the differences in health and illness between men and women. The purpose of the Illinois Women’s Health Registry (USA) is to provide a research and education tool that advances scientific knowledge of sex- and gender-based differences in health and disease. Specifically, the Registry is a confidential 30-min health and lifestyle survey for female residents of Illinois over the age of 18 years. The survey includes questions regarding health, environment, health-related behaviors, symptoms and illnesses or conditions that a participant may have now or has had in the past. By enrolling in the Registry, women throughout the state are provided with information and access to clinical research studies that they may be eligible for, based on their self-reported health information. The Registry not only serves as a platform for recruitment into pivotal research studies, but also represents the beginning of a state-wide database that enables researchers to examine the collective de-identified health information provided by women living in Illinois. Ultimately, a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of these data will help to clarify the issues that women themselves identify as their main health concerns. In response to these concerns, specific research studies can be designed and launched, allowing us to eventually deliver tailored treatment and prevention options to women. Finally, by creating a reliable state-focused research tool, developed by staff that are trained in women’s health research, we can compare health issues across the state and apply strategies for improvement where it is needed most. This article will provide examples of sex differences in disease, the lack of federal enforcement for inclusion of women in studies, researcher-perceived burdens and sex-based reasons as to why recruitment of women is considered to be more challenging. In addition, this article

  18. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2011 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  19. An Update on the Florida State Twin Registry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeanette E.; Hart, Sara A.; Mikolajewski, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Florida State Twin Registry began in 2002 through a pilot study of personality disorders and executive cognitive functioning in adult twins. Since 2006, the registry has grown substantially as part of the Learning Disability Research Center at Florida State University that recently began its second funding cycle through the National Institute of Child Health and Development. An update on the Florida State Twin Registry sample, focus, and measures is provided as well as future directions. PMID:23067863

  20. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  1. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  2. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  3. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  4. Use of Health Plan Combined with Registry Data to Predict Clinical Trial Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Wright, Nicole C; Xie, Fenglong; Chen, Lang; Zhang, Jie; Saag, Kenneth G; Bharat, Aseem; Kremer, Joel; Cofield, Stacey; Winthrop, Kevin; Delzell, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Large pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) are increasingly used to conduct comparative effectiveness research. In the context of planning a safety PCT of the live herpes zoster vaccine in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients age ≥ 50 receiving anti- tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy, we evaluated the use of health plan combined with registry data to assess the feasibility of recruiting the 4,000 patients needed for the trial and to facilitate site selection. Methods Using national United States data from Medicare, we identified older RA patients who received anti-TNF therapy in the last quarter of 2009. Extrapolations were made from the Medicare patient population to younger patients and those with other types of insurance using the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) disease registry. Patients’ treating rheumatologists were grouped into practices and sorted by size from the greatest to the least number of eligible patients. Results Approximately 50,000 RA patients receiving anti-TNF therapy were identified in the Medicare data, distributed across 1,980 physician practices. After augmenting Medicare data with information from CORRONA and extrapolating to younger patients and those with other types of insurance, more than 12,000 potentially eligible study subjects were identified from the 40-45 largest rheumatology practices. Conclusion Health plan and registry databases appear useful to assess feasibility of large pragmatic trials and to assist in selection of recruitment sites with the greatest number of potentially eligible patients. This novel approach is applicable to trials with simple inclusion/exclusion criteria that can be readily assessed in these data sources. PMID:24346611

  5. The Québec BCG Vaccination Registry (1956–1992): assessing data quality and linkage with administrative health databases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination registries have undoubtedly proven useful for estimating vaccination coverage as well as examining vaccine safety and effectiveness. However, their use for population health research is often limited. The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Vaccination Registry for the Canadian province of Québec comprises some 4 million vaccination records (1926-1992). This registry represents a unique opportunity to study potential associations between BCG vaccination and various health outcomes. So far, such studies have been hampered by the absence of a computerized version of the registry. We determined the completeness and accuracy of the recently computerized BCG Vaccination Registry, as well as examined its linkability with demographic and administrative medical databases. Methods Two systematically selected verification samples, each representing ~0.1% of the registry, were used to ascertain accuracy and completeness of the electronic BCG Vaccination Registry. Agreement between the paper [listings (n = 4,987 records) and vaccination certificates (n = 4,709 records)] and electronic formats was determined along several nominal and BCG-related variables. Linkage feasibility with the Birth Registry (probabilistic approach) and provincial Healthcare Registration File (deterministic approach) was examined using nominal identifiers for a random sample of 3,500 individuals born from 1961 to 1974 and BCG vaccinated between 1970 and 1974. Results Exact agreement was observed for 99.6% and 81.5% of records upon comparing, respectively, the paper listings and vaccination certificates to their corresponding computerized records. The proportion of successful linkage was 77% with the Birth Registry, 70% with the Healthcare Registration File, 57% with both, and varied by birth year. Conclusions Computerization of this Registry yielded excellent results. The registry was complete and accurate, and linkage with administrative databases was highly feasible. This

  6. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  7. A method to map heterogeneity between near but non-equivalent semantic attributes in multiple health data registries.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Nadine; Leszczynski, Agnieszka

    2008-03-01

    Health registries from multiple jurisdictions often include terms that are assumed to be semantically equivalent (e.g. fetal death and stillbirth). Closer examination reveals that such attributes have near--but non-equivalent--semantics. Thus their degree of semantic heterogeneity is an important indicator of uncertainty associated with data integration between registries. We build an OWL-encoded ontology which formalizes the relationships between similar perinatal concepts found in different databases. We also introduce the concept of ontology-based metadata as a means of contextualizing such terms and linking context to the attribute data. This extended metadata are exported as XML from the health registries, and it--along with the OWL ontology--is interfaced via a web-based GUI accessible to health researchers. The GUI mapping serves as the basis for making ad hoc comparison and integration decisions. Uncertainty is addressed by precisely mapping semantic heterogeneity between fields.

  8. Development of a Patient Registry to Evaluate Hospital Admissions Related to Chemotherapy Toxicity in a Community Cancer Center1

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, Monika K.; Treacy, Jean; Maloney, Betty; Lavino, Antoinette; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Most chemotherapy (CT) administration occurs in routine care settings, yet little is known about treatment-related toxicity outside of clinical trials. To examine trends in toxicity, modify practice, and establish benchmarks for severe toxicity in a community cancer center we created a prospective registry of all treatment-related hospitalizations at the North Shore Medical Center Cancer Center, a community-based cancer facility in Peabody, MA. Methods Eligible population consisted of all adult cancer patients admitted to the hospital within 30 days of their last CT administration. Each admission was reviewed by a panel of hospital staff to determine whether admission was treatment-related. Information on admission was collected using a standard form. Results Between October 2001 and December 2003, there were 365 hospitalizations among patients receiving CT, 117 (32%) of which were deemed treatment-related. The median age of the cohort with treatment-related toxicity was 67 years, and 41% were male. Most frequent diagnoses were non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (23%) and colorectal cancer (21%), with 49% of the patients receiving treatment with palliative intent. The most common reasons for admission were gastrointestinal toxicity or infection. The mean length of stay was 7.1 days. Seven patients (6%) died during hospitalization. When the registry was reviewed to identify areas where care may be improved, several admissions for decadron-related hyperglycemia in nondiabetic patients with myeloma were noted. This led to introduction of glucose monitoring guidelines with no subsequent admissions for this toxicity since then. Conclusions About one third of hospital admissions in patients receiving CT are treatment-related and most occur in patients with advanced disease. Collection of data on toxicity in the routine care setting is feasible and may facilitate quality improvement. PMID:20871674

  9. National Center for Environmental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Asthma Carbon Monoxide Clean Water for Health Climate and Public Health Environmental Noise Exposure and Health ... Overviews Asthma Control Built Environment and Health Initiative Climate and Health Environmental Health Laboratory Environmental Health Services ...

  10. Patterns of health care seeking of Gulf War registry members prior to deployment.

    PubMed

    Miller, Richard N; Costigan, Daniel J; Young, Heather A; Kang, Han K; Dalager, Nancy; Mathes, Robert W; Crawford, Harriet C; Page, William F; Thaul, Susan

    2006-05-01

    Following the Gulf War (GW), large numbers of individuals reported illness that they attributed to exposures encountered during the GW deployment. In response, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense established programs and registries for the evaluation and documentation of GW-related illness. We obtained registrants' medical records, which contained information on outpatient encounters during the 1-year period before their GW deployment, to determine whether registrants with multisymptom illness (cases) have patterns of predeployment health care seeking that are different from those of well registrants (controls). We found that subjects had significantly more predeployment outpatient visits than controls, but this varied by type of visit. Although the number of certain types of predeployment outpatient visits is significantly associated with subsequent multisymptom illness, these associations will have limited predictive value. These findings increase our understanding of multisymptom illness, especially its chronic nature, and justify doing additional studies. PMID:16761884

  11. Reinventing the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives. PMID:16249294

  12. Reinventing the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives.

  13. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future. PMID:25553603

  14. A review of school mental health programs in SAMHSA's national registry of evidence-based programs and practices.

    PubMed

    George, Melissa; Taylor, Leslie; Schmidt, Sara C; Weist, Mark D

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE School programs provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP) were reviewed to describe program characteristics, costs, and ratings of research and dissemination. METHODS Data were gathered from the NREPP to identify mental health programs adaptable for schools. Program costs and quality and dissemination ratings were examined as a function of program characteristics. RESULTS School mental health programs constituted 32% of the registry, with 44% providing only materials at cost and 46% providing universal mental health promotion rather than intensive supports. Readiness for dissemination was poorer for programs providing only intensive supports, and quality of research increased as total costs of program implementation increased. CONCLUSIONS Mechanisms for tracking mental health promotion and treatment can be effective in disseminating information about evidence-based school programming. Assessing program transportability is necessary for decision making to match programs with the needs of particular schools and communities. PMID:23632576

  15. Government registries containing sensitive health data and the implementation of EU directive on the protection of personal data in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Lasse A

    2002-01-01

    Legislation on the protection of personal data was first enacted in Finland in 1987 (Act 471/1987) and revised in 1999 (Act 523/1999). The Personal Registries Act of 1987 established a special authority, the "data protection ombudsman" to ensure that a citizen's right to privacy would be maintained despite increased usage of computerised registries containing sensitive data. Health care and medical research, however, have been largely outside the scope of effective scrutiny due to special legislation that gives health care authorities the right to gather and register information on the medical history of an individual citizen. In Finland, the National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES)--which works in close co-operation with the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health--maintains or supervises several centralised registries containing sensitive data. These registries which are based on an exemption (Act 556/1989) from the general data protection legislation, contain in practice a complete database on all Finnish citizens that have used public health care services. Furthrmore, additional personal information is added into these databases. For example, the central registry on abortions contains not only the identification data of a subject who has had an abortion but also information on the reason for abortion and on the methods of contraception she used. It is noteworthy that these registers are not accessible to the physicians who treat the patient whose data is registered, but are used by the governmental authorities only. At the moment it is unclear whether the recent implementation of an EU directive into the Finnish legislation and the constitutional right to privacy in the revised Finnish constitution (effective from March 1, 2000 onwards) will have any impact on the content or usage of these centralised registers.

  16. The NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research Patient Registry Standard: A Report from the University of New Mexico’s Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvari, Shamsi; Youssof, Sarah; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries remove barriers to performing research by assembling patient cohorts and data in a systematic, efficient, and proactive manner. Consequently, registries are a valuable strategy for facilitating research and scientific discovery. Registries for rare diseases are arguably even more valuable since there is difficulty in assembling cohorts of adequate size for study. Recently, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research created a rare disease registry Standard to facilitate research across multiple registries. We implemented the Standard for the Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy patient registry created at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. We performed a data element analysis for each Common Data Element defined in the Standard. Problems included the use of previous HL7 versions, non-structured data types, and a recent update to the Standard. Overall, the Standard is an excellent first step toward standardizing patient registries to facilitate work on broader questions and promote novel interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:24551336

  17. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and health outcomes: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Kumari, Varuni; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Romero, Lorena; Evans, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many developed countries have regional and national clinical registries aimed at improving health outcomes of patients diagnosed with particular diseases or cared for in particular healthcare settings. Clinical quality registries (CQRs) are clinical registries established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care and providing feedback to improve health outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to understand the impact of CQRs on (1) mortality/survival; (2) measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of healthcare; (3) healthcare utilisation and (4) costs. Methods and analysis The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard strategy using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data abstraction tools will be followed. A search of the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and CINAHL will be undertaken, in addition to Google Scholar and grey literature, to identify studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2014. Case–control, cohort, randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials which describe the registry as an intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Narrative synthesis of study findings will be conducted, guided by a conceptual framework developed to analyse the outcome measure of the registry using defined criteria. If sufficient studies are identified with a similar outcome of interest and measure using the same comparator and time of interval, results will be pooled for random-effects meta-analysis. Test for heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis will be conducted. To identify reporting bias, forest plots and funnel plots will be created and, if required, Egger's test will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. Review results will be published as a part of thesis, peer-reviewed journal and conferences. Trial registration number CRD

  18. A Web-Based Interactive Diabetes Registry for Health Care Management and Planning in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Amira M; Subhani, Shazia N; Ahmad, Najlaa A; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H; Ibrahim, Heba M

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, eHealth is a rapidly growing technology. It provides good quality health services at lower cost and increased availability. Diabetes has reached an epidemic stage in Saudi Arabia and has a medical and economic impact at a countrywide level. Data are greatly needed to better understand and plan to prevent and manage this medical problem. Objective The Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) is an electronic medical file supported by clinical, investigational, and management data. It functions as a monitoring tool for medical, social, and cultural bases for primary and secondary prevention programs. Economic impact, in the form of direct or indirect cost, is part of the registry’s scope. The registry’s geographic information system (GIS) produces a variety of maps for diabetes and associated diseases. In addition to availability and distribution of health facilities in the Kingdom, GIS data provide health planners with the necessary information to make informed decisions. The electronic data bank serves as a research tool to help researchers for both prospective and retrospective studies. Methods A Web-based interactive GIS system was designed to serve as an electronic medical file for diabetic patients retrieving data from medical files by trained registrars. Data was audited and cleaned before it was archived in the electronic filing system. It was then used to produce epidemiologic, economic, and geographic reports. A total of 84,942 patients were registered from 2000 to 2012, growing by 10% annually. Results The SNDR reporting system for epidemiology data gives better understanding of the disease pattern, types, and gender characteristics. Part of the reporting system is to assess quality of health care using different parameters, such as HbA1c, that gives an impression of good diabetes control for each institute. Economic reports give accurate cost estimation of different services given to diabetic patients, such as the annual insulin

  19. New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Stroke Registry: I. Methods, Data Base, Distribution of Brain Lesions, Stroke Mechanisms, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C-S; Wityk, RJ; Glass, TA; Tapia, J; Pazdera, L; Chang, H-M; Dashe, JF; Chaves, CJ; Vemmos, K; Leary, M; Dewitt, LD; Pessin, MS

    2005-01-01

    Among 407 New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation Registry (NEMC-PCR) patients, 59% had strokes without transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), 24% had TIAs before strokes, and 16% had only posterior circulation TIAs. Embolism was the commonest stroke mechanism accounting for 40% of cases (24% cardiac origin, 14% arterial origin, 2% had potential cardiac and arterial sources). In 32%, large artery occlusive lesions caused hemodynamic brain infarction. Stroke mechanisms in the posterior and anterior circulation are very similar. Infarcts most often included the distal posterior circulation territory (rostral brainstem, superior cerebellum and occipital and temporal lobes), while the proximal (medulla and posterior inferior cerebellum) and middle (pons and anterior inferior cerebellum) territories were equally involved. Infarcts that included the distal territory were twice as common as those that included the proximal or middle territories. Most distal territory infarcts were attributable to embolism. Thirty day mortality was low (3.6%). Embolic stroke mechanism, distal territory location, and basilar artery occlusive disease conveyed the worst prognosis. PMID:20396469

  20. Second generation registry framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. Results This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. Conclusions We introduce the

  1. Interschool Relationships in Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1981-01-01

    Within academic health centers there exists a well-established "pecking order" influencing daily life and reflecting fundamental relationships between medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health. Relationships between individual professionals and between schools within a center are examined for clues to possible change. (MSE)

  2. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  3. Health Wellness and Hospital Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Bonnie; And Others

    This paper describes activities conducted by an early childhood classroom in its health play center. A major purpose of this play center was to reduce children's fears and anxieties about medical personnel and emergency vehicles, and to raise awareness of the many aspects of health and wellness. The classroom environment contained a variety of…

  4. HRSA: Find a Health Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... box Or you can try to start a search with any other close or appropriate keyword. HELP: 877-464-4772, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET, weekdays (except federal holidays) HRSA Contact Center Close × Center Name Close ... Filters Select filters to narrow the search results. After filters have been selected, go to ...

  5. National down syndrome patient database: Insights from the development of a multi-center registry study.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jenifer; Sharr, Christianne; Ozonoff, Al; Prock, Lisa Albers; Baumer, Nicole; Brasington, Campbell; Cannon, Sheila; Crissman, Blythe; Davidson, Emily; Florez, Jose C; Kishnani, Priya; Lombardo, Angela; Lyerly, Jordan; McCannon, Jessica B; McDonough, Mary Ellen; Schwartz, Alison; Berrier, Kathryn L; Sparks, Susan; Stock-Guild, Kara; Toler, Tomi L; Vellody, Kishore; Voelz, Lauren; Skotko, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    The Down Syndrome Study Group (DSSG) was founded in 2012 as a voluntary, collaborative effort with the goal of supporting evidenced-based health care guidelines for individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Since then, 5 DS specialty clinics have collected prospective, longitudinal data on medical conditions that co-occur with DS. Data were entered by clinical staff or trained designees into the National Down Syndrome Patient Database, which we created using REDCap software. In our pilot year, we enrolled 663 participants across the U.S., ages 36 days to 70 years, from multiple racial and ethnic backgrounds. Here we report: (i) the demographic distribution of participants enrolled, (ii) a detailed account of our database infrastructure, and (iii) lessons learned during our pilot year to assist future researchers with similar goals for other patient populations.

  6. National Center for Health Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Data and Tools Publications News and Events Population Surveys National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey National Health Interview Survey National Survey of Family Growth Vital Records National Vital Statistics System National Death ...

  7. School-Based Health Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... C., serving more than 2 million students in preschool through 12th grade. Centers usually are inside a ... Help Your Teen Succeed in High School 504 Education Plans Getting Involved at Your Child's School Gifted ...

  8. Department of Defense, Deployment Health Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... component of the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (DCoE). DHCC’s mission is to improve the lives of our nation’s service members, veterans and families by advancing excellence in ... health care and prevention of psychological health disorders. ...

  9. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  10. Federal Health Care Planning: Impact on the Student Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogen, Gerald K.

    1978-01-01

    Major proposals for national health insurance are surveyed with regard to the alternative impacts on the student health center enterprise, and suggestions are made for preparing for and directing the impact. (Author/DS)

  11. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffery R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the purpose, potential members and participants of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC). Included in the overview is a brief description of the administration and current activities of the NHHPC.

  12. Virtual health care center in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Thomas; Kldiashvili, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Application of telemedicine systems to cover distant geographical areas has increased recently. However, the potential usefulness of similar systems for creation of national networks does not seem to be widely appreciated. The article describes the "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" project. Its aim was the set up of an online integrated web-based platform to provide remote medical consultations and eLearning cycles. The project "Virtual Health Care Knowledge Center in Georgia" was the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant dedicated for development of telemedicine in non-NATO countries. The project implemented a pilot to organize the creation of national eHealth network in Georgia and to promote the use of innovative telemedicine and eLearning services in the Georgian healthcare system. In June 2007 it was continued under the NATO Networking Infrastructure Grant "ePathology--Virtual Pathology Center in Georgia as the Continuation of Virtual Health Care Center". PMID:18673518

  13. Health center 2000: the mission development challenge.

    PubMed

    Warner, M J

    1995-11-01

    College and university health centers are facing a dynamic era of change. In fact, change is the constant that permeates the organization. The one essential ingredient to dealing most effectively with change is to have a clearly defined mission. The author outlines a seven-step process that can be used by college and university health center personnel to create, reaffirm, and/or revise their mission statements, which serve as a beacon for decision making, organizational culture, and responsible action.

  14. The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carty, Lee; Burley, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is the nation's leading legal advocate for the rights of adults and children with mental disabilities. The Center uses a coordinated strategy of federal policy advocacy, legal support for a nationwide network of advocates, and creation of educational materials to help families, professionals,…

  15. Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health.

    PubMed

    Ternullo, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal; Lane, Susan; Myint-U, Khinlei; Havasy, Robert; Carter, Michael; Kvedar, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    This article reviews the history, current status, and future plans of the Partners HealthCare Center for Connected Health (the Center). Established in 1995 by Harvard Medical School teaching hospitals, the Center develops strategies to move healthcare from the hospital and doctor's office into the day-to-day lives of patients. It leverages information technology to help manage chronic conditions, maintain health and wellness, and improve adherence to prescribed regimen, patient engagement, and clinical outcomes. Since inception, it has served over 30,000 patients. The Center's core functions include videoconference-based real-time virtual visits, home vital sign monitoring, store-and-forward online consultations, social media, mobile technology, and other novel methods of providing care and enabling health and wellness remotely and independently of traditional time and geographic constraints. It offers a wide range of services, programs, and research activities. The Center comprises over 40 professionals with various technical and professional skills. Internally within Partners HealthCare, the role of the Center is to collaborate, guide, advise, and support the experimentation with and the deployment and growth of connected health technologies, programs, and services. Annually, the Center engages in a deliberative planning process to guide its annual research and operational agenda. The Center enjoys a diversified revenue stream. Funding sources include institutional operating budget/research funds from Partners HealthCare, public and private competitive grants and contracts, philanthropic contributions, ad hoc funding arrangements, and longer-term contractual arrangements with third parties.

  16. How community mental health centers are coping.

    PubMed

    Okin, R L

    1984-11-01

    Many community mental health centers have had to operate with less funding in the past several years, especially since the advent of block grant funding. Evidence is now accumulating that some centers have had to decrease their overall level of services and staffing. Others have attempted to adjust by increasing their clinician caseloads, closing their satellite facilities, and de-emphasizing services that fail to generate adequate fees and third-party reimbursements, such as consultation and education, partial hospitalization, and programs for children and the elderly. In contrast, and partly as a result of the increased authority of the states over the community mental health centers program, services for the severely and chronically mentally ill appear to be receiving higher priority. This development will require that centers improve their access to the general health care sector, maintain and improve their relationships with academic institutions, and increase the number, responsibilities, and rewards of the psychiatrists they employ. PMID:6500524

  17. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) Increased Demand for Services (IDS..., 2009, to March 26, 2011 (IDS) and June 29, 2009, to June 28, 2011 (CIP). Replacement Awardee: Upper Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. Amount of Replacement Award: $103,317 (IDS) and $262,740 (CIP). Period...

  18. ATSDR evaluation of health effects of chemicals. VI. Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Fay, M; Donohue, J M; De Rosa, C

    1999-12-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (also known as DEHP, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, or BEHP; CAS Registry Number 117-81-7) is a widely-used plasticizer. It is found in numerous plastic articles, such as paints, inks, floor tiles, upholstery, shower curtains, footwear, plastic bags, food-packaging materials, toys, and medical tubing. Not surprisingly, DEHP appears at many waste sites. As part of its mandate, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) prepares toxicological profiles on hazardous chemicals that are of greatest public health concern at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priority List (NPL) sites. These profiles comprehensively summarize toxicological and environmental information. This article constitutes the release of the bulk of ATSDR's profile for DEHP (ATSDR, 1993) into the mainstream scientific literature. An extensive listing of human and animal health effects, organized by route, duration, and endpoint, is presented. Toxicological information on toxicokinetics, biomarkers, interactions, sensitive subpopulations, reducing toxicity after exposure, and relevance to public health is also included. Environmental information encompasses physical properties, production and use, environmental fate, levels seen in the environment, analytical methods, and a listing of regulations. ATSDR, at the behest of Congress and therefore the citizenry, prepares these profiles to inform the public about site contaminants. PMID:10786378

  19. [Rural health center in Bali].

    PubMed

    Lasserre, R

    1977-09-01

    The rural Health Centre of Mengwi, on the island of Bali, was built and equipped for US $ 15,000 by Project Concern, a non-sectarian, medical relief organization. It has been run so successfully by them since it opened in 1974, that not only has the Centre gained the trust of the local community into which it is now fully integrated, but it is also regarded by the Indonesian Government as a pilot project. Amongst the factors leading to this success, the author underlines the following points: a suitable location for the Centre, easily accessible by the villagers; a local staff recruited from the villages of Mengwi District, well trained and sympathetic to the population; constant retraining of the staff leading to better medical care; the availability of a doctor and nurse around the clock; an adequate supply of drugs. Evaluation of the operation is best done by the acceptance of special programmes such as the Under-Five Clinic, the Family Planning Scheme, Ante-Natal Clinic and vaccinations. The mere success of the general clinic would not mean that the Centre had been integrated into the community and become a factor in rural development. The success of these special clinics, as well as the out-reach programmes, demonstrates that through adequate delivery of medical care, the Health Centre of Mengwi can now fulfil its role of being an important factor in the development of a rural community in the tropics. PMID:21553

  20. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program.

    PubMed

    Marmaro, G M; Cardinale, M A; Summerfield, B R; Tipton, D A

    1992-08-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  1. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  2. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  3. Improving Access to Health Care: School-Based Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Shauna L.; Calvert, Richard D.; Davis, Lisa; Gullotta, Thomas P.

    This article explores an approach for better serving the complete health care needs of children, specifically, the efficacy of school-based health centers (SBHCs) to provide a service delivery mechanism capable of functioning as a medical home for children, providing primary care for both their physical and behavioral health care needs. The…

  4. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  5. Observations Illustrating the Use of Health Informatics to Link Public Health Immunization Registries and Pharmacies to Increase Adult Immunization Rates and Improve Population Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Popovich, Michael; Altstadter, Brandy; Popovich, Lara Hargraves

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act encourages health information exchange between clinical care and public health through Meaningful Use measures. Meaningful Use specifically identifies objectives to support a number of public health programs including immunizations, cancer registries, syndromic surveillance, and disease case reports. The objective is to improve public and population health. Stage 2 of Meaningful Use focused on compliance to sending of information to public health. The next phase focuses on bi-directional information exchange to support immunization intelligence and to empower providers, pharmacists, and the consumer. The HITECH Act Stage 2 initiative provided incentive and motivation for healthcare providers to encourage their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) vendors to implement data exchanges with public health, with the expected result being timely awareness of health risks. The empowerment nugget in the HITECH Act is not in the compliance reporting to public health. The nugget is the ability for a provider to receive relevant information on the patient or consumer currently in front of them or to those they will connect to through their outreach efforts. The ability for public health to retain current immunization records of individuals from a variety of providers supports their program goals to increase immunization rates and mitigate the risk of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). The ability for providers to receive at the point of service more complete immunization histories integrated with decision support enhances their delivery of care, thereby reducing the risk of VPD to their patients. Indirectly payers benefit through healthcare cost savings and when the focus is expanded from a health model to a business model, there are significant return on investment (ROI) opportunities that exponentially increase the value of a bi-directional immunization data exchange. This paper will provide

  6. Observations Illustrating the Use of Health Informatics to Link Public Health Immunization Registries and Pharmacies to Increase Adult Immunization Rates and Improve Population Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Altstadter, Brandy; Popovich, Lara Hargraves

    2016-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act encourages health information exchange between clinical care and public health through Meaningful Use measures. Meaningful Use specifically identifies objectives to support a number of public health programs including immunizations, cancer registries, syndromic surveillance, and disease case reports. The objective is to improve public and population health. Stage 2 of Meaningful Use focused on compliance to sending of information to public health. The next phase focuses on bi-directional information exchange to support immunization intelligence and to empower providers, pharmacists, and the consumer. The HITECH Act Stage 2 initiative provided incentive and motivation for healthcare providers to encourage their Electronic Medical Record (EMR) vendors to implement data exchanges with public health, with the expected result being timely awareness of health risks. The empowerment nugget in the HITECH Act is not in the compliance reporting to public health. The nugget is the ability for a provider to receive relevant information on the patient or consumer currently in front of them or to those they will connect to through their outreach efforts. The ability for public health to retain current immunization records of individuals from a variety of providers supports their program goals to increase immunization rates and mitigate the risk of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD). The ability for providers to receive at the point of service more complete immunization histories integrated with decision support enhances their delivery of care, thereby reducing the risk of VPD to their patients. Indirectly payers benefit through healthcare cost savings and when the focus is expanded from a health model to a business model, there are significant return on investment (ROI) opportunities that exponentially increase the value of a bi-directional immunization data exchange. This paper will provide

  7. Polish project of a Sex Offenders Registry - a mental health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Szumski, Filip; Kasparek, Krzysztof; Gierowski, Józef Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the governmental draft of the Act on counteracting threats of sexual offences. It assumes the creation of the Registry of Sex Offenders in a version with a limited access and a version available to the public. The registry is supplemented with a publically available map of sexual crime threats, which includes the places of sexual offences and the places of residence of offenders. Criticising the proposed solutions, the authors point out the lack of integration with other interventions conducted in Poland against sex offenders, noncompliance with the recommendations of the most important expert circles in the field, as well as the research results showing the lack of effectiveness of the planned measures to reduce sexual offences. Anumber of negative consequences of making the sex offenders'data available to the public was also highlighted in the form of a clear deterioration of social rehabilitation prognoses, additional stigmatisation, as well as social exclusion of the offenders themselves and the victims of sexual violence. The summary emphasises the need to counteract the problem of sexual offences in a systematic way and the need to diversify the interventions undertaken against the offenders, depending on the level of risk of sexual recidivism. PMID:27556108

  8. Neurosurgery clinical registry data collection utilizing Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside and electronic health records at the University of Rochester.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Christine A; Miranpuri, Amrendra S

    2015-12-01

    In a population health-driven health care system, data collection through the use of clinical registries is becoming imperative to continue to drive effective and efficient patient care. Clinical registries rely on a department's ability to collect high-quality and accurate data. Currently, however, data are collected manually with a high risk for error. The University of Rochester's Department of Neurosurgery in conjunction with the university's Clinical and Translational Science Institute has implemented the integrated use of the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) informatics framework with the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) databases. PMID:26621414

  9. Mental Health and School-Based Health Centers. Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This guidebook consists of three parts. The first part is an introductory overview focusing on where mental health facets of school-based health centers (SBHC) fit into the work of schools. The second part is made up of three modules, each containing a set of units and resource aids focusing on day-by-day SBHC operational considerations and…

  10. Community Mental Health Centers and Insurance Reimbursements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissim-Sabat, Denis; And Others

    The economic solvency of Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) is a problem that needs immediate attention. In order to study the shift in funding sources for the 40 Community Services Boards (CSBs) which administer the 114 CMHCs in Virginia, the funding sources of CMHCs, and the fee collections of the CSBs, were examined. Data revealed that…

  11. Quality measurement indicators for Iranian Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefi Manesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, quality is a serious concern in development of organizations. There are various indicators to assess quality and the purpose of this study was to identify the main indicators for quality measurement of Iranian health centers. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in three stages: first, review of the literature was performed to identify different indicators for quality measurement in health centers; second, a tworound Delphi process was used with participation of 18 experts in both rounds; third, Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) method was applied to give weights to each indicator. Results: Twenty-seven indicators were identified from the literature review stage. The Delphi method reduced the list to 4 indicators. Developing a quality plan in the health center had the highest weight (38%) and percentage of followed complaints the lowest (12%). The consistency rate was 7.2% indicating appropriateness of the data. Conclusion: This list of indicators can be used as a template for measuring quality of health centers in Iran and possibly in other developing countries. PMID:26034730

  12. 2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HEALTH CENTER OFFICE SOUTH BACK AND EAST SIDE, FROM PASSAGE BEHIND COURTHOUSE, CAMERA FACING NORTHWEST. - Lancaster County Center, Health Center Office, 4845 Cedar Avenue, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 42 CFR 124.515 - Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compliance alternative for community health centers, migrant health centers and certain National Health Service Corps sites. 124.515 Section 124.515 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES...

  14. [Community health centers: an alternative for the health system

    PubMed

    Fernandes; Monteiro

    1997-01-01

    Reflecting on the current reorganization of the relationship between the state and civil society, the health care field is involved in an intense debate over the organization and use of government and private health services. The authors propose an alternative, consisting of the implementation of primary health care clinics, managed by local institutions and funded by the Unified Health System. To support this proposition, they report on the current experience at the Rocinha slum in Rio de Janeiro, where a community health center was built by the neighborhood association 12 years ago and has been managed by the community since then. The hospital referral rate at the clinic, requests for laboratory tests, and use of precriptions have been considerably limited, although these services are available. These low rates are attributed to the possibility of closer social control by the community, as well as to the geographical features of the center, favoring a broader perception of both health problems and treatment. In order to provide more substantial support to the proposed centers, some suggestions are presented, like the implementation of direct agreements between the government and neighborhood associations (not allowed under current legislation) and expanding potential sources of funding for the health centers, currently restricted to government programs. PMID:10886837

  15. JBEI Registry

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registriesmore » for data sharing and exchange.« less

  16. Health services at the Kennedy Space Center.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E B; Humbert, P; Long, I D; Tipton, D A

    1992-08-01

    Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

  17. Health services at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, E. B.; Humbert, P.; Long, I. D.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive occupational health services are provided to approximately 17,000 workers at the Kennedy Space Center and an additional 6000 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. These areas cover about 120,000 acres encompassing part of the Merritt Island Wild Life Refuge and wetlands which are the habitat of numerous endangered and protected species of wildlife. The services provided at the Kennedy Space Center optimally assure a safe and healthy working environment for the employees engaged in the preparation and launching of this country's Space Shuttle and other important space exploration programs.

  18. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services...

  19. Quality of race, Hispanic ethnicity, and immigrant status in population-based cancer registry data: implications for health disparity studies.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Limin X; Reichman, Marsha E; Hankey, Benjamin F; Miller, Barry A; Lin, Yi D; Johnson, Norman J; Schwartz, Stephen M; Bernstein, Leslie; Chen, Vivien W; Goodman, Marc T; Gomez, Scarlett L; Graff, John J; Lynch, Charles F; Lin, Charles C; Edwards, Brenda K

    2007-03-01

    Population-based cancer registry data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program at the National Cancer Institute are based on medical records and administrative information. Although SEER data have been used extensively in health disparities research, the quality of information concerning race, Hispanic ethnicity, and immigrant status has not been systematically evaluated. The quality of this information was determined by comparing SEER data with self-reported data among 13,538 cancer patients diagnosed between 1973-2001 in the SEER--National Longitudinal Mortality Study linked database. The overall agreement was excellent on race (kappa = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.88-0.91), moderate to substantial on Hispanic ethnicity (kappa = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.58-0.64), and low on immigrant status (kappa = 0.21. 95% CI = 0.10, 0.23). The effect of these disagreements was that SEER data tended to under-classify patient numbers when compared to self-identifications, except for the non-Hispanic group which was slightly over-classified. These disagreements translated into varying racial-, ethnic-, and immigrant status-specific cancer statistics, depending on whether self-reported or SEER data were used. In particular, the 5-year Kaplan-Meier survival and the median survival time from all causes for American Indians/Alaska Natives were substantially higher when based on self-classification (59% and 140 months, respectively) than when based on SEER classification (44% and 53 months, respectively), although the number of patients is small. These results can serve as a useful guide to researchers contemplating the use of population-based registry data to ascertain disparities in cancer burden. In particular, the study results caution against evaluating health disparities by using birthplace as a measure of immigrant status and race information for American Indians/Alaska Natives.

  20. [Respiratory disease registries in Spain: fundamentals and organization].

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Morales, Pilar; Blanco, Ignacio; Vendrell, Montserrat; de Gracia Roldán, Javier; Monreal, Manel; Orriols, Ramón; Isidro, Isabel; Abú-Shams, Khalil; Escribano, Pilar; Villena, Victoria; Rodrigo, Teresa; Vidal Plà, Rafael; García-Yuste, Mariano; Miravitlles, Marc

    2011-08-01

    This present paper describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the respiratory disease registries in Spain with the aim to report their activities and increase their diffusion. The document compiles information on the following registries: the Spanish Registry of Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, Spanish Registry of Bronchiectasis, International Registry of Thromboembolic Disease, Spanish Registry of Occupational Diseases, Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Artery Hypertension, Registry of Pleural Mesothelioma, Spanish Registry of Tuberculosis and Spanish Multi-center Study of Neuroendocrine Pulmonary Tumors. Our paper provides information on each of the registries cited. Each registry has compiled specific clinical information providing data in real situations, and completes the results obtained from clinical assays. Said information has been published both in national as well as international publications and has lead to the creation of various guidelines. Therefore, the activities of the professionals involved in the registries have spread the knowledge about the diseases studied, promoting the exchange of information among workgroups.

  1. Rethinking the Health Center: Assessing Your Health Center and Setting Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Nancy S.

    2001-01-01

    Camp health center management begins with assessing the population served, camp areas impacted, and the contract of care with parents. That information is used to plan the size of the center; its location in the camp; the type of equipment; and considerations such as medication management, infectious disease control, size of in- and out-patient…

  2. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC.

  3. Women's health centers and specialized services.

    PubMed

    LaFleur, E K; Taylor, S L

    1996-01-01

    More than 75% of the female respondents in this study would choose a women's health center (WHC) over a standard health facility. Women who worked outside the home perceived a greater WHC need. And almost all respondents were interested in communications from the center via a quarterly newsletter. Significant test results related to age, income, education, and work status as segmentation variables, offering WHC's an opportunity to target their patients with specialized services such as cosmetic surgery, infertility treatment, breast imaging, etc. If enough resources are allocated, a WHC can design itself to attract highly lucrative patients. Little difference was found in the opinions of women regarding the need for a WHC or the core services desired, but the specific service mix decision must be carefully considered when designing a WHC. PMID:10163055

  4. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Richard, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) will provide a collaborative and virtual forum to integrate all disciplines of the human system to address spaceflight, aviation, and terrestrial human health and performance topics and issues. The NHHPC will serve a vital role as integrator, convening members to share information and capture a diverse knowledge base, while allowing the parties to collaborate to address the most important human health and performance topics of interest to members. The Center and its member organizations will address high-priority risk reduction strategies, including research and technology development, improved medical and environmental health diagnostics and therapeutics, and state-of-the art design approaches for human factors and habitability. Once full established in 2011, the NHHPC will focus on a number of collaborative projects focused on human health and performance, including workshops, education and outreach, information sharing and knowledge management, and research and technology development projects, to advance the study of the human system for spaceflight and other national and international priorities.

  5. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  6. Information Management in Cancer Registries: Evaluating the Needs for Cancer Data Collection and Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Iris; Boren, Suzanne A; Simoes, Eduardo; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Davis, J Wade; Hicks, Lanis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer registry data collection involves, at a minimum, collecting data on demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment. A common, identified, and standardized set of data elements is needed to share data quickly and efficiently with consumers of this data. This project highlights the fact that, there is a need to develop common data elements; Surveys were developed for central cancer registries (CCRs) and cancer researchers (CRs) at NCI-designated Cancer Centers, in order to understand data needs. Survey questions were developed based on the project focus, an evaluation of the research registries and database responses, and systematic review of the literature. Questions covered the following topics: 1) Research, 2) Data collection, 3) Database/ repository, 4) Use of data, 5) Additional data items, 6) Data requests, 7) New data fields, and 8) Cancer registry data set. A review of the surveys indicates that all cancer registries' data are used for public health surveillance, and 96% of the registries indicate the data are also used for research. Data are available online in interactive tables from over 50% of CRs and 87% of CCRs. Some other survey responses indicate that CCR treatment data are not complete for example treatment data, however cancer researchers are interested in treatment variables from CCRs. Cancer registries have many data available for review, but need to examine what data are needed and used by different entities. Cancer Registries can further enhance usage through collaborations and partnerships to connect common interests in the data by making registries visible and accessible. PMID:26392844

  7. Research results from a registry supporting efforts to improve maternal and child health in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Robert L; McClure, Elizabeth M; Bose, Carl L; Jobe, Alan H; Belizán, José M

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development created and continues to support the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research, a partnership between research institutions in the US and low-middle income countries. This commentary describes a series of 15 papers emanating from the Global Network's Maternal and Newborn Health Registry. Using data from 2010 to 2013, the series of papers describe nearly 300,000 pregnancies in 7 sites in 6 countries - India (2 sites), Pakistan, Kenya, Zambia, Guatemala and Argentina. These papers cover a wide range of topics including several dealing with efforts made to ensure data quality, and others reporting on specific pregnancy outcomes including maternal mortality, stillbirth and neonatal mortality. Topics ranging from antenatal care, adolescent pregnancy, obstructed labor, factors associated with early initiation of breast feeding and maintenance of exclusive breast feeding and contraceptive usage are presented. In addition, case studies evaluating changes in mortality over time in 3 countries - India, Pakistan and Guatemala - are presented. In order to make progress in improving pregnancy outcomes in low-income countries, data of this quality are needed. PMID:26032486

  8. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Sign up Search: Defense Centers of Excellence For Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury U.S. Department ... Section 508 External Link Disclaimer Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury | 800- ...

  9. Global Challenges in People-Centered E-Health.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Safran, Charles

    2015-01-01

    People-centered health care seeks an active role for the patient while empowering all other members of the health care team. By promoting greater patient responsibility and optimal usage, patient-centered health care leads to improved health outcomes, quality of life and optimal value for health care investment. This paper reviews some definitions of people-centered health care and various e-health approaches around the world used to implement this vision. The barriers and enablers to implementation this type of approach are explored. This paper provides a proposed research agenda for future implementations of people-centered e-health.

  10. South African National Cancer Registry: Effect of withheld data from private health systems on cancer incidence estimates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, E; Underwood, J M; Nattey, C; Babb, C; Sengayi, M; Kellett, P

    2015-01-01

    Background The National Cancer Registry (NCR) was established as a pathology-based cancer reporting system. From 2005 to 2007, private health laboratories withheld cancer reports owing to concerns regarding voluntary sharing of patient data. Objectives To estimate the impact of under-reported cancer data from private health laboratories. Methods A linear regression analysis was conducted to project expected cancer cases for 2005 – 2007. Differences between actual and projected figures were calculated to estimate percentage under-reporting. Results The projected NCR case total varied from 53 407 (3.8% net increase from actual cases reported) in 2005 to 54 823 (3.7% net increase) in 2007. The projected number of reported cases from private laboratories in 2005 was 26 359 (19.7% net increase from actual cases reported), 27 012 (18.8% net increase) in 2006 and 27 666 (28.4% net increase) in 2007. Conclusion While private healthcare reporting decreased by 28% from 2005 to 2007, this represented a minimal impact on overall cancer reporting (net decrease of <4%). PMID:26242527

  11. Malaysian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Jaffar, Sharifah Halimah

    2013-02-01

    The National Malaysian Twin Registry was established in Royal College of Medicine, Perak, University Kuala Lumpur (UniKL) in June 2008 through a grant provided by UniKL. The general objective is to facilitate scientific research involving participation of twins and their family members in order to answer questions of health and wellbeing relevant to Malaysians. Recruitment is done via mass media, poster, and pamphlets. We now have 266 adult and 204 children twins registered. Several research projects including reproductive health study of twins and the role of co-bedding on growth and development of children are carried out. Registry holds annual activities for twins and seeks to provide health-related information for twins. We seek international collaboration.

  12. Structural change in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Munson, F C; D'Aunno, T A

    1989-01-01

    In response to opportunities and threats in their environments, academic health centers (AHCs) are making important changes in their structure. Several AHCs have legally separated their university hospital from the university. In contrast, other AHCs are linking the university hospital more closely to the medical school by concentrating authority for key decisions in the office of an AHC executive. This article draws from a national study of AHCs and examines the advantages and disadvantages of such changes in AHC structure. An important reason for these changes is maximizing revenues from patient care; an important consequence is the increased salience of patient care among the multiple purposes of AHCs. PMID:10294354

  13. Comparative study on the National Renal Disease Registry in America, England and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Askarianzadeh, Mahdi; Saghaeiannejad-Isfahani, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Mojgan; Ehteshami, Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Context: A disease registry is a database that includes information about people diagnosed with specific types of diseases. The registry collects information that can be used for capturing, managing, and organizing specific information for patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to identify and compare the National Renal Disease Registry (NRDR) in selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Settings and Design: Retrieval of data of the NRDR performed through scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, and data registries in the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran. Materials and Methods: This research was an applied and descriptive, comparative study. The study population consisted of the National Renal Disease Registry of the selected countries including the United States, United Kingdom, and Iran, from which data were collected using forms that were designed according to the study objectives. Sources of data were researchers, scholars responsible in related agencies, including the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, and Renal Disease charity, data registries, articles, books, journals, databases, websites, and related documents. Data were gathered through phone, e-mail, study, observation, and interview. Statistical Analysis Used: The researchers collected data for each country based on the study objectives and then put them in comparative tables. Data were analyzed by descriptive, comparative, and theoretical methods. Results: There is no NRDR in Iran to report the short- and long-term results of renal disease. Most of the renal transplant teams report their own results as single-center experiences. America and Britain have pre-eminent national registry of renal disease, compared to other countries. Conclusions: The Iranian Society of Nephrology should be actively involved to create a National Renal Registry in Iran. The registry should have

  14. Mental health of those directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: unmet mental health care need, mental health treatment service use, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, Robert M; Stellman, Steven D; Perlman, Sharon E; Walker, Deborah J; Farfel, Mark R

    2013-03-01

    Mental health service utilization several years following a man-made or natural disaster can be lower than expected, despite a high prevalence of mental health disorders among those exposed. This study focused on factors associated with subjective unmet mental health care need (UMHCN) and its relationship to a combination of diagnostic history and current mental health symptoms, 5-6 years after the 9-11-01 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster in New York City, USA. Two survey waves of the WTC Health Registry, after exclusions, provided a sample of 36,625 enrollees for this analysis. Important differences were found among enrollees who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a self-reported mental health diagnosis and symptoms indicative of post-traumatic stress disorder or serious psychological distress. Persons with diagnoses and symptoms had the highest levels of UMHCN, poor mental health days, and mental health service use. Those with symptoms only were a vulnerable group much less likely to use mental health services yet reporting UMHCN and poor mental health days. Implications for delivering mental health services include recognizing that many persons with undiagnosed but symptomatic mental health symptoms are not using mental health services, despite having perceived need for mental health care.

  15. Global comparisons for developing a national dementia registry in Cuba.

    PubMed

    González, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A review/analysis of current literature on exemplary multicenter registries of clinical dementias was conducted as a comparative basis for a proposed Cuban registry on cognitive impairment and dementia. The study of mental health disorders has been predominantly based on clinical concepts and criteria, and only in recent years a public health approach has been applied. Traditional epidemiological studies do not reveal patterns of cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders (particularly dementias) in routine clinical practice in a defined geographic area, which would provide essential information for long-term planning and allocation of health and social resources. Thus, multicenter clinical registries have become an important source of clinical and epidemiological data on dementias in recent decades. This article addresses the Cuban proposal for an automated national dementia registry, comparing it to others internationally. The registry would be housed in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute, and would include a duly protected surveillance network hosted on the Institute's website. Such a multicenter dementia registry based on epidemiological surveillance methods and limited to a defined area would provide new, valid, representative and current data on dementia occurrence patterns by subtype, flow of case identification and referral from primary care, as well as the main clinical features of patients at the time of their first contact with health services. This information would support development of health planning policies for implementation of programs aimed at improved distribution of social and health resources in the affected population, monitoring of the disorder's natural evolution and identification of preventive measures. The scientific benefits would be equally important: production of new knowledge, generation of hypotheses for clinical research projects, standardization of diagnostic criteria, and promotion of multicenter research in both

  16. Area Health Education Center of the Navajo Health Authority to Establish the Navajo Center for Health Professions Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    The Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is designed to provide educational opportunities in health and allied fields and to improve health care for the Navajo people and other Indians in the region that includes and immediately surrounds the Navajo Indian Reservation. As prime contractor, the University of New Meixco School of Medicine will…

  17. Toward a statewide health information technology center (abbreviated version).

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Joe, John C

    2010-11-01

    With the passage of The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 that includes the Health Care Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health Act, the opportunity for states to develop a Health Information Technology Center (THITC) has emerged. The Center provides the intellectual, financial, and technical leadership along with the governance and oversight for all health information technology-related activities in the state. This Center would be a free-standing, not-for-profit, public-private partnership that would be responsible for operating one or more (in large states) Regional Health Information Technology Extension Centers (Extension Centers) along with several Regional Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) and one or more Regional Health Information Data Centers (Data Centers). We believe that if these features and functions could be developed, deployed, and integrated statewide, the health and welfare of the citizens of the state could be improved while simultaneously reducing the costs associated with the provision of care.

  18. National Institutes of Health, Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Available for NIH Researchers More NIH Blood Bank Clinical Center patients need over 30 units of ... on social media: NIH Clinical Center NIH Blood Bank @NIHClinicalCntr @CCMedEd Clinical Center TV Privacy Statement | Accessibility | ...

  19. 42 CFR 405.2462 - Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for rural health clinic and Federally qualified health center services. 405.2462 Section 405.2462 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic...

  20. 76 FR 40733 - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, (NIOSH), World Trade Center Health Program Science/Technical Advisory Committee...

  1. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    PubMed Central

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-01-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication. PMID:884349

  2. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    PubMed

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  3. 75 FR 43172 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (BSC, NCEH/ ATSDR): Notice... Officer, BSC, NCEH/ATSDR, 1600 Clifton Road, NE, Mailstop E-28, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, telephone...

  4. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population.

  5. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population. PMID:26782871

  6. School-Based Health Centers. Technical Assistance Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    The rapid growth in the number of school-based health centers reflects the interest schools and communities have for this approach to the delivery of health care to children and adolescents. This technical assistance sampler contains information about resources for those developing or operating school-based health centers. The first section…

  7. [European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection (Hp-EuReg protocol): The first results of Russian centers].

    PubMed

    Bordin, D S; Yanova, O B; Abdulkhakov, R A; Tsukanov, V V; Livzan, M A; Burkov, S G; Zakharova, N V; Plotnikova, E Yu; Osipenko, M F; Tarasova, L V; Maev, I V; Kucheryavyi, Yu A; Butov, M A; Sablin, O A; Kolbasnikov, S V; Voinovan, I N; Abdulkhakov, S R; Vasyutin, A V; Lyalyukova, E A; Golubev, N N; Savilova, I V; Grigoryeva, L V; Kononova, A G; O'Morain, Colm; Ramas, Mercedes; Mcnicholl, Adrian G; Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-01-01

    Резюме Цель исследования. Оценка клинической практики диагностики и лечения больных с инфекцией Helicobacter pylori и сопоставление этой практики с международными рекомендациями в Европейском регистре (European Registry on the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, протокол: «Hp-EuReg») — наблюдательном многоцентровом проспективном исследовании, инициированном Европейской группой по изучению H. pylori и микробиоты (EHMSG). Материалы и методы. Проведен анализ данных 813 больных, инфицированных H. pylori и внесенных в регистр Российскими центрами исследования «Hp-EuReg» в 2013—2015 гг. Результаты. Наиболее распространенными методами первичной диагностики инфекции H. pylori являются гистологический (40,3%), быстрый уреазный тест (35,7%) и серологический (17,2%). Длительность антихеликобактерной терапии в 18% случаев составила 7 дней, в 49,3% — 10 дней, в 25,1% — 14 дней. Для контроля эффективности лечения используются гистологический метод (34%), уреазный дыхательный тест (27,3%), антиген H. pylori в кале (22,8%), быстрый уреазный тест (16,3%). В 2,5% случаев использовался серологический метод. У 13,5% больных контроль не проводился. Средняя эффективность эрадикации

  8. Design and Development of a Web-Based Saudi National Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Subhani, Shazia; Khalid, Al-Rubeaan

    2010-01-01

    Background Given that diabetes is an extremely common disorder in Saudi Arabia, the National Diabetes Registry was designed by King Saud University Hospital Diabetes Center in collaboration with King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in the year 2001. The aim of the registry is to identify risk factors related to diabetes and to provide statistics to public health programs and health care professionals for use in planning and evaluation. The registry was designed to provide information on the extent and nature of specific types of diabetes, diabetes complications, and treatment of diabetes in the Kingdom. The registry has been available since 2001, with major collaborations from 26 hospitals as part of Phase I in which 100,000 patient data is to be collected on a regional level from Ar-Riyadh before extending the program to other regions of Saudi Arabia. Methods The web application was designed using relational database techniques along with on-line help topics to assist users to get acquainted with application functionalities. All Internet forms were designed with validation checks and appropriate messages to ensure quality of data. The security measures established within the application ensure that only authorized users can gain access to the functionalities of the registry at allowed times. Administrative features were designed to manage the registry-related operations easily. Results The diabetes registry has been in operation for almost 10 years, and around 67,000 patients have been registered to date. The Web-application offers an anytime-anywhere access to the registry’s data, removing geographical boundaries and allowing the national registry to provide real-time data entry, updates, reporting, and mapping functionalities more easily. Conclusion Merging related information in the form of databases can provide improved health care operations through instant access to data, ease of managing complex data structures, and

  9. 75 FR 66114 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special Emphasis Panel; NCMHD Health Disparities Research on Minority and Underserved Population (R01)....

  10. 75 FR 12766 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special Emphasis Panel Loan Repayment Program for Health Disparities Research--Panel 2. Date: April 5, 2010....

  11. 75 FR 9421 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment Program for Health Disparities Research--Panel 1. Date: March 18, 2010....

  12. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health. PMID:6419276

  13. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the better at the Clinical Center. Annie Brown of Washington, DC, has experienced recurrent pain crises ... Winford , a Texan, was 25 years old when he first came to the Clinical Center in 1988. ...

  14. Promoting Ecological Health Resilience for Minority Youth: Enhancing Health Care Access through the School Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the demographic realities of children of color in the U.S., with a focus on health care needs and access issues that have an enormous influence on health status. An ecologic model is presented that incorporates cultural values and community structures into the school health center. (Contains 50 references.) (GCP)

  15. Kennedy Space Center Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Joanne W.

    1997-01-01

    Topic considered include: environmental health services; health physics; ionizing radiation; pollution control; contamination investigations; natural resources; surface water; health hazard evaluations; combustion gas; launch support; asbestos; hazardous noise; and ventilation.

  16. Meta-analysis of survival curve data using distributed health data networks: application to hip arthroplasty studies of the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries.

    PubMed

    Cafri, Guy; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art; Paxton, Liz; Furnes, Ove; Graves, Stephen; Marinac-Dabic, Danica

    2015-12-01

    The motivating example for this paper comes from a distributed health data network, the International Consortium of Orthopaedic Registries (ICOR), which aims to examine risk factors for orthopedic device failure for registries around the world. Unfortunately, regulatory, privacy, and propriety concerns made sharing of raw data impossible, even if de-identified. Therefore, this article describes an approach to extraction and analysis of aggregate time-to-event data from ICOR. Data extraction is based on obtaining a survival probability and variance estimate for each unique combination of the explanatory variables at each distinct event time for each registry. The extraction procedure allows for a great deal of flexibility; models can be specified after the data have been collected, for example, modeling of interaction effects and selection of subgroups of patients based on their values on the explanatory variables. Our analysis models are adapted from models presented elsewhere--but allowing for censoring in the calculation of the correlation between serial survival probabilities and using the square root of the covariance matrix to transform the data to avoid computational problems in model estimation. Simulations and a real-data example are provided with strengths and limitations of the approach discussed.

  17. Enabling Quality: Electronic Health Record Adoption and Meaningful Use Readiness in Federally Funded Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Wittie, Michael; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie; Shi, Leiyu; Nair, Suma

    2016-01-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration has supported the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by federally funded health centers for over a decade; however, little is known about health centers' current EHR adoption rates, progress toward Meaningful Use, and factors related to adoption. We analyzed cross-sectional data from all 1,128 health centers in 2011, which served over 20 million patients during that year. As of 2011, 80% of health centers reported using an EHR, and high proportions reported using many advanced EHR functionalities. There were no indications of disparities in EHR adoption by census region, urban/rural location, patient sociodemographic composition, physician staffing, or health center funding; however, there were small variations in adoption by total patient cost and percent of revenue from grants. Findings revealed no evidence of a digital divide among health centers, indicating that health centers are implementing EHRs, in keeping with their mission to reduce health disparities.

  18. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned. PMID:23698666

  19. 76 FR 49645 - National Health Center Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-20497 Filed 8-9-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... August 10, 2011 Part IV The President Proclamation 8698--National Health Center Week, 2011 #0; #0; #0... Health Center Week, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across...

  20. 75 FR 48853 - National Health Center Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010... Proclamation 8545--National Health Center Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal...;The President ] Proclamation 8545 of August 5, 2010 National Health Center Week, 2010 By the...

  1. 77 FR 47765 - National Health Center Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-19749 Filed 8-8-12; 11:15 am] Billing code... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8847 of August 6, 2012 National Health Center Week, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation For nearly half a century, health centers have helped...

  2. School-Based Health Centers and Managed Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Inspector General (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This report describes school-based health centers and their degree of coordination with managed care providers. Although the investigation focuses on adolescents, many ideas discussed here are germane to elementary school-based health centers as well. Information was gathered through an extensive literature review, relevant legislation, and 88…

  3. The Community Mental Health Center as a Matrix Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen L.

    1978-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the literature on matrix organizational designs and discusses the ways in which the matrix design might be applied to the special features of a community mental health center. The phases of one community mental health center's experience in adopting a matrix organizational structure are described. (Author)

  4. Community perceptions and utilization of a consumer health center*

    PubMed Central

    Ports, Katie A.; Ayers, Antoinette; Crocker, Wayne; Hart, Alton; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Rafie, Carlin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand factors that may affect the usage of a consumer health center located in a public library. More specifically, the authors wanted to know what health resources are of interest to the community, what patrons' perceptions of their experience at the center are, and finally, how staff can increase utilization of the center. In general, perceptions of the center were positive. The findings support that participants appreciate efforts to provide health information in the public library setting and that utilization could be improved through marketing and outreach. PMID:25552943

  5. Use of registry employees can pose legal problems.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S F

    1994-07-01

    In view of the potential legal liability to which a recipient entity can be exposed when using registry employees, some care must be taken in drafting registry contract services and in modulating the recipient entity's behavior towards the registry personnel. The following steps should generally be taken by health care establishments purchasing registry services to minimize such exposure: (1) Ensure that the registry treats its personnel as employees and complies with all applicable employment law obligations, including state and federal employment tax requirements, workers' compensation laws, and any state law wage and hour requirements in the recipient's state. (2) If using an out-of-state registry, make sure that the registry also has workers' compensation insurance in the recipient's state and complies with that state workers' compensation laws. (3) Make sure that termination decisions regarding registry employees are not made for reasons that violate any federal anti-discrimination laws. (4) Provide in the registry agreement for full indemnification by the registry to the recipient. (5) Ensure that the registry is solvent and has adequate insurance to honor its indemnification obligation. (6) Obtain a warranty from the registry that it carefully screens all of its employees before hiring them. (7) Expressly state in the registry agreement that the registry has the right to discipline and supervise the personnel it refers. (8) Do not reject registry personnel for reasons that would be improper with respect to the facility's own employees, e.g., race, sex, age, religion, disability, etc. PMID:10135140

  6. Correlates of negative physical health in call center shift workers.

    PubMed

    Rameshbabu, Anjali; Reddy, Diane M; Fleming, Raymond

    2013-05-01

    The call center industry, a burgeoning sector is characterized by unique job demands, which render it susceptible to high attrition rates and negative health concerns. This study examined the relationship between job stress from interpersonal factors, job stress from work factors, coping, inadequate sleep, and negative physical health reports among call center shift workers (n = 239), a relatively under-researched population. Inadequate sleep and job stress from interpersonal factors were associated with negative physical health outcome for the participants in this study. Further, spending longer in the call center industry was associated with negative health outcome for the shift worker participants.

  7. Assessing uncertainty in outsourcing clinical services at tertiary health centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2007-01-01

    When tertiary health centers face capacity constraint, one feasible strategy to meet service demand is outsourcing clinical services to qualified community providers. Clinical outsourcing enables tertiary health centers to meet the expectations of service timeliness and provides good opportunities to collaborate with other health care providers. However, outsourcing may result in dependence and loss of control for the tertiary health centers. Other parties involved in clinical outsourcing such as local partners, patients, and payers may also encounter potential risks as well as enjoy benefits in an outsourcing arrangement. Recommendations on selecting potential outsourcing partners are given to minimize the risks associated with an outsourcing contract.

  8. Pharmacy assistance programs in a community health center setting.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Maxsimo C.; Herman, Debra; Montano, Seferino; Love, Leah

    2002-01-01

    Prescription drug costs represent the fastest growing item in health care and are a driving force in rapidly increasing health care costs. Community health centers serve an indigent population with limited access to pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceutical companies sponsor patient assistance programs. These pharmacy assistance programs can be developed to facilitate the provision of needed pharmaceuticals to this vulnerable population. La Casa de Buena Salud is a rural community health center in eastern New Mexico, which has provided access to a substantial amount of pharmaceuticals to indigent patients through patient assistance programs. Cost savings potential are considerable for a community health center and for patients when a pharmacy assistance program is organized efficiently and employed systematically. Secondary benefits are derived from the entire medical community. While some community health centers currently make effective use of pharmaceutical company-sponsored pharmacy assistance programs, a comprehensive, long-term approach at a national level may be required. PMID:12510707

  9. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  10. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2006.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad E; Suri, Rita S; Zoller, Rezso; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Lindsay, Robert M

    2006-07-01

    Interest in short daily and nocturnal hemodialysis (HD) regimens continues to grow worldwide. Despite growing optimism that these therapies will afford better patient outcomes over conventional HD, the current literature has not been viewed as sufficiently compelling to affect widespread implementation in most jurisdictions. Before these therapies can gain wider acceptance, larger and more rigorous studies will likely be needed. In June 2004, the Quotidian Dialysis Registry, based at the Lawson Health Research Institute at the University of Western Ontario, Canada, began recruiting patients across North America. By using an Internet-based data entry platform, patients from various centers worldwide will eventually be recruited, and studied prospectively. This paper constitutes the second annual update on patient and center recruitment, patient and treatment characteristics, and future directions for the registry. PMID:16805881

  11. 76 FR 14673 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy...

  12. 76 FR 11500 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special..., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, National...

  13. 76 FR 11499 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy...

  14. 76 FR 55078 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special..., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 6707...

  15. 76 FR 57068 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health, and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy...

  16. Analysis of pregnancy and infant health outcomes among women in the National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry who received Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Ava Marie S; Bukowinski, Anna T; Gumbs, Gia R

    2015-08-26

    The National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry (NSVIPR) actively follows women inadvertently vaccinated with smallpox vaccine during or shortly before pregnancy to evaluate their reproductive health outcomes. Approximately 65% of NSVIPR participants also inadvertently received Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) while pregnant, providing a ready opportunity to evaluate pregnancy and infant health outcomes among these women. AVA-exposed pregnancies were ascertained using NSVIPR and electronic healthcare data. Rates of pregnancy loss and infant health outcomes, including major birth defects, were compared between AVA-exposed and AVA-unexposed pregnancies. Analyses included AVA-exposed and AVA-unexposed pregnant women who also received smallpox vaccine 28 days prior to or during pregnancy. Rates of adverse outcomes among the AVA-exposed group were similar to or lower than expected when compared with published reference rates and the AVA-unexposed population. The findings provide reassurance of the safety of AVA when inadvertently received by a relatively young and healthy population during pregnancy.

  17. Hospitals as Centers for Consumer Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, Judith M.

    1978-01-01

    Hospitals are trying to make health information available to lay persons to increase their knowledge of the processes of health and disease. Specific programs cited include those based in hospital libraries. Findings of several studies evaluating program effectiveness are indicated, as well as directions for future research. (MBR)

  18. Center for the Advancement of Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disparities in Mental Health Care December 3, 2014 Depression and Dementia in Older Adults Increase Risk of Preventable Hospitalizations November 20, 2014 More HBNS Articles » BE A PREPARED PATIENT® Resources to help people find good health care and make the most ...

  19. Patient registries: utility, validity and inference.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel; Vehik, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Patient registries are essential tools for public health surveillance and research inquiry, and are a particularly important resource for understanding rare diseases. Registries provide consistent data for defined populations and can support the study of the distribution and determinants of various diseases. One advantage of registries is the ability to observe caseload and population characteristics over time, which might facilitate the evaluation of disease incidence, disease etiology, planning, operation and evaluation of services, evaluation of treatment patterns, and diagnostic classification. Any registry program must collect high quality data to be useful for its stated purpose. Registries can be developed for many different needs, and caution should be taken in interpreting registry data, which has inherent biases. We describe the methodological issues, limitations, and ideal features of registries to support various rare disease purposes. The future impact of registries on our understanding and interventions for rare diseases will depend upon technological and political solutions for global cooperation to achieve consistent data (via standards) and regulations for various registry applications.

  20. 75 FR 28262 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... Health Disparities. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  1. 76 FR 31618 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... Health Disparities. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  2. 75 FR 53975 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... Health Disparities. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  3. 76 FR 55075 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... Health Disparities. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  4. 76 FR 6808 - National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities... Health Disparities. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance limited to... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council on Minority Health and Health...

  5. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care. PMID:15499311

  6. Health Literacy Innovations in California Community College Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenia, Joanne Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Limited health literacy is a national public health problem contributing to adverse health outcomes and increasing healthcare costs. Both health and educational systems are intervention points for improvement; however, there is paucity in empirical research regarding the role of educational systems. This needs assessment study explored health…

  7. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  8. HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE WORLD TRADE CENTER DISASTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) created an acute environmental disaster of enormous magnitude. This study characterizes the environmental exposures resulting from destruction of the WTC and assesses their effects on health. Methods include ambient air sampling; analyse...

  9. Ask Dr. Sue: Center Directors Express These Health Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1991-01-01

    A physician addresses three health concerns of child care center directors. She provides information about the increasing number of children with asthma problems, the exclusion of ill children from child care settings, and the increasing concern about lead poisoning. (GLR)

  10. Center for Global Health announces grants to support portable technologies

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Center for Global Health announced grants that will support the development and validation of low-cost, portable technologies. These technologies have the potential to improve early detection, diagnosis, and non-invasive or minimally invasive treatm

  11. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver.

  12. Improving Patient Outcomes in Gynecology: The Role of Large Data Registries and Big Data Analytics.

    PubMed

    Erekson, Elisabeth A; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-01-01

    Value-based care is quality health care delivered effectively and efficiently. Data registries were created to collect accurate information on patients with enough clinical information to allow for adequate risk adjustment of postoperative outcomes. Because most gynecologic procedures are elective and preference-sensitive, offering nonsurgical alternatives is an important quality measure. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), in conjunction with mandates from the Affordable Care Act, passed by Congress in 2010, has developed several initiatives centered on the concept of paying for quality care, and 1 of the first CMS initiatives began with instituting payment penalties for hospital-acquired conditions, such as catheter-associated urinary tract infections, central line-associated bloodstream infections, and surgical site infections. Registries specific to gynecology include the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology registry established in 1996; the FIBROID registry established in 1999; the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry established by the American Urogynecologic Society in conjunction with other societies (2014); and the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists Clinical Outcomes Registry. Data from these registries can be used to critically analyze practice patterns, find best practices, and enact meaningful changes in systems and workflow. The ultimate goal of data registries and clinical support tools derived from big data is to access accurate and meaningful data from electronic records without repetitive chart review or the need for direct data entry. The most efficient operating systems will include open-access computer codes that abstract data, in compliance with privacy regulations, in real-time to provide information about our patients, their outcomes, and the quality of care that we deliver. PMID:26188310

  13. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  14. Smartphone use at a university health science center.

    PubMed

    Bushhousen, Ellie; Norton, Hannah F; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth; Jesano, Rae; David, Don; Tennant, Michele R

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of library patrons conducted by librarians and information technology specialists at the Health Science Center Libraries at the University of Florida. The purpose of the survey was to learn if and how library patrons were using smartphones to perform their work-related tasks and how patrons felt the library could support smartphone use at the Health Science Center.

  15. Aftercare and Rehabilitation in a Community Mental Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scoles, Pascal; Fine, Eric W.

    1971-01-01

    The community, state mental hospitals, and a community mental health center work together to provide an environment conducive to the continued well being of chronic mental patients in an area of West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The authors describe a program that involves day care centers and the patients' everyday living. (Author)

  16. Marketing backgrounds and activities of community mental health center CEOs.

    PubMed

    Whyte, E G; Smith, M; Reidenbach, E N; Sharpe, T R

    1989-01-01

    More than 300 directors of community mental health centers responded to a survey concerning their marketing training and the marketing activities in which their centers had been engaged. Formal marketing training was found to be in the backgrounds of few of the respondents. The majority had not been engaged in a listing of marketing activities.

  17. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  18. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  19. 76 FR 28795 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301)...

  20. 75 FR 56549 - National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Classifications and Public Health Data Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS... topics: Contrast Dye Removal Endovascular partial occlusion of abdominal aorta Endovascular Intracranial... Pulmonary Artery Pressure Monitoring Addenda (procedures) September 16, 2010 Corticobasal...

  1. The health center story: forty years of commitment.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    The first community health centers were established 40 years ago, with roots in the civil rights and social justice movements of the 1960s. As part of the federal War on Poverty, the centers combined preventive and primary care, social and support services, and consumer involvement. While most observers gave them little chance for survival, health centers beat back repeated efforts to cut funds or eliminate the program, grew exponentially, and were selected for further expansion. Possible reasons include provision of concrete, essential services, community ownership, bipartisan political support, interested and involved officials, unusually committed leadership, persistent need, and a record of effectiveness, quality, and cultural sensitivity.

  2. Johnson Space Center Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    1.HMTA responsibilities: a) Assure program/project compliance with Agency health and medical requirements at identified key decision points. b) Certify that programs/projects comply with Agency health and medical requirements prior to spaceflight missions. c) Assure technical excellence. 2. Designation of applicable NASA Centers for HMTA implementation and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) appointment. 3. Center CMO responsible for HMTA implementation for programs and projects at the center. JSC HMTA captured in "JSC HMTA Implementation Plan". 4. Establishes specifics of dissenting opinion process consistent with NASA procedural requirements.

  3. Use of the national quality registry to monitor health-related quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Christina; Huus, Karina; Samuelsson, Ulf; Hanberger, Lena; Akesson, Karin

    2015-03-01

    The management of diabetes is complicated, as treatment affects the everyday life of both children and their families. To enable optimal care for children with type 1 diabetes, it is important to highlight health-related quality of life (HrQoL) as well as medical outcomes to detect psychological problems that otherwise could be missed. The aim was to study HrQoL in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes dependent on gender, age and co-morbidity and to study the consistency between children's self-reporting and parents' proxy reporting. The cross-sectional data were collected using the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure and the DISABKIDS diabetes module. Parents in the proxy report perceived their children's HrQoL to be lower than children themselves. Boys reported their HrQoL to be better than girls. Results show that living with an additional disease has an impact on the HrQoL, which is an important factor to consider in the quality registry. Assessing HrQoL on a routine basis may facilitate detection and discussion of HrQoL-related questions in the national quality registry.

  4. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    PubMed

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  5. Mental Health Consultation in Child Care Centers. Data Trends #96

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Data Trends" reports present summaries of research on mental health services for children and adolescents and their families. The article summarized in this "Data Trends" reports research that revealed mental health consultation has positive impact on teacher and center quality. Research has shown that parents of children, aged one to three…

  6. Options for Sustaining School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swider, Susan M.; Valukas, Amy

    2004-01-01

    Several methods exist for financing and sustaining operations of school-based health centers (SBHCs). Promising sources of funds include private grants, federal grants, and state funding. Recently, federal regulation changes mandated that federal funding specifically for SBHCs go only to SBHCs affiliated with a Federally Qualified Health Center…

  7. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  8. Health extension in new Mexico: an academic health center and the social determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Arthur; Powell, Wayne; Alfero, Charles; Pacheco, Mario; Silverblatt, Helene; Anastasoff, Juliana; Ronquillo, Francisco; Lucero, Ken; Corriveau, Erin; Vanleit, Betsy; Alverson, Dale; Scott, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The Agricultural Cooperative Extension Service model offers academic health centers methodologies for community engagement that can address the social determinants of disease. The University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center developed Health Extension Rural Offices (HEROs) as a vehicle for its model of health extension. Health extension agents are located in rural communities across the state and are supported by regional coordinators and the Office of the Vice President for Community Health at the Health Sciences Center. The role of agents is to work with different sectors of the community in identifying high-priority health needs and linking those needs with university resources in education, clinical service and research. Community needs, interventions, and outcomes are monitored by county health report cards. The Health Sciences Center is a large and varied resource, the breadth and accessibility of which are mostly unknown to communities. Community health needs vary, and agents are able to tap into an array of existing health center resources to address those needs. Agents serve a broader purpose beyond immediate, strictly medical needs by addressing underlying social determinants of disease, such as school retention, food insecurity, and local economic development. Developing local capacity to address local needs has become an overriding concern. Community-based health extension agents can effectively bridge those needs with academic health center resources and extend those resources to address the underlying social determinants of disease.

  9. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced. PMID:25000072

  10. Patients' satisfaction evaluation with the health center of elis province.

    PubMed

    Karavida, Angeliki; Stamouli, Maria-Aggeliki; Balis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction related to the provided health services is a key indicator of the quality of the health sector. The SERVQUAL model was employed as a way of measuring the level of patient satisfaction with the services of the Health Center of Elis Province. Although certain aspects such as "Assurance" and "Empathy" meet the users' needs, improvements like a detailed medical record and an overhaul of the equipment need to be introduced.

  11. The congenital anomalies registry in Belarus: a tool for assessing the public health impact of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Lazjuk, G; Verger, P; Gagnière, B; Kravchuk, Zh; Zatsepin, I; Robert-Gnansia, E

    2003-01-01

    A national population-based malformation registry (BNR) has been in operation since 1979 in Belarus, one of the countries most heavily exposed to the contamination from the Chernobyl accident of 26 April 1986. We describe its methodology and its compliance with established criteria, evaluate the completeness of its reporting, and analyze the data collected in four administrative regions with contrasting contamination levels from 1983 through 1999. Nine easily diagnosed malformations have been monitored since 1983. Reporting completeness exceeds 85% for all periods and all regions. In all periods, the prevalence at birth of these malformations was lower in the most contaminated regions and showed a similar positive time trend in areas of low and high contamination. We conclude that the BNR is a reliable tool for studying the possible effects on congenital malformations caused by the Chernobyl accident. Although the trend we observed may be explained by better ascertainment and prenatal diagnosis, a real increase cannot be ruled out.

  12. Forging successful academic-community partnerships with community health centers: the California statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) experience.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Mitchell, Brenda; Herrera-Mata, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to insurance under the Affordable Care Act will increase demands for clinical services in community health centers (CHCs). CHCs also have an increasingly important educational role to train clinicians who will remain to practice in community clinics. CHCs and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are logical partners to prepare the health workforce for the future. Both are sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and they share a mission to improve quality of care in medically underserved communities. AHECs emphasize the educational side of the mission, and CHCs the service side. Building stronger partnerships between them can facilitate a balance between education and service needs.From 2004 to 2011, the California Statewide AHEC program and its 12 community AHECs (centers) reorganized to align training with CHC workforce priorities. Eight centers merged into CHC consortia; others established close partnerships with CHCs in their respective regions. The authors discuss issues considered and approaches taken to make these changes. Collaborative innovative processes with program leadership, staff, and center directors revised the program mission, developed common training objectives with an evaluation plan, and defined organizational, functional, and impact characteristics for successful AHECs in California. During this planning, centers gained confidence as educational arms for the safety net and began collaborations with statewide programs as well as among themselves. The AHEC reorganization and the processes used to develop, strengthen, and identify standards for centers forged the development of new partnerships and established academic-community trust in planning and implementing programs with CHCs. PMID:24280858

  13. Internal communications program expands at Salina Regional Health Center as the health system grows.

    PubMed

    Herreria, J

    1999-01-01

    The e-mail system is evolving into one of Salina, Kan., Regional Health Center's primary sources of communications for its 1,350 employees and physicians. Check out how the health system uses other internal communication tools. PMID:10387297

  14. Academic health centers and society: an ethical reflection.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, E D

    1999-08-01

    Academic health centers--which combine university, medical school, and hospital--exist to satisfy universal human needs and thus are by definition instruments of social purpose. Their core mission is threefold: to provide medical knowledge that can help relieve and prevent illness and suffering, to supply practitioners able to apply that knowledge wisely, and to serve as sites where optimal use of medical knowledge can be demonstrated and investigated. Maintaining a balance between core mission and responsiveness to social trends is a delicate exercise. Overly close accommodation to such trends can endanger the core mission, as has occurred in the United States with regard to managed care. Society and academic health centers have mutual obligations. Obligations of society include giving academic health centers financial and other support and allowing them sufficient freedom to pursue their mission; obligations of academic medical centers include accepting greater scrutiny by society and providing social criticism on matters relating to health. A task for the future is to discern how academic health centers can be responsive to social needs without being totally subservient to societal desires. PMID:10495739

  15. Health centers at 40: implications for future public policy.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Dan; Rosenbaum, Sara

    2005-01-01

    As health centers celebrate their 40th anniversary, the larger American healthcare system faces challenges as daunting as any in its history. These include rising, unchecked costs of care, deteriorating access to care--especially among low-income, uninsured, and minority Americans--and unsettled quality of care for many. The authors argue that, as policymakers face the challenge of health system reform, the health centers program serves as a potential model for improving the cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of healthcare, setting the course for primary healthcare. At the same time, the program's very future depends on matters that extend into the broadest reaches of US health policy, in the areas of coverage, finance, workforce, quality improvement, and population health. PMID:16172565

  16. A revisionist view of the integrated academic health center.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Judith

    2004-02-01

    Like many academic health centers that had expanded aggressively during the 1990s, the nation's first vertically integrated academic health center, the University of Pennsylvania Health System, was profoundly challenged by the dramatic and unanticipated financial impacts of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. The author explains why-although Penn's Health System had lost $300 million over two years and its debts threatened to cause serious financial and educational damage to the rest of the University-Penn chose to manage its way out of the financial crisis (instead of selling or spinning off its four hospitals, clinical practices, and possibly even its medical school). A strategy of comprehensive integration has not only stabilized Penn's Health System financially, but strengthened its position of leadership in medical education, research, and health care delivery. The author argues that a strategy of greater horizontal integration offers important strategic advantages to academic health centers. In an era when major social and scientific problems demand broadly multidisciplinary and highly-integrated approaches, such horizontally integrated institutions will be better able to educate citizens and train physicians, develop new approaches to health care policy, and answer pressing biomedical research questions. Institutional cultural integration is also crucial to create new, innovative organizational structures that bridge traditional disciplinary, school, and clinical boundaries.

  17. 76 FR 72424 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Program on the Genetic Testing Registry AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), PHS, DHHS. ACTION... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: The Genetic Testing Registry; Type of Information Collection... developing a voluntary registry of genetic tests. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) will provide...

  18. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  19. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  20. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it. PMID:25738387

  1. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  2. Improving the financial viability of primary care health centers.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A; Knickman, J R; Hanson, K L

    1994-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national demonstration program to improve the long-term financial viability of small not-for-profit primary care health centers. The program initiatives and their implementation are described in some detail. A standard pre/post study design was used to measure the impact of the initiatives on general outcome measures, financial ratios, and the utilization of management techniques. Overall, demonstration centers showed improvement over the study period. Notable short-term improvements included significant growth in the volume of patient visits and increased profit. Observed changes also revealed an increased use of sophisticated management techniques, expected to positively affect longer-term financial health. The findings suggest that improving the financial viability of health centers need not be expensive.

  3. Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

  4. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice Regarding Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP):...

  5. 75 FR 42100 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special..., National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800,...

  6. 75 FR 25273 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD...

  7. The University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, L. E.; Smith, S. L.; Minnett, P. J.

    2007-05-01

    Two recent major reports on the health of the oceans in the United States have warned that coastal development and population pressures are responsible for the dramatic degradation of U.S. ocean and coastal environments. The significant consequences of this increased population density, particularly in sub/tropical coastal regions, can be seen in recent weather events: Hurricanes Andrew, Ivan, and Katrina in the US Gulf of Mexico states, and the Tsunami in Southeast Asia in December 2004, all causing significant deaths and destruction. Microbial contamination, man-made chemicals, and a variety of harmful algal blooms and their toxins are increasingly affecting the health of coastal human populations via the seafood supply, as well as the commercial and recreational use of coastal marine waters. At the same time, there has been the realization that the oceans are a source of unexplored biological diversity able to provide medicinal, as well as nutritional, benefits. Therefore, the exploration and preservation of the earth's oceans have significant worldwide public health implications for current and future generations. The NSF/NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health Center (COHH) at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and its collaborators builds on several decades of collaborative and interdisciplinary research, education, and training to address the NIEHS-NSF research initiative in Oceans and Human Health. The COHH focuses on issues relevant to the Southeastern US and Caribbean, as well as global Sub/Tropical areas worldwide, to integrate interdisciplinary research between biomedical and oceanographic scientists. The Center includes three Research Projects: (1) research into the application of toxic algal culture, toxin analysis, remote sensing, oceanography, and genomics to subtropical/tropical Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) organism and toxin distribution; (2) exploring the interaction between functional genomics and oceanography of the subtropical

  8. Providing consumer health information in the rural setting: Planetree Health Resource Center's approach

    PubMed Central

    Spatz, Michele A.

    2000-01-01

    Both lifestyle and geography make the delivery of consumer health information in the rural setting unique. The Planetree Health Resource Center in The Dalles, Oregon, has served the public in a rural setting for the past eight years. It is a community-based consumer health library, affiliated with a small rural hospital, Mid-Columbia Medical Center. One task of providing consumer health information in rural environments is to be in relationship with individuals in the community. Integration into community life is very important for credibility and sustainability. The resource center takes a proactive approach and employs several different outreach efforts to deepen its relationship with community members. It also works hard to foster partnerships for improved health information delivery with other community organizations, including area schools. This paper describes Planetree Health Resource Center's approach to rural outreach. PMID:11055307

  9. Chronic physical health consequences of being injured during the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, Robert M; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have focused on injuries from the World Trade Center disaster on September 11, 2001. Severe injury has health consequences, including an increased mortality risk 10 years after injury and the risk of mental health problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The World Trade Center Health Registry identified 14,087 persons with none of a selected group of preexisting chronic conditions before 2002 who were present during and soon after the World Trade Center attacks, 1,980 of whom reported sustaining 1 or more types of injury (e.g., a broken bone or burn). Survey data obtained during 2003-2004 and 2006-2007 were used to assess the odds of reporting a diagnosis of chronic conditions (heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer) up to 5-6 years after the attacks. Number of injury types and probable PTSD were significantly associated with having any chronic conditions diagnosed in 2002-2007. Persons with multiple injuries and PTSD had a 3-fold higher risk of heart disease than did those with no injury and no PTSD, and persons with multiple injuries and with no PTSD had a 2-fold higher risk of respiratory diseases. The present study shows that injured persons with or without comorbid PTSD have a higher risk of developing chronic diseases. Clinicians should be aware of the heightened risk of chronic heart and respiratory conditions among injured persons.

  10. Chronic Physical Health Consequences of Being Injured During the Terrorist Attacks on World Trade Center on September 11, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Brackbill, Robert M.; Cone, James E.; Farfel, Mark R.; Stellman, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have focused on injuries from the World Trade Center disaster on September 11, 2001. Severe injury has health consequences, including an increased mortality risk 10 years after injury and the risk of mental health problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The World Trade Center Health Registry identified 14,087 persons with none of a selected group of preexisting chronic conditions before 2002 who were present during and soon after the World Trade Center attacks, 1,980 of whom reported sustaining 1 or more types of injury (e.g., a broken bone or burn). Survey data obtained during 2003−2004 and 2006−2007 were used to assess the odds of reporting a diagnosis of chronic conditions (heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer) up to 5–6 years after the attacks. Number of injury types and probable PTSD were significantly associated with having any chronic conditions diagnosed in 2002–2007. Persons with multiple injuries and PTSD had a 3-fold higher risk of heart disease than did those with no injury and no PTSD, and persons with multiple injuries and with no PTSD had a 2-fold higher risk of respiratory diseases. The present study shows that injured persons with or without comorbid PTSD have a higher risk of developing chronic diseases. Clinicians should be aware of the heightened risk of chronic heart and respiratory conditions among injured persons. PMID:24561992

  11. Chronic physical health consequences of being injured during the terrorist attacks on World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

    PubMed

    Brackbill, Robert M; Cone, James E; Farfel, Mark R; Stellman, Steven D

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have focused on injuries from the World Trade Center disaster on September 11, 2001. Severe injury has health consequences, including an increased mortality risk 10 years after injury and the risk of mental health problems, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The World Trade Center Health Registry identified 14,087 persons with none of a selected group of preexisting chronic conditions before 2002 who were present during and soon after the World Trade Center attacks, 1,980 of whom reported sustaining 1 or more types of injury (e.g., a broken bone or burn). Survey data obtained during 2003-2004 and 2006-2007 were used to assess the odds of reporting a diagnosis of chronic conditions (heart disease, respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer) up to 5-6 years after the attacks. Number of injury types and probable PTSD were significantly associated with having any chronic conditions diagnosed in 2002-2007. Persons with multiple injuries and PTSD had a 3-fold higher risk of heart disease than did those with no injury and no PTSD, and persons with multiple injuries and with no PTSD had a 2-fold higher risk of respiratory diseases. The present study shows that injured persons with or without comorbid PTSD have a higher risk of developing chronic diseases. Clinicians should be aware of the heightened risk of chronic heart and respiratory conditions among injured persons. PMID:24561992

  12. The Evolving Academic Health Center: Challenges and Opportunities for Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirin, Steven; Summergrad, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regardless of the outcome of current efforts at healthcare reform, the resources that academic health centers need--to provide care for increasingly complex patient populations, support clinical innovation, grow the clinical enterprise, and carry out their research and teaching missions--are in jeopardy. This article examines the value…

  13. Financial Performance of Academic Health Center Hospitals, 1994-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Allen; Koenig, Lane; Sen, Namrata; Ho, Silver; Gilani, Jawaria

    This study examined how competitive market dynamics between 1994 and 2000 have affected the financial stability of Academic Health Center (AHC) hospitals and their ability to support their academic and social missions. It looked at the financial challenges facing AHC hospitals through a survey involving 1,138 teaching hospitals. Findings…

  14. 78 FR 49357 - National Health Center Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; #0; #0;Title 3-- #0;The President ] Proclamation 9002 of August 9, 2013 National Health Center Week, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Community...

  15. Utilization Review and Evaluation in a Community Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riedel, Donald C.; And Others

    The paper presents the conceptual framework and research strategy of the psychiatric utilization review and evaluation (PURE) project at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Review by structure, by outcome and by process are considered briefly. The Basic Utilization Review Program was developed to provide a more sophisticated and economical…

  16. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  17. Characteristics of Effective Administrators of Rural Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenell, David L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Identifies characteristics and competencies that define the right kind of person for rural mental health center administration. In order of importance, characteristics defined are leadership ability, appreciation of rural community, program development, professional background and training, political savvy, personnel management, budget and fiscal…

  18. Ankylosing spondylitis clinical registries: principles, practices and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Liron; Clegg, Daniel O; Inman, Robert D

    2013-06-01

    The need for a rigorously developed longitudinal registry of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) is clear and urgent. Like randomized controlled trials, registries rely on a prospective, systematic protocol-driven approach to data acquisition to assess outcomes for a prescribed cohort of patients. Registries seek to capture large numbers of patients across large geographic zones and can serve as a valuable resource for patient advocacy, patient education and support, incidence and prevalence, and broad demographic profiles. Building on 3 existing registries--the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Ankylosing Spondylitis, the Program to Understand the Longterm Outcomes of Spondyloarthritis (PULSAR) and the University Health Network Spondyloarthritis Program--these registries and the Spondylitis Association of America propose to form a combined registry of North American SpA patients. The combined registry would, ideally, complement ongoing clinical goals and improve patient care. PMID:23841118

  19. Building diversity in a complex academic health center.

    PubMed

    South-Paul, Jeannette E; Roth, Loren; Davis, Paula K; Chen, Terence; Roman, Anna; Murrell, Audrey; Pettigrew, Chenits; Castleberry-Singleton, Candi; Schuman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    For 30 years, the many diversity-related health sciences programs targeting the University of Pittsburgh undergraduate campus, school of medicine, schools of the health sciences, clinical practice plan, and medical center were run independently and remained separate within the academic health center (AHC). This lack of coordination hampered their overall effectiveness in promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2007, a group of faculty and administrators from the university and the medical center recognized the need to improve institutional diversity and to better address local health disparities. In this article, the authors describe the process of linking the efforts of these institutions in a way that would be successful locally and applicable to other academic environments. First, they engaged an independent consultant to conduct a study of the AHC's diversity climate, interviewing current and former faculty and trainees to define the problem and identify areas for improvement. Next, they created the Physician Inclusion Council to address the findings of this study and to coordinate future efforts with institutional leaders. Finally, they formed four working committees to address (1) communications and outreach, (2) cultural competency, (3) recruitment, and (4) mentoring and retention. These committees oversaw the strategic development and implementation of all diversity and inclusion efforts. Together these steps led to structural changes within the AHC and the improved allocation of resources that have positioned the University of Pittsburgh to achieve not only diversity but also inclusion and to continue to address the health disparities in the Pittsburgh community. PMID:23886998

  20. Integrating Expanded School Mental Health Programs and School-Based Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weist, Mark D.; Goldstein, Amy; Morris, Leslie; Bryant, Tanya

    2003-01-01

    Provides background on national movements toward expanded school mental health programs and school-based health centers, and presents advantages and challenges of joining these two systems of child and adolescent health care. These challenges, ideas for overcoming them, and future directions for promising service delivery are discussed. (Contains…

  1. School-Based Health Centers: On the Front Line for Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2011

    2011-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are the "ideal location" for primary care and mental health staff to "collaboratively address students' physical and mental health needs"--leading to greater success in school and in life. This brief document provides key facts that support this argument.

  2. The New Child Health Insurance Expansions: How Will School-Based Health Centers Fit In?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Jane; Lear, Julia Graham

    Under the State Child Health Insurance Program, states receive funds to purchase health insurance for low-income, uninsured children. Noting that partnering with managed care will be essential if school-based health centers are to receive reimbursement for serving the publicly insured portion of their clientele, this paper examines the…

  3. Adolescent Health Care in School-Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2008

    2008-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are considered one of the most effective strategies for delivering preventive care, including reproductive and mental health care services, to adolescents--a population long considered difficult to reach. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies to assure…

  4. The Health of Children--1970: Selected Data From the National Center for Health Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Health Statistics (DHEW/PHS), Hyattsville, MD.

    In this booklet, charts and graphs present data from four divisions of the National Center for Health Statistics. The divisions represented are those concerned with vital statistics (births, deaths, fetal deaths, marriages and divorces); health interview statistics (information on health and demographic factors related to illness); health…

  5. Violence against health workers in Family Medicine Centers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turki, Nouf; Afify, Ayman AM; AlAteeq, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care violence is a significant worldwide problem with negative consequences on both the safety and well-being of health care workers as well as workplace activities. Reports examining health care violence in Saudi Arabia are limited and the results are conflicting. Objective To estimate the prevalence and determine the demographic and occupational characteristics associated with workplace violence in primary care centers in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study included 270 health care workers in 12 family medicine centers in Riyadh during November and December 2014. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to estimate the frequency, timing, causes, reactions, and consequences of workplace violence plus participants’ demographic and occupational data. Results A total 123 health care workers (45.6%) experienced some kind of violence over 12 months prior to the study. These included physical (6.5%) and nonphysical violence (99.2%), including verbal violence (94.3%) and intimidation (22.0%). Offenders were patients (71.5%) in the majority of cases, companions (20.3%), or both (3.3%). Almost half (48.0%) of health care workers who experienced violence did nothing, 38.2% actively reported the event, and 13.8% consulted a colleague. A significant association of workplace violence was found with working multiple shifts, evening or night shift, and lack of an encouraging environment to report violence. Conclusion Workplace violence is still a significant problem in primary care centers. The high frequency of violence together with underreporting may indicate the inefficiency of the current safety program. More safety programs and training activities for health care workers, efficient reporting system, and zero tolerance policies need to be implemented to minimize workplace violence against health workers. PMID:27330300

  6. 78 FR 45543 - Center for Mental Health Services; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS) National...). Committee Name: SAMHSA's Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council. Date/Time/Type:...

  7. Mental Health Characteristics and Health-Seeking Behaviors of Adolescent School-Based Health Center Users and Nonusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Gorette; Geierstanger, Sara; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to compare the mental health risk profile and health utilization behaviors of adolescent school-based health center (SBHC) users and nonusers and discuss the role that SBHCs can play in addressing adolescent health needs. Methods: The sample included 4640 students in grades 9 and 11 who completed the…

  8. The Role of School Based Health Centers (SBHCs) in Improving Health Equity and Reducing Health Disparities. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacksin, Beth; Gall, Gail; Feldman, Elizabeth; Miller, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Health inequities exist largely among socially disadvantaged people who are denied the highest attainable standard of health available to many Americans. Access to culturally competent, high quality, first-contact primary care through school-based health centers is an effective way to reduce health inequities and, therefore, improve health…

  9. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior. PMID:26422592

  10. Health Reform and Academic Health Centers: Commentary on an Evolving Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Wartman, Steven A; Zhou, Yingying; Knettel, Anthony J

    2015-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), both directly and indirectly, has had a demonstrable impact on academic health centers. Given the highly cross-subsidized nature of institutional funds flows, the impact of health reform is not limited to the clinical care mission but also extends to the research and education missions of these institutions. This Commentary discusses how public policy and market-based health reforms have played out relative to expectations. The authors identify six formidable challenges facing academic health centers in the post-ACA environment: finding the best mission balance; preparing for the era of no open-ended funding; developing an integrated, interprofessional vision; broadening the institutional perspective; addressing health beyond clinical care; and finding the right leadership for the times. Academic health centers will be well positioned for success if they can focus on 21st-century realities, reengineer their business models, and find transformational leaders to change institutional culture and behavior.

  11. Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Knight, Amy; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Gibbons, M Christopher; Berger, Zackary; Aboumatar, Hanan; Wilson, Renee F; Lau, Brandyn D; Sharma, Ritu; Bass, Eric B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT

  12. 75 FR 62406 - Plan To Develop a Genetic Testing Registry at the National Institutes of Health; Public Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ....m. Location: The public meeting will be held at the Walter E. Johnson Convention Center, Room 147... accommodations: Anyone planning to attend the meeting who needs special assistance, such as sign language... requests by e-mail to cfomous@od.nih.gov ; by fax to 301-496-9839; or via postal service to Cathy...

  13. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed.

  14. Feminist health care in a hostile environment: a case study of the Womancare Health Center.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Cheryl A

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the Womancare Health Center in order to illustrate the development of and challenges to the feminist health movement in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the legislative, fiscal, and direct actions by the New Right against this organization. Analysis focuses on the means through which Womancare survived. The repercussions of constant intimidation and harassment for women's health programs and for health care policy overall are discussed. PMID:19213480

  15. Data available from birth and death registries and cancer registries in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.L. |; Houser, A.R.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, cancer registries have been compiling data for decades, and state vital statistics offices have been compiling birth and death data for nearly a century. Although this information has been well used for disease surveillance and various studies, it could be better exploited by making it more readily available, reducing the duplication of effort that occurs when researchers at the private, city, county, state, and federal levels work separately on their data collection and disease investigations. This report summarizes the nationwide availability of birth and death records and cancer registry data, with particular emphasis on subcounty geographic detail, such as zip code and census tract. Birth and death data are available at the county level for the entire United States from the National Center for Health Statistics. However, county level data are inadequate for small area studies of potential environmental hazards. Hazards of current interest to the Department of Energy (DOE) include DOE facilities, nuclear power plants, and sources of electromagnetic radiation such as broadcasting towers and power lines.

  16. Pattern of care and effectiveness of treatment for glioblastoma patients in the real world: Results from a prospective population-based registry. Could survival differ in a high-volume center?

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Tosoni, Alicia; Albani, Fiorenzo; Depenni, Roberta; Faedi, Marina; Pisanello, Anna; Crisi, Girolamo; Urbini, Benedetta; Dazzi, Claudio; Cavanna, Luigi; Mucciarini, Claudia; Pasini, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Stefania; Marucci, Gianluca; Morandi, Luca; Zunarelli, Elena; Cerasoli, Serenella; Gardini, Giorgio; Lanza, Giovanni; Silini, Enrico Maria; Cavuto, Silvio; Baruzzi, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    Background As yet, no population-based prospective studies have been conducted to investigate the incidence and clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) or the diffusion and impact of the current standard therapeutic approach in newly diagnosed patients younger than aged 70 years. Methods Data on all new cases of primary brain tumors observed from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, in adults residing within the Emilia-Romagna region were recorded in a prospective registry in the Project of Emilia Romagna on Neuro-Oncology (PERNO). Based on the data from this registry, a prospective evaluation was made of the treatment efficacy and outcome in GBM patients. Results Two hundred sixty-seven GBM patients (median age, 64 y; range, 29–84 y) were enrolled. The median overall survival (OS) was 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.2–12.4). The 139 patients ≤aged 70 years who were given standard temozolomide treatment concomitant with and adjuvant to radiotherapy had a median OS of 16.4 months (95% CI, 14.0–18.5). With multivariate analysis, OS correlated significantly with KPS (HR = 0.458; 95% CI, 0.248–0.847; P = .0127), MGMT methylation status (HR = 0.612; 95% CI, 0.388–0.966; P = .0350), and treatment received in a high versus low-volume center (HR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.328–0.986; P = .0446). Conclusions The median OS following standard temozolomide treatment concurrent with and adjuvant to radiotherapy given to (72.8% of) patients aged ≤70 years is consistent with findings reported from randomized phase III trials. The volume and expertise of the treatment center should be further investigated as a prognostic factor. PMID:26034628

  17. [Influence of registries on the quality of care].

    PubMed

    Stengel, D; Dreinhöfer, K; Kostuj, T

    2016-06-01

    Registries are a topic of lively debate amongst all stakeholders in healthcare, politics and economics. In general, registries are national or international (prospective) databases documenting the current state of diagnostic, therapeutic and long-term outcome variables of subjects with a distinct condition or health problem. The access to and handling of registry information is subject to strict legal, methodological and ethical principles and regulations before these data can be scientifically utilized and reentered into the routine daily practice. Because of the representativeness and reality of data, registries are widely regarded as the backbone of health systems and budgets.Currently there is only indirect evidence that registries influence outcomes and the quality of care. Recent statistical techniques may allow quasi-experimental modelling of observational information. In orthopedic and trauma surgery, current and upcoming registries should be wisely utilized to develop and evaluate innovations and to make informed decisions relevant to care. PMID:27164976

  18. 76 FR 38913 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for Enrollment, Appeals, Certification of Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Reimbursement AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS. ACTION: Interim final rule with request... the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will provide medical monitoring and treatment to...

  19. Changing structure to improve function: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B; Davis, L; Kohler, P O

    1997-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) have been under siege for the past few years, with decreased federal and state funding for educational and research programs and increasing competition in the health care marketplace. In addition, many AHCs are burdened with the bureaucratic red tape of large educational institutions, which makes agility in responding to a demanding health care market difficult. The authors describe the response to these threats by Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU), an approach that has been different from those of most similar institutions. OHSU chose to change its structure from being part of the state system of higher education to being an independent public corporation. The authors outline the political process of building widespread support for the legislation passed in 1995, the key features of the restructuring, the challenges faced before and after the transition to a public corporation, and lessons learned in this metamorphosis to a new form.

  20. Nurse-midwives in federally funded health centers: understanding federal program requirements and benefits.

    PubMed

    Carter, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Midwives are working in federally funded health centers in increasing numbers. Health centers provide primary and preventive health care to almost 20 million people and are located in every US state and territory. While health centers serve the entire community, they also serve as a safety net for low-income and uninsured individuals. In 2010, 93% of health center patients had incomes below 200% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines, and 38% were uninsured. Health centers, including community health centers, migrant health centers, health care for the homeless programs, and public housing primary care programs, receive grant funding and enjoy other benefits due to status as federal grantees and designation as federally qualified health centers. Clinicians working in health centers are also eligible for financial and professional benefits because of their willingness to serve vulnerable populations and work in underserved areas. Midwives, midwifery students, and faculty working in, or interacting with, health centers need to be aware of the regulations that health centers must comply with in order to qualify for and maintain federal funding. This article provides an overview of health center regulations and policies affecting midwives, including health center program requirements, scope of project policy, provider credentialing and privileging, Federal Tort Claims Act malpractice coverage, the 340B Drug Pricing Program, and National Health Service Corps scholarship and loan repayment programs.

  1. Biosecurity and Health Monitoring at the Zebrafish International Resource Center.

    PubMed

    Murray, Katrina N; Varga, Zoltán M; Kent, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) is a repository and distribution center for mutant, transgenic, and wild-type zebrafish. In recent years annual imports of new zebrafish lines to ZIRC have increased tremendously. In addition, after 15 years of research, we have identified some of the most virulent pathogens affecting zebrafish that should be avoided in large production facilities, such as ZIRC. Therefore, while importing a high volume of new lines we prioritize safeguarding the health of our in-house fish colony. Here, we describe the biosecurity and health-monitoring program implemented at ZIRC. This strategy was designed to prevent introduction of new zebrafish pathogens, minimize pathogens already present in the facility, and ensure a healthy zebrafish colony for in-house uses and shipment to customers.

  2. Mergers involving academic health centers: a formidable challenge.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, V D

    2001-10-01

    Escalating economic pressures on the clinical enterprise threaten the missions of education and research in many of the most prestigious academic health centers. Following the model of industry, mergers of the healthcare delivery systems of teaching hospitals and clinics held promise for economies of scale and an improved operating margin. Failure to follow business principles in constructing the merged entity, differences in organizational governance and culture, and inability of physician leadership to prioritize, downsize, and consolidate clinical programs to optimize operational efficiencies all compromise the success of such mergers in academic medicine. Academic institutions and their respective governing boards need to exercise greater discipline in financial analysis and a willingness to make difficult decisions that show favor to one parent institution over another if mergers are to be effective in this setting. To date, an example of a vibrant and successful merger of academic health centers remains to be found.

  3. Snake bite envenomation at Aysha refugee camp health center.

    PubMed

    Tameru, Kassa

    2006-01-01

    Snake bite remains one of the major public health problems in many countries including Ethiopia. This case report comprises four snake bite envenomation incidents presented to Aysha refugee camp health center in the eastern part of the country between May and August 1999 (hottest season of the year). All the four this cases had systemic manifestations one of whom died at arrival, the rest being successfully treated and discharged. In the body of the report, each case is described, relevant literature reviewed briefly, discussed, and finally conclusions are made. PMID:17447366

  4. Surgical volume and center effects on early mortality after pediatric cardiac surgery: 25-year North American experience from a multi-institutional registry.

    PubMed

    Vinocur, Jeffrey M; Menk, Jeremiah S; Connett, John; Moller, James H; Kochilas, Lazaros K

    2013-06-01

    Mortality after pediatric cardiac surgery varies among centers. Previous research suggests that surgical volume is an important predictor of this variation. This report characterizes the relative contribution of patient factors, center surgical volume, and a volume-independent center effect on early postoperative mortality in a retrospective cohort study of North American centers in the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (up to 500 cases/center/year). From 1982 to 2007, 49 centers reported 109,475 operations, 85,023 of which were analyzed using hierarchical multivariate logistic regression analysis. Patient characteristics varied significantly among the centers. The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for mortality decreased more than 10-fold during the study period (1982 vs. 2007: OR, 12.27, 95 % confidence interval [CI], 8.52-17.66; p < 0.0001). Surgical volume was associated inversely with odds of death (additional 100 cases/year: OR, 0.84; 95 % CI, 0.78-0.90; p < 0.0001). In the analysis of interactions, this effect was fairly consistent across age groups, risk categories (except the lowest), and time periods. However, a volume-independent center effect contributed substantially more to the risk model than did the volume. The Risk Adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery, version 1 (RACHS-1) risk category remains the strongest predictor of postoperative mortality through the 25-year study period. In conclusion, center-specific variation exists but is only partially explained by operative volume. Low-risk operations are safely performed at centers in all volume categories, whereas regionalization or other quality improvement strategies appear to be warranted for moderate- and high-risk operations. Potentially preventable mortality occurs at centers in all volume categories studied, so referral or regionalization strategies must target centers by observed outcomes rather than assume that volume predicts quality.

  5. Options for sustaining school-based health centers.

    PubMed

    Swider, Susan M; Valukas, Amy

    2004-04-01

    Several methods exist for financing and sustaining operations of school-based health centers (SBHCs). Promising sources of funds include private grants, federal grants, and state funding. Recently, federal regulation changes mandated that federal funding specifically for SBHCs go only to SBHCs affiliated with a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Becoming a FQHC allows a SBHC to bill Medicaid at a higher rate, be notified about federal grants, and access the federal drug-pricing program. However, FQHCs must bill for services, including a sliding-fee scale based on ability to pay; develop a governance board with a majority of consumer members; provide a set of designated primary care services; and serve all people regardless of ability to pay. Private grants impose fewer restrictions and usually provide start-up and demonstration funds for specific program needs. Such funds are generally time limited, so new programs need to be incorporated into the operational budget of the center. State funding proves relatively stable, but fiscal challenges in some states made these funds less available. Using a variety of funding sources will enable ongoing provision of health care to students. Overall, SBHCs should consider infrastructure development that allows a variety of funding options, including formalizing existing partnership commitments, engaging in a needs assessment and strategic planning process, developing the infrastructure for FQHC status, and implementing a billing system for client services.

  6. Contributions of physical function and satisfaction with social roles to emotional distress in chronic pain: a Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR) study.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, John A; Dixon, Eric A; Darnall, Beth D; Mackey, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with chronic pain show greater vulnerability to depression or anger than those without chronic pain, and also show greater interpersonal difficulties and physical disability. The present study examined data from 675 individuals with chronic pain during their initial visits to a tertiary care pain clinic using assessments from Stanford University's Collaborative Health Outcomes Information Registry (CHOIR). Using a path modeling analysis, the mediating roles of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) Physical Function and PROMIS Satisfaction with Social Roles and Activities were tested between pain intensity and PROMIS Depression and Anger. Pain intensity significantly predicted both depression and anger, and both physical function and satisfaction with social roles mediated these relationships when modeled in separate 1-mediator models. Notably, however, when modeled together, ratings of satisfaction with social roles mediated the relationship between physical function and both anger and depression. Our results suggest that the process by which chronic pain disrupts emotional well-being involves both physical function and disrupted social functioning. However, the more salient factor in determining pain-related emotional distress seems to be disruption of social relationships, than global physical impairment. These results highlight the particular importance of social factors to pain-related distress, and highlight social functioning as an important target for clinical intervention in chronic pain.

  7. 3 CFR - Medicare Demonstration To Test Medical Homes in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services My Administration is committed to building a high-quality, efficient health care system and improving access to health care for all Americans. Health centers are a vital part of the health care delivery system. For more than 40 years, health centers...

  8. 76 FR 40384 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special... Health and Health Disparities, 6707 Democracy Boulevard, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20892. (301)...

  9. 76 FR 18566 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special...-Sharp, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Minority Health and Health...

  10. A new conceptual framework for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Mushlin, Alvin I; Gordon, Jonathan E; Leiman, Joan M; Pardes, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Led by the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. health care system is undergoing a transformative shift toward greater accountability for quality and efficiency. Academic health centers (AHCs), whose triple mission of clinical care, research, and education serves a critical role in the country's health care system, must adapt to this evolving environment. Doing so successfully, however, requires a broader understanding of the wide-ranging roles of the AHC. This article proposes a conceptual framework through which the triple mission is expanded along four new dimensions: health, innovation, community, and policy. Examples within the conceptual framework categories, such as the AHCs' safety net function, their contributions to local economies, and their role in right-sizing the health care workforce, illustrate how each of these dimensions provides a more robust picture of the modern AHC and demonstrates the value added by AHCs. This conceptual framework also offers a basis for developing new performance metrics by which AHCs, both individually and as a group, can be held accountable, and that can inform policy decisions affecting them. This closer examination of the myriad activities of modern AHCs clarifies their essential role in our health care system and will enable these institutions to evolve, improve, be held accountable for, and more fully serve the health of the nation.

  11. Focus on: SUNY Health Center at Brooklyn Scientific & Medical Instrumentation Center.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, S

    1988-01-01

    The Scientific and Medical Instrumentation Center (SMIC) is the clinical engineering program serving the State University of New York's Health Science Center at Brooklyn. SMIC is a separate department within the center's 354-bed University Hospital, and provides many instrumentation support services for the hospital and the center's Basic Sciences Division. Now in its 24th year, SMIC developed the nation's first mandatory initial checkout program for patient care equipment, and in 1973 published the results of a funded pilot preventive maintenance program; this served as a model for the start-up of other PM programs in hospitals across the country and overseas. Today, this 35-person department is primarily responsible for some 7,000 units used in over 60 University Hospital departments and clinics. With its interdisciplinary expertise, SMIC also provides the hospital with many other instrumentation services, including prepurchase evaluation and review, and on-site emergency instrumentation service. SMIC also develops unique devices and instruments for the center's researchers, from the prototype stage through to final construction, and may modify instruments for increased safety and efficacy. PMID:10286254

  12. [Mental health, vulnerability and general practice: a study of non-profit health centers in Grenoble].

    PubMed

    Dubois-Fabing, Delphine; Pichon, Philippe; Arnevielhe, Alizée; Suscillon, Marie-Paule; Caron, Bruno; Saillard, Fabienne; François, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Very little research has been conducted on the role of general practitioners (GPs) in mental health care among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations in France. The non-profit community health care centers in Grenoble provide populations living in sensitive urban zones with high quality primary health care that includes a medico-social and prevention dimension. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of mental health issues diagnosed by GPs in health care centers, to identify the factors associated with these issues and to describe treatment characteristics. This cross-sectional study focused on general practice consultations in the AGECSA Grenoble health care centers over the course of one week. At the end of each consultation, the GP collected information about the patient, including personal data, psychological disorders, vulnerability, and patient health management. Among the 451 patients included in the study, GPs found that 45.2% of patients were in vulnerable situations and 43% of patients suffered from a mental disorder, including 29% of cases of anxiety and 20% of cases of depression. 44% of patients suffered from a psychological disorder (mental disorder and/or psychological suffering). For these patients, 52.8% of the consultations lasted more than 20 minutes. Their treatment generally included a mental health care follow-up (in 76% of cases), including psychological support (59%) and treatment of functional somatic disorders (46%). The study shows the high prevalence of psychological disorders diagnosed in the patients treated by GPs working in health care centers in disadvantaged urban areas. Research shows that GPs play an important and specific role in mental health care and prevention. An analysis of the organizational methods used in health care centers is highly relevant.

  13. Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: Trend or Major Thrust in Health Care Delivery?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killion, Cheryl M.

    2007-01-01

    In this reaction article to the Major Contribution, the merits and challenges of implementing patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, or cultural competence plus, are explicated. Three themes are addressed: separate but equal?, factoring in mental health, and sharing the load. The need to refine the conceptualization of the two…

  14. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign. PMID:23348094

  15. Forging stronger partnerships between academic health centers and patient-driven organizations.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Elaine K; Bond, Enriqueta; Califf, Robert M; Crowley, William F; Davis, Pamela; Galbraith, Richard; Reece, E Albert

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review the unique role that patient-driven organizations, such as patient advocacy groups and voluntary health organizations (PAG/VHOs), play in translational and clinical research. The importance of fostering collaborations between these organizations and U.S. academic health centers (AHCs) is also discussed. Although both the PAG/VHO community and AHCs are heterogeneous, and although not all organizations are well governed or provide independent, well-researched views, there are many outstanding, well-managed, independent PAG/VHOs in the United States whose missions overlap with those of AHCs. The characteristics of effective PAG/VHOs that would serve as excellent partners for AHCs are discussed, and examples are provided regarding their many contributions, which have included advancing research on rare diseases, recruiting patients for clinical trials, and establishing patient registries and biospecimen banks. The authors present feedback obtained from informal discussions with PAG/VHO staff, as well as a survey of a small sample of organizations, that has identified bureaucratic processes, negotiating intellectual property rights, and institutional review board (IRB) delays as the most problematic areas of interactions with AHCs. Actions are suggested for building effective partnerships between the two sectors and the activities that AHCs should undertake to facilitate their interactions with PAG/VHOs including streamlining contract review and IRB processes and finding ways to better align the incentives motivating academic clinical and translational investigators with the goals of PAG/VHOs. This article is one product of the Clinical Research Forum's Partnering with Patient Advocacy Groups Initiative. PMID:23887007

  16. Forging stronger partnerships between academic health centers and patient-driven organizations.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Elaine K; Bond, Enriqueta; Califf, Robert M; Crowley, William F; Davis, Pamela; Galbraith, Richard; Reece, E Albert

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review the unique role that patient-driven organizations, such as patient advocacy groups and voluntary health organizations (PAG/VHOs), play in translational and clinical research. The importance of fostering collaborations between these organizations and U.S. academic health centers (AHCs) is also discussed. Although both the PAG/VHO community and AHCs are heterogeneous, and although not all organizations are well governed or provide independent, well-researched views, there are many outstanding, well-managed, independent PAG/VHOs in the United States whose missions overlap with those of AHCs. The characteristics of effective PAG/VHOs that would serve as excellent partners for AHCs are discussed, and examples are provided regarding their many contributions, which have included advancing research on rare diseases, recruiting patients for clinical trials, and establishing patient registries and biospecimen banks. The authors present feedback obtained from informal discussions with PAG/VHO staff, as well as a survey of a small sample of organizations, that has identified bureaucratic processes, negotiating intellectual property rights, and institutional review board (IRB) delays as the most problematic areas of interactions with AHCs. Actions are suggested for building effective partnerships between the two sectors and the activities that AHCs should undertake to facilitate their interactions with PAG/VHOs including streamlining contract review and IRB processes and finding ways to better align the incentives motivating academic clinical and translational investigators with the goals of PAG/VHOs. This article is one product of the Clinical Research Forum's Partnering with Patient Advocacy Groups Initiative.

  17. Logic-centered architecture for ubiquitous health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Jacek; Arochena, Hisbel E; Naguib, Raouf N G; Chao, Kuo-Ming; Garcia-Perez, Alexeis

    2014-09-01

    One of the key points to maintain and boost research and development in the area of smart wearable systems (SWS) is the development of integrated architectures for intelligent services, as well as wearable systems and devices for health and wellness management. This paper presents such a generic architecture for multiparametric, intelligent and ubiquitous wireless sensing platforms. It is a transparent, smartphone-based sensing framework with customizable wireless interfaces and plug'n'play capability to easily interconnect third party sensor devices. It caters to wireless body, personal, and near-me area networks. A pivotal part of the platform is the integrated inference engine/runtime environment that allows the mobile device to serve as a user-adaptable personal health assistant. The novelty of this system lays in a rapid visual development and remote deployment model. The complementary visual Inference Engine Editor that comes with the package enables artificial intelligence specialists, alongside with medical experts, to build data processing models by assembling different components and instantly deploying them (remotely) on patient mobile devices. In this paper, the new logic-centered software architecture for ubiquitous health monitoring applications is described, followed by a discussion as to how it helps to shift focus from software and hardware development, to medical and health process-centered design of new SWS applications.

  18. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise.

  19. A Multidimensional Data Warehouse for Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kunjan, Kislaya; Toscos, Tammy; Turkcan, Ayten; Doebbeling, Brad N.

    2015-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) play a pivotal role in healthcare delivery to vulnerable populations, but have not yet benefited from a data warehouse that can support improvements in clinical and financial outcomes across the practice. We have developed a multidimensional clinic data warehouse (CDW) by working with 7 CHCs across the state of Indiana and integrating their operational, financial and electronic patient records to support ongoing delivery of care. We describe in detail the rationale for the project, the data architecture employed, the content of the data warehouse, along with a description of the challenges experienced and strategies used in the development of this repository that may help other researchers, managers and leaders in health informatics. The resulting multidimensional data warehouse is highly practical and is designed to provide a foundation for wide-ranging healthcare data analytics over time and across the community health research enterprise. PMID:26958297

  20. Developing of National Accreditation Model for Rural Health Centers in Iran Health System

    PubMed Central

    TABRIZI, Jafar Sadegh; GHARIBI, Farid; PIRAHARY, Samereh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The primary health care has notable effects on community health and accreditation is one of the appropriate evaluation methods that led to health system performance improvement, therefore, this study aims to developing of national accreditation model for rural health centers in Iran Health System. Methods Firstly the suitable accreditation models selected to benchmarking worldwide via systematic review, the related books and medical university’s web site surveyed and some interviews hold with experts. Then the obtain standards surveyed from the experts’ perspectives via Delphi technique. Finally, the obtainedmodel assessedvia the experts’ perspective and pilot study. Results The researchers identified JCAHO and CCHSA as the most excellent models. The obtained standards and their quality accepted from experts’ perspective and pilot study, and finally the number of 55 standards acquired. Conclusion The designed model has standards with acceptable quality and quantity, and researchers’ hopeful that its application in rural health centers led to continues quality improvement. PMID:26060646

  1. Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardan, Omid; Gozdyra, Peter; Misic, Bratislav; Moola, Faisal; Palmer, Lyle J.; Paus, Tomáš; Berman, Marc G.

    2015-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger.

  2. Neighborhood greenspace and health in a large urban center

    PubMed Central

    Kardan, Omid; Gozdyra, Peter; Misic, Bratislav; Moola, Faisal; Palmer, Lyle J.; Paus, Tomáš; Berman, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that natural environments can enhance health and here we build upon that work by examining the associations between comprehensive greenspace metrics and health. We focused on a large urban population center (Toronto, Canada) and related the two domains by combining high-resolution satellite imagery and individual tree data from Toronto with questionnaire-based self-reports of general health perception, cardio-metabolic conditions and mental illnesses from the Ontario Health Study. Results from multiple regressions and multivariate canonical correlation analyses suggest that people who live in neighborhoods with a higher density of trees on their streets report significantly higher health perception and significantly less cardio-metabolic conditions (controlling for socio-economic and demographic factors). We find that having 10 more trees in a city block, on average, improves health perception in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $10,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $10,000 higher median income or being 7 years younger. We also find that having 11 more trees in a city block, on average, decreases cardio-metabolic conditions in ways comparable to an increase in annual personal income of $20,000 and moving to a neighborhood with $20,000 higher median income or being 1.4 years younger. PMID:26158911

  3. 77 FR 24628 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the Addition of New WTC-Related Health Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and... Addition of New WTC-Related Health Conditions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS... Advisor, World Trade Center Health Program, Office of the Director, National Institute for...

  4. Implications of the World Trade Center Attack for the Public Health and Health Care Infrastructures

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Susan; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    The September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center had profound effects on the well-being of New York City. The authors describe and assess the strengths and weaknesses of the city’s response to the public health, environmental/ occupational health, and mental health dimensions of the attack in the first 6 months after the event. They also examine the impact on the city’s health care and social service system. The authors suggest lessons that can inform the development of a post–September 11th agenda for strengthening urban health infrastructures. PMID:12604481

  5. How one academic health center is successfully facing the future.

    PubMed

    Abdelhak, S S

    1996-04-01

    The author maintains that the academic health centers (AHCs) that successfully weather the current vast changes in the health care environment will be stronger institutions. But to survive and prosper in the future, AHCs must come to terms with their entrenched cultures and create new forms of organization that are more flexible, more adaptive, and more agile. Even though each center confronts unique circumstances requiring unique solutions the author describes the changes made during the last six years at his center--the Allegheny Health, Education and Research Foundation (AHERF), in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania--to show how one AHC is successfully facing change. The central problem facing AHERF (and all AHCs) is that revenues from all traditional sources are declining significantly. AHERF is dealing with the problem in part by actively seeking philanthropic and public funding for research and education. But such funding cannot be relied upon, and for AHERF to stay true to its mission, it must practice the "Three Rs" of modern academic medicine. First, the center is cultivating a more responsive organization. The author describes the organizational structure of the center; the emphasis on providing an environment that unleashes the creativity and productive potential of each employee and fosters teamwork; goals, objectives, and incentives; the way decisions are made; and the way revenue is allocated. Second, productivity must be improved through re-engineering. For example, AHERF oversaw the consolidation of two medical schools into one. The author describes the organizational changes that made the management of the resulting institution possible and cost-effective, and discusses changes in workflow, support functions, the use of information systems, and innovative supplier arrangements. Third, the revenue base must be secured. The author describes four of the main ways this is being done (e.g., the expansion of the center's large network of primary care physicians

  6. Systematic Review of Cerebral Palsy Registries/Surveillance Groups: Relationships between Registry Characteristics and Knowledge Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Donna S; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J; Pavone, Larissa; Mutlu, Akmer; Dewald, Julius PA; Msall, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive summary of the body of research disseminated by Cerebral Palsy (CP) registries and surveillance programs from January 2009 through May 2014 in order to describe the influence their results have on our overall understanding of CP. Secondly, registries/surveillance programs and the work they produced were evaluated and grouped using standardized definitions and classification systems. Method A systematic review search in PubMed, CINAH and Embase for original articles published from 1 January 2009 to 20 May 2014 originating from or supported by population based CP registries and surveillance programs or population based national registries including CP were included. Articles were grouped by 2009 World CP Registry Congress aim, registry/surveillance program classification, geographical region, and the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) domain. Registry variables were assessed using the ICF-CY classification. Results Literature searches returned 177 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The majority (69%) of registry/surveillance program productivity was related to contributions as a Resource for CP Research. Prevention (23%) and Surveillance (22%) articles were other areas of achievement, but fewer articles were published in the areas of Planning (17%) and Raising the Profile of CP (2%). There was a range of registry/surveillance program classifications contributing to this productivity, and representation from multiple areas of the globe, although most of the articles originated in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The domains of the ICF that were primarily covered included body structures and function at the early stages of life. Encouragingly, a variety of CP registry/surveillance program initiatives included additional ICF domains of participation and environmental and personal factors. Interpretation CP registries and surveillance programs, including novel non-traditional ones

  7. HIV testing practices among New England college health centers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to increase among certain populations including young men who have sex with men (MSM). College campuses represent a potential setting to engage young adults and institute prevention interventions including HIV testing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate testing practices for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on college campuses. Methods Medical directors at four-year residential baccalaureate college health centers in New England were surveyed from June, 2011 to September, 2011. Thirty-one interviews were completed regarding experiences with HIV testing, acute HIV infection, other STI testing, and outreach efforts targeting specific at-risk groups such as MSM. Results Among schools that responded to the survey, less than five percent of students were tested for HIV at their local college health center in the past academic year (2010–2011). Significant barriers to HIV testing included cost and availability of rapid antibody testing. One-third of college health medical directors reported that their practitioners may not feel comfortable recognizing acute HIV infection. Conclusions Improved HIV testing practices are needed on college campuses. Programs should focus on outreach efforts targeting MSM and other at-risk populations. PMID:23496891

  8. Strategic planning and entrepreneurism in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Smith, C T

    1988-01-01

    This article examines the academic medical center as a mature component of the industry, whose complex mission can be reconciled with the public's changing needs in an era of cost containment through the use of increasingly businesslike strategic planning. New dimensions in academic health center missions (as a result of changing public mandates) emphasize the need to identify the most appropriate settings for both the delivery of patient care and physician education. Strategies to meet these new demands, reflecting a market-oriented approach, such as diversification through corporate reorganization and joint ventures are delineated. Legal, tax, and regulatory problems that develop as a result of not-for-profit hospital engagement in unrelated business activity are also reviewed.

  9. 42 CFR 405.2469 - Federally Qualified Health Centers supplemental payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federally Qualified Health Centers supplemental payments. 405.2469 Section 405.2469 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED...

  10. 76 FR 63310 - National Center On Minority and Health Disparities Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center On Minority and Health Disparities Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special Emphasis Panel; NIMHD Health Disparities Research (R01). Date: November 7-8, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5...

  11. 75 FR 71449 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities...

  12. 76 FR 52959 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special Emphasis Panel; NIMHD Revision Applications to Support Environmental Health Disparities Research P20....

  13. 75 FR 29357 - National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center on Minority and Health Disparities; Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Special NCMHD Health Disparities Research on Minority and Underserved Population (R01). Date: June 16-18,...

  14. Organizational models of emerging academic health science centers in England.

    PubMed

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Davies, Stephen M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2010-08-01

    Recent government policy initiatives to foster medical innovation and high-quality care in England have prompted academic and clinical leaders to develop new organizational models to support the tripartite Flexnerian mission of academic medicine. Medical schools and health care providers have responded by aligning their missions and creating integrated governance structures that strengthen their partnerships. In March 2009, the government officially designated five academic-clinical partnerships as England's first academic health science centers (AHSCs). As academic-clinical integration is likely to continue, future AHSC leaders could benefit from an analysis of models for organizing medical school-clinical enterprise relationships in England's emerging AHSCs. In addition, as the United States ponders health systems reform and universal coverage, U.S. medical leaders may benefit from insight into the workings of academic medicine in England's universal health system. In this article, the authors briefly characterize the organization and financing of the National Health Service and how it supports academic medicine. They review the policy behind the designation of AHSCs. Then, the authors describe contrasting organizational models adopted in two of the newly designated AHSCs and analyze these models using a framework derived from U.S. literature. The authors conclude by outlining the major challenges facing academic medicine in England and offer suggestions for future research collaborations between leaders of AHSCs in the United States and England.

  15. [Considerations on limits and profits of registries].

    PubMed

    Addis, Antonio; Costa, Enrico; De Palma, Rossana; Magrini, Nicola; Marata, Anna Maria; Martelli, Luisa; Papini, Donato; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The article collects the summary of the discussion occurred in the setting of PRIER II, in the session dedicated to the taxonomy of registries. Shown below, some specific contributions by health professionals working at the regional departments, which deal with registries, as well as the contribution on the same subject by specialists working at some pharmaceutical companies. In particular, after the presentation summarized in the article by prof. Giuseppe Costa1, the contributions, respectively by a representative of the Emilia-Romagna Region, of a health and hospital service and by the PRIER II workgroup, are following. Finally, a collective work with all participants to the working group took place to focus on all the issues considered to be crucial in defining clinical registries. At the same discussion table, institutional representatives of the regulatory national and regional branch were also invited to take into consideration the points of view of all public and private registry users, in particular in their benefits, limits and purposes. Going through the discussion on a specific check list and deepening a number of statements identified by the working group, a list of key points, essential to characterize each clinical registry, was produced. PMID:26418504

  16. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  17. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a

  18. The Briscoe Library, University of Texas Health Science Center.

    PubMed

    Bowden, V M

    1994-09-01

    The Briscoe Library at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio opened in 1983, to replace and expand space for the growing campus. Work on the design phase began in 1979, once the legislature allocated $9.5 million for the new building. Of the 23 design objectives specified in the building program, flexibility to accommodate changing services and technology was given first priority. Details cover layout and technology, as well as changes to the environment and the building since it opened.

  19. Challenges and future directions of the T1D Exchange Clinic Network and registry.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kellee M; Xing, Dongyuan; Tamborlane, William V; Bergenstal, Richard M; Beck, Roy W

    2013-07-01

    The T1D Exchange Clinic Network consists of 67 clinics throughout the United States. Among the more than 100,000 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) who receive care at these centers, more than 26,000 have been enrolled in a registry. The registry includes participants over a wide age range, from age <1 to 93 years, and consists of both those newly diagnosed (more than 3000 diagnosed <1 year from the time of enrollment) and those with long-standing diabetes (more than 1000 with T1DM for at least 40 years). Data on diabetes history, insulin administration, diabetes management, monitoring, complications, medical conditions, medications, and laboratory results are collected at enrollment and annually through participant completion of Web-based questionnaires and data extraction from medical records. The clinic registry has provided a rich data set to address important clinical and public health issues, including important observations regarding the current state of treatment of T1DM in diabetes centers in the United States. Challenges encountered during the establishment of the clinic registry include establishment of criteria for a diagnosis of presumed autoimmune T1DM, standardization of data collected across clinics, data quality, and understanding of potential bias. Collecting the data and maximizing data quality has required considerable effort. Even with these efforts, certain data elements are difficult to capture in a meaningful way. A standard T1DM module used by all electronic health records could be developed based on the data collection instruments developed for the T1D Exchange clinic registry.

  20. System Integration and Network Planning in the Academic Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Marcia A.; Spackman, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer of information within the academic health center is complicated by the complex nature of the institution's multi-dimensional role. The diverse functions of patient care, administration, education and research result in a complex web of information exchange which requires an integrated approach to system management. System integration involves a thorough assessment of “end user” needs in terms of hardware and software as well as specification of the communications network architecture. The network will consist of a series of end user nodes which capture, process, archive and display information. This paper will consider some requirements of these nodes, also called intelligent workstations, relating to their management and integration into a total health care network.

  1. 78 FR 40152 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Nominations of Candidates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory... Health and Human Services. The CDC is soliciting nominations for membership on the World Trade...

  2. 78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... name of the Committee should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical...

  3. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F

    2016-02-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services in SBHCs. Databases were searched extensively for research studies published between January 1990 and March 2014. Data analysis was based on the method proposed by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Twenty-three studies were selected for review. Each study was explored for accessibility and content of mental health services in SBHCs. SBHCs provide access and eliminate barriers to mental health services. Students who exhibited high-risk behaviors were more likely to have sought services at the SBHC. However, there is a lack of high-quality research evaluating mental health services in the SBHCs and their effect on children and adolescents.

  4. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  5. Building Global Health Through a Center-Without-Walls: The Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Vermund, Sten H.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health. PMID:18303361

  6. Building global health through a center-without-walls: the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health. PMID:18303361

  7. Building global health through a center-without-walls: the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health.

    PubMed

    Vermund, Sten H; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Khedkar, Sheetal; Jia, Yujiang; Etherington, Carol; Vergara, Alfredo

    2008-02-01

    The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health.

  8. Commentary: Institutes versus traditional administrative academic health center structures.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Michael; Lofgren, Richard

    2012-05-01

    In the Point-Counterpoint section of this issue, Kastor discusses the pros and cons of a new, institute-based administrative structure that was developed at the Cleveland Clinic in 2008, ostensibly to improve the quality and efficiency of patient care. The real issue underlying this organizational transformation is not whether the institute model is better than the traditional model; instead, the issue is whether the traditional academic health center (AHC) structure is viable or whether it must evolve. The traditional academic model, in which the department and chair retain a great deal of autonomy and authority, and in which decision-making processes are legislative in nature, is too tedious and laborious to effectively compete in today's health care market. The current health care market is demanding greater efficiencies, lower costs, and thus greater integration, as well as more transparency and accountability. Improvements in both quality and efficiency will demand coordination and integration. Focusing on quality and efficiency requires organizational structures that facilitate cohesion and teamwork, and traditional organizational models will not suffice. These new structures must and will replace the loose amalgamation of the traditional AHC to develop the focus and cohesion to address the pressures of an evolving health care system. Because these new structures should lead to more successful clinical enterprises, they will, in fact, support the traditional academic missions of research and education more successfully than traditional organizational models can. PMID:22531588

  9. Strategies for developing biostatistics resources in an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Welty, Leah J; Carter, Rickey E; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Harrell, Frank E; Lindsell, Christopher J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Mazumdar, Madhu; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Roberson, Paula K; Ware, James H

    2013-04-01

    Biostatistics--the application of statistics to understanding health and biology-provides powerful tools for developing research questions, designing studies, refining measurements, analyzing data, and interpreting findings. Biostatistics plays an important role in health-related research, yet biostatistics resources are often fragmented, ad hoc, or oversubscribed within academic health centers (AHCs). Given the increasing complexity and quantity of health-related data, the emphasis on accelerating clinical and translational science, and the importance of conducting reproducible research, the need for the thoughtful development of biostatistics resources within AHCs is growing.In this article, the authors identify strategies for developing biostatistics resources in three areas: (1) recruiting and retaining biostatisticians, (2) efficiently using biostatistics resources, and (3) improving biostatistical contributions to science. AHCs should consider these three domains in building strong biostatistics resources, which they can leverage to support a broad spectrum of research. For each of the three domains, the authors describe the advantages and disadvantages of AHCs creating centralized biostatistics units rather than dispersing such resources across clinical departments or other research units. They also address the challenges that biostatisticians face in contributing to research without sacrificing their individual professional growth or the trajectory of their research teams. The authors ultimately recommend that AHCs create centralized biostatistics units because this approach offers distinct advantages both to investigators who collaborate with biostatisticians as well as to the biostatisticians themselves, and it is better suited to accomplish the research and education missions of AHCs.

  10. Routine HIV Testing in Indiana Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Beth E; Navale, Shalini M; Gillespie, Anthony; Ohmit, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed routine HIV testing in Indiana community health centers (CHCs). Methods. CHC medical directors reported HIV services, testing behaviors, barriers, and health center characteristics via survey from April to May 2013. Standard of care testing was measured by the extent to which CHCs complied with national guidelines for routine HIV testing in clinical settings. Results. Most (85.7%) CHCs reported HIV testing, primarily at patient request or if the patient was symptomatic. Routine HIV testing was provided for pregnant women by 60.7% of CHCs. Only 10.7% provided routine testing for adolescents to adults up to age 65 years. Routine testing was reported by 14.3% for gay and bisexual men, although 46.4% of CHCs reported asking patients about sexual orientation. Linkage to care services for HIV-positive patients, counseling for HIV treatment adherence, and partner testing generally was not provided. Conclusions. Most CHCs reported HIV testing, but such testing did not reflect the standard of care, because it depended on patient request or symptoms. One approach in future studies may be to allow respondents to compare current testing with standard of care and then reflect on barriers to and facilitators of adoption and implementation of routine HIV testing.

  11. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  12. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  16. [Cancer registry of laryngectomized persons in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Pavlić, Blazenka

    2014-03-01

    Cancer poses a major problem in the population of Croatia. Owing to Professor Zivko Kulcar, who founded Cancer Registry at the Institute of Public Health in 1959, statistical data on patients with malignant cancer, including information on the entire territory of the Republic of Croatia, are available. The Act on Official Statistics (Official Gazette 103/2003) and Annual Implementation Plan regulate data recording in Cancer Registry, which is performed by the County Public Health Institutes that control the volume and quality of registration, after which the information is forwarded to the Croatian National Public Health Institute. If information and statistical data are needed for public health or scientific research purposes, one should approach Cancer Registry, having previously filled out a form for aggregated or individual information. However, when requesting information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy, such information is not available. If information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy is needed, e.g., how many of such individuals there are out there, when, where and how they are treated, or their demographic characteristics, such information unfortunately is not available. Therefore, establishment of the registry of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is proposed, which would be maintained by nurses working at ENT departments. PMID:24979893

  17. Oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center

    PubMed Central

    Wyne, Amjad; Hammad, Nouf; Splieth, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oral health knowledge of health care workers in special children’s center. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect following information: demographics, oral hygiene practices, importance of fluoride, dental visits, cause of tooth decay, gingival health, and sources of oral health information. The study was conducted at Riyadh Center for Special Children in Riyadh City from December 2013 to May 2014. Results: All 60 health care workers in the center completed the questionnaire. A great majority (95%) of the workers brushed their teeth twice or more daily. More than two-third (71.7%) of the workers knew that fluoride helps in caries prevention. One in five (21.7%) workers thought that a dental visit only becomes necessary in case of a dental problem. Similarly, 13.3% of the workers thought to “wait till there is some pain in case of a dental cavity” before seeking dental treatment. The workers ranked soft drinks/soda (98.3%), flavored fizzy drinks (60%) and sweetened/flavored milks (43.3%) as top three cariogenic drinks. A great majority (95%) of the workers correctly responded that blood on toothbrush most probably is a sign of “gum disease”. Dentists (50%) and media (45%) were the main source of their oral health information. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in workers’ response in relation to their specific job. Conclusion: The special health care workers in the disabled children’s center generally had satisfactory oral health knowledge and practices. PMID:25878636

  18. Integrating Mental Health in Schools: Schools, School-Based Centers, and Community Programs Working Together. A Center Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This paper explores why integrated efforts to include mental health in schools are important and what is involved in such an effort. In order to deal with the full continuum of school mental health concerns, a comprehensive, integrated approach is required.. To be comprehensive, the mental health focus of school based centers must be multifaceted…

  19. The Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Jong Woo; Chung, Kee Wha; Shin, Joong Sik; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Auta, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Twin studies of Africans have been scarce although Africans have shown the highest twin birth rate in the world. As a parallel study of the South Korean Twin Registry, the Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry (NTSR) was developed to understand causal influences on the development of cognitive abilities, personality, and mental health among Nigerians. Currently, 1,134 twins and 404 full- and half-siblings have been registered with NTSR. This article describes research background, goals, major recruitment strategies, measures, and future directions of the NTSR.

  20. Solid health care waste management status at health care centers in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Khatib, Issam A. Sato, Chikashi

    2009-08-15

    Health care waste is considered a major public health hazard. The objective of this study was to assess health care waste management (HCWM) practices currently employed at health care centers (HCCs) in the West Bank - Palestinian Territory. Survey data on solid health care waste (SHCW) were analyzed for generated quantities, collection, separation, treatment, transportation, and final disposal. Estimated 4720.7 m{sup 3} (288.1 tons) of SHCW are generated monthly by the HCCs in the West Bank. This study concluded that: (i) current HCWM practices do not meet HCWM standards recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) or adapted by developed countries, and (ii) immediate attention should be directed towards improvement of HCWM facilities and development of effective legislation. To improve the HCWM in the West Bank, a national policy should be implemented, comprising a comprehensive plan of action and providing environmentally sound and reliable technological measures.

  1. Commentary on women-centered reproductive health services.

    PubMed

    Toro, O L

    1989-01-01

    From women's perspectives, the primary principles of a reproductive health framework in the developing world are as follows: Family planning is a basic human right to which all human beings are entitled. Provision of family planning services must be comprehensive, including safe and low cost methods, freedom of choice about both contraception and pregnancy termination, timely and honest information, privacy and confidentiality, individual needs assessment, and counseling of women, men or the couple. Wide contraceptive choice requires more research on methods that are less invasive of women's anatomy and physiology and more supportive of women's control of their own bodies. These parameters of quality care in family planning must be centered on women's needs, desires and expectations. The concept of conscious contraception implies an attitude of conscious sexuality. When a woman accepts that sexual gratification independent of reproduction is a legitimate right, she is better prepared to engage in the pursuit of her own health and happiness. If family planning programs do not include sexuality as a key issue to discuss with clients, all long-term strategies will fall short in modifying people's attitudes, especially women's reluctance to contracept. Sexual and reproductive health includes emotional health. As Dr. Sai points out, the effects of underdevelopment and poverty strike women in dramatic ways, and quite often all the pressures to which they are exposed lead to precarious emotional health. They become victims of violence and repeat the cycle of violence with their children. We, as advocates of sexual and reproductive rights, must also consider the psychological and emotional implications of sexuality and reproduction, and learn to deal with them in our clinics and services.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Integrating the environment, the economy, and community health: a Community Health Center's initiative to link health benefits to smart growth.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Peter V; Driscoll, Mary Beth; Gramling, Benjamin J

    2004-04-01

    The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC) in Milwaukee, Wis, is making a difference in the livability of surrounding neighborhoods and the overall health of the families it serves. SSCHC is going beyond traditional health care provider models and working to link the environment, the economy, and community health through urban brownfield redevelopment and sustainable land-use planning. In 1997, SSCHC recognized that restoration of local air and water quality and other environmental conditions, coupled with restoring family-supporting jobs in the neighborhood, could have a substantial impact on the overall health of families. Recent events indicate that SSCHC's pursuit of smart growth strategies has begun to pay off. PMID:15053995

  3. 42 CFR 405.2469 - Federally Qualified Health Centers supplemental payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural... they would receive under the cost-based Federally Qualified Health Center payment system. (a... per visit basis; and (ii) The Federally Qualified Health Center's all-inclusive cost-based per...

  4. 42 CFR 405.2469 - Federally Qualified Health Centers supplemental payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED Rural... they would receive under the cost-based Federally Qualified Health Center payment system. (a... per visit basis; and (ii) The Federally Qualified Health Center's all-inclusive cost-based per...

  5. 77 FR 50144 - Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS); Amendment of Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... amendment of meeting agenda and date change for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA), Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council (CMHS NAC). Public...

  6. 42 CFR 422.316 - Special rules for payments to Federally qualified health centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... health centers. 422.316 Section 422.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Payments to Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.316 Special rules for payments to Federally qualified health...

  7. Providing Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care: A Formative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Carolyn M.; Herman, Keith C.; Ferdinand, Lisa A.; Bailey, Tamika R.; Lopez, Manuel Thomas; Beato, Cristina; Adams, Diane; Cooper, Leslie L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the literature-based, testable, formative Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care Model that explains the associations between patient-centered culturally sensitive health care, health-promoting treatment behaviors, and health outcomes and statuses. An intervention program based on the model and its foundational…

  8. 77 FR 50519 - Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS); Amendment of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Mental Health... of meeting agenda, date change, and participant link change for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA), Center for Mental Health Services National Advisory Council (CMHS...

  9. Holistic Health Care for the Medically Uninsured: The Church Health Center of Memphis.

    PubMed

    Morris, G Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Church Health Center (CHC) in Memphis was founded in 1987 to provide quality, affordable health care for working, uninsured people and their families. With numerous, dedicated financial supporters and health care volunteers, CHC has become the largest faith-based health care organization of its type nationally, serving >61,000 patients. CHC embraces a holistic approach to health by promoting wellness in every dimension of life. It offers on-site services including medical care, dentistry, optometry, counseling, social work, and nutrition and fitness education, to promote wellness in every dimension of life. A 2012 economic analysis estimated that a $1 contribution to the CHC provided roughly $8 in health services. The CHC has trained >1200 Congregational Health Promoters to be health leaders and is conducting research on the effectiveness of faith community nurses partnering with congregations to assist in home care for patients recently discharged from Memphis hospitals. The MEMPHIS Plan, CHC's employer-sponsored health care plan for small business and the self-employed, offers uninsured people in lower-wage jobs access to quality, affordable health care. The CHC also conducts replications workshops several times a year to share their model with leaders in other communities. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) recently completed a case study that concluded: "The CHC is one of a very few organizations successfully embodying all three components of the IHI Triple Aim by improving population health outcomes, enhancing the individual's health care experience, and controlling costs. All three have been part of the Center's DNA since its inception, and as a transforming force in the community, the model is well worth national attention."

  10. Mental Health Services for Children; Focus: The Community Mental Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Center for Studies of Child and Family Mental Health.

    The need to help the emotionally disturbed is discussed with a focus on community mental health centers. Psychiatric services described are diagnosis, inpatient care, day care, outpatient care, emergency care, continuity of care and services, and care adjusted to age groupings ranging from infancy to adolescence. Aspects of the community goal of…

  11. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  12. Adoption and use of electronic health records among federally qualified health centers grew substantially during 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily B; Furukawa, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Federally qualified health centers play an important role in providing health care to underserved populations. Recent substantial federal investments in health information technology have enabled health centers to expand their use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, but factors associated with adoption are not clear. We examined 2010-12 administrative data from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Uniform Data System for more than 1,100 health centers. We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Only one-third of health centers had EHR systems that could meet CMS's stage 1 meaningful-use core requirements. Health centers that met the stage 1 requirements had more than twice the odds of receiving quality recognition, compared with centers with less than basic EHRs. Policy initiatives should focus assistance on EHR capabilities with slower uptake; connect providers with technical assistance to support implementation; and leverage the connection between meaningful use and quality recognition programs.

  13. Adoption and use of electronic health records among federally qualified health centers grew substantially during 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily B; Furukawa, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Federally qualified health centers play an important role in providing health care to underserved populations. Recent substantial federal investments in health information technology have enabled health centers to expand their use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, but factors associated with adoption are not clear. We examined 2010-12 administrative data from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Uniform Data System for more than 1,100 health centers. We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Only one-third of health centers had EHR systems that could meet CMS's stage 1 meaningful-use core requirements. Health centers that met the stage 1 requirements had more than twice the odds of receiving quality recognition, compared with centers with less than basic EHRs. Policy initiatives should focus assistance on EHR capabilities with slower uptake; connect providers with technical assistance to support implementation; and leverage the connection between meaningful use and quality recognition programs. PMID:25006154

  14. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  15. Shifting physical health care responsibilities at a community mental health center.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cindy; Martinez, Ruby

    2003-06-01

    This study assesses the effects of transferring physical health care of consumers from non-nurse case managers to a nurse case manager at a community mental health center. Using a comparative descriptive design, pre- and postintervention surveys were distributed to clinical staff before and after the transfer of responsibilities to determine differences in responses relating to workload and quality of consumer care. Findings suggested that staff had more time to spend on treatment consistent with their education and training, and experienced improved job satisfaction. They reported that consumers' health care improved in terms of quality, efficiency, access, continuity, and follow-up. A chart review revealed that the number of current annual health histories decreased slightly (6%), but annual physical exams increased by 24%. Types of medical appointments were analyzed to note the complexity of health needs of the consumers, with 38% being for routine care and the remaining 62% for chronic, specialty, and acute care. Nurse case managers responsible for overseeing consumers' physical health care would be a valuable addition to community mental health centers. This study suggests improved consumer care and job satisfaction ramifications.

  16. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach. PMID:26604205

  17. Modular group therapy in a community mental health center.

    PubMed

    Elmore, J L; Young, D M

    1996-12-01

    To use staff resources more efficiently, a community mental health center in South Carolina initiated an eight-session modular psychoeducational and group therapy program with a classroom format. Groups were composed of three to 12 patients with the same or similar diagnoses. Each session in the series constituted a complete module and included didactic presentations and group discussion about the material. At follow-up two years after the program started, the program was well accepted by staff and patients. The proportion of patient contacts for group therapy and revenue generated by group contacts had increased. Although an aim of the program was to reduce the frequency of contacts for individual therapy, these contacts did not decline over the follow-up period.

  18. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach.

  19. Resource allocation in academic health centers: creating common metrics.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Keith A; Castellanos, Nathan; Wartman, Steven A

    2011-09-01

    Optimizing resource allocation is essential for effective academic health center (AHC) management, yet guidelines and principles for doing so in the research and educational arenas remain limited. To address this issue, the authors analyzed responses to the 2007-2008 Association of Academic Health Centers census using ratio analysis. The concept was to normalize data from an individual institution to that same institution, by creating a ratio of two separate values from the institution (e.g., total faculty FTEs/total FTEs). The ratios were then compared across institutions. Generally, this strategy minimizes the effect of institution size on the responses, size being the predominant limitation of using absolute values for developing meaningful metrics. In so doing, ratio analysis provides a range of responses that can be displayed in graphical form to determine the range and distribution of values. The data can then be readily scrutinized to determine where any given institution falls within the distribution. Staffing ratios and operating ratios from up to 54 institutions are reported. For ratios including faculty numbers in the numerator or denominator, the range of values is wide and minimally discriminatory, reflecting heterogeneity across institutions in faculty definitions. Values for financial ratios, in particular total payroll expense/total operating expense, are more tightly clustered, reflecting in part the use of units with a uniform definition (i.e., dollars), and emphasizing the utility of such ratios in decision guidelines. The authors describe how to apply these insights to develop metrics for resource allocation in the research and educational arenas. PMID:21785307

  20. Resource allocation in academic health centers: creating common metrics.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Keith A; Castellanos, Nathan; Wartman, Steven A

    2011-09-01

    Optimizing resource allocation is essential for effective academic health center (AHC) management, yet guidelines and principles for doing so in the research and educational arenas remain limited. To address this issue, the authors analyzed responses to the 2007-2008 Association of Academic Health Centers census using ratio analysis. The concept was to normalize data from an individual institution to that same institution, by creating a ratio of two separate values from the institution (e.g., total faculty FTEs/total FTEs). The ratios were then compared across institutions. Generally, this strategy minimizes the effect of institution size on the responses, size being the predominant limitation of using absolute values for developing meaningful metrics. In so doing, ratio analysis provides a range of responses that can be displayed in graphical form to determine the range and distribution of values. The data can then be readily scrutinized to determine where any given institution falls within the distribution. Staffing ratios and operating ratios from up to 54 institutions are reported. For ratios including faculty numbers in the numerator or denominator, the range of values is wide and minimally discriminatory, reflecting heterogeneity across institutions in faculty definitions. Values for financial ratios, in particular total payroll expense/total operating expense, are more tightly clustered, reflecting in part the use of units with a uniform definition (i.e., dollars), and emphasizing the utility of such ratios in decision guidelines. The authors describe how to apply these insights to develop metrics for resource allocation in the research and educational arenas.

  1. Viewpoint: professionalism and humanism beyond the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Swick, Herbert M

    2007-11-01

    Medical professionalism and humanism have long been integral to the practice of medicine, and they will continue to shape practice in the 21st century. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the nature of medical professionalism and in efforts to teach and assess professional values and behaviors. As more and more teaching of both medical students and residents occurs in settings outside of academic medical centers, it is critically important that community physicians demonstrate behaviors that resonate professionalism and humanism. As teachers, they must be committed to being role models for what physicians should be. Activities that are designed to promote and advance professionalism, then, must take place not only in academic settings but also in clinical practice sites that are beyond the academic health center. The author argues that professionalism and humanism share common values and that each can enrich the other. Because the cauldron of practice threatens to erode traditional values of professionalism, not only for individual physicians but also for the medical profession, practicing physicians must incorporate into practice settings activities that are explicitly designed to exemplify those values, not only with students and patients, but also within their communities. The author cites a number of examples of ways in which professionalism and humanism can be fostered by individual physicians as well as professional organizations.

  2. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Amy J.; White Hat, Emily R.; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E.; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years. PMID:26703683

  3. Fostering Social Determinants of Health Transdisciplinary Research: The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Amy J; White Hat, Emily R; Angal, Jyoti; Grey Owl, Victoria; Puumala, Susan E; Baete Kenyon, DenYelle

    2016-01-01

    The Collaborative Research Center for American Indian Health (CRCAIH) was established in September 2012 as a unifying structure to bring together tribal communities and health researchers across South Dakota, North Dakota and Minnesota to address American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health disparities. CRCAIH is based on the core values of transdisciplinary research, sustainability and tribal sovereignty. All CRCAIH resources and activities revolve around the central aim of assisting tribes with establishing and advancing their own research infrastructures and agendas, as well as increasing AI/AN health research. CRCAIH is comprised of three divisions (administrative; community engagement and innovation; research projects), three technical cores (culture, science and bioethics; regulatory knowledge; and methodology), six tribal partners and supports numerous multi-year and one-year pilot research projects. Under the ultimate goal of improving health for AI/AN, this paper describes the overarching vision and structure of CRCAIH, highlighting lessons learned in the first three years. PMID:26703683

  4. [Primary health care reform and implications for the organizational culture of Health Center Groups in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Leone, Claudia; Dussault, Gilles; Lapão, Luís Velez

    2014-01-01

    The health sector's increasing complexity poses major challenges for administrators. There is considerable consensus on workforce quality as a key determinant of success for any health reform. This study aimed to explore the changes introduced by an action-training intervention in the organizational culture of the 73 executive directors of Health Center Groups (ACES) in Portugal during the primary health care reform. The study covers two periods, before and after the one-year ACES training, during which the data were collected and analyzed. The Competing Values Framework allowed observing that after the ACES action-training intervention, the perceptions of the executive directors regarding their organizational culture were more aligned with the practices and values defended by the primary health care reform. The study highlights the need to continue monitoring results over different time periods to elaborate further conclusions.

  5. National Suicide Registry Malaysia (NSRM).

    PubMed

    Hayati, A N; Kamarul, A K

    2008-09-01

    To create a nationwide system to capture data on completed suicide in Malaysia i.e. the morbidity, geographic and temporal trends and the population at high risk of suicide. Data from this registry can later be used to stimulate and facilitate further research on suicide. This paper describes the rationale and processes involved in developing a national suicide registry in 2007. The diagnosis of suicide is based on the ICD-10 codes for fatal intentional self-harm (X60-X84). A case report form with an accompanying instruction manual had been prepared to ensure systematic and uniform data collection. State Forensic Pathologist's offices are responsible for data collection in their respective states, and in turn will submit the data to a central data management unit. Data collection began in July 2007 and currently in data cleaning process. Training for source data producers is ongoing. In 2008, the NSRM plans to involve university hospitals into its network as currently only Ministry of Health hospitals are involved. The NSRM will be launching its online application for case registration this year while an overview of results will be available via its public domain at www.nsrm.gov.my beginning 20 April 2008. To efficiently capture the data on suicide, a concerted effort between various agencies is needed. A lot of conceptual work and data base development remains to be done in order to position preventive efforts on a more solid foundation. PMID:19227674

  6. Walking the Tightrope: Directing a Student Health Center at a Research Institution with an Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christmas, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Reporting lines for directors of student health centers (SHCs) at colleges and universities are a matter of continuing interest for those of us who must follow them. SHC directors at institutions with academic medical centers face a greater number of reporting choices that also have the potential of being more politically charged. The author…

  7. 76 FR 27648 - World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program... establishment of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee. The WTC... WTC Program Administrator. For information, contact Larry Elliott, Designated Federal Officer,...

  8. 77 FR 2548 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for...

  9. A statewide approach to health care personnel maldistribution. The California Area Health Education Center System.

    PubMed

    Crowder, J E; Schnepper, J E; Gessert, C

    1984-05-01

    An Area Health Education Center (AHEC) system has been established in California to address the maldistribution of physicians and other health care professionals. The AHEC program uses educational incentives to recruit and retain health care personnel in underserved areas by linking the academic resources of university health science centers with local educational and clinical facilities. The medical schools, working in partnership with urban or rural AHECs throughout the state, are implementing educational programs to attract trainees and licensed professionals to work in underserved communities. The California AHEC project entered its fifth year in October of 1983 with the participation of all eight medical schools and the Charles Drew Postgraduate School of Medicine, 35 other health professions schools, 17 independent AHECs and more than 400 clinical training sites. Educational programs are reaching more than 22,000 students and practicing health professionals throughout California. We review the current status of the California AHEC system and use the AHEC programs at Loma Linda University to illustrate the effect this intervention is having.

  10. Making Value-Based Payment Work for Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Harold D

    2015-10-01

    Under fee-for-service payment systems, physicians and hospitals can be financially harmed by delivering higher-quality, more efficient care. The author describes how current "value-based purchasing" initiatives fail to address the underlying problems in fee-for-service payment and can be particularly problematic for academic health centers (AHCs). Bundled payments, warranties, and condition-based payments can correct the problems with fee-for-service payments and enable physicians and hospitals to redesign care delivery without causing financial problems for themselves. However, the author explains several specific actions that are needed to ensure that payment reforms can be a "win-win-win" for patients, purchasers, and AHCs: (1) disconnecting funding for teaching and research from payment for service delivery, (2) providing predictable payment for essential hospital services, (3) improving the quality and efficiency of care at AHCs, and (4) supporting collaborative relationships between AHCs and community providers by allowing each to focus on their unique strengths and by paying AHC specialists to assist community providers in diagnosis and treatment. With appropriate payment reforms and a commitment by AHCs to redesign care delivery, medical education, and research, AHCs could provide the leadership needed to improve care for patients, lower costs for health care purchasers, and maintain the financial viability of both AHCs and community providers. PMID:26266462

  11. Patient-Centered e-Health Record over the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilacopoulos, George; Prentza, Andrianna; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Malamateniou, Flora; Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Mourouzis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Patient-Centered e-Health (PCEH) conceptual aspects alongside a multidisciplinary project that combines state-of-the-art technologies like cloud computing. The project, by combining several aspects of PCEH, such as: (a) electronic Personal Healthcare Record (e-PHR), (b) homecare telemedicine technologies, (c) e-prescribing, e-referral, e-learning, with advanced technologies like cloud computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), will lead to an innovative integrated e-health platform of many benefits to the society, the economy, the industry, and the research community. To achieve this, a consortium of experts, both from industry (two companies, one hospital and one healthcare organization) and academia (three universities), was set to investigate, analyse, design, build and test the new platform. This paper provides insights to the PCEH concept and to the current stage of the project. In doing so, we aim at increasing the awareness of this important endeavor and sharing the lessons learned so far throughout our work.

  12. Predictors of consumer satisfaction in community mental health center services.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Minji; Barrett, Hope; Talbert, Jeffery

    2014-11-01

    Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities conducted a survey to evaluate consumers' satisfaction with services delivered at the Community Mental Health Centers (CMHCs) in Kentucky. The survey was administered at outpatient clinics operated by fourteen CMHCs in 2010. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that predict whether clients will respond that they were "generally satisfied" with services received from CMHCs. A logistic regression model was developed using respondents' characteristics and their responses to survey questions. Survey questions were grouped into seven core domains: general satisfaction, access, quality, participation in treatment planning, outcomes, functioning, and social connectedness. In result, responses to domains of access, quality and participation in treatment planning significantly affected clients' perception of general satisfaction. Respondents who positively assessed those domains of services were more likely to answer that they were generally satisfied with services. Based on the analysis in this report, improvement in certain domains of services, especially access, quality and participation in treatment planning could increase the level of positive responses in general satisfaction.

  13. Transdisciplinary Cardiovascular and Cancer Health Disparities Training: Experiences of the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Ferketich, Amy; Boyington, Josephine; Dugan, Sheila; Garroutte, Eva; Kaufmann, Peter G.; Krok, Jessica; Kuo, Alice; Ortega, Alexander N.; Purnell, Tanjala; Srinivasan, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities program promotes multilevel and multifactorial health equity research and the building of research teams that are transdisciplinary. We summarized 5 areas of scientific training for empowering the next generation of health disparities investigators with research methods and skills that are needed to solve disparities and inequalities in cancer and cardiovascular disease. These areas include social epidemiology, multilevel modeling, health care systems or health care delivery, community-based participatory research, and implementation science. We reviewed the acquisition of the skill sets described in the training components; these skill sets will position trainees to become leaders capable of effecting significant change because they provide tools that can be used to address the complexities of issues that promote health disparities. PMID:25905828

  14. Respiratory and Other Health Effects Reported in Children Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster of 11 September 2001

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Pauline A.; Brackbill, Robert; Thalji, Lisa; DiGrande, Laura; Campolucci, Sharon; Thorpe, Lorna; Henning, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Background Effects of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster on children’s respiratory health have not been definitively established. Objective This report describes respiratory health findings among children who were < 18 years of age on 11 September 2001 (9/11) and examine associations between disaster-related exposures and respiratory health. Methods Children recruited for the WTC Health Registry (WTCHR) included child residents and students (kindergarten through 12th grade) in Manhattan south of Canal Street, children who were south of Chambers Street on 9/11, and adolescent disaster-related workers or volunteers. We collected data via computer-assisted telephone interviews in 2003–2004, with interview by adult proxy for children still < 18 years of age at that time. We compared age-specific asthma prevalence with National Health Interview Survey estimates. Results Among 3,184 children enrolled, 28% were < 5 years of age on 9/11; 34%, 5–11 years; and 39%, 12–17 years. Forty-five percent had a report of dust cloud exposure on 9/11. Half (53%) reported at least one new or worsened respiratory symptom, and 5.7% reported new asthma diagnoses. Before 9/11, age-specific asthma prevalence in enrolled children was similar to national estimates, but prevalence at interview was elevated among enrollees < 5 years of age. Dust cloud exposure was associated with new asthma diagnosis (adjusted odds ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.5–3.5). Conclusions Asthma prevalence after 9/11 among WTCHR enrollees < 5 years of age was higher than national estimates, and new asthma diagnosis was associated with dust cloud exposure in all age groups. We will determine severity of asthma and persistence of other respiratory symptoms on follow-up surveys. PMID:18941582

  15. A Computer System for Processing Tumor Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer system for processing tumor registry data has been developed by the Washington, D.C. VA Medical Center Systems Development Group. The automated registry system replaces a manual registry, which had been implemented according to the guidelines established for Cancer Programs by the American College of Surgeons. A permanent on-line data base of patient data is maintained by a minicomputer at the medical center. A user oriented application program provides entry, edit, and retrieval of patient data in the following formats - Suspense, Master, Accession, and Follow-up registers, and in Abstract form. Data entered in any of the formats is stored in a common file, and is available as needed in any other format. The programs were written in the standard Mumps Language. Construction of the Tumor Registry application was greatly assisted by use of the File Manager, a data base file management package written in the standard Mumps language.

  16. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    PubMed

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  17. 75 FR 55588 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Florida Family-to-Family Health Information Center (F2F HIC) grant (H84MC00006) from the Florida Institute of Family Involvement (FIFI) to...

  18. Intention and Usage of Computer Based Information Systems in Primary Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosizah; Kuntoro; Basuki N., Hari

    2016-01-01

    The computer-based information system (CBIS) is adopted by almost all of in health care setting, including the primary health center in East Java Province Indonesia. Some of softwares available were SIMPUS, SIMPUSTRONIK, SIKDA Generik, e-puskesmas. Unfortunately they were most of the primary health center did not successfully implemented. This…

  19. 76 FR 68770 - Proposed Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented Minority Individuals... comments on proposed eligibility criteria for the Centers of Excellence (COE) program in health professions... INFORMATION: Purpose: The COE program supports programs of excellence in health professions education for...

  20. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.365 Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or...

  1. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.365 Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or...

  2. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.365 Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or...

  3. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.365 Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or...

  4. 42 CFR 440.365 - Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.365 Coverage of rural health clinic and federally qualified health center (FQHC) services. If a State provides benchmark or...

  5. [The micropolitics of the work of health professionals in health centers: regarding the health needs of families].

    PubMed

    Graziano, Ana Paula; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the strengths and limitations of the process of nursing work at a health center in terms of recognizing the health needs of the population. The methodological framework used was social research in the qualitative perspective, with discourse analysis based on hermeneutics-dialectics and founded on the Theory of Praxis Interpretation of Community Health Nursing. The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, and the working processes of the teams were examined according to the Analyzing Flowchart of the Model of a Health Care Service. In conclusion, there are limitations in the daily working process of the nursing team regarding the recognition of the health needs of the population. Coping with these needs consisted of the identification of complications, relegating the social determinants of the poor life conditions associated with the health-disease process to a secondary concern.

  6. Health Consultation & Resource Needs of Pre-Schools and Child Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Silvana F.

    This study describes the state of health education programs and practices in child care centers in Rhode Island. The foci of the study were: (1) planned group health education activities; (2) staff ability to teach health topics; (3) availability of resources regarding health topics; (4) barriers to providing health instruction; (5) parental…

  7. School-Based Health Centers and Childhood Obesity: "An Ideal Location to Address a Complex Issue"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    One of today's most pressing public health problems is the rise in childhood overweight and obesity. School-based health centers (SBHCs)--the convergence of public health, primary care, and mental health in schools--represent an important element in the public health toolbox for combating the challenging epidemic. When working side-by-side in a…

  8. The Health IT Regional Extension Center Program: Evolution and Lessons for Health Care Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Kimberly; Kendall, Mat; Shanks, Katherine; Haque, Ahmed; Jones, Emily; Wanis, Maggie G; Furukawa, Michael; Mostashari, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the Regional Extension Center (REC) program’s progress toward its goal of supporting over 100,000 providers in small, rural, and underserved practices to achieve meaningful use (MU) of an electronic health record (EHR). Data Sources/Study Setting Data collected January 2010 through June 2013 via monitoring and evaluation of the 4-year REC program. Study Design Descriptive study of 62 REC programs. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Primary data collected from RECs were merged with nine other datasets, and descriptive statistics of progress by practice setting and penetration of targeted providers were calculated. Principal Findings RECs recruited almost 134,000 primary care providers (PCPs), or 44 percent of the nation’s PCPs; 86 percent of these were using an EHR with advanced functionality and almost half (48 percent) have demonstrated MU. Eighty-three percent of Federally Qualified Health Centers and 78 percent of the nation’s Critical Access Hospitals were participating with an REC. Conclusions RECs have made substantial progress in assisting PCPs with adoption and MU of EHRs. This infrastructure supports small practices, community health centers, and rural and public hospitals to use technology for care delivery transformation and improvement. PMID:24359032

  9. Health and environmental consequences of the world trade center disaster.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Philip J; Lioy, Paul J; Thurston, George; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Chen, L C; Chillrud, Steven N; Gavett, Stephen H; Georgopoulos, Panos G; Geyh, Alison S; Levin, Stephen; Perera, Frederica; Rappaport, Stephen M; Small, Christopher

    2004-05-01

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) created an acute environmental disaster of enormous magnitude. This study characterizes the environmental exposures resulting from destruction of the WTC and assesses their effects on health. Methods include ambient air sampling; analyses of outdoor and indoor settled dust; high-altitude imaging and modeling of the atmospheric plume; inhalation studies of WTC dust in mice; and clinical examinations, community surveys, and prospective epidemiologic studies of exposed populations. WTC dust was found to consist predominantly (95%) of coarse particles and contained pulverized cement, glass fibers, asbestos, lead, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated furans and dioxins. Airborne particulate levels were highest immediately after the attack and declined thereafter. Particulate levels decreased sharply with distance from the WTC. Dust pH was highly alkaline (pH 9.0-11.0). Mice exposed to WTC dust showed only moderate pulmonary inflammation but marked bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 10,116 firefighters showed exposure-related increases in cough and bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 183 cleanup workers showed new-onset cough (33%), wheeze (18%), and phlegm production (24%). Increased frequency of new-onset cough, wheeze, and shortness of breath were also observed in community residents. Follow-up of 182 pregnant women who were either inside or near the WTC on 11 September showed a 2-fold increase in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. In summary, environmental exposures after the WTC disaster were associated with significant adverse effects on health. The high alkalinity of WTC dust produced bronchial hyperreactivity, persistent cough, and increased risk of asthma. Plausible causes of the observed increase in SGA infants include maternal exposures to PAH and particulates. Future risk of mesothelioma may be increased, particularly among workers and

  10. Health and environmental consequences of the world trade center disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, Philip J; Lioy, Paul J; Thurston, George; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Chen, L C; Chillrud, Steven N; Gavett, Stephen H; Georgopoulos, Panos G; Geyh, Alison S; Levin, Stephen; Perera, Frederica; Rappaport, Stephen M; Small, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The attack on the World Trade Center (WTC) created an acute environmental disaster of enormous magnitude. This study characterizes the environmental exposures resulting from destruction of the WTC and assesses their effects on health. Methods include ambient air sampling; analyses of outdoor and indoor settled dust; high-altitude imaging and modeling of the atmospheric plume; inhalation studies of WTC dust in mice; and clinical examinations, community surveys, and prospective epidemiologic studies of exposed populations. WTC dust was found to consist predominantly (95%) of coarse particles and contained pulverized cement, glass fibers, asbestos, lead, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated furans and dioxins. Airborne particulate levels were highest immediately after the attack and declined thereafter. Particulate levels decreased sharply with distance from the WTC. Dust pH was highly alkaline (pH 9.0-11.0). Mice exposed to WTC dust showed only moderate pulmonary inflammation but marked bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 10,116 firefighters showed exposure-related increases in cough and bronchial hyperreactivity. Evaluation of 183 cleanup workers showed new-onset cough (33%), wheeze (18%), and phlegm production (24%). Increased frequency of new-onset cough, wheeze, and shortness of breath were also observed in community residents. Follow-up of 182 pregnant women who were either inside or near the WTC on 11 September showed a 2-fold increase in small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants. In summary, environmental exposures after the WTC disaster were associated with significant adverse effects on health. The high alkalinity of WTC dust produced bronchial hyperreactivity, persistent cough, and increased risk of asthma. Plausible causes of the observed increase in SGA infants include maternal exposures to PAH and particulates. Future risk of mesothelioma may be increased, particularly among workers and

  11. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  12. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    PubMed

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  13. The Health Literacy Environment of Hospitals and Health Centers. Partners for Action: Making Your Healthcare Facility Literacy-Friendly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, Rima E.; Anderson, Jennie E.

    2006-01-01

    The "health literacy environment" of a healthcare facility represents the expectations, preferences, and skills of those providing health information and services. Some of these demands are in the form of physical aspects of the hospital or health center, such as signs and postings. At the same time, access to and navigation of health services…

  14. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  15. Training Residents in Community Health Centers: Facilitators and Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Carl G.; Chen, Frederick M.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Training family medicine residents in underserved settings, such as community health centers (CHCs), may provide a solution to the primary care workforce shortage. We sought to describe the facilitators and barriers to creating partnerships between CHCs and family medicine residencies (FMRs). METHODS We conducted 19 key informant interviews and 3 focus groups to identify the key factors in the CHC-FMR relationship. Audiotapes and transcripts were analyzed to identify major themes. Key informant results were validated and expanded in the focus group discussions. RESULTS Four major themes describe the CHC-FMR training partnership: mission, money, quality, and administrative/governance complexity. The CHC-FMR training affiliation is a complex relationship drawn together by a shared mission of service to the underserved, enhanced financial stability, workforce improvement, and greater educational and clinical quality. The relationship is hindered by competing primary missions, chronic underfunding, complex governing institutional regulations, and administrative challenges. In addition, the focus groups offered several policy solutions to address the barriers to CHC-FMR affiliation. CONCLUSIONS A successful CHC-FMR training partnership relies upon the development of a shared mission of education and service, as well as innovation and flexibility by the organizations that govern them. PMID:19901307

  16. [Conditions of dental extractions in areas health centers of Senegal].

    PubMed

    Faye, D; Tine, S D; Cisse, D; Lo, C M; Mbodj, El B; Diouf, M; Diallo, P D

    2009-12-01

    Dental extraction is a surgical act frequently carried out in the African dental structures. It requires the rigorous respect of the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis. Equipments and anaesthetic and avulsional products must be also sufficient. Our study undertaken among 46 dental services in areas health centers of Senegal aimed to determine the conditions under which dental extractions are carried out. The principle results of our study showed that 93% of dental practitioners wore sterilized gloves. 49% of the dentist's care activity consisted in dental extractions. 50% of the practitioners re-use anaesthetic needles, 2% re-use anaesthetic carpules. We noticed that the dental structures were facing a deficit of materials and products of extraction. Face to the outbreak of serious illnesses as infections of HIV and Hepatitis B, the practitioner and his team must be sensitized and trained to struggle against the transmissible infections and to carry out the dental extraction only if the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis are joined together. A pleading towards the medical authorities must be done to support the services in equipments and periodic renewals of the materials and products of extractions.

  17. School-Based Health Centers in an Era of Health Care Reform: Building on History

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D.

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs’ impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths’ academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation’s youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons

  18. 76 FR 38937 - World Trade Center Health Program Requirements for the Addition of New WTC-Related Health Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... New WTC-Related Health Conditions AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HHS. ACTION... Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), will provide medical monitoring and treatment to...

  19. Need for a roadmap for development of a coordinated national registry programme.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, S; Best, R L; Evans, S M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical quality registries are an overlooked and under-funded arm of clinical research in Australia. Registries are databases for patients with a particular disease, or who undergo a procedure, or use a health resource. Registries, where properly funded and universally adopted, have provided substantial benefits to the quality of healthcare and, in some cases, have had demonstrable effect in reducing costs. There is a lack of a coordinated programme for both funding and development of registries in Australia. A coordinated effort is required to address key gaps in registry coverage and ensure registries comply with appropriate technical and operating principles, and target areas where registries can add value to the health system. This will ensure that Australia is competitive with its international peers in this dynamic environment.

  20. Registries in systemic sclerosis: a worldwide experience.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Felice; Walker, Ulrich A; Nihtyanova, Svetlana; Moinzadeh, Pia; Hunzelmann, Nicholas; Krieg, Thomas; Steen, Virginia; Baron, Murray; Sampaio-Barros, Percival; Kayser, Cristiane; Nash, Peter; Denton, Chris P; Tyndall, Alan; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2011-01-01

    SSc is a multisystem disease characterized by an unpredictable course, high mortality and resistance to therapy. The complexity and severity of SSc is a growing burden on the health-care systems. As a result, researchers are seeking new therapeutic strategies for effectively managing these patients. Disease registries are used to support care management efforts for groups of patients with chronic diseases and are meaningful to capture and track key patient information to assist the physicians in managing patients. For these reasons, SSc surveys, research associations and consortiums are pivotal to conduct ongoing research and data collection to enhance disease knowledge and support research projects. Currently, there are several national SSc registries in the UK, Germany, USA, Canada, Brazil and Australia. There is also an international registry established by the European League Against Rheumatism scleroderma trial and research (EUSTAR) called minimal essential data set (MEDS) Online, which collects data from over 8000 patients from 92 centres worldwide, including 21 European centres and 9 centres outside Europe. By collecting, analysing and disseminating data on disease progression and patient responses to long-term disease management strategies, registries help to improve understanding of the disease and keep medical professionals up to date on the latest advances. PMID:21148153

  1. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients.

  2. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients. PMID:25162618

  3. [Monitoring of pregnancies exposed to drugs in France: the experience of the registries of congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice

    2014-01-01

    Registries of congenital malformations were implemented in many industrialized countries following the drama of thalidomide. In 2013, four French registries of congenital malformations in France provide the systematic epidemiological surveillance of birth defects. All are part of international networks of registries, especially European surveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT). If the development of prevention actions including prenatal diagnosis has gradually led the registries to play a key role of assessment on the impact of public health policies, one of the major roles of registries of congenital malformations remains early detection of clusters of malformations secondary to teratogenic effects.

  4. Global Health: The Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health: Vision and Mission, Programs, and Accomplishments

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Joel G.; Bridbord, Kenneth; Kupfer, Linda E.; Glass, Roger I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Fogarty International Center (FIC) of the U.S. National Institutes of Health has supported long-term (>6 months) basic, clinical and applied research training and research for over 3,600 future leaders in science and public health from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs); tens of thousands more persons have received short-term training. FIC started these programs in 1988 with the flagship HIV/AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) in response to the global pandemic. More than 23 extramural training and research programs plus an intramural program are now operating – all in collaboration with other Institutes and Centers at NIH, U.S. government agencies, foundations, and partner institutions in LMICs and the U.S. While infectious diseases still reign mightily in Sub-Saharan African and South East Asian countries, non-communicable diseases are emerging globally, including in LMICs. Newer FIC training programs are addressing chronic, non-communicable diseases and strengthening the quality of medical schools and health care provider training, in addition to expanding expertise in infectious diseases. The model for successful training is based on long-term commitments, institutional strengthening, “twinning” of research centers, focus on local problems, and active mentoring. Trainees from Africa, Asia, and Latin America have made notable scientific contributions to global health, attained leadership positions, and received special recognition nationally and internationally. As the FIC programs are institutional-strengthening partnerships and candidates are carefully selected and mentored, close to 90% of FIC trainees return to their countries of origin. After returning home the FIC-trained leaders have continued to mentor and train thousands of individuals in their home countries. PMID:21896356

  5. An examination of the integration of certified peer specialists into community mental health centers.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emily A; Reinhart, Chrystal; Wituk, Scott; Meissen, Greg

    2012-08-01

    The formal role of Certified Peer Specialist (CPS) is a recent addition to the mental health field. CPSs are people in recovery employed within the mental health system, mostly by community mental health centers, to provide support through sharing life experiences with those working toward recovery from mental illness. This brief report examines participant's experiences being a CPS, responsibilities and activities as a CPS, and integration into community mental health centers. Findings suggest that CPSs demonstrate high levels of communal orientation, job satisfaction, workplace integration and organizational support and are well received in mental health centers. PMID:22806435

  6. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  7. Walking the tightrope: directing a student health center at a research institution with an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Christmas, William A

    2008-01-01

    Reporting lines for directors of student health centers (SHCs) at colleges and universities are a matter of continuing interest for those of us who must follow them. SHC directors at institutions with academic medical centers face a greater number of reporting choices that also have the potential of being more politically charged. The author describes his experience at 2 such institutions and offers some cautious advice.

  8. Health center financial performance: national trends and state variation, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leiyu; Collins, Patricia B; Aaron, Kaytura Felix; Watters, Vanessa; Shah, Leslie Greenblat

    2007-01-01

    For four decades, health centers have provided quality, cost-effective primary healthcare to underserved populations. Using the Uniform Data System, this study analyzes national trends in health center patients, providers, and financial performance for 1998-2004, and state-specific data for 2004. Between 1998 and 2004, health centers served increasing numbers of underserved patients, which included patients who were uninsured or on Medicaid, minorities, and patients at or below poverty level. Even though the number of health center providers and patients increased, patient-to-provider ratios did not change significantly. Medicaid remained the single largest source of health center revenue, accounting for 36.4 percent of total revenue in 2004. Compared with Medicare, private insurance, and self-pay, Medicaid consistently reimbursed health centers at the highest rate per patient. Federal and nonfederal grants to support care for the uninsured as well as enabling services such as transportation, translation, and other support systems is one of many important sources of revenue. Financial challenges for health centers included increasing costs and varied or declining rates of reimbursement for services rendered. However, health centers became more self-sufficient over time, average net revenues increased, and operating margins were predominantly positive. Data on individual states, with different numbers and types of health centers, varied widely in all of these categories. In conclusion, health centers rely on federal and nonfederal grant support in concert with the Medicaid program as major funding sources and continued financial stability will be contingent upon health centers' ability to balance revenues with the cost of managing the vulnerable populations that they serve.

  9. Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: Analyzing Participatory Culture-Centered Health Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, Ambar; Dutta, Mohan J.

    2009-01-01

    An emerging trend in health communication research advocates the need to foreground articulations of health by participants who are at the core of any health campaign. Scholarly work suggests that the culture-centered approach to health communication can provide a theoretical and practical framework to achieve this objective. The culture-centered…

  10. Oregon School-Based Health Centers, 1992-1994 Services Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nystrom, Robert J.

    This report describes the activities of Oregon's 25 high school-based health centers between 1992 and 1994. Information is provided on funding sources, services offered (including general medical services and reproductive health, mental health, health promotion services, and hours of operation), staffing (including levels of staffing and…

  11. Oregon School-Based Health Centers: A Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, James W.; White, Lisa C.; Alexander, Tammy

    A follow-up study evaluated the impact of School-Based Health Centers (SBHC) on health behaviors (including emotional and reproductive health and substance abuse), school attendance and academic performance, and health service use. The study compared these behaviors between 1990 and 1992 in several Oregon high schools with and without SBHCs.…

  12. A School-Based Health Center-University Nursing Partnership: How We Filled in the GAPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kim; Clark, Amy; Colborn, Brittanie; Perez, Ashley; Engelke, Martha K.; Hill, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    Young adolescents, age 10-15 years, have increasing psychosocial and biomedical health care needs, yet are some of the lowest users of conventional health services. In eastern North Carolina, school-based health centers (SBHCs) provide primary health care to thousands of school-age children in the most rural, medically underserved areas. SBHCs…

  13. The Relationship between School-Based Health Centers and the Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Background: School-based health centers (SBHCs) have improved access to primary and preventive health care for underserved children and youth by bringing comprehensive health services into the schools while addressing critical health problems that make it difficult for students to learn. Despite the findings on the positive effects of SBHCs on…

  14. The Health Informatics Center of Acadiana--informing health policymaking in post-Katrina/Rita Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Caillouet, L Philip

    2007-01-01

    A "healthy communities" initiative in Louisiana led to creation of the Health Informatics Center of Acadiana(HICA) at The University of Louisiana at Lafayette, in the south central United States. Since hurricanes Katrina and Rita devastated the Louisiana coast in 2005, HICA's role has taken on heightened significance. HICA identifies vulnerable populations, documents their risk factors, and evaluates interventions intended to improve community health. HICA collaborates with the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals and the Lafayette Community Health Consortium (LCHC), the latter formed for coordination among local healthcare providers and agencies. Both HICA and LCHC were created when "Bonne Santé à Lafayette!"--a locally developed community health improvement plan--was implemented. This paper reports on methods and experiences of HICA and LCHC, offering these as models for addressing community concerns elsewhere. Of special interest is the discussion of Louisiana HABITS, a consumer survey methodology that HICA has developed to measure healthcare access barriers, to provide information that healthcare organizations and governments need to implement workable business strategy and public policy.

  15. Commentary: dinosaurs fated for extinction? Health care delivery at academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bryan N; Formisano, Roger A; Getto, Carl J

    2010-05-01

    Health care delivery at academic health centers (AHCs) can be viewed as dinosaur-like. Both are large and complex entities that consume many resources and are slow to adapt to competitive predatory forces. The potential for severe climate shifts, with changes in payer mix, competition from the private sector, and health care reform all occurring in the current health care system, could precipitate either the beginning of extinction for the AHC dinosaur or, hopefully, stimulate its evolution and development into a new model of health care delivery.Given the importance of clinical revenue to the entirety of the AHC enterprise, there is incentive for AHCs to maintain and indeed expand their clinical care delivery mechanisms. Yet, AHCs are institutions of investigation and inquiry. New models of care delivery and their impact on the current clinical care system must be developed through local demonstration projects and experimental clinical models. These models must be studied, and the findings should be shared with the community.The authors argue that this course of action will be challenging because traditional workflows must be restricted to improve care coordination and a changing workforce demographic. It will also require thoughtful approaches to reward innovative clinical work and new directions in strategic management by institution leaders. This commentary outlines recommendations to stave off extinction and enhance the next generation of clinical care delivery at AHCs.

  16. Navigating to health: Evaluation of a community health center patient navigation program.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monica L; Gallivan, Leah; Lemon, Stephenie C; Borg, Amy; Ramirez, Jose; Figueroa, Brenda; McGuire, Antonia; Rosal, Milagros C

    2015-01-01

    Patient Navigators are trained, lay health care workers who guide patients in overcoming barriers to health care access and utilization. Little evidence exists regarding reach and impact of Patient Navigators for chronic disease management. This study evaluated a Patient Navigator program aimed at optimizing health care utilization among ethnically diverse patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a community health center (CHC). Trained Patient Navigators contacted eligible patients who had not seen a primary care provider (PCP) for ≥ 6 months. Outcomes included number of patients reached by Patient Navigators and seen by PCPs after Patient Navigator contact. Distributions and frequencies of outcomes pre- and post-call were compared. A total of 215 patients had ≥ 1 call attempt from Patient Navigators. Of these, 74 were additionally contacted via mailed letters or at the time of a CHC visit. Among the 45 patients reached, 77.8% scheduled an appointment through the Patient Navigator. These patients had higher rates of PCP visits 6 months post-call (90%) than those not reached (42.2%) (p < 0.0001). Findings emphasize the value of direct telephone contact in patient health care re-engagement and may inform the development of future Patient Navigator programs to improve reach and effectiveness. PMID:26844134

  17. American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center: Challenges of a Health Equity Quest

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Neil; Carson, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    American Indians are classified by the federal government as a “health disparities population” with significant excess morbidity and mortality caused by diabetes and its many complications. The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health has created a national program titled “Centers of Excellence” whose primary goal is the elimination of health disparities. This article describes the American Indian Diabetes Prevention Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Public Health, in terms of its intellectual foundations rooted in a biocultural analytic model and operationalized by an interdisciplinary functioning staff. Challenges are described in terms of the monumental task of impacting health disparity conditions and in the exigencies of research collaborations with American Indian Nations located in rural areas remote to the University's health sciences urban-based hub. PMID:26294900

  18. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  19. 78 FR 48438 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National... (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Health... Information: Virginia S. Cain, Ph.D., Director of Extramural Research, NCHS/CDC, 3311 Toledo Road, Room...

  20. The cancer registry: a clinical repository of oncology data.

    PubMed

    Hoyler, S S

    1997-02-01

    Health care institutions need complete and accurate data to plan, monitor, and evaluate their oncology programs. Although financial and discharge data are available, clinical repositories generally are not. For oncology, the cancer registry database serves as a clinical repository. The data in the registry are complete, accurate, and readily available. They can be used to plan new services, evaluate existing programs, and monitor patient care. PMID:10165382

  1. 78 FR 18855 - World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ..., National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Patriots... for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and Pentagon Responders AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... administered by the Director of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), within...

  2. Community Health Centers and the Rural Economy: The Struggle for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rural Health Association, Kansas City, MO.

    The intent of this project was to determine the financial impact of the rural economic crisis on rural community health centers. A 1986-87 survey reported changes in accounts receivable, bad debt, and sliding fee use, and the effect such changes may have on the cash position of rural community health centers. Of 284 rural community and migrant…

  3. 75 FR 82030 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  4. 75 FR 17754 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  5. 75 FR 55333 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  6. 76 FR 53137 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  7. 77 FR 31359 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) Notice of Cancellation: This notice was published in the...

  8. 76 FR 9019 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics (BSC, NCHS) Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register...

  9. 77 FR 22326 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics, (BSC, NCHS) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  10. Screening and Brief Interventions for Alcohol Use in College Health Centers: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seigers, Danielle K. L.; Carey, Kate B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a critical review of the efficacy of brief interventions for alcohol use in college health centers. Methods: Studies were included if (a) they examined brief intervention trials that were conducted in college- or university-based student health centers or emergency departments, and (b) they provided pre-post data to estimate…

  11. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of... Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: The Centers of Excellence (COE... comments that the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) received on the updates to...

  12. School-Based Health Centers and School Nurses: Cementing the Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacker, Karen; Wessel, Genie L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses partnerships between school-based health centers and school nurses, clarifying the role of school nurses and school-based health centers in the areas of collaboration, communication, and cooperation and examining obstacles to partnerships. Elements for successful collaboration are reviewed (clarifying roles, sharing leadership and…

  13. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  14. THE MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER--THE WORLD OF STEPHEN SHAKER.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint Board of Education, MI.

    THE C.S. MOTT FOUNDATION CHILDREN'S HEALTH CENTER WAS BUILT TO SERVE CHILDREN OF THOSE BORDERLINE FAMILIES WHOSE INCOMES PROHIBIT PRIVATE MEDICAL CARE YET MAKE THEM INELIGIBLE FOR DIRECT RELIEF OF ANY KIND. THE NEED FOR SUCH A CENTER WAS PROVED BY THE CHILDREN'S 18,000 VISITS ANNUALLY FOR HEALTH CARE. WHILE PROVIDING CARE FOR CHILDREN WAS THE MAIN…

  15. Involving Community Health Workers in the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities Research Projects: Benefits and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Krok-Schoen, Jessica L; Weier, Rory C; Hohl, Sarah D; Thompson, Beti; Paskett, Electra D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the benefits and challenges of including community health workers (CHWs) in health disparities research can improve planning and delivery of culturally appropriate interventions. Representatives from 18 projects from the Centers for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) initiative completed an online questionnaire about the benefits and challenges of involving CHWs in their research. Eight emergent themes were classified into two categories: 1) Personal qualities and background CHWs bring to research including community knowledge and cultural sensitivity to improve recruitment and effectiveness of interventions; and 2) Workplace demands of CHWs including human resource policies and processes, research skills/background (training needs), and oversight despite distance. These findings demonstrate the benefits of involving CHWs in research and draw attention to the hiring, training, and oversight of CHWs and subsequent challenges. Additional research is needed to understand interactions between project staff and CHWs better and to identify best practices to involve CHWs in research. PMID:27524766

  16. Secure Cloud-Based Solutions for Different eHealth Services in Spanish Rural Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The combination of eHealth applications and/or services with cloud technology provides health care staff—with sufficient mobility and accessibility for them—to be able to transparently check any data they may need without having to worry about its physical location. Objective The main aim of this paper is to put forward secure cloud-based solutions for a range of eHealth services such as electronic health records (EHRs), telecardiology, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis. Methods The scenario chosen for introducing the services is a set of four rural health centers located within the same Spanish region. iCanCloud software was used to perform simulations in the proposed scenario. We chose online traffic and the cost per unit in terms of time as the parameters for choosing the secure solution on the most optimum cloud for each service. Results We suggest that load balancers always be fitted for all solutions in communication together with several Internet service providers and that smartcards be used to maintain identity to an appropriate extent. The solutions offered via private cloud for EHRs, teleconsultation, and telediagnosis services require a volume of online traffic calculated at being able to reach 2 Gbps per consultation. This may entail an average cost of €500/month. Conclusions The security solutions put forward for each eHealth service constitute an attempt to centralize all information on the cloud, thus offering greater accessibility to medical information in the case of EHRs alongside more reliable diagnoses and treatment for telecardiology, telediagnosis, and teleconsultation services. Therefore, better health care for the rural patient can be obtained at a reasonable cost. PMID:26215155

  17. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  18. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network : an evolving methodology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K; Richards, Janice; Robertson, Annette; Stamplecoski, Melissa; Silver, Frank L

    2011-06-01

    Stroke registries can provide information on evidence-based practices and interventions, which are critical for us to understand how stroke care is delivered and how outcomes are achieved. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN) was initiated in 2001 and has evolved over the past decade. In the first two years, we found it extremely difficult to obtain informed consent from the patient or surrogate which led to selection biases in the registry. Subsequently (2003 onwards), under the new health privacy legislation in Ontario, Canada, the RCSN was granted special status as a "prescribed registry" which allowed us to collect data on all consecutive patients at the regional stroke centres without consent. The stroke data was encrypted and all personal contact information had been removed, therefore we could no longer conduct follow- up interviews. To obtain patient outcomes after discharge, we linked the non-consent-based registry database to population-based administrative databases to obtain information on patient mortality, readmissions, socioeconomic status, medication use and other clinical information of interest. In addition, the registry methodology was modified to include a periodic population-based audit on a sample of all stroke patients from over 150 acute hospitals across the province, in addition to continuous data collection at the 12 registry hospitals in the province. The changes in the data collection methodology developed by the RCSN can be applied to other provinces and countries. PMID:21739386

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1st Jan 2014 to 1st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future. PMID:26435598

  20. Louisiana School-Based Health Centers: Annual Services Report, 1996-1997. Adolescent School Health Initiative Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Office of Public Health, New Orleans. Dept. of Health and Hospitals.

    Since 1991, 23 school health centers have been established to serve children and families through locally sponsored health and education partnerships to improve the health and learning potential of Louisiana's public school students. This report presents information on the program operation in 1996-97. Section 1 of the report describes the growth…

  1. Success Stories: How School Health Centers Make a Difference. A Special Report of the National Health and Education Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shearer, Christopher A.

    This booklet provides examples of how students have been helped through the provision of school-based health care. The stories, submitted by principals, school nurses, nurse practitioners, doctors, health center directors, and students, illustrate the pressing health problems faced by students today. The problems addressed in these personal…

  2. Fee-for-Service Revenue for School Mental Health through a Partnership with an Outpatient Mental Health Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lever, Nancy A.; Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Axelrod, Jennifer; Weist, Mark D.

    2004-01-01

    School mental health programs are increasingly prominent in the United States and in other countries, but funding remains tentative. This article describes a partnership between a school mental health program and an outpatient mental health center, and considers the larger goal of promoting sustainability and increasing revenue. Issues related to…

  3. Linkage between the Danish National Health Service Prescription Database, the Danish Fetal Medicine Database, and other Danish registries as a tool for the study of drug safety in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Lars H; Petersen, Olav B; Nørgaard, Mette; Ekelund, Charlotte; Pedersen, Lars; Tabor, Ann; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-01-01

    A linked population-based database is being created in Denmark for research on drug safety during pregnancy. It combines information from the Danish National Health Service Prescription Database (with information on all prescriptions reimbursed in Denmark since 2004), the Danish Fetal Medicine Database, the Danish National Registry of Patients, and the Medical Birth Registry. The new linked database will provide validated information on malformations diagnosed both prenatally and postnatally. The cohort from 2008 to 2014 will comprise 589,000 pregnancies with information on 424,000 pregnancies resulting in live-born children, ∼420,000 pregnancies undergoing prenatal ultrasound scans, 65,000 miscarriages, and 92,000 terminations. It will be updated yearly with information on ∼80,000 pregnancies. The cohort will enable identification of drug exposures associated with severe malformations, not only based on malformations diagnosed after birth but also including those having led to termination of pregnancy or miscarriage. Such combined data will provide a unique source of information for research on the safety of medications used during pregnancy. PMID:27274312

  4. Implementing Personalized Medicine in the Academic Health Center.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2016-01-01

    Recently we at Partners Health Care had a series of articles in the Journal of Personalized Medicine describing how we are going about implementing Personalized Medicine in an academic health care system [1-10].[...]. PMID:27657137

  5. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Needs Dental Caries Dental Home Dental Sealants Fluoridated Water Fluoride Varnish Health Literacy Home Visiting Injury K–12 Education Mobile and Portable Services Nutrition Pregnancy Primary Care Quality Improvement School Health Services School Readiness Spanish-Language ...

  6. School-Based Health Centers and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Poor academic outcomes and high dropout rates are major concerns of educators, policy makers, and parents alike--and poor health severely limits a child's motivation and ability to learn. Recent research confirms that "health disparities affect educational achievement". Improving students' health is integral to education reform. "School-Based…

  7. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines. PMID:25894119

  8. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines.

  9. Addressing underutilization of consumer health information resource centers: a formative study*

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, May G.; Kiken, Laura; Shipman, Jean P.

    2008-01-01

    Problem: Four consumer health information centers in Richmond, Virginia, provide one-on-one assistance in accessing health information. Because they may not be fully utilized at present, an exploratory marketing study of factors affecting usage of the centers was conducted. Method: Observers counted center passers-by and tracked their paths. Also, brief intercept interviews were conducted with people who had just used a center, people nearby who could have used one but did not, and people on the street. Finally, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with key informants. Results: There was a high degree of satisfaction with the centers among users. Nonusers universally endorsed the center concept. However, most passers-by did not even glance at the centers, and intercept interviewees suggested better signage and promoting the resource centers through various media channels. Key informants added suggestions about interpersonal strategies (e.g., physician referrals) for center usage promotion but cautioned that a large increase in traffic could not be accommodated without increasing staff size or shifting from a model of individualized service. Conclusions: Triangulating findings from multiple data collection methods can provide useful guidance for efforts to promote center utilization. At minimum, steps should be taken to make the largest centers more noticeable. Because center utilization is not only associated with consumer satisfaction with hospitals, but may also foster health literacy, both hospital-based and community-based usage promotion strategies may be warranted. All such promotional strategies should be audience-tested before they are adopted. PMID:18219380

  10. Establishing a people-centered health service in Gwent, Wales.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B

    1992-01-01

    The Welsh Health Planning Forum has developed a "Strategic Intent and Direction for the NHS in Wales." The aim is "to take the people of Wales into the 21st Century with a level of health on course to compare with the best in Europe" (Welsh Office NHS Directorate, The Welsh Health Planning Forum, 1989). Gwent Health, one of the nine health authorities in Wales, provides a comprehensive health service to its population of 445,000 and was chosen to develop a prototype for the provision of cancer services. Gwent residents were invited to seminars to express their opinions of the health service that was provided and describe the type of service they would like to have in the future. The response was encouraging enough to engender the planning of future seminars. PMID:10119895

  11. NASA Specialized Center for Research and Training (NSCORT) in space environmental health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, Thomas W.; Utell, Mark J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; Eberhardt, Ralph; Rabin, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Activities of the Center for Space Environmental Health (CSEH), one of several NSCORTs supported by NASA in order to advance knowledge in environmental health in space habitats, are reviewed. Research in environmental health will define the standards or requirements needed to protect human health. This information will affect mission plans and the design of space habitats. This reseach will study unique contaminant stresses and lead to risk models for human health and performance.

  12. Introduction to the 2006 UK Renal Registry report (chapter 2).

    PubMed

    Ansell, David; Will, Es; Tomson, Charlie

    2007-08-01

    The UK Renal Registry is part of the UK Renal Association and provides independent audit and analysis of renal replacement therapy in the UK. The Registry is funded directly by participating renal units through an annual fee per patient registered. The Registry is now collecting data on incidence and prevalence from 100% of UK renal units, with the five remaining non-linked sites in England providing summary data. Maintaining and enhancing Registry functionality will be an important touchstone for the Connecting for Health initiative. Collaboration with other formal agencies also promises an exciting prospect for future development. After a long proving period, the means, methods and roles have come together to complete an effective adjunct to clinical activity, planning, research and the performance of the renal community.

  13. 77 FR 69548 - Proposed Information Collection (Agent Orange Registry Code Sheet); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... required to organize and update the information contained in AOR to be able to notify Vietnam era veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam of any increased health risks resulting from exposure to dioxin... VA that is similar to the Persian Gulf War Veterans Health Registry. Registry examination is...

  14. The ADVANCE network: accelerating data value across a national community health center network

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer E; Gold, Rachel; Cottrell, Erika; Bauer, Vance; Brickman, Andrew; Puro, Jon; Nelson, Christine; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sears, Abigail; Burdick, Tim; Merrell, Jonathan; Matthews, Paul; Fields, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The ADVANCE (Accelerating Data Value Across a National Community Health Center Network) clinical data research network (CDRN) is led by the OCHIN Community Health Information Network in partnership with Health Choice Network and Fenway Health. The ADVANCE CDRN will ‘horizontally’ integrate outpatient electronic health record data for over one million federally qualified health center patients, and ‘vertically’ integrate hospital, health plan, and community data for these patients, often under-represented in research studies. Patient investigators, community investigators, and academic investigators with diverse expertise will work together to meet project goals related to data integration, patient engagement and recruitment, and the development of streamlined regulatory policies. By enhancing the data and research infrastructure of participating organizations, the ADVANCE CDRN will serve as a ‘community laboratory’ for including disadvantaged and vulnerable patients in patient-centered outcomes research that is aligned with the priorities of patients, clinics, and communities in our network. PMID:24821740

  15. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1. PMID:27303636

  16. Expanding Federal Funding to Community Health Centers Slows Decline in Access for Low-Income Adults

    PubMed Central

    McMorrow, Stacey; Zuckerman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the impact of the Health Center Growth Initiative on access to care for low-income adults. Data Sources Data on federal funding for health centers are from the Bureau of Primary Health Care's Uniform Data System (2000–2007), and individual-level measures of access and use are derived from the National Health Interview Survey (2001–2008). Study Design We estimate person-level models of access and use as a function of individual- and market-level characteristics. By using market-level fixed effects, we identify the effects of health center funding on access using changes within markets over time. We explore effects on low-income adults and further examine how those effects vary by insurance coverage. Data Collection We calculate health center funding per poor person in a health care market and attach this information to individual observations on the National Health Interview Survey. Health care markets are defined as hospital referral regions. Principal Findings Low-income adults in markets with larger funding increases were more likely to have an office visit and to have a general doctor visit. These results were stronger for uninsured and publicly insured adults. Conclusions Expansions in federal health center funding had some mitigating effects on the access declines that were generally experienced by low-income adults over this time period. PMID:24344818

  17. Oregon School-Based Health Centers 1996-1997 Services Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Tammis; Nystrom, Robert J.; Spitz, Lauren

    School based health centers (SBHC) are effective providers of health services and education because they are easy for students to access, they take an integrated and developmentally appropriate approach to meeting health needs, and they are prevention-oriented. This report describes the 1996-1997 services provided in 15 of 19 state-supported…

  18. Reflections and Recommendations Based on a Migrant Health Center's Participation in a CDC Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolon, Anne K.; O'Barr, James

    Hudson Valley Migrant Health (HVMH) (a Public Health Service program) collaborated with the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) on a study of the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis among migrant farmworkers in the mid-Hudson region of New York. CDC research personnel…

  19. A Phenomenological Study: Community Mental Health Centers Leaders Influence on Clinician Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Beth B.

    2011-01-01

    Some clinical leaders of community mental health centers are not aware of successful methods for supporting and empowering staff to be more effective, specifically when the staff is experiencing change because of new health information technology. Clinical leaders in community mental health face similar management issues as do other business,…

  20. 73 FR 34766 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Meditation for Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2008-06-18

    ... Announcement of Meditation for Health Purposes Workshop ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) will convene a workshop on Meditation for Health Purposes. The... the mechanisms and efficacy of meditation practices for a variety of health concerns. This...

  1. Differences in Access to Care among Students Using School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Sarika Rane; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform has changed the landscape for the nation's health safety net, and school-based health centers (SBHCs) remain an important part of this system. However, few large-scale studies have been conducted to assess their impact on access to care. This study investigated differences in access among a nationally representative sample of…

  2. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  3. 76 FR 21748 - Health Disparities Subcommittee (HDS), Advisory Committee to the Director, Centers for Disease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... update including the CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report, U.S. 2011; the National Prevention... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health Disparities Subcommittee...

  4. Engaging African American and Latino Adolescent Males through School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Franzen, Carolyn W.; White-Frese', Jesse

    2014-01-01

    African American and Latino males are less likely to seek mental health services and obtain adequate care than their White counterparts. They are more likely to receive mental health services in school-based health centers (SBHCs) than in other community-based setting. The purpose of this article was to understand the issues and reasons these…

  5. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  6. 42 CFR 422.527 - Agreements with Federally qualified health centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 422.527 Section 422.527 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.527 Agreements with Federally qualified health...

  7. 75 FR 55587 - Family-to-Family Health Information Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Family-to-Family Health Information Center... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring the Vermont Family-to-Family Health... Family Network, Inc. (VFN) in Williston, due to an organizational merger involving these entities and...

  8. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis.

  9. Current status of acute stroke management in Korea: a report on a multicenter, comprehensive acute stroke registry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Joon; Han, Moon-Ku; Park, Tai Hwan; Park, Sang-Soon; Lee, Kyung Bok; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Cha, Jae Kwan; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Jun; Lee, Soo Joo; Ko, Youngchai; Park, Jong-Moo; Kang, Kyusik; Cho, Yong-Jin; Hong, Keun-Sik; Cho, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Joon-Tae; Kim, Dong-Eog; Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Ji Sung; Jang, Myung Suk; Broderick, Joseph P; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-06-01

    There are limited data on the utilization of diagnostics and the variation of treatments at the national level in acute stroke care. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division stroke registry aimed to describe stroke statistics and quality of care in Korea and to implement quality indicators. Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry was established in April 2008 and covers pretreatment demographics, medical and stroke severity measures, diagnostic evaluation, hyperacute revascularization, in-hospital management, discharge disposition, quality indicators, and long-term functional outcomes. Consecutive stroke cases from 12 participating centers are registered to a web-based database. Meticulous data management and auditing policy were applied. A total of 14,792 ischemic stroke cases were enrolled from April 2008 to January 2012. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 4 at admission, with median delay of onset to arrival of 14 h. Rate of risk factor management before stroke exceeds more than 80% for hypertension and diabetes. Revascularization procedures were performed in 1736 subjects (12%), and 34% were endovascular (n = 598). Substantial variability was noted in the preferred modality of hyperacute revascularization (range of endovascular recanalization = 6-60%), use of computed tomography (30-93%), and perfusion imaging (2-96%). The Clinical Research Center for Stroke--5th division registry documented that the current practice of acute stroke care in South Korea largely met the standard of guidelines, but variability of practice still remains. The registry would provide an opportunity to evaluate the quality of stroke care across South Korea and compare it with that of other countries.

  10. Assessing Readiness for Establishing a Farmers’ Market at a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Y. Omar; Brandt, Heather M.; Young, Vicki; Friedman, Daniela B.; Hébert, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Farmers’ markets are community health promotion interventions that increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables. As farmers’ markets continue to develop, it is important to strategically locate them in settings that are accessible to populations disparately affected by health disparities. One potential setting is a community health center. The goal of this analysis is to extend existing research on community readiness to identify indicators of preparedness among community health centers for establishing onsite farmers’ markets. The sampling frame for the readiness assessment included all community health centers in South Carolina (N = 20) representing 163 practice sites. Data collection included two brief online surveys, in-depth key informant interviews, and secondary analysis of contextual data. Five themes related to readiness for establishing a farmers market at a community health center were identified: capacity, social capital, awareness of health problems and solutions, logistical factors, and sustainability. Findings from this study provide guidance to researchers and community health center staff as they explore the development of environmental interventions focused on reducing diet-related health conditions by improving access to healthy foods. PMID:21643822

  11. National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Skip to Content 1. Select a User Group 2. Select a Category 3. Select an Age Range Individuals & Caregivers Physical & Occupational Therapy Public Health Professionals Teachers Individuals & Caregivers Physical & Occupational ...

  12. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnant women, infants, children, adolescents, and their families. Fluoride Varnish: A Resource Guide (2nd ed.) This resource ... provides information about the use and application of fluoride varnish, including materials and organizations. Promoting Oral Health ...

  13. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Montie T; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges.

  14. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, Montie T.; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A.

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges. PMID:22545020

  15. 78 FR 48163 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Times and Dates: 11:00...

  16. 78 FR 17411 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Center for Health Statistics In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Statistics (NCHS) announces the following meeting of the aforementioned committee: Times and Dates: 11:00...

  17. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  18. Center Director Bridges opens Super Safety and Health Day at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges opens the second Super Safety and Health Day at Kennedy Space Center, an entire day when most normal work activities are suspended to allow personnel to attend safety- and health-related activities. The theme, 'Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand,' emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space- related resources first and foremost. Events included a keynote address, a panel session about related issues, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television.

  19. Contributing to the Community: The Economic Significance of Academic Health Centers and Their Role in Neighborhood Development. Report IV. Report of the Task Force on Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report is a selective analysis and assessment of quantitative data and field studies that reflect the economic role of the Academic Health Center (AHC) in the urban economy and in neighborhood revitalization. It describes the effect of a variety of cooperative efforts between local community organizations and AHCs, which usually include a…

  20. Mental Health Professionals in Children's Advocacy Centers: Is There Role Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Theodore P.; Fine, Janet E.; Jones, Lisa M.; Walsh, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    Two recent chapters in professional books have criticized children's advocacy centers for creating role conflict for mental health professionals because of their work with criminal justice and child protection professionals in children's advocacy centers as part of a coordinated response to child abuse. This article argues that these critiques…

  1. HIV testing at a community health center before and after implementing universal screening.

    PubMed

    Kayingo, Gerald; Bruce, Robert Douglas

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzed the quality of HIV screening at one of the largest community health centers in Connecticut. The data indicated that implementing universal HIV screening increased the proportion of underrepresented minorities and women tested, reducing the HIV testing disparities that previously existed at this center. PMID:27467298

  2. A Learner-Centered Molecular Modeling Exercise for Allied Health Majors in a Biochemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Terace M.; Ershler, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Learner-centered molecular modeling exercises in college science courses can be especially challenging for nonchemistry majors as students typically have a higher degree of anxiety and may not appreciate the relevance of the work. This article describes a learner-centered project given to allied health majors in a Biochemistry course. The project…

  3. 77 FR 72868 - The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention... (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis...

  4. Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs: Are We Moving Forward?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotze, Geri M.; Bellin, Melissa H.; Oswald, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) is widely acknowledged as supporting positive outcomes in children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and their parents. The intent of this mixed-method research was to enhance understanding of family-centered behaviors in professionals who had received specialty training in the principles of FCC and to explore…

  5. 78 FR 6328 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific Counselors, National...

  6. 76 FR 7217 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Public Law 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Board of Scientific Counselors,...

  7. [Programs of the Shawnee Hills Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawnee Hills Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center, Inc., Charleston, WV.

    Descriptions of several programs of the Shawnee Hills Community Mental Health/Mental Retardation Center, Inc. (Charleston, West Virginia) are presented. Included in this document are: (1) a description of the Shawnee Hills Day Training Center, a cooperative program of Shawnee Hills and several county school boards for severely/profoundly impaired…

  8. An Assessment of the Client-Centered Planning Approach in Continuing Education for Public Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Ward H.; Stewart, Cynthia J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents essential elements and reviews the concept of client-centered planning as an approach to program development for continuing education in public health. Client-centered planning is aimed at the identification of individual practitioner needs and the development of educational interventions tailored to improve competency in selected areas.…

  9. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  10. Tackling NCD in LMIC: Achievements and Lessons Learned From the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence Program.

    PubMed

    Engelgau, Michael M; Sampson, Uchechukwu K; Rabadan-Diehl, Cristina; Smith, Richard; Miranda, Jaime; Bloomfield, Gerald S; Belis, Deshiree; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2016-03-01

    Effectively tackling the growing noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) is a major challenge. To address research needs in this setting for NCDs, in 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and UnitedHealth Group (UHG) engaged in a public-private partnership that supported a network of 11 LMIC-based research centers and created the NHLBI-UnitedHealth Global Health Centers of Excellence (COE) Program. The Program's overall goal was to contribute to reducing the cardiovascular and lung disease burdens by catalyzing in-country research institutions to develop a global network of biomedical research centers. Key elements of the Program included team science and collaborative approaches, developing research and training platforms for future investigators, and creating a data commons. This Program embraced a strategic approach for tackling NCDs in LMICs and will provide capacity for locally driven research efforts that can identify and address priority health issues in specific countries' settings.

  11. Cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of cancer affects all countries; while high-income countries have the capacity and resources to establish comprehensive cancer control programs, low and middle-income countries have limited resources to develop such programs. This paper examines factors associated with the development of cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey. It looks at the progress made by these registries, the challenges they faced, and the lessons learned. Other countries with similar resources can benefit from the lessons identified in this case study. Methods A mix of qualitative case study methods including key informant interviews, document review and questionnaires was used. Results This case study showed that surveillance systems that accurately report current cancer-related data are essential components of a country’s comprehensive cancer control program. At the initial stages, Turkey established one cancer registry with international support, which was used as a model for other registries. The Ministry of Health recognized the value of the registry data and its contribution to the country’s cancer control program and is supporting sustainability of these registries as a result. Conclusions This study demonstrates how Turkey was able to use resources from multiple sources to enhance its population based cancer registry system in four provinces. With renewed international interest in non-communicable diseases and cancer following the 2011 UN high-level meeting on NCDs, low- and middle- income countries can benefit from Turkey’s experience. Other countries can utilize lessons learned from Turkey as they address cancer burden and establish their own registries. PMID:23110989

  12. Toxic Substances Registry System Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The July 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  13. Retinoblastoma Registry report--Hospital Kuala Lumpur experience.

    PubMed

    Jamalia, R; Sunder, R; Alagaratnam, J; Goh, P P

    2010-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is a childhood ocular cancer. The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with retinoblastoma in a major paediatric ophthalmology center in the country. Retrospective information was collected through the retinoblastoma registry. Late presentation with advanced staging is a major problem.

  14. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities.

  15. Hypertension Health Promotion via Text Messaging at a Community Health Center in South Africa: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Haricharan, Hanne J; Brittain, Kirsty; Lau, Yan Kwan; Cassidy, Tali; Heap, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of mobile phones to deliver health care (mHealth) is increasing in popularity due to the high prevalence of mobile phone penetration. This is seen in developing countries, where mHealth may be particularly useful in overcoming traditional access barriers. Non-communicable diseases may be particularly amenable to mHealth interventions, and hypertension is one with an escalating burden in the developing world. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether the dissemination of health information via a short message service (SMS) led to improvements in health knowledge and self-reported health-related behaviors. Methods A mixed methods study was carried out among a cohort of 223 hypertension clinic patients, in a resource-poor setting in Cape Town, South Africa, in 2012. Hypertensive outpatients were recruited at the clinic and administered a baseline questionnaire to establish existing knowledge of hypertension. Participants were then randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. The intervention group received 90 SMSes over a period of 17 weeks. Thereafter, the baseline questionnaire was readministered to both groups to gauge if any improvements in health knowledge had occurred. Those who received SMSes were asked additional questions about health-related behavior changes. A focus group was then conducted to obtain in-depth feedback about participants’ experience with, and response to, the SMS campaign. Results No statistically significant changes in overall health knowledge were observed between the control and intervention groups. The intervention group had positive increases in self-reported behavior changes. These were reaffirmed by the focus groups, which also revealed a strong preference for the SMS campaign and the belief that the SMSes acted as a reminder to change, as opposed to providing new information. Conclusions Although the content of the SMSes was not new, and did not improve health knowledge, SMSes were

  16. Connecting the Dots: Linking the National Program of Cancer Registries and the Needs of Survivors and Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Ryerson, A Blythe; Eheman, Christie; Styles, Timothy; Rycroft, Randi; Snyder, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Cancer survivors, the medical community, public health professionals, researchers, and policymakers all need information about newly diagnosed cancer cases and deaths to better understand and address the disease burden. CDC collects cancer data on 96% of the U.S. population through the National Program of Cancer Registries. The National Program of Cancer Registries routinely collects data on all cancer occurrences, deaths, and the types of initial treatment received by the patients, and recently CDC has made advances in its cancer surveillance activities that have direct applicability to cancer survivorship research and care. This article examines CDC's innovative uses of the National Program of Cancer Registries infrastructure and data as a recruitment source for survivorship research studies and behavioral interventions; comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research; and the collection, consolidation, and dissemination of treatment summaries for cancer survivors and their providers. This paper also discusses long-term, idealistic plans for additional data linkages and sharing among public health, providers, and the cancer survivor through innovative concepts such as patient portals and rapid-learning health care. PMID:26590648

  17. The Emergency Response Program at the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    PubMed Central

    Holler, James

    2016-01-01

    As part of our continuing effort to highlight innovative approaches to improving the health and environment of communities, the Journal is pleased to publish a bimonthly column from the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The ATSDR, based in Atlanta, Georgia, is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and shares a common office of the Director with the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). ATSDR serves the public by using the best science, taking responsive public health actions, and providing trusted health information to prevent harmful exposures and diseases related to toxic substances. The purpose of this column is to inform readers of ATSDR’s activities and initiatives to better understand the relationship between exposure to hazardous substances in the environment and their impact on human health and how to protect public health. We believe that the column will provide a valuable resource to our readership by helping to make known the considerable resources and expertise that ATSDR has available to assist communities, states, and others to assure good environmental health practice for all is served. PMID:24288850

  18. 78 FR 55731 - Health Workforce Research Center Cooperative Agreement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... cooperative agreement program. Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) HRSA-13-185, issued on November 26, 2012... assistance (TA). The FOA identified five broad areas of focus for research in HWRCs: Allied health, long-term... workforce policy and planning questions. Though the FOA indicated the intent to fund only one...

  19. Building a health sciences center: a design primer.

    PubMed

    Wollaber, Debra B

    2008-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on the nursing shortage, many academic institutions are constructing or renovating facilities to meet the needs of growing enrollment. The author provides practical suggestions to assist those engaged in planning and constructing a health sciences and/or nursing facility. PMID:18981904

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Children With Juvenile Dermatomyositis: The Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Hoeltzel, Mark F.; Wahezi, Dawn M.; Becker, Mara L.; Kessler, Elizabeth A.; Schmeling, Heinrike; Carrasco, Ruy; Huber, Adam M.; Feldman, Brian M.; Reed, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate aspects of juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), including disease characteristics and treatment, through a national multicenter registry. Methods Subjects meeting the modified Bohan and Peter criteria for definite juvenile DM were analyzed from the cross-sectional Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry between 2010 and 2012 from 55 US pediatric rheumatology centers. Demographics, disease characteristics, diagnostic assessments, and medication exposure data were collected at enrollment. Results A total of 384 subjects met the criteria for analysis. At enrollment, the median Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score was 51 (interquartile range [IQR] 46–52), the median Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire score was 0 (IQR 0–0.5), and the median physician and subject global assessment scores were 1 (IQR 0–2) and 1 (IQR 0–3), respectively, out of a maximum of 10. Of the diagnostic assessments, magnetic resonance imaging was more likely than electromyography or muscle biopsy to show abnormalities. A total of 329 subjects had ≥2 diagnostic studies performed, and >34% of these subjects reported ≥1 negative study. Ninety-five percent had been treated with corticosteroids and 92% with methotrexate, suggesting that these medications were almost universally prescribed for juvenile DM in the US. Conclusion In 2 years, the ongoing CARRA Registry has collected clinical data on 384 children with juvenile DM and has the potential to become one of the largest juvenile DM cohorts in the world. More research is needed about prognostic factors in juvenile DM, and differences in therapy based on manifestations of disease need to be explored by practitioners. This registry provides the infrastructure needed to advance clinical and translational research and represents a major step toward improving outcomes of children with juvenile DM. PMID:23983017

  1. Conference Proceedings: “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks”

    PubMed Central

    Oster-Granite, Mary Lou; Parisi, Melissa A.; Abbeduto, Leonard; Berlin, Dorit S.; Bodine, Cathy; Bynum, Dana; Capone, George; Collier, Elaine; Hall, Dan; Kaeser, Lisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Krischer, Jeffrey; Livingston, Michelle; McCabe, Linda L.; Pace, Jill; Pfenninger, Karl; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Reeves, Roger H.; Rubinstein, Yaffa; Sherman, Stephanie; Terry, Sharon F.; Whitten, Michelle Sie; Williams, Stephen; McCabe, Edward R.B.; Maddox, Yvonne T.

    2011-01-01

    A December 2010 meeting, “Down Syndrome: National Conference on Patient Registries, Research Databases, and Biobanks,” was jointly sponsored by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, and the Global Down Syndrome Foundation (GDSF)/Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome based in Denver, CO. Approximately 70 attendees and organizers from various advocacy groups, federal agencies (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and various NIH Institutes, Centers, and Offices), members of industry, clinicians, and researchers from various academic institutions were greeted by Drs. Yvonne Maddox, Deputy Director of NICHD, and Edward McCabe, Executive Director of the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome. They charged the participants to focus on the separate issues of contact registries, research databases, and biobanks through both podium presentations and breakout session discussions. Among the breakout groups for each of the major sessions, participants were asked to generate responses to questions posed by the organizers concerning these three research resources as they related to Down syndrome and then to report back to the group at large with a summary of their discussions. This report represents a synthesis of the discussions and suggested approaches formulated by the group as a whole. PMID:21835664

  2. Assessing the need for on-site eye care professionals in community health centers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Peter; Finnegan, Brad

    2009-02-01

    Poor vision health severely impacts school and work performance, quality of life, and life expectancy, and results in billions of dollars in medical expenditures each year. While eye and vision problems are often associated with age, low income and racial and ethnic minorities also have elevated risk of eye problems. Federally-funded community health centers, which are mandated to provide comprehensive primary care in underserved communities, are often the only option to improve vision health for low-income residents. With respect to certain chronic conditions, health centers are able to provide high quality care that meets or exceeds national benchmarks despite limited financial resources, a shortage of primary care providers, and greater health care demands. What is not well known, is the extent to which health centers are able to provide on-site professional vision care. Our analysis found that seven out of 10 health centers do not staff on-site eye care professionals to provide comprehensive eye exams. Rather, many health centers rely on referral arrangements with local optometrists and ophthalmologists for such services. Major barriers to providing on-site comprehensive eye care services include the inability to afford necessary space/equipment and the perceived lack of reimbursement or inadequate reimbursement from Medicaid, Medicare and private insurers. Health centers indicated also that they also need assistance in developing a business plan, designing space, and developing an inventory of eye care equipment. While the lack of health insurance coverage, differences in Medicaid coverage and benefits across states, and inadequate reimbursements are likely to limit capacity and access to vision care professionals, another challenge may be patient's general lack of understanding about the need for routine eye exams. Therefore, strategies to improve access to vision care must go beyond developing financial incentives and restoring eye care professionals for

  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Minority Health & Health Equity (OMHHE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs CDC Works for You 24-7 Health Literacy: Accurate, Accessible and Actionable Health Information for All ... Equity HHS Toolkit! Minority Health Ethics Forum 2016 Media Gallery Ethics Forum Speakers Events Health Equity Matters ...

  4. PARENT joint action: increasing the added value of patient registries in a cross-border setting.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Matic; Doupi, Persephone; Pristaš, Ivan; Skalkidis, Yannis; Zaletel, Metka; Orel, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries are poorly interoperable and as a result data exchange or aggregation across organizations, regions and countries for secondary purposes (i.e. research and public health) is difficult to perform. PARENT Joint Action aims to provide EU Member States with a set of guidelines, recommendations and tools to support setting-up, management and governance of interoperable patient registries, thus helping EU Member States to drive down cost and interoperability risks of patient registries as well as improving secondary us-age of registry data in a cross-border setting. PMID:23920935

  5. School-Based Health Center Model Within the Military Health System: The Role of the Adolescent Medicine Physician.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jeffery P; Dawson, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Adolescents are less motivated to seek medical care for various reasons. Within the military health care system, access barriers, although less encountered, can still be a burden not only to the adolescent, but also the school system. This article describes the development of a school-based health center within a school district on a military installation. The school clinic was created by adolescent medicine specialists to maximize access to care. Students of adolescent age utilized the clinic for evaluation of acute and chronic conditions, preventative services, preparticipation evaluation, and other general complaints. After receiving signed consent forms, 30% of students were eligible for health care. There was minimal cost to initiate the service. Development of school-based health center programs at other military installations could potentially improve the status of the military health system during a time of high stress among military dependents. PMID:27612351

  6. Louisiana School-Based Health Centers Annual Services Report, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Office of Public Health, New Orleans. Dept. of Health and Hospitals.

    Louisiana's initiative to assist local communities to develop and operate school-based health centers (SBHCs) is a nationally recognized model. This annual report illustrates the vital work being done in SBHCs in Louisiana to assist families in ensuring their children's health and well-being. Section 1 of the report details the continuous…

  7. Louisiana School-Based Health Centers Annual Services Report, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Office of Public Health, New Orleans. Dept. of Health and Hospitals.

    Louisiana's initiative to assist local communities to develop and operate school-based health centers (SBHCs), in place for 10 years, is a nationally-recognized model. This annual report illustrates the vital work being done in Louisiana's SBHCs over the past 10 years to assist families in ensuring their children's health and well-being. Section 1…

  8. Partnership for Health Care: An Academic Nursing Center in a Rural Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMone, Priscilla; McDaniel, Roxanne W.; Sullivan, Toni J.

    1998-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing collaborates with Moberly Area Community College in providing holistic health care services to rural college students. This academic nursing center is based on nursing models rather than medical models of health. (JOW)

  9. School-Based Health Centers: National Census School Year 2007-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strozer, Jan; Juszczak, Linda; Ammerman, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care's (NASBHC) 2007-2008 Census is the 11th request for data from school-based health centers (SBHCs) since 1986. The Census: (1) provides a better understanding of the role of SBHCs in meeting the needs of underserved children and adolescents; (2) collects relevant trend data on demographics,…

  10. Innovative Services Offered by School-Based Health Centers in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisselman, Amanda; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Auerbach, Charles; Sharon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) continue to provide essential health care services to children and families in underserved neighborhoods across the country. Preliminary studies show that students who use SBHCs have better attendance rates as well as higher rates of academic achievement and attachment to the learning environment. Few studies,…

  11. 40 Steps to Better Physician Recruitment and Retention: A Guidebook for Community and Migrant Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Health Federation, Sacramento.

    This guide presents methods for community and migrant health centers to attract and keep competent physicians. Strategies for recruiting physicians include planning the recruitment and choosing the right physician. Compensation arrangements should attract and retain competent health providers, provide incentives for productivity and professional…

  12. School-Based Health Centers: National Census School Year 2004-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juszczak, Linda; Schlitt, John; Moore, Aisha

    2007-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care conducted the 2004-05 Census, the tenth count of school-based health centers (SBHCs) since 1986, to: (1) provide a better understanding of the role of SBHCs in meeting the needs of underserved children and adolescents; (2) collect up-to-date data on demographics, staffing services, operations,…

  13. Cultural health capital and the interactional dynamics of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Dubbin, Leslie A; Chang, Jamie Suki; Shim, Janet K

    2013-09-01

    As intuitive and inviting as it may appear, the concept of patient-centered care has been difficult to conceptualize, institutionalize and operationalize. Informed by Bourdieu's concepts of cultural capital and habitus, we employ the framework of cultural health capital to uncover the ways in which both patients' and providers' cultural resources, assets, and interactional styles influence their abilities to mutually achieve patient-centered care. Cultural health capital is defined as a specialized collection of cultural skills, attitudes, behaviors and interactional styles that are valued, leveraged, and exchanged by both patients and providers during clinical interactions. In this paper, we report the findings of a qualitative study conducted from 2010 to 2011 in the Western United States. We investigated the various elements of cultural health capital, how patients and providers used cultural health capital to engage with each other, and how this process shaped the patient-centeredness of interactions. We find that the accomplishment of patient-centered care is highly dependent upon habitus and the cultural health capital that both patients and providers bring to health care interactions. Not only are some cultural resources more highly valued than others, their differential mobilization can facilitate or impede engagement and communication between patients and their providers. The focus of cultural health capital on the ways fundamental social inequalities are manifest in clinical interactions enables providers, patients, and health care organizations to consider how such inequalities can confound patient-centered care. PMID:23906128

  14. Use of Adult Day Care Centers: Do They Offset Utilization of Health Care Services?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther; Biderman, Aya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the medical offset effect, the goal of the study was to examine the extent to which users and nonusers of adult day care centers (ADCC) differ in frequency of use of out-patient health services (visits to specialists) and in-patient health services (number of hospital admissions, length of hospitalizations, and visits to…

  15. The Complementary Roles of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Baszler, Rita; Wright, Janet

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the unique combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) facilitate positive health outcomes for students. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is responsible for management of the daily health…

  16. Quality Improvement Initiative in School-Based Health Centers across New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, John M.; Schluter, Janette A.; Carrillo, Kris; McGrath, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement principles have been applied extensively to health care organizations, but implementation of quality improvement methods in school-based health centers (SBHCs) remains in a developmental stage with demonstration projects under way in individual states and nationally. Rural areas, such as New Mexico, benefit from the…

  17. 77 FR 48524 - Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Health Statistics; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... the NHANES genetics program and an open session for comments from the public. Requests to make oral... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Center for Health Statistics; Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal...

  18. Applying Systems Engineering to Implement an Evidence-based Intervention at a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shin-Ping; Feng, Sherry; Storch, Richard; Yip, Mei-Po; Sohng, HeeYon; Fu, Mingang; Chun, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Impressive results in patient care and cost reduction have increased the demand for systems-engineering methodologies in large health care systems. This Report from the Field describes the feasibility of applying systems-engineering techniques at a community health center currently lacking the dedicated expertise and resources to perform these activities. PMID:23698657

  19. Mental Health Technician Training Program, Desert Willow Training Center, March 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    Founded in 1971, the program was designed to allow Indian Health Service (IHS) trainees to take as little or as much training as they needed to fill their agency's requirements and their own career ambitions. A full complement of courses leading to an associate degree in Mental Health Technology was developed for the Center and accredited through…

  20. Educational Specifications for the Health Occupations Education Center, Peralta Junior College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. System, Oakland, CA.

    Educational specifications are presented for the development of a health occupations education center that would provide coordinated instruction in health-related occupations. Detailed descriptions are presented of the activities, space allocations, spatial relationships, equipment, and special environmental conditions for each of the ten sections…