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Sample records for central america modis

  1. Fires in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As can be seen in this true-color scene acquired on April 2, 2002, many fires dot the landscape across portions of Central America. This image spans from Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula across Guatemala and into El Salvador and Honduras. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The red boxes (click on the image above to see it at 250-meter resolution) indicate where active fires were burning. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. Fires in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As can be seen in this true-color scene acquired on April 2, 2002, many fires dot the landscape across portions of Central America. This image spans from Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula across Guatemala and into El Salvador and Honduras. This image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The red boxes indicate where active fires were burning.

  3. Gangs in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-02

    564 ( Engel ) recognizing that violence poses an increasingly serious threat to peace and stability in Central America and supporting expanded...2005; UNODC, May 2007. 10 For example, see Federico Brevé, former Minister of Defense of Honduras, “The Maras: A Menace to the Americas,” Military...police training and judicial reform. On July 31, 2007, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs approved H.Res. 564 ( Engel ) recognizing that violence

  4. Gangs in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-17

    activity and in the handling of deported gang members. However, none of those bills were enacted. On October 2, 2007, the House passed H.Res. 564 ( Engel ...UNODC, May 2007. 12 For example, see Federico Brevé, former Minister of Defense of Honduras, “The Maras: A Menace to the Americas,” Military Review...passed H.Res. 564 ( Engel ) supporting expanded cooperation between the United States and Central America to combat crime and violence. Mérida

  5. Gangs in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-27

    handling of deported gang members, but none of those bills were enacted. On October 2, 2007, the House passed H.Res. 564 ( Engel ) supporting expanded...crimes committed CRS-4 12 For example, see Federico Brevé, former Minister of Defense of Honduras, “The Maras: A Menace to the Americas,” Military...examined the effects of U.S. deportations on Central America. On October 2, 2007, the House passed H.Res. 564 ( Engel ) supporting expanded

  6. Education in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, George R.; Waggoner, Barbara Ashton

    The first chapter of this book describes the physical and cultural environment of Central America and includes analytical comments showing the complexity of the problems confronting the region. Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama are then treated in separate chapters including: 1) political, economic, social and…

  7. Central America's shrinking forests.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    This news brief reports that 66% of deforestation in Central America has happened in the past 40 years, based on World Conservation Union (WCU) data. Deforestation is expected to continue. The population of Central America and Mexico grew by 28% between 1977 and 1987. Growth is decreasing but remains high at 2.5% in all countries of the region except Panama. 29 million was the regional population in 1990; the projection is for 63 million by 2025. Population is migrating to urban centers. Forests declined by 13% and croplands increased from 4% to 13% of total land area and pasture land from 2% to 37%. There was an increase in unproductive land from 145 to 24%, i.e., 50% of El Salvador's land had soil degradation as does 30% of Guatemala's. In addition to deforestation and soil degradation, there has been soil erosion leading to sedimentation buildup near dam sites and in rivers, which diminishes hydroelectric power capability. Silting also affects groundwater resources, which impact on a safe drinking water supply. Population growth results in increased demand for fuelwood, urban land, and agricultural land. New techniques practiced widely are needed in order to meet the region's needs or demands. Slowing population growth buys time for adjusting to the necessary changes needed for sustaining the region's population. WCU urges conservation organizations to raise awareness about the role population plays in environmental degradation, and to support efforts to reduce birth rates. Women's status needs to be improved through income-generating projects, for instance, and cooperation is needed between conservation groups and organizations involved with improving maternal and child health.

  8. Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Bronfman, M

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on migration and HIV/AIDS in Mexico and Central America, including Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. Most migrants travel to the US through Mexico. US-Mexico trade agreements created opportunities for increased risk of HIV transmission. The research literature focuses on Mexico. Most countries, with the exception of Belize and Costa Rica, are sending countries. Human rights of migrants are violated in transit and at destination. Migration policies determine migration processes. The Mexican-born population in the US is about 3% of US population and 8% of Mexico's population. About 22% arrived during 1992-97, and about 500,000 are naturalized US citizens. An additional 11 million have a Mexican ethnic background. Mexican migrants are usually economically active men who had jobs before leaving and were urban people who settled in California, Texas, Illinois, and Arizona. Most Mexican migrants enter illegally. Many return to Mexico. The main paths of HIV transmission are homosexual, heterosexual, and IV-drug-injecting persons. Latino migrants frequently use prostitutes, adopt new sexual practices including anal penetration among men, greater diversity of sexual partners, and use of injectable drugs.

  9. Demographic tensions in Central America.

    PubMed

    1986-08-01

    This discussion of Central America focuses on the rapid growth of its population, its stagnating economy, and those countries that are socioeconomically advanced. Between 1950-85 the population of Central America tripled, from 9.1 million to 26. 4 million, due to marked mortality declines and the absence of off-setting fertility declines. The distribution of Central Americas's growing populations sets its population growth apart from that of other developing regions. Currently, almost half of all Central Americans live in cities. Although the average growth rate for Central American countries has fallen and is expected to drop further, the decline does not counterbalance the effect of the absolute rise in population numbers. The average annual growth rate of more than 3% annually in the 1960s fell to about 2.6% in recent years, but this decline is due primarily to socioeconomically advanced Costa Rica and Panama. Central America's age structure further complicates the population crisis. About 43% of Central Americans are under the age of 15. When the increasingly larger young population group enters it reproductive years, the potential for future growth (albeit the falling rate of population increase) is unparalleled. UN population projections show the region's population at 40 million by the year 2000. The 1973 oil crisis began a downward spiral for the buoyant post World War II Central American economy. Between 1950-79, real per capita income growth in Central America doubled, with Central American economies growing an average of 5.3% annually. By the early 1980s, overseas markets of the trade-dependent countries of Central America had dried up due to protectionism abroad and slumping basic commodity prices. These and other factors plunged Central America into its current economic malaise of falling real per capita income, rising unemployment, curtailed export led economic growth, and a rising cost of living. In general, economic growth in Central America

  10. Geothermal activities in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Hanold, R.J.

    1985-09-11

    The Agency for International Development is funding a new program in energy and minerals for Central America. Geothermal energy is an important component. A country-wide geothermal assessment has started in Honduras, and other assessment activities are in progress or planned for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama. Instrumentation for well logging has been provided to Costa Rica, and a self-contained logging truck will be made available for use throughout Central America. An important objective of this program is to involve the private sector in resource development. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Fire management in central America

    Treesearch

    Andrea L. Koonce; Armando González-Cabán

    1992-01-01

    Information on fire management operations in Central America is scant. To evaluate the known level of fire occurrence in seven countries in that area, fire management officers were asked to provide information on their fire control organizations and on any available fire statistics. The seven countries surveyed were Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua,...

  12. Training Educational Administrators in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernede, Jean-Francois

    1977-01-01

    Training of educational administrators in Central America is described and evaluated and future prospects are discussed. It is recommended that the six countries of Central America cooperate to achieve educational reform. (Author/DB)

  13. Volcanic hazards in Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, William I.; Bluth, Gregg J.S.; Carr, Michael J.; Ewert, John W.; Patino, Lina C.; Vallance, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This volume is a sampling of current scientific work about volcanoes in Central America with specific application to hazards. The papers reflect a variety of international and interdisciplinary collaborations and employ new methods. The book will be of interest to a broad cross section of scientists, especially volcanologists. The volume also will interest students who aspire to work in the field of volcano hazards mitigation or who may want to work in one of Earth’s most volcanically active areas.

  14. Hazardous pesticides in Central America.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, C; Aragón, A; Castillo, L; Corriols, M; Chaverri, F; de la Cruz, E; Keifer, M; Monge, P; Partanen, T J; Ruepert, C; van Wendel de Joode, B

    2001-01-01

    Pesticides are an extensively documented occupational and environmental hazard in Central America. Yet, severe problems persist. Toxic pesticide use in the Region increased during 1985-1999. High exposure levels and ineffectiveness of personal protective equipment evidence the difficulties for risk reduction. Acute poisonings remain a severe problem. Delayed and/or long-lasting health effects include dermatoses, cancer, and genotoxic, neurotoxic, and respiratory effects. The use of hazardous pesticides persists through deficiencies in government-driven assessment and risk management; excessive focus on regional harmonization; short-term economic interests; strong links between industry and governments; aggressive marketing; weak trade unions; and failure of universities to reach decision makers. Regulation based on local data is lacking. An agreement of the Ministries of Health for restricting the most toxic pesticides in Central America has potential for progress. The most effective way to reduce risk is to greatly reduce pesticide use. Actions needed include development of multidisciplinary strategies for local studies on health and environmental impact of pesticides; development of sustainable nonchemical agricultural technologies; evaluation of interventions; extending and sharing of expertise within the Region; strengthening of unions and communities; and redefining the role of industry toward development of safer products, with responsible marketing and reliable information.

  15. Smoke from Fires in Central America Drifts over Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Smoke from widespread fires in tropical Mexico and Central America appears to be drifting over the U.S. Gulf States. In 1998 similar circumstances resulted in air-quality warnings being issued in several U.S. states, including Texas and Louisiana. The top image shows smoke and fires (red pixels) observed by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. Possibly hundreds of small fires are scattered across Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The lower image, acquired by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), shows smoke from these fires carried by the prevailing winds across the Gulf of Mexico and over the United States. Images courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the SeaWiFS Project, NASA GSFC, and ORBIMAGE

  16. Children in Central America: Victims of War.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronstrom, Anitha

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the armed conflicts in Central America and their influence on civilian populations. Discusses the psychosocial consequences and therapeutic considerations of warfare, displacement and refuge for children. (RJC)

  17. Comparison of Vegetation Phenology estimated from MODIS and AVHRR over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B.; Morisette, J. T.; Wolfe, R. E.; Gao, F.; Ederer, G. A.; Nightingale, J.; Pedelty, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Vegetation indices (VIs) derived from satellite data are now commonly used for detecting vegetation phenology at continental to global scales. Vegetation phenology estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) VIs over North America from 2001 to 2006 have been produced and freely available online from http://www.accweb.nascom.nasa.gov. The algorithm to produce this MODIS phenology metrics is based on revised TIMESAT software, which uses the 3rd derivation of a fitted Gauss curve to locate four key phenology dates - begin and end of the greenup and browndown. In order to achieve a long-term phenology record, the same phenology detection algorithm is applied to 1982-2002 GIMMS AVHRR NDVI data sets over North America. To make the phenology estimations from different sensors consistent and comparable, several different methods are utilized in this research. We first compare the phenology metrics estimated from MODIS NDVI and AVHRR NDVI in 2001 and 2002. We found no significant latitudinal gradients in the AVHRR phenology metrics. At the same time, the length of the growing season is artificially overestimated in Northern US and Southern Canada. Both phenomena indicates lower quality from the AVHRR phenology metrics, which is mainly due to the unreliable snow flag of AVHRR data and the absence of ancillary land surface temperature data. To improve the quality of the AVHRR phenology metrics, a more accurate definition of non-growing season is required. We first use the 21-year climatologic mean of minimum NDVI as a threshold to refine the non-growing season pixels. In addition, a sensitivity analysis is performed to address the impact of the threshold on derived phenology metrics. Overall, this research will provide a 25-year phenology product for North America using both MODIS and AVHRR NDVI, which can be applied in regional/continental climate variation analysis and vegetation monitoring. The method to calibrate MODIS and AVHRR phenology products

  18. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  19. Use of MODIS Snow-Cover Maps for Detecting Snowmelt Trends in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; Riggs, George A.; Robinson, David A.; Hoon-Starr, Jody A.

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that the snow season in the Northern Hemisphere has been getting shorter in recent decades, consistent with documented global temperature increases. Specifically, the snow is melting earlier in the spring allowing for a longer growing season and associated land-cover changes. Here we focus on North America. Using the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Radiometer (MODIS) cloud-gap-filled standard snow-cover data product we can detect a trend toward earlier spring snowmelt in the approx 12 years since the MODIS launch. However, not all areas in North America show earlier spring snowmelt over the study period. We show examples of springtime snowmelt over North America, beginning in March 2000 and extending through the winter of 2012 for all of North America, and for various specific areas such as the Wind River Range in Wyoming and in the Catskill Mountains in New York. We also compare our approx 12-year trends with trends derived from the Rutgers Global Snow Lab snow cover climate-data record.

  20. Snowline variations over Central Asia from MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Wulf, H.

    2012-12-01

    Snow is an important runoff source in large parts of South and Central Asia, where water demands for consumption, irrigation, and hydropower are high. It is anticipated that observed climate warming in this region will lead to shrinking snow-covered areas, shorter periods and smaller amounts of snowfall, and thus to reduced snowmelt runoff. Due to the scarcity of ground stations in this regions, knowledge about the amount of snowfall and its spatial and temporal variation is limited. Furthermore, variations between individual sites can be substantial, which complicates a comprehensive picture of regional snow-cover changes. Here we present a new approach to map regional snowline elevations from MODIS Aqua and Terra imagery, based on the fractional snow cover (FSC) data set MOYD10A1 to derive gridded maps of snowline elevations for each day during the time period 2000-2012. Our methodology includes conservative spatial and temporal interpolation of FSC to reduce cloud-cover related data gaps, least squares fitting of FSC versus surface elevation with a hyperbolic tangent, and spatial interpolation of data gaps in the snowline data. We test the snowline elevation results by adopting different sample window sizes and shapes and compare our results to existing snowline elevation data sets based on ground observations. Our novel approach is an appropriate tool to measure regional snowline elevations, which provides the basis to analyze the spatial and temporal variability in snow cover and snowline elevations over Central Asia. We aim to use this dataset to assess the climatic controls of snowline elevations in this region and compare our data to estimates of glacier steady-state equilibrium line altitudes for assessing their likely adjustment to present-day climate.

  1. External Review Teams Training in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva-Trivino, Moises; Ramirez-Gatica, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Many Latin American countries have started actions to promote a higher education quality assurance system. Central America appears as a regional effort that includes universities from all seven countries under the initiative of Central American University Higher Council (CSUCA). After focusing in quality management and self-study processes, CSUCA…

  2. Raising the Bar in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Several years ago, students in Central America rarely leave their countries to find work elsewhere. Such is the case of Sebastian Pinto who felt that his degree would not mean much beyond Guatemala, his country. But now, universities in Central American have started to offer regionally accredited degrees that would allow students' credentials to…

  3. External Review Teams Training in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva-Trivino; Moises; Ramirez-Gatica, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Many Latin American countries have started actions to promote a higher education quality assurance system. Central America appears as a regional effort that includes universities from all seven countries under the initiative of Central American University Higher Council (CSUCA). After focusing in quality management and self-study processes, CSUCA…

  4. Raising the Bar in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Several years ago, students in Central America rarely leave their countries to find work elsewhere. Such is the case of Sebastian Pinto who felt that his degree would not mean much beyond Guatemala, his country. But now, universities in Central American have started to offer regionally accredited degrees that would allow students' credentials to…

  5. Snow-Cover Variability in North America in the 2000-2001 Winter as Determined from MODIS Snow Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; Riggs, George A.; Chien, Janet Y. L.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover maps have been available since September 13, 2000. These products, at 500 m spatial resolution, are available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Boulder, Colorado. By the 2001-02 winter, 5 km climate-modeling grid (CMG) products will be available for presentation of global views of snow cover and for use in climate models. All MODIS snow-cover products are produced from automated algorithms that map snow in an objective manner. In this paper, we describe the MODIS snow products, and show snow maps from the fall of 2000 in North America.

  6. Snow-Cover Variability in North America in the 2000-2001 Winter as Determined from MODIS Snow Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; Riggs, George A.; Chien, Y. L.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover maps have been available since September 13, 2000. These products, at 500-m spatial resolution, are available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Boulder, Colorado. By the 2001-02 winter, 5-km climate-modeling grid (CMG) products will be available for presentation of global views of snow cover and for use in climate models. All MODIS snow-cover products are produced from automated algorithms that map snow in an objective manner. In this paper, we describe the MODIS snow products, and show snow maps from the fall of 2000 in North America.

  7. Hydrological climate change projections for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Hugo G.; Amador, Jorge A.; Alfaro, Eric J.; Quesada, Beatriz

    2013-07-01

    Runoff climate change projections for the 21st century were calculated from a suite of 30 General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations for the A1B emission scenario in a 0.5° × 0.5° grid over Central America. The GCM data were downscaled using a version of the Bias Correction and Spatial Downscaling (BCSD) method and then used in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrological model. The VIC model showed calibration skill in Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama, but the results for some of the northern countries (Guatemala, El Salvador and Belize) and for the Caribbean coast of Central America was not satisfactory. Bias correction showed to remove effectively the biases in the GCMs. Results of the projected climate in the 2050-2099 period showed median significant reductions in precipitation (as much as 5-10%) and runoff (as much as 10-30%) in northern Central America. Therefore in this sub-region the prevalence of severe drought may increase significantly in the future under this emissions scenario. Northern Central America could warm as much as 3 °C during 2050-2099 and southern Central America could reach increases as much as 4 °C during the same period. The projected dry pattern over Central America is consistent with a southward displacement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). In addition, downscaling of the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data from 1948 to 2012 and posterior run in VIC, for two locations in the northern and southern sub-regions of Central America, suggested that the annual runoff has been decreasing since ca. 1980, which is consistent with the sign of the runoff changes of the GCM projections. However, the Reanalysis 1980-2012 drying trends are generally much stronger than the corresponding GCM trends. Among the possible reasons for that discrepancy are model deficiencies, amplification of the trends due to constructive interference with natural modes of variability in the Reanalysis data, errors in the Reanalysis

  8. Central America: A Regional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowry, George; Lacy, Ann

    This lesson is a series of activities and multi-media presentations designed to enable students to understand the historic and geographic roots of some of the problems that Central American nations have faced. Geography, history, writing, and storytelling are used as ways of understanding a multicultural world. Creative thinking and participation…

  9. English Language Assessment in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, JoAnn; And Others

    This document, the final report of a project assessing the general status of English language training (ELT) in Central America, includes an overview of the process, general recommendations, and country-specific information and recommendations for training and policy development. The purpose was to assess the potential effects of the ELT situation…

  10. Regional Strategic Appraisal of Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control ...since the early 1960’s. During the last ten years Central America has experimented significant economic, social and political progress. These advances...3 ECONOMIC TRENDS/CHALLENGES/RISKS ................................................................ 6 SOCIAL

  11. Occupational health in Central America.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Aragón, Aurora; Morgado, Hugo; Elgstrand, Kaj; Hogstedt, Christer; Partanen, Timo

    2002-01-01

    The 12.4 million economically active population (EAP) of the seven Central American countries includes a large informal sector. Social security covers only 14-60%. No surveillance of occupational safety and health (OSH) hazards or accidents exists. Extrapolating the incidence of occupational accidents among insured Costa Rican workers to the Central American EAP yields two million accidents yearly, still a gross underestimate. Occupational diseases are underreported, misdiagnosed, and not recognized as such. A number of regional OSH programs aim at modernization of the labor administrations and address the formal sector, in particular textile maquila, in connection with free trade agreements. The weak role of the ministries of health is expected to strengthen under the Pan American Health Organization OSH program. Employers largely influence new policies. Workers' influence on OSH policies has been weak, with only about 10% unionization rate and scarce resources and OSH knowledge. Informal workers, however, are getting organized. OSH research is underdeveloped and not linked to policy making. Construction, agriculture, and general un/underemployment are considered priorities for intervention. The informal sector needs to be included in national and regional OSH policies. Regional collaboration and international development support are of strategic importance to achieve sustainable improvement in OSH.

  12. Bluetongue virus in South America, Central America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Legisa, Danilo M; Gonzalez, Fernanda N; Dus Santos, Maria José

    2014-03-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) has been detected in many parts of the world but the data available from each continent are substantially different. Some regions are not covered by proper surveillance programs and thus, the real situation concerning the incidence of BTV in those regions is unknown. This is the case of Central America, South America and the Caribbean, where few outdated data about the presence and spread of BTV have been reported. In the present review, we update the BTV situation in those regions by compiling the serologic data available and analyzing the genetic information reported by the different research groups which are studying the disease in the region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of the wetlands map derived from MODIS imagery in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tana, Gegen; Letu, Husi; Tateishi, Ryutaro

    2012-10-01

    As wetlands are among the most important ecosystems in the world, it is becoming increasingly important to develop a wetlands map at continental or global scale. A wetlands map in North America was produced using 500 m MODIS data obtained in 2008. To assess the accuracy of the map, the quantitative accuracy assessment was performed. A stratified random sampling method was applied to collect the validation point. A total of 2400 sampling pixels were used for the accuracy assessment. The overall accuracy of the map was assessed at 80.3%. Furthermore, the wetlands map was also compared with the existing global land cover products GLC2000 and IGBP DISCover. Three wetland sites designated in the Ramsar Convention were used to compare with Landsat images. As a result, the spatial distributions of wetlands in the new map were closest to those were in Landsat images. The new map also gave more detailed spatial information on wetlands especially in the transition zone between aquatic and terrestrial area. This study indicates that MODIS data are capable for developing an improved wetlands map at a global scale.

  14. The Interannual Variability of Biomass Burning in North America using MODIS Data: Observations and Meteorological Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D.; Wang, J.; Remer, L.; Ichoku, C.

    2008-12-01

    Meteorological impacts on the interannual variability of wildfires in North America including Alaska are investigated using six years of the MODIS fire and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products, the meteorological data from North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), and the lightning data collected by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The relationships of MODIS fire counts, fire radiative power, and AOD with over 13 meteorological variables were investigated in four sub-regions of the North American continent (Alaska, western U.S., Québec, and the rest of Canada). Atmospheric instability and anomalies in the 500 hPa geopotential height field explain more than 60% of the interannual variability in wildfires in Alaska and Quebec; while in the western Unites States, pre-season precipitation is a dominant factor. Lightning strike data show little correlation with fire counts in the western United States, suggesting the importance of anthropogenic cause of fires in this region. Relationships between fire occurrence, atmospheric instability, and smoke production were also investigated. It is revealed that although the Haines Index is widely used for fire forecasting, it is not sufficient to interpret the interannual variability of fires in Boreal North America, but its performance improves when used with 500mb geopotential height anomalies. Continuing work will focus on the meteorological impact and interannual variability of smoke production and subsequent transport between regions. In addition, analysis using lightning strike data may also be preformed for the Canada and Alaska regions via Environment Canada and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) respectively.

  15. Caribbean basin framework, 2: Northern Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Tyburski, S.A.; Gordon, M.B.; Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    There are four Jurassic to Recent basin-forming periods in northern Central America (honduras, Honduran Borderlands, Belize, Guatemala, northern Nicaragua): (1) Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rifting and subsidence along normal faults in Honduras and Guatemala; rifts are suggested but are not well defined in Honduras by the distribution of clastic sediments and associated volcanic rocks. Rifting is attributed to the separation of Central America from the southern margin of the North American plate; (2) Cretaceous subsidence recorded by the development of a Cretaceous carbonate platform in Honduras, Guatemala, and Belize; subsidence is attributed to thermal subsidence of the rifted margins of the various blocks; (3) Late Cretaceous-Recent development of a volcanic arc along the western margin of Middle America and the northern margin of Honduras; (4) Late Cretaceous large-scale folding in Honduras, ophiolite obduction, and formation of a foredeep basin in Guatemala (Sepur trough); deformation is attributed to the collision between a north-facing arc in northern Honduras and the Nicaraguan Rise and the passive margin of Guatemala and Belize; and (5) Eocene to Recent strike-slip faulting along the present-day North American-Caribbean plate boundary in Guatemala, northern Honduras, and Belize. Strike-slip faults and basins form a California-type borderlands characterized by elongate basins that appear as half-grabens in profile. Counterclockwise rotation of the central honduras plateau, a thicker and topographically higher-than-average block within the plate boundary zone, is accommodated by rifting or strike-slip faults at its edges.

  16. Vietnam and Central America: Reflections on Power and Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Robert J.

    1983-01-01

    Would the spread of Marxist revolution in Central America threaten America's vital interests? Would the people of that region be better off if we intervened? We cannot live forever under the shadow of Vietnam. It is not beyond our power to prevent a communist victory in Central America. (SR)

  17. Protection of mammal diversity in Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Clinton N.; Giri, Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Central America is exceptionally rich in biodiversity, but varies widely in the attention its countries devote to conservation. Protected areas, widely considered the cornerstone of conservation, were not always created with the intent of conserving that biodiversity. We assessed how well the protected-area system of Central America includes the region's mammal diversity. This first required a refinement of existing range maps to reduce their extensive errors of commission (i.e., predicted presences in places where species do not occur). For this refinement, we used the ecological limits of each species to identify and remove unsuitable areas from the range. We then compared these maps with the locations of protected areas to measure the habitat protected for each of the region's 250 endemic mammals. The species most vulnerable to extinction—those with small ranges—were largely outside protected areas. Nevertheless, the most strictly protected areas tended toward areas with many small-ranged species. To improve the protection coverage of mammal diversity in the region, we identified a set of priority sites that would best complement the existing protected areas. Protecting these new sites would require a relatively small increase in the total area protected, but could greatly enhance mammal conservation.

  18. Elimination of Rhodnius prolixus in Central America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Rhodnius prolixus is one of the main vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease. In Central America, it was first discovered in 1915 in El Salvador, from where it spread northwest to Guatemala and Mexico, and southeast to Nicaragua and Costa Rica, arriving also in Honduras in the late 1950s. Indoor residual spraying (IRS) by the antimalaria services of Costa Rica prevented its spread southwards, and similar IRS programmes appear to have eliminated it from El Salvador by the late 1970s. In 1997, by resolution of the Ministers of Health of the seven Central American countries, a multinational initiative against Chagas disease (IPCA) was launched with one of the specific objectives being the elimination of R. prolixus from the region. As a result, more and more infested areas were encountered, and progressively sprayed using an IRS strategy already deployed against Triatoma infestans in the southern cone countries of South America. In 2008, Guatemala became the first of these countries to be formally certified as free of Chagas disease transmission due to R. prolixus. The other infested countries have since been similarly certified, and none of these has reported the presence of R. prolixus since June 2010. Further surveillance is required, but current evidence suggests that R. prolixus may now been eliminated from throughout the mesoamerican region, with a corresponding decline in the incidence of T. cruzi infections. PMID:22357219

  19. High resolution mapping of dust sources in Central Asia using MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht, Mohamad; Shahgedanova, Maria; White, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    Dust impacts the energy balance of the Earth via absorption and scattering of radiation in the atmosphere and through the mechanism by which aerosols modify the optical properties of clouds and land surfaces. It is now established that the deposition of mineral dust significantly affects high-altitude environments, including both snow pack and glacier ice. Central Asia is a region where large deserts are located in close proximity to the mountains whose extensive glaciers and snow pack provide runoff supporting agriculture in the densely populated foothills. More than 75% of the territory in Central Asia is desert lowland varying from sandy to stony, salt, and clay deserts. Significant amounts of wind-blown desert dust, originating from these deserts, are deposited on glaciers of Tian Shan Mountains in Central Asia. Satellite remote sensing using optical imagery has provided us with a powerful tool for identification and characterization of dust emission sources. In this study we investigated the spatial distribution and seasonal pattern of dust emissions in surrounding lowlands of the Tian Shan Mountains using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery. Seasonality of dust emission is studied by analyzing MODIS Deep Blue aerosol optical depth, acquired over a period of 12 years from January 2003 to December 2014. We analyzed the spatial distribution and frequency of occurrence of dust optical depth to identify the main dust sources in this region. In order to produce a detailed map of dust emission sources, we also employed a dust enhancement algorithm to obtain high resolution (1km) dust enhancement products from MODIS imageries. The high resolution of MODIS dust enhancement products enabled us to identify several small, eroding point sources within the dust source areas. Different seasonal patterns of dust emissions were observed in northern, western and southern deserts around the Tian Shan Mountains and their relation to climatological

  20. Mantle Structure Beneath Central South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecar, J. C.; Silver, P. G.; James, D. E.; Assumpcao, M.; Schimmel, M.; Zandt, G.

    2003-12-01

    Making use of 60 digital broadband seismic stations that have operated across central South America in recent years, we have undertaken an inversion for the upper- and uppermost lower-mantle P- and S-wave velocity structures beneath the region. We have combined data from four portable PASSCAL-type experiments as well as the 3 GTSN permanent stations (LPAZ, BDFB and CPUP) and 1 Geoscope station (SPB) located in the region. The portable data were deployed at various times between 1992 and 1999 and include: 28 sites from the Brazilian Lithosphere Seismic Project (BLSP: Carnegie Institution of Washington and Universidade de Sao Paulo), 16 sites from the Broadband ANdean JOint experiment (BANJO: Carnegie Institution of Washington and University of Arizona), 8 sites from the Seismic Exploration of the Deep Altiplano project (SEDA: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) and 4 sites from the University of Brasilia. The P- and S-wave relative delay times are independently obtained via a multi-channel cross correlation of band-passed waveforms for each teleseismic event. These data are then inverted using an iterative, robust, non-linear scheme which parameterizes the 3-D velocity variations as splines under tension constrained at over 120,000 nodes across South America between latitudes of 15 and 30 degrees South. Amongst other features, we robustly image the high-velocity subducting Nazca plate penetrating into the lower mantle and the high-velocity root of the ~3.2 Gyr old Sao Francisco Craton extending to depths of 200-300 km. We will discuss the consistency between our tomographic models and predictions of dynamic mantle models based on plate tectonic reconstructions of subduction.

  1. Commercial Agriculture and Modern Transport in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Oscar H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an exercise for use in college-level geography courses dealing with the tandem development of transport networks and commercial agriculture in Central America. Using six maps, the author shows the parallels between highway and railroad construction and commercial crops, (coffee, bananas, and cotton) in Central America between 1855-1975.…

  2. Commercial Agriculture and Modern Transport in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Oscar H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an exercise for use in college-level geography courses dealing with the tandem development of transport networks and commercial agriculture in Central America. Using six maps, the author shows the parallels between highway and railroad construction and commercial crops, (coffee, bananas, and cotton) in Central America between 1855-1975.…

  3. Development of Retinoblastoma Programs in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Wilimas, Judith A.; Wilson, Matthew W.; Haik, Barrett G.; Barnoya, Margarita; Fu, Ligia; Castellanos, Mauricio; Bonilla, Miguel; Phillips, Blanca; Helveston, Eugene M.; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Ribeiro, Raul; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma, a curable eye tumor, is associated with poor survival in Central America (CA). To develop a retinoblastoma program in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, twinning initiatives were undertaken between local pediatric oncology centers, nonprofit foundations, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, and the University of Tennessee Hamilton Eye Institute. Procedure The retinoblastoma program focused on developing early diagnosis programs in Honduras with national vaccination campaigns, developing treatment protocols suited to local conditions, building local networks of oncologists and ophthalmologists, training local healthcare providers, using modern donated equipment for diagnosis and treatment, and the ORBIS Cybersight consultation program and Internet meetings to further education and share expertise. Pediatric ophthalmologists and oncologists worked with foundations to treat patients locally with donated equipment and Internet consultations, or at the center in Guatemala. Results Number of patients successfully treated increased after the program was introduced. For 2000–2003 and 2004–2007, patients abandoning/refusing treatment decreased in Guatemala from 20 of 95 (21%) to 14 of 123 (11%) and in Honduras from 13 of 37 (35%) to 7 of 37 (19%). Survival in El Salvador was good and abandonment/refusal low for both periods. Of 18 patients receiving focal therapy for advanced disease, 14 have single remaining eyes. Conclusion Development of the program in CA has decreased abandonment/refusal and enabled ophthalmologists at local centers to use modern equipment to provide better treatment. This approach might serve as a guide for developing other multispecialty programs. PMID:19326423

  4. Colored Height and Shaded Relief, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Belize, southern Mexico and parts of Cuba and Jamaica are all seen in this image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The dominant feature of the northern part of Central America is the Sierra Madre Range, spreading east from Mexico between the narrow Pacific coastal plain and the limestone lowland of the Yucatan Peninsula. Parallel hill ranges sweep across Honduras and extend south, past the Caribbean Mosquito Coast to lakes Managua and Nicaragua. The Cordillera Central rises to the south, gradually descending to Lake Gatun and the Isthmus of Panama. A highly active volcanic belt runs along the Pacific seaboard from Mexico to Costa Rica.

    High-quality satellite imagery of Central America has, until now, been difficult to obtain due to persistent cloud cover in this region of the world. The ability of SRTM to penetrate clouds and make three-dimensional measurements has allowed the generation of the first complete high-resolution topographic map of the entire region. This map was used to generate the image.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to white at the highest elevations.

    For an annotated version of this image, please select Figure 1, below: [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Large image: 9 mB jpeg)

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was

  5. Quantifying the Uncertainties of MODIS GPP and ET Products under Different Land Cover Types across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Brunsell, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing products play a significant role in studying large scale carbon and hydrological cycle. MOD 17 and MOD 16 with a 1-km resolution has been providing continuous global estimate of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) respectively. There has been a significant amount of validation of the two products over the globe, most of which focusing on single product or specific sites. However, carbon and water cycle are deeply interconnected; a combined validation is in need to better understand their processes and relationship. We classified available flux towers in North America into six groups according to their land cover types. To reduce the uncertainty originated from the mismatch between MODIS grids and tower measurement, we estimated the footprints of the towers and did a weighted average for the grids corresponding to the flux footprint. The flux towers' measurements being used as ground truth, we quantified the uncertainties of the MODIS products for the typical land covers across the continent. Specifically, we calculated the bias, root mean square error and correlation coefficient. This could be useful reference when using these products in models or for refinement of MODIS products algorithm. We also used Bayesian methodology for uncertainty analysis, and quantified the bias as function of soil moisture content and temperature. Overall speaking, the MODIS products reflect the seasonal variation. Results also indicate that the MOD17 overestimates GPP up to 100 % and MOD16 underestimates ET in growing season and the performance of the products varies with different vegetation. Studying the ability of satellites to monitor carbon and water cycling is important for our understanding and addressing global and regional climate change issues.

  6. Total adult cardiovascular risk in Central America.

    PubMed

    Barceló, A; Gregg, E W; Wong-McClure, R; Meiners, M; Ramirez-Zea, M; Segovia, J

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate prevalence of cardiovascular risk among adults 40 years and older using population-based samples from six Central American countries. Risk factors were derived from a multi-national cross-sectional survey implemented in 2003-2006, which included a sample of 4 202 participants aged 40 years and older. Charts produced by the World Health Organization and the International Society of Hypertension for the Region of the Americas sub-region B were used to predict risk on the basis of factors including age, sex, blood pressure, total serum cholesterol, smoking status, and diabetes status. Overall, 85.9% of the population was classified as having < 10% risk for cardiovascular events during the following ten years. The likelihood of being in this risk group decreased with age in both males and females. Four percent of respondents were identified as having > 20% risk. More than 75% of those with a 30-40% risk had previously been identified by health services, and an additional 23% were identified during the study, suggesting they could be diagnosed by opportunistic screening for diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Results of bivariate analysis showed that respondents who were male, older, obese and/or less educated had higher risk for cardiovascular events, but a multivariate analysis including education indicated highest risks for older, obese, and less educated females. Measuring cardiovascular disease risk identifies most cases of (or at risk for) diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia among adults 40 years and older. This strategy can facilitate implementation of control programs and decrease disabilities and premature mortality.

  7. Spatial change analysis of paddy cropping pattern using MODIS time series imagery in Central Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Fatoni, Muhammad; Dwi Nugroho, Kreshna; Fatikhunnada, Alvin; Liyantono; Setiawan, Yudi

    2017-01-01

    Central Java had the diverse paddy field cropping patterns and it was influenced by several factors such as water availability, land condition, paddy fields ownership, and local culture. This research was aimed to analyze dynamic changes of paddy cropping pattern using MODIS imagery (MOD13Q1 16-day composite from 2001 to 2015). This research used k-means clustering algorithm for classified cropping pattern in Central Java based on similarity pattern of annual data from vegetation index. The result of this research classified cropping pattern become a main class and produced 15 maps of distribution cropping patterns (from 2001 to 2015). The result also divided Central Java’s paddy fields become 2 section (constant and change) based on cropping pattern that majority was caused by water availability. This research got the better accuracy (77.67%) of cropping pattern than long time series analysis from previous research. Although some classes successfully obtained upon annual time series analysis, MODIS still difficult to detect mixed crop pattern.

  8. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Central and South America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Reports the state-of-the-art in seismology and earthquake engineering that is being advanced in Central and South America. Provides basic information on seismological station locations in Latin America and some of the programmes in strong-motion seismology, as well as some of the organizations involved in these activities.-from Author

  9. Youth: A Solution to the Crisis in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manaut, Raul Benitez

    1985-01-01

    The economic, political, and cultural crises in third world countries have profound effects on youth. Maintains that peace is a synonym for democracy in Central America, and that democracy and peace are youth's principal aspirations. (JDH)

  10. Evaluation of United States Strategy In Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-03

    General Treaty for Central American Integration, signed by the five coun- tries in 1960, led to the establishment of a Central American Common Market ...The Bipartisan Commission on Central America de- scribed this period as follows: The common market inspired a surge of energy and optimism throughout...regional tensions and unrest collapsing the Central American Common Market and causing capital flight; bad government policies resulting in dis- incentives

  11. The Relationship of Forest Fires Detected by MODIS and SRTM Derived Topographic Features in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, Jon K.; Kovacs, Katalin; Kharuk, Viatcheslav; Burke, Erin

    2006-01-01

    Fires are a common occurrence in the Siberian boreal forest. The MOD14 Thermal anomalies product of the Terra MODIS Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer) product set is designed to detect thermal anomalies (i.e. hotspots or fires) on the Earth's surface. Recent field studies showed a dependence of fire occurrence on topography. In this study MODIS thermal anomaly data and SRTM topography data were merged and analyzed to evaluate if forest fires are more likely to occur at certain combinations of elevation, slope and aspect. Using the satellite data over a large area can lead to better understanding how topography and forest fires are related. The study area covers a 2.5 Million krn(exp 2) portion of the Central Siberian southern taiga from 72 deg to 110 deg East and from 50 deg to 60 deg North. About 57% of the study area is forested and 80% of the forest grows between 200 and 1000 m. Forests with pine (Pinus sylvestris), larch (Larix sibirica, L. gmelinii), Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica), spruce (Picea obovata.) and fir (Abies sibirica) cover most of the landscape. Deciduous stands with birch (Betula pendula, B. pubescens) and aspen (Populus tremula) cover the areas of lower elevation in this region. The climate of this area is distinctly continental with long, cold winters and short hot summers. The tree line in this part of the world is around 1500 m in elevation with alpine tundra, snow and ice fields and rock outcrops extending up to over 3800 m. A 500 m resolution landcover map was developed using 2001 MODIS MOD13 Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Middle Infrared (MIR) products for seven 16-day periods. The classification accuracy was over 87%. The SRTM version 2 data, which is distributed in 1 degree by 1 degree tiles were mosaiced using the ENVI software. In this study, only those MODIS pixels were used that were flagged as "nominal or high confidence fire" by the MODIS fire product team. Using MODIS data from the years 2000 to 2005 along with the

  12. The Relationship of Forest Fires Detected by MODIS and SRTM Derived Topographic Features in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, Jon K.; Kovacs, Katalin; Kharuk, Viatcheslav; Burke, Erin

    2006-01-01

    Fires are a common occurrence in the Siberian boreal forest. The MOD14 Thermal anomalies product of the Terra MODIS Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer) product set is designed to detect thermal anomalies (i.e. hotspots or fires) on the Earth's surface. Recent field studies showed a dependence of fire occurrence on topography. In this study MODIS thermal anomaly data and SRTM topography data were merged and analyzed to evaluate if forest fires are more likely to occur at certain combinations of elevation, slope and aspect. Using the satellite data over a large area can lead to better understanding how topography and forest fires are related. The study area covers a 2.5 Million krn(exp 2) portion of the Central Siberian southern taiga from 72 deg to 110 deg East and from 50 deg to 60 deg North. About 57% of the study area is forested and 80% of the forest grows between 200 and 1000 m. Forests with pine (Pinus sylvestris), larch (Larix sibirica, L. gmelinii), Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica), spruce (Picea obovata.) and fir (Abies sibirica) cover most of the landscape. Deciduous stands with birch (Betula pendula, B. pubescens) and aspen (Populus tremula) cover the areas of lower elevation in this region. The climate of this area is distinctly continental with long, cold winters and short hot summers. The tree line in this part of the world is around 1500 m in elevation with alpine tundra, snow and ice fields and rock outcrops extending up to over 3800 m. A 500 m resolution landcover map was developed using 2001 MODIS MOD13 Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Middle Infrared (MIR) products for seven 16-day periods. The classification accuracy was over 87%. The SRTM version 2 data, which is distributed in 1 degree by 1 degree tiles were mosaiced using the ENVI software. In this study, only those MODIS pixels were used that were flagged as "nominal or high confidence fire" by the MODIS fire product team. Using MODIS data from the years 2000 to 2005 along with the

  13. Private Higher Education in a Cold War World: Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In Central America the Cold War support of the elites by the United States was designed to ward off the communist threat. At the same time social and economic demands by the working and middle classes created revolutionary movements in the face of rigid and violent responses by Central American governments. Issues of social justice pervaded the…

  14. Private Higher Education in a Cold War World: Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In Central America the Cold War support of the elites by the United States was designed to ward off the communist threat. At the same time social and economic demands by the working and middle classes created revolutionary movements in the face of rigid and violent responses by Central American governments. Issues of social justice pervaded the…

  15. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  16. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  17. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  18. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  19. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  20. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  1. An approach to derive regional snow lines and glacier mass change from MODIS imagery, western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, J. M.; Menounos, B.; Moore, R. D.; Tennant, C.

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method to calculate regional snow line elevations and annual equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) from daily MODIS imagery (MOD02QKM) on large glaciers and icefields in western North America. An automated cluster analysis of the cloud-masked visible and near-infrared bands at 250 m resolution is used to delineate glacier facies (snow and ice) for ten glacierized regions between 2000-2011. For each region and season, the maximum observed value of the 20th percentile of snow-covered pixels (ZS(20)) is used to define a regional ELA proxy (ELAest). Our results indicate significant increases in the regional ELA proxy at two continental sites (Peyto Glacier and Gulkana Glacier) over the period of observation, though no statistically significant trends are identified at other sites. To evaluate the utility of regional ELA proxies derived from MOD02QKM imagery, we compare standard geodetic estimates of glacier mass change with estimates derived from historical mass balance gradients and observations of ZS(20) at three large icefields. Our approach yields estimates of mass change that more negative than traditional geodetic approaches, though MODIS-derived estimates are within the margins of error at all three sites. Both estimates of glacier mass change corroborate the continued mass loss of glaciers in western North America. Between 2000 and 2009, the geodetic change approach yields mean annual rates of surface elevation change for the Columbia, Lillooet, and Sittakanay icefields of -0.29 ± 0.05, -0.26 ± 0.05, and -0.63 ± 0.17 m a-1, respectively. This study provides a new technique for glacier facies detection at daily timescales, and contributes to the development of regional estimates of glacier mass change, both of which are critical for studies of glacier contributions to streamflow and global sea level rise.

  2. MODIS Snowcover in North America: A Comparison of Winter 2013/14 and 2014/15 to Median Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubilowicz, J. W.; Floyd, B. C.; D'Amore, D. V.; Bidlack, A.

    2015-12-01

    The winters from 2013-2015 had exceptionally low snow-packs in much of western North America. In particular, the winter of 2014/2015 had the lowest peak snow-water-equivalent (SWE) depths ever recorded in many areas of the Pacific Northwest. These low snow-packs have contributed to drought conditions from British Columbia to California. Along with the low SWE values, the snow covered area (SCA) of the previous two winters has been a significant departure from normal conditions. SCA is related to SWE, rain-on-snow events and the seasonal water supply, provides insulation for plant root systems from late season frost, and is an important factor in forest fire hazard, delaying the start of soil and fuel drying. Remote sensing can be a useful tool to monitor SCA over large regions, with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments providing a suitable temporal (twice daily), and spatial resolution (500m) to create detailed maps, even with high frequencies of cloud covered days. While comparison of SWE at snow monitoring sites to historical values is a standard analysis, doing the same for SCA has been difficult due to the technical and logistical problems related to processing the large amounts of spatial data required to determine a 'normal' annual SCA cycle. Through the use of new cloud-based computation methods from Google Earth Engine, we have calculated the monthly median (from 2002-2015) MODIS SCA, at a 500 m resolution, for all of the major Pacific draining watersheds of North America. Determining the 'normal' SCA cycle of the past 13 years allowed us to compare the past two winters to the median SCA levels, showing which basins have seen the most significant departures from normal SCA levels. Results indicate more significant departures from normal in basins with significant maritime-influenced snow-packs.

  3. Combining MISR and MODIS data to automatically catalogue smoke plumes in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzoni, Dominic; Tong, Lingling; Diner, David

    2005-01-01

    We are in the early stages of work on EPA task to investigate the effects of fires on air quality in North America, led by Jennifer Logan of Harvard University. JPL's contribution to this study is to find thousands of smoke plumes in satellite images of North America, and derive statistics about their geographic distribution, extent, orientation, and injection height.

  4. Historic America: The South Central States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beardsley, Donna A.

    Many sites in the south central states recall the procession of people who came across the continent with the passing frontier. This paper elaborates on several historic sites in the south central United States. The purpose of the paper is to introduce a series of places to the students and teachers of U.S. history. The paper recommends that…

  5. Comparison of Summer and Winter California Central Valley Aerosol Distributions from Lidar and MODIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.; Chu, D. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol distributions from two aircraft lidar campaigns conducted in the California Central Valley are compared in order to identify seasonal variations. Aircraft lidar flights were conducted in June 2003 and February 2008. While the PM2.5 concentration is highest in the winter, the aerosol optical depth measured from MODIS is highest in the summer. A seasonal comparison shows that PM2.5 in the winter can exceed summer PM2.5 by 55%, while summer AOD exceeds winter AOD by 43%. Higher temperatures wildfires in the summer produce elevated aerosol layers that are detected by satellite measurements, but not surface particulate matter monitors. Measurements of the boundary layer height from lidar instruments are necessary to incorporate satellite measurements with air quality measurements.

  6. Assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources in Central and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    The USGS has assessed undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in 128 selected petroleum provinces of the world. Of these 128 provinces, 23 are in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean area. In the USGS 2000 Assessment, the provinces resulted in mean totals for undiscovered resource of 105 billion bbl of oil and 487 tcf of gas. The potential for giant oil and gas fields is greatest in the basins along the Atlantic margin of eastern South America, from the Santos Basin in the south to the Guyana-Suriname Basin in the north. The potential for giant fields is mainly offshore, in water depths up to 3600 m. The South and Central America region ranks third in the world for undiscovered conventional oil and gas behind the Middle East and the Former Soviet Union.

  7. Low-Temperature cooling history of a Modi Khola transect, central Nepalese Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadin, E. S.; Martin, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    While most of the convergence between the Indian and Eurasian plates is thought to be taken up on the Main Himalayan-Main Frontal thrust system in southern Nepal, it has been suggested that additional faults to the north are also active. Among these is the Main Central thrust (MCT), a major deformational feature that crosses the length of the Himalayan chain and whose surface trace overlies a seismically active region. Most researchers agree that motion on the MCT initiated in Early Miocene time, but debate continues regarding its post-Miocene history. In order to investigate the bedrock uplift histories in this part of the Nepalese Himalaya, we undertook fission-track and (U-Th)/He dating of apatites from Greater and Lesser Himalayan pelites and quartzites at nearly constant elevation. The transect across the Modi Khola, in the western Annapurna Range of central Nepal, also crossed slope breaks that have been attributed to recent fault motion. From the 15 samples analyzed, most fission track ages are ca. 0.8 Ma, and large uncertainties mean outliers cannot be distinguished with confidence to have a different age. Apatite He (AHe) ages are mainly ca. 0.5 Ma, also with large uncertainties. HeFTy inverse modeling of sample cooling paths, using fission-track lengths and both AHe and fission-track ages, likewise reveal no apparent differences in cooling histories between any of the samples, with the exception of the samples immediately below and above the MCT. The different cooling histories of these two samples might indicate different uplift histories for the footwall and hanging wall of the MCT within the past million years. However, other samples within 200 meters of the trace of the MCT do not show this pattern. Further, at the temporal resolution of the apatite fission-track and He data, there is little support for motion on other faults of the Modi Khola valley in the past ca. 1 Ma. Geologic map of part of the Modi Khola valley showing the study area.

  8. Infant botulism in Costa Rica: first report from Central America.

    PubMed

    Hernández-de Mezerville, Marcela; Rojas-Solano, Mariela; Gutierrez-Mata, Alfonso; Hernández-Con, Laura; Ulloa-Gutierrez, Rolando

    2014-01-15

    Clostridium botulinum is known to cause descending paralysis in infants throughout the world. The subject of this study was a three-month-old Costa Rican boy who was hospitalized because of poor suction and feeding, hypotonia, and constipation. Clinical history and physical examination findings suggested infant botulism. Samples were sent to the Winnipeg Public Health Laboratory, where Clostridium botulinum toxin A was identified by PCR and culture from the stools, making this the first report of infant botulism in Central America. Although infant botulism is a known disease, the limitations in identifying it in Central America contributes to the misdiagnosis and under-reporting of this disease.

  9. Nutrition, poverty alleviation, and development in Central America and Panama.

    PubMed

    Immink, Maarten D C

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews research with policy relevance for food and nutrition in Central America and similar areas. The research was conducted by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) during the last three decades of the past millennium (1970-99). Six policy areas were selected for this review: agricultural commercialization and rural development; wage and price policies; human resource development; social safety nets, particularly complementary food programs; multi-sectoral nutrition planning; and food and nutrition monitoring for policy formulation. The contents and major conclusions of the work are described, as well as their public policy implications.

  10. Is the Central America forearc sliver part of the North America plate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Speziale, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Central America Forearc sliver is located between the Central America volcanic arc and the Middle America trench. Several authors have suggested that the forearc is being displaced to the northwest with respect to the Caribbean plate; they point to right-lateral, normal-faulting earthquakes along the Central America volcanic arc as prime evidence of this displacement. Apparently, the forearc continues to the northwest into southeastern Mexico, although this portion of the forearc is not being displaced. I present evidence that suggests that the forearc indeed continues into southeastern Mexico and that it belongs to the North America plate. Physiographically, there is a continuity of the forearc into the Coastal plains of southeastern (Chiapas) Mexico, across the Motagua and Polochic faults. Offshore, cross-sections of the Middle America trench are similar along the mexican (Chiapas) segment, and the Central American segment. Furthermore, at the northwestern end of the coastal plain there are no compressive structures, which suggests that the coastal plain is not being displaced to the northwest. As a matter of fact, fault-plane solutions for shallow earthquakes show extension rather than compression. Shallow, interplate earthquakes along the trench show similar parameters along both segments. P-axes and earthquake slip vectors have consistent azimuths, which relate better with Cocos-North America convergence than with Cocos-Caribbean. Azimuth of T-axes for normal-faulting earthquakes also agree well with Cocos-North America convergence. Similarity in several parameters is thus found across both segments, the Chiapas coastal plain and the Central America forearc sliver proper. This suggests that both segments are continuous and probably one and the same, and belonging to the North America plate. Perhaps more properly, the forearc sliver extends into southeastern Mexico and is part of the zone of deformation associated to the Cocos-North America-Caribbean plates

  11. Ticks and rickettsiae from wildlife in Belize, Central America.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marcos G; May Junior, Joares; Foster, Rebecca J; Harmsen, Bart J; Sanchez, Emma; Martins, Thiago F; Quigley, Howard; Marcili, Arlei; Labruna, Marcelo B

    2016-02-02

    The agents of spotted fevers in Latin America are Rickettsia rickettsii, R. parkeri, Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, and R. massiliae. In Continental Central America, R. rickettsii remains the only known pathogenic tick-borne rickettsia. In the present study, ticks were collected from wild mammals in natural areas of Belize. Besides providing new data of ticks from Belize, we investigated rickettsial infection in some of these ticks. Our results provide ticks harboring rickettsial agents for the first time in Central America. Between 2010 and 2015, wild mammals were lived-trapped in the tropical broadleaf moist forests of central and southern Belize. Ticks were collected from the animals and identified to species by morphological and molecular analysis (DNA sequence of the tick mitochondrial 16S RNA gene). Some of the ticks were tested for rickettsial infection by molecular methods (DNA sequences of the rickettsial gltA and ompA genes). A total of 84 ticks were collected from 8 individual hosts, as follows: Amblyomma pacae from 3 Cuniculus paca; Amblyomma ovale and Amblyomma coelebs from a Nasua narica; A. ovale from an Eira Barbara; A. ovale, Amblyomma cf. oblongoguttatum, and Ixodes affinis from a Puma concolor; and A. ovale, A. coelebs, A. cf. oblongoguttatum, and I. affinis from two Panthera onca. Three rickettsial agents were detected: Rickettsia amblyommii in A. pacae, Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest in A. ovale, and Rickettsia sp. endosymbiont in Ixodes affinis. The present study provides unprecedented records of ticks harboring rickettsial agents in the New World. An emerging rickettsial pathogen of South America, Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest, is reported for the first time in Central America. Besides expanding the distribution of 3 rickettsial agents in Central America, our results highlight the possible occurrence of Rickettsia sp. strain Atlantic rainforest-caused spotted fever human cases in Belize, since its possible

  12. Surface energy flux consequences of bark beetle outbreaks in the south-central Rockies using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M. K.; Williams, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in canopy cover due to disturbance-related mortality have been shown to profoundly impact parameters within the surface energy balance and water budget. A shift in such fluxes can have consequences for surface temperature, cloudiness, run-off and stream flow, forest regeneration and net primary productivity. Current outbreaks of native bark beetles in western North America are some of the largest and most severe in recorded history. In recent outbreaks, bark beetles have reduced the basal area of host-dominated forests by up to 70%; with over-story mortality often exceeding 90% in mature, even-aged stands. The magnitude, frequency and intensity of recent outbreaks have been attributed to warmer summer and winter temperatures and drought conditions as a result of climate change. However, despite the likelihood that canopy mortality from bark beetle attacks will have profound effects on forest albedo and evapotranspiration, consequences for this disturbance type remain largely un-documented. This study addressed the question: how does a bark beetle outbreak event influence surface albedo and evapotranspiration? Seasonal patterns of surface temperature, albedo, evapotranspiration, and radiative forcing were modeled for lodgepole and ponderosa pine stands by outbreak age using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data within the south-central Rocky Mountains. Beetle damage data was derived from both field-based plots as well as aerial surveys. The prevalence of bark beetle outbreaks in high-elevation environments, which are exceedingly sensitive to climate change, necessitates the importance of understanding the energy and evapotranspiration consequences of such events.

  13. Energy and development in Central America. Volume 2: Country assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Gallagher, W.; Palmedo, P.; Doenberg, A.; Oberg, K.; Kyle, S.

    1980-03-01

    An energy assessment for each of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama is presented. The program assists the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America. The following issues are treated separately for each individual country; geographic, social and economic aspects; energy resources; current and future energy use; energy strategies.

  14. Central Florida Community College, Exploring America's Communities. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Central Florida Community Coll., Ocala.

    In 1996, Central Florida Community College (CFCC) participated in the American Association of Community Colleges' Exploring America's Communities project, which works to strengthen the teaching and learning of American history, literature, and culture at U.S. community colleges. CFCC's principal goals were to promote conversation among faculty…

  15. Visiting the Digital Divide: Women Entrepreneurs in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Helena

    2006-01-01

    Micro and small enterprises comprise approximately 60-70% of enterprises in South and Central America. Most of these enterprises, particularly micro enterprises, are managed and owned by women. These women for the most part lack both skills and training in the use of computers and the Internet, and access to the use of information and…

  16. Women Farmers in Central America: Myths, Roles, Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudelman, Sally W.

    1994-01-01

    Improving economic opportunities for the increasing number of women farmers in rural Central America involves addressing low educational levels and challenging traditional social values. Government policies need to strengthen women's agricultural and natural-resource management skills by improving land access; encouraging membership in…

  17. National Geothermal Association Trade Mission to Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The United States (US) geothermal industry, the world's most technically proficient, has been unable to achieve penetration into the markets of the developing nations. This report details the findings of an industry Trade Mission to Central America, tasked with determining the reasons for this shortfall and with developing a US industry geothermal export strategy designed to achieve immediate and long-term export benefits.

  18. Visiting the Digital Divide: Women Entrepreneurs in Central America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Helena

    2006-01-01

    Micro and small enterprises comprise approximately 60-70% of enterprises in South and Central America. Most of these enterprises, particularly micro enterprises, are managed and owned by women. These women for the most part lack both skills and training in the use of computers and the Internet, and access to the use of information and…

  19. Applications of a MODIS-adjusted NDVI3g dataset in Central Europe between 1982 and 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Anikó; Marjanović, Hrvoje; Bognár, Péter; Pásztor, Szilárd; Barcza, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is widely used to study vegetation greenness, production, phenology and the responses of ecosystems to climate fluctuations. The extended global NDVI3g dataset created by Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) has an exceptional 32 years temporal coverage for the period of 1982-2013. Due to the methodology that was used to create NDVI3g inherent noise and uncertainty is present in the dataset. We used Collection-6 MOD13 NDVI data for the overlapping period of 2000-2013 as a reference to evaluate the accuracy of NDVI3g at a regional scale and to perform statistical harmonization (adjustment) of the NDVI3g dataset for Central Europe. The applied MOD13A2 is one of the official products of vegetation indices created from measurements of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board satellite Terra with 1 km × 1 km horizontal, and 16-day temporal resolution. Mean seasonal NDVI profiles, start, end and length of the growing season, anomalies, magnitude and timing of peak NDVI were calculated from NDVI3g (original, noise filtered and harmonized) and MODIS NDVI and compared with each other between 2000-2013. Results indicate that the harmonization of NDVI3g with MODIS NDVI is promising since the newly created dataset has improved quality for diverse vegetation metrics. As further application of the MODIS-adjusted dataset, we performed temporal trend analysis and crop yield estimations of winter wheat for the whole 1982-2013 period, indicating the reasonable applicability of the harmonized dataset in Central Europe. The presented results can help researchers to assess the expected quality of the NDVI3g-based studies in Central Europe and to exploit the information content of the adjusted NDVI3g. Keywords: NDVI; NDVI3g; MODIS; phenology; trend analysis; crop yield estimation

  20. Drought assessment for cropland of Central America using course-resolution remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. F.; Nguyen, S. T.; Chen, C. R.; Chiang, S. H.; Chang, L. Y.; Khin, L. V.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is one of the most frequent and costliest natural disasters, which imposes enormous effects to human societies and ecosystems. Agricultural drought is referred to an interval of time, such as weeks or months, when the soil moisture supply of a region consistently falls below the appropriate moisture supply leading to negative impacts on agricultural production. Millions of households in Central America were dependent upon major food crops, including maize, beans, and sorghum, for their daily subsistence. In recent years, impacts of climate change through global warming in forms of higher temperature and widespread rainfall deficits have however triggered severe drought during the primera cropping season (April-August) in the study region, causing profound impacts on agriculture, crop production losses, increased market food prices, as well as food security issues. This study focuses on investigating agricultural droughts for cropland of Central America using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. We processed the data for a normal year 2013 and an abnormal year 2014 using a simple vegetation health index (VHI) that is developed based on the temperature condition index (TCI) and vegetation condition index (VCI). The VHI results were validated using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) precipitation data and temperature vegetation dryness index (TVDI) that is developed based on the empirical analysis of TCI and VCI data. The correlation coefficients (r) obtained by comparisons between the VHI data and the AMSR2 precipitation and TVDI data were higher than 0.62 and -0.61, respectively. The severe drought was intensive during the dry season (January-April) and likely backed to normal conditions in May with the onset of rainy season. The larger area of serve drought was observed for the 2014 primera season, especially during April-July. When investigating the cultivated areas affected by severe drought in the primera

  1. CASA Central and South America GPS geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, James; Dixon, Timothy; Neilan, Ruth

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest Global Positioning System (GPS) campaign in the world to date (Table 1) [Neilan et al., 1988]. From January 18 to February 5, 1988, 43 GPS receivers collected about 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA UNO, an acronym for Central and South America—and “uno” is Spanish for “one,” designating first-epoch measurements. The CASA UNO experiment was the first civilian effort at implementing an extended GPS satellite-tracking network and established the first major GPS network in the northern Andean margin and the western Caribbean.

  2. Contextualizing the Trauma Experience of Women Immigrants From Central America, South America, and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Kaltman, Stacey; de Mendoza, Alejandra Hurtado; Gonzales, Felisa A.; Serrano, Adriana; Guarnaccia, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Trauma has been understudied among Latina immigrants from Central and South America. This study examined the types and context of trauma exposure experienced by immigrant women from Central America, South America, and Mexico living in the United States. Twenty-eight women seeking care in primary care or social service settings completed life history interviews. The majority of the women reported some type of trauma exposure in their countries of origin, during immigration, and/or in the United States. In the interviews, we identified types of trauma important to the experience of these immigrants that are not queried by trauma assessments typically used in the United States. We also identified factors that are likely to amplify the impact of trauma exposure. The study highlights the importance of utilizing a contextualized approach when assessing trauma exposure among immigrant women. PMID:22144133

  3. Contextualizing the trauma experience of women immigrants from Central America, South America, and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Stacey; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Gonzales, Felisa A; Serrano, Adriana; Guarnaccia, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    Trauma has been understudied among Latina immigrants from Central and South America. This study examined the types and context of trauma exposure experienced by immigrant women from Central America, South America, and Mexico living in the United States. Twenty-eight women seeking care in primary care or social service settings completed life history interviews. The majority of the women reported some type of trauma exposure in their countries of origin, during immigration, and/or in the United States. In the interviews, we identified types of trauma important to the experience of these immigrants that are not queried by trauma assessments typically used in the United States. We also identified factors that are likely to amplify the impact of trauma exposure. The study highlights the importance of utilizing a contextualized approach when assessing trauma exposure among immigrant women. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  4. Central America: Region in Conflict; A Selective Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    published during the period19893 DO , ~ NO OI~ UOV SB S OSSO ETE SECURITY CLASSFICATfOR OF rNIS PAGE (When Date Entered) 8 4 10 01 1137.%7. .4. *V461 -j -. r...F1527 .S62 D53 Di Giovanni, Cleto, Jr., and Harvey, Hose L. CRISIS IN CENTRAL AMERICA: FACTS, ARGUMENTS, IMPORTANCE, DANGERS, RAMIFICATIONS. Washington...Land. AMERICA 142:245-246, March 22, 1980 "Mqilitary Excess and Democratic Hopes--An Inflammtory Mix." (With dis - cussion--E1 Salvador

  5. Earth and water resources and hazards in Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Fary, R.W.; Guffanti, Marianne; Laura, Della; Lee, M.P.; Masters, C.D.; Miller, R.L.; Quinones-Marques, Ferdinand; Peebles, R.W.; Reinemund, J.A.; Russ, D.P.

    1984-01-01

    Long-range economic development in Central America will depend in large part on production of indigenous mineral, energy, and water resources and on mitigation of the disastrous effects of geologic and hydrologic hazards such as landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and floods. The region has six world-class metal mines at present as well as additional evidence of widespread mineralization. Systematic investigations using modern mineral exploration techniques should reveal more mineral deposits suitable for development. Widespread evidence of lignite and geothermal resources suggests that intensive studies could identify producible energy sources in most Central American countries. Water supply and water quality vary greatly from country to country. Local problems of ground- and surface-water availability and of contamination create a need for systematic programs to provide better hydrologic data, capital improvements, and management. Disastrous earthquakes have destroyed or severely damaged many cities in Central America. Volcanic eruptions, landslides, mudflows, and floods have devastated most of the Pacific side of Central America at one time or another. A regional approach to earthquake, volcano, and flood-risk analysis and monitoring, using modern technology and concepts, would provide the facilities and means for acquiring knowledge necessary to reduce future losses. All Central American countries need to strengthen institutions and programs dealing with earth and water resources and natural hazards. Some of these needs may be satisfied through existing or pending projects and technical and economic assistance from U.S. or other sources. The need for a comprehensive study of the natural resources of Central America and the requirements for their development is evident. The U.S. Caribbean Basin Initiative offers both an excellent opportunity for a regional approach to these pervasive problems and an opportunity for international cooperation.

  6. Comparison of Summer and Winter California Central Valley Aerosol Distributions from Lidar and MODIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper; DeYoung, Russell; Ferrare, Richard; Chu, D. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol distributions from two aircraft lidar campaigns conducted in the California Central Valley are compared in order to identify seasonal variations. Aircraft lidar flights were conducted in June 2003 and February 2007. While the ground PM(sub 2.5) concentration is highest in the winter, the aerosol optical depth measured from MODIS is highest in the summer. A seasonal comparison shows that PM(sub 2.5) in the winter can exceed summer PM(sub 2.5) by 55%, while summer AOD exceeds winter AOD by 43%. Higher temperatures and wildfires in the summer produce elevated aerosol layers that are detected by satellite measurements, but not surface particulate matter monitors. Temperature inversions, especially during the winter, contribute to higher PM(sub 2.5) measurements at the surface. Measurements of the boundary layer height from lidar instruments provide valuable information need to understand the relationship between satellite measurements of optical depth and in-situ measurements of PM(sub 2.5).

  7. Skylab photography applied to geologic mapping in northwestern Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. I., Jr.; Johnson, D. J.; Hahn, G. A.; Johns, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Two photolineation maps of southwestern Guatemala and Chiapas were made from S190 photographs along a ground track from Acajutla, El Salvador to San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico. The maps document a structural complexity spanning the presumed triple junction of the Cocos, Americas, and Caribbean plates. The Polochic fault zone, supposedly the Americas-Caribbean plate boundary, is a sharply delineated feature across western Guatemala. Westward of the Mexican border it splays into a large number of faults with NW to SW trends. The structural pattern is quite different to the north (Americas plate) and to the south (Caribbean plate) of the Polochic fault, though both areas are dominated by NW-trending lineations. Within the Central American volcanic chain, the lineation patterns support the segmented model of the Benioff Zone, by showing a concentration of transverse lineations in the predicted locations, most notably NE-trending elements near Quezaltenango, Guatemala. The structural pattern obtained from the maps are compared to patterns described on recently published maps of more southerly parts of Central America, to begin a synthesis of the structure of the convergent plate boundary.

  8. Central America and the Caribbean: No place for the unwary

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, L.M.

    1994-11-15

    Central America and the Caribbean have not enjoyed the same high profile as more prominent independent power markets like India and China. Indeed, only one country in the region appeared in a recent survey of the 20 most promising markets: Panama, with a projected demand for 2,040 megawatts (MW) of new capacity, was ranked twentieth. Nevertheless, taken as a whole, Central America and the Caribbean offer significant opportunities for new development. Projected incremental capacity needs in some of the larger markets in the region include: Costa Rica (700-1,000 MW), Dominican Republic (1,100 MW), Guatemala (450 MW), Honduras (225 MW), Jamaica (729 MW), Panama (2,040 MW), and Trinidad & Tobago (200 MW). These markets represent an aggregate potential demand of 5,750 MW - more than the projected demand in Colombia, one of South America`s most active markets. Yet although its need for capacity is significant, the region presents developers with unique challenges because it comprises so many relatively small countries, each with its own special needs and characteristics.

  9. Skylab photography applied to geologic mapping in northwestern Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, W. I., Jr.; Johnson, D. J.; Hahn, G. A.; Johns, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Two photolineation maps of southwestern Guatemala and Chiapas were made from S190 photographs along a ground track from Acajutla, El Salvador to San Cristobal de las Casas, Mexico. The maps document a structural complexity spanning the presumed triple junction of the Cocos, Americas, and Caribbean plates. The Polochic fault zone, supposedly the Americas-Caribbean plate boundary, is a sharply delineated feature across western Guatemala. Westward of the Mexican border it splays into a large number of faults with NW to SW trends. The structural pattern is quite different to the north (Americas plate) and to the south (Caribbean plate) of the Polochic fault, though both areas are dominated by NW-trending lineations. Within the Central American volcanic chain, the lineation patterns support the segmented model of the Benioff Zone, by showing a concentration of transverse lineations in the predicted locations, most notably NE-trending elements near Quezaltenango, Guatemala. The structural pattern obtained from the maps are compared to patterns described on recently published maps of more southerly parts of Central America, to begin a synthesis of the structure of the convergent plate boundary.

  10. Distribution and ecology of Haemagogus aeritinctus in Belize, Central America.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D S

    1993-03-01

    Immatures of Haemagogus aeritinctus are reported from a black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) tree hole on an offshore key in the Belize barrier reef. This is the first report of this species from other than coastal mainland sites in Central America. The high salinity (10,000 ppm) recorded in the tree hole water suggests that this species has a tolerance, or possibly a requirement, for soluble salts that may explain its affiliation solely with mangrove habitats.

  11. Narco-scapes: Cocaine Trafficking and Deforestation in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrathall, D.; McSweeney, K.; Nielsen, E.; Pearson, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Narcotics trafficking and drug interdiction efforts have resulted in a well-documented social crisis in Central America, but more recently, has been tightly linked to environmental catastrophe and accelerated deforestation in transit zones. This talk will outline synthesis findings from multi-country, interdisciplinary research on cocaine trafficking as an engine of forest loss in Central America. During the "narco-boom" of the mid-2000s, we observed a geographical evolution of cocaine flows into Central America, and the transit of cocaine through new spaces, accompanied by specific patterns of social and environmental change in new nodes of transit. We coarsely estimated that the total amount of cocaine flowing through Central America increased from 70 metric tons in 2000 to 350 mt in 2012, implying that total cocaine trafficking revenue in the region increased from roughly 600 million dollars to 3.5 billion in that time. We describe the mechanism by which these locally captured cocaine rents resulted in a rapid conversion of forest into cattle pasture. Narco-traffickers are drawn to invest in the cattle economy, as a direct means of laundering and formalizing proceeds. Ranching is a land intensive activity, and new narco-enriched cattle pastures can be isolated from other forms forest loss solely by their spatial and temporal change characteristics. A preliminary forest change study in Honduras, for example, indicated that areas of accelerated deforestation were in close proximity to known narcotics trafficking routes and were thirteen times more extensive on average than other forest clearings. Deforested areas commonly appeared in isolated and biodiverse lowland tropical rainforest regions that often intersected with protected areas and indigenous reserves. We find that narco-deforestation is a readily identifiable signal of the extent and health of the cocaine economy. This talk will feature summaries of both ethnographic and land cover change we have observed

  12. National Geothermal Association Trade Mission to Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The United States (US) geothermal industry, the world`s most technically proficient, has been unable to achieve penetration into the markets of the developing nations. This report details the findings of an industry Trade Mission to Central America, tasked with determining the reasons for this shortfall and with developing a US industry geothermal export strategy designed to achieve immediate and long-term export benefits.

  13. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  14. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  15. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  16. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  17. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  18. 77 FR 13618 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). This is a proposed extension of an... information collection: Title: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR...

  19. Information systems design for development projects in Central America.

    PubMed

    Ramiro Montealegre, J

    1991-06-01

    Present development projects in Central America, particularly food aid and food and nutrition education programs, are operating under severe management constraints which limit their potential to produce positive and measurable impacts on target communities and families. Thus, operational analysis and information systems are basic managerial tools to improve the efficiency of the projects. This paper presents an information system development methodology which has been used by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP) to assist different development projects of Central America. The methodology is geared on the one hand, towards systematizing the definition of the demand and of applications and, on the other, of the types of response required or deemed convenient, taking into account the technologies that are appropriate to the users' various capacities. The complete development cycle is based on good understanding of the social, organizational and human aspects of the project. Through the whole process, not only is the information system being developed and documented, but personnel is being trained and assisted in solving their problems, contributing thereby, to true transfer of technology. No new set of techniques of systems development is presented. What has been done is to carefully select elements of current technical practices, modifying tools and techniques to generate a unique methodology through which the information systems' requirements, specifications, and details may be expressed.

  20. The regime of aerosol optical depth over Central Asia based on MODIS Aqua Deep Blue data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floutsi, Athina; KorrasCarraca, Marios; Matsoukas, Christos; Biskos, George

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can affect the regional and global climate through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. To quantify these effects it is therefore important to determine the aerosol load, and an effective way to do that is by measuring the aerosol optical depth (AOD). In this study we investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the AOD over the climatically sensitive region of Central Asia (36° N - 50° N, 46° E - 75° E), which has significant sources of both natural and anthropogenic particles. The primary source of anthropogenic particles is fossil fuel combustion occurring mainly at oil refineries in the Caspian Sea basin. Natural particles originate mostly from the two deserts in the region (namely Kara-Kum and Kyzyl-Kum), where persistent dust activity is observed. Another source is the Aral Sea region, which due to its phenomenal desertification also drives an intense salt and dust transport from the exposed sea-bed to the surrounding regions. This transport is of particular interest because of health-hazardous materials contained in the Aral Sea sea-bed. For our analysis we use Level-3 daily MODIS - Aqua Dark Target - Deep Blue combined product, from the latest MODIS collection (006), available in 1° x 1° resolution (about 100 km x 100 km) over the period 2002-2014.Our first results indicate a significant spatial variability of the aerosol load over the study region. The data also show a clear seasonal cycle, with large aerosol load being associated with strong dust activity during spring and summer (AOD up to 0.5), and low during autumn and winter (AOD up to 0.4). In spring and summer significant aerosol load is observed in the Garabogazköl basin, Northeast and South-southeast Caspian Sea (offshore North Iran and Azerbaijan), as well as southwest of the Aral Sea. In the later region, the high AOD values can be explained by export of

  1. MODIS-Aqua detects Noctiluca scintillans and hotspots in the central Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, R; Priyaja, P; Rafeeq, M; Sudhakar, M

    2016-01-01

    Northern Arabian Sea is considered as an ecologically sensitive area as it experiences a massive upwelling and long-lasting algal bloom, Noctiluca scintillans (green tide) during summer and spring-winter, respectively. Diatom bloom is also found to be co-located with N. scintillans and both have an impact on ecology of the basin. In-house technique of detecting species of these blooms from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data was used to generate a time-series of images revealing their spatial distribution. A study of spatial-temporal variability of these blooms using satellite data expressed a cyclic pattern of their spread over a period of 13 years. An average distribution of the blooms for January-March period revealed a peak in 2015 and minimum in 2013. Subsequently, a time-series of phytoplankton species images were generated for these 2 years to study their inter-annual variability and the associated factors. Species images during active phase of the bloom (February) in 2015 indicated development of N. scintillans and diatom in the central Arabian Sea also, up to 12° N. This observation was substantiated with relevant oceanic parameters measured from the ship as well as satellite data and the same is highlight of the paper. While oxygen depletion and release of ammonia associated with N. scintillans are detrimental for waters on the western side; it is relatively less extreme and supports the entire food chain on the eastern side. In view of these contrasting eco-sensitive events, it is a matter of concern to identify biologically active persistent areas, hot spots, in order to study their ecology in detail. An ecological index, persistence of the bloom, was derived from the time-series of species images and it is another highlight of our study.

  2. Acute pesticide poisoning and pesticide registration in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Wesseling, Catharina . E-mail: cwesseli@una.ac.cr; Corriols, Marianela; Bravo, Viria

    2005-09-01

    The International Code of Conduct on the Distribution and Use of Pesticides of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations has been for 20 years the most acknowledged international initiative for reducing negative impact from pesticide use in developing countries. We analyzed pesticide use and poisoning in Central America, particularly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, and evaluated whether registration decisions are based on such data, in accordance with the FAO Code. Extensive use of very hazardous pesticides continues in Central America and so do poisonings with organophosphates, carbamates, endosulfan and paraquat as the main causative agents. Central American governments do not carry out or commission scientific risk assessments. Instead, guidelines from international agencies are followed for risk management through the registration process. Documentation of pesticide poisonings during several decades never induced any decision to ban or restrict a pesticide. However, based on the official surveillance systems, in 2000, the ministers of health of the seven Central American countries agreed to ban or restrict twelve of these pesticides. Now, almost 4 years later, restrictions have been implemented in El Salvador and in Nicaragua public debate is ongoing. Chemical and agricultural industries do not withdraw problematic pesticides voluntarily. In conclusion, the registration processes in Central America do not comply satisfactorily with the FAO Code. However, international regulatory guidelines are important in developing countries, and international agencies should strongly extend its scope and influence, limiting industry involvement. Profound changes in international and national agricultural policies, steering towards sustainable agriculture based on non-chemical pest management, are the only way to reduce poisonings.

  3. Flying shells: historical dispersal of marine snails across Central America

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Osamu; Torchin, Mark E.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Jacobs, David K.; Hechinger, Ryan F.

    2012-01-01

    The geological rise of the Central American Isthmus separated the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans about 3 Ma, creating a formidable barrier to dispersal for marine species. However, similar to Simpson's proposal that terrestrial species can ‘win sweepstakes routes’—whereby highly improbable dispersal events result in colonization across geographical barriers—marine species may also breach land barriers given enough time. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether intertidal marine snails have crossed Central America to successfully establish in new ocean basins. We used a mitochondrial DNA genetic comparison of sister snails (Cerithideopsis spp.) separated by the rise of the Isthmus. Genetic variation in these snails revealed evidence of at least two successful dispersal events between the Pacific and the Atlantic after the final closure of the Isthmus. A combination of ancestral area analyses and molecular dating techniques indicated that dispersal from the Pacific to the Atlantic occurred about 750 000 years ago and that dispersal in the opposite direction occurred about 72 000 years ago. The geographical distribution of haplotypes and published field evidence further suggest that migratory shorebirds transported the snails across Central America at the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southern Mexico. Migratory birds could disperse other intertidal invertebrates this way, suggesting the Central American Isthmus may not be as impassable for marine species as previously assumed. PMID:21920976

  4. Seamount, ridge, and transform subduction in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, Kristin D.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the factors that control subduction zone processes is a first-order goal in the study of convergent margins. In southern Central America, a growing body of research reveals strong links between the character of the subducting slab and the mechanics of important processes that include subduction erosion, fluid flow, deformation, and seismogenesis. In this paper, I evaluate the role that seamount, ridge, and transform subduction have in the development of upper plate deformation and volcanism by summarizing previous work across a >500 km long region of Central America where each of these three scenarios are present along strike. The data show that the subduction of short-wavelength bathymetry (e.g., seamounts and faults on the seafloor) produces short-wavelength deformation that persists for relatively short timescales (104-105 years), whereas the subduction of longer-wavelength bathymetry (e.g., the aseismic Cocos Ridge) results in longer-wavelength deformation that endures over a longer time scale (106 years). The timing and distribution of upper plate deformation are consistent with subhorizontal Cocos Ridge subduction driving upper plate deformation, and the increased crustal thickness (>20 km) of the subducting Cocos Ridge is likely one of the most important factors in the production of upper plate contraction and crustal thickening. The data illustrate a fundamental connection between lower plate properties and upper plate deformation and highlight the profound influence that bathymetry and crustal thickness have in the localization and kinematics of upper plate strain and volcanism in Middle America.

  5. Are there trends towards drier hydrological conditions in Central America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, H. G.

    2013-12-01

    A summary of hydrological projections at the end of the century from 30 General Circulation Models (GCMs) is presented; and several hydrometeorological parameters are analyzed to validate if there are hydroclimatological trends during the observational period (1982-2005) consistent with the GCMs results. At the end of the century the median of 30 GCM simulations projects a drier future for Tegucigalpa and San Jose, with a marked increment in evapotranspiration in the first half of the rainy season along with reductions of soil moisture. With respect to the observations (1982-2005): 1) the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index showed negative trends in the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica, the border of Honduras and Nicaragua, and especially in southern Mexico (except the Yucatan Peninsula). Positive trends were found in the several parts of Central America, 2) the Palmer Drought Severity Index showed strong and consistent trends from Nicaragua to the North of Central America and southern Mexico (not including Yucatan), consistent with the direction of GCM projections; 3) negative precipitation trends in satellite data were found in Nicaragua, with strong trends in its Caribbean coast; 4) NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis precipitation showed strong negative trends in northern Central America, the Central Valley, the Dry Pacific of Costa Rica and the South-Pacific coast of Nicaragua, all consistent with the direction of GCM projections; and 5) station data showed no significant trends however, and 6) Reanalysis' temperature showed positive trends in southern Mexico (not including Yucatan) and negative trends in El Salvador. It can be concluded that several trends in drought indexes and precipitation are consistent with the future projected by the GCMs; that is, with some exceptions some of the trends were validated towards a drier future for the region, especially in the northern part.

  6. Posttraumatic stress in immigrants from Central America and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, R C; Salgado de Snyder, V N; Padilla, A M

    1989-06-01

    International migration has been associated with increased levels of psychological disturbance, particularly among refugees who have fled from war or political unrest. This study examined self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, somatization, generalized distress, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a community sample of 258 immigrants from Central America and Mexico and 329 native-born Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans. Immigrants were found to have higher levels of generalized distress than native-born Americans. Fifty-two percent of Central American immigrants who migrated as a result of war or political unrest reported symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of PTSD, compared with 49 percent of Central Americans who migrated for other reasons and 25 percent of Mexican immigrants. The authors call for more research to document the psychosocial aspects of migration.

  7. Central and South America GPS geodesy - CASA Uno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, James N.; Dixon, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    In January 1988, scientists from over 25 organizations in 13 countries and territories cooperated in the largest GPS campaign in the world to date. A total of 43 GPS receivers collected approximately 590 station-days of data in American Samoa, Australia, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Sweden, United States, West Germany, and Venezuela. The experiment was entitled CASA Uno. Scientific goals of the project include measurements of strain in the northern Andes, subduction rates for the Cocos and Nazca plates beneath Central and South America, and relative motion between the Caribbean plate and South America. A second set of measurements are planned in 1991 and should provide preliminary estimates of crustal deformation and plate motion rates in the region.

  8. Monitoring pesticide use and associated health hazards in Central America.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Viria; Rodríguez, Teresa; van Wendel de Joode, Berna; Canto, Nonato; Calderón, Gloria Ruth; Turcios, Miguel; Menéndez, Luis Armando; Mejía, Winston; Tatis, Anabel; Abrego, Federico Z; de la Cruz, Elba; Wesseling, Catharina

    2011-01-01

    We established methods for monitoring pesticide use and associated health hazards in Central America. With import data from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama for 2000-2004, we constructed quantitative indicators (kg active ingredient) for general pesticide use, associated health hazards, and compliance with international regulations. Central America imported 33 million kg active ingredient per year. Imports increased 33% during 2000-2004. Of 403 pesticides, 13 comprised 77% of the total pesticides imported. High volumes of hazardous pesticides are used; 22% highly/extremely acutely toxic, 33% moderately/severely irritant or sensitizing, and 30% had multiple chronic toxicities. Of the 41 pesticides included in the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), the Rotterdam Convention on Prior Informed Consent (PIC), the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, the Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Dirty Dozen, and the Central American Dirty Dozen, 16 (17% total volume) were imported, four being among the 13 most imported pesticides. Costa Rica is by far the biggest consumer. Pesticide import data are good indicators of use trends and an informative source to monitor hazards and, potentially, the effectiveness of interventions.

  9. Cocos-Nazca slab window beneath Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Stephen T.; Thorkelson, Derek J.

    1997-02-01

    Integration of petrologic and tectonic data favours a model of slab window formation beneath Central America in the Pliocene-Pleistocene. Central America has been the site of voluminous Cenozoic arc volcanism. The Cocos and Nazca plates, which are subducting beneath Central America, are diverging along the east-trending Cocos-Nazca spreading ridge. Since 25 Ma the Americas have advanced about 1800 km west over the ridge-transform system. Since at least 8 Ma, plate integrity and the ridge-transform configuration have been preserved during convergence, resulting in subduction of the spreading ridge and development of a slab window. The Panama fracture zone, an active transform fault, is the part of the ridge-transform system currently being subducted. The ridge-transform system formerly adjoining the northern end of the Panama fracture zone is likely to have been left-stepping. We use present-day plate motions to design a slab window to fit known variations in igneous composition, hypocentre distribution, and mantle anisotropy. The modeling demonstrates that subduction of ridge segments and resultant slab window development began between 6 and 10 Ma. Cessation of ridge subduction occurred between 1 and 3 Ma, when subduction of the Panama fracture zone is considered to have begun. The slab window is continuing to expand and migrate northeastward below the Central American volcanic arc. The absence of a Wadati-Benioff zone from southeastern Costa Rica through Panama corresponds to the position of the slab window. Within this region, dacitic and rhyolitic volcanic rocks have "adakitic" compositions, and are thought to result from anatexis of the young, buoyant crust which forms the trailing edges of the slabs bounding the window. Basalts in this area were derived from an enriched ocean-island type mantle source, whereas basalts from the rest of the arc, in Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala, are mainly derived from slab-modified depleted mantle, characteristic of

  10. Forces of environmental flux in Central America during the holocene

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, B. )

    1994-06-01

    A review of palynological and limnological data from Central America serves as a framework for evaluating environmental stability during the Holocene. The magnitude of climatic forcing after the early Holocene has not produced the dramatic changes that spanned the transition to post-glacial conditions. Nevertheless, climatic variability and human disturbance have had a significant impact on the vegetation of the region. This discussion has relevance for broader questions of species diversity and the long-term stability of vegetation associations in the tropics.

  11. Geothermal corehole drilling and operations, Platanares, Honduras, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.; Rufenacht, H.D.; Laughlin, A.W.; Adams, A.; Planner, H.; Ramos, N.

    1987-01-01

    Two slim exploration coreholes to depths of 650 m and 428 m, respectively, have been completed at the Platanares geothermal site, Honduras, Central America. A third corehole is now being drilled. These boreholes have provided information on the stratigraphy, temperature variation with depth, nature and compositions of fluids, fracturing, permeability, and hydrothermal alterations associated with the geothermal reservoir. Eruptions of hot water occurred during the drilling of both the first and third boreholes. Recovery of >98% core has been obtained even under difficult superheated conditions.

  12. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-04-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

  13. Aerosol optical depth over central north Asia based on MODIS-Aqua data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgousta Foutsi, Athina; Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Matsoukas, Christos; Biskos, George

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can affect the regional and global climate through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. To quantify these effects it is important to determine the aerosol load, and an effective way to do that is by measuring the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The central Asia region (mainly the Caspian and Aral sea basins), the arid and semi-arid regions of Western China as well as Siberia are of great interest due to the significant natural sources of mineral aerosols originating from local deserts and biomass burning from wildfires in boreal forests. What is of particular interest in the region is the phenomenal shrinking and desertification of the Aral Sea that drives an intense salt and dust transport from the exposed sea-bed to the surrounding regions with important implications in regional air quality. Anthropogenic particles are also observed due to fossil-fuel combustion occurring mainly at oil refineries in the Caspian Sea basin. Here we investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the AOD at 550 nm over central Asia, Siberia and western China, in the region located between 35° N - 65° N and 45° E - 110° E. For our analysis we use Level-3 daily MODIS - Aqua Dark Target - Deep Blue combined product, from the latest collection (006), available in a 1°×1° resolution (ca. 100 km × 100 km) over the period 2002-2014. Our results indicate a significant spatial variability of the aerosol load over the study region. The highest AODs are observed over the Aral Sea year-round, with extreme values reaching 2.1 during July. In the rest of our study region a clear seasonal cycle with highest AOD values (up to 1.2 over the Taklamakan Desert) during spring and summer is observed. The arid parts of central north Asia are characterized by larger aerosol loads during spring, lower but still high AOD in summer and much lower values in autumn and spring

  14. Review of the genera of Conoderinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from North America, Central America, and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Anzaldo, Salvatore S

    2017-01-01

    The thirty-nine extant genera of Conoderinae known to occur in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean are reviewed based on external morphology. An identification key is provided along with diagnoses, distributions, species counts, and natural history information, when known, for each genus. Morphological character systems of importance for weevil classification are surveyed, potential relationships among the tribes and genera are discussed, and groups most in need of taxonomic and phylogenetic attention are identified. The following genera are transferred to new tribes: Acoptus LeConte, 1876 from the Lechriopini to the Othippiini (new placement) and the South American genus Hedycera Pascoe, 1870 from the Lechriopini to the Piazurini (new placement). Philides Champion, 1906 and Philinna Champion, 1906 are transferred from the Lechriopini to Conoderinae incertae sedis(new placement) although their placement as conoderines is uncertain. The species Copturomimus cinereus Heller, 1895 is designated as the type species of the genus Copturomimus Heller, 1895.

  15. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wiman, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986 was considerably reduced compared to 1985. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Venezuela had increased oil production, with Colombia showing a dramatic 71% increase attributed mainly to bringing on-stream the pipeline connecting Occidental-Shell-Ecopetrol's Cano Limon complex to the port of Covenas. Significant discoveries were reported from Argentina in the Olmedo, Oran, and San Jorge basins; Brazil in the offshore Campos and Amazon basins; Colombia in the Llanos basin; Ecuador in the Oriente basin; Mexico in the Bay of Campeche; Peru in the Ucayali basin; and Venezuela in the Eastern Venezuela basin. Eastern Venezuela's Furrial discovery is reported to have recoverable reserves of more than 1 million bbl of oil, and Shell's Ucayali basin discovery is reported to hold more than 7 tcf of gas. 7 figures, 10 tables.

  16. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wiman, W.D.

    1986-10-01

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1985 was concentrated in proven petroleum provinces. Successful exploration and development efforts were most intense in Colombia and Venezuela, where activity centered around the Cano Limon field area. Initial production of 30,000 BOPD from Cano Limon started in December, raising Colombia again to the ranks of an exporting nation. Another significant discovery in Colombia was San Francisco field in the Upper Magdalena basin. Argentina reported significant discoveries by YPF in the Northwest Cretaceous and Neuquen basins and by Total offshore Tierra del Fuego. Brazil continued to discover major reserves in the offshore Campos basin in ever-increasing water depths. At year end, Venezuela was drilling Furrial-1 in eastern Venezuela. The well is reported to be the outstanding discovery of 1985, if not of the last 2 decades. 4 figures, 7 tables.

  17. Review of the genera of Conoderinae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from North America, Central America, and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Anzaldo, Salvatore S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The thirty-nine extant genera of Conoderinae known to occur in North America, Central America, and the Caribbean are reviewed based on external morphology. An identification key is provided along with diagnoses, distributions, species counts, and natural history information, when known, for each genus. Morphological character systems of importance for weevil classification are surveyed, potential relationships among the tribes and genera are discussed, and groups most in need of taxonomic and phylogenetic attention are identified. The following genera are transferred to new tribes: Acoptus LeConte, 1876 from the Lechriopini to the Othippiini (new placement) and the South American genus Hedycera Pascoe, 1870 from the Lechriopini to the Piazurini (new placement). Philides Champion, 1906 and Philinna Champion, 1906 are transferred from the Lechriopini to Conoderinae incertae sedis (new placement) although their placement as conoderines is uncertain. The species Copturomimus cinereus Heller, 1895 is designated as the type species of the genus Copturomimus Heller, 1895. PMID:28769729

  18. Implications of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement for the nutrition transition in Central America.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Corinna; Thow, Anne Marie

    2008-11-01

    To identify potential impacts of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) on food consumption patterns associated with the nutrition transition, obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases. Examination of CAFTA-DR agreement to identify measures that have the potential to affect food availability and retail prices. CAFTA-DR includes agreements on tariffs, tariff-rate quotas (TRQs), and sanitary and phytosanitary regulations with direct implications for the availability and prices of various foods. Agreements on investment, services, and intellectual property rights (IPR) are also relevant because they create a business climate more conducive to long-term investment by the transnational food industry. Trade liberalization under CAFTA-DR is likely to increase availability and lower relative prices of two food groups associated with the nutrition transition: meat and processed foods. These outcomes are expected to occur as the direct result of increased imports from the United States and increased production by U.S. companies based in Central America, and the indirect result of increased domestic meat production (due to increased availability of cheaper animal feed) and increased production of processed foods by domestic companies (due to a more competitive market environment). CAFTA-DR is likely to further the nutrition transition in Central America by increasing the consumption of meat; highly processed foods; and new, non-traditional foods. The public health community should be more aware of the implications of trade agreements for dietary health. Governments and related stakeholders should assess the coherence between changes fostered by specific trade agreements with national policies on diet and nutrition.

  19. Mantle Xenoliths of Cerro Mercedes, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, F. N.; Carr, M. J.; Herzberg, C. T.; Feigenson, M. D.

    2003-12-01

    Mantle peridotite occurs as xenoliths in lavas and bombs at Cerro Mercedes, a Plio-Quaternary potassic alkaline basalt volcano approximately 70 km behind the volcanic front of northern Costa Rica (Tournon and Alvarado, 1997). Mineral exploration led to the first discovery of abundant mantle xenoliths in Central America (Vargas and Alfaro, 1992). The compositions of 71 xenoliths recovered in January 2003 include dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite and olivine websterite. Twenty xenoliths have a diameter of at least 3 cm. The nodules are abundant in basalt outcrops and the rare bombs. In spite of substantial soil development in a rain forest environment, both xenoliths and host lava remain well preserved. Olivine, pyroxenes and spinel are common, plagioclase is present and garnet appears to be absent. There is no obvious shearing or deformation and several pyroxenes are as much as 1 cm in diameter. The mineralogy suggests a relatively shallow upper mantle source, within either the lithosphere or possibly the uppermost asthenosphere. Cerro Mercedes, at latitude 10° 58' N and longitude 82° 21' W, lies along the Rio San Juan, which is locally the border between Nicaragua and Costa Rica, Central America. This location approximately coincides with a boundary between dominantly depleted mantle to the northwest and OIB or Galapagos-like mantle to the southeast. We will use mineralogical data to better define the likely depths and oxidation states of representative nodules and isotopic data to define the type of mantle source.

  20. Exploration geothermal gradient drilling, Platanares, Honduras, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Ruefenacht, H.D.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.; Ramos, N.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is a review and summary of the core drilling operations component of the Honduras Geothermal Resource Development Project at the Platanares geothermal prospect in Honduras, Central America. Three intermediate depth (428 to 679 m) coreholes are the first continuously cored geothermal exploration boreholes in Honduras. These coring operations are part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) effort funded by the Agency for International Development (AID) and implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) in cooperation with the Empresa Nacional de Energia Electrica (ENEE) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). This report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy, thermal gradient, and flow test data of the boreholes. The primary objectives of this coring effort were (1) to obtain quantitative information on the temperature distribution as a function of depth, (2) to recover fluids associated with the geothermal reservoir, (3) to recover 75% or better core from the subsurface rock units, and (4) to drill into the subsurface rock as deeply as possible in order to get information on potential reservoir rocks, fracture density, permeabilities, and alteration histories of the rock units beneath the site. The three exploration coreholes drilled to depths of 650, 428 and 679 m, respectively, encountered several hot water entries. Coring operations and associated testing began in mid-October 1986 and were completed at the end of June 1987.

  1. Team Massachusetts & Central America Solar Decathlon 2015 Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kenneth

    2016-04-29

    Our team was Team MASSCA (Massachusetts and Central America), which was a partnership of Western New England University (WNE) located in Massachusetts USA, The Technological University of Panama (UTP), and Central American Technological University (UNITEC) of Honduras. Together we had a group of 6 faculty members and approximately 30 undergraduate students. Our house is ‘The EASI’ House, which stands for Efficient, Affordable, Solar Innovation. The EASI house is rectangular with two bedrooms and one bath, and offers a total square footage of 680. Based on competition estimates, The EASI house costs roughly $121,000. The EASI house has a 5kW solar system. Faculty and students from all three institutions were represented at the competition in Irvine California. Team MASSCA did well considering this was our first entry in the Solar Decathlon competition. Team MASSCA won the following awards: First Place – Affordability Contest Second Place – Energy Balance Contest. The competition provided a great experience for our students (and faculty as well). This competition provided leadership, endurance, and technical knowledge/skills for our students, and was the single most important hands-on experience during their undergraduate years. We are extremely pleased with the awards we received. At the same time we have learned from our efforts and would do better if we were to compete in the future. Furthermore, as a result of our team’s Inter-Americas collaborative effort, UTP and WNE have partnered to form Team PANAMASS (PANAma and MASSachusetts) and have developed The 3 SMART House for the inaugural Solar Decathlon Latin America & Caribbean competition held in Colombia.

  2. Seismic array constraints on the D" discontinuity beneath Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Stefanie Nicole

    We analyzed 16,150 transverse component seismic waveforms from 54 deep-focus earthquakes that occurred in the South American and Caribbean regions between the years of 2005-2012. The data were recorded at broadband stations across North America. We treated subgroups of seismic stations within 3° geographical bins as seismic arrays and performed vespagram analysis on these subarrays. Focusing on S, ScS, and Scd arrivals, we collected data in the epicentral distance range from 55° to 90°. In particular, we searched for D" discontinuity presence in the vespagrams in a 25° by 35° (or 1520 by 2130 km) area in the deepest mantle beneath Central America. Analysis of these data showed 125 clear Scd observations, 180 Scd observations of lesser quality, and 343 nonobservations. We used numerical simulations to develop empirical relationships between Scd--S differential travel times and D" discontinuity thickness and used these relationships to produce a new thickness map of the discontinuity beneath Central America. Our map shows an average discontinuity thickness of 297 km for the region, but it is punctuated by a large topographic high centered at approximately 10° N and 90° W with a maximum average thickness of 375 km. Two smaller topographic highs are located at approximately 4° N and 83° W (discontinuity thickness of 320 km) and at 4° N and 70° W (discontinuity thickness of 330 km). The observation of multiple Scd arrivals collocated with the strongest gradients in inferred topography provides evidence for topographic variation on the discontinuity rather than multiple discontinuities. The regions where the discontinuity is the thickest can be explained by localized enrichment of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB) from the subducted Farallon slab impinging on the core-mantle boundary.

  3. Seismic array constraints on the D″ discontinuity beneath Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Stefanie; Thorne, Michael S.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Miyagi, Lowell

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 16,150 transverse component seismic recordings from 54 deep-focus earthquakes in the South American and Caribbean regions recorded at broadband stations in North America between 2005 and 2012. We treated subgroups of seismic stations within 3° radius geographical bins as seismic arrays and performed vespagram analysis. We focused on the S, ScS, and Scd arrivals and collected data in the epicentral distance range from 55° to 90°. In particular, we searched for D″ discontinuity presence in the vespagrams in a 25° by 35° (or 1520 by 2130 km) area beneath Central America. Analysis of these data showed 125 clear Scd observations, 180 Scd observations of lesser quality, and 343 nonobservations. We produced a new map of the discontinuity height beneath Central America. Our map shows an average discontinuity height of 286 ± 6 km (σ = 76 km). The region is punctuated by a large topographic high centered at approximately 10°N and 90°W with a maximum height of 380 km. Two smaller topographic highs are located at approximately 4°N and 81°W (discontinuity height of 320 km) and at 4°N and 70°W (height of 315 km). The observation of multiple Scd arrivals collocated with the strongest gradients in inferred topography provides evidence for topographic variation on the discontinuity rather than multiple discontinuities. The regions where the discontinuity has the greatest height can be explained by localized enrichment of mid-ocean ridge basalt from the subducted Farallon slab impinging on the core-mantle boundary.

  4. Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America

    SciTech Connect

    DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

    1987-04-01

    A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered

  5. Performance of Early Warning Systems on Landslides in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, W.; Devoli, G.

    2012-04-01

    We performed a reconnaissance about Early Warning Systems (EWS) on Landslides (EWSL) in the countries of Central America. The advance of the EWSL began in the 1990-ies and accelerated dramatically after the regional disaster provoked by Hurricane Mitch in 1998. In the last decade, Early Warning Systems were intensely promoted by national and international development programs aimed on disaster prevention. Early Warning on landslides is more complicated than for other geological phenomena. But, we found information on more than 30 EWSL in the region. In practice, for example in planning, implementation and evaluation of development projects, it is often not clearly defined what exactly is an Early Warning System. Only few of the systems can be classified as true EWSL that means 1) being directly and solely aimed at persons living in the well-defined areas of greatest risk and 2) focusing their work on saving lives before the phenomenon impacts. There is little written information about the work of the EWSL after the initial phase. Even, there are no statistics whether they issued warnings, if the warnings were successful, how many people were evacuated, if there were few false alerts, etc.. Actually, we did not find a single report on a successful landslide warning issued by an EWSL. The lack of information is often due to the fact that communitarian EWSL are considered local structures and do not have a clearly defined position in the governmental hierarchy; there is little oversight and no qualified support and long-term support. The EWSL suffer from severe problems as lack of funding on the long term, low technical level, and insufficient support from central institutions. Often the EWSL are implemented by NGÓs with funding from international agencies, but leave the project alone after the initial phase. In many cases, the hope of the local people to get some protection against the landslide hazard is not really fulfilled. There is one case, where an EWSL with a

  6. A Comparative Overview of the Education of Deaf Children in Central America, the Caribbean and Parts of South America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado, Gilbert L.

    This paper describes the current state of education for deaf children in Central America and the Caribbean (with some mention of parts of South America), focusing on an historical description of events and forces impacting these regions; current educational philosophies; adult associations of deaf people; intra/intercountry networking; educational…

  7. A new dust source map of Central Asia derived from MODIS Terra/Aqua data using dust enhancement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobakht, Mohamad; Shahgedanova, Maria; White, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    Central Asian deserts are a significant source of dust in the middle latitudes, where economic activity and health of millions of people are affected by dust storms. Detailed knowledge of sources of dust, controls over their activity, seasonality and atmospheric pathways are of crucial importance but to date, these data are limited. This paper presents a detailed database of sources of dust emissions in Central Asia, from western China to the Caspian Sea, obtained from the analysis of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data between 2003 and 2012. A dust enhancement algorithm was employed to obtain two composite images per day at 1 km resolution from MODIS Terra/Aqua acquisitions, from which dust point sources (DPS) were detected by visual analysis and recorded in a database together with meteorological variables at each DPS location. Spatial analysis of DPS has revealed several active source regions, including some which were not widely discussed in literature before (e.g. Northern Afghanistan sources, Betpak-Dala region in western Kazakhstan). Investigation of land surface characteristics and meteorological conditions at each source region revealed mechanisms for the formation of dust sources, including post-fire wind erosion (e.g. Lake Balkhash basin) and rapid desertification (e.g. the Aral Sea). Different seasonal patterns of dust emissions were observed as well as inter-annual trends. The most notable feature was an increase in dust activity in the Aral Kum.

  8. Flood detection and mapping of the Thailand Central plain using RADARSAT and MODIS under a sensor web environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auynirundronkool, Kridsakron; Chen, Nengcheng; Peng, Caihua; Yang, Chao; Gong, Jianya; Silapathong, Chaowalit

    2012-02-01

    Flooding in general is insignificant event worldwide and also in Thailand. The Central plain, the Northern plain and the northeast of Thailand are frequently flooded areas, caused by yearly monsoons. The Thai government has extra expenditure to provide disaster relief and for the restoration of flood affected structures, persons, livestock, etc. Current flood detection in real time or near real time has become a challenge in the flood emergency response. In this paper, an automatic instant time flood detection approach consisting of a data retrieval service, flood sensor observation service (SOS), flood detection web processing service (WPS) under a sensor web environment, is presented to generate dynamically real-time flood maps. A scenario of a RADARSAT and MODIS sensor web data service for flood detection cover of the Thailand Central plain is used to test the feasibility of the proposed framework. MODIS data are used to overview the wide area, while RADARSAT data are used to classify the flood area. The proposed framework using the transactional web coverage service (WCS-T) for instant flood detection processes dynamic real-time remote sensing observations and generates instant flood maps. The results show that the proposed approach is feasible for automatic instant flood detection.

  9. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  10. Evolution of the Earthquake Catalog in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, W.; Camacho, E. I.; Marroquín, G.; Molina, E.; Talavera, E.; Benito, M. B.; Lindholm, C.

    2013-05-01

    Central America (CA) is known as a seismically active region in which several historic destructive earthquakes have occurred. This fact has promoved the development of seismic hazard studies that provide necessary estimates for decision making and risk assessment efforts, requiring a complete and standardized seismic catalog. With this aim, several authors have contributed to the study of the historical seismicity of Central America (e.g. Grases, Feldaman; White y Harlow, 1993; White et al. 2004; Ambraseys y Adams, 2001; Peraldo y Montero, 1999), who complied historical data. A first catalogue was developed by Rojas (1993) that comprises the 1522 to 1993 period. This information was integrated in 2007, together with data from the International Seismological Centre (CASC) and the national catalogs of CA countries in a new regional catalogue. Since 2007 a continuous effort has been done in order to complete and update this CA earthquake catalog. In particular, two workshops were held in 2008 and 2011 in the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain), joining experts from the different CA countries who worked each one in its own catalogue covering the entire region and the border with northwestern Colombia and southern Mexico. These national catalogues were later integrated in a common regional catalogue in SEISAN format. At this aim it was necessary to solve some problems, like to avoid duplicity of events, specially close to the boundaries, to consider the different scales of magnitude adopted by different countries, to take into account the completeness by the different national networks, etc. Some solutions were adopted for obtaining a homogenized catalogue to Mw, containing historical and instrumental events with Mw > 3.5 from 1522 up to 2011. The catalogue updated to December 2007 was the basis for the first regional hazard study carried out by Benito et al., (2011) as part of the collaborative RESIS II project under coordination of NORSAR. The ones updated to

  11. Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

  12. Coughing and fever after surfing in Central America.

    PubMed

    Pongratz, Peter; Laferl, Hermann; Strau, Günther; Stanek, Gerold; Wenisch, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old surfer, returning from Central America, who presented with chronic cough. The X-ray and full blood count, which had been performed in Costa Rica, were without pathology; laboratory parameters showed slightly increased C-reactive protein (59 mg/l). Malaria was excluded by thick smear. Immune serological tests for typhus, paratyphus, brucellosis, rickettsioses, leptospirosis and dengue fever were negative. An ambulant antimicrobial treatment was without any clinical effect. A computer tomography of the thorax showed a solid lesion (30 × 20 mm, middle lobe of the right lung). The patient rejected a bronchoscopic examination. He decided to be treated after his return to Austria. Here, we could substantiate a pulmonal histoplasmosis by a positive immune diffusion test. The patient was successfully treated with itraconazole.

  13. Global GIS database; digital atlas of Central and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn,, Paul P.; Hare, T.; Schruben, P.; Sherrill, D.; LaMar, C.; Tsushima, P.

    2000-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a digital atlas of the countries of Central and South America. This atlas is part of a global database compiled from USGS and other data sources at the nominal scale of 1:1 million and is intended to be used as a regional-scale reference and analytical tool by government officials, researchers, the private sector, and the general public. The atlas includes free GIS software or may also be used with ESRI's ArcView software. Customized ArcView tools, specifically designed to make the atlas easier to use, are also included. The atlas contains the following datasets: country political boundaries, digital shaded relief map, elevation, slope, hydrology, locations of cities and towns, airfields, roads, railroads, utility lines, population density, geology, ecological regions, historical seismicity, volcanoes, ore deposits, oil and gas fields, climate data, landcover, vegetation index, and lights at night.

  14. Investigation of the nutrition problems of Central America and Panama.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Guillermo

    2010-03-01

    From its earliest years, INCAP gave a high priority to a multidisciplinary effort to learn as much as possible about the dietary habits, nutritional status, and their consequences in the populations of Central America and Panama. Most of the papers in this Special Issue contain some of this information. The first studies were in schoolchildren but were soon extended to preschool children, pregnant and lactating women, and other adults. This paper describes the principal findings of the initial dietary, biochemical, and clinical community-based studies. From 1965-67, very extensive studies were carried out in all six countries including dietary, biochemical, clinical, and anthological studies were carried out in all six countries, the results of which are summarized.

  15. Interplate coupling along segments of the Central America Subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarifi, Zoya; Raeesi, Mohammad; Atakan, Kuvvet

    2013-04-01

    We analyzed 5 major earthquakes that occurred during 1992 to 2012 in a segment of the Central America subduction zone along the coasts of Guatemala and El Salvador. These events include 1992/09/02 (Mw 7.7), 1993/09/10 (Mw 7.2), 2001/01/13 (Mw 7.7), 2012/08/27 (Mw 7.3) and 2012/11/07 (Mw 7.3). We derived the asperities of these earthquakes using two completely independent methods of body-waveform inversion and a gravity-derived measure, Trench Parallel Bouguer Anomaly (TPBA). Using TPBA we discuss the status of interplate coupling along the segment and interpret each of the major earthquakes as a piece of the governing rupture process. We delineate the critical unbroken asperities along the segment that will likely generate great earthquake(s) in the future.

  16. Aerial and Ground-Based Remote Sensing In Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, Payson; Sever, Thomas L.; Conyers, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Remote sensing of archaeological features is most successful when instrumentation and imagery are carefully selected bearing in mind the nature of the remains and the local context. Instruments need to be calibrated to local conditions, and extensive field verification studies are necessary. This is illustrated by remote sensing in two research programs in Central America: the Arena1 Research Program in Costa Rica and the Ceren Research Program in El Salvador. Satellite and aircraft remote sensing was successful in the former, while the Ceren site required the development of ground-based geophysical exploration techniques. In both cases, remote sensing contributed information that was not available by any other means, thus allowing new interpretations and a fuller understanding of ancient societies.

  17. The burden of oesophageal cancer in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Enrique; Sierra, Monica S; Musetti, Carina; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    Oesophageal cancer shows marked geographic variations and is one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. We described the burden of this malignancy in Central and South America. Regional and national level incidence data were obtained from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries. Mortality data were obtained from the WHO mortality database. Incidence of oesophageal cancer by histological subtype were available from high-quality population-based cancer registries. Males had higher incidence and mortality rates than females (male-to-female ratios: 2-6:1 and 2-5:1). In 2003-2007, the highest rates were in Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile. Mortality rates followed the incidence patterns. Incidence of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was higher than adenocarcinoma (AC), except in females from Cuenca (Ecuador). SCC and AC incidence were higher in males than females, except in the Region of Antofagasta and Valdivia (Chile), Manizales (Colombia) and Cuenca (Ecuador). Incidence and mortality rates tended to decline in Argentina, Chile, Brazil (incidence) and Costa Rica from 1997 to 2008. The geographic variation and sex disparity in oesophageal cancer across Central and South America may reflect differences in the prevalence of tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption which highlights the need to implement and/or strengthen tobacco and alcohol control policies. Maté consumption, obesity, diet and Helicobacter pylori infection may also explain the variation in oesophageal cancer rates but these relationships should be evaluated. Continuous monitoring of oesophageal cancer rates is necessary to provide the basis for cancer prevention and control in the region. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  19. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  20. Gene flow among Anopheles albimanus populations in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean assessed by microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; de Mérida, Ana María P; Mills, Katherine; Rodríguez, Fernando; Schoua, Carolina; Yurrita, María Marta; Molina, Eduviges; Palmieri, Margarita; Black, William C

    2004-09-01

    Gene flow was examined among Anopheles albimanus populations from Cuba, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, and Venezuela by examining variation at four microsatellite (MS) loci and a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker. There was little variation among Central American populations and weak isolation by distance was only observed with the MS loci. There was moderate to large variation between Central and South American populations, suggesting a barrier to gene flow between Central and South America. However, Panamanian and Pacific Costa Rican populations differed with respect to western Central America, suggesting that there may be another barrier within Central America. There was small to moderate variation among Caribbean and continental populations. Phylogenetic and diversity analyses of mtDNA indicate that more ancestral and diverse haplotypes were present in the Caribbean population, suggesting that current continental An. albimanus populations may have originated from the Caribbean.

  1. Detecting leaf phenology of seasonally moist tropical forests in South America with multi-temporal MODIS images.

    Treesearch

    Xiangming Xiao; Stephen Hagen; Qingyuan Zhang; Michael Keller; Berrien Moore III

    2006-01-01

    Leaf phenology of tropical evergreen forests affects carbon and water fluxes. In an earlier study of a seasonally moist evergreen tropical forest site in the Amazon basin, time series data of Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the VEGETATION and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors showed an unexpected seasonal pattern, with higher EVI in the...

  2. Informal employment and health status in Central America.

    PubMed

    López-Ruiz, María; Artazcoz, Lucía; Martínez, José Miguel; Rojas, Marianela; Benavides, Fernando G

    2015-07-24

    Informal employment is assumed to be an important but seldom studied social determinant of health, affecting a large number of workers around the world. Although informal employment arrangements constitute a permanent, structural pillar of many labor markets in low- and middle-income countries, studies about its relationship with health status are still scarce. In Central America more than 60% of non-agricultural workers have informal employment. Therefore, we aimed to assess differences in self-perceived and mental health status of Central Americans with different patterns of informal and formal employment. Employment profiles were created by combining employment relations (employees, self-employed, employers), social security coverage (yes/no) and type of contract--only for employees--(written, oral, none), in a cross-sectional study of 8,823 non-agricultural workers based on the I Central American Survey of Working Conditions and Health of 2011. Using logistic regression models, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) by country, age and occupation, of poor self-perceived and mental health were calculated by sex. Different models were first fitted separately for the three dimensions of employment conditions, then for employment profiles as independent variables. Poor self-perceived health was reported by 34% of women and 27% of men, and 30% of women and 26% of men reported poor mental health. Lack of social security coverage was associated with poor self-perceived health (women, aOR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.13-1.67; men, aOR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.13-1.63). Almost all employment profiles with no social security coverage were significantly associated with poor self-perceived and poor mental health in both sexes. Our results show that informal employment is a significant factor in social health inequalities among Central American workers, which could be diminished by policies aimed at increasing social security coverage.

  3. Regional fire monitoring and characterization using global NASA MODIS fire products in dry lands of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loboda, Tatiana V.; Giglio, Louis; Boschetti, Luigi; Justice, Christopher O.

    2012-06-01

    Central Asian dry lands are grass- and desert shrub-dominated ecosystems stretching across Northern Eurasia. This region supports a population of more than 100 million which continues to grow at an average rate of 1.5% annually. Dry steppes are the primary grain and cattle growing zone within Central Asia. Degradation of this ecosystem through burning and overgrazing directly impacts economic growth and food supply in the region. Fire is a recurrent disturbance agent in dry lands contributing to soil erosion and air pollution. Here we provide an overview of inter-annual and seasonal fire dynamics in Central Asia obtained from remotely sensed data. We evaluate the accuracy of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) global fire products within Central Asian dry lands and use these products to characterize fire occurrence between 2001 and 2009. The results show that on average ˜15 million ha of land burns annually across Central Asia with the majority of the area burned in August and September in grasslands. Fire is used as a common crop residue management practice across the region. Nearly 89% of all burning occurs in Kazakhstan, where 5% and 3% of croplands and grasslands, respectively, are burned annually.

  4. The descriptive epidemiology of gastric cancer in Central America and comparison with United States Hispanic populations.

    PubMed

    Corral, Juan E; Delgado Hurtado, Juan J; Domínguez, Ricardo L; Valdez de Cuéllar, Marisabel; Balmore Cruz, Carlos; Morgan, Douglas R

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to delineate the epidemiology of gastric adenocarcinoma in Central America and contrast it with Hispanic-Latino populations in the USA. Published literature and Central America Ministry of Health databases were used as primary data sources, including national, population-based, and hospital-based registries. US data was obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Epidemiology End Results Program (SEER) registry. Incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases were analyzed for available data between 1985 and 2011, including demographic variables and pathology information. In Central America, 19,741 incident gastric adenocarcinomas were identified. Two thirds of the cases were male, 20.5 % were under age 55, and 58.5 %were from rural areas. In the SEER database (n = 7871), 57.8 % were male and 28.9 % were under age 55. Among the US Hispanics born in Central America with gastric cancer (n = 1210), 50.3 % of cases were male and 38.1 % were under age 55. Non-cardia gastric cancer was more common in Central America (83.3 %), among US Hispanics (80.2 %), and Hispanics born in Central America (86.3 %). Cancers of the antrum were more common in Central America (73.6 %), whereas cancers of the corpus were slightly more common among US Hispanics (54.0 %). Adenocarcinoma of the diffuse subtype was relatively common, both in Central America (35.7 %) and US Hispanics (69.5 %), although Lauren classification was reported in only 50 % of cases. A significant burden of gastric adenocarcinoma is observed in Central America based upon limited available data. Differences are noted between Central America and US Hispanics. Strengthening population-based registries is needed for improved cancer control in Central America, which may have implications for the growing US Hispanic population.

  5. The descriptive epidemiology of gastric cancer in Central America and comparison with United States Hispanic populations

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Delgado Hurtado, Juan J.; Domínguez, Ricardo L.; de Cuéllar, Marisabel Valdez; Cruz, Carlos Balmore; Morgan, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Delineate the epidemiology of gastric adenocarcinoma in Central America and contrast it with Hispanic-Latino populations in the U.S. Methods Published literature and Central America Ministry of Health databases were used as primary data sources, including national, population-based and hospital-based registries. U.S. data was obtained from the NCI-SEER registry. Incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases were analyzed for available data between 1985–2011, including demographic variables and pathology information. Results In Central America, 19,741 incident gastric adenocarcinomas were identified. Two-thirds of cases were male, 20.5% were under age 55, and 58.5% were from rural areas. In the SEER database (n=7,871), 57.8% were male, and 28.9% were under age 55. Among the U.S. Hispanics born in Central America with gastric cancer (n=1,210), 50.3% of cases were male, and 38.1% were under age 55. Noncardia gastric cancer was more common in Central America (83.3%), among U.S. Hispanics (80.2%), and Hispanics born in Central America (86.3%). Cancers of the antrum were more common in Central America (73.6%), whereas cancers of the corpus were slightly more common among U.S. Hispanics (54.0%). Adenocarcinoma of the diffuse subtype was relatively common, both in Central America (35.7%), and U.S. Hispanics (69.5%), although Lauren classification was reported in only 50% of cases. Conclusions A significant burden of gastric adenocarcinoma is observed in Central America based upon limited available data. Differences are noted between Central America and U.S. Hispanics. Strengthening population-based registries is needed for improved cancer control in Central America, which may have implications for the growing U.S. Hispanic population. PMID:25412859

  6. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wiman, W.D.

    1988-10-01

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1987 showed significant increases in seismic acquisition in Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, and Peru, and a decrease in Chile and Venezuela. Exploratory drilling increased in most major producing countries but was accompanied by a decline in development drilling. Most of the increase could be attributed to private companies fulfilling obligations under risk contracts; however, state oil companies in Bolivia, Chile, and Colombia showed significant increased activity, with only Mexico showing a decrease. Colombia again had a dramatic increase in production (29% from 1986). Noteworthy discoveries were made in Bolivia (Villamontes-1); Brazil, in the Solimoes basin (1-RUC-1-AM); Chile (Rio Honda-1); Colombia, in the Llanos basin (Austral-1, La Reforma-1, Libertad Norte-1, Cravo Este-1, and Cano Yarumal-1), in the Upper Magdalena basin (Toldado-1 and Los Mangos-1); Ecuador (Frontera-1, a joint-exploration venture with Colombia); Mexico, in the Chiapas-Tabasco region (Guacho-1 and Iridi-1), in the Frontera Norte area (Huatempo-1); Peru, in the Madre de Dios basin (Armihuari-4X); Trinidad (West East Queen's Beach-1); and Venezuela (Musipan-1X). Brazil's upper Amazon (Solimoes basin) discovery, Colombia's Upper Magdalena basin discoveries Toldado-1 and Los Mangos-1, Mexico's Chiapas-Tabasco discoveries, Peru's confirmation of the giant Cashiriari discovery of 1986, and Venezuela's success in Monagas state were the highlights of 1987. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Universities in the Business of Repression: The Academic-Military-Industrial Complex and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jonathan

    This book presents the thesis that U.S. universities have become part of an academic-military-industrial complex that support repression and murder in Central America. Part 1 explains how U.S. policies have been based on murder in Central America and examines the responsibility of transnational corporations and U.S. war planners in this…

  8. 7 CFR 319.56-25 - Papayas from Central America and Brazil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Papayas from Central America and Brazil. 319.56-25... § 319.56-25 Papayas from Central America and Brazil. The Solo type of papaya may be imported into the... section and all other applicable provisions of this subpart. (a) The papayas were grown and packed...

  9. Evaluating regional differences in macroinvertebrate communities from forested depressional wetlands across eastern and central North America

    Treesearch

    Darold P. Batzer; Susan E. Dietz-Brantley; Barbara E. Taylor; Adrienne E. DeBiase

    2005-01-01

    Forested depressional wetlands are an important seasonal wetland type across eastern and central North America. Macroinvertebrates are crucial ecosystem components of most forested depressional wetlands, but community compositions can vary widely across the region. We evaluated variation in macroinvertebrate faunas across eastern and central North America using 5...

  10. Universities in the Business of Repression: The Academic-Military-Industrial Complex and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jonathan

    This book presents the thesis that U.S. universities have become part of an academic-military-industrial complex that support repression and murder in Central America. Part 1 explains how U.S. policies have been based on murder in Central America and examines the responsibility of transnational corporations and U.S. war planners in this…

  11. Toward a Comprehensive Model of Volcanism in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    In 1987, MJ Carr and WI Rose published CENTAM, a database primarily of major element analyses, but now much expanded and called CAGeochem. Our motivation included a desire to bypass editors who wanted to publish only representative analyses, and not the extensive data sets starting to be produced by semi- automated instruments. We felt a commitment to publish data that had been obtained with public funds (primarily NSF). We also provided the data in digital format, which is now trivial but was not at the time. We did not predict that the database itself would help produce the explosion of new research into the geochemistry, geophysics and tectonics of Central America. Because CENTAM provided a comprehensive geochemical outline of an entire convergent margin, Central America was recognized for several large regional variations in geochemistry that helped make it a choice of the NSF Margins Subduction Factory program. Margins and the cooperating German research programs centered at GEOMAR have revolutionized our understanding of Central America. Data and samples from CAGeochem have assisted research efforts at several universities including, Columbia, Washington Univ., Rice, New Mexico, Caltec, Boston College, GEOMAR. The primary result of the regional database was the discovery of large geographic variations in elemental and isotopic ratios (e.g. Ba/La, 10B/9Be, U/Th, 87Sr/86Sr) that trace the cycling of elements from the subducted plate. Tracers of subducted material reach maxima in Nicaragua in the center of the margin and decrease outward toward Costa Rica and Guatemala as well as decreasing across the margin. Estimates of the flux of elements, e.g. Ba and U, indicate a constant volcanic output along the margin. The regional variation occurs in La, Th etc, the denominators of the ratios, all of which change with degree of melting. There is a margin-wide correlation between element and isotope ratios that trace subduction and degree of melting. The tectonic factor

  12. Trends in Land Surface Phenologies Across Central Asia and the Central Eurasian Grain Belt as Viewed From MODIS Collection 5 NBAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. R.; Henebry, G. M.; Kovalskyy, V.; de Beurs, K. M.

    2008-12-01

    The disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991 precipitated a multitude of institutional changes, including the disestablishment of a centrally-planned agricultural sector. Our previous work with AVHRR data has shown that among the environmental consequences were significant shifts in land surface phenologies (LSPs) across Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan. Here we explored trends in LSPs across Central Asia and the central Eurasian Grain Belt that stretches westward across northern Kazakhstan and southern Russia into eastern Ukraine. We used the recently released of MODIS Collection 5 Nadir BRDF Adjusted Reflectance (NBAR) product and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) Full Data Reanalysis v4, a monthly 0.5 degree product. We characterized trends from 2000-2007 using the nonparametric seasonal Mann- Kendall trend test on a per-pixel basis, thereby generating surfaces of per-pixel trend estimates with corresponding estimates of model uncertainty at each pixel. In the Pontic Steppe ecoregion of northwestern Kazakhstan, a region characterized by temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands, we found spatially coherent, highly significant (p<0.01) negative trends in MODIS NDVI. This appears to be driven by regional drought, and visual inspection of Landsat TM imagery from the study area indicates drying of relatively abundant depressional wetlands accompanied by a number of large fires over the period of interest. In the neighboring Kazakh Steppe ecoregion, a landscape dominated by small-grain production, we find similar, but noisier negative trends (typically p<0.05), likely reflecting a combination of drought and highly heterogeneous land use practices. By contrast, in the Central Asian Southern Desert ecoregion of Uzbekistan, we find highly significant (p<0.01) positive trends in NDVI from 2000-2007. These xeric shrublands are nearly entirely dependent on winter and spring precipitation for water inputs. GPCC trends indicate in some regions

  13. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Clara, Bianchi

    2017-04-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 70 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) belonging to Central and South America, which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, and diverse relieves, therefore the patterns of IWV diurnal variations are very different for each station. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). Firstly, our work study the main characteristics of the IWV diurnal cycle (and for surface temperature, T) obtained for all stations together, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). First and second PCA modes highlight the global main behaviors of IWV variability for all stations. The first mode on IWV represent the 70% of the variability and could be related to the surface evapotranspiration, while the second mode (27 % of the variability) is practically in counter phase to T variability (its first mode represent the 97% of the variability), therefore this mode could be related to breeze regime. Then, every station is separately analyzed and seasonal and local variations (relative to the relives) are detected, these results spotlight, among other characteristics, the sea and mountain breeze regime. This presentation shows the first analysis of IWV diurnal cycle performed over Central and South America and another original characteristic is PCA technique employed to infer the results. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl

  14. Cretaceous rift related magmatism in central-western South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viramonte, J. G.; Kay, S. M.; Becchio, R.; Escayola, M.; Novitski, I.

    1999-03-01

    The Cretaceous-Paleocene Andean basin system of central-western South America, comprises northwestern Argentina and southwestern Bolivia. It is situated between 62°-68°W and 18°-27°S, but extends westward to northern Chile and northward to Bolivia and Peru. These basins have been interpreted as an aborted foreland rift. In a general sense, it may be possible to relate this rift to the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, however it was directly associated, in a backarc position, with the subduction of the Nazca Plate below the South American Plate. Three main magmatic episodes were recognized: the pre-rift stage (130-120 Ma) which is characterized by an early phase of anorogenic plutonism, with subalkaline and alkaline granitic intrusives; the syn-rift volcanic episode which started with a mainly alkaline volcanic activity (110-100) in which alkaline rocks prevail; a second more voluminous volcanic episode (80-75 Ma) which is characterized by an alkaline suite represented by basanites and tephriphonolites; and the last volcanic episode (65-60 Ma) which consists of lamproitic sills and basic K rich lava flows. Petrography, chemistry and chronology of the Cretaceous plutonic bodies indicate anorogenic pre-rift related A-type granite complexes closely related to the further evolution of the Cretaceous rift basin. The petrology and geochemistry of the Cretaceous volcanic rocks show strong alkaline affinities and suggest a similar rift-related origin. The geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the alkaline basalts suggest that they originated through low degrees of partial melting of a depleted mantle subcontinental lithosphere which was previously enriched by processes such as the introduction of veins rich in amphibole, high Ti phlogopite, and apatite. Cretaceous plutonic and volcanic rocks from central-southwestern South America are related to an intracontinental rift environment and although their ages are correlative with those of the Paraná volcanic

  15. Descriptive epidemiology of brain and central nervous system cancers in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, Marion; Sierra, Mónica S; Izarzugaza, M Isabel; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    Although malignant tumors of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) represent less than 3% of new cancer cases estimated worldwide, they cause significant morbidity and in the case of gliomas, the most common histological type, have a poor prognosis. We describe patterns and trends in brain and CNS incidence and mortality in Central and South America. We obtained regional- and national-level incidence data from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries and cancer deaths from the WHO mortality database for 18 countries. We estimated world population age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and mortality rates (ASMRs) per 100,000 person-years, and present incidence by histological subtypes. In general, incidence rates were higher in males than in females. The highest incidence ASRs were observed for Cuba (5.1 males, 3.6 females) in Central America, and for Brazil (6.4 males, 4.8 females) and Uruguay (6.2 and 4.0) in South America. Mortality rates closely followed the pattern of incidence rates. Argentina, Brazil and Chile showed increasing mortality trends, although these were not statistically significant. Glioma and unspecified tumors were the most common histological types, accounting for 55.4% and 32.8%, respectively. The proportion of microscopically verified diagnoses was 47-70% in most countries. Although incidence and mortality rates in general were low, some countries displayed high- to intermediate-level incidence rates; under-reporting and under-ascertainment of cases could contribute to the geographic variations observed. There is a need to improve both the ascertainment of cases and the accuracy of histological diagnosis. Monitoring of brain and CNS cancers along with etiological research remain priorities. Copyright © 2016 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Proposal for a comprehensive vertical datum for North America, Central America and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. A.; Roman, D. R.; Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.; Youngman, M.

    2013-05-01

    As part of its Ten Year Strategic Plan (2013-2023), the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) of the USA is planning to replace the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) by the year 2022. The replacement vertical datum will be defined through a gravimetric geoid model and accessed via GNSS technology, in direct contrast to the definition and access of NAVD 88, which is through passive, generally unmonitored benchmarks connected through geodetic leveling. A USA-Canada-Mexico joint effort is underway to compute a single geoid model by 2022 for the entire region, which can be adopted as the vertical datum reference surface by all countries within the area. The proposed area ranges from the North Pole to the Equator and from the Aleutian Islands (in the west) to the islands of Newfoundland (in the east). As such, the entirety of the Caribbean Sea, all of Central America, all of Hawaii, plus parts of Greenland and South America will be covered. This will allow one singular, unified vertical datum to be accessible to every country in the region, alleviating the need for island-by-island vertical datums as is currently the case. A major component of the geoid modeling effort is NGS's GRAV-D project (Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum). That project has a two-fold approach: First, to collect a static, accurate "snapshot" of the entire gravity field. This is primarily being done through airborne gravity collection over the USA and its territories, as well as through improvements in and additions to terrestrial data holdings. A second, long-term effort of GRAV D is to monitor the geoid over time. This talk will discuss the prospects of improving the static gravity field holdings outside of the USA and its territories, including a discussion on existing holdings, data gaps and NGS's desire for potential collaborations with interested countries in the region both before and after the 2022 datum change.

  17. Soil conservation in Central America and Panama: current problems.

    PubMed

    Popenoe, H

    1976-06-01

    Soil conservation measures in Central America go back to the Maya civilization, in which terracing was employed. After the Spanish conquest, plowing, livestock raising, and the succession of social and political changes all contributed to accelerate erosion. Through the past few decades, awareness of the need for soil conservation has again increased; El Salvador and Costa Rica began efforts in that direction in 1943. For sometime, the use of machinery and chemical fertilizers has masked the loss of topsoil, but under recent increases in population pressures, soil conservation measures are gaining in importance. Important agents of erosion in the tropics are heavy seasonal rains at high elevations, alternating with long dry seasons; wind erosion; and landslides after saturation of the soil during prolonged rains. Modern machinery often hastens soil removal, as do also overgrazing, deforestation and vertical crop rows. Under the present energy crisis, human labor is becoming again a significant element in crop production, and soil conservation becomes thereby more feasible and more important.

  18. Pre-Cenozoic tectonic framework of Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Central America (C.A.) lies along the junctions of five crustal plates at the western edge of the Caribbean. Major fault zones divide it into at least three blocks, each of which has experienced a distinct tectonic history. Although the region has been dominated by plate interactions during the Cenozoic, paleogeographic and palinspastic relations among the various blocks is increasingly obscure and conjectural back through the Phanerozoic. Pre-Mesozoic rocks are unknown in southern C.A., but are widespread as metamorphic basement complexes in northern C.A. The Maya basement consists of Precambrian igneous massifs and Lower Paleozoic metasedimentary sequences cut by mid-Paleozoic plutons, unconformably overlain locally by Upper Paleozoic terrestrial-to-marine strata. The Chorotega-Choco basement is a Late Mesozoic ophiolite sequence accreted with Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary deep marine volcanic and sedimentary strata into a forearc subduction complex along the Pacific margin. By contrast, Mesozoic successions on the Maya and Chortis blocks are cratonic and grossly similar, consisting of basal transgressive clastics, one or more thick Lower Cretaceous rudistid limestone units, and fluvial-deltaic terrigenous redbed sequences; sections vary in detail locally, and evaporites are common on the Maya block. The Late Cretaceous along the Maya-Chortis boundary was characterized by plate collision, ophiolite obduction, and sinistral block translation.

  19. Subgingival microbiota of indigenous Indians of Central America.

    PubMed

    Dowsett, S A; Kowolik, M J; Archila, L A; Eckert, G J; LeBlanc, D J

    2002-02-01

    To define the subgingival microbial profiles of adult subjects from a previously identified rural community of indigenous Indians in Guatemala, Central America. A full-mouth periodontal examination was performed in 114 adult subjects from 45 families. Plaque samples were collected from both deep and shallow periodontal pockets and checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization was employed to identify 17 species previously associated with periodontitis or health. Plaque deposits and gingivitis were universal and widespread, and periodontal pocketing > or =5 mm was highly prevalent (84% of subjects). Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 2 and Fusobacterium nucleatum were significantly more prevalent in shallow sites. At the subject level, Actinomyces naeslundii and Peptostreptococcus micros were significantly more prevalent in periodontally-healthy subjects. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans was not detected in any sample. There was no association between periodontal disease status and presence of suspected periodontal pathogens. These latter results conflict somewhat with those from treated populations. However, in this population where extensive plaque deposits and gingivitis are universal, the presence of putative pathogens may be more reflective of the local environment.

  20. Sustainability of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in Central America.

    PubMed

    Sabogal, Raquel I; Medlin, Elizabeth; Aquino, Gonzalo; Gelting, Richard J

    The American Red Cross and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collaborated on a sustainability evaluation of post-hurricane water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions in Central America. In 2006 and 2009, we revisited six study areas in rural El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua to assess sustainability of WASH interventions finalized in 2002, after 1998's Hurricane Mitch. We used surveys to collect data, calculate indicators and identify factors that influence sustainability. Regional sustainability indicator results showed there was a statistically significant decline in access to water. The presence of sanitation facilities had not changed since the beginning of the project; however, maintenance and use of latrines declined but continued to meet the goal of 75% use after 7 years. The hygiene indicator, hand washing, initially declined and then increased. Declines in water access were due to operational problems related to storm events and population changes. Sanitation facilities were still present and sometimes used even though they reached or surpassed their original design life. Changes in hygiene practices appeared related to ongoing hygiene promotion from outside organizations. These results provide useful input for making WASH programs more sustainable and informing future, more in-depth research into factors influencing sustainability.

  1. Sustainability of water, sanitation and hygiene interventions in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Medlin, Elizabeth; Aquino, Gonzalo; Gelting, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The American Red Cross and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collaborated on a sustainability evaluation of post-hurricane water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions in Central America. In 2006 and 2009, we revisited six study areas in rural El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua to assess sustainability of WASH interventions finalized in 2002, after 1998’s Hurricane Mitch. We used surveys to collect data, calculate indicators and identify factors that influence sustainability. Regional sustainability indicator results showed there was a statistically significant decline in access to water. The presence of sanitation facilities had not changed since the beginning of the project; however, maintenance and use of latrines declined but continued to meet the goal of 75% use after 7 years. The hygiene indicator, hand washing, initially declined and then increased. Declines in water access were due to operational problems related to storm events and population changes. Sanitation facilities were still present and sometimes used even though they reached or surpassed their original design life. Changes in hygiene practices appeared related to ongoing hygiene promotion from outside organizations. These results provide useful input for making WASH programs more sustainable and informing future, more in-depth research into factors influencing sustainability. PMID:26413262

  2. Federacion de Universidades Privadas de America Central y Panama: Boletin Estadistico (Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama: Statistical Bulletin).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serrano, Jorge A.

    This statistical bulletin provides details on the universities belonging to the Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama (FUPAC): Central American University, Rafael Landivar University, Saint John's College, University of Santa Maria La Antigua, Jose Simeon Canas University, Doctor Mariano Galvez University, and the…

  3. A regional dynamic vegetation-climate model for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, R. S.; Cowling, S. A.; Smith, B.

    2009-12-01

    Global vegetation models simulate the distribution of vegetation as a function of climate. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are also able to simulate the vegetation shifts in response to climate change, which makes them particularly useful for addressing questions about past and future climate scenarios. However, DGVMs have been criticized for using generic plant functional types (PFTs) and running the models at a coarse grid cell resolution. Regional dynamic vegetation models are able to simulate important landscape variation, since they use a finer resolution and specific PFTs for their region. Regional studies have typically focused on boreal or temperate ecosystems in North America and Europe. We will be presenting the results of applying a dynamic regional vegetation-climate model (LPJ-GUESS) for Central America. Initially, the model was run with the described global PFTs. However, several biomes were very poorly represented. Two PFTs were added: a Tropical Needleleaf Evergreen Tree to improve the simulation of the Mixed Pine-Oak biome, and a Desert Shrub to capture the Xeric Shrublands. The overall distribution of biomes was visually similar, however the Kappa statistic indicated a poor agreement with the potential biome map (overall Kappa = 0.301). The Kappa statistic did improve as we aggregated cell sizes and simplified the biomes (overall Kappa = 0.728). Compared to remote sensing data, the model showed a strong correlation with total LAI (r = 0.75). The poor Kappa statistic is likely due to a combination of factors. The way in which biomes are defined by the author can have a large influence on the level of agreement between simulated and potential vegetation. The Kappa statistic is also limited to comparing individual grid cells and thus, cannot detect overall patterns. Examining those areas which are poorly represented will help to identify future work and improve the representation of vegetation in these ecological models. In particular, the

  4. An 85-ka Paleoclimate Record From Lowland Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, J.; Hodell, D. A.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Brenner, M.; Curtis, J. H.; Gilli, A.; Grzesik, D. A.; Guilderson, T. J.; Müller, A. D.; Bush, M. B.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2008-05-01

    Lake sediment cores recovered at seven sites in Lake Peten Itza, northern Guatemala, contain a record of climate change from lowland Central America extending back to ~200 ka. Drill cores at site PI-6 contain a high- resolution record (1 m/ka) for the last ~85 ka. Peten climate generally varied between wetter conditions during interstadials and a drier state during stadials of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3. The most arid periods coincided with Heinrich Events in the North Atlantic and reductions in the strength of meridional overturning circulation. The pattern of clay-gypsum (wet-dry) oscillations during MIS 3 closely resembles the temperature record from Greenland ice cores and North Atlantic marine sediment cores and precipitation proxies from the Cariaco Basin. Previous studies suggested that cool, dry conditions prevailed in the region during the last glacial maximum (LGM) chronozone, ~23 to 18 ka BP. Sedimentologic and palynologic data support a moist climate in the Peten lowlands during this period whenvegetation consisted of a temperate pine-oak forest. This finding contradicts the previous inferences. At the end of the LGM, Peten climate switched abruptly from moist to arid conditions during the so-called "Mystery Period" from 18 to 14.9 ka. Moister conditions prevailed during the warmer Bolling-Allerod (14.7 to 12.8 ka), with the exception of a drier climate, with greater δ18O values between ca. 14.5 and 13.5 ka BP. This drier period in Central America coincided with Meltwater Pulse 1A (14.1- 13.5 ka) (Fairbanks et al., 2005) when a substantial volume of glacial meltwater was introduced to the Gulf of Mexico (e.g. Flower et al., 2004). The greatest δ18O values in Peten Itza occurred at 13.7 ka coinciding with the greatest rate of sea level rise (4.3 cm yr-1) at 13.9 ka. In contrast, sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions (Lea et al., 2003), color reflectance, and elemental (Fe, Ti) data (Peterson et al., 2000) from Cariaco Basin cores, north of

  5. Some Recent USF Studies at Volcanoes in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have been working in Central America for several decades. Efforts have focused on Physical Volcanology in Nicaragua, GPS in Costa Rica, and assessment of Geothermal projects in El Salvador, amongst others. Two years ago a Seismology Lab was established at USF. Personnel now include three Professors, a Post-Doc, and 4 graduate students. Seismic and GPS networks were installed at Telica Volcano, Nicaragua, in 2010 by Roman, LaFemina and colleagues. Data are recorded on site and recovered several times per year at this persistently restless volcano, which has rates of 5 to 1400 low frequency seismic events per day (Rodgers et al., submitted). Proposals have been submitted to install instruments on other Nicaraguan volcanoes, including seismometers, GPS, infrasound, and lightning sensors. This suite of instruments has proven to be very effective to study a range of volcanic processes. The proposals have not been successful to date (some are pending), and alternative funding sources are being explored. One interesting scientific issue is the presence of strong seasonal effects, specifically a pronounced rainy season and dry season and possible interaction between shallow volcanic processes and surface waters. We are also pursuing a variety of studies that are complementary to the instrumental efforts. One such study is examining volcanic earthquake swarms, with the focus to date on identifying diagnostics. One clear pattern is that peak rates often occur early in swarms, whereas the largest M event occurs late. Additional evidence suggests that the seismic source size grows systematically, especially for events with similar waveforms (families). Recognition of such patterns, linked to processes, may help to improve monitoring and better take advantage of instrumental data to reduce vulnerability from eruptions.

  6. Mapping Mangrove Density from Rapideye Data in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Nguyen-Thanh; Chen, Chi-Farn; Chen, Cheng-Ru

    2017-06-01

    Mangrove forests provide a wide range of socioeconomic and ecological services for coastal communities. Extensive aquaculture development of mangrove waters in many developing countries has constantly ignored services of mangrove ecosystems, leading to unintended environmental consequences. Monitoring the current status and distribution of mangrove forests is deemed important for evaluating forest management strategies. This study aims to delineate the density distribution of mangrove forests in the Gulf of Fonseca, Central America with Rapideye data using the support vector machines (SVM). The data collected in 2012 for density classification of mangrove forests were processed based on four different band combination schemes: scheme-1 (bands 1-3, 5 excluding the red-edge band 4), scheme-2 (bands 1-5), scheme-3 (bands 1-3, 5 incorporating with the normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI), and scheme-4 (bands 1-3, 5 incorporating with the normalized difference red-edge index, NDRI). We also hypothesized if the obvious contribution of Rapideye red-edge band could improve the classification results. Three main steps of data processing were employed: (1) data pre-processing, (2) image classification, and (3) accuracy assessment to evaluate the contribution of red-edge band in terms of the accuracy of classification results across these four schemes. The classification maps compared with the ground reference data indicated the slightly higher accuracy level observed for schemes 2 and 4. The overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients were 97% and 0.95 for scheme-2 and 96.9% and 0.95 for scheme-4, respectively.

  7. Diabetes in South and Central America: an update.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Pablo; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Aguirre, Loreto; Franco, Laercio; Gagliardino, Juan Jose; de Lapertosa, Sylvia Gorban; Seclen, Segundo; Vinocour, Mary

    2014-02-01

    The estimated population of the South and Central America (SACA) Region is 467.6 million and 64% is in the age range of 20-79 years but the population pyramid and age distribution are changing. The average prevalence of diabetes in the Region is 8.0% and is expected to reach 9.8% by the year 2035. Prevalence is much lower in rural settings than in urban and the differences attributed to lifestyle changes may be a target for intervention. The indigenous population is a particularly vulnerable group needing special attention. On average, 24% of the adult cases with diabetes are undiagnosed but in some countries this is still as high as 50%. Health expenditure due to diabetes in the Region is around 9% of the global total. Inadequate glycemic control, defined as HbA1c >7%, is a strong predictor of chronic complications which increase resource use in the Region and less than half of the patients enrolled in diabetes care programmes are at target. Fifty percent or more of the adult population is overweight/obese and around one third of the adult population has metabolic syndrome using regional cutoffs for waist circumference. The number of people with IGT is almost equal to those with diabetes presenting an additional challenge for prevention. Children with type 1 diabetes represent only 0.2% of the total population with diabetes but the incidence may be increasing. In many places they have limited access to insulin, and even when available, it is not used appropriately. The available epidemiological data provide the background to act in developing national diabetes programmes which integrate diabetes care with cardiovascular prevention and promote diabetes prevention as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Forearc sedimentation in Terraba Trough, Costa Rica, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, P.B.; Lowe, D.R.

    1987-05-01

    Sedimentary rocks of Terraba Trough, Costa Rica, were deposited in a forearc basin developed at an ocean-ocean convergent boundary. The basin developed in the middle to late Eocene when the Farallon plate began its subduction beneath the Caribbean plate. Shallow-water carbonates of the Brito Formation were deposited on shoals of basement blocks. These were surrounded by deeper marine areas in which volcaniclastics and carbonate debris accumulated. The Brito Formation consists of algal-foraminiferal packstone to grainstone, rudstone, and rare wackestone formed in fore-slope, carbonate buildup, and open platform environments in a warm, tropical sea. The Eocene Brito Formation is overlain by rocks of the upper Oligocene Rio Claro Member of the Terraba Formation. It is composed of rhodolite and bioclastic grainstone deposited in shallow water. A combination of little subsidence, mild volcanism, and possible erosion at about 30 Ma during a global drop of sea level may be responsible for the absence of lower Oligocene rocks in the study area. After the deposition of the Rio Claro Member, the area subsided rapidly to become a trough possibly deeper than 2000 m. Sedimentation took place in deep water from sediment gravity flows. In the early to early middle Miocene, coarser sediments and thicker sand units containing coal fragments became more abundant, suggesting that the basin was gradually filled. This study indicates that the timing and degree of subsidence of the fore-arc basin and the vertical variation in lithology are closely related to the variation in convergence rate between lithospheric plates in this part of Central America and the eastern Pacific.

  9. Paleogeographic and Tectonic Implications of Paleomagnetic Data From Mexico, Central America, Northern South America and Caribbean Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Goguitchaishvili, A.; Soler-Arechalde, A.; Benammi, M.

    2006-05-01

    Results from recent paleomagnetic studies in Mexico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica are summarized and discussed in terms of their tectonic and paleogeographic implications. Rock units studied range in age from Jurassic to Neogene. Additionally, we present an updated paleomagnetic database for widely distributed localities from Mexico, Central America, northern South America and the Caribbean. Paleomagnetic constraints are analyzed within a paleogeographic and tectonic framework, which departs from models for continental plate collision of North and South America, including intervening terranes, and subsequent evolution of the Atlantic bordering continental land masses. Most paleoreconstructions imply an allochthonous nature for most of Mexico, Central America and Caribbean. Mesozoic and early Cenozoic evolution of the region has been dominated by Pangea assembly and subsequent drift apart of major continental plates of North and South America following break up of the Pangea supercontinent. Separation of North and South America and opening of the central North Atlantic Ocean permitted development of the Gulf of Mexico and eastward motion of the proto Caribbean plate. Terrane accretion, block rotation and lateral movements are recorded for terranes in Mexico, associated with terrane amalgamation, Gulf of Mexico opening, plate tectonic re-organizations, margin truncation and compression/extensional intra-plate and margin deformation. Paleomagnetic data from the Antilles arc document the occurrence of vertical-axis block rotations, associated with arc development and pull-apart basins. Data from volcanic units in El Salvador do not support occurrence of vertical-axis rotations during the Neogene, as had been proposed for the Central American arc. Paleomagnetic studies provide quantitative information on paleolatitude, latitudinal translations and relative rotations of large and small tectonic blocks, assisting in distinguishing and

  10. Illustrated Key to Species of Genus Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Occurring in Mexico and Central America.

    PubMed

    Armendáriz-Toledano, Francisco; Zúñiga, Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    We provide an illustrated key of species of Dendroctonus Erichson from Mexico and Central America based on characters of the male genitalia and external morphology. The key incorporates newly identified diagnostic characters for this genus that enhance discrimination of particularly difficult sibling species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  11. An Overview of School Dropout in Central America: Unresolved Issues and New Challenges for Education Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Melissa A.; Székely, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    School dropout is a growing concern in Central America, and in Latin America as a whole, because of its consequences for economic productivity, the inclusiveness of growth, social cohesion, and increasing youth risks. This paper utilizes more than two decades of household survey data to construct a systematic overview of school dropout at the…

  12. 76 FR 75893 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ...- Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). OMB Number: 1651-0125. Form Number: None. Abstract... States Free Trade Agreement with Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras...

  13. Cloud and Sun-Glint Statistics Derived from GOES and MODIS Observations Over the Intra-Americas Sea for GEO-CAPE Mission Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin; Barnes, Brian B.; Mannino, Antonio; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Strabala, Kathleen; Iraci, Laura T.

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of cloud cover, frequency, and duration is not only important to study cloud dynamics, but also critical in determining when and where to take ocean measurements from geostationary orbits such as the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission due to the challenges in achieving complete hemispheric coverage of coastal oceans, estuaries, and inland waters at hourly frequency. Using GOES hourly measurements at 4 km nadir resolution between 2006 and 2011, the number of cloud-free hourly observations per day (N(sub cf)) for solar zenith angle Theta(sub 0) less than 80 degrees was estimated for each 0.1 degree location of the Intra-Americas Sea. The number of Sun-glint-affected hourly observations per day [Ns(sub sg)] was also calculated based on the planned GEO-CAPE observation geometry and realistic wind speed. High-latitude and equatorial oceans showed the lowest N(sub cf) (less than 2.4) in all climatological months, and highest N(sub cf) was observed in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and Caribbean (greater than 4.5). Different regions showed differences in seasonality of cloud-free conditions and also showed differences in the hour of a day at which the satellite observations would have the maximal cloud-free and glint-free probability (Temperature maximum). Cloud cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1 km measurements are greater than 10 degrees higher than those from the MODIS 250 m measurements, supporting ocean color missions at subkilometer resolutions to enhance both spatial coverage and temporal frequency. These findings provide valuable information for GEO-CAPE mission planning to maximize its science value through minimizing the impacts of clouds and Sun glint.

  14. Cloud and Sun-glint statistics derived from GOES and MODIS observations over the Intra-Americas Sea for GEO-CAPE mission planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lian; Hu, Chuanmin; Barnes, Brian B.; Mannino, Antonio; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Strabala, Kathleen; Iraci, Laura T.

    2017-02-01

    Knowledge of cloud cover, frequency, and duration is not only important to study cloud dynamics, but also critical in determining when and where to take ocean measurements from geostationary orbits such as the Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission due to the challenges in achieving complete hemispheric coverage of coastal oceans, estuaries, and inland waters at hourly frequency. Using GOES hourly measurements at 4 km nadir resolution between 2006 and 2011, the number of cloud-free hourly observations per day (Ncf) for solar zenith angle θo < 80° was estimated for each 0.1° location of the Intra-Americas Sea. The number of Sun-glint-affected hourly observations per day (Nsg) was also calculated based on the planned GEO-CAPE observation geometry and realistic wind speed. High-latitude and equatorial oceans showed the lowest Ncf (<2.4) in all climatological months, and highest Ncf was observed in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) and Caribbean (>4.5). Different regions showed differences in seasonality of cloud-free conditions and also showed differences in the hour of a day at which the satellite observations would have the maximal cloud-free and glint-free probability (Tmax). Cloud cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 1 km measurements are >10% higher than those from the MODIS 250 m measurements, supporting ocean color missions at subkilometer resolutions to enhance both spatial coverage and temporal frequency. These findings provide valuable information for GEO-CAPE mission planning to maximize its science value through minimizing the impacts of clouds and Sun glint.

  15. USAID Expands eMODIS Coverage for Famine Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkerson, C.; Meyer, D. J.; Evenson, K.; Merritt, M.

    2011-12-01

    Food security in countries at risk is monitored by U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through its Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) using many methods including Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data processed by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) into eMODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products. Near-real time production is used comparatively with trends derived from the eMODIS archive to operationally monitor vegetation anomalies indicating threatened cropland and rangeland conditions. eMODIS production over Central America and the Caribbean (CAMCAR) began in 2009, and processes 10-day NDVI composites every 5 days from surface reflectance inputs produced using predicted spacecraft and climatology information at Land and Atmosphere Near real time Capability for Earth Observing Systems (EOS) (LANCE). These expedited eMODIS composites are backed by a parallel archive of precision-based NDVI calculated from surface reflectance data ordered through Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System (LAADS). Success in the CAMCAR region led to the recent expansion of eMODIS production to include Africa in 2010, and Central Asia in 2011. Near-real time 250-meter products are available for each region on the last day of an acquisition interval (generally before midnight) from an anonymous file transfer protocol (FTP) distribution site (ftp://emodisftp.cr.usgs.gov/eMODIS). The FTP site concurrently hosts the regional historical collections (2000 to present) which are also searchable using the USGS Earth Explorer (http://edcsns17.cr.usgs.gov/NewEarthExplorer). As eMODIS coverage continues to grow, these geographically gridded, georeferenced tagged image file format (GeoTIFF) NDVI composites increase their utility as effective tools for operational monitoring of near-real time vegetation data against historical trends.

  16. Mobility and HIV in Central America and Mexico: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Perez-Rosales, Maria D; Sued, Omar

    2012-02-01

    Mobility is a key determinant of HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) transmission dynamics in Asia and Africa. Scant data exist regarding its dynamic impacts on HIV/STI risk in Central America and Mexico. Our objective was to critically review the epidemiology and social and structural context of HIV/STI risk among mobile populations in Central America and Mexico. Eligible articles were published in English or Spanish between January 1, 2000 and August 31, 2010; conducted in Central America or Mexico; specified the mobile population included; and described primary research. 2045 records were screened, 275 articles reviewed, and 22 studies included. Mobility is associated with increased HIV risk behaviors, though it also may increase preventive behaviors. Among mobile groups in Central America and Mexico, social isolation, the socio-economic impacts of displacement, gender inequalities, and stigma/discrimination shape HIV risk. Epidemiologic research and multi-level interventions that target and engage vulnerable groups in transit stations are recommended.

  17. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: BP America Production Company - Salvador I/II Central Delivery Point

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the final synthetic minor NSR permit for the BP America Production Company, Salvador I/II Central Delivery Point, located on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in La Plata County, CO.

  18. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: BP America Production Company - Treating Site #8 Central Delivery Point

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the response to public comments and the final synthetic minor NSR permit for the BP America Production Company, Treating Site #8 Central Delivery Point, located on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in La Plata County, CO.

  19. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: BP America Production Company - Wolf Point Central Delivery Point

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the response to public comments and the final synthetic minor NSR permit for the BP America Production Company, Wolf Point Central Delivery Point, located on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in La Plata County, CO.

  20. Characterization of the Mid Summer Drought in the Central Valley of Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, E.

    2013-05-01

    The IAS region is characterized by climate features of unique nature, one of them is the Mid-Summer Drought (MSD) or "veranillo", an atmospheric feature rarely observed in other tropical regions. On the Pacific slope of Central America, the precipitation annual cycle is characterized by two rainfall maxima in June and September-October, an extended dry season from November to May, and a secondary precipitation minima during July-August (MSD). Three daily gauge stations records, e.g. La Argentina, Fabio Baudrit and Juan Santamaria, located in the Central Valley of Costa Rica were studied to characterize the MSD from 1937 to 2010. Among the aspects considered are the MSD duration, intensity, timing and seasonal predictability. The modulation of these aspects by climate variability sources as Equatorial Eastern Pacific and Tropical North Atlantic was lately explored, including their interannual and decadal variability. The MSD signal strongly impact social and economic life in the region like energy and the agriculture sector. Additionally, the Central Valley of Costa Rica hosts most of the Costa Rican population with the higher level of exposure and vulnerability to hydro-meteorological hazards.

  1. Developing a 30-m grassland productivity estimation map for central Nebraska using 250-m MODIS and 30-m Landsat-8 observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    Accurately estimating aboveground vegetation biomass productivity is essential for local ecosystem assessment and best land management practice. Satellite-derived growing season time-integrated Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) has been used as a proxy for vegetation biomass productivity. A 250-m grassland biomass productivity map for the Greater Platte River Basin had been developed based on the relationship between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) GSN and Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) annual grassland productivity. However, the 250-m MODIS grassland biomass productivity map does not capture detailed ecological features (or patterns) and may result in only generalized estimation of the regional total productivity. Developing a high or moderate spatial resolution (e.g., 30-m) productivity map to better understand the regional detailed vegetation condition and ecosystem services is preferred. The 30-m Landsat data provide spatial detail for characterizing human-scale processes and have been successfully used for land cover and land change studies. The main goal of this study is to develop a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map for central Nebraska, leveraging 250-m MODIS GSN and 30-m Landsat data. A rule-based piecewise regression GSN model based on MODIS and Landsat (r = 0.91) was developed, and a 30-m MODIS equivalent GSN map was generated. Finally, a 30-m grassland biomass productivity estimation map, which provides spatially detailed ecological features and conditions for central Nebraska, was produced. The resulting 30-m grassland productivity map was generally supported by the SSURGO biomass production map and will be useful for regional ecosystem study and local land management practices.

  2. On the classification and sub-classification of aerosol key types over south central peninsular India: MODIS-OMI algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, V

    2014-01-15

    Long-term (8 years), simultaneous data on aerosol optical properties from MODIS and OMI satellite sensors are analyzed to study their temporal characteristics and to infer on the major aerosol types present over the study location, Bangalore situated in south central peninsular India. Investigations are carried out on Aerosol Optical Depths (AODs), Angstrom exponent (α) and Aerosol Index (AI) for the purpose. Aerosol parameters exhibited significant seasonal variations: AODs peaking during monsoon, α during post-monsoon and AI during summer. Seasonal air mass back trajectories are computed to infer on the transport component over the study region. By assigning proper thresholds (depending on the nature of the location and transport pathways) on AOD and α values, aerosols are discriminated into their major types viz., marine influenced, desert dust, urban/industrialized and mixed types. Further sub-categorization of the aerosols has been done on an annual scale taking into account of their absorptance information in terms of the OMI-AI values. Mixed type aerosols contributed the most during all the seasons. Next to mixed type aerosols, marine influenced aerosols dominated during winter, desert dust during monsoon and summer, urban/industrialized aerosols during post-monsoon. Considering the urban nature of the study location, urban/industrialized/carbonaceous type aerosols have been significantly underestimated in these methodologies. Finally, discussion has been made on the consistency of the results obtained from the methodologies (i) based on AODs and α; (ii) based on AODs, α and AI. © 2013.

  3. Mapping the extent of abandoned farmland in Central and Eastern Europe using MODIS time series satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcantara, Camilo; Kuemmerle, Tobias; Baumann, Matthias; Bragina, Eugenia V.; Griffiths, Patrick; Hostert, Patrick; Knorn, Jan; Müller, Daniel; Prishchepov, Alexander V.; Schierhorn, Florian; Sieber, Anika; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2013-09-01

    The demand for agricultural products continues to grow rapidly, but further agricultural expansion entails substantial environmental costs, making recultivating currently unused farmland an interesting alternative. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to widespread abandonment of agricultural lands, but the extent and spatial patterns of abandonment are unclear. We quantified the extent of abandoned farmland, both croplands and pastures, across the region using MODIS NDVI satellite image time series from 2004 to 2006 and support vector machine classifications. Abandoned farmland was widespread, totaling 52.5 Mha, particularly in temperate European Russia (32 Mha), northern and western Ukraine, and Belarus. Differences in abandonment rates among countries were striking, suggesting that institutional and socio-economic factors were more important in determining the amount of abandonment than biophysical conditions. Indeed, much abandoned farmland occurred in areas without major constraints for agriculture. Our map provides a basis for assessing the potential of Central and Eastern Europe’s abandoned agricultural lands to contribute to food or bioenergy production, or carbon storage, as well as the environmental trade-offs and social constraints of recultivation.

  4. The effect of precipitation and temperature anomalies for the Central-European forests based on Collection 6 MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Anikó; Marjanović, Hrvoje; Dobor, Laura; Barcza, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Forest phenology and productivity is intimately linked with the actual weather conditions, and in the long term with the local climate. Our current understanding on the environmental control on spring leaf-out and autumn senescence is incomplete. Causes of the interannual variability of tree growth and forest carbon balance are not well understood as well. Satellite remote sensing provides a feasible way to monitor and study the changes of forest functioning in general and to understand its relationship with the climate fluctuations. In the presented study the latest version (Collection 6) of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) products calculated from measurements of the MODIS sensor onboard the NASA Terra and Aqua satellites are used to characterize forest activity and its interannual variability in Central Europe (Hungary and Croatia). The applied EVI and NDVI dataset is part of the MOD13 product of NASA and covers the 2000-2015 time period. The newest, Collection 6 dataset is free from the sensor degradation effect (that was present in previous versions) which can contribute to the better characterization of the changes in forest phenology. Using the FORESEE climatological database the effects of drought is studied on the NDVI and EVI variations. Possible lagged effect of severe drought on NDVI variability during the consecutive years is studied at the selected sites. Drivers of forest phenology are studied in terms of linear relationships between temperature and onset/offset of the growing season.

  5. Health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America versus Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Carina; Koethe, John R; Giganti, Mark J; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James; Levison, Julie; Kitahata, Mari; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Moore, Richard D; McGowan, Catherine; Shepherd, Bryan E; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Latinos living with HIV in the Americas share a common ethnic and cultural heritage. In North America, Latinos have a relatively high rate of new HIV infections but lower rates of engagement at all stages of the care continuum, whereas in Latin America antiretroviral therapy (ART) services continue to expand to meet treatment needs. In this analysis, we compare HIV treatment outcomes between Latinos receiving ART in North America versus Latin America. HIV-positive adults initiating ART at Caribbean, Central and South America Network for HIV (CCASAnet) sites were compared to Latino patients (based on country of origin or ethnic identity) starting treatment at North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) sites in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2011. Cox proportional hazards models compared mortality, treatment interruption, antiretroviral regimen change, virologic failure and loss to follow-up between cohorts. The study included 8400 CCASAnet and 2786 NA-ACCORD patients initiating ART. CCASAnet patients were younger (median 35 vs. 37 years), more likely to be female (27% vs. 20%) and had lower nadir CD4 count (median 148 vs. 195 cells/µL, p<0.001 for all). In multivariable analyses, CCASAnet patients had a higher risk of mortality after ART initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 1.96), particularly during the first year, but a lower hazard of treatment interruption (AHR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.50), change to second-line ART (AHR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.62) and virologic failure (AHR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.57). HIV-positive Latinos initiating ART in Latin America have greater continuity of treatment but are at higher risk of death than Latinos in North America. Factors underlying these differences, such as HIV testing, linkage and access to care, warrant further investigation.

  6. Rainfall Induced Natural Disaster in Central America, a challenge for Regional Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estuardo Guinea Barrientos, Héctor; Swain, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall induced natural disasters rank first among all natural disasters in Central America. According to the records of the EM-DAT international database, 248 out of 486 disasters registered in Central America were disasters triggered by rainfall invents, in countries like Belize and Honduras, rainfall-induced natural disasters, mainly floods and landslides, account for more than 90% of the total number of casualties as well as the economic damage of all the disasters. Due to the natural conditions of the Central American Isthmus, precipitation events often struck more than one country at the time, for example Hurricane Mitch in 1998 affected the entire Central American region causing more than 18,000 casualties. In this context, the Central America countries have been working on joint programs and policies aiming transboundary cooperation and management of natural disasters, a clear example of this effort is CEPREDENAC which is the intergovernmental body with the mandate of promoting activities, projects and programs towards reduction of the risks to disasters in order to avoid loss of life and economic assets in the Central America, however, transnational management face several challenges that fall mostly in the political, economical and technical areas. In this paper we described and analyzed the rainfall induced natural disasters, their impacts and the inherent management challenges in the Central American context. Key words: Central America, Natural Disasters, Risk Management, International Cooperation

  7. eMODIS Expedited: Overview of a Near Real Time MODIS Production System for Operational Vegetation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkerson, C.; Meyer, D. J.; Werpy, J.; Evenson, K.; Merritt, M.

    2010-12-01

    The expedited MODIS, or eMODIS production system derives near-real time Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance provided by the Land and Atmosphere Near-real time Capability for EOS (LANCE). There are currently three regions covered by this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) capability, including the continental U.S., Africa, and the Central America/Caribbean regions. Each of the eMODIS production streams is configured to output its data in map projections, compositing intervals, spatial resolutions, and file formats specific to its region and user community. The challenges of processing 1,000-meter, 500-m, and especially 250-m products by midnight on the last day of a product interval have been met with increasingly effective software and system architecture. An anonymous file transfer protocol (FTP) distribution site (ftp://emodisftp.cr.usgs.gov/eMODIS) allows users direct access to eMODIS NDVI products for operational (near-real time) monitoring of vegetation conditions like drought, crop failure, insect infestation, and other threats, thus supporting subsequent early warning of famine and the targeting of vulnerable populations for insecure food situations.

  8. 75 FR 34311 - To Implement Certain Provisions of the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement With Respect to Costa Rica, and for Other Purposes By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation 1. On August 5, 2004, the United States entered into the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (the...

  9. Improving Timeliness of Winter Wheat Production Forecast in United States of America, Ukraine and China Using MODIS Data and NCAR Growing Degree Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermote, E.; Franch, B.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Claverie, M.; Huang, J.; Zhang, J.; Sobrino, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Wheat is the most important cereal crop traded on international markets and winter wheat constitutes approximately 80% of global wheat production. Thus, accurate and timely forecasts of its production are critical for informing agricultural policies and investments, as well as increasing market efficiency and stability. Becker-Reshef et al. (2010) used an empirical generalized model for forecasting winter wheat production. Their approach combined BRDF-corrected daily surface reflectance from Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Climate Modeling Grid (CMG) with detailed official crop statistics and crop type masks. It is based on the relationship between the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) at the peak of the growing season, percent wheat within the CMG pixel, and the final yields. This method predicts the yield approximately one month to six weeks prior to harvest. In this study, we include the Growing Degree Day (GDD) information extracted from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data in order to improve the winter wheat production forecast by increasing the timeliness of the forecasts while conserving the accuracy of the original model. We apply this modified model to three major wheat-producing countries: United States of America, Ukraine and China from 2001 to 2012. We show that a reliable forecast can be made between one month to a month and a half prior to the peak NDVI (meaning two months to two and a half months prior to harvest) while conserving an accuracy of 10% in the production forecast.

  10. Central America: Theme IV. Social Studies Grade 5: The Western Hemisphere. Teacher Strategies and Student Worksheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, Eileen; And Others

    This curriculum guide presents materials for teaching about Central America and emphasizes the concepts of environment, culture, interdependence, and citizenship. The guide is designed to integrate the study of geographic, economic, historic, political, and social features of Central American nations. The major theme of the document deals with how…

  11. Central America: Theme IV. Social Studies Grade 5: The Western Hemisphere. Teacher Strategies and Student Worksheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeson, Eileen; And Others

    This curriculum guide presents materials for teaching about Central America and emphasizes the concepts of environment, culture, interdependence, and citizenship. The guide is designed to integrate the study of geographic, economic, historic, political, and social features of Central American nations. The major theme of the document deals with how…

  12. The Portrayal of Central America in Selected Contemporary Social Studies Textbooks: An Outline of the Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalker, Sylvia

    Current U.S. policies toward Central American nations motivated this examination of the presentation of the region in 12 social studies textbooks. In order to determine if each text's treatment of Central America was representative of the entire book, three regions, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean were selected for comparison purposes. The…

  13. Vegetation structure and greenness in Central Africa from Modis multi-temporal data

    PubMed Central

    Gond, Valéry; Fayolle, Adeline; Pennec, Alexandre; Cornu, Guillaume; Mayaux, Philippe; Camberlin, Pierre; Doumenge, Charles; Fauvet, Nicolas; Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    African forests within the Congo Basin are generally mapped at a regional scale as broad-leaved evergreen forests, with the main distinction being between terra-firme and swamp forest types. At the same time, commercial forest inventories, as well as national maps, have highlighted a strong spatial heterogeneity of forest types. A detailed vegetation map generated using consistent methods is needed to inform decision makers about spatial forest organization and their relationships with environmental drivers in the context of global change. We propose a multi-temporal remotely sensed data approach to characterize vegetation types using vegetation index annual profiles. The classifications identified 22 vegetation types (six savannas, two swamp forests, 14 forest types) improving existing vegetation maps. Among forest types, we showed strong variations in stand structure and deciduousness, identifying (i) two blocks of dense evergreen forests located in the western part of the study area and in the central part on sandy soils; (ii) semi-deciduous forests are located in the Sangha River interval which has experienced past fragmentation and human activities. For all vegetation types enhanced vegetation index profiles were highly seasonal and strongly correlated to rainfall and to a lesser extent, to light regimes. These results are of importance to predict spatial variations of carbon stocks and fluxes, because evergreen/deciduous forests (i) have contrasted annual dynamics of photosynthetic activity and foliar water content and (ii) differ in community dynamics and ecosystem processes. PMID:23878336

  14. Long term spatio-temporal analyses of snow cover in Central Asia using ERA-Interim and MODIS products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. P.; Zhang, W. C.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an approach for generating a long term series of snow-cover products from 1979 to 2015 was proposed by integrating the data of ERA-Interim snow-depth and 8-day cloud-free MODIS snow-cover derived by removing cloud from MOD10A2/MYD10A2 product. On the basis of the spatio-temporal analyses and evaluation of snow-cover duration (SCD) during the hydrological year from 1979/1980 to 2014/2015 over Central Asia, the average start and melt date of snow-cover (SCS and SCM, respectively) were estimated using the long term snow-cover product. The results suggested that the snow-cover product derived by this approach is fairly satisfactory with the mean bias error (MBE) of -.55%±5.03%. The SCD, SCS and SCM all presented an apparent north-south towards gradient as long as mountainous regions and waterbodies were avoided. The mean SCD over the high-latitude and high-mountainous regions were all beyond 122 days, however, it gradually became shorter with a significant level of a < 0.05 or even a < 0.001 from 1979/1980 to 2014/2015. In contrast, the SCD over low-latitude and low-altitude regions, like Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, were evidently shorter than the former, but it became significantly longer with a significant level of a < 0.05 or even a < 0.001 in the southwestern, northern Turkmenistan and most of Uzbekistan in the same duration. Notably, most of Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, where snow-cover usually appeared late and melting out early, even always stay snow-free throughout the year.

  15. Are the Maras Overwhelming Governments in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    States, 4,000 members in canada, and a large presence in mexico .6 The numbers fluctu- ate—mara membership being dynamic, and gang membership is...better track movements of criminal organizations. Saca proposed a “Plan centroamerica Segura” (central american Security Plan) to the central...2005 where the presidents of all the central american nations were joined by representatives from mexico and the United States. more recently, the

  16. Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2011-03-01

    The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

  17. Health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America versus Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Koethe, John R; Giganti, Mark J; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James; Levison, Julie; Kitahata, Mari; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Moore, Richard D; McGowan, Catherine; Shepherd, Bryan E; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Latinos living with HIV in the Americas share a common ethnic and cultural heritage. In North America, Latinos have a relatively high rate of new HIV infections but lower rates of engagement at all stages of the care continuum, whereas in Latin America antiretroviral therapy (ART) services continue to expand to meet treatment needs. In this analysis, we compare HIV treatment outcomes between Latinos receiving ART in North America versus Latin America. Methods HIV-positive adults initiating ART at Caribbean, Central and South America Network for HIV (CCASAnet) sites were compared to Latino patients (based on country of origin or ethnic identity) starting treatment at North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) sites in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2011. Cox proportional hazards models compared mortality, treatment interruption, antiretroviral regimen change, virologic failure and loss to follow-up between cohorts. Results The study included 8400 CCASAnet and 2786 NA-ACCORD patients initiating ART. CCASAnet patients were younger (median 35 vs. 37 years), more likely to be female (27% vs. 20%) and had lower nadir CD4 count (median 148 vs. 195 cells/µL, p<0.001 for all). In multivariable analyses, CCASAnet patients had a higher risk of mortality after ART initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 1.96), particularly during the first year, but a lower hazard of treatment interruption (AHR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.50), change to second-line ART (AHR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.62) and virologic failure (AHR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.57). Conclusions HIV-positive Latinos initiating ART in Latin America have greater continuity of treatment but are at higher risk of death than Latinos in North America. Factors underlying these differences, such as HIV testing, linkage and access to care, warrant further investigation. PMID:26996992

  18. Climate change, workplace heat exposure, and occupational health and productivity in Central America.

    PubMed

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Crowe, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Climate change is increasing heat exposure in places such as Central America, a tropical region with generally hot/humid conditions. Working people are at particular risk of heat stress because of the intrabody heat production caused by physical labor. This article aims to describe the risks of occupational heat exposure on health and productivity in Central America, and to make tentative estimates of the impact of ongoing climate change on these risks. A review of relevant literature and estimation of the heat exposure variable wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) in different locations within the region were used to estimate the effects. We found that heat stress at work is a real threat. Literature from Central America and heat exposure estimates show that some workers are already at risk under current conditions. These conditions will likely worsen with climate change, demonstrating the need to create solutions that will protect worker health and productivity.

  19. Very-to-barely remote sensing of prehistoric features under tephra in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, Payson D.

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of remote sensing instruments have been utilized to attempt to detect archaeological features under volcanic ash in Central America. Some techniques have not been successful, such as seismic refraction, for reasons that are not difficult to understand. Others have been very successful and provide optimism for archaeologists witnessing the destruction of unburied sites throughout Central America. The sudden burial of buildings, gardens, and footpaths by volcanic ash can preserve them extremely well providing a rich data base for understanding human life and culture at certain points in time.

  20. Very-to-barely remote sensing of prehistoric features under tephra in Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, Payson D.

    1991-01-01

    A wide variety of remote sensing instruments have been utilized to attempt to detect archaeological features under volcanic ash in Central America. Some techniques have not been successful, such as seismic refraction, for reasons that are not difficult to understand. Others have been very successful and provide optimism for archaeologists witnessing the destruction of unburied sites throughout Central America. The sudden burial of buildings, gardens, and footpaths by volcanic ash can preserve them extremely well providing a rich data base for understanding human life and culture at certain points in time.

  1. Effectiveness of statistical method for estimation of water use efficiency in temperate and boreal forests of North America exclusively using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjie; Chen, Yunhao; Quan, Jinling

    2015-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) is an important biophysical variable reflecting the couple of water and carbon cycle in the ecosystem. The canopy level WUE including ecosystem WUE (eWUE) and inherent WUE (iWUE) can be estimated at flux towers, where eWUE is derived from the ratio of gross primary product (GPP) to evapotranspiration (ET) and iWUE is the product of eWUE and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Upscaling methods are necessary to obtain spatially continuous WUE. Previous methods require field measurement which cannot be easily acquired by remote sensing. Moreover, the effectiveness of statistical method for estimation WUE across different forest types and climates, exclusively using remote sensing, remains unknown. In this study, we calculate 16-day forest WUE at temperate and boreal forests (including deciduous and evergreen forests) of North America using flux tower data and conduct a linear regression between WUE and related variables derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), including enhanced vegetation index (EVI), daytime land surface temperature (dLST), leaf area index (LAI), fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) and normalized difference water index (NDWI). Results show that the correlation varies among different sites and variables. EVI, LAI and fPAR result in higher correlation coefficients (R2) of 0.34-0.75, 0.39-0.68, and 0.35-0.76, respectively, at five deciduous forest sites without much disturbance (e.g. drought). For all of the deciduous forest sites, EVI has the closest relation with eWUE (R2=0.35, p

  2. Educating the Special Child in the Caribbean and Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris-Stowe State Coll., St. Louis, MO. Teacher Education Dept.

    This paper represents the perspectives of 25 special education teacher scholarship students from 13 Caribbean and Central American countries (Barbados, Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Nevis, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Dominica, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Jamaica, Grenada, and Antigua) on the status of special education in their…

  3. Criticality of U.S. Military Presence in Central America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    authorities ( MACA ), nation assistance/support to counter-insurgency, noncombatant evacuation operations (NEO), peace operations, protection of...FOLs, the U.S. military commitment falls under the execution of Operation Central Skies. Interestingly, military assistance to civil authorities ( MACA

  4. U.S. Involvement in Central America: A Historical Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornbluh, Peter R.

    1983-01-01

    The current U.S. policy in El Salvador is strikingly similar to Coolidge's methods of countering revolutionary activity in that area 55 years ago. The current policy is neither in the moral nor pragmatic interests of the United States, let alone the interests of the Central American people. (SR)

  5. Work and health in Latin America: results from the working conditions surveys of Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Central America and Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Merino-Salazar, Pamela; Artazcoz, Lucía; Cornelio, Cecilia; Iñiguez, María José Itatí; Rojas, Marianela; Martínez-Iñigo, David; Vives, Alejandra; Funcasta, Lorena; Benavides, Fernando G

    2017-06-01

    To describe working and employment conditions, and health status between non-agricultural employees with a written contract from Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Central America and Uruguay. We compared data from the first working condition surveys (WCS) of Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Central America and Uruguay. For comparative purposes, we selected a subsample of 15 241 non-agricultural employees aged 18-64 years and working with a written contract. We calculated prevalences and 95% CIs for the selected variables on working and employment conditions, and health status, separated by sex. Across all countries, at least 40% of women and 58% of men worked >40 hours a week. The most prevalent exposures were repetitive movements, followed by noise and manual handling, especially among men. Psychosocial exposures were very common among both sexes. Workers in Chile (33.4% of women and 16.6% of men) and Central America (24.3% of women and 19.1% of men) were more likely to report poor self-perceived health and were least likely to do so in Colombia (5.5% of women and 4.2% of men). The percentage of workers reporting occupational injuries was <10% across all countries. This study provides, for the first time, a broad picture of work and health in different Latin American countries, based on the national WCSs available. This allows for a better understanding of occupational health and could serve as a baseline for future research and surveillance of work and health in the Region. However, greater efforts are needed to improve WCSs comparability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. National Bibliographies and the International Conference on National Bibliographic Services Recommendations: Europe; North, Central and South America; and Oceania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langballe, Anne M. Hasund

    This paper discusses the findings of a survey that examined the national bibliographies of 81 countries in Europe, North America, Central America, South America, and Oceania. Results are presented in the following areas: (1) the connection between legal deposit laws and national bibliographies; (2) coverage and scripts of the national…

  7. A new seismically constrained subduction interface model for Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Newman, A. V.; Thomas, A. M.; Moore-Driskell, M.; Farmer, G. T.

    2015-08-01

    We provide a detailed, seismically defined three-dimensional model for the subducting plate interface along the Middle America Trench between northern Nicaragua and southern Costa Rica. The model uses data from a weighted catalog of about 30,000 earthquake hypocenters compiled from nine catalogs to constrain the interface through a process we term the "maximum seismicity method." The method determines the average position of the largest cluster of microseismicity beneath an a priori functional surface above the interface. This technique is applied to all seismicity above 40 km depth, the approximate intersection of the hanging wall Mohorovičić discontinuity, where seismicity likely lies along the plate interface. Below this depth, an envelope above 90% of seismicity approximates the slab surface. Because of station proximity to the interface, this model provides highest precision along the interface beneath the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica, an area where marked geometric changes coincide with crustal transitions and topography observed seaward of the trench. The new interface is useful for a number of geophysical studies that aim to understand subduction zone earthquake behavior and geodynamic and tectonic development of convergent plate boundaries.

  8. Molecular phylogeny of Trypanosoma cruzi from Central America (Guatemala) and a comparison with South American strains.

    PubMed

    Iwagami, M; Higo, H; Miura, S; Yanagi, T; Tada, I; Kano, S; Agatsuma, T

    2007-12-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analysis was carried out for 21 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi, nine of which were obtained from Guatemala and 12 from South America. Phylogenetic trees were constructed using the nucleotide sequences of two nuclear gene regions, dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) and trypanothione reductase (TR), and contiguous portions of two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1). Possible genetic exchange between the rather divergent lineages of T. cruzi II from South America was suggested in the trees of the two nuclear genes. T. cruzi I strains obtained from Guatemala and Colombia were identical in all the genes examined, but other T. cruzi I isolates from South America were rather polymorphic in the DHFR-TS and mitochondrial genes. No genetic exchange was identified between T. cruzi I populations from Central and South America in the present study.

  9. Secondary Schools in the States of Central America, South America, and the West Indies: Scholastic Scope and Standards. Bulletin, 1915, No. 26. Whole Number 653

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anna Tolman

    1915-01-01

    The States of Central America and South America are in the midst of an industrial development, which imparts new impulses to their educational activities. There is at once an awakened sense of the economic bearings of elementary or popular education and of the need of a readjustment of the work of the long-established secondary schools. Efforts in…

  10. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in Central and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed an assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in 130 selected petroleum provinces of the world (USGS, 2000). Of these 130 provinces, 23 are in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean area (fig. 1). The assessed provinces range from established petroleum provinces with long histories of production such as the Maracaibo Basin to frontier provinces with little or no petroleum production such as the Guyana-Suriname Basin. Not all provinces with historic production or potential production were assessed for the USGS 2000 Assessment. At present we are assessing many of the remaining oil and gas provinces in Central and South America. In each province we (1) geologically defined total petroleum systems, (2) defined assessment units within total petroleum systems, and (3) assessed the volume of undiscovered conventional oil and gas in each assessment unit. We defined 26 total petroleum systems and 55 assessment units in the 23 provinces. 

  11. Capacity-Building Programs Under the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States signed the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) in August 2004 with five Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua) and the Dominican Republic.

  12. Costa Rica, Central America as seen from STS-60

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-02-09

    STS060-85-000AD (3-11 Feb 1994) --- This photograph shows the Central American nations of Nicaragua, Costa Rica and parts of Panama. Lake Nicaragua defines the southern limits of the country of Nicaragua. The cloud-free portion of the photo shows Costa Rica, it's gulf and Peninsula of Nicoya. Agricultural land use is clearly seen around Nicoya and a few islands of tropical forests are seen at the edges. The capital city of San Jose, Costa Rica, is partly cloud-covered in this image.

  13. [Experiences with early weaning of calves in Central America].

    PubMed

    Jarquín, R

    1989-09-01

    This study presents a review of traditional feed calves systems used in Central American specialized dairy farms. The systems discussed are considered costly, due to the high quantity of milk and concentrate required, besides causing shortage of milk for human consumption. The early weaning calf system developed by INCAP is also discussed, as well as its implementation with slight modifications oriented towards the application of research findings to achieve a reduction of the milk volume commonly used in the traditional rearing system. The development of appropriate concentrate formulations for animals of that age, using local feed ingredients, is also presented.

  14. Development in Mexico and Central America. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program. Summer 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of International Education, New York, NY.

    This document features writings and curriculum projects by teachers who traveled to Mexico and Central America in the summer of 1991 as members of a Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar. The following items are among the 20 included: Curriculum Project: "'Escritoras Mexicanas Contemporaneas': A Survey of Mexican Women Fiction Writers" (Laura J.…

  15. Network Television Coverage of Human Rights in Central America during the Carter Administration, 1977-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Jarice; Miller, Christine

    A study examined the United States television networks' news coverage of human rights in Central America during the administration of President Jimmy Carter to determine whether the President's hopes for greater media coverage of human rights issues were acknowledged by network newscasts. A content analysis of "Television News Index and…

  16. Mosquito studies in Belize, Central America: records, taxonomic notes, and a checklist of species.

    PubMed

    Pecor, James E; Harbach, Ralph E; Peyton, E L; Roberts, Donald R; Rejmankova, Eliska; Manguin, Sylvie; Palanko, Jorge

    2002-12-01

    Data from mosquito collections made in Belize, Central America, between September 1990 and April 1993 are presented. A total of 537 collections yielding 15,139 specimens are summarized. One genus, 4 subgenera, and 31 species are recorded from Belize for the 1st time. A checklist of the 111 mosquito species now known to occur in Belize is presented.

  17. U.S. Blacks' Perceptions, Experiences, and Scholarship regarding Central and South America--1822 to 1959

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fikes, Robert, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Instances of U.S. Black Americans having direct contact with the inhabitants of Central and South America, whose majority populations are not Black, can be traced back to the early nineteenth century. Slaves and freemen were aware of the possibility of a better life in these regions and a few found their way there to experience trials,…

  18. Illustrated Key to Species of Genus Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Occurring in Mexico and Central America

    PubMed Central

    Armendáriz-Toledano, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We provide an illustrated key of species of Dendroctonus Erichson from Mexico and Central America based on characters of the male genitalia and external morphology. The key incorporates newly identified diagnostic characters for this genus that enhance discrimination of particularly difficult sibling species. PMID:28355476

  19. Annotated zoogeography of non-marine Tardigrada. Part I: Central America.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Łukasz; Michalczyk, Łukasz; McInnes, Sandra J

    2014-02-05

    Dividing the world into nine regions, this first paper describes literature records of the limno-terrestrial tardigrades (Tardigrada) reported from Central America. Updating previously published species lists we have revised the taxonomy and provided additional habitat, geographic co-ordinates, and biogeographic comments. It is hoped this work will serve as a reference point and background for further zoogeographic studies.

  20. Mites associated with Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmerman (Scolytidae: Coleoptera) in Central America and Mexico

    Treesearch

    John C. Moser; Robert C. Wilkinson; Edgar W. Clark

    1974-01-01

    The pine forests of central and North America continually suffer economic damage from the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmerman 1868***, and associated bark beetles. The most severe epidemic in the history of this insect occured in Honduras from 1962 to 1965 (1, 2). Then and subsequently, studies aimed at determining the biology and...

  1. Planting the Seeds of a New Agriculture: Living with the Land in Central America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriance, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Central America's macroeconomics, land tenure patterns, and population growth are forcing small-scale farmers to alternatives based on farmer-to-farmer teaching and farming in concert with the environment. Discusses major schools of thought that have fueled this phenomenon, and how extension services and isolated groups are joining to form a…

  2. Comparative study of general public owl knowledge in Costa Rica, Central America and Malawi, Africa

    Treesearch

    Paula A. Enriquez; Heimo Mikkola

    1997-01-01

    The public knowledge of owls in Central America and Africa was compared based on 162 interviews in Costa Rica and 147 in Malawi. General knowledge of owls included: species, common names, habitats, food, and calls, and was quite similar in both study areas. In Malawi, more than 90 percent of the respondents connected owls with bad luck, witchcraft, and death. In Costa...

  3. Central America: Current Crisis and Future Prospects. Foreign Policy Association Headline Series, No. 271.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Jorge I.; Lindenberg, Marc

    One of a series of booklets on world issues, this document summarizes some of the salient aspects of Central America with special attention given to Nicaragua and El Salvador. The booklet identifies the interests, policies, and choices of the major actors in the drama that engulfs the region and, increasingly, much of the world. Chapter one…

  4. STR data for 11 autosomal STR markers from Costa Rica, Central America.

    PubMed

    Sanóu, I; Núñez, G; Rodríguez, A; Silva, S; García, O; Uriarte, J; Espinoza, M

    2005-10-29

    Allele frequencies for 11 STR autosomal loci (F13A01, F13B, FESFPS, LPL, CSF1PO, TH01, TPOX, VWA, D16S539, D7S820 and D13S317) were obtained from a sample of 200 unrelated individuals from Costa Rica, Central America.

  5. A new genus and two new species of Tingidae (Heteroptera) from Central America.

    PubMed

    Montemayor, Sara I

    2008-04-01

    A new genus, Ceratotingis, distributed in Central America, is described to accommodate two new species, C. rafaeli from Panama and C. costarriquense from Costa Rica and to include Macrotingis zeteki from Panama. This paper includes descriptions of the new genus and its species, a redescription of C. zeteki, an identification key, and habitus photographs.

  6. [The first experience wih ICSI and MESA in Panama, Central America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Alleyne, C; Sánchez, F

    1998-01-01

    The intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has represented an important advance in human reproduction technology, improving the results in those couples with a very low probability of achieving pregnancy. Our aim is present the results of our first experience with ICSI and MESA in Panama, Central America and the Caribe.

  7. Gulf of Fonseca, Pacifica coast of Central America as seen from Apollo 9

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-12

    AS09-19-3019 (3-13 March 1969) --- Gulf of Fonseca, on the Pacific coast of Central America, as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. The gulf is shared by the nations of El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. The prominent volcano on the peninsula in Nicaragua is Volcan Cosiguina.

  8. Drug Cartels and Gangs in Mexico and Central America: A View through the Lens of Counterinsurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-04

    crime in today’s Central America. First, the institution of an Encomienda system of land ownership, which granted Spanish Conquistadors and upper class...2 Britannica on line, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/186567/ encomienda (accessed October 15, 2009). 3 Net Industries, http

  9. 77 FR 66870 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Dominican Republic--Central America--United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of... Dominican Republic--Central America--United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). On March 26, 2012,...

  10. In the Shadow of the Cold War: The Caribbean and Central America in U.S. Foreign Policy. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkasian, Mark; Davidson, Louise K.

    In this document, students examine the economic and military concerns that linked the history of the Caribbean and Central America to the United States. Organized into four chapters, the first chapter examines the history of U.S. relations with the Caribbean and Central America from the early 19th century to 1961. The second chapter focuses on the…

  11. In the Shadow of the Cold War: The Caribbean and Central America in U.S. Foreign Policy. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkasian, Mark; Davidson, Louise K.

    In this document, students examine the economic and military concerns that linked the history of the Caribbean and Central America to the United States. Organized into four chapters, the first chapter examines the history of U.S. relations with the Caribbean and Central America from the early 19th century to 1961. The second chapter focuses on the…

  12. 77 FR 15397 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... of the Secretary Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of... Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). Father Christopher Hartley.... Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of Trade and Labor Affairs (OTLA) gives notice that...

  13. The burden of cutaneous melanoma and status of preventive measures in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Esther; Sierra, Mónica; Piñeros, Marion; Loria, Dora; Forman, David

    2016-09-01

    Very little is known about the burden of cutaneous melanoma in Central and South America, despite the existence of a reasonable amount of population-based data. We present data on melanoma incidence calculated in a standardized way for Central and South America, as well as an overview of primary and secondary prevention issues in the region. Cancer registry data on all incident cases reported in the different registries present in Central and South America were combined to provide registry-based country estimates of age-standardized, sex-specific cutaneous melanoma incidence overall, and by histological subtype and anatomical site. A literature search provided additional information. Age-standardized incidence rates were between 1 and 5 per 100,000 and tended to be higher further away from the equator. Cutaneous melanomas of the acral type, mostly occurring on the lower limbs, are a distinguishing feature of melanoma in Central and South America in comparison with high-incidence areas. Several preventive measures, both primary and secondary, are in place, albeit largely without evaluation. Due to incomplete registration and different registration practices, reliable and comparable data on melanoma were difficult to obtain; thus it is likely that the true burden of melanoma in Central and South America has been underestimated. The different characteristics of the cutaneous melanoma patient population in terms of anatomical site and histological type distribution imply a need for adapted primary and secondary prevention measures. The generally high ambient ultraviolet radiation levels require sufficient sun protection measures. Copyright © 2016 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Large-volume volcanic edifi ce failures in Central America and associated hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siebert, L.; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Vallance, J.W.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2006-01-01

    Edifi ce-collapse phenomena have, to date, received relatively little attention in Central America, although ??40 major collapse events (??0.1 km3) from about two dozen volcanoes are known or inferred in this volcanic arc. Volcanoes subjected to gravitational failure are concentrated at the arc's western and eastern ends. Failures correlate positively with volcano elevation, substrate elevation, edifi ce height, volcano volume, and crustal thickness and inversely with slab descent angle. Collapse orientations are strongly infl uenced by the direction of slope of the underlying basement, and hence are predominately perpendicular to the arc (preferentially to the south) at its extremities and display more variable failure directions in the center of the arc. The frequency of collapse events in Central America is poorly constrained because of the lack of precise dating of deposits, but a collapse interval of ??1000-2000 yr has been estimated during the Holocene. These high-impact events fortunately occur at low frequency, but the proximity of many Central American volcanoes to highly populated regions, including some of the region's largest cities, requires evaluation of their hazards. The primary risks are from extremely mobile debris avalanches and associated lahars, which in Central America have impacted now-populated areas up to ??50 km from a source volcano. Lower probability risks associated with volcanic edifi ce collapse derive from laterally directed explosions and tsunamis. The principal hazards of the latter here result from potential impact of debris avalanches into natural or man-made lakes. Much work remains on identifying and describing debris-avalanche deposits in Central America. The identifi cation of potential collapse sites and assessing and monitoring the stability of intact volcanoes is a major challenge for the next decade. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  15. Markets for renewable energy in Central America and the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, P.G.; Sloop, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    For market studies of renewable energy and conservation equipment, Costa Rica was selected as the most favorable Central American country and representative of the rest. The Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, and Antigua were selected as representative of the Caribbean islands, from the largest to one of the smallest. Best markets in Costa Rica are judged to be micro and mini hydroelectric systems, heat pumps for large hot water users, photovoltaic systems for low-power remote devices, small distilleries for producing alcohol from sugar cane, solar dryers for bagasse, and energy conservation equipment. Market prospects for the Caribbean islands are very good, including micro and mini hydroelectric systems for those countries with water resources, solar drying of bagasse, solar water heaters, solar ponds/solar thermal systems for electric power or heat processes, wind-electric systems for utility grids and farms, photovoltaics for small power uses, and energy conservation equipment.

  16. Central America Regional Climate Change Program: Tools for Your Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Dan; Irving, Bill; Yeager, Carey

    2006-01-01

    USAID/E-CAM and EGAT's Global Climate Change Team, in partnership with EPA, NASA, Oak Ridge National Lab, and the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), have had a significant impact on the region's ability to monitor, mitigate, and adapt to environmental threats. Environmental decision-making tools and data are posted on a website (SERVIR: http://servir.nsstc.nasa.pov/home.html)that provides satellite and geographic data and maps to anybody with an Internet connection. The SERVIR program has been identified as the model for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) - a major international effort to develop a 21st century system for environmental management and disaster response. In coordination with the USAID/EPA program, NASA has developed a GIs tool that enables countries to examine their forest cover and document changes on an annual basis. This information is used in calculating carbon emissions as part of greenhouse gas inventories, but also serves a valuable monitoring function. In addition, USAID/E-CAM and EGAT's Global Climate Change Team in collaboration with EPA are helping countries meet their obligations as signatories to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). EPA is assisting Central American governments to improve the quality of their greenhouse gas emission inventories reported to the UNFCCC through the development of tools and improvements in data quality. New EPA tools developed include software to automatically calculate greenhouse gas emissions for the agricultural and forestry sector inventories, determine key sources of greenhouse gas emissions, and document institutional arrangements. Several of these tools are state of the art and are comparable to tools currently used in the U.S.

  17. Central America Regional Climate Change Program: Tools for Your Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Dan; Irving, Bill; Yeager, Carey

    2006-01-01

    USAID/E-CAM and EGAT's Global Climate Change Team, in partnership with EPA, NASA, Oak Ridge National Lab, and the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), have had a significant impact on the region's ability to monitor, mitigate, and adapt to environmental threats. Environmental decision-making tools and data are posted on a website (SERVIR: http://servir.nsstc.nasa.pov/home.html)that provides satellite and geographic data and maps to anybody with an Internet connection. The SERVIR program has been identified as the model for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) - a major international effort to develop a 21st century system for environmental management and disaster response. In coordination with the USAID/EPA program, NASA has developed a GIs tool that enables countries to examine their forest cover and document changes on an annual basis. This information is used in calculating carbon emissions as part of greenhouse gas inventories, but also serves a valuable monitoring function. In addition, USAID/E-CAM and EGAT's Global Climate Change Team in collaboration with EPA are helping countries meet their obligations as signatories to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). EPA is assisting Central American governments to improve the quality of their greenhouse gas emission inventories reported to the UNFCCC through the development of tools and improvements in data quality. New EPA tools developed include software to automatically calculate greenhouse gas emissions for the agricultural and forestry sector inventories, determine key sources of greenhouse gas emissions, and document institutional arrangements. Several of these tools are state of the art and are comparable to tools currently used in the U.S.

  18. Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America: Mantle refertilization by arc-hot spot interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Feigenson, Mark D.; Szymanski, David; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Although most Central American magmas have a typical arc geochemical signature, magmas in southern Central America (central Costa Rica and Panama) have isotopic and trace element compositions with an ocean island basalt (OIB) affinity, similar to the Galapagos-OIB lavas (e.g., Ba/La < 40, La/Yb > 10, 206Pb/204Pb > 18.8). Our new data for Costa Rica suggest that this signature, unusual for a convergent margin, has a relatively recent origin (Late Miocene ˜6 Ma). We also show that there was a transition from typical arc magmas (analogous to the modern Nicaraguan volcanic front) to OIB-like magmas similar to the Galapagos hot spot. The geographic distribution of the Galapagos signature in recent lavas from southern Central America is present landward from the subduction of the Galapagos hot spot tracks (the Seamount Province and the Cocos/Coiba Ridge) at the Middle American Trench. The higher Pb isotopic ratios, relatively lower Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, and enriched incompatible-element signature of central Costa Rican magmas can be explained by arc-hot spot interaction. The isotopic ratios of central Costa Rican lavas require the subducting Seamount Province (Northern Galapagos Domain) component, whereas the isotopic ratios of the adakites and alkaline basalts from southern Costa Rica and Panama are in the geochemical range of the subducting Cocos/Coiba Ridge (Central Galapagos Domain). Geological and geochemical evidence collectively indicate that the relatively recent Galapagos-OIB signature in southern Central America represents a geochemical signal from subducting Galapagos hot spot tracks, which started to collide with the margin ˜8 Ma ago. The Galapagos hot spot contribution decreases systematically along the volcanic front from central Costa Rica to NW Nicaragua.

  19. Social protection networks in Central America and the Dominican Republic: Do they have a nutritional dimension?

    PubMed

    Cespedes, Angela; Lechtig, Aaron; Francischi, Rachel

    2011-06-01

    It is not known whether the social protection networks in the Central American subregion and the Dominican Republic have a nutritional dimension. To explore whether the social protection networks in Central America and the Dominican Republic have a nutritional dimension. A survey was conducted during 2009 of 110 social protection programs and 10 national plans in Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. Most of the social protection programs did not have a nutritional dimension. With few exceptions, the social protection programs were not prepared to prevent undernutrition. There may be a similar situation in other regions. It is recommended to incorporate the nutritional dimension into all social protection programs and social safety nets in Central America and the Dominican Republic as well as in all other countries with low-income populations, worldwide.

  20. Geochemistry of Concepcion and Maderas Volcanoes, Nicaragua, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, F. N.; Bolge, L. L.; Carr, M. J.; Feigenson, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    The occurrence of geochemical zoning along the Central American volcanic arc is due primarily to changes in mantle composition and both the composition and amount of incorporated slab components. The maximum slab signal, represented by the ratio of Ba/La, occurs in the Nicaraguan volcano Telica and decreases to both the northwest and southeast. Whereas continuous geochemical coverage between El Salvador and Nicaragua suggests that the transition is gradual, a gap in volcanic geochemical analyses between Nicaraguan and Costa Rican volcanoes hinders any conclusion as to whether the decrease is gradual here as well, or more abrupt. To this end, we analyze newly collected volcanic lavas from Isla de Ometepe in Lago de Nicaragua and northern Costa Rica using XRF and HR- ICP- MS techniques to quantify major oxides and trace elements. The island consists of two volcanoes: Concepcion and Maderas. Concepcion is presently active and records two periods of lava flows, one recent and one prehistoric. Here, our work on lavas from the eastern side of the island complements the recent work by Benjamin van Wyk de Vries on western tephra. Maderas, while not historically active, has long been a private coffee plantation granting public access only recently. These analyses will mark the first samples of this volcano within the geological community.

  1. Corporate good citizenship pays off in Central America.

    PubMed

    1974-07-22

    Fear of expropriation and increasing public scrutiny of the activities of multinational companies are forcing these companies to develop social programs in the countries where they operate. Frequently these programs are viewed as products of colonialism or as veiled attempts to dominate the nationals employed by these companies. The United Brands Company, which is involved in large scale banana production in several Central American countries, has adopted a program which seeks to reduce the paternalism which was associated with the operations of the United Fruit Company, the predecessor of the United Brands Company. A series of new programs emphasizing community self help projects were developed by a company-hired sociologist and initiated 4 years ago. In Panama, the projects were started by holding town meetings in which the citizens decided what projects to pursue. With company help the community has begun to build recreational and educational facilities and are also building new docks. The company is contributing $10 million annually to promote these projects. Other programs involve selling homes to workers for half the cost of constructing these homes and increasing efforts to put host country citizens into management positions. Home ownership is expected to stabilize the work force and increased opportunities for advancement are expected to increase productivity. Future plans include the construction of technical schools which will provide a pool of skilled technicians needed by the banana company.

  2. High level of molecular and phenotypic biodiversity in Jatropha curcas from Central America compared to Africa, Asia and South America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main bottleneck to elevate jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) from a wild species to a profitable biodiesel crop is the low genetic and phenotypic variation found in different regions of the world, hampering efficient plant breeding for productivity traits. In this study, 182 accessions from Asia (91), Africa (35), South America (9) and Central America (47) were evaluated at genetic and phenotypic level to find genetic variation and important traits for oilseed production. Results Genetic variation was assessed with SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat), TRAP (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) and AFLP (Amplified fragment length polymorphism) techniques. Phenotypic variation included seed morphological characteristics, seed oil content and fatty acid composition and early growth traits. Jaccard’s similarity and cluster analysis by UPGM (Unweighted Paired Group Method) with arithmetic mean and PCA (Principle Component Analysis) indicated higher variability in Central American accessions compared to Asian, African and South American accessions. Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) values ranged from 0 to 0.65. In the set of Central American accessions. PIC values were higher than in other regions. Accessions from the Central American population contain alleles that were not found in the accessions from other populations. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA; P < 0.0001) indicated high genetic variation within regions (81.7%) and low variation across regions (18.3%). A high level of genetic variation was found on early growth traits and on components of the relative growth rate (specific leaf area, leaf weight, leaf weight ratio and net assimilation rate) as indicated by significant differences between accessions and by the high heritability values (50–88%). The fatty acid composition of jatropha oil significantly differed (P < 0.05) between regions. Conclusions The pool of Central American accessions showed very large genetic variation as

  3. High level of molecular and phenotypic biodiversity in Jatropha curcas from Central America compared to Africa, Asia and South America.

    PubMed

    Montes Osorio, Luis Rodolfo; Torres Salvador, Andres Fransisco; Jongschaap, Raymond Elmar Etienne; Azurdia Perez, Cesar Augusto; Berduo Sandoval, Julio Ernesto; Trindade, Luisa Miguel; Visser, Richard Gerardus Franciscus; van Loo, Eibertus Nicolaas

    2014-03-25

    The main bottleneck to elevate jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) from a wild species to a profitable biodiesel crop is the low genetic and phenotypic variation found in different regions of the world, hampering efficient plant breeding for productivity traits. In this study, 182 accessions from Asia (91), Africa (35), South America (9) and Central America (47) were evaluated at genetic and phenotypic level to find genetic variation and important traits for oilseed production. Genetic variation was assessed with SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat), TRAP (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) and AFLP (Amplified fragment length polymorphism) techniques. Phenotypic variation included seed morphological characteristics, seed oil content and fatty acid composition and early growth traits. Jaccard's similarity and cluster analysis by UPGM (Unweighted Paired Group Method) with arithmetic mean and PCA (Principle Component Analysis) indicated higher variability in Central American accessions compared to Asian, African and South American accessions. Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) values ranged from 0 to 0.65. In the set of Central American accessions. PIC values were higher than in other regions. Accessions from the Central American population contain alleles that were not found in the accessions from other populations. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA; P < 0.0001) indicated high genetic variation within regions (81.7%) and low variation across regions (18.3%). A high level of genetic variation was found on early growth traits and on components of the relative growth rate (specific leaf area, leaf weight, leaf weight ratio and net assimilation rate) as indicated by significant differences between accessions and by the high heritability values (50-88%). The fatty acid composition of jatropha oil significantly differed (P < 0.05) between regions. The pool of Central American accessions showed very large genetic variation as assessed by DNA-marker variation

  4. Seasonal Prediction at the Regional Scale: An Analysis of Regional Climate Model Performance Over Central America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourigny, E.; Jones, C.; McTaggart-Cowan, R.

    2006-05-01

    The majority of Regional Climate Models (RCMs) have been developed for application over either Europe or North America. Relatively few RCMs have been evaluated over tropical land regions, where convection and the interaction between convection and the land-surface are of fundamental importance. In this presentation we analyse the performance of 2 RCMs over Central and South America, with particular emphasis on the representation on the regional details of precipitation and its response to large-scale atmospheric circulation anomalies. To assess this we have integrated the Swedish Rossby Centre Atmospheric model (RCA3) and the Limited- Area version of the Canadian GEM model (Global Environmental Multiscale model) for the rainy season of Central America (April-November), using observed SSTs and boundary conditions derived from the ECMWF reanalyses. Results will be presented for contrasting positive and negative phases of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation cycle to assess the response of the model parameterizations to anomalous large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns as defined by the opposite phases of ENSO. Simulated Outgoing Longwave Radiation is compared to satellite observations in order to gauge if the models capture the response of convection over Central and South America to ENSO forcing. Higher resolution precipitation observations are compared to the RCM results in order to evaluate the higher-resolution, regional details of simulated precipitation. Problems in the interaction of the large-scale circulation with convection and surface forcing will be highlighted.

  5. Molecular characterization of adenovirus circulating in Central and South America during the 2006–2008 period

    PubMed Central

    García, Josefina; Sovero, Merly; Laguna‐Torres, Victor Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; De Rivera, Ivette L.; Agudo, Roberto; Arango, Ana E.; Barboza, Alma; Aguayo, Nicolas; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Human Adenoviruses are recognized pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases. Serotype identification is critical for epidemiological surveillance, detection of new strains and understanding of HAdvs pathogenesis. Little data is available about HAdvs subtypes in Latin America. Methods  In this study, we have molecularly characterized 213 adenoviruses collected from ILI presenting patients, during 2006‐08, in Central and South America. Results  Our results indicate that 161(76%) adenoviruses belong to subgroup C, 45 (21%) to subgroup B and 7 (3%) to subtype E4. PMID:19903214

  6. Hydrogeochemical investigation of six geothermal sites in Honduras, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Grigsby, C.O.; Janik, C.J.; Shevenell, L.A.; Paredes, J.R.; Gutierrez, J.W.; Trujillo, Jr.; Counce, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    We conducted detailed hydrogeochemical investigations at six geothermal sites in western Honduras: Azacualpa, El Olivar, Pavana, Platanares, Sambo Creek, and San Ignacio. None of the sites is associated with Quaternary silicic volcanism, although El Olivar lies adjacent to a small Quaternary basalt field and Pavana is part of a belt of hot spring activity parallel to and 35 km east of the Central American volcanic arc. None of the sites contains acid-sulfate waters indicative of vapor-dominated conditions. Thermal fluids are characterized by pH between 7 and 10, Cl<125 mg/l, HCO/sub 3/>Cl, SO/sub 4/greater than or equal toCl, Bless than or equal to17 mg/l, Liless than or equal to4 mg/l, and Asless than or equal to1.25 mg/l. Stable isotope analyses of the water show that recharge to the geothermal systems generally occurs from areas of higher elevation adjacent to the sites. Tritium contents of apparently undiluted thermal fluids range from 0 to 0.4 T.U., indicating residence times of fluids in the systems of more than 500 y. Various geochemical indicators show that mixing of hot and cold end-member fluids occurs in the system at Platanares and, to a lesser degree, in the systems at San Ignacio and Azacualpa. No mixing is apparent in the fluids discharging at Pavana, Sambo Creek, or El Olivar. Boiling is the dominant process responsible for subtle geochemical variations at Azacualpa and, possibly, San Ignacio. Our best estimates of subsurface reservoir temperatures are 225/sup 0/C at Platanares, 190/sup 0/C at San Ignacio, 185/sup 0/C at Azacualpa, 155/sup 0/C at Sambo Creek, 150/sup 0/C at Pavana, and 120/sup 0/C at El Olivar. The estimated power output of the three hottest sites is 45 thermal megawatts at Platanares, 14 thermal megawatts at San Ignacio, and 13 thermal megawatts at Azacualpa.

  7. Geochemical signatures of the oceanic complexes in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Carr, M. J.; Denyer, P.

    2006-12-01

    /204Pb (18.5-19.0) and 207Pb/204Pb (15.53-15.58). Cretaceous oceanic islands show the same 206Pb/204Pb ratios but higher 207Pb/204Pb. Both could be included in the north and central fields of the Galapagos hot-spot. The post-Cretaceous oceanic islands show higher Pb isotopic ratios that reflect a higher HIMU component and could be included in the in the eastern Galapagos Hot-Spot field. Zr/Nb, Nb/Th, Nb/Y, and Zr/Y show that the CLIP rocks are included within the range of the oceanic plateau basalts with primitive and MORB components. The oceanic islands share these components but also include a recycling component (OIB). Santa Elena Nappe trends toward the subduction component (ARC).

  8. Mapping agricultural landscapes and characterizing adaptive capacity in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, M. B.; Imbach, P. A.; Bouroncle, C.; Donatti, C.; Leguia, E.; Martinez, M.; Medellin, C.; Saborio-Rodriguez, M.; Shamer, S.; Zamora, J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the key challenges in developing adaptation strategies for smallholder farmers in developing countries is that of a data-poor environment, where spatially-explicit information about where the most vulnerable smallholder communities are located is lacking. Developing countries tend to lack consistent and reliable maps on agricultural land use, and have limited information available on smallholder adaptive capacity. We developed a novel participatory and expert mapping process to overcome these barriers and develop detailed national-scale maps that allow for a characterization of unique agricultural landscapes based on profiles of adaptive capacity for smallholder agriculture in each area. This research focuses specifically on the Central American nations of Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Honduras, where our focus is on coffee and basic grains as the two main cropping systems. Here we present the methodology and results of a series of in-depth interviews and participatory mapping sessions with experts working within the broader agricultural sector in each country. We held individual interviews and mapping sessions with approximately thirty experts from each country, and used a detailed survey instrument for each mapping session to both spatially identify distinct agricultural landscapes, and to further characterize each area based on specific farm practices and social context. The survey also included a series of questions to help us assess the relative adaptive capacity of smallholder agriculture within each landscape. After all expert mapping sessions were completed in each country we convened an expert group to assist in both validating and refining the set of landscapes already defined. We developed a characterization of adaptive capacity by aggregating indicators into main assets-based criteria (e.g. land tenure, access to credit, access to technical assistance, sustainable farm practices) derived from further expert weighting of indicators through an online

  9. Large-volume volcanic edifice failures in Central America and associated hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siebert, Lee; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Vallance, James W.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Edifice-collapse phenomena have, to date, received relatively little attention in Central America, although ∼40 major collapse events (≥0.1 km3) from about two dozen volcanoes are known or inferred in this volcanic arc. Volcanoes subjected to gravitational failure are concentrated at the arc's western and eastern ends. Failures correlate positively with volcano elevation, substrate elevation, edifice height, volcano volume, and crustal thickness and inversely with slab descent angle. Collapse orientations are strongly influenced by the direction of slope of the underlying basement, and hence are predominately perpendicular to the arc (preferentially to the south) at its extremities and display more variable failure directions in the center of the arc.The frequency of collapse events in Central America is poorly constrained because of the lack of precise dating of deposits, but a collapse interval of ∼1000–2000 yr has been estimated during the Holocene. These high-impact events fortunately occur at low frequency, but the proximity of many Central American volcanoes to highly populated regions, including some of the region's largest cities, requires evaluation of their hazards. The primary risks are from extremely mobile debris avalanches and associated lahars, which in Central America have impacted now-populated areas up to ∼50 km from a source volcano. Lower probability risks associated with volcanic edifice collapse derive from laterally directed explosions and tsunamis. The principal hazards of the latter here result from potential impact of debris avalanches into natural or man-made lakes. Much work remains on identifying and describing debris-avalanche deposits in Central America. The identification of potential collapse sites and assessing and monitoring the stability of intact volcanoes is a major challenge for the next decade.

  10. Medicinal plants used to treat snakebite in Central America: Review and assessment of scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Peter; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R

    2017-03-06

    Every year between 1.2 and 5.5 million people worldwide are victims of snakebites, with about 400,000 left permanently injured. In Central America an estimated 5500 snakebite cases are reported by health centres, but this is likely to be an underestimate due to unreported cases in rural regions. The aim of this study is to review the medicinal plants used traditionally to treat snakebites in seven Central American countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. A literature search was performed on published primary data on medicinal plants of Central America and those specifically pertaining to use against snakebites. Plant use reports for traditional snakebite remedies identified in primary sources were extracted and entered in a database, with data analysed in terms of the most frequent numbers of use reports. The scientific evidence that might support the local uses of the most frequently reported species was also examined. A total of 260 independent plant use reports were recorded in the 34 sources included in this review, encompassing 208 species used to treat snakebite in Central America. Only nine species were reported in at least three studies: Cissampelos pareira L., Piper amalago L., Aristolochia trilobata L., Sansevieria hyacinthoides (L.) Druce, Strychnos panamensis Seem., Dorstenia contrajerva L., Scoparia dulcis L., Hamelia patens Jacq., and Simaba cedron Planch. Genera with the highest number of species used to treat snakebite were Piper, Aristolochia, Hamelia, Ipomoea, Passiflora and Peperomia. The extent of the scientific evidence available to understand any pharmacological basis for their use against snakebites varied between different plant species. At least 208 plant species are traditionally used to treat snakebite in Central America but there is a lack of clinical research to evaluate their efficacy and safety. Available pharmacological data suggest different plant species may target different symptoms of

  11. The implications of trade liberalization for diet and health: a case study from Central America.

    PubMed

    Thow, Anne Marie; Hawkes, Corinna

    2009-07-28

    Central America has undergone extensive trade liberalization over the past two decades, and has recently signed a Free Trade Agreement with the United States. The region is also experiencing a dual burden of malnutrition with the growth of dietary patterns associated with the global 'nutrition transition'. This study describes the relationship between trade liberalization policies and food imports and availability, and draws implications for diet and health, using Central America as a case study region. Changes in tariff and non-tariff barriers for each country were documented, and compared with time-series graphs of import, production and availability data to show the outcome of changes in trade policy in relation to food imports and food availability. Changes in trade policy in Central America have directly affected food imports and availability via three avenues. First, the lowering of trade barriers has promoted availability by facilitating higher imports of a wide range of foods. Second, trade liberalization has affected food availability through promoting domestic meat production. Third, reductions in barriers to investment appear to be critical in expansion of processed food markets. This suggests that changes in trade policies have facilitated rising availability and consumption of meat, dairy products, processed foods and temperate (imported fruits) in Central America. This study indicates that the policies of trade liberalization in Central American countries over the past two decades, particularly in relation to the United States, have implications for health in the region. Specifically, they have been a factor in facilitating the "nutrition transition", which is associated with rising rates of obesity and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Given the significant cost of chronic disease for the health care system, individuals and the wider community, it is critical that preventive health measures address such upstream determinants

  12. [Natural resources of Central America: the origin of the botanical expedition to Guatemala].

    PubMed

    Maldonado Polo, J L

    1995-01-01

    The scientific commission to Central America originated like a continuation of the three big botanical Spanish expeditions being carried out during the reign of Carlos III through the American territories. The presence of the naturalists José Longinos Martínez and José Mociño, and the painter Vicente de la Cerda at the capital of Guatemala was reason of great interest in the "Capitanía General", and it caused great impact on the Enlightened institutions of the time. Friends' of the Country Economical Society and the Consulado of commerce supported the works of the members of the expedition contributing to the institutionalization of the Natural History in Central America.

  13. Mineral deposits of Central America, with a section on manganese deposits of Panama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Irving, Earl Montgomery; Simons, F.S.

    1957-01-01

    The mineral deposits of Central America were studied between 1942 and 1945, in cooperation with the United States Department of State and the Foreign Economic Administration. Emphasis was originally placed on the study of strategic-mineral deposits, especially of antimony, chromite, manganese, quartz, and mica, but deposits of other minerals that offered promise of significant future production were also studied. A brief appraisal of the base-metal deposits was made, and deposits of iron ore in Honduras and of lead and zinc ores in Guatemala were mapped. In addition, studies were made of the regional geology of some areas, data were collected from many sources, and a new map of the geology of Central America was compiled.

  14. Resisting violence against women in Central America: the experience of a feminist collective.

    PubMed

    Profitt, N J

    1994-01-01

    This article explores how violence against women was resisted in Central America. It was observed that women in Central America have "developed a feminist critical consciousness of the negative responses to their personal and political transformation." This consciousness served as a bridge between various women groups and movements such as the Women's Collective Pancha Carrasco and other mutual support groups. This paper made clear that any organization addressing the issue of violence against women should take place in a context of a political framework where women can make sense of their resistance. Feminist social work practice should therefore be aimed towards a deeper understanding of the social and political dimensions of women. With this, feminist workers shall be able to create a feminist politics that is rooted on the collectivity of the experiences of women and resistance to abuse and violence.

  15. Coupled Global-Regional Climate Model Simulations of Future Changes in Hydrology over Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oglesby, R. J.; Erickson, D. J.; Hernandez, J. L.; Irwin, D.

    2005-12-01

    Central America covers a relatively small area, but is topographically very complex, has long coast-lines, large inland bodies of water, and very diverse land cover which is both natural and human-induced. As a result, Central America is plagued by hydrologic extremes, especially major flooding and drought events, in a region where many people still barely manage to eke out a living through subsistence. Therefore, considerable concern exists about whether these extreme events will change, either in magnitude or in number, as climate changes in the future. To address this concern, we have used global climate model simulations of future climate change to drive a regional climate model centered on Central America. We use the IPCC `business as usual' scenario 21st century run made with the NCAR CCSM3 global model to drive the regional model MM5 at 12 km resolution. We chose the `business as usual' scenario to focus on the largest possible changes that are likely to occur. Because we are most interested in near-term changes, our simulations are for the years 2010, 2015, and 2025. A long `present-day run (for 2005) allows us to distinguish between climate variability and any signal due to climate change. Furthermore, a multi-year run with MM5 forced by NCEP reanalyses allows an assessment of how well the coupled global-regional model performs over Central America. Our analyses suggest that the coupled model does a credible job simulating the current climate and hydrologic regime, though lack of sufficient observations strongly complicates this comparison. The suite of model runs for the future years is currently nearing completion, and key results will be presented at the meeting.

  16. A key to the Mexican and Central America Genera of Anthonomini (Curculionidae, Curculioninae).

    PubMed

    Hernández, Macotulio Soto; Jones, Robert W; Castillo, Pedro Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Presently the only keys available for identification of genera of Anthonomini are limited to those of the United States of America and Canada. A dichotomous key is presented to identify all genera of Mexican and Central American Anthonomini. Previous keys do not include the genera Achia, Botanebius, Loncophorus, Loncophorellus and Melexerus. A brief synopsis is given for each genus and photographs of representative species are included.

  17. Honduran Electoral Politics and Military Rule: The Geopolitics of Central America,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    January 1982 after nearly ten years of direct rule by the Armed Forces of Honduras . The return to constitutional rule began as early as 1976 when an...NM 87131 ’"Honduran Electoral Politics and Military Rule: - The Geopolitics of Central America"--Q- I-’ For nearly five centuries Honduras has been... Honduras is at a turning point. This conjuncture of time and conditions is further complicated by the revolution, violence, and global politics that

  18. A dynamic landslide hazard assessment system for Central America and Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Stanley, T.; Simmons, J.

    2015-10-01

    Landslides pose a serious threat to life and property in Central America and the Caribbean Islands. In order to allow regionally coordinated situational awareness and disaster response, an online decision support system was created. At its core is a new flexible framework for evaluating potential landslide activity in near real time: Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational Awareness. This framework was implemented in Central America and the Caribbean by integrating a regional susceptibility map and satellite-based rainfall estimates into a binary decision tree, considering both daily and antecedent rainfall. Using a regionally distributed, percentile-based threshold approach, the model outputs a pixel-by-pixel nowcast in near real time at a resolution of 30 arcsec to identify areas of moderate and high landslide hazard. The daily and antecedent rainfall thresholds in the model are calibrated using a subset of the Global Landslide Catalog in Central America available for 2007-2013. The model was then evaluated with data for 2014. Results suggest reasonable model skill over Central America and poorer performance over Hispaniola due primarily to the limited availability of calibration and validation data. The landslide model framework presented here demonstrates the capability to utilize globally available satellite products for regional landslide hazard assessment. It also provides a flexible framework to interchange the individual model components and adjust or calibrate thresholds based on access to new data and calibration sources. The availability of free satellite-based near real-time rainfall data allows the creation of similar models for any study area with a spatiotemporal record of landslide events. This method may also incorporate other hydrological or atmospheric variables such as numerical weather forecasts or satellite-based soil moisture estimates within this decision tree approach for improved hazard analysis.

  19. A key to the Mexican and Central America Genera of Anthonomini (Curculionidae, Curculioninae)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Macotulio Soto; Jones, Robert W.; Castillo, Pedro Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Presently the only keys available for identification of genera of Anthonomini are limited to those of the United States of America and Canada. A dichotomous key is presented to identify all genera of Mexican and Central American Anthonomini. Previous keys do not include the genera Achia, Botanebius, Loncophorus, Loncophorellus and Melexerus. A brief synopsis is given for each genus and photographs of representative species are included. PMID:23717181

  20. A dynamic landslide hazard assessment system for Central America and Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D. B.; Stanley, T.; Simmons, J.

    2015-04-01

    Landslides pose a serious threat to life and property in Central America and the Caribbean Islands. In order to allow regionally coordinated situational awareness and disaster response, an online decision support system was created. At its core is a new flexible framework for evaluating potential landslide activity in near real-time: Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational Awareness. This framework was implemented in Central America and the Caribbean by integrating a regional susceptibility map and satellite-based rainfall estimates into a binary decision tree, considering both daily and antecedent rainfall. Using a regionally distributed, percentile-based threshold approach, the model outputs a pixel-by-pixel nowcast in near real-time at a resolution of 30 arcsec to identify areas of moderate and high landslide hazard. The daily and antecedent rainfall thresholds in the model are calibrated using a subset of the Global Landslide Catalog in Central America available for 2007-2013. The model was then evaluated with data for 2014. Results suggest reasonable model skill over Central America and poorer performance over Hispaniola, due primarily to the limited availability of calibration and validation data. The landslide model framework presented here demonstrates the capability to utilize globally available satellite products for regional landslide hazard assessment. It also provides a flexible framework to interchange the indiviual model components and adjust or calibrate thresholds based on access to new data and calibration sources. The availability of free, satellite-based near real-time rainfall data allows the creation of similar models for any study area with a spatiotemporal record of landslide events. This method may also incorporate other hydrological or atmospheric variables such as numerical weather forecasts or satellite-based soil moisture estimates within this decision tree approach for improved hazard analysis.

  1. Deformation Survey of Volcanoes in Central America Using Japanese L-Band SAR Satellite ALOS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.; Lebowitz, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Japanese L-Band SAR satellite ALOS-1 has proven intself to be a useful tool for deformation monitoring of active volcanoes. Here we present a systematic deformation survey of volcanoes in Central America for the 2007-2011 time frame using the Small Baseline InSAR time-series approach. We present results for deforming volcanoes and non-deforming volcanoes, including simple elastic source models for the volcanoes that show surface deformation.

  2. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  3. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  4. Transition from the Farallon Plate subduction to the collision between South and Central America: Geological evolution of the Panama Isthmus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barat, Flore; Mercier de Lépinay, Bernard; Sosson, Marc; Müller, Carla; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents new geological constraints on the collision of southern Central America with South America, and the resulting deformational episodes that have affected the Panama Isthmus since the Late Cretaceous. The Panama Isthmus is located in southwestern Central America, and it represents the zone of contact between the two land masses: Central America and South America. This collision event is still active today. It has resulted in regional uplift since the Late Miocene/Pliocene and is responsible for the Great American Biotic Interchange between South and North America. Depending on the methods of investigation used, and due to the lack of data available, the time when this collision began is still widely debated and poorly constrained. To better constrain this age, we have studied the rock formations and the tectonic deformations in central and eastern Panama that have occurred since the Late Cretaceous. This study presents new rock ages, field-work documentation and analyses, and seismic-line interpretations, and it is complemented by spatial images for the eastern Panama area. During the Middle Eocene, a number of changes suddenly appeared in the geological records that were synchronous with the break-up of southern Central America into two smaller blocks: Chorotega and Chocó. Our main results identify the prevalence of an extensional tectonic regime from the Middle Eocene to the Middle Miocene that caused the formation of horst and graben structures with thick sedimentary basin fills, and a synchronous clockwise block rotation. Here, we propose that these geologic events are associated with the initiation of the oblique collision of southern Central America with South America. The first contact of the southeastern extremity of Central America occurred around 40 Ma to 38 Ma, and then propagated northwestwards. We describe here this long-term collision episode in relation to the history of the Panama Isthmus.

  5. Modeling the Agroecological Land Suitability for Coffea arabica L. in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, Leonel; Rasche, Livia; Schneider, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Coffee production is an important income source for small farms in Central America, but climate change threatens the production. In order to develop efficient adaptation strategies, an assessment of local conditions and opportunities is essential. Lack or uncertainty of information are common challenges for such assessments. A tool to resolve these challenges is Bayesian network analysis. In this study, we developed ALECA, the first Bayesian network model to evaluate the agroecological land suitability for Coffea arabica L. A new set of suitability functions was created and subsequently used to populate the conditional probability tables of the variables. The variables include temperature, precipitation and dry season length for the climate, slope and aspect for the landform, and soil pH, cation exchange capacity and texture for the soil component. We validated ALECA by comparing a map of current coffee areas, and specific coffee areas with known suitability for coffee production in Central America to the suitability evaluations of the model; and proceeded to explore 1) the capabilities of the model to manage data uncertainty, and 2) the changes to suitability scores under climate change. The results showed that the area suitable for coffee production will decline in Central America under climate change, underlining the need for models like ALECA, which can be used to produce reliable land evaluations at local, national and regional scales under uncertainty.

  6. Active mountain building and the distribution of core Maxillariinae species in tropical Mexico and Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The observation that southeastern Central America is a hotspot for orchid diversity has long been known and confirmed by recent systematic studies and checklists. An analysis of the geographic and elevation distribution demonstrates that the most widespread species of “core” Maxillariinae are all adapted to life near sea level, whereas the most narrowly endemic species are largely distributed in wet highland environments. Drier, hotter lowland gaps exist between these cordilleras and evidently restrict the dispersal of the species adapted to wetter, cooler conditions. Among the recent generic realignments of “core” Maxillariinae based on molecular phylogenetics, the Camaridium clade is easily the most prominent genus in Central America and is largely restricted to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama, indicating that this region is the ancestral home of this genus and that its dispersal limits are drier, lowland cordilleran gaps. The mountains of Costa Rica and Panama are among the geologically youngest topographic features in the Neotropics, reflecting the complex and dynamic interactions of numerous tectonic plates. From consideration of the available geological evidence, I conclude that the rapid growth of the mountain ranges in Costa Rica and Panama during the late Cenozoic times created, in turn, very rapid ranges in ecological life zones and geographic isolation in that part of the isthmus. Thus, I suggest that these recent geologic events were the primary drivers for accelerated orchid evolution in southeastern Central America.

  7. Current challenges for confronting the public health problem of snakebite envenoming in Central America

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a serious public health problem in Central America, where approximately 5,500 cases occur every year. Panama has the highest incidence and El Salvador the lowest. The majority, and most severe, cases are inflicted by the pit viper Bothrops asper (family Viperidae), locally known as ‘terciopelo’, ‘barba amarilla’ or ‘equis’. About 1% of the bites are caused by coral snakes of the genus Micrurus (family Elapidae). Despite significant and successful efforts in Central America regarding snakebite envenomings in the areas of research, antivenom manufacture and quality control, training of health professionals in the diagnosis and clinical management of bites, and prevention of snakebites, much remains to be done in order to further reduce the impact of this medical condition. This essay presents seven challenges for improving the confrontation of snakebite envenoming in Central America. Overcoming these challenges demands a coordinated partnership of highly diverse stakeholders though inter-sectorial and inter-programmatic interventions. PMID:24602234

  8. [Musculoskeletal pain in Central American workers: results of the First Survey on Working Conditions and Health in Central America].

    PubMed

    Rojas, Marianela; Gimeno, David; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Benavides, Fernando G

    2015-08-01

    Examine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) in the six Spanish-speaking countries of Central America using a single standardized instrument, the First Survey on Working Conditions and Health in Central America in workers from all manual and non-manual labor sectors, using social security coverage as an indicator of formal versus informal employment. The workers (n = 12 024) were surveyed in their homes. The age-adjusted prevalence of MSP during the previous month was calculated for pain in the back (upper, or cervical; middle, or thoracic; and lower, or lumbar) and arm joints (shoulder, elbow, and wrist). Prevalence was estimated by sex, occupation (manual or non-manual), economic sector (agriculture, industry, or services), and social security coverage. Poisson regression models were used to calculate the prevalence rates and 95% confidence intervals, with stratification by country and anatomical site. By sites, the age-adjusted prevalence of cervical-dorsal MSP was the highest, especially in El Salvador (47.8%) and Nicaragua (45.9%), and lumbar MSP was less prevalent, especially in Panama (12.8%) and Guatemala (14.8%). After additional adjustments, the prevalence of MSP was higher in women and manual workers for all the sites and in all the countries. There were no differences in MSP in terms of social security coverage or sector of economic activity. The high prevalence of MSP in Central America, regardless of sector of activity or social security coverage, indicates that the prevention of MSP should be a priority in occupational health programs in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women and manual workers.

  9. Parvitermes (Isoptera, Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) in Central America: Two new termite species and reassignment of Nasutitermes mexicanus

    PubMed Central

    Scheffrahn, Rudolf H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The termite genus Parvitermes is now recognized on the Central American mainland to include Parvitermes mexicanus, new combination (previously in Nasutitermes) and two new species, Parvitermes mesoamericanus sp. n. and Parvitermes yucatanus sp. n., herein described from soldiers and workers. These three species, nine West Indian Parvitermes, and Antillitermes subtilis all share characteristic enteric valve spines that orientate against intestinal flow. All species are subterranean nesters and cellulose feeders. Evidence is mounting that generic-level endemicity may be completely absent among the West Indian nasutitermitine fauna and that its origins stem from Central America. PMID:27667954

  10. Parvitermes (Isoptera, Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) in Central America: Two new termite species and reassignment of Nasutitermes mexicanus.

    PubMed

    Scheffrahn, Rudolf H

    2016-01-01

    The termite genus Parvitermes is now recognized on the Central American mainland to include Parvitermes mexicanus, new combination (previously in Nasutitermes) and two new species, Parvitermes mesoamericanus sp. n. and Parvitermes yucatanus sp. n., herein described from soldiers and workers. These three species, nine West Indian Parvitermes, and Antillitermes subtilis all share characteristic enteric valve spines that orientate against intestinal flow. All species are subterranean nesters and cellulose feeders. Evidence is mounting that generic-level endemicity may be completely absent among the West Indian nasutitermitine fauna and that its origins stem from Central America.

  11. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Central America: a cross-sectional population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wong-McClure, Roy A; Gregg, Edward W; Barceló, Alberto; Lee, Kahye; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra; Sanabria-López, Laura; Tortós-Guzmán, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    To report the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) as found by the Central American Diabetes Initiative (CAMDI) study for five major Central American populations: Belize (national); Costa Rica (San José); Guatemala (Guatemala City); Honduras (Tegucigalpa); and Nicaragua (Managua). Study data on 6 185 adults aged 20 years or older with anthropometric and laboratory determination of MetS from population-based surveys were analyzed. Overall, the survey response rate was 82.0%. MetS prevalence was determined according to criteria from the Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program. The study's protocol was reviewed and approved by the bioethical committee of each country studied. The overall standardized prevalence of MetS in the Central American region was 30.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 27.1-33.4). There was wide variability by gender and work conditions, with higher prevalence among females and unpaid workers. The standardized percentage of the population free of any component of MetS was lowest in Costa Rica (9.0%; CI: 6.5-11.4) and highest in Honduras (21.1%; CI: 16.4-25.9). Overall prevalence of MetS in Central America is high. Strengthening surveillance of chronic diseases and establishing effective programs for preventing cardiovascular diseases might reduce the risk of MetS in Central America.

  12. Quantitative estimates of tropical temperature change in lowland Central America during the last 42 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauel, Anna-Lena; Hodell, David A.; Bernasconi, Stefano M.

    2016-03-01

    Determining the magnitude of tropical temperature change during the last glacial period is a fundamental problem in paleoclimate research. Large discrepancies exist in estimates of tropical cooling inferred from marine and terrestrial archives. Here we present a reconstruction of temperature for the last 42 ka from a lake sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala, located at 17°N in lowland Central America. We compared three independent methods of glacial temperature reconstruction: pollen-based temperature estimates, tandem measurements of δ18O in biogenic carbonate and gypsum hydration water, and clumped isotope thermometry. Pollen provides a near-continuous record of temperature change for most of the glacial period but the occurrence of a no-analog pollen assemblage during cold, dry stadials renders temperature estimates unreliable for these intervals. In contrast, the gypsum hydration and clumped isotope methods are limited mainly to the stadial periods when gypsum and biogenic carbonate co-occur. The combination of palynological and geochemical methods leads to a continuous record of tropical temperature change in lowland Central America over the last 42 ka. Furthermore, the gypsum hydration water method and clumped isotope thermometry provide independent estimates of not only temperature, but also the δ18O of lake water that is dependent on the hydrologic balance between evaporation and precipitation over the lake surface and its catchment. The results show that average glacial temperature was cooler in lowland Central America by 5-10 °C relative to the Holocene. The coldest and driest times occurred during North Atlantic stadial events, particularly Heinrich stadials (HSs), when temperature decreased by up to 6 to 10 °C relative to today. This magnitude of cooling is much greater than estimates derived from Caribbean marine records and model simulations. The extreme dry and cold conditions during HSs in the lowland Central America were associated

  13. Prevalence, Distributions and Determinants of Obesity and Central Obesity in the Southern Cone of America.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Fernando; Bazzano, Lydia; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Calandrelli, Matias; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Elorriaga, Natalia; Gutierrez, Laura; Manfredi, Jose A; Seron, Pamela; Mores, Nora; Poggio, Rosana; Ponzo, Jacqueline; Olivera, Hector; He, Jiang; Irazola, Vilma E

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major determinant of cardiovascular disease in South America. However, population-based data are limited. A total of 7,524 women and men, aged 35 to 74 years old, were randomly selected from 4 cities in the Southern Cone of Latin America between February 2010 and December 2011. Obesity clinical measurements and cardiovascular risk factors were measured using standard methodology. The prevalence of obesity and central obesity were 35.7% and 52.9%, respectively. The prevalence of obesity and central obesity were higher in women, and even higher in women with lower education compared with women with higher education. In men and women obesity was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes, odds ratio (OR) 2.38 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.86 to 3.05) and 3.01 (95%CI 2.42 to 3.74) respectively, hypertension (OR 2.79 (95%CI 2.32 to 3.36) and 2.40 (95%CI 2.05 to 2.80) respectively, dyslipidemia (OR 1.83 (95%CI 1.50 to 2.24) and 1.69 (95%CI 1.45 to 1.98), respectively, low physical activity (OR 1.38(95%CI 1.14 to 1.68) and 1.38 (95%CI 1.18 to 1.62) respectively and a lower prevalence of smoking (OR, 0.65 (95%CI 0.53 to 0.80) and 0.58(95%CI 0.48 to 0.70) respectively. Obesity and central obesity are highly prevalent in the general population in the Southern Cone of Latin America and are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk factor prevalence. These data suggest that efforts toward prevention, treatment, and control of obesity should be a public health priority in the Southern Cone of Latin America.

  14. Circulation characteristics of persistent cold spells in central-eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Manson, Alan H.; Li, Yanping; Meek, Chris

    2017-02-01

    The circulation patterns of persistent cold weather spells with durations longer than 10 days in central-eastern North America (United States and Canada; 32°-52°N, 95°-65°W) are investigated by using NCEP reanalysis data from 1948 to 2014. The criteria for the persistent cold spells are: (1) three-day averaged temperature anomalies for the regional average over the central-eastern United States and Canada must be below the 10th percentile, and (2) such extreme cold spells must last at least 10 days. The circulation patterns associated with these cold spells are examined to find the common signals of these events. The circulation anomaly patterns of these cold spells are categorized based on the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Arctic Oscillation (AO), and other climate indices. The atmospheric circulation patterns that favor the cold spells are identified through composites of geopotential height maps for the cold spells. Negative AO phases favor persistent cold spells. Phases of sea surface temperature (SST) modes that are associated with warm SSTs in the eastern extratropical Pacific also favor persistent cold events in the study region. Stratospheric polar vortex breakdown alone is not a good predictor for the regional extreme cold spells in central-eastern North America. The meridional dispersions of quasi-stationary Rossby waves in the Pacific-North America sector in terms of cut-off zonal wavenumber modulated by background flow are analyzed to provide insight into the difference in evolution of the cold spells under different mean AO phases. The waveguide for AO > 1 is in a narrow latitudinal band centered on 40°N, whereas the waveguide for AO <-1 is in a broader latitudinal band from 40° to 65°N. The circulation patterns and lower boundary conditions favorable for persistent cold spells identified by this study can be a stepping-stone for improving winter subseasonal forecasting in North America.

  15. Prevalence, Distributions and Determinants of Obesity and Central Obesity in the Southern Cone of America

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia; Rubinstein, Adolfo; Calandrelli, Matias; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Elorriaga, Natalia; Gutierrez, Laura; Manfredi, Jose A.; Seron, Pamela; Mores, Nora; Poggio, Rosana; Ponzo, Jacqueline; Olivera, Hector; He, Jiang; Irazola, Vilma E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major determinant of cardiovascular disease in South America. However, population-based data are limited. Methods A total of 7,524 women and men, aged 35 to 74 years old, were randomly selected from 4 cities in the Southern Cone of Latin America between February 2010 and December 2011. Obesity clinical measurements and cardiovascular risk factors were measured using standard methodology. Results The prevalence of obesity and central obesity were 35.7% and 52.9%, respectively. The prevalence of obesity and central obesity were higher in women, and even higher in women with lower education compared with women with higher education. In men and women obesity was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes, odds ratio (OR) 2.38 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.86 to 3.05) and 3.01 (95%CI 2.42 to 3.74) respectively, hypertension (OR 2.79 (95%CI 2.32 to 3.36) and 2.40 (95%CI 2.05 to 2.80) respectively, dyslipidemia (OR 1.83 (95%CI 1.50 to 2.24) and 1.69 (95%CI 1.45 to 1.98), respectively, low physical activity (OR 1.38(95%CI 1.14 to 1.68) and 1.38 (95%CI 1.18 to 1.62) respectively and a lower prevalence of smoking (OR, 0.65 (95%CI 0.53 to 0.80) and 0.58(95%CI 0.48 to 0.70) respectively. Conclusions Obesity and central obesity are highly prevalent in the general population in the Southern Cone of Latin America and are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk factor prevalence. These data suggest that efforts toward prevention, treatment, and control of obesity should be a public health priority in the Southern Cone of Latin America. PMID:27741247

  16. Regional Hydrological Response to Climate Change in Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmalkar, A. V.; Bradley, R. S.; Diaz, H. F.

    2009-12-01

    Future changes in precipitation amount and variability are among the most important and serious projected consequences of climate change. Central America (CAM) shows most of its climate variability in precipitation. Thus, the large hydrological response to global warming can have negative consequences on agricultural activities and the ecosystem dynamics in the region. Indeed, Central America is considered to be a climate change hot-spot in the tropics mainly due to a future decrease in precipitation and an increase in precipitation variability as projected by the IPCC models. These coarse resolution general circulation models (GCMs) do not provide climate information at spatial scales appropriate for impacts assessment. A regional climate model PRECIS was used in this study to carry out two experiments: (i) the baseline (present-day) run and (ii) the SRES A2 run, both performed at 25 km horizontal resolution. The low-level circulation in the region around Central America is controlled by the low pressure area in the Pacific (the ITCZ) and the high pressure area (North Atlantic Subtropical High, NASH) in the Atlantic. Changes in the position and magnitude of the ITCZ low and the NASH govern the low-level circulation in the region. The spatial pattern of precipitation over CAM landmass is further modified by the complex topography and the land surface properties. A large reduction in precipitation is projected during the wet season (May-Oct) for eastern Mexico (30% decrease) and the Yucatan Peninsula (40% decrease) under the A2 scenario. A small decrease in precipitation during the wet season is projected for the Caribbean slopes of southern Central America. In general, a decrease in precipitation in these regions is associated with an increase in sea level pressure that indicates extended/intensified NASH in the future scenario. Regions on the Pacific side of the CAM cordillera show up to 20-25% decrease in precipitation in the wet season which is associated with

  17. Webinar Presentation: Black Carbon and Other Light-absorbing Particles in Snow in Central North America and North China

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Black Carbon and Other Light-absorbing Particles in Snow in Central North America and North China, was given at the STAR Black Carbon 2016 Webinar Series: Accounting for Impact, Emissions, and Uncertainty held on Nov. 7, 2016.

  18. Diurnal and Seasonal Trends in Canopy Transpiration and Conductance of Pristine Forest Types in Belize, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Oren, R.; Billings, S.; Muller-Ezards, C.; Schaaff, C.; Strohmeier, P.; Obermaier, E.

    1994-01-01

    Five semi-deciduous broadleaf forest types growing over tropical karst in Belize, Central America, were monitored for three years to study diurnal and seasonal changes of transpiration and micro-meteorologic conditions.

  19. Diurnal and Seasonal Trends in Canopy Transpiration and Conductance of Pristine Forest Types in Belize, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, R.; Oren, R.; Billings, S.; Muller-Ezards, C.; Schaaff, C.; Strohmeier, P.; Obermaier, E.

    1994-01-01

    Five semi-deciduous broadleaf forest types growing over tropical karst in Belize, Central America, were monitored for three years to study diurnal and seasonal changes of transpiration and micro-meteorologic conditions.

  20. Pre-Hispanic agricultural decline prior to the Spanish Conquest in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Zachary P.; Horn, Sally P.; Finkelstein, David B.

    2013-08-01

    Archeological and paleoenvironmental records from southern Central America attribute population collapse to the Spanish Conquest about 500 years ago. Paleoclimate records from the circum-Caribbean have shown evidence of severe, regional droughts that contributed to the collapse of the Mayan Civilization, but there are few records of these droughts in southern Central America and no records of their effects on prehistoric populations in the region. Here we present a high-resolution lake sediment record of prehistoric agricultural activities using bulk sediment stable carbon isotopes from Laguna Zoncho, Costa Rica. We find isotopic evidence that agriculture was nearly absent from the watershed approximately 220 years prior to the Spanish arrival in Costa Rica and identify two distinct periods of agricultural decline, 1150-970 and 860-640 cal yr BP, which correspond to severe droughts in central Mexico. We attribute decreases in agriculture to a weakened Central American monsoon, which would have shortened the growing season at Laguna Zoncho, reduced crop yields, and negatively affected prehistoric populations.

  1. The impact of global unknown teleconnection patterns on terrestrial precipitation across North and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Imen, Sanaz; Bai, Kaixu; Jeffrey Yang, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Global sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies can affect terrestrial precipitation via ocean-atmosphere interactions known as climate teleconnections. Nonstationary and nonlinear characteristics of the teleconnection signals passing through the complex ocean-atmosphere-land system may provide a unique opportunity to quantify large-scale climate variability. This work explores the systematic relationships between global SST anomalies and terrestrial precipitation variability with respect to long-term nonlinear and nonstationary teleconnection signals during 1981-2010 over three regions in North America and one in Central America. The aim of this study was to investigate the surveillance capacity of teleconnections through varying atmospheric pathways toward different types of landscape and geographical environments. After finding possible associations between the dominant variation of seasonal precipitation and global SST anomalies through the integrated empirical mode decomposition, wavelet analysis, and lagged correlation analysis, the statistically significant SST regions were extracted to identify both known and unknown teleconnections. Results indicate that previously unidentified SST regions contribute a salient portion of terrestrial precipitation variability over different terrestrial regions. Central America and Pacific Northwest study sites receive highest probable impacts of climate variability driven by some unknown teleconnections that reveal unique coupling interactions between oceanic and atmospheric processes, implying possible linkages with atmospheric rivers.

  2. Landscape evolution within a retreating volcanic arc, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Idleman, Bruce D.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Fisher, Donald M.

    2003-05-01

    Subduction of hotspot-thickened seafloor profoundly affects convergent margin tectonics, strongly affecting upper plate structure, volcanism, and landscape evolution. In southern Central America, low-angle subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamount domain largely controls landscape evolution in the volcanic arc. Field mapping, stratigraphic correlation, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of central Costa Rica provide new insights into the geomorphic response of volcanic arc landscapes to changes in subduction parameters (slab thickness, roughness, dip). Late Neogene volcanism was focused primarily along the now-extinct Cordillera de Aguacate. Quaternary migration of the magmatic front shifted volcanism northeastward to the Caribbean slope, creating a new topographic divide and forming the Valle Central basin. Stream capture across the paleo Aguacate divide led to drainage reversal toward the Pacific slope and deep incision of reorganized fluvial networks. Pleistocene caldera activity generated silicic ash flows that buried the Valle Central and descended the Tárcoles gorge to the Orotina debris fan at the coast. Growth of the modern Cordillera Central accentuated relief along the new divide, establishing the Valle Central as a Pacific slope drainage basin. Arc migration, relocation of the Pacific-Caribbean drainage divide, and formation of the Valle Central basin resulted from slab shallowing as irregular, hotspot-thickened crust entered the subduction zone. The geomorphic evolution of volcanic arc landscapes is thus highly sensitive to changes in subducting plate character.

  3. Development and Analysis of a Hurricane Hazard Model for Disaster Risk Assessment in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pita, G. L.; Gunasekera, R.; Ishizawa, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane and tropical storm activity in Central America has consistently caused over the past decades thousands of casualties, significant population displacement, and substantial property and infrastructure losses. As a component to estimate future potential losses, we present a new regional probabilistic hurricane hazard model for Central America. Currently, there are very few openly available hurricane hazard models for Central America. This resultant hazard model would be used in conjunction with exposure and vulnerability components as part of a World Bank project to create country disaster risk profiles that will assist to improve risk estimation and provide decision makers with better tools to quantify disaster risk. This paper describes the hazard model methodology which involves the development of a wind field model that simulates the gust speeds at terrain height at a fine resolution. The HURDAT dataset has been used in this study to create synthetic events that assess average hurricane landfall angles and their variability at each location. The hazard model also then estimates the average track angle at multiple geographical locations in order to provide a realistic range of possible hurricane paths that will be used for risk analyses in all the Central-American countries. This probabilistic hurricane hazard model is then also useful for relating synthetic wind estimates to loss and damage data to develop and calibrate existing empirical building vulnerability curves. To assess the accuracy and applicability, modeled results are evaluated against historical events, their tracks and wind fields. Deeper analyses of results are also presented with a special reference to Guatemala. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the

  4. A phylogeny of Astyanax (Characiformes: Characidae) in Central and North America.

    PubMed

    Schmitter-Soto, Juan J

    2016-05-06

    A phylogeny is presented for 34 species of Astyanax, 27 of them once included within A. aeneus or A. fasciatus in Central America and Mexico, based on 52 morphological characters (mostly osteological, but also pigmentation and meristics), with three outgroups. Monophyly is not supported for A. aeneus s. lat., as Brazilian species such as A. fasciatus s. str. and others occur also within that clade. There were only five resolved clades, three of them including both Brazilian and Central American species, one purely Nicaraguan, and one for central-northern Mexico and Texas. Coincidence with previous cladistic hypotheses is only partial. The genus Bramocharax Gill is not recovered, and thus confirmed as a synonym of Astyanax Baird & Girard. The findings point at a more complex biogeographic history of the region than usually recognized.

  5. [Lack of food and nutritional security in Central America: contributing factors and social exclusion].

    PubMed

    Delgado, H

    2001-12-01

    In August 2001, the XVII Meeting of the Health Sector in Central America and the Dominican Republic (RESSCAD) was held in Managua, Nicaragua. At the meeting, a resolution was adopted in support of strengthening and furthering the Central American initiative for the Promotion of Food and Nutritional Security. This paper examines the conceptual framework behind the initiative, which was approved by the XIV Central American Presidents Summit Meeting (Guatemala City, Guatemala) and launched in 1994 at the regional, national, and municipal levels (Guacimo, Costa Rica, 1994). It focuses on the accomplishments attributable to this initiative, the challenges it has faced over 2001 and those it will be facing over the next biennium, and the measures taken or recommended so far in order to ensure its long-term success.

  6. The occurrence of rabies in pre-Columbian Central America: an historical search.

    PubMed

    Vos, A; Nunan, C; Bolles, D; Müller, T; Fooks, A R; Tordo, N; Baer, G M

    2011-10-01

    Rabies is considered one of the oldest infectious diseases known to humans. However, the first written reports on rabies cases in the Americas did not appear until the first decade of the 18th century from Mexico. In an attempt to clarify if the disease was already present in pre-Columbian times, we searched for evidence in the Maya and Aztec cultures. Other sources of information were early manuscripts written by the conquistadors and early explorers. We did not identify any unequivocal direct evidence that the disease rabies was known in pre-Columbian Central America but sufficient circumstantial evidence is available suggesting that (bat) rabies was already present in these early times.

  7. Circulating Strains of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Sovero, Merly; Garcia, Josefina; Kochel, Tadeusz; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Gomez, Jorge; Chicaiza, Wilson; Barrantes, Melvin; Sanchez, Felix; Jimenez, Mirna; Comach, Guillermo; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Arango, Ana E.; Agudo, Roberto; Halsey, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a major cause of viral lower respiratory tract infections among infants and young children. HRSV strains vary genetically and antigenically and have been classified into two broad subgroups, A and B (HRSV-A and HRSV-B, respectively). To date, little is known about the circulating strains of HRSV in Latin America. We have evaluated the genetic diversity of 96 HRSV strains by sequencing a variable region of the G protein gene of isolates collected from 2007 to 2009 in Central and South America. Our results show the presence of the two antigenic subgroups of HRSV during this period with the majority belonging to the genotype HRSV-A2. PMID:21829605

  8. Genetic divergence disclosing a rapid prehistorical dispersion of Native Americans in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    He, Yungang; Wang, Wei R; Li, Ran; Wang, Sijia; Jin, Li

    2012-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the divergence time between Native Americans is important for understanding the initial entry and early dispersion of human beings in the New World. Current methods for estimating the genetic divergence time of populations could seriously depart from a linear relationship with the true divergence for multiple populations of a different population size and significant population expansion. Here, to address this problem, we propose a novel measure to estimate the genetic divergence time of populations. Computer simulation revealed that the new measure maintained an excellent linear correlation with the population divergence time in complicated multi-population scenarios with population expansion. Utilizing the new measure and microsatellite data of 21 Native American populations, we investigated the genetic divergences of the Native American populations. The results indicated that genetic divergences between North American populations are greater than that between Central and South American populations. None of the divergences, however, were large enough to constitute convincing evidence supporting the two-wave or multi-wave migration model for the initial entry of human beings into America. The genetic affinity of the Native American populations was further explored using Neighbor-Net and the genetic divergences suggested that these populations could be categorized into four genetic groups living in four different ecologic zones. The divergence of the population groups suggests that the early dispersion of human beings in America was a multi-step procedure. Further, the divergences suggest the rapid dispersion of Native Americans in Central and South Americas after a long standstill period in North America.

  9. Genetic Divergence Disclosing a Rapid Prehistorical Dispersion of Native Americans in Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    He, Yungang; Wang, Wei R.; Li, Ran; Wang, Sijia; Jin, Li

    2012-01-01

    An accurate estimate of the divergence time between Native Americans is important for understanding the initial entry and early dispersion of human beings in the New World. Current methods for estimating the genetic divergence time of populations could seriously depart from a linear relationship with the true divergence for multiple populations of a different population size and significant population expansion. Here, to address this problem, we propose a novel measure to estimate the genetic divergence time of populations. Computer simulation revealed that the new measure maintained an excellent linear correlation with the population divergence time in complicated multi-population scenarios with population expansion. Utilizing the new measure and microsatellite data of 21 Native American populations, we investigated the genetic divergences of the Native American populations. The results indicated that genetic divergences between North American populations are greater than that between Central and South American populations. None of the divergences, however, were large enough to constitute convincing evidence supporting the two-wave or multi-wave migration model for the initial entry of human beings into America. The genetic affinity of the Native American populations was further explored using Neighbor-Net and the genetic divergences suggested that these populations could be categorized into four genetic groups living in four different ecologic zones. The divergence of the population groups suggests that the early dispersion of human beings in America was a multi-step procedure. Further, the divergences suggest the rapid dispersion of Native Americans in Central and South Americas after a long standstill period in North America. PMID:22970308

  10. Central America in Transition: From Maize to Wheat. Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Amado Salvador; Crusius, Jakob Bart Arie

    2015-01-01

    The Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama are in transition from a dietary culture based mainly on maize to a wheat-containing diet. Several other changes are occurring, such as a decrease of parasitic and infectious diseases. The environmental changes permit a prediction of an increase of celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes and thyroid disease in these genetically heterogeneous countries. At present, celiac disease and gluten-related disorders are considered to be of no relevance at the level of public health in these nations. This review documents the presence of celiac disease in Central America. It draws attention to some of the challenges in planning systematic studies in the region since up until recently celiac disease was unknown. The aim of this review is to disseminate knowledge obtained with preliminary data, to stimulate clinical and basic scientists to study these diseases in Central America and to alert authorities responsible for the planning of education and health, to find possibilities to avoid a rise in these disorders before the epidemics start, as has occurred in the Mediterranean countries. PMID:26343711

  11. Central America in Transition: From Maize to Wheat Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Peña, Amado Salvador; Crusius, Jakob Bart Arie

    2015-08-26

    The Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama are in transition from a dietary culture based mainly on maize to a wheat-containing diet. Several other changes are occurring, such as a decrease of parasitic and infectious diseases. The environmental changes permit a prediction of an increase of celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes and thyroid disease in these genetically heterogeneous countries. At present, celiac disease and gluten-related disorders are considered to be of no relevance at the level of public health in these nations. This review documents the presence of celiac disease in Central America. It draws attention to some of the challenges in planning systematic studies in the region since up until recently celiac disease was unknown. The aim of this review is to disseminate knowledge obtained with preliminary data, to stimulate clinical and basic scientists to study these diseases in Central America and to alert authorities responsible for the planning of education and health, to find possibilities to avoid a rise in these disorders before the epidemics start, as has occurred in the Mediterranean countries.

  12. Evidence for Pleistocene Population Divergence and Expansion of Anopheles albimanus in Southern Central America

    PubMed Central

    Loaiza, Jose R.; Scott, Marilyn E.; Bermingham, Eldredge; Rovira, Jose; Conn, Jan E.

    2010-01-01

    The micro-geographic structure of Anopheles albimanus was studied in southern Central America using partial sequences of the mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene (COI). Analysis of molecular variance supported significant genetic structure between populations from Costa Rica and western Panama versus those from central-eastern Panama (ΦCT = 0.33), whereas the within group divergence was shallow and statistically insignificant (ΦST = 0.08). Furthermore, a statistical parsimony network depicted three divergent groups of haplotypes that were not evenly distributed across the study area. Our findings are in partial agreement with previous studies, yet they do not support physical barriers to gene flow or contemporary isolation by distance in this region. Instead, three co-occurring groups of An. albimanus may be the result of multiple introductions, most likely caused by historical fragmentation and subsequent secondary contact. In addition, the molecular signature of population expansion of An. albimanus was detected in central-eastern Panama approximately 22,000 years ago (95% confidence interval [CI] 10,183–38,169). We hypothesize that the population structure of An. albimanus, as determined by our COI locus analysis, is the result of late Pleistocene climatic changes in northern South America. PMID:20065014

  13. Characterising droughts in Central America with uncertain hydro-meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada Montano, B.; Westerberg, I.; Wetterhall, F.; Hidalgo, H. G.; Halldin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Droughts studies are scarce in Central America, a region frequently affected by droughts that cause significant socio-economic and environmental problems. Drought characterisation is important for water management and planning and can be done with the help of drought indices. Many indices have been developed in the last decades but their ability to suitably characterise droughts depends on the region of application. In Central America, comprehensive and high-quality observational networks of meteorological and hydrological data are not available. This limits the choice of drought indices and denotes the need to evaluate the quality of the data used in their calculation. This paper aimed to find which combination(s) of drought index and meteorological database are most suitable for characterising droughts in Central America. The drought indices evaluated were the standardised precipitation index (SPI), deciles (DI), the standardised precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI) and the effective drought index (EDI). These were calculated using precipitation data from the Climate Hazards Group Infra-Red Precipitation with station (CHIRPS), CRN073, the Climate Research Unit (CRU), ERA-Interim and station databases, and temperature data from the CRU database. All the indices were calculated at 1-, 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-month accumulation times. As a first step, the large-scale meteorological precipitation datasets were compared to have an overview of the level of agreement between them and find possible quality problems. Then, the performance of all the combinations of drought indices and meteorological datasets were evaluated against independent river discharge data, in form of the standardised streamflow index (SSI). Results revealed the large disagreement between the precipitation datasets; we found the selection of database to be more important than the selection of drought index. We found that the best combinations of meteorological drought index and database were

  14. Seismic hazard maps of Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, J.G.; Shedlock, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard and/or economic constraints. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. We have produced a suite of seismic hazard estimates for Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. One of the preliminary maps in this suite served as the basis for the Caribbean and Central and South America portion of the Global Seismic Hazard Map (GSHM) published in 1999, which depicted peak ground acceleration (pga) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. Herein we present maps depicting pga and 0.2 and 1.0 s spectral accelerations (SA) with 50%, 10%, and 2% chances of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. The seismicity catalog used in the generation of these maps adds 3 more years of data to those used to calculate the GSH Map. Different attenuation functions (consistent with those used to calculate the U.S. and Canadian maps) were used as well. These nine maps are designed to assist in global risk mitigation by providing a general seismic hazard framework and serving as a resource for any national or regional agency to help focus further detailed studies required for regional/local needs. The largest seismic hazard values in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes. High hazard values occur in areas where shallow-to-intermediate seismicity occurs frequently. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating regional differences in macroinvertebrate communities from forested depressional wetlands across eastern and central North America.

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, Darold, P.; Dietz-Brantley, Susan E.; Taylor, Barbera E.; DeBiase, Adrienne E.

    2005-02-12

    Batzer, Darold, P., Susan E. Dietz-Brantley, Barbera E. Taylor, and Adrienne E. DeBiase. 2005. Evaluating regional differences in macroinvertebrate communities from forested depressional wetlands across eastern and central North America. J. N. Am. Benthol. Soc. 24(2):403-414. Abstract. Forested depressional wetlands are an important seasonal wetland type across eastern and central North America. Macroinvertebrates are crucial ecosystem components of most forested depressional wetlands, but community compositions can vary widely across the region. We evaluated variation in macroinvertebrate faunas across eastern and central North America using 5 published taxa lists from forested depressional wetlands in Michigan, Ontario, Wisconsin, Florida, and Georgia. We supplemented those data with quantitative community descriptions generated from 17 forested depressional wetlands in South Carolina and 74 of these wetlands in Minnesota. Cluster analysis of presence/absence data from these 7 locations indicated that distinct macroinvertebrate communities existed in northern and southern areas. Taxa characteristic of northern forested depressionalwetlands included Sphaeriidae, Lumbriculidae, Lymnaeidae, Physidae, Limnephilidae, Chirocephalidae, and Hirudinea (Glossophoniidae and/or Erpodbellidae) and taxa characteristic of southern sites included Asellidae, Crangonyctidae, Noteridae, and Cambaridae. Quantitative sampling in South Carolina and Minnesota indicated that regionally characteristic taxa included some of the most abundant organisms, with Sphaeriidae being the 2nd most abundant macroinvertebrate in Minnesota wetlands and Asellidae being the 2nd most abundant macroinvertebrate in South Carolina wetlands. Mollusks, in general, were restricted to forested depressional wetlands of northern latitudes, a pattern that may reflect a lack of Ca needed for shell formation in acidic southern sites. Differences in community composition probably translate into region

  16. LISN: Measurement of TEC values, and TID characteristics over South and Central America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) is a distributed observatory designed to provide the climatology and weather of the low latitude ionosphere over the South American continent. Presently, the LISN observatory consists of 47 GPS receivers able to transmit TEC and scintillation values to a central server in a real-time basis. Historical TEC values from these receivers and from about 300 other GPSs that operated in South and Central America between 2008 and 2012 were used to derive regional maps of TEC and TIDs. A prominent feature of the TEC maps is the intense day-to-day variability that is observed during all seasons and under quiet and active magnetic conditions. To assess the TEC dependencies a non-linear least-square fit was conducted to simultaneously extract the solar flux, magnetic and seasonal variability for each square cell of the TEC maps and for each 30-min local time sector. It was found that TEC values and the anomaly intensity increase as a function of the solar flux. The latitudinal separation increases with magnetic activity, and TEC values in Central America become the largest when Kp is equal to 5o or more. TIDs are seen quite frequently over the Caribbean region and in the northern part of South America. To calculate the TIDs travel velocities, their propagation direction, and the scale-size of the disturbances a multi-site multi-dimension cross-correlation method was applied to the TEC database. Phase velocities of order 150 m/s and scale sizes between 100 and 400 km were typically observed. This paper will present the morphology and statistics of TIDs as a function of latitude, longitude, local time and season. It is also introduced the results of an investigation to correlate the appearance, phase velocity and angle of propagation of TIDs and tropospheric phenomena observed with the TRMM satellite.

  17. Covariability of Central America/Mexico winter precipitation and tropical sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yutong; Zeng, Ning; Mariotti, Annarita; Wang, Hui; Kumar, Arun; Sánchez, René Lobato; Jha, Bhaskar

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the relationships between Central America/Mexico (CAM) winter precipitation and tropical Pacific/Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are examined based on 68-year (1948-2015) observations and 59-year (1957-2015) atmospheric model simulations forced by observed SSTs. The covariability of the winter precipitation and SSTs is quantified using the singular value decomposition (SVD) method with observational data. The first SVD mode relates out-of-phase precipitation anomalies in northern Mexico and Central America to the tropical Pacific El Niño/La Niña SST variation. The second mode links a decreasing trend in the precipitation over Central America to the warming of SSTs in the tropical Atlantic, as well as in the tropical western Pacific and the tropical Indian Ocean. The first mode represents 67% of the covariance between the two fields, indicating a strong association between CAM winter precipitation and El Niño/La Niña, whereas the second mode represents 20% of the covariance. The two modes account for 32% of CAM winter precipitation variance, of which, 17% is related to the El Niño/La Niña SST and 15% is related to the SST warming trend. The atmospheric circulation patterns, including 500-hPa height and low-level winds obtained by linear regressions against the SVD SST time series, are dynamically consistent with the precipitation anomaly patterns. The model simulations driven by the observed SSTs suggest that these precipitation anomalies are likely a response to tropical SST forcing. It is also shown that there is significant potential predictability of CAM winter precipitation given tropical SST information.

  18. A spatio-temporal analysis of forest loss related to cocaine trafficking in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesnie, Steven E.; Tellman, Beth; Wrathall, David; McSweeney, Kendra; Nielsen, Erik; Benessaiah, Karina; Wang, Ophelia; Rey, Luis

    2017-05-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that criminal activities associated with drug trafficking networks are a progressively important driver of forest loss in Central America. However, the scale at which drug trafficking represents a driver of forest loss is not presently known. We estimated the degree to which narcotics trafficking may contribute to forest loss using an unsupervised spatial clustering of 15 spatial and temporal forest loss patch metrics developed from global forest change data. We distinguished anomalous forest loss from background loss patches for each country exhibiting potential ‘narco-capitalized’ signatures which showed a statistically significant dissimilarity from other patches in terms of size, timing, and rate of forest loss. We also compared annual anomalous forest loss with the number of cocaine shipments and volume of cocaine seized, lost, or delivered at country- and department-level. For Honduras, results from linear mixed effects models showed a highly significant relationship between anomalous forest loss and the timing of increased drug trafficking (F = 9.90, p = 0.009) that also differed significantly from temporal patterns of background forest loss (t-ratio = 2.98, p = 0.004). Other locations of high forest loss in Central America showed mixed results. The timing of increased trafficking was not significantly related to anomalous forest loss in Guatemala and Nicaragua, but significantly differed in patch size compared to background losses. We estimated that cocaine trafficking could account for between 15% and 30% of annual national forest loss in these three countries over the past decade, and 30% to 60% of loss occurred within nationally and internationally designated protected areas. Cocaine trafficking is likely to have severe and lasting consequences in terms of maintaining moist tropical forest cover in Central America. Addressing forest loss in these and other tropical locations will require a stronger

  19. Climate change in Central America and Mexico: regional climate model validation and climate change projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmalkar, Ambarish V.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Diaz, Henry F.

    2011-08-01

    Central America has high biodiversity, it harbors high-value ecosystems and it's important to provide regional climate change information to assist in adaptation and mitigation work in the region. Here we study climate change projections for Central America and Mexico using a regional climate model. The model evaluation shows its success in simulating spatial and temporal variability of temperature and precipitation and also in capturing regional climate features such as the bimodal annual cycle of precipitation and the Caribbean low-level jet. A variety of climate regimes within the model domain are also better identified in the regional model simulation due to improved resolution of topographic features. Although, the model suffers from large precipitation biases, it shows improvements over the coarse-resolution driving model in simulating precipitation amounts. The model shows a dry bias in the wet season and a wet bias in the dry season suggesting that it's unable to capture the full range of precipitation variability. Projected warming under the A2 scenario is higher in the wet season than that in the dry season with the Yucatan Peninsula experiencing highest warming. A large reduction in precipitation in the wet season is projected for the region, whereas parts of Central America that receive a considerable amount of moisture in the form of orographic precipitation show significant decreases in precipitation in the dry season. Projected climatic changes can have detrimental impacts on biodiversity as they are spatially similar, but far greater in magnitude, than those observed during the El Niño events in recent decades that adversely affected species in the region.

  20. A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Sarah C.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 occurs in both the Old World and New World tropics and subtropics and contains nearly half of the species in the family Selenopidae Simon, 1897. In this paper the members of the genus Selenops found in North America, Central America, and on islands of the Caribbean are revised, excluding Cuban endemics. No taxonomic changes are currently made to the species from the southwestern United States. In total, 21 new species are described, including Selenops arikok sp. n., Selenops chamela sp. n., Selenops amona sp. n., Selenops baweka sp. n., Selenops bocacanadensis sp. n., Selenops enriquillo sp. n, Selenops ixchel sp. n., Selenops huetocatl sp. n., Selenops kalinago sp. n., Selenops oviedo sp. n., Selenops morro sp. n., Selenops denia sp. n., Selenops duan sp. n., Selenops malinalxochitl sp. n., Selenops oricuajo sp. n., Selenops petenajtoy sp. n., Selenops guerrero sp. n., Selenops makimaki sp. n., Selenops souliga sp. n., Selenops wilmotorum sp. n., and Selenops wilsoni sp. n. Six species names were synonymized: Selenops lunatus Muma, 1953 syn. n. = Selenops candidus Muma, 1953; Selenops tehuacanus Muma 1953 syn. n., Selenops galapagoensis Banks, 1902 syn. n. and Selenops vagabundus Kraus, 1955 syn. n. = Selenops mexicanus Keyserling, 1880; Selenops santibanezi Valdez-Mondragón, 2010 syn. n. = Selenops nigromaculatus Keyserling, 1880; and Selenops salvadoranus Chamberlin, 1925 syn. n. = Selenops bifurcatus Banks, 1909. Lectotypes are designated for the following three species: Selenops marginalis F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900 (♂), Selenops morosus Banks, 1898 (♂), and Selenops mexicanus Keyserling, 1880 (♀). The female neotype is designated for Selenops aissus Walckenaer, 1837. The males of Selenops bani Alayón-García, 1992 and Selenops marcanoi Alayón-García, 1992 are described for the first time, and the females of Selenops phaselus Muma, 1953 and Selenops geraldinae Corronca, 1996 are described for the

  1. A revision of the spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 (Arachnida, Araneae, Selenopidae) in North America, Central America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Crews, Sarah C

    2011-01-01

    The spider genus Selenops Latreille, 1819 occurs in both the Old World and New World tropics and subtropics and contains nearly half of the species in the family Selenopidae Simon, 1897. In this paper the members of the genus Selenops found in North America, Central America, and on islands of the Caribbean are revised, excluding Cuban endemics. No taxonomic changes are currently made to the species from the southwestern United States. In total, 21 new species are described, including Selenops arikoksp. n., Selenops chamelasp. n., Selenops amonasp. n., Selenops bawekasp. n., Selenops bocacanadensissp. n., Selenops enriquillosp. n, Selenops ixchelsp. n., Selenops huetocatlsp. n., Selenops kalinagosp. n., Selenops oviedosp. n., Selenops morrosp. n., Selenops deniasp. n., Selenops duansp. n., Selenops malinalxochitlsp. n., Selenops oricuajosp. n., Selenops petenajtoysp. n., Selenops guerrerosp. n., Selenops makimakisp. n., Selenops souligasp. n., Selenops wilmotorumsp. n., and Selenops wilsonisp. n. Six species names were synonymized: Selenops lunatus Muma, 1953 syn. n. =Selenops candidus Muma, 1953; Selenops tehuacanus Muma 1953 syn. n., Selenops galapagoensis Banks, 1902 syn. n. and Selenops vagabundus Kraus, 1955 syn. n. = Selenops mexicanus Keyserling, 1880; Selenops santibanezi Valdez-Mondragón, 2010 syn. n. = Selenops nigromaculatus Keyserling, 1880; and Selenops salvadoranus Chamberlin, 1925 syn. n. = Selenops bifurcatus Banks, 1909. Lectotypes are designated for the following three species: Selenops marginalis F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900 (♂), Selenops morosus Banks, 1898 (♂), and Selenops mexicanus Keyserling, 1880 (♀). The female neotype is designated for Selenops aissus Walckenaer, 1837. The males of Selenops bani Alayón-García, 1992 and Selenops marcanoi Alayón-García, 1992 are described for the first time, and the females of Selenops phaselus Muma, 1953 and Selenops geraldinae Corronca, 1996 are described for the first time. Almost all species

  2. (Mid-term evaluation of the Central America Rural Electrification Support program)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D.

    1990-03-30

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by Regional Office for Central America and Panama (ROCAP) to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the CARES project. Numerous meetings were held with National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) staff, ROCAP staff, and local officials in Guatemala, Honduras, and Belize. In general, the CARES project has been quite successful in a number of key areas as well as in soliciting support from utilities and US Agency for International Development (USAID) Missions. Changes were recommended in the area of report writing and some management activities. It was also recommended that any new activities be considered in the light of the availability of local personnel.

  3. Abrupt climate oscillations during the last deglaciation in central north america

    PubMed

    Yu; Eicher

    1998-12-18

    Evidence from stable isotopes and a variety of proxies from two Ontario lakes demonstrate that many of the late glacial-to-early Holocene events that are well known from the North Atlantic seaboard, such as the Gerzensee-Killarney Oscillation (also known as the Intra-Allerod Cold Period), Younger Dryas, and Preboreal Oscillation, also occurred in central North America. These results thus imply that climatic forcing acted in the same manner in both regions and that atmospheric circulation played an important role in the propagation of these events.

  4. Interannual variability of the midsummer drought in Central America and the connection with sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Tito; Rutgersson, Anna; Alfaro, Eric; Amador, Jorge; Claremar, Björn

    2016-04-01

    The midsummer drought (MSD) in Central America is characterised in order to create annual indexes representing the timing of its phases (start, minimum and end), and other features relevant for MSD forecasting such as the intensity and the magnitude. The MSD intensity is defined as the minimum rainfall detected during the MSD, meanwhile the magnitude is the total precipitation divided by the total days between the start and end of the MSD. It is shown that the MSD extends along the Pacific coast, however, a similar MSD structure was detected also in two stations in the Caribbean side of Central America, located in Nicaragua. The MSD intensity and magnitude show a negative relationship with Niño 3.4 and a positive relationship with the Caribbean low-level jet (CLLJ) index, however for the Caribbean stations the results were not statistically significant, which is indicating that other processes might be modulating the precipitation during the MSD over the Caribbean coast. On the other hand, the temporal variables (start, minimum and end) show low and no significant correlations with the same indexes.The results from canonical correlation analysis (CCA) show good performance to study the MSD intensity and magnitude, however, for the temporal indexes the performance is not satisfactory due to the low skill to predict the MSD phases. Moreover, we find that CCA shows potential predictability of the MSD intensity and magnitude using sea surface temperatures (SST) with leading times of up to 3 months. Using CCA as diagnostic tool it is found that during June, an SST dipole pattern upon the neighbouring waters to Central America is the main variability mode controlling the inter-annual variability of the MSD features. However, there is also evidence that the regional waters are playing an important role in the annual modulation of the MSD features. The waters in the PDO vicinity might be also controlling the rainfall during the MSD, however, exerting an opposite effect at

  5. Diarrhea and respiratory symptoms among travelers to Asia, Africa, and South and Central America from Scotland.

    PubMed

    Redman, Christopher Allan; Maclennan, Alice; Wilson, Eleanor; Walker, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Surveillance using admissions to hospital, while being useful, is a poor indicator of the real incidence of disease encountered by travelers. An alternative is self-reported illness among those who attended at a pretravel clinic prior to their travels. Estimates of incidence and risk factors were determined for attendees at a travel clinic in Scotland using a questionnaire. Analysis for risk factors was carried out for those travelers visiting countries in Africa, Asia, or South and Central America, who had traveled for 1 week or more and had returned between 1997 and 2001 (N= 4,856). Multivariate logistic regression was used to test the hypotheses that time abroad and age-group would be significant for both respiratory and diarrheal symptoms regardless of which of the three geographical areas are visited. From 2006 returned questionnaires (response rate = 41.3%), diarrhea and respiratory symptoms were reported by 44.2 and 16.8% of respondents, respectively; the incidence was significantly greater among travelers to Asia for both diarrheal (55.5%) and respiratory (23.7%) symptoms than among travelers to Africa (36.6 and 12.2%, respectively) or South and Central America (39.5 and 16.2%, respectively). For diarrhea, age was a highly significant risk factor for travelers to Asia, South and Central America, and Africa. Being a self-organized tourist/backpacker, traveling to Asia was associated with increased risk, while for Africa and South and Central America visiting family or friends was associated with a lower risk. For travelers to Asia, traveling to the Indian subcontinent was significantly associated with increased risk. The majority of travelers had an adverse event while traveling abroad, with diarrhea and respiratory conditions being especially common despite attending a travel clinic for advice prior to departure. However, the limitations of this surveillance-based strategy have highlighted the requirement for more research to understand more fully the

  6. Potential impact of climate change on coffee rust over Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon-Ezquerro, Maria del Carmen; Martinez-Lopez, Benjamin; Cabos Narvaez, William David; Sein, Dmitry

    2017-04-01

    In this work, some meteorological variables from a regional climate model are used to characterize the dispersion of coffee rust (a fungal disease) from Central America to Mexico, during the 20 Century. The climate model consists of the regional atmosphere model REMO coupled to the MPIOM global ocean model with increased resolution in the Atlantic Ocean. Lateral atmospheric and upper oceanic boundary conditions outside the coupled domain were prescribed using both ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalysis data. In addition to the historical simulation, a projection of the evolution of the coffee rust for the 21 Century was obtained from a REMO run using MPIESM data for the lateral forcing.

  7. Reproductive periodicity of the tropical crab Callinectes arcuatus Ordway in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, M. C.; Epifanio, C. E.; Dittel, A. I.

    1983-12-01

    The Gulf of Nicoya, an estuary on the Pacific coast of Central America, contains a large population of the portunid crab Callinectes arcuatus. Results of a 12 month survey indicated that spawning activity occurs throughout the year, but with a distinct peak during the five-month dry season (December-April). Mature females were most prevalent in the upper regions of the gulf during the rainy season and appeared to migrate to the lower gulf to spawn during the dry season. Patterns of spawning and apparent migration differed from those reported in an earlier study of C. arcuatus along the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  8. [MODIS Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the last six months were: (1) Complete sensitivity analysis of fluorescence; line height algorithms (2) Deliver fluorescence algorithm code and test data to the University of Miami for integration; (3) Complete analysis of bio-optical data from Southern Ocean cruise; (4) Conduct laboratory experiments based on analyses of field data; (5) Analyze data from bio-optical mooring off Hawaii; (6) Develop calibration/validation plan for MODIS fluorescence data; (7) Respond to the Japanese Research Announcement for GLI; and (8) Continue to review plans for EOSDIS and assist ECS contractor.

  9. Survey of otolaryngology services in Central America: need for a comprehensive intervention.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Richard; Fagan, Johan

    2013-11-01

    In the developing world, there exists a scarcity of services and training in otolaryngology, audiology, and speech therapy, which is reflected by the gap between health care delivery in high-income countries and low-income countries. We surveyed, by questionnaire, the countries of Central America, except for Belize, because of the lack of otolaryngology services, on the following issues: availability of otolaryngology, audiology, and speech therapy services and equipment; otolaryngologist, audiologist, and speech therapist training; and availability of services in rural areas. Surveys were distributed via email and by hand at the 2011 Central American Congress of Otolaryngology, in San Salvador, El Salvador, to otolaryngologists, audiologists, and speech therapists. Not to our surprise, there is a shortfall in services and training in all three professions. The data collected and presented in this commentary will provide a basis by which change might take place.

  10. Pharmacogenetic research activity in Central America and the Caribbean: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; LLerena, Adrián; Duconge, Jorge; Montané-Jaime, Lazara K; Roblejo, Hilda; Fariñas, Humberto; Campos, María de Los A; Ramírez, Ronald; Serrano, Víctor; Villagrán, Carmen I; Peñas-LLedó, Eva M

    2016-10-01

    The present review was aimed at analyzing the pharmacogenetic scientific activity in Central America and the Caribbean. A literature search for pharmacogenetic studies in each country of the region was conducted on three databases using a list of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers including 'phenotyping probe drugs' for major drug metabolizing enzymes. The review included 132 papers involving 47 biomarkers and 35,079 subjects (11,129 healthy volunteers and 23,950 patients). The country with the most intensive pharmacogenetic research was Costa Rica. The most studied medical therapeutic area was oncology, and the most investigated biomarkers were CYP2D6 and HLA-A/B. Conclusion: Research activity on pharmacogenetics in Central American and the Caribbean populations is limited or absent. Therefore, strategies to promote effective collaborations, and foster interregional initiatives and research efforts among countries from the region could help for the rational clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine.

  11. Pharmacogenetic research activity in Central America and the Caribbean: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes-Garro, Carolina; Naranjo, María-Eugenia G; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; LLerena, Adrián; Duconge, Jorge; Montané-Jaime, Lazara K; Roblejo, Hilda; Fariñas, Humberto; Campos, María de los A; Ramírez, Ronald; Serrano, Víctor; Villagrán, Carmen I; Peñas-LLedó, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present review was aimed at analyzing the pharmacogenetic scientific activity in Central America and the Caribbean. Materials & methods: A literature search for pharmacogenetic studies in each country of the region was conducted on three databases using a list of the most relevant pharmacogenetic biomarkers including ‘phenotyping probe drugs’ for major drug metabolizing enzymes. The review included 132 papers involving 47 biomarkers and 35,079 subjects (11,129 healthy volunteers and 23,950 patients). Results: The country with the most intensive pharmacogenetic research was Costa Rica. The most studied medical therapeutic area was oncology, and the most investigated biomarkers were CYP2D6 and HLA-A/B. Conclusion: Research activity on pharmacogenetics in Central American and the Caribbean populations is limited or absent. Therefore, strategies to promote effective collaborations, and foster interregional initiatives and research efforts among countries from the region could help for the rational clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine. PMID:27633613

  12. Five decades of vitamin A studies in the region of Central America and Panama.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Guillermo; Mejia, Luis A

    2010-03-01

    Vitamin A deficiency in Central America was first identified as a public health problem in the 1950s. It affected primarily children. The main underlying cause was a deficient intake of pre-formed vitamin A, but infection and intestinal parasitism also played important roles. INCAP focused its efforts on overcoming this problem and developed, as a short-term solution, the technology to fortify sugar with vitamin A. Fortification programs were implemented in several Central American countries. Evaluation of these programs revealed a significant impact-not only on vitamin A status, but also on iron nutrition and hematological condition. Longer-term solutions, like increasing the availability and consumption of vitamin A-rich foods, were later suggested and operational tools were developed to assist the countries in the region in the implementation, evaluation and monitoring of their own fortification programs.

  13. D″ shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy and discontinuity structure beneath the Caribbean and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnero, Edward J.; Lay, Thorne

    2003-11-01

    The D″ region in the lowermost mantle beneath the Caribbean and Central America is investigated using shear waves from South American earthquakes recorded by seismic stations in North America. We present a large-scale, composite study of volumetric shear velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and the possible presence of a D″ discontinuity in the region. Our data set includes: 328 S( Sdiff)- SKS differential travel times, 300 ScS-S differential travel times, 125 S( Sdiff) and 120 ScS shear wave splitting measurements, and 297 seismograms inspected for Scd, the seismic phase refracted from a high-velocity D″ layer. Broadband digital data are augmented by high-quality digitized analog WWSSN data, providing extensive path coverage in our study area. In all, data from 61 events are utilized. In some cases, a given seismogram can be used for velocity heterogeneity, anisotropy, and discontinuity analyses. Significant mid-mantle structure, possibly associated with the ancient subducted Farallon slab, affects shear wave travel times and must be corrected for to prevent erroneous mapping of D″ shear velocity. All differential times are corrected for contributions from aspherical mantle structure above D″ using a high-resolution tomography model. Travel time analyses demonstrate the presence of pervasive high velocities in D″, with the highest velocities localized to a region beneath Central America, approximately 500-700 km in lateral dimension. Short wavelength variability overprints this general high-velocity background. Corrections are also made for lithospheric anisotropy beneath the receivers. Shear wave splitting analyses of the corrected waveforms reveal D″ anisotropy throughout the study area, with a general correlation with heterogeneity strength. Evidence for Scd arrivals is pervasive across the study area, consistent with earlier work, but there are a few localized regions (100-200 km) lacking clear Scd arrivals, which indicates heterogeneity in the

  14. The 10 April 2014 Earthquake in Central Nicaragua: Evidence of Complex Crustal Deformation in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, G.; Muñoz, A.; Talavera, E.; Tenorio, V.; Farraz, I.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Sánchez, A.

    2014-12-01

    On 10 April 2014 a magnitude Mw 6.1 struck central Nicaragua. The main event and the aftershocks were clearly recorded by the Nicaraguan seismic network. These crustal earthquakes were strongly felt but caused relatively little damage to the city of Managua and to the surrounding cities and towns. This is in sharp contrast to the destructive effects of the 1972 earthquake in the capital city of Managua. The differences in damage stem from the fact that in 1972, the earthquake occurred on a fault beneath the city; in contrast, the 2014 event lies offshore, under Lake Managua. The distribution of aftershocks shows two clusters of seismic activity. In the northwestern part of Lake Managua, an alignment of aftershocks suggests a southeast trending fault. The reported source mechanism suggests right-lateral strike slip motion on a plane with the same azimuth as the aftershock sequence. A second cluster of seismic activity occurred simultaneously, but spatially separated, beneath Apoyeque volcano. There is no clear alignment of the epicenters in this cluster. Seismic scaling relations between magnitude and the fault length predict a length of approximately 10 km for an earthquake of this magnitude. This is in agreement with the extent of the fault defined by the aftershock sequence. The northeast - southwest trending Tiscapa and Ciudad Jardín faults that broke during the 1972 and 1931 Managua earthquakes are orthogonal to the fault where the 10 April earthquake occurred. This set of conjugate faults confirms that Central Nicaragua is being deformed in a complex tectonic style of deformation. The forearc sliver between the trench and the volcanic arc moves to the northwest relative to the Caribbean plate. This deformation, however, does not take place on a single set of faults. The motion is apparently accommodated by a system of conjugate faults: right lateral, strike-slip faults oriented parallel to the volcanic arc and another set of faults trending northeast

  15. Do pathogens become more virulent as they spread? Evidence from the amphibian declines in Central America.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ben L; Puschendorf, Robert

    2013-09-07

    The virulence of a pathogen can vary strongly through time. While cyclical variation in virulence is regularly observed, directional shifts in virulence are less commonly observed and are typically associated with decreasing virulence of biological control agents through coevolution. It is increasingly appreciated, however, that spatial effects can lead to evolutionary trajectories that differ from standard expectations. One such possibility is that, as a pathogen spreads through a naive host population, its virulence increases on the invasion front. In Central America, there is compelling evidence for the recent spread of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and for its strong impact on amphibian populations. Here, we re-examine data on Bd prevalence and amphibian population decline across 13 sites from southern Mexico through Central America, and show that, in the initial phases of the Bd invasion, amphibian population decline lagged approximately 9 years behind the arrival of the pathogen, but that this lag diminished markedly over time. In total, our analysis suggests an increase in Bd virulence as it spread southwards, a pattern consistent with rapid evolution of increased virulence on Bd's invading front. The impact of Bd on amphibians might therefore be driven by rapid evolution in addition to more proximate environmental drivers.

  16. Do pathogens become more virulent as they spread? Evidence from the amphibian declines in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ben L.; Puschendorf, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The virulence of a pathogen can vary strongly through time. While cyclical variation in virulence is regularly observed, directional shifts in virulence are less commonly observed and are typically associated with decreasing virulence of biological control agents through coevolution. It is increasingly appreciated, however, that spatial effects can lead to evolutionary trajectories that differ from standard expectations. One such possibility is that, as a pathogen spreads through a naive host population, its virulence increases on the invasion front. In Central America, there is compelling evidence for the recent spread of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and for its strong impact on amphibian populations. Here, we re-examine data on Bd prevalence and amphibian population decline across 13 sites from southern Mexico through Central America, and show that, in the initial phases of the Bd invasion, amphibian population decline lagged approximately 9 years behind the arrival of the pathogen, but that this lag diminished markedly over time. In total, our analysis suggests an increase in Bd virulence as it spread southwards, a pattern consistent with rapid evolution of increased virulence on Bd's invading front. The impact of Bd on amphibians might therefore be driven by rapid evolution in addition to more proximate environmental drivers. PMID:23843393

  17. SALTRA: a regional program for workers' health and sustainable development in Central America.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Catharina; Aragón, Aurora; Elgstrand, Kaj; Flores, Reinaldo; Hogstedt, Christer; Partanen, Timo

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, the university-based Program on Work and Health in Central America, SALTRA, was launched to build national and regional capacities in occupational safety and health with the goal of preventing and reducing poverty in Central America. SALTRA has implemented 20 projects including action projects in priority sectors (e.g., construction, sugarcane, hospitals, migrant coffee workers); strengthening of surveillance (occupational health profiles, carcinogenic exposures, fatal injuries and pesticides); a participatory model for training and risk monitoring by workers; building occupational health capacity for professionals, employers, and workers, with collaborating networks between the countries; strengthening of universities in work, environment, and health; studies of serious occupational and environmental situations; communication channels; and continued efforts to raise political awareness. SALTRA has placed issues of workers' health on political, business, and academic agendas throughout the region and has laid the foundations for achieving substantial future improvements in health conditions of all workers in the region. External evaluators envisioned SALTRA as an innovative development model.

  18. [Population mobility and HIV/AIDS in Central America and Mexico].

    PubMed

    Leyva-Flores, René; Aracena-Genao, Belkis; Serván-Mori, Edson

    2014-09-01

    Estimate the magnitude of the association between population mobility, measured by net migration rate (NMR), and HIV prevalence in Central America and Mexico. Using time series models, based on public information from UNAIDS, UNDP, ECLAC, and the World Bank for the period 1990-2009, this association was studied in individuals aged 15-49 years, and adjusted for socioeconomic factors (education, unemployment, life expectancy, and income). NMR was negative in all countries except Costa Rica and Panama. Unadjusted results of the model show a positive association and that NMR can explain 6% of recorded HIV prevalence. When socioeconomic cofactors are included by country (education, health, and income), the magnitude increases to 9% (P<0.05). NMR, even when adjusted for socioeconomic factors, explains some of recorded HIV prevalence. All socioeconomic indicators show improvements in Central America and Mexico, although large gaps persist among countries. The modest association observed between population mobility and HIV prevalence is conditioned by the socioeconomic status of the countries studied. Information availability limited the study's ability to establish the existence of this association with greater certainty. Accordingly, based on available information, it is not possible to affirm that migration plays a key role in the spread of HIV.

  19. Global change and the distributional dynamics of migratory bird populations wintering in Central America.

    PubMed

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Blancher, Peter J; Rodewald, Amanda D; Ruiz-Gutierrez, Viviana; Rosenberg, Kenneth V; Hochachka, Wesley M; Verburg, Peter H; Kelling, Steve

    2017-07-24

    Understanding the susceptibility of highly mobile taxa such as migratory birds to global change requires information on geographic patterns of occurrence across the annual cycle. Neotropical migrants that breed in North America and winter in Central America occur in high concentrations on their non-breeding grounds where they spend the majority of the year and where habitat loss has been associated with population declines. Here, we use eBird data to model weekly patterns of abundance and occurrence for 21 forest passerine species that winter in Central America. We estimate species' distributional dynamics across the annual cycle, which we use to determine how species are currently associated with public protected areas and projected changes in climate and land-use. The effects of global change on the non-breeding grounds is characterized by decreasing precipitation, especially during the summer, and the conversion of forest to cropland, grassland, or peri-urban. The effects of global change on the breeding grounds are characterized by increasing winter precipitation, higher temperatures, and the conversion of forest to peri-urban. During spring and autumn migration, species are projected to encounter higher temperatures, forests that have been converted to peri-urban, and increased precipitation during spring migration. Based on current distributional dynamics, susceptibility to global change is characterized by the loss of forested habitats on the non-breeding grounds, warming temperatures during migration and on the breeding grounds, and declining summer rainfall on the non-breeding grounds. Public protected areas with low and medium protection status are more prevalent on the non-breeding grounds, suggesting that management opportunities currently exist to mitigate near-term non-breeding habitat losses. These efforts would affect more individuals of more species during a longer period of the annual cycle, which may create additional opportunities for species to

  20. Multi-year GNSS monitoring of atmospheric IWV over Central and South America for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara; Fernández, Laura; Natali, María Paula; Meza, Amalia; Moirano, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric water vapour has been acknowledged as an essential climate variable. Weather prediction and hazard assessment systems benefit from real-time observations, whereas long-term records contribute to climate studies. Nowadays, ground-based GNSS products have become widely employed, complementing satellite observations over the oceans. Although the past decade has seen a significant development of the GNSS infrastructure in Central and South America, its potential for atmospheric water vapour monitoring has not been fully exploited. With this in mind, we have performed a regional, seven-year long and homogeneous analysis, comprising 136 GNSS tracking stations, obtaining high-rate and continuous observations of column integrated water vapour and troposphere zenith total delay (Bianchi et al. 2016). As preliminary application for this data set, we have estimated local water vapour trends, their significance, and their relation with specific climate regimes. We have found evidence of drying at temperate regions in South America, at a rate of about 2% per decade, while a slow moistening of the troposphere over tropical regions is also weakly suggested by our results. Furthermore, we have assessed the regional performance of the empirical model GPT2w to blindly estimate troposphere delays. The model fairly reproduces the observed mean delays, including their annual and semi-annual variations. Nevertheless, a long-term evaluation has shown systematical biases, up to 20 mm, probably inherited form the underling atmospheric reanalysis. Additionally, the complete data set has been made openly available at a scientific repository (doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.858234). References: C. Bianchi, L. Mendoza, L. Fernandez, M. P. Natali, A. Meza, J. F. Moirano, Multi-year GNSS monitoring of atmospheric IWV over Central and South America for climate studies, Ann. Geophys., ISSN 0992-7689, eISSN 1432-0576, 34 (7), 623-639 (doi:10.5194/angeo-34-623-2016).

  1. A review of bioinformatics training applied to research in molecular medicine, agriculture and biodiversity in Costa Rica and Central America.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Allan; Morera, Jessica; Jiménez, Sergio; Boza, Ricardo

    2013-09-01

    Today, Bioinformatics has become a scientific discipline with great relevance for the Molecular Biosciences and for the Omics sciences in general. Although developed countries have progressed with large strides in Bioinformatics education and research, in other regions, such as Central America, the advances have occurred in a gradual way and with little support from the Academia, either at the undergraduate or graduate level. To address this problem, the University of Costa Rica's Medical School, a regional leader in Bioinformatics in Central America, has been conducting a series of Bioinformatics workshops, seminars and courses, leading to the creation of the region's first Bioinformatics Master's Degree. The recent creation of the Central American Bioinformatics Network (BioCANET), associated to the deployment of a supporting computational infrastructure (HPC Cluster) devoted to provide computing support for Molecular Biology in the region, is providing a foundational stone for the development of Bioinformatics in the area. Central American bioinformaticians have participated in the creation of as well as co-founded the Iberoamerican Bioinformatics Society (SOIBIO). In this article, we review the most recent activities in education and research in Bioinformatics from several regional institutions. These activities have resulted in further advances for Molecular Medicine, Agriculture and Biodiversity research in Costa Rica and the rest of the Central American countries. Finally, we provide summary information on the first Central America Bioinformatics International Congress, as well as the creation of the first Bioinformatics company (Indromics Bioinformatics), spin-off the Academy in Central America and the Caribbean.

  2. Lagrangian analysis of moisture sources associated with precipitation in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán-Quesada, A.; Gimeno, L.; Amador, J.

    2013-05-01

    The moisture sources associated with precipitation in Central America are identified using a Lagrangian methodology based on backward trajectories for the 1980-1999 period. The Caribbean Sea is highlighted as the main source of moisture for Central American precipitation. The Eastern Tropical Pacific is identified as a complementary oceanic source with a marked annual cycle. Moisture recycling is determined to be of importance in terms of local precipitation. The importance of improving the representation of vegetation coverage and land use in the region is pointed out. A remote terrestrial moisture source is identified in northern South America with a peak of intensity in summer. This source is suggested to provide a link between climate in the north of South America and precipitation in the Intra Americas Sea through convective anomalies. The variability of the moisture sources is analysed and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is found to be the leading variability mode. Forcing from the North Atlantic Oscillation seems to be of importance modulating the Caribbean via the forcing exerted by the NASH. The results suggest that the Madden-Julian Oscillation may play a role in the modulation of precipitation associated with moisture transport through variations in convective activity, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the Caribbean Low Level Jet (CLLJ). Low frequency variability is suggested to affect the remote terrestrial source. The contributions to precipitation from the sources are computed. It is found that moisture transported from the sources and recycling may account up to a 80% of the observed precipitation. The CLLJ is found to be the modulator of the regional precipitation by means of the distribution of the regional moisture transport. It is suggested that there may be an important connection between the CLLJ and the ITCZ which may be responsible for the modulation of the regional distribution of precipitation. The response of the

  3. A five-year analysis of MODIS NDVI and NDWI for grassland drought assessment over the central Great Plains of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Brown, J.F.; Verdin, J.P.; Wardlow, B.

    2007-01-01

    A five-year (2001–2005) history of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference water index (NDWI) data was analyzed for grassland drought assessment within the central United States, specifically for the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma. Initial results show strong relationships among NDVI, NDWI, and drought conditions. During the summer over the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, the average NDVI and NDWI were consistently lower (NDVI < 0.5 and NDWI < 0.3) under drought conditions than under non-drought conditions (NDVI>0.6 and NDWI>0.4). NDWI values exhibited a quicker response to drought conditions than NDVI. Analysis revealed that combining information from visible, near infrared, and short wave infrared channels improved sensitivity to drought severity. The proposed normalized difference drought index (NDDI) had a stronger response to summer drought conditions than a simple difference between NDVI and NDWI, and is therefore a more sensitive indicator of drought in grasslands than NDVI alone.

  4. A five-year analysis of MODIS NDVI and NDWI for grassland drought assessment over the central Great Plains of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yingxin; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Verdin, James P.; Wardlow, Brian

    2007-03-01

    A five-year (2001-2005) history of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference water index (NDWI) data was analyzed for grassland drought assessment within the central United States, specifically for the Flint Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma. Initial results show strong relationships among NDVI, NDWI, and drought conditions. During the summer over the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, the average NDVI and NDWI were consistently lower (NDVI < 0.5 and NDWI < 0.3) under drought conditions than under non-drought conditions (NDVI>0.6 and NDWI>0.4). NDWI values exhibited a quicker response to drought conditions than NDVI. Analysis revealed that combining information from visible, near infrared, and short wave infrared channels improved sensitivity to drought severity. The proposed normalized difference drought index (NDDI) had a stronger response to summer drought conditions than a simple difference between NDVI and NDWI, and is therefore a more sensitive indicator of drought in grasslands than NDVI alone.

  5. Head and neck cancer burden and preventive measures in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Sandra; Martin Roa, Guillermo; Brennan, Paul; Forman, David; Sierra, Mónica S

    2016-09-01

    Central and South America comprise one of the areas characterized by high incidence rates for head and neck cancer. We describe the geographical and temporal trends in incidence and mortality of head and neck cancers in the Central and South American region in order to identify opportunities for intervention on the major identified risk factors: tobacco control, alcohol use and viral infections. We obtained regional- and national-level incidence data from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries and cancer deaths from the WHO mortality database for 18 countries. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and mortality (ASMR) rates per 100,000 person-years were estimated. Brazil had the highest incidence rates for oral and pharyngeal cancer in the region for both sexes, followed by Cuba, Uruguay and Argentina. Cuba had the highest incidence and mortality rates of laryngeal cancer in the region for males and females. Overall, males had rates about four times higher than those in females. Most countries in the region have implemented WHO recommendations for both tobacco and alcohol public policy control. Head and neck squamous-cell cancer (HNSCC) incidence and mortality rates in the Central and South America region vary considerably across countries, with Brazil, Cuba, French Guyana, Uruguay and Argentina experiencing the highest rates in the region. Males carry most of the HNSCC burden. Improvement and implementation of comprehensive tobacco and alcohol control policies as well as the monitoring of these factors are fundamental to prevention of head and neck cancers in the region. Copyright © 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Early and dynamic colonization of Central America drives speciation in Neotropical army ants.

    PubMed

    Winston, Max E; Kronauer, Daniel J C; Moreau, Corrie S

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of the Isthmus of Panama is one of the most important events in recent geological history, yet its timing and role in fundamental evolutionary processes remain controversial. While the formation of the isthmus was complete around 3 million years ago (Ma), recent studies have suggested prior intercontinental biotic exchange. In particular, the possibility of early intermittent land bridges facilitating colonization constitutes a potential mechanism for speciation and colonization before full closure of the isthmus. To test this hypothesis, we employed genomic methods to study the biogeography of the army ant genus Eciton, a group of keystone arthropod predators in Neotropical rainforests. Army ant colonies are unable to disperse across water and are therefore ideally suited to study the biogeographic impact of land bridge formation. Using a reduced representation genome sequencing approach, we show that all strictly Central American lineages of Eciton diverged from their respective South American sister lineage between 4 and 7 Ma, significantly prior to the complete closure of the isthmus. Furthermore, three of the lineage pairs form extensive and coincident secondary contact zones in Costa Rica and Nicaragua, with no evidence of gene flow. Such a discrete and repeated biogeographic pattern indicates at least two waves of army ant dispersal into Central America that were separated by significant genetic divergence times. Thus, by integrating phylogenomic, population genomic and geographic evidence, we show that early colonization of Central America across the emerging Isthmus of Panamá drove parallel speciation in Eciton army ants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP): a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development.

    PubMed

    López, Augusto; Cáceres, Victor M

    2008-12-16

    The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP) is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development.

  8. Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP): a pathway to sustainable public health capacity development

    PubMed Central

    López, Augusto; Cáceres, Victor M

    2008-01-01

    The Central America Field Epidemiology Training Program (CA FETP) is a public health capacity-building training programme aimed at developing high-caliber field epidemiologists at various levels of the public health system. It began in 2000 as part of the effort to rebuild public health infrastructure in six Central American and Caribbean countries following the devastation of Hurricanes Mitch and Georges in late 1998. Since then, the CA FETP has evolved from one regional training programme managed by CDC to several national FETPs with each country assuming ownership of its domestic programme. The curriculum is competency-based, and is divided into a three-tiered training pyramid that corresponds to the needs at the local, district and central levels of the health system. Trainees at each tier spend about 20% of their time in the classroom and 80% in the field implementing what they have learned while being mentored by graduates of the programme. FETP trainees have responded to multiple natural disasters and conducted hundreds of investigations including surveillance evaluations, outbreak responses and planned studies. Also graduates of the CA FETP are assuming influential positions in their respective ministries. As countries meet the challenge of institutionalizing their programmes, the CA FETP concept will increasingly be recognized as a model for sustainable public health capacity development. PMID:19087253

  9. Multi-year GNSS monitoring of atmospheric IWV over Central and South America for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Clara Eugenia; Mendoza, Luciano Pedro Oscar; Fernández, Laura Isabel; Natali, María Paula; Meza, Amalia Margarita; Francisco Moirano, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric water vapour has been acknowledged as an essential climate variable. Weather prediction and hazard assessment systems benefit from real-time observations, whereas long-term records contribute to climate studies. Nowadays, ground-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) products have become widely employed, complementing satellite observations over the oceans. Although the past decade has seen a significant development of the GNSS infrastructure in Central and South America, its potential for atmospheric water vapour monitoring has not been fully exploited. With this in mind, we have performed a regional, 7-year-long and homogeneous analysis, comprising 136 GNSS tracking stations, obtaining high-rate and continuous observations of column-integrated water vapour and troposphere zenith total delay. As a preliminary application for this data set, we have estimated local water vapour trends, their significance, and their relation with specific climate regimes. We have found evidence of drying at temperate regions in South America, at a rate of about 2 % per decade, while a slow moistening of the troposphere over tropical regions is also weakly suggested by our results. Furthermore, we have assessed the regional performance of the empirical model GPT2w to blindly estimate troposphere delays. The model reproduces the observed mean delays fairly well, including their annual and semi-annual variations. Nevertheless, a long-term evaluation has shown systematical biases, up to 20 mm, probably inherited from the underlying atmospheric reanalysis. Additionally, the complete data set has been made openly available as supplementary material.

  10. Are recommended standards for diabetes care met in Central and South America? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Uma; Kim, Woon-Cho; Kirk, Katy; Rouse, Chaturia; Narayan, K M Venkat; Ali, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated quality of diabetes care in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) of Central and South America by documenting the ability to meet the guideline-recommended targets. We also identified barriers to achieving goals of treatment and characteristics of successful programs. We searched the National Library of Medicine and Embase databases to systematically compile literature that reported on guideline-recommended processes of care (annual foot, eye, urine examinations, and regular blood glucose testing) and risk factor control (glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid levels) among people with diabetes since 1980. We compared risk factor control across clinic and household populations and benchmarked against the IDF guidelines. The available literature was largely from Mexico, Jamaica, and Brazil with little data from rural regions or smaller countries. Twenty-nine clinic-based and ten population-based studies showed a consistent failure to meet recommended care goals due to multiple underlying social and economic themes. Across all studies, the proportion of those not meeting targets ranged from 13.0 to 92.2% for glycemic control, 4.6 to 92.0% for blood pressure, and 28.2 to 78.3% for lipids. Few studies report quality of diabetes care in LMICs of the Americas, and heterogeneity across studies limits our understanding. Greater regard for audits, use of standardized reporting methods, and an emphasis on overcoming barriers to care are required. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Consensus between genes and stones in the biogeographic and evolutionary history of Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-García, Tania Anaid; Vázquez-Domínguez, Ella

    2013-05-01

    Results from genetic and geologic studies can be combined to elucidate some general patterns of the biogeographic and evolutionary history of Central America (CA) and of its biota. Based on an ample review of geologic, biogeographic and genetic studies, our aim was to examine how common genetic patterns can be linked with geologic processes. Considering information about geologic and tectonic evolution of CA, we subdivided the region into four tectonic blocks: Maya, Chortis, Chorotega and Chocó. Species exchange between North/South America and CA encompasses three events: a first migration during the Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene, a second through a terrestrial corridor preceding the formation of the Isthmus of Panama (IP), and the third involving a major dispersion through the IP. Such events caused similar genetic differentiation patterns and left a signature on the diversification of extant taxa, which we propose as three evolutionary groups: 1) Mayan, characterized by marked genetic structure and divergence, multiple refugia and formation of cryptic species; 2) Mid-CA, defined by high differentiation at the population level and between highland and lowlands, associated with intense volcanic activity; 3) Panamian, distinguished by migration from north to south and vice versa via de IP, with markedly high species divergence and speciation.

  12. Deep Earthquake Mechanics Inferred From Fault-Plane Orientations in Central South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Biryol, C. B.; Beck, S. L.

    2007-05-01

    To place constraints on the physical mechanisms of deep earthquakes, we analyze the rupture properties of >30 intraslab earthquakes with MW ≥ 5.7 in central South America. For each earthquake, we combine a directivity analysis with mapping of the slip distribution to estimate the rupture vector and identify the fault plane. We can distinguish the fault plane of the focal mechanism for ~1/3 of these earthquakes. At intermediate depths, we test whether earthquakes result from dehydration embrittlement reactivating the steep, trenchward- dipping faults of the outer rise. After accounting for the angle of subduction, the outer-rise faults would be approximately vertical. This prediction disagrees with our identified fault planes between 100-300 km depth, which are all subhorizontal. Subhorizontal faults are consistent with only one of the two failure planes expected from the slab stress field, suggesting that the slab fabric or an isobaric rupture process may also influence fault- plane orientations. The occurrence of exclusively subhorizontal faults at intermediate depths agrees with previous studies in the Tonga-Kermadec and Middle America subduction zones. The similarity in results between the three subduction zones despite large differences in temperature, lithospheric thickness, subduction velocity, and subduction angle suggests that the earthquake-generating mechanism is controlled by pressure rather than temperature or other tectonic parameters. Deeper than 300 km, earthquakes slip along both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes, in agreement with the ambient stress field.

  13. Deep Earthquake Mechanics Inferred From Fault-Plane Orientations in Central South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Biryol, C. B.; Beck, S. L.

    2007-12-01

    To place constraints on the physical mechanisms of deep earthquakes, we analyze the rupture properties of >30 intraslab earthquakes with MW >5.7 in central South America (15°--25°S). For all earthquakes, we perform a directivity analysis to estimate the rupture vector and identify the fault plane. After comparing the results with synthetics, we can distinguish the fault plane of the focal mechanism for ~1/3 of these earthquakes. For the largest earthquakes, we also invert for the slip distribution on the fault plane. At intermediate depths, we test whether earthquakes result from dehydration embrittlement reactivating the steep, trenchward-dipping faults of the outer rise. After accounting for the angle of subduction, these faults would be approximately vertical. This prediction contrasts with the orientation of faults identified between 100--300 km depth, which are all subhorizontal and instead suggest the creation of a new system of faults. The exclusive occurrence of subhorizontal faults agrees with previous studies in the Tonga-Kermadec and Middle America subduction zones. The similarity in results between the three subduction zones despite large differences in temperature, subduction velocity, and subduction angle suggests that the earthquake-generating mechanism is controlled by pressure rather than tectonic parameters. Deeper than 300 km, earthquakes occur along both subhorizontal and subvertical fault planes.

  14. First record of the invasive Asian fish tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in Honduras, Central America

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Matamoros, Wilfredo A.; Kreiser, Brian R.; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides the first report of the invasive Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti, 1934, in Honduras. The cestode was found in Profundulus portillorum (Cyprinodontiformes: Profundulidae), which represents a new host record, and which is a member of a genus faced with a variety of conservation challenges, now potentially complicated by the presence of this pathogenic cestode. Nearly complete sequence data from the ITS-1 5.8S and ITS-2 regions corroborate the determination based on morphological characteristics. Several species of carp were introduced to Honduras for aquaculture purposes in the early 1980s and the presence of the Asian fish tapeworm in Honduras may be related to these introductions. In addition, this report documents the currently known geographical distribution of this parasite in Central America, first recorded from Panamá and now from Honduras. PMID:25654444

  15. New species and records of Charisius Champion from Mexico and Central America (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Alleculinae)

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The species of the genus Charisius Champion, from Mexico and Central America are reviewed. The flightless genus Narses Champion, with one included species, N. subalatus Champion, is placed in synonymy with the genus Charisius. Four new species are described and illustrated, C. granulatus and C. punctatus (from Guatemala) and C. apterus and C. howdenorum (from Mexico). Charisius subalatus (Champion) is redescribed and illustrated. The species C. interstitialis Champion is placed in synonymy with C. zunilensis Champion. The genus is redescribed to include the four new species and N. subalatus. New distributional records are presented for all other species of the genus and a revised key is presented for identification of all the species of the genus. PMID:25009430

  16. Screening of anti-bacterial activity of medicinal plants from Belize (Central America).

    PubMed

    Camporese, A; Balick, M J; Arvigo, R; Esposito, R G; Morsellino, N; De Simone, F; Tubaro, A

    2003-07-01

    Twenty-one extracts from seven herbal drugs, Aristolochia trilobata (Aristolochiaceae) leaves and bark, Bursera simaruba (Burseraceae) bark, Guazuma ulmifolia (Sterculiaceae) bark, Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) leaves and Syngonium podophyllum (Araceae) leaves and bark, used in traditional medicine of Belize (Central America) as deep and superficial wound healers, were evaluated for their anti-bacterial properties. Activity was tested against standard strains of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. Almost all the extracts were able to inhibit the growth of one or more of the bacterial strains, except that of Enterococcus faecalis. For the first time an anti-microbial activity is reported for Aristolochia trilobata as well as for Syngonium podophyllum. The hexane extracts of Aristolochia trilobata leaves and bark were the most active extracts against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=0.31 and 0.625mg/ml, respectively).

  17. [Thysanopterans of the generic group Anaphothrips (Thripidae: Thripinae) with emphasis in Central America].

    PubMed

    Retana-Salazar, Axel P

    2007-03-01

    A taxonomic revision and phylogenetic analysis of the generic group Anaphothrips are presented. Several genera in Central America are closely related to this generic group. Based on the analysis of characters and its possible evolution, the new genus Nakaharathrips has been segregated from Anaphothrips, and the taxonomic status of the subspecies of Aurantothrips has been changed to the species level. The phylogenetic analysis shows a close relationship between the genera Anaphothrips, Ranjana, Nakaharathrips n.gen., Aurantothrips, Nicolemma n.gen., Ameranathrips, Baileyothrips and Gonzalezya n.gen., where the first lineage is formed by the genera (Ranjana (Aurantothrips+Nicolemma)) and the second lineage contains the genera [(Anaphothrips+Nakaharathrips)(Baileyothrips (Ameranathrips+Gonzalezya)].

  18. Open Skies aerial photography of selected areas in Central America affected by Hurricane Mitch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Bruce; Hallam, Cheryl A.

    1999-01-01

    Between October 27 and November 1, 1998, Central America was devastated by Hurricane Mitch. Following a humanitarian relief effort, one of the first informational needs was complete aerial photographic coverage of the storm ravaged areas so that the governments of the affected countries, the U.S. agencies planning to provide assistance, and the international relief community could come to the aid of the residents of the devastated area. Between December 4 and 19, 1998 an Open Skies aircraft conducted five successful missions and obtained more than 5,000 high-resolution aerial photographs and more than 15,000 video images. The aerial data are being used by the Reconstruction Task Force and many others who are working to begin rebuilding and to help reduce the risk of future destruction.

  19. First record of the invasive Asian fish tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in Honduras, Central America.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Maldonado, Guillermo; Matamoros, Wilfredo A; Kreiser, Brian R; Caspeta-Mandujano, Juan Manuel; Mendoza-Franco, Edgar F

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides the first report of the invasive Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi Yamaguti, 1934, in Honduras. The cestode was found in Profundulus portillorum (Cyprinodontiformes: Profundulidae), which represents a new host record, and which is a member of a genus faced with a variety of conservation challenges, now potentially complicated by the presence of this pathogenic cestode. Nearly complete sequence data from the ITS-1 5.8S and ITS-2 regions corroborate the determination based on morphological characteristics. Several species of carp were introduced to Honduras for aquaculture purposes in the early 1980s and the presence of the Asian fish tapeworm in Honduras may be related to these introductions. In addition, this report documents the currently known geographical distribution of this parasite in Central America, first recorded from Panamá and now from Honduras. © G. Salgado-Maldonado et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2015.

  20. A new species of Leptoderma Vaillant, 1886 (Osmeriformes: Alepocephalidae) from the Pacific coast of Central America.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Arturo; Baldwin, Carole C; Robertson, D Ross

    2016-01-18

    A new species of Leptoderma Vaillant, 1886 is described from a single specimen trawled at 1368-1406 m depth off El Salvador, Central America, tropical eastern Pacific. Leptoderma ospesca n. sp. can be readily distinguished from its congeners by the following combination of characters: dermal papillae absent along the lateral line, pectoral-fin rays 6, pelvic-fin rays 5, pre-dorsal length 54.9% of SL, both dorsal and anal fins separated from the caudal fin, dorsal- and anal-fin rays long, procurrent caudal-fin rays numerous and extending far forward on caudal peduncle, caudal-fin rays 16, and total pre-ural vertebrae 60. A key to the species of the genus is presented.

  1. New species and records of Charisius Champion from Mexico and Central America (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Alleculinae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, J M

    2014-01-01

    The species of the genus Charisius Champion, from Mexico and Central America are reviewed. The flightless genus Narses Champion, with one included species, N. subalatus Champion, is placed in synonymy with the genus Charisius. Four new species are described and illustrated, C. granulatus and C. punctatus (from Guatemala) and C. apterus and C. howdenorum (from Mexico). Charisius subalatus (Champion) is redescribed and illustrated. The species C. interstitialis Champion is placed in synonymy with C. zunilensis Champion. The genus is redescribed to include the four new species and N. subalatus. New distributional records are presented for all other species of the genus and a revised key is presented for identification of all the species of the genus.

  2. [Sexually transmitted infections: profile of care in border areas of Central America (2007-2010)].

    PubMed

    Serván-Mori, Edson; Leyva-Flores, René; Heredia-Pi, Ileana; García-Cerde, Rodrigo

    2013-07-01

    To analyze the profile of care for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in health centers in border areas of Central America during 2007-2010. Cross-sectional study in a sample of 3 357 patients. Doctors were trained and medicines, condoms and HIV testing (basic package of care [BPC]) were supplied. Sample was characterized according to sociodemographic variables. Factors associated with the probability of receiving the BPC were identified. Sixty six percent were 25-59 years old, and 93.2% were women. The most frequently diagnosed syndrome was vaginal discharge associated with candidiasis, bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis and gonorrhea. Sixty six percent of prescriptions were adhered to the international recommendations. Only 10% received the complete BPC.The likelihood of receiving it was lower in women. It is not enough to increase service delivery capacity to change care practices. These are deeply rooted in the sociocultural context. Highlights gendered medical practices that adversely affect the profile of care.

  3. First Complete Day from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This spectacular, full-color image of the Earth is a composite of the first full day of data gathered by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. MODIS collected the data for each wavelength of red, green, and blue light as Terra passed over the daylit side of the Earth on April 19, 2000. Terra is orbiting close enough to the Earth so that it cannot quite see the entire surface in a day, resulting in the narrow gaps around the equator. Although the sensor's visible channels were combined to form this true-color picture, MODIS collects data in a total of 36 wavelengths, ranging from visible to thermal infrared energy. Scientists use these data to measure regional and global-scale changes in marine and land-based plant life, sea and land surface temperatures, cloud properties, aerosols, fires, and land surface properties. Notice how cloudy the Earth is, and the large differences in brightness between clouds, deserts, oceans, and forests. The Antarctic, surrounded by clockwise swirls of cloud, is shrouded in darkness because the sun is north of the equator at this time of year. The tropical forests of Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America are shrouded by clouds. The bright Sahara and Arabian deserts stand out clearly. Green vegetation is apparent in the southeast United States, the Yucatan Peninsula, and Madagascar. Image by Mark Gray, MODIS Atmosphere Team, NASA GSFC

  4. Seismicity at Fuego, Pacaya, Izalco, and San Cristobal Volcanoes, Central America, 1973-1974

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic data collected at four volcanoes in Central America during 1973 and 1974 indicate three sources of seismicity: regional earthquakes with hypocentral distances greater than 80 km, earthquakes within 40 km of each volcano, and seismic activity originating at the volcanoes due to eruptive processes. Regional earthquakes generated by the underthrusting and subduction of the Cocos Plate beneath the Caribbean Plate are the most prominent seismic feature in Central America. Earthquakes in the vicinity of the volcanoes occur on faults that appear to be related to volcano formation. Faulting near Fuego and Pacaya volcanoes in Guatemala is more complex due to motion on a major E-W striking transform plate boundary 40 km north of the volcanoes. Volcanic activity produces different kinds of seismic signatures. Shallow tectonic or A-type events originate on nearby faults and occur both singly and in swarms. There are typically from 0 to 6 A-type events per day with b value of about 1.3. At very shallow depths beneath Pacaya, Izalco, and San Cristobal large numbers of low-frequency or B-type events are recorded with predominant frequencies between 2.5 and 4.5 Hz and with b values of 1.7 to 2.9. The relative number of B-type events appears to be related to the eruptive states of the volcanoes; the more active volcanoes have higher levels of seismicity. At Fuego Volcano, however, low-frequency events have unusually long codas and appear to be similar to tremor. High-amplitude volcanic tremor is recorded at Fuego, Pacaya, and San Cristobal during eruptive periods. Large explosion earthquakes at Fuego are well recorded at five stations and yield information on near-surface seismic wave velocities (??=3.0??0.2 km/sec.). ?? 1983 Intern. Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior.

  5. GIS Representation of Coal-Bearing Areas in North, Central, and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tewalt, Susan J.; Kinney, Scott A.; Merrill, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide coal consumption and international coal trade are projected to increase in the next several decades (Energy Information Administration, 2007). A search of existing literature indicates that in the Western Hemisphere, coal resources are known to occur in about 30 countries. The need exists to be able to depict these areas in a digital format for use in Geographic Information System (GIS) applications at small scales (large areas) and in visual presentations. Existing surficial geology GIS layers of the appropriate geologic age have been used as an approximation to depict the extent of coal-bearing areas in North, Central, and South America, as well as Greenland (fig. 1). Global surficial geology GIS data were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for use in world petroleum assessments (Hearn and others, 2003). These USGS publications served as the major sources for the selection and creation of polygons to represent coal-bearing areas. Additional publications and maps by various countries and agencies were also used as sources of coal locations. GIS geologic polygons were truncated where literature or hardcopy maps did not indicate the presence of coal. The depicted areas are not adequate for use in coal resource calculations, as they were not adjusted for geologic structure and do not include coal at depth. Additionally, some coal areas in Central America could not be represented by the mapped surficial geology and are shown only as points based on descriptions or depictions from scientific publications or available maps. The provided GIS files are intended to serve as a backdrop for display of coal information. Three attributes of the coal that are represented by the polygons or points include geologic age (or range of ages), published rank (or range of ranks), and information source (published sources for age, rank, or physical location, or GIS geology base).

  6. Seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local government, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes), emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful regional seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions specify the horizontal force a building should be able to withstand during an earthquake. This seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. Short-period ground motions effect short-period structures (e.g., one-to-two story buildings). The highest seismic hazard values in the region generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes.

  7. Mercury in Forage Fish from Mexico and Central America: Implications for Fish-Eating Birds.

    PubMed

    Elliott, John E; Kirk, David A; Elliott, Kyle H; Dorzinsky, Jessica; Lee, Sandi; Inzunza, Ernesto Ruelas; Cheng, Kimberly M T; Scheuhammer, Tony; Shaw, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant of aquatic food chains. Aquatic birds, such as the osprey (Pandion haliaetus), with migratory populations breeding in Canada and the northern United States and wintering in the Central and South America, can be exposed to mercury on both the breeding and wintering ranges. We examined Hg levels in 14 fish taxa from 24 osprey wintering sites identified from satellite telemetry. Our main goal was to determine whether fish species that feature in the diet of overwintering and resident fish-eating birds reached toxicity thresholds for Hg. Mean Hg levels in fish whole carcasses ranged from a high of 0.18 µg g(-1) (wet weight) in Scomberomorus sierra to a low of 0.009 µg g(-1) in Catostomidae. Average Hg levels were within published toxicity threshold values in forage fish for only two sites in Mexico (Puerto Vallarta and San Blas Estuary), and all were marine species, such as mackerel (Scomberomorus sierra), sea catfish (Ariopus spp.), and sardinas species (Centropomus spp.). Except for one sample from Nicaragua, sea catfish from Puerto Morazan, none of the fish from sites in Central America had Hg levels which exceeded the thresholds. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling revealed geographical differences in Hg levels with significant pairwise differences between sites along the Pacific Ocean (Mexico) versus the Bay of Campeche, partly due to differences in species composition of sampled fish (and species distributions). Hg increased with trophic level, as assessed by nitrogen stable isotope ratios (δ(15)N but not δ(13)C), in freshwater and marine, but not estuarine, environments. Hg concentrations in forage fish do not account for the elevated Hg reported for many osprey populations on the breeding grounds, thus primary sources of contamination appear to be in the north.

  8. Connections between the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the Caribbean Low Level Jet in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, H. G.; Durán-Quesada, A.; Amador, J.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores statistical connections between the displacements and strength of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and the Caribbean Low Level Jet (CLLJ). Indicators of the strength and position of the ITCZ include the latitude (LATC) and longitude (LONC) of the center of mass of precipitation and the mean domain precipitation (Pdomain) in a region bounded by coordinates 10 oS and 25 oN and 100 - 55 oW. The CLLJ was indexed using the average zonal wind velocity at 925 hPa over a region bounded by 7.5 - 12.5 oN and 85 - 75 oW. Preliminary analyses show that there is a strong correlation (0.82) between summer (JJA) LATC and JJA CLLJ index for the period 1979 - 2010; this correlation is lower in other seasons (0.63 for Autumn, 0.20 for Winter and 0.49 for Spring). These correlations were verified in the zonal wind composites at 925 hPa for the 5 lowest and 5 highest years of LATC. LONC does not seem to have the same strong relationship with the CLLJ. At daily level, composites show that precipitation in the Central America region is influenced by Pdomain, LATC, and the CLLJ index. From the comparison between the highest and lowest years of LATC, a strong contrast is observed for the evaporation over the Caribbean and the moisture transport to Central America. Moisture uptake increases significantly for the lowest LATC which corresponds to a stronger CLLJ. Composites of Sea Surface Temperature for the 5 years of highest and lowest LATC show some relationship with ENSO, although there is a disproportionate influence of the 1997-98 El Niño that may be affecting the results. There is however a consistent feature: during years of high LATC, there are warm anomalies in the tropical Atlantic off the coast of Venezuela, that are not present during years of low LATC.

  9. From transpressional to transtensional tectonics in Northern Central America controlled by Cocos - Caribbean subduction coupling change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Alvarez-Gomez, José Antonio; Jesús Martinez-Diaz, José

    2017-04-01

    The Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) is located at the western margin of the Caribbean plate, over the Chortís Block, spanning from Guatemala to Costa Rica. The CAVA is associated to the subduction of the Cocos plate under the Caribbean plate at the Middle America Trench. Our study is focused in the Salvadorian CAVA segment, which is tectonically characterized by the presence of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ), part of the western boundary of a major block forming the Caribbean plate (the Chortis Block). The structural evolution of the western boundary of the Chortis Block, particularly in the CAVA crossing El Salvador remains unknown. We have done a kinematic analysis from seismic and fault slip data and combined our results with a review of regional previous studies. This approach allowed us to constrain the tectonic evolution and the forces that control the deformation in northern Central America. Along the active volcanic arc we identified active transtensional deformation. On the other hand, we have identified two deformation phases in the back arc region: A first one of transpressional wrenching close to simple shearing (Miocene); and a second one characterized by almost E-W extension. Our results reveal a change from transpressional to transtensional shearing coeval with a migration of the volcanism towards the trench in Late Miocene times. This strain change could be related with a coupled to decoupled transition on the Cocos - Caribbean subduction interface, which could be related to a slab roll-back of the Cocos Plate beneath the Chortis Block. The combination of different degrees of coupling on the subduction interface, together with a constant relative eastward drift of the Caribbean Plate, control the deformation style along the western boundary of the Chortis Block.

  10. Pediatric Sarcoma in Central America: Outcomes, Challenges and Plans for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Paola; Ortiz, Roberta; Strait, Kelly; Fuentes, Soad; Gamboa, Yéssica; Arambú, Ingrid; Ah-Chu-Sanchez, María; London, Wendy; Rodríguez-Galindo, Carlos; Antillón-Klussmann, Federico; Báez, Fulgencio

    2012-01-01

    Background Children with cancer in middle-income countries have inferior outcomes to those in high-income countries. The magnitude and drivers for this survival gap are not well understood. We sought to describe patterns of clinical presentation, magnitude of treatment abandonment, and survival in children with sarcoma in Central America. Methods Retrospective review of hospital-based registries from national pediatric oncology referral centers. Patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma (Ewing), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and soft tissue sarcomas (STS) between 1/1/00-12/31/09 were included. Survival analysis was performed using standard definitions of overall and event-free survival (OS and EFS) and with abandonment included as an event (AOS and AEFS). Results A total of 785 new cases of pediatric sarcoma were reported (264 osteosarcoma, 175 Ewing, 240 RMS, and 106 STS). Metastatic disease at presentation was high (osteosarcoma 38%, Ewing 39%, RMS 29% and STS 21%). Treatment abandonment rate was high, particularly among patients with extremity bone sarcomas (osteosarcoma 30%, Ewing 15%, RMS 25% and STS 15%). Of 559 patients experiencing a first event, 59% had either relapse or progressive disease. The 4-year OS was 40% (SE±3%) and EFS was 30% (SE±2%), but further decreased to 31% (SE±2%) and 24% (SE±2%), when abandonment was taken into account. Conclusion High rate of metastases and treatment abandonment, and difficulty with upfront treatment effectiveness are important contributors to poor survival of children with pediatric sarcomas in Central America. Initiatives for early diagnosis, psychosocial support, quality improvement, and multidisciplinary care are warranted to improve outcomes. PMID:22972687

  11. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, and Central America: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Brenner, Hermann; Chen, Kexin; Chia, Kee Seng; Chen, Jian Guo; Law, Stephen C K; Ahn, Yoon-Ok; Xiang, Yong Bing; Yeole, Balakrishna B; Shin, Hai Rim; Shanta, Viswanathan; Woo, Ze Hong; Martin, Nimit; Sumitsawan, Yupa; Sriplung, Hutcha; Barboza, Adolfo Ortiz; Eser, Sultan; Nene, Bhagwan M; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Jayalekshmi, Padmavathiamma; Dikshit, Rajesh; Wabinga, Henry; Esteban, Divina B; Laudico, Adriano; Bhurgri, Yasmin; Bah, Ebrima; Al-Hamdan, Nasser

    2010-02-01

    Population-based cancer survival data, a key indicator for monitoring progress against cancer, are not widely available from countries in Africa, Asia, and Central America. The aim of this study is to describe and discuss cancer survival in these regions. Survival analysis was done for 341 658 patients diagnosed with various cancers from 1990 to 2001 and followed up to 2003, from 25 population-based cancer registries in 12 countries in sub-Saharan Africa (The Gambia, Uganda), Central America (Costa Rica), and Asia (China, India, Pakistan, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Turkey). 5-year age-standardised relative survival (ASRS) and observed survival by clinical extent of disease were determined. For cancers in which prognosis depends on stage at diagnosis, survival was highest in China, South Korea, Singapore, and Turkey and lowest in Uganda and The Gambia. 5-year ASRS ranged from 76-82% for breast cancer, 63-79% for cervical cancer, 71-78% for bladder cancer, and 44-60% for large-bowel cancers in China, Singapore, South Korea, and Turkey. Survival did not exceed 22% for any cancer site in The Gambia; in Uganda, survival did not exceed 13% for any cancer site except breast (46%). Variations in survival correlated with early detection initiatives and level of development of health services. The wide variation in cancer survival between regions emphasises the need for urgent investments in improving awareness, population-based cancer registration, early detection programmes, health-services infrastructure, and human resources. Association for International Cancer Research (AICR; St Andrews, UK), Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (ARC, Villejuif, France), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (Seattle, USA). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Spatial variations of effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere in Central America and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Ruiz, Javier; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta; Kirby, Jon F.; Álvarez-Gómez, José A.; Tejero, Rosa; Capote, Ramón

    2014-04-01

    As a proxy for long-term lithospheric strength, the effective elastic thickness (Te) can be used to understand the relationship between lithospheric rheology and geodynamic evolution of complex tectonic settings. Here we present, for the first time, high-resolution maps of spatial variations of Te in Central America and surrounding regions from the analysis of the coherence between topography and Bouguer gravity anomaly using multitaper and wavelet methods. Regardless of the technical differences between the two methods, there is a good overall agreement in the spatial variations of Te recovered from both methods. Although absolute Te values can vary in both maps, the qualitative Te structure and location of the main Te gradients are very similar. The pattern of the Te variations in Central America and surrounding regions agrees well with the tectonic provinces in the region, and it is closely related to major tectonic boundaries, where the Middle American and Lesser Antilles subduction zones are characterized by a band of high Te on the downgoing slab seaward of the trenches. These high Te values are related to internal loads (and in the case of the southernmost tip of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone also associated with a large amount of sediments) and should be interpreted with caution. Finally, there is a relatively good correlation, despite some uncertainties, between surface heat flow and our Te results for the study area. These results suggest that although this area is geologically complex, the thermal state of the lithosphere has profound influence on its strength, such that Te is strongly governed by thermal structure.

  13. Satellite versus ground-based estimates of burned area: A comparison between MODIS based burned area and fire agency reports over North America in 2007

    Treesearch

    Stephane Mangeon; Robert Field; Michael Fromm; Charles McHugh; Apostolos Voulgarakis

    2015-01-01

    North American wildfire management teams routinely assess burned area on site during firefighting campaigns; meanwhile, satellite observations provide systematic and global burned-area data. Here we compare satellite and ground-based daily burned area for wildfire events for selected large fires across North America in 2007 on daily timescales. In a sample of 26 fires...

  14. [MODIS Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of the last six months were: (1) Revise the algorithms for the Fluorescence Line Height (FLH) and Chlorophyll Fluorescence Efficiency (CFE) products, especially the data quality flags; (2) Revise the MOCEAN validation plan; (3) Deploy and recover bio-optical instrumentation at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) site as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS); (4) Prepare for field work in the Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone as part of JGOFS; (5) Submit manuscript on bio-optical time scales as estimated from Lagrangian drifters; (6) Conduct chemostat experiments on fluorescence; (7) Interface with the Global Imager (GLI) science team; and (8) Continue development of advanced data system browser. We are responsible for the delivery of two at-launch products for AM-1: Fluorescence line height (FLH) and chlorophyll fluorescence efficiency (CFE). We also considered revising the input chlorophyll, which is used to determine the degree of binning. We have refined the quality flags for the Version 2 algorithms. We have acquired and installed a Silicon Graphics Origin 200. We are working with the University of Miami team to develop documentation that will describe how the MODIS ocean components are linked together.

  15. The PACARDO research project: youthful drug involvement in Central America and the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Dormitzer, Catherine M; Gonzalez, Gonzalo B; Penna, Marcel; Bejarano, Julio; Obando, Patricia; Sanchez, Mauricio; Vittetoe, Kenneth; Gutierrez, Ulises; Alfaro, Juan; Meneses, Guillermo; Bolivar Diaz, Jorge; Herrera, Manuel; Hasbun, Julia; Chisman, Anna; Caris, Luis; Chen, Chuan-Yu; Anthony, James C

    2004-06-01

    To estimate the occurrence and school-level clustering of drug involvement among school-attending adolescent youths in each of seven countries in Latin America, drawing upon evidence from the PACARDO research project, a multinational collaborative epidemiological research study. During 1999-2000, anonymous self-administered questionnaires on drug involvement and related behaviors were administered to a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample that included a total of 12,797 students in the following seven countries: Costa Rica (n = 1,702), the Dominican Republic (n = 2,023), El Salvador (n = 1,628), Guatemala (n = 2,530), Honduras (n = 1,752), Nicaragua (n = , 419), and Panama (n = 1,743). (The PACARDO name concatenates PA for Panamá, CA for Centroamérica, and RDO for República Dominicana). Estimates for exposure opportunity and actual use of alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, cocaine (crack/coca paste), amphetamines and methamphetamines, tranquilizers, ecstasy, and heroin were assessed via responses about questions on age of first chance to try each drug, and first use. Logistic regression models accounting for the complex survey design were used to estimate the associations of interest. Cumulative occurrence estimates for alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drug use for the overall sample were, respectively: 52%, 29%, 5%, 4%, and 5%. In comparison to females, males were more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drugs; the odds ratio estimates were 1.3, 2.1, 1.6, 4.1, and 3.2, respectively. School-level clustering was noted in all countries for alcohol and tobacco use; it was also noted in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama for illegal drug use. This report sheds new light on adolescent drug experiences in Panama, the five Spanish-heritage countries of Central America, and the Dominican Republic, and presents the first estimates of school-level clustering of youthful drug involvement in

  16. Catalogo General de Universidades, 1970-1971: Federacion de Universidades Privadas de America Central y Panama (General Catalog of Universities, 1970-1971: Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federacion de Universidades Privadas de America Central y Panama, Guatemala City (Guatemala).

    This document contains the 1970-1971 catalogues of five universities belonging to the Federation of Private Universities of Central America and Panama (FUPAC). The catalogues provide information on university administrators and staff, historical background, admission requirements, degree programs, scholarships, and courses. The catalogues included…

  17. Phylogeny and biogeography of Poecilia (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliinae) across Central and South America based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Adeljean L F C; Pruett, Christin L; Lin, Junda

    2016-08-01

    Poeciliids are a diverse group of small Neotropical fishes, and despite considerable research attention as models in ecology and evolutionary biology, our understanding of their biogeographic and phylogenetic relationships is still limited. We investigated the phylogenetic relationships of South and Central American Poecilia, by examining 2395 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA (ATPase 8/6, COI) and nuclear DNA (S7) for 18 species across six subgenera. Fifty-eight novel sequences were acquired from newly collected specimens and 20 sequences were obtained from previously published material. Analyses of concatenated and partitioned mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA sets resulted in a well-supported phylogeny that resolved several monophyletic groups corresponding to previously hypothesized subgenera and species complexes. A divergence-dating analysis supported the hypothesis of the genus Poecilia dispersing into Central America in the early Pliocene (ancestors of Psychropoecilia+Allopoecilia+Mollienesia: 7.3-2.0Mya) from predominantly South America. Subsequently, one lineage (subgenus Allopoecilia: 5.1-1.3Mya) expanded deeper into South America from Lower-Central America, and one lineage expanded from Nuclear-Central America into South America (subgenus Mollienesia: 0.71-0.14Mya). The subgenus Mollienesia diverged into three monophyletic groups that can be identified by nuptial male dorsal fin morphology and inner jaw dentition. A subclade of the unicuspid short-fins (subgenus Mollienesia) was the lineage that expanded into South America during the middle Pleistocene. Species in this subclade are now distributed across northern South America, where they are partially sympatric with Allopoecilia. However the P. (A.) caucana complex was not monophyletic, with P. (A.) wandae clustering in the Mollienesia subclade that expanded into South America. It is apparent that characters (body size, scale count, pigmentation, and gonopodium morphology) used to define the P. (A

  18. Molecular genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from Central and South America revealed high diversity within and between populations.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, C; Su, C; Dubey, J P

    2012-03-01

    Recent population studies revealed that a few major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma gondii dominate in different geographical regions. The Type II and III lineages are widespread in all continents and dominate in Europe, Africa and North America. In addition, the type 12 lineage is the most common type in wildlife in North America, the Africa 1 and 3 are among the major types in Africa, and ToxoDB PCR-RFLP #9 is the major type in China. Overall the T. gondii strains are more diverse in South America than any other regions. Here, we analyzed 164 T. gondii isolates from three countries in Central America (Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica), from one country in Caribbean (Grenada) and five countries from South America (Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Chile, and Argentina). The multilocous polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) based genotyping of 11 polymorphic markers (SAG1, SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, L358, PK1, C22-8, C29-2 and Apico) were applied to 148 free-range chicken (Gallus domesticus) isolates and 16 isolates from domestic cats (Felis catus) in Colombia; 42 genotypes were identified. Linkage disequilibrium analysis indicated more frequent genetic recombination in populations of Nicaragua and Colombia, and to a lesser degree in populations of Costa Rica and Argentina. Bayesian structural analysis identified at least three genetic clusters, and phylogenetic network analysis identified four major groups. The ToxoDB PCR-RFLP #7, Type III and II were major lineages identified from Central and South America, with high frequencies of the closely related ToxoDB PCR-RFLP #7 and Type III lineages. Taken together, this study revealed high diversity within and between T. gondii populations in Central and South America, and the dominance of Type III and its closely related ToxoDB PCR-RFLP #7 lineages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cropping Pattern Detection and Change Analysis in Central Luzon, Philippines Using Multi-Temporal MODIS Imagery and Artificial Neural Network Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dela Torre, D. M.; Perez, G. J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Cropping practices in the Philippines has been intensifying with greater demand for food and agricultural supplies in view of an increasing population and advanced technologies for farming. This has not been monitored regularly using traditional methods but alternative methods using remote sensing has been promising yet underutilized. This study employed multi-temporal data from MODIS and neural network classifier to map annual land use in agricultural areas from 2001-2014 in Central Luzon, the primary rice growing area of the Philippines. Land use statistics derived from these maps were compared with historical El Nino events to examine how land area is affected by drought events. Fourteen maps of agricultural land use was produced, with the primary classes being single-cropping, double-cropping and perennial crops with secondary classes of forests, urban, bare, water and other classes. Primary classes were produced from the neural network classifier while secondary classes were derived from NDVI threshold masks. The overall accuracy for the 2014 map was 62.05% and a kappa statistic of 0.45. 155.56% increase in single-cropping systems from 2001 to 2014 was observed while double cropping systems decreased by 14.83%. Perennials increased by 76.21% while built-up areas decreased by 12.22% within the 14-year interval. There are several sources of error including mixed-pixels, scale-conversion problems and limited ground reference data. An analysis including El Niño events in 2004 and 2010 demonstrated that marginally irrigated areas that usually planted twice in a year resorted to single cropping, indicating that scarcity of water limited the intensification allowable in the area. Findings from this study can be used to predict future use of agricultural land in the country and also examine how farmlands have responded to climatic factors and stressors.

  20. Characterization of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in Belize, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manguin, S.; Roberts, D. R.; Andre, R. G.; Rejmankova, E.; Hakre, S.

    1996-01-01

    Surveys for larvae of Anopheles darlingi Root were conducted in April, May, and August 1994 in riverine habitats of central Belize (Cayo and Belize districts). An. darlingi was present during both the dry and wet seasons. Larvae were encountered most frequently in patches of floating debris along river margins. The floating mats were often formed by bamboo hanging over the banks and dense submersed bamboo roots. Larvae were found less frequently in lake margins, small lagoons, and ground pools with submersed roots and patches of floating leaves or vegetation. In addition to their association with floating debris, larvae of An. darlingi were associated positively with shade and submersed plants in riverine environments. Samples from river habitats showed the larvae of Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann to be strongly associated with sun-exposed sites containing green or blue-green algae. Unlike An. darlingi, An. albimanus was an ubiquitous mosquito, the immatures of which occurred in a wide variety of riverine and nonriverine aquatic habitats. Based on published reports and our experience, the association of An. darlingi with river systems was verified, and its distribution in Central America and Mexico was mapped.

  1. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America: database and attributes.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, R; Lucas, E; Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-one registries in 17 countries submitted data for systematic and centralized scrutiny. Data on 564 606 cases of different cancers ranging 1-56 sites/types from 27 registries in 14 low-/medium-resource countries in Eastern and Western Africa, the Caribbean, Central America and four regions of Asia, registered during 1990-2001 (period varying for individual registries) were reported. The database for this survival study comprised data that were classified as mandatory and optional. Mandatory variables provided by all registries included case-ID, age at diagnosis, sex, incidence date, most valid basis of diagnosis, cancer site/type (ICD-10 codes C00-96), vital status at follow-up and corresponding date. Clinical extent of disease was prominent among the optional variables provided by 17 registries and analysed. The grouping of cancer sites for analysis was based on standard norms, and only categories with at least 25 cases were reported. Cases registered based on a death certificate only, cases lacking any follow-up after initial registration, or cases rejected based on validation checks were excluded from the survival analysis. An easy guide to contents in subsequent chapters, especially tables and graphs describing data quality indices, survival statistics and online dynamic functions, is provided.

  2. Geoid modeling in Mexico and the collaboration with Central America and the Caribbean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalos, D.; Gomez, R.

    2012-12-01

    The model of geoidal heights for Mexico, named GGM10, is presented as a geodetic tool to support vertical positioning in the context of regional height system unification. It is a purely gravimetric solution computed by the Stokes-Helmert technique in resolution of 2.5 arc minutes. This product from the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia (INEGI) is released together with a series of 10 gravimetric models which add to the improvements in description of the gravity field. In the recent years, the INEGI joined the initiative of the U.S. National Geodetic Survey and the Canada's Geodetic Survey Division to promote the regional height system unification. In an effort to further improve the compatibility among national geoid models in the region, the INEGI has begun to champion a network of specialists that includes national representatives from Central America and the Caribbean. Through the opening of opportunities for training and more direct access to international agreements and discussions, the tropical region is gaining participation. Now a significantly increased number of countries is pushing for a future North and Central American geoid-based vertical datum as support of height system unification.eoidal height in Mexico, mapped from the model GGM10.

  3. Characterization of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in Belize, Central America.

    PubMed

    Manguin, S; Roberts, D R; Andre, R G; Rejmankova, E; Hakre, S

    1996-03-01

    Surveys for larvae of Anopheles darlingi Root were conducted in April, May, and August 1994 in riverine habitats of central Belize (Cayo and Belize districts). An. darlingi was present during both the dry and wet seasons. Larvae were encountered most frequently in patches of floating debris along river margins. The floating mats were often formed by bamboo hanging over the banks and dense submersed bamboo roots. Larvae were found less frequently in lake margins, small lagoons, and ground pools with submersed roots and patches of floating leaves or vegetation. In addition to their association with floating debris, larvae of An. darlingi were associated positively with shade and submersed plants in riverine environments. Samples from river habitats showed the larvae of Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann to be strongly associated with sun-exposed sites containing green or blue-green algae. Unlike An. darlingi, An. albimanus was an ubiquitous mosquito, the immatures of which occurred in a wide variety of riverine and nonriverine aquatic habitats. Based on published reports and our experience, the association of An. darlingi with river systems was verified, and its distribution in Central America and Mexico was mapped.

  4. Characterization of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) larval habitats in Belize, Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manguin, S.; Roberts, D. R.; Andre, R. G.; Rejmankova, E.; Hakre, S.

    1996-01-01

    Surveys for larvae of Anopheles darlingi Root were conducted in April, May, and August 1994 in riverine habitats of central Belize (Cayo and Belize districts). An. darlingi was present during both the dry and wet seasons. Larvae were encountered most frequently in patches of floating debris along river margins. The floating mats were often formed by bamboo hanging over the banks and dense submersed bamboo roots. Larvae were found less frequently in lake margins, small lagoons, and ground pools with submersed roots and patches of floating leaves or vegetation. In addition to their association with floating debris, larvae of An. darlingi were associated positively with shade and submersed plants in riverine environments. Samples from river habitats showed the larvae of Anopheles albimanus Wiedemann to be strongly associated with sun-exposed sites containing green or blue-green algae. Unlike An. darlingi, An. albimanus was an ubiquitous mosquito, the immatures of which occurred in a wide variety of riverine and nonriverine aquatic habitats. Based on published reports and our experience, the association of An. darlingi with river systems was verified, and its distribution in Central America and Mexico was mapped.

  5. Coda Wave Analysis in Central-Western North America Using Earthscope Transportable Array Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Doser, D. I.

    2011-12-01

    We determined seismic wave attenuation in the western and central United States (e.g. Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas) using coda waves. We selected approximately twenty moderate earthquakes (magnitude between 5.5 and 6.5) located along the Mexican subduction zone, Gulf of California, southern and northern California, and off the coast of Oregon for the analysis. These events were recorded by the EarthScope transportable array (TA) network from 2008 to 2011. In this study we implemented a method based on the assumption that coda waves are single backscattered waves from randomly distributed heterogeneities to calculate the coda Q. The frequencies studied lie between 1 and 15 Hz. The scattering attenuation is calculated for frequency bands centered at 1.5, 3, 5, 7.5, 10.5, and 13.5 Hz. In this work, we present coda Q resolution maps along with a correlation analysis between coda Q and seismicity, tectonic and geology setting. We observed higher attenuation (low coda Q values) in regions of sedimentary cover, and lower attenuation (high coda Q values) in hard rock regions. Using the 4-6 Hz frequency band, we found the best general correlation between coda Q and central-western North America bedrock geology.

  6. Controls on the fore-arc CO2 flux along the Central America margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Barry, P. H.; Ramirez, C. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Patel, B. S.; Virrueta, C.; Blackmon, K.

    2015-12-01

    The subduction of carbon to the deep mantle via subduction zones is interrupted by outputs via the fore-arc, volcanic front, and back-arc regions. Whereas output fluxes for arc and back-arc locales are well constrained for the Central America Volcanic Arc (CAVA) [1-2], the fore-arc flux via cold seeps and ground waters is poorly known. We present new He and CO2 data (isotopes and relative abundances) for the volcanic front and inner fore-arc of western Panama to complement on-going studies of fore-arc C-fluxes in Costa Rica [3-4] and to determine tectonic controls on the fore-arc C-outgassing fluxes. Helium isotope (3He/4He) values at Baru, La Yeguada, and El Valle volcanoes are high (5-8RA), consistent with results for other Central America volcanoes. However, CO2/3He values are variable (from > 1012 to < 108). Baru has an arc-like δ13C of - 4‰, whereas the other volcanoes have δ13C < -10 ‰. Cold seeps collected in the coastal fore-arc of Panama show a trend of decreasing He-isotopes from west (~6RA) to east (~1RA). This trend is mirrored by δ13C (-5‰ to <-20‰) values. CO2/3He values of the seeps are also variable and fall between 106 and 1012. Using CO2/3He-δ13C mixing plots with conventional endmember values for Limestone, Organic Sediment and Mantle CO2, we show that several Panama samples have been extensively modified by crustal processes. Nevertheless, there are clear west-to east trends (both volcanoes and coastal seeps), whereby L dominates the CO2 inventory in the west, similar to Costa Rica, and S-derived CO2 increases eastward towards central Panama. Previously [4], we limited the Costa Rica subaerial fore-arc flux to ~ 6 × 107 gCkm-1yr-1, or ~ 4% of the total incoming sedimentary C-load. This flux diminishes to zero within ~400 km to the east of Baru volcano. The transition from orthogonal subduction of the Cocos Plate to oblique subduction of the Nazca Plate, relative to the common over-riding Caribbean Plate, is the major impediment to

  7. Application of Spectral Analysis Techniques in the Intercomparison of Aerosol Data: Part III. Using Combined PCA to Compare Spatiotemporal Variability of MODIS, MISR and OMI Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  8. Application of spectral analysis techniques in the intercomparison of aerosol data: Part III. Using combined PCA to compare spatiotemporal variability of MODIS, MISR, and OMI aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-04-01

    Satellite measurements of global aerosol properties are very useful in constraining aerosol parameterization in climate models. The reliability of different data sets in representing global and regional aerosol variability becomes an essential question. In this study, we present the results of a comparison using combined principal component analysis (CPCA), applied to monthly mean, mapped (Level 3) aerosol optical depth (AOD) product from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). This technique effectively finds the common space-time variability in the multiple data sets by decomposing the combined AOD field. The results suggest that all of the sensors capture the globally important aerosol regimes, including dust, biomass burning, pollution, and mixed aerosol types. Nonetheless, differences are also noted. Specifically, compared with MISR and OMI, MODIS variability is significantly higher over South America, India, and the Sahel. MODIS deep blue AOD has a lower seasonal variability in North Africa, accompanied by a decreasing trend that is not found in either MISR or OMI AOD data. The narrow swath of MISR results in an underestimation of dust variability over the Taklamakan Desert. The MISR AOD data also exhibit overall lower variability in South America and the Sahel. OMI does not capture the Russian wild fire in 2010 nor the phase shift in biomass burning over East South America compared to Central South America, likely due to cloud contamination and the OMI row anomaly. OMI also indicates a much stronger (boreal) winter peak in South Africa compared with MODIS and MISR.

  9. A Volcano Population Index for Estimating Relative Risk With Example Data From Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Harpel, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    We have developed a Volcano Population Index (VPI) to make objective comparisons among individual volcanoes of populations that may be subject to volcanic hazards. We used volcano location data from the Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) with the LandScan 2001 gridded global population data base from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate population distribution near potentially active volcanoes in Central America. The LandScan database reports global ambient population on a 30- by 30-arc second grid (about 1 km by 1 km). The countries in Central America with volcanoes of Holocene age (<10 ka) are Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama. The VPI is defined as the sum of the population values of all LandScan 2001 cells within 10 km (VPI10) of the coordinates given for each Holocene volcano in the Smithsonian GVP catalog. An analysis of recent evacuations in the region in response to volcanic activity and a global compilation of eruption data by Newhall and Hoblitt (2002) prompted us to also evaluate population within 5 km of Holocene volcanoes and create a 5 km Volcano Population Index (VPI5). The VPI5 is an estimate of the number of people who will almost certainly have to be evacuated and cared for over some time period while an eruption is underway. There will almost always be some volcanic phenomena that adversely affects people within 10 km of the vent, and if an eruption is big enough, acute hazards may easily reach 10 km or more in any direction. We view the VPI10 as an estimate of the number of people who may have to be evacuated and cared for, and we use the VPI10 as the principal population statistic for comparison among individual volcanoes. We calculated the VPI statistics for 75 Central American Holocene volcanoes and report a country by country summary of population within 10 km of Holocene volcanoes that shows the relative exposure to volcano hazards in Central America. We also analyzed the historically

  10. Languages of North, Central, and South America. A Survey of Materials for the Study of the Uncommonly Taught Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dora E.; And Others

    This is an annotated bibliography of basic tools of access for the study of the uncommonly taught languages of North, Central, and South America. It is one of eight fascicles which constitute a revision of "A Provisional Survey of Materials for the Study of the Neglected Languages" (CAL 1969). The emphasis is on materials for the adult…

  11. In the Shadow of the Cold War: The Caribbean and Central America in U.S. Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkasian, Mark; Davidson, Louise K.

    With the improvement of U.S.-Soviet relations in recent years, there is much reason to take a fresh look at U.S. foreign policy. This unit provides secondary students with an opportunity to examine U.S. policy toward the Caribbean and Central America. Composed of four chapters, the first chapter examines the economic and military concerns that…

  12. Languages of North, Central, and South America. A Survey of Materials for the Study of the Uncommonly Taught Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dora E.; And Others

    This is an annotated bibliography of basic tools of access for the study of the uncommonly taught languages of North, Central, and South America. It is one of eight fascicles which constitute a revision of "A Provisional Survey of Materials for the Study of the Neglected Languages" (CAL 1969). The emphasis is on materials for the adult…

  13. A Popular Education Handbook. An Educational Experience Taken from Central America and Adapted to the Canadian Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Rick; Burke, Bev

    In this booklet two members of a Canadian educational development organization share their experiences during 1983 in trying to adapt the popular education they had experienced in Central America to the Canadian context. The guide is organized in five chapters. Chapter 1 defines popular education and describes its characteristics and the role of…

  14. 77 FR 9724 - Request for Petitions To Modify the Rules of Origin Under the Dominican Republic-Central America...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE Request for Petitions To Modify the Rules of Origin Under the Dominican Republic...-apparel products rules of origin under the Dominican Republic--Central America--United States Free Trade... changes that USTR should consider for modifying the CAFTA-DR's rules of origin under Article 4.14 of the...

  15. In the Shadow of the Cold War: The Caribbean and Central America in U.S. Foreign Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkasian, Mark; Davidson, Louise K.

    With the improvement of U.S.-Soviet relations in recent years, there is much reason to take a fresh look at U.S. foreign policy. This unit provides secondary students with an opportunity to examine U.S. policy toward the Caribbean and Central America. Composed of four chapters, the first chapter examines the economic and military concerns that…

  16. Projected impact of twenty-first century ENSO changes on rainfall over Central America and northwest South America from CMIP5 AOGCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, Daniel F.; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Clark, Martyn P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to the importance that the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has on rainfall over the tropical Americas, future changes in ENSO characteristics and teleconnections are important for regional hydroclimate. Projected changes to the ENSO mean state and characteristics, and the resulting impacts on rainfall anomalies over Central America, Colombia, and Ecuador during the twenty-first century are explored for several forcing scenarios using a suite of coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models (AOGCMs) from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Mean-state warming of eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, drying of Central America and northern Colombia, and wetting of southwest Colombia and Ecuador are consistent with previous studies that used earlier versions of the AOGCMs. Current and projected future characteristics of ENSO (frequency, duration, amplitude) show a wide range of values across the various AOGCMs. The magnitude of ENSO-related rainfall anomalies are currently underestimated by most of the models, but the model ensembles generally simulate the correct sign of the anomalies across the seasons around the peak ENSO effects. While the models capture the broad present-day ENSO-related rainfall anomalies, there is not a clear sense of projected future changes in the precipitation anomalies.

  17. Risk for transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Schmunis, G A; Zicker, F; Pinheiro, F; Brandling-Bennett, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the potential risk for an infectious disease through tainted transfusion in 10 countries of South and Central America in 1993 and in two countries of South America in 1994, as well as the cost of reagents as partial estimation of screening costs. Of the 12 countries included in the study, nine screened all donors for HIV; three screened all donors for hepatitis B virus (HBV); two screened all donors for Trypanosoma cruzi; none screened all donors for hepatitis C virus (HCV); and six screened some donors for syphilis. Estimates of the risk of acquiring HIV through blood transfusion were much lower than for acquiring HBV, HCV, or T. cruzi because of significantly higher screening and lower prevalence.rates for HIV. An index of infectious disease spread through blood transfusion was calculated for each country. The highest value was obtained for Bolivia (233 infections per 10,000 transfusions); in five other countries, it was 68 to 103 infections per 10,000. The risks were lower in Honduras (nine per 10,000), Ecuador (16 per 10,000), and Paraguay (19 per 10,000). While the real number of potentially infected units or infected persons is probably lower than our estimates because of false positives and already infected recipients, the data reinforce the need for an information system to assess the level of screening for infectious diseases in the blood supply. Since this information was collected, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela have made HCV screening mandatory; serologic testing for HCV has increased in those countries, as well as in El Salvador and Honduras. T. cruzi screening is now mandatory in Colombia, and the percentage of screened donors increased not only in Colombia, but also in Ecuador, El Salvador, and Paraguay. Laws to regulate blood transfusion practices have been enacted in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Peru. However, donor screening still needs to improve for one or more diseases in most countries.

  18. Understanding the MIS 5e in Central America: the Chalco Lake perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenes, G. M.; Lozano, S.; Correa-Metrio, A.; Bush, M. B.

    2013-05-01

    Southestern Mexico is a biogeographic divide between the Neotropics and temperate region. Prior work has established that Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events influenced Central America as well as North America, but there is a knowledge gap relating to rapid climate change associated with the termination and initiation of glacial episodes in the American tropics. Here we present pollen, charcoal and stratigraphic data derived from the lower part of a 122-m long composite sedimentary sequence from paleolake Chalco in Southeastern Mexico D.F. (19°14'40.99''N/98°53'30.99'', 2245 m.a.s.l.). This study established the paleoclimatic and vegetational dynamics of the northern Neotropics during MIS 6-4 using fossil pollen, charcoal and stratigraphic analysis. The history of Chalco Lake has been strongly influenced by volcanic activity around the basin, for example, four pumitic events and eight ash layers were found in the 20 m of core discussed here. Pollen data derived from the sediments showed abrupt changes in the vegetation assemblages throughout the period of study. Quercus, Pinus, Abies and Picea were dominant types at different times in the lake history reflecting changes in both temperature and precipitation. Our data indicate that at the peak of MIS5e Lake Chalco dried out, suggesting warm and dry conditions. Charcoal analysis indicated that except during the period when the lake dried out, natural fire was a component of this landscape. This study demonstrates that understanding MIS 5e, which was the last warm period before the present, is important to contextualize modern climate change and refine regional vegetation models.

  19. Wave climate and trends in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Nava, Héctor; Esquivel-Trava, Bernardo; Ocampo-Torres, Francisco J.

    2017-04-01

    Proper planning of maritime activities strongly depends on the prior knowledge of wave characteristics. In particular, knowledge of wave climate and its variability is essential for offshore and coastal operations and engineering projects. This work describes the wave climate and its variability in the Pacific region off Mexico and Central America (PMCA) based on a 19 years wave hindcast. It is found that the variability of the wave height is dominated by changes of the swell arriving from the North Pacific and of the waves generated in the Gulfs of Tehuantepec and Papagayo. The highest waves in PMCA region are associated with the occurrence of tropical storms however; tropical storms are so sparse in time and space that have little influence in the long-term mean. An analysis of the correlation of the monthly anomaly of wave height with several climate indices suggests that the major source of variability in PMCA region is El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). It is also suggested that, through the Pacific-North America teleconnection, ENSO modifies the storms characteristics over the North Pacific and causes changes in the waves arriving into PMCA region. In PMCA region wave height exhibits a negative trend almost everywhere. Notwithstanding, trends are only statistically significant in regions dominated by swell from the North Pacific, with decreasing rates between -1 to -3 cm.yr-1. This study suggests that the variability of the waves conditions over the North Pacific are related to changes of the strength and position of the Aleutian Low which are evidenced by the behaviour of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. If this is the case, the observed negative trends are expected to be part of a multi-decadal oscillation rather than a long-term behaviour.

  20. Humanizing access to modern contraceptive methods in national hospitals in Guatemala, Central America.

    PubMed

    Kestler, Edgar; Barrios, Beatriz; Hernández, Elsa M; del Valle, Vinicio; Silva, Alejandro

    2009-07-01

    The overall situation in Guatemala, Central America, regarding programs caring for women's reproductive health has been lagging behind for some decades. Since the year 2000, 56% of Guatemalan families have lived below the poverty line. Guatemala has one of the highest fertility rates (lifetime births per woman) in Latin America and the Caribbean countries, comparable to those observed in less developed countries in Africa. Considering the lack of sex education, poor access to effective contraceptive methods and issues of unwanted pregnancy, Guatemalan women engage in illegal and unsafe abortions, which often causes harm and sometimes death. A key strategy designed to improve women's health is through free and informed access to contraceptive methods that are effective and accepted by Guatemalan women. From July 1, 2003, to December 31, 2006, specially hired trained facilitators visited 22 public hospitals for 1 week to train corresponding physician staff in postabortion counseling, enabling them to assist patients to select and use an effective contraceptive method. To monitor the progress achieved, the trained facilitators returned 4 weeks later. The main purpose of the training was to focus in strengthening the understanding and technical capacity of the hospital staff to implement postabortion contraceptive counseling and to enable women to obtain an effective contraceptive method prior to hospital discharge. Out of 22 hospitals, 21 managed to improve their record for counseling patients admitted for postabortion complications, from 31% to 96%. Furthermore, the percentage of women being discharged from the hospital with an effective contraceptive method rose from 20% to 64% from 2003 to 2006. The successful results obtained during this study to meet postabortion demands by Guatemalan women point out to the urgent need for the government to expand this initiative within the national health system, including health centers nationwide. This is one of the worldwide

  1. Risk for transfusion-transmitted infectious diseases in Central and South America.

    PubMed Central

    Schmunis, G. A.; Zicker, F.; Pinheiro, F.; Brandling-Bennett, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the potential risk for an infectious disease through tainted transfusion in 10 countries of South and Central America in 1993 and in two countries of South America in 1994, as well as the cost of reagents as partial estimation of screening costs. Of the 12 countries included in the study, nine screened all donors for HIV; three screened all donors for hepatitis B virus (HBV); two screened all donors for Trypanosoma cruzi; none screened all donors for hepatitis C virus (HCV); and six screened some donors for syphilis. Estimates of the risk of acquiring HIV through blood transfusion were much lower than for acquiring HBV, HCV, or T. cruzi because of significantly higher screening and lower prevalence.rates for HIV. An index of infectious disease spread through blood transfusion was calculated for each country. The highest value was obtained for Bolivia (233 infections per 10,000 transfusions); in five other countries, it was 68 to 103 infections per 10,000. The risks were lower in Honduras (nine per 10,000), Ecuador (16 per 10,000), and Paraguay (19 per 10,000). While the real number of potentially infected units or infected persons is probably lower than our estimates because of false positives and already infected recipients, the data reinforce the need for an information system to assess the level of screening for infectious diseases in the blood supply. Since this information was collected, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Venezuela have made HCV screening mandatory; serologic testing for HCV has increased in those countries, as well as in El Salvador and Honduras. T. cruzi screening is now mandatory in Colombia, and the percentage of screened donors increased not only in Colombia, but also in Ecuador, El Salvador, and Paraguay. Laws to regulate blood transfusion practices have been enacted in Bolivia, Guatemala, and Peru. However, donor screening still needs to improve for one or more diseases in most countries. PMID:9452393

  2. A comparative study of Taiwan's short-term medical missions to the South Pacific and Central America

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Taiwan has been dispatching an increasing number of short-term medical missions (STMMs) to its allied nations to provide humanitarian health care; however, overall evaluations to help policy makers strengthen the impact of such missions are lacking. Our primary objective is to identify useful strategies by comparing STMMs to the South Pacific and Central America. Methods The data for the evaluation come from two main sources: the official reports of 46 missions to 11 countries in Central America and 25 missions to 8 countries in the South Pacific, and questionnaires completed by health professionals who had participated in the above missions. In Central America, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from multiple institutions. In the South Pacific, STMMs were staffed by volunteer health professionals from single institutions. Results In comparison to STMMs to Central America, STMMs to the South Pacific accomplished more educational training for local health providers, including providing heath-care knowledge and skills (p<0.05), and training in equipment administration (p<0.001) and drug administration (p<0.005). In addition, language constraints were more common among missions to Central America (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the performance of clinical service between the two regions. Conclusions Health-care services provided by personnel from multiple institutions are as efficient as those from single institutions. Proficiency in the native language and provision of education for local health-care workers are essential for conducting a successful STMM. Our data provide implications for integrating evidence into the deployment of STMMs. PMID:23270459

  3. [MODIS Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the last six months were: (1) Continue analysis of Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) bio-optical mooring data, and Southern Ocean bio-optical drifter data; (2) Complete development of documentation of MOCEAN algorithms and software for use by MOCEAN team and GLI team; (3) Deploy instrumentation during JGOFS cruises in the Southern Ocean; (4) Participate in test cruise for Fast Repetition Rate (FRR) fluorometer; (5) Continue chemostat experiments on the relationship of fluorescence quantum yield to environmental factors; and (6) Continue to develop and expand browser-based information system for in situ bio-optical data. We are continuing to analyze bio-optical data collected at the Hawaii Ocean Time Series mooring as well as data from bio-optical drifters that were deployed in the Southern Ocean. A draft manuscript has now been prepared and is being revised. A second manuscript is also in preparation that explores the vector wind fields derived from NSCAT measurements. The HOT bio-optical mooring was recovered in December 1997. After retrieving the data, the sensor package was serviced and redeployed. We have begun preliminary analysis of these data, but we have only had the data for 3 weeks. However, all of the data were recovered, and there were no obvious anomalies. We will add second sensor package to the mooring when it is serviced next spring. In addition, Ricardo Letelier is funded as part of the SeaWiFS calibration/validation effort (through a subcontract from the University of Hawaii, Dr. John Porter), and he will be collecting bio-optical and fluorescence data as part of the HOT activity. This will provide additional in situ measurements for MODIS validation. As noted in the previous quarterly report, we have been analyzing data from three bio-optical drifters that were deployed in the Southern Ocean in September 1996. We presented results on chlorophyll and drifter speed. For the 1998 Ocean Sciences meeting, a paper will be presented on

  4. Merging IceSAT GLAS and Terra MODIS Data in Order to Derive Forest Type Specific Tree Heights in the Central Siberian Boreal Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Kimes, Daniel; Kovacs, Katalin; Kharuk, Viatscheslav

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of boreal forest's type, biomass, and other structural parameters are critical for understanding of the boreal forest's significance in the carbon cycle, its response to and impact on global climate change. We believe the nature of the forest structure information available from MISR and GLAS can be used to help identify forest type, age class, and estimate above ground biomass levels beyond that now possible with MODIS alone. The ground measurements will be used to develop relationships between remote sensing observables and forest characteristics and provide new information for understanding forest changes with respect to environmental change. Lidar is a laser altimeter that determines the distance from the instrument to the physical surface by measuring the time elapsed between the pulse emission and the reflected return. Other studies have shown that the returned signal may identify multiple returns originating from trees, building and other objects and permits the calculation of their height. Studies using field data have shown that lidar data can provide estimates of structural parameters such as biomass, stand volume and leaf area index and allows remarkable differentiation between primary and secondary forest. NASA's IceSAT Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was launched in January 2003 and collected data during February and September of that year. This study used data acquired over our study sites in central Siberia to examine the GLAS signal as a source of forest height and other structural characteristics. The purpose of our Siberia project is to improve forest cover maps and produce above-ground biomass maps of the boreal forest in Northern Eurasia from MODIS by incorporating structural information inherent in the Terra MISR and ICESAT Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instruments. A number of forest cover classifications exist for the boreal forest. We believe the limiting factor in these products is the lack of structural

  5. Merging IceSAT GLAS and Terra MODIS Data in Order to Derive Forest Type Specific Tree Heights in the Central Siberian Boreal Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Sun, Guoqing; Kimes, Daniel; Kovacs, Katalin; Kharuk, Viatscheslav

    2006-01-01

    Mapping of boreal forest's type, biomass, and other structural parameters are critical for understanding of the boreal forest's significance in the carbon cycle, its response to and impact on global climate change. We believe the nature of the forest structure information available from MISR and GLAS can be used to help identify forest type, age class, and estimate above ground biomass levels beyond that now possible with MODIS alone. The ground measurements will be used to develop relationships between remote sensing observables and forest characteristics and provide new information for understanding forest changes with respect to environmental change. Lidar is a laser altimeter that determines the distance from the instrument to the physical surface by measuring the time elapsed between the pulse emission and the reflected return. Other studies have shown that the returned signal may identify multiple returns originating from trees, building and other objects and permits the calculation of their height. Studies using field data have shown that lidar data can provide estimates of structural parameters such as biomass, stand volume and leaf area index and allows remarkable differentiation between primary and secondary forest. NASA's IceSAT Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was launched in January 2003 and collected data during February and September of that year. This study used data acquired over our study sites in central Siberia to examine the GLAS signal as a source of forest height and other structural characteristics. The purpose of our Siberia project is to improve forest cover maps and produce above-ground biomass maps of the boreal forest in Northern Eurasia from MODIS by incorporating structural information inherent in the Terra MISR and ICESAT Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instruments. A number of forest cover classifications exist for the boreal forest. We believe the limiting factor in these products is the lack of structural

  6. Hydrological Dynamics of Central America: Time-of-Emergence of the Global Warming Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbach, P. A.; Georgiou, S.; Calderer, L.; Coto, A.; Nakaegawa, T.; Chou, S. C.; Lyra, A. A.; Hidalgo, H. G.; Ciais, P.

    2016-12-01

    Central America is among the world's most vulnerable regions to climate variability and change. Country economies are highly dependent on the agricultural sector and over 40 million people's rural livelihoods directly depend on the use of natural resources. Future climate scenarios show a drier outlook (higher temperatures and lower precipitation) over a region where rural livelihoods are already compromised by water availability and climate variability. Previous efforts to validate modelling of the regional hydrology have been based on high resolution (1 km2) equilibrium models (Imbach et al., 2010) or using dynamic models (Variable Infiltration Capacity) with coarse climate forcing (0.5°) (Hidalgo et al., 2013; Maurer et al., 2009). We present here: (i) validation of the hydrological outputs from high-resolution simulations (10 km2) of a dynamic vegetation model (Orchidee), using 7 different sets of model input forcing data, with monthly runoff observations from 182 catchments across Central America; (ii) the first assessments of the region's hydrological variability using the historical simulations (iii) an estimation of the time of emergence of the climate change signal (under the SRES emission scenarios) on the water balance. We found model performance to be comparable with that from studies in other world regions (Yang et al. 2016) when forced with high resolution precipitation data (monthly values at 5 km2, Funk et al. (2015)) and the Climate Research Unit (CRU 3.2, Harris et al. (2014)) dataset of meteorological parameters. Validation results showed a Pearson correlation coefficient ≈ 0.6, general underestimation of runoff of ≈ 60% and variability close to observed values (ratio of standard deviations of ≈ 0.7). Maps of historical runoff are presented to show areas where high runoff variability follows high mean annual runoff, with opposite trends over the Caribbean. Future scenarios show large areas where future maximum water availability will

  7. Naturalization of central European plants in North America: species traits, habitats, propagule pressure, residence time.

    PubMed

    Pyšek, Petr; Manceur, Ameur M; Alba, Christina; McGregor, Kirsty F; Pergl, Jan; Stajerová, Katerina; Chytrý, Milan; Danihelka, Jiří; Kartesz, John; Klimesova, Jitka; Lucanova, Magdalena; Moravcová, Lenka; Nishino, Misako; Sadlo, Jiri; Suda, Jan; Tichy, Lubomir; Kühn, Ingolf

    2015-03-01

    The factors that promote invasive behavior in introduced plant species occur across many scales of biological and ecological organization. Factors that act at relatively small scales, for example, the evolution of biological traits associated with invasiveness, scale up to shape species distributions among different climates and habitats, as well as other characteristics linked to invasion, such as attractiveness for cultivation (and by extension propagule pressure). To identify drivers of invasion it is therefore necessary to disentangle the contribution of multiple factors that are interdependent. To this end, we formulated a conceptual model describing the process of invasion of central European species into North America based on a sequence of "drivers." We then used confirmatory path analysis to test whether the conceptual model is supported by a statistical model inferred from a comprehensive database containing 466 species. The path analysis revealed that naturalization of central European plants in North America, in terms of the number of North American regions invaded, most strongly depends on residence time in the invaded range and the number of habitats occupied by species in their native range. In addition to the confirmatory path analysis, we identified the effects of various biological traits on several important drivers of the conceptualized invasion process. The data supported a model that included indirect effects of biological traits on invasion via their effect on the number of native range habitats occupied and cultivation in the native range. For example, persistent seed banks and longer flowering periods are positively correlated with number of native habitats, while a stress-tolerant life strategy is negatively correlated with native range cultivation. However, the importance of the biological traits is nearly an order of magnitude less than that of the larger scale drivers and highly dependent on the invasion stage (traits were associated

  8. Hurricanes, Extreme Rainfall, and Subseasonal Predictability for the US, Mexico, and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M.; Rhoads, J.

    2007-05-01

    The influence of hurricanes on extreme daily rainfall events and the potential subseasonal predictability of those events due to the influence of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are examined for the US, Mexico, and Central America. More than 15,000 daily precipitation stations from the Global Daily Climatology Network (GDCN) are used to analyze extreme rainfall events. Hurricane and tropical storm locations are taken from the Hurricane Best Track (HURDAT) files of the National Hurricane Center for the Atlantic and Eastern North Pacific, 1974-2000. The Wheeler and Hendon real-time index is used to characterize the MJO activity and the Maharaj and Wheeler approach is used to forecast the MJO. As expected, hurricane activity strongly influences the occurrence of extreme daily rainfall events over large areas of the region and the daily station data provides the maximum resolution of the signal, especially in regions with sparse data coverage. Of particular note are the large spatial scales of the influence of hurricanes in their extratropical stage over land, resulting in the hurricane influence extending considerably further inland than the well-known coastal impacts. Given the previously-established MJO influence on hurricane activity and the link between hurricanes and extreme rainfall events, the MJO influence on extreme rainfall events is examined both for hurricane-related events and for non-hurricane-related events. The MJO influence on daily rainfall extremes in Mexico identified in our previous work is seen to be closely related to the MJO modulation of hurricane activity. The influence of hurricanes and the MJO on flood disasters in Central America and Mexico is examined in terms of societal impact using the EM-DAT disaster database of the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED). Since the MJO is predictable at subseasonal timescales, the MJO influence on extreme events (both hurricane and non-hurricane related) may also be

  9. The burden of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Diumenjo, Maria C; Abriata, Graciela; Forman, David; Sierra, Monica S

    2016-09-01

    The burden of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has increased in some Central and South American countries. We describe the current patterns and trends in NHL incidence and mortality in Central and South America. We obtained regional- and national-level incidence data from 48 population-based cancer registries in 13 countries, and national-level cancer mortality data from the WHO mortality database for 18 countries. We estimated world population age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) and mortality rates (ASMRs) per 100,000 person-years for 2003-2007, and presented distributions by histological subtype. NHL incidence and mortality rates varied between countries by 2-8- and 6-fold, respectively. ASRs per 100,000 ranged from 1.4 to 10.9 among males and 1.3-9.2 among females. Corresponding ASMRs were between 0.5 and 4.8 among males and between 0.5 and 3.0 among females. The highest incidence was observed in Uruguay (males), Ecuador, Peru and Colombia (males). The highest mortality was seen in Uruguay and Costa Rica. Trends in NHL incidence and mortality in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Costa Rica did not show marked changes. B-cell neoplasms and NHL not otherwise specified (NOS) accounted for 44% and 34% of all NHL cases. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, NOS, was the most frequent histological subtype. The geographic variations in NHL rates may partially reflect differences in registration practices, disease classification, diagnostic practice, and death certification quality. There is a need for high-quality data and improvements in the accuracy of NHL histological diagnosis. Given the expected increase in NHL, careful monitoring of rates remains a priority to guide cancer control programs. Copyright © 2016 International Agency for Research on Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Trypanosoma rangeli genotypes association with Rhodnius prolixus and R. pallescens allopatric distribution in Central America.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Antón, Fernando; Urrea, Daniel Alfonso; Guhl, Felipe; Arévalo, Carolina; Azofeifa, Gabriela; Urbina, Andrea; Blandón-Naranjo, Melissa; Sousa, Octavio E; Zeledón, Rodrigo; Vallejo, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-12-01

    Previous kDNA polymorphism-based reports have revealed the existence of two Trypanosoma rangeli genotypes (KP1+ and KP1-): SL and SSU rRNA gene polymorphism-based studies have revealed that five genotypes (A-E) are distributed throughout different Latin-American countries. Some evidence has shown that the genotypes' biogeographical distribution is associated with sympatric Rhodnius species. 12 T. rangeli isolates from humans and reservoirs from El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica and Panama were characterised by kDNA and mini-exon gene intergene spacer analysis and compared to 12 previously characterised isolates from humans and vectors from Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras and Venezuela. Central American isolates corresponded to genotypes called KP1(+) or lineage A and KP1(-) or lineage C. Such dimorphism was corroborated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) in 22 selected isolates; a dendrogram was thus produced having two defined branches. One branch grouped KP1(-) or lineage C strains isolated from Rhodnius colombiensis (Colombia), humans (Panama), Procyon lotor and Choloepus hoffmanni (Costa Rica). The other group was formed by KP1(+) or lineage A strains isolated from Rhodnius prolixus (Colombia, Venezuela) and humans (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras). These results present evidence that both groups infect different mammals (humans, domestic and silvatic animals) having no association with any particular vertebrate species; however, T. rangeli KP1(+) or (A) strains have been isolated in Central America in areas where R. prolixus circulate (Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala) and KP1(-) or (C) strains have been isolated in areas where Rhodnius pallescens is the main vector (Panama and Costa Rica) indicating a parasite-vector association. The same lineages circulate in Andean countries (Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru), KP1+ being associated with members of the prolixus group (R. prolixus and Rhodnius robustus) and KP1- with members of the

  11. Fires and Smoke Observed from the Earth Observing System MODIS Instrument: Products, Validation, and Operational Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Ichoku, C.; Giglio, L.; Korontzi, S.; Chu, D. A.; Hao, W. M.; Justice, C. O.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODIS sensor, launched on NASA's Terra satellite at the end of 1999, was designed with 36 spectral channels for a wide array of land, ocean, and atmospheric investigations. MODIS has a unique ability to observe fires, smoke, and burn scars globally. Its main fire detection channels saturate at high brightness temperatures: 500 K at 4 microns and 400 K at 11 microns, which can only be attained in rare circumstances at the I kin fire detection spatial resolution. Thus, unlike other polar orbiting satellite sensors with similar thermal and spatial resolutions, but much lower saturation temperatures (e.g. AVHRR and ATSR), MODIS can distinguish between low intensity ground surface fires and high intensity crown forest fires. Smoke column concentration over land is for the first time being derived from the MOMS solar channels, extending from 0.41 microns to 2.1 microns. The smoke product has been provisionally validated both globally and regionally over southern Africa and central and south America. Burn scars are observed from MODIS even in the presence of smoke, using the 1.2 to 2.1 micron channels. MODIS burned area information is used to estimate pyrogenic emissions. A wide range of these fire and related products and validation are demonstrated for the wild fires that occurred in northwestern United States in the summer of 2000. The MODIS rapid response system and direct broadcast capability is being developed to enable users to obtain and generate data in near real time. It is expected that health and land management organizations will use these systems for monitoring the occurrence of fires and the dispersion of smoke within two to six hours after data acquisition.

  12. Medicinal Plants from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Used as Immunostimulants.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Juárez-Vázquez, María Del Carmen; Campos-Xolalpa, Nimsi

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was undertaken by analyzing distinguished books, undergraduate and postgraduate theses, and peer-reviewed scientific articles and by consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases, such as SCOPUS, Web of Science, SCIELO, Medline, and Google Scholar. Medicinal plants used as immunostimulants were classified into two categories: (1) plants with pharmacological studies and (2) plants without pharmacological research. Medicinal plants with pharmacological studies of their immunostimulatory properties were subclassified into four groups as follows: (a) plant extracts evaluated for in vitro effects, (b) plant extracts with documented in vivo effects, (c) active compounds tested on in vitro studies, and (d) active compounds assayed in animal models. Pharmacological studies have been conducted on 29 of the plants, including extracts and compounds, whereas 75 plants lack pharmacological studies regarding their immunostimulatory activity. Medicinal plants were experimentally studied in vitro (19 plants) and in vivo (8 plants). A total of 12 compounds isolated from medicinal plants used as immunostimulants have been tested using in vitro (11 compounds) and in vivo (2 compounds) assays. This review clearly indicates the need to perform scientific studies with medicinal flora from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, to obtain new immunostimulatory agents.

  13. [Optimization of registry of deaths from chronic kidney disease in agricultural communities in Central America].

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Cejudo, José Antonio; Báez, Jorge Lara; Peña, Rodolfo; Luna, Patricia Lorena Ruiz; Ordunez, Pedro

    2016-11-01

    Several Central American countries are seeing continued growth in the number of deaths from chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes (CKDnT) among farm workers and there is underreporting. This report presents the results of a consensus process coordinated by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO), the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH). This consensus seeks to increase the probability of detecting and recording deaths from these causes. There has been recognition of the negative impact of the lack of a standardized instrument and the lack of training in the medical profession for adequate registration of the cause or causes of death. As a result of the consensus, the following has been proposed: temporarily use a code from the Codes for Special Purposes in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10); continue to promote use of the WHO international standardized instrument for recording causes and preceding events related to death; increase training of physicians responsible for filling out death certificates; take action to increase the coverage and quality of information on mortality; and create a decision tree to facilitate selection of CKDnT as a specific cause of death, while presenting the role that different regional and subregional mechanisms in the Region of the Americas should play in order to improve CKD and CKDnT mortality records.

  14. Morphometric analysis of El Salvador Fault Zone. Implications to the tectonic evolution. Central America.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Henar, Jorge; Jesús Martínez-Díaz, José; Álvarez-Gómez, José Antonio

    2013-04-01

    It is considered that the study of the recent topography development, and the use of geomorphological indexes are good tools for the quantification of the active tectonics. We have used quantitative geomorphology in order to improve our understanding of the recent activity and tectonic evolution of the El Salvador Fault Zone (ESFZ); an E-W oriented strike-slip fault zone that extends 150 km through El Salvador (Martínez-Díaz et al. 2004). Previous studies propose a transtensive tectonic regime at the Central America Volcanic Arc in El Salvador, which induces relative vertical motions on the faults within El Salvador Fault Zone (i.e. Álvarez-Gómez et al., 2008, Cáceres et al. 2005,). This relative vertical displacement can be quantified with the use of hypsometry as a geomorphological character. The morphometric analysis done contributes to a better understanding of the ESFZ. We have defined km scale tectonic block relative displacements that may be useful to constrain the strain distribution along the ESFZ, length of segments with homogeneous vertical movements and lateral relay of active structures. This study supports the hypothesis of a recent migration in the maximum shortening direction, and the accomodation of the current deformation through the reactivation of pre-existing structures inherited from a previous tectonic frame. A similar tectonic evolution as described Weinberg (1992) in Nicaragua, is interpreted from the results of this study.

  15. Medicinal Plants from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean Used as Immunostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Vázquez, María del Carmen; Campos-Xolalpa, Nimsi

    2016-01-01

    A literature review was undertaken by analyzing distinguished books, undergraduate and postgraduate theses, and peer-reviewed scientific articles and by consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases, such as SCOPUS, Web of Science, SCIELO, Medline, and Google Scholar. Medicinal plants used as immunostimulants were classified into two categories: (1) plants with pharmacological studies and (2) plants without pharmacological research. Medicinal plants with pharmacological studies of their immunostimulatory properties were subclassified into four groups as follows: (a) plant extracts evaluated for in vitro effects, (b) plant extracts with documented in vivo effects, (c) active compounds tested on in vitro studies, and (d) active compounds assayed in animal models. Pharmacological studies have been conducted on 29 of the plants, including extracts and compounds, whereas 75 plants lack pharmacological studies regarding their immunostimulatory activity. Medicinal plants were experimentally studied in vitro (19 plants) and in vivo (8 plants). A total of 12 compounds isolated from medicinal plants used as immunostimulants have been tested using in vitro (11 compounds) and in vivo (2 compounds) assays. This review clearly indicates the need to perform scientific studies with medicinal flora from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, to obtain new immunostimulatory agents. PMID:27042188

  16. Asymmetric forest transition driven by the interaction of socioeconomic development and environmental heterogeneity in Central America.

    PubMed

    Redo, Daniel J; Grau, H Ricardo; Aide, T Mitchell; Clark, Matthew L

    2012-06-05

    Forest transitions (FT) have been observed in many developed countries and more recently in the developing world. However, our knowledge of FT from tropical regions is mostly derived from case studies from within a particular country, making it difficult to generalize findings across larger regions. Here we overcome these difficulties by conducting a recent (2001-2010) satellite-based analysis of trends in forest cover across Central America, stratified by biomes, which we related to socioeconomic variables associated with human development. Results show a net decrease of woody vegetation resulting from 12,201 km(2) of deforestation of moist forests and 6,825 km(2) of regrowth of conifer and dry forests. The Human Development Index was the socioeconomic variable best associated with forest cover change. The least-developed countries, Nicaragua and Guatemala, experienced both rapid deforestation of moist forests and significant recovery of conifer and dry forests. In contrast, the most developed countries, Panama and Costa Rica, had net woody vegetation gain and a more stable forest cover configuration. These results imply a good agreement with FT predictions of forest change in relation to socioeconomic development, but strong asymmetry in rates and directions of change largely dependent upon the biome where change is occurring. The FT model should be refined by incorporating ecological and socioeconomic heterogeneity, particularly in multicountry and regional studies. These asymmetric patterns of forest change should be evaluated when developing strategies for conserving biodiversity and environmental services.

  17. Cancer survival in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, R

    2011-01-01

    The dearth of reliable survival statistics from developing countries was very evident until the mid-1990s. This prompted the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) to undertake a project that facilitated hands-on-training and thereby transfer of knowledge and technology on cancer survival analysis to a majority of researchers from the participating population-based cancer registries, which culminated in the publication of the first volume of the IARC scientific publication on Cancer Survival in Developing Countries in 1998. The present study is the second in the series with wider geographical coverage and is based on data from 27 registries in 14 countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Central America. The calendar period of registration of incident cases for the present study ranges between 1990 and 2001. Data on 564 606 cases of 1-56 cancer sites from different registries are reported. Data from eleven registries were utilized for eliciting survival trend and seventeen registries for reporting survival by clinical extent of disease. Besides chapters on every registry and general chapters on methodology, database and overview, the availability of online comparative statistics on cancer survival data by participating registries or cancer site in the form of tables or graphs is an added feature (available online at http://survcan.iarc.fr).

  18. [STI and HIV prevention in female sex workers at border communities in Central America].

    PubMed

    Leyva-Flores, René; Quintino-Pérez, Frida; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Cuadra, Magali; Smith, Dee; García, Carmen

    2013-07-01

    To analyze access to STI and HIV prevention services for female sex workers in border communities of Central America. A quasi-experimental study was carried out in a non-random sample of 558 sex workers, in border communities with and without prevention interventions related to information on human rights, sexual behavior and access to information on prevention/transmission, condoms, HIV testing, contraception, healthcare and condom use. A descriptive analysis of these variables was done and a logistic regression model was used, in order to identify factors associated with condom use. Female sex workers of communities with intervention had greater access to information on prevention (99 vs 87%), condoms (98 vs 75%), HIV testing (89 vs 61%), contraception (74 vs 65%), gynecological services (83 vs 57%), and condom use with clients, 3.9 (IC:1.2-12.7), compared to workers in communities without intervention. The observed differences must be considered in a more general framework related to sociocultural characteristics and population mobility in border contexts, as well as to the organization of healthcare services.

  19. Comparison of GNSS integrated water vapor and NWM reanalysis data over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Laura Isabel; Natali, Maria Paula; Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Integrated water vapor (IWV) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Numerical Weather Models (NWM) reanalysis data were compared in order to assess the consistency between the different datasets over the extended geographical region of Central and South America. The analysis was performed for the seven years period between 2007 and 2013. We analyzed two different NWM: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA Interim) and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The statistical analysis of the differences was performed in 110 GNSS sites (GPS + GLONASS), although the most interesting results came from the 73 sites which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, and it is characterized by large temporal variability of the integrated total humidity content. Moreover, the scarce coverage of operational radio sounding stations is noticeable in large areas of the selected region; hence the contribution of IWV-GNSS is essential to improve the weather understanding. Considering that the atmospheric water vapor has a highly variable and complex distribution which knowledge is essential for weather prediction and local meteorological studies. This study aims to provide IWV-GNSS observations able to be assimilated by operational weather centers, for both prediction and simulation, as well for improving regional modeling.

  20. Evidence of avian pneumovirus spread beyond Minnesota among wild and domestic birds in central North America.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R S; Nezworski, J; Velayudhan, B T; Nagaraja, K V; Zeman, D H; Dyer, N; Graham, T; Lauer, D C; Njenga, M K; Halvorson, D A

    2004-12-01

    To detect avian pneumovirus (APV) in central North America, nasal turbinates or choanal deft tissues from domestic turkeys and wild birds were examined for the presence of APV RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), whereas serum samples from domestic turkeys were analyzed for APV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In 2002, the seroprevalence of disease in domestic turkeys in Minnesota remained high (42.3% of the flocks). In addition, there is evidence the disease has spread to turkey flocks in North Dakota (8.2%), South Dakota (7%), Iowa (10%), and Wisconsin (8.6%) as detected by RT-PCR and/or ELISA. House sparrows and ring-billed gulls sampled in Minnesota and snow geese from Saskatchewan, Canada, were found to harbor APV RNA. Sequence analysis of wild bird APV strains showed high amino acid sequence identity among wild bird isolates (<97%) and between wild bird and turkey viral isolates (93.2%-99.3%). This study demonstrated that APV infections were present in domestic turkey flocks and wild birds outside the state of Minnesota; however, the role of wild birds in spreading APV to domestic turkeys remains unclear.

  1. Application of scientific core drilling to geothermal exploration: Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala, Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Goff, F.E.; Heiken, G.H.; Duffield, W.A.; Janik, C.J.

    1994-04-01

    Our efforts in Honduras and Guatemala were part of the Central America Energy Resource Project (CAERP) funded by the United States Agency for International Development (AID). Exploration core drilling operations at the Platanares, Honduras and Tecuamburro Volcano, Guatemala sites were part of a geothermal assessment for the national utility companies of these countries to locate and evaluate their geothermal resources for electrical power generation. In Honduras, country-wide assessment of all thermal areas determined that Platanares was the site with the greatest geothermal potential. In late 1986 to middle 1987, three slim core holes were drilled at Platanares to a maximum depth of 680 m and a maximum temperature of 165{degree}C. The objectives were to obtain information on the geothermal gradient, hydrothermal alterations, fracturing, and possible inflows of hydrothermal fluids. Two holes produced copious amounts of water under artesian conditions and a total of 8 MW(t) of energy. Geothermal investigations in Guatemala focused on the Tecuamburro Volcano geothermal site. The results of surface geological, volcanological, hydrogeochemical, and geophysical studies at Tecuamburro Volcano indicated a substantial shallow heat source. In early 1990 we drilled one core hole, TCB-1, to 808 m depth. The measured bottom hole temperature was 238{degree}C. Although the borehole did not flow, in-situ samples indicate the hole is completed in a vapor-zone above a probable 300{degree}C geothermal reservoir.

  2. Dietary intakes of preschool children in LA Pa, El Salvador, Central America.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, P; Trowbridge, F L

    1980-03-01

    A dietary survey was conducted in a department of El Salvador as part of an assessment of the nutritional status of preschool children. Intake of calories, protein and retinol equivalents were estimated using a 24-hour recall technique. The average daily energy intake for children 1-4 years old was 866 Kcal representing 60% of the 1973 level recommended by the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), for this age group, and 76% of the recommended level on a body-weight basis. Average protein intake per child per day in the same age group was 31.3 g, which represents 110% of the recommended level for the age group, and 136% of the recommended level on a body weight basis. The estimated retinol equivalent intake was 36% of the recommended allowance. In general, the results of the present study were similar to those obtained in the study carried out in El Salvador by INCAP during the period September-November, 1965.

  3. Asymmetric forest transition driven by the interaction of socioeconomic development and environmental heterogeneity in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Redo, Daniel J.; Grau, H. Ricardo; Aide, T. Mitchell; Clark, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    Forest transitions (FT) have been observed in many developed countries and more recently in the developing world. However, our knowledge of FT from tropical regions is mostly derived from case studies from within a particular country, making it difficult to generalize findings across larger regions. Here we overcome these difficulties by conducting a recent (2001–2010) satellite-based analysis of trends in forest cover across Central America, stratified by biomes, which we related to socioeconomic variables associated with human development. Results show a net decrease of woody vegetation resulting from 12,201 km2 of deforestation of moist forests and 6,825 km2 of regrowth of conifer and dry forests. The Human Development Index was the socioeconomic variable best associated with forest cover change. The least-developed countries, Nicaragua and Guatemala, experienced both rapid deforestation of moist forests and significant recovery of conifer and dry forests. In contrast, the most developed countries, Panama and Costa Rica, had net woody vegetation gain and a more stable forest cover configuration. These results imply a good agreement with FT predictions of forest change in relation to socioeconomic development, but strong asymmetry in rates and directions of change largely dependent upon the biome where change is occurring. The FT model should be refined by incorporating ecological and socioeconomic heterogeneity, particularly in multicountry and regional studies. These asymmetric patterns of forest change should be evaluated when developing strategies for conserving biodiversity and environmental services. PMID:22615408

  4. Intellectual property and access to medicines: an analysis of legislation in Central America.

    PubMed

    Cerón, Alejandro; Godoy, Angelina Snodgrass

    2009-10-01

    Globalization of intellectual property (IP) protection for medicines has been advancing during the past decade. Countries are obliged to adapt their legislation as a requirement of their membership to the World Trade Organization or as a condition of being part of international trade agreements. There is a growing recognition that, in low-income countries, stronger IP protection is a barrier to access to medicines. At the same time, the number of low-income countries writing national legislation to protect IP for pharmaceutical products is growing worldwide, but little research has been done on the ways in which this process is happening at the national level. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the implementation of IP legislation at the national level by providing a comparative analysis of the countries that are part of the United States-Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA). The analysis shows three trends. First, countries have often implemented stronger IP protection than required by trade agreements. Second, some countries have adopted IP protection before signing the trade agreements. Third, the process of ratification of DR-CAFTA increased public debate around these issues, which in some cases led to IP legislation that considers public health needs. These trends suggest that industrialized countries and the pharmaceutical industry are using more tactics than just trade agreements to push for increased IP protection and that the process of national legislation is a valid arena for confronting public health needs to those of the industry.

  5. Microsatellite data suggest significant population structure and differentiation within the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Lisa; Vineis, Joseph H; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Scarpassa, Vera M; Póvoa, Marinete M; Padilla, Norma; Achee, Nicole L; Conn, Jan E

    2008-01-01

    Background Anopheles darlingi is the most important malaria vector in the Neotropics. An understanding of A. darlingi's population structure and contemporary gene flow patterns is necessary if vector populations are to be successfully controlled. We assessed population genetic structure and levels of differentiation based on 1,376 samples from 31 localities throughout the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon and Central America using 5–8 microsatellite loci. Results We found high levels of polymorphism for all of the Amazonian populations (mean RS = 7.62, mean HO = 0.742), and low levels for the Belize and Guatemalan populations (mean RS = 4.3, mean HO = 0.457). The Bayesian clustering analysis revealed five population clusters: northeastern Amazonian Brazil, southeastern and central Amazonian Brazil, western and central Amazonian Brazil, Peruvian Amazon, and the Central American populations. Within Central America there was low non-significant differentiation, except for between the populations separated by the Maya Mountains. Within Amazonia there was a moderate level of significant differentiation attributed to isolation by distance. Within Peru there was no significant population structure and low differentiation, and some evidence of a population expansion. The pairwise estimates of genetic differentiation between Central America and Amazonian populations were all very high and highly significant (FST = 0.1859 – 0.3901, P < 0.05). Both the DA and FST distance-based trees illustrated the main division to be between Central America and Amazonia. Conclusion We detected a large amount of population structure in Amazonia, with three population clusters within Brazil and one including the Peru populations. The considerable differences in Ne among the populations may have contributed to the observed genetic differentiation. All of the data suggest that the primary division within A. darlingi corresponds to two white gene genotypes between Amazonia (genotype 1) and

  6. Geomorphological impact on agroforestry systems in the interior highlands of Nicaragua, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentler, Axel; Wriessnig, Karin; Ottner, Franz; Schomakers, Jasmin; Benavides González, Álvaro; Cisne Contreras, José Dolores; Querol Lipcovich, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Cerro el Castillo is located in the NW of Nicaragua, Central America, close to the border of Honduras (Provincia Central de las Cordilleras) at 1000-1200m above sea level. In this region, small and medium-sized farms are agroforestry systems with mangos, avocados, coffee, papayas, bananas, strawberries, maize, pumpkins, beans and other vegetables. The production systems are strongly linked to facilities for raising small domestic animals and cows. Main regional agricultural production problems are steep slopes, soil erosion, varying precipitation and distribution, water management and the unstable family income. An investigation of topsoil properties with comparable management systems showed on small scales significant differences in key values of soil chemistry and mineralogy. The outline of the analytical parameters included determination of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN) and dissolved nitrogen (DN) in soil solution, and plant available nutrients (P and K). The soil's mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The area is a highly weathered karst landscape within a tropical limestone region displaying different amounts of volcanic pyroclastic parent material. The dominant Nitisoils and Andosols show degraded argic and andic horizons along the upper half of the mountainside. The pH values in the topsoil are moderate from pH 5.0 to 5.6. The upland topsoil is decalcified and the amount of plant available phosphorous is very low with significant low Ca concentration at the sorption complex. The mineralogical composition points to the high weathering intensity of this area (high content of kaolinite and a lower concentration of potassium and plagioclase feldspars and andesite). Along the upper half of the mountain, the soil profiles show wider C:N ratios and lower amounts of organic matter. Topsoil at lower altitude and with a lower

  7. The Banded Elm Bark Beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Scolytinae) in North America: a taxonomic review and modifications to the Wood (1982) key to the species of Scolytus Geoffroy in North and Central America

    PubMed Central

    R. LaBonte, James

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In 2003, an Asian bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), the banded elm bark beetle, was detected for the first time in North America. This paper modifies the Wood (1982) key to the species of Scolytus Geoffroy to enable identification of Scolytus schevyrewi in North and Central America. Variation of diagnostic characters in Scolytus schevyrewi is discussed. PMID:21594181

  8. Plume-subduction interaction in southern Central America: Mantle upwelling and slab melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hoernle, Kaj; Carr, Michael J.; Herzberg, Claude; Saginor, Ian; den Bogaard, Paul van; Hauff, Folkmar; Feigenson, Mark; Swisher, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic front in southern Central America is well known for its Galapagos OIB-like geochemical signature. A comprehensive set of geochemical, isotopic and geochronological data collected on volumetrically minor alkaline basalts and adakites were used to better constrain the mantle and subduction magma components and to test the different models that explain this OIB signature in an arc setting. We report a migration of back-arc alkaline volcanism towards the northwest, consistent with arc-parallel mantle flow models, and a migration towards the southeast in the adakites possibly tracking the eastward movement of the triple junction where the Panama Fracture Zone intersects the Middle America Trench. The adakites major and trace element compositions are consistent with magmas produced by melting a mantle-wedge source metasomatized by slab derived melts. The alkaline magmas are restricted to areas that have no seismic evidence of a subducting slab. The geochemical signature of the alkaline magmas is mostly controlled by upwelling asthenosphere with minor contributions from subduction components. Mantle potential temperatures calculated from the alkaline basalt primary magmas increased from close to ambient mantle (~ 1380-1410 °C) in the Pliocene to ~ 1450 °C in the younger units. The calculated initial melting pressures for these primary magmas are in the garnet stability field (3.0-2.7 GPa). The average final melting pressures range between 2.7 and 2.5 GPa, which is interpreted as the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary at ~ 85-90 km. We provide a geotectonic model that integrates the diverse observations presented here. The slab detached after the collision of the Galapagos tracks with the arc (~ 10-8 Ma). The detachment allowed hotter asthenosphere to flow into the mantle wedge. This influx of hotter asthenosphere explains the increase in mantle potential temperatures, the northwest migration in the back-arc alkaline lavas that tracks the passage of the

  9. Tsunami hazard assessment in El Salvador, Central America, from seismic sources through flooding numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Gómez, J. A.; Aniel-Quiroga, Í.; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, O. Q.; Larreynaga, J.; González, M.; Castro, M.; Gavidia, F.; Aguirre-Ayerbe, I.; González-Riancho, P.; Carreño, E.

    2013-05-01

    El Salvador is the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America; its coast has approximately a length of 320 km, 29 municipalities and more than 700 000 inhabitants. In El Salvador there have been 15 recorded tsunamis between 1859 and 2012, 3 of them causing damages and hundreds of victims. The hazard assessment is commonly based on propagation numerical models for earthquake-generated tsunamis and can be approached from both Probabilistic and Deterministic Methods. A deterministic approximation has been applied in this study as it provides essential information for coastal planning and management. The objective of the research was twofold, on the one hand the characterization of the threat over the entire coast of El Salvador, and on the other the computation of flooding maps for the three main localities of the Salvadorian coast. For the latter we developed high resolution flooding models. For the former, due to the extension of the coastal area, we computed maximum elevation maps and from the elevation in the near-shore we computed an estimation of the run-up and the flooded area using empirical relations. We have considered local sources located in the Middle America Trench, characterized seismotectonically, and distant sources in the rest of Pacific basin, using historical and recent earthquakes and tsunamis. We used a hybrid finite differences - finite volumes numerical model in this work, based on the Linear and Non-linear Shallow Water Equations, to simulate a total of 24 earthquake generated tsunami scenarios. In the western Salvadorian coast, run-up values higher than 5 m are common, while in the eastern area, approximately from La Libertad to the Gulf of Fonseca, the run-up values are lower. The more exposed areas to flooding are the lowlands in the Lempa River delta and the Barra de Santiago Western Plains. The results of the empirical approximation used for the whole country are similar to the results obtained with the high resolution

  10. Tsunami hazard assessment in El Salvador, Central America, from seismic sources through flooding numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Gómez, J. A.; Aniel-Quiroga, Í.; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, O. Q.; Larreynaga, J.; González, M.; Castro, M.; Gavidia, F.; Aguirre-Ayerbe, I.; González-Riancho, P.; Carreño, E.

    2013-11-01

    El Salvador is the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America; its coast has an approximate length of 320 km, 29 municipalities and more than 700 000 inhabitants. In El Salvador there were 15 recorded tsunamis between 1859 and 2012, 3 of them causing damages and resulting in hundreds of victims. Hazard assessment is commonly based on propagation numerical models for earthquake-generated tsunamis and can be approached through both probabilistic and deterministic methods. A deterministic approximation has been applied in this study as it provides essential information for coastal planning and management. The objective of the research was twofold: on the one hand the characterization of the threat over the entire coast of El Salvador, and on the other the computation of flooding maps for the three main localities of the Salvadorian coast. For the latter we developed high-resolution flooding models. For the former, due to the extension of the coastal area, we computed maximum elevation maps, and from the elevation in the near shore we computed an estimation of the run-up and the flooded area using empirical relations. We have considered local sources located in the Middle America Trench, characterized seismotectonically, and distant sources in the rest of Pacific Basin, using historical and recent earthquakes and tsunamis. We used a hybrid finite differences-finite volumes numerical model in this work, based on the linear and non-linear shallow water equations, to simulate a total of 24 earthquake-generated tsunami scenarios. Our results show that at the western Salvadorian coast, run-up values higher than 5 m are common, while in the eastern area, approximately from La Libertad to the Gulf of Fonseca, the run-up values are lower. The more exposed areas to flooding are the lowlands in the Lempa River delta and the Barra de Santiago Western Plains. The results of the empirical approximation used for the whole country are similar to the results

  11. An investigation of thermal anomalies in the Central American volcanic chain and evaluation of the utility of thermal anomaly monitoring in the prediction of volcanic eruptions. [Central America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoiber, R. E. (Principal Investigator); Rose, W. I., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground truth data collection proves that significant anomalies exist at 13 volcanoes within the test site of Central America. The dimensions and temperature contrast of these ten anomalies are large enough to be detected by the Skylab 192 instrument. The dimensions and intensity of thermal anomalies have changed at most of these volcanoes during the Skylab mission.

  12. Tree-ring records of near-Younger Dryas time in central North America : preliminary results from the Lincoln Quarry site, central Illinois, USA

    Treesearch

    Irina P. Panyushkina; Steven W. Leavitt; Alex Wiedenhoeft; Sarah Noggle; Brandon Curry; Eric Grimm

    2004-01-01

    The abrupt millennial-scale changes associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event (“chronozone”) near the dawn of the Holocene are at least hemispheric, if not global, in extent. Evidence for the YD cold excursion is abundant in Europe but fairly meager in central North America. We are engaged in an investigation of high-resolution environmental changes in mid-North...

  13. A single early introduction of HIV-1 subtype B into Central America accounts for most current cases.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Wendy; Veras, Nazle; Prosperi, Mattia; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Juarez, Sandra I; Yang, Chunfu; DeVos, Joshua; Marín, José Pablo; Mild, Mattias; Albert, Jan; Salemi, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants show considerable geographical separation across the world, but there is limited information from Central America. We provide the first detailed investigation of the genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in six Central American countries. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on 625 HIV-1 pol gene sequences collected between 2002 and 2010 in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Belize. Published sequences from neighboring countries (n = 57) and the rest of the world (n = 740) were included as controls. Maximum likelihood methods were used to explore phylogenetic relationships. Bayesian coalescence-based methods were used to time HIV-1 introductions. Nearly all (98.9%) Central American sequences were of subtype B. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 437 (70%) sequences clustered within five significantly supported monophyletic clades formed essentially by Central American sequences. One clade contained 386 (62%) sequences from all six countries; the other four clades were smaller and more country specific, suggesting discrete subepidemics. The existence of one large well-supported Central American clade provides evidence that a single introduction of HIV-1 subtype B in Central America accounts for most current cases. An introduction during the early phase of the HIV-1 pandemic may explain its epidemiological success. Moreover, the smaller clades suggest a subsequent regional spread related to specific transmission networks within each country.

  14. A Single Early Introduction of HIV-1 Subtype B into Central America Accounts for Most Current Cases

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Wendy; Veras, Nazle; Prosperi, Mattia; de Rivera, Ivette Lorenzana; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Morales-Miranda, Sonia; Juarez, Sandra I.; Yang, Chunfu; DeVos, Joshua; Marín, José Pablo; Mild, Mattias; Albert, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants show considerable geographical separation across the world, but there is limited information from Central America. We provide the first detailed investigation of the genetic diversity and molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in six Central American countries. Phylogenetic analysis was performed on 625 HIV-1 pol gene sequences collected between 2002 and 2010 in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Belize. Published sequences from neighboring countries (n = 57) and the rest of the world (n = 740) were included as controls. Maximum likelihood methods were used to explore phylogenetic relationships. Bayesian coalescence-based methods were used to time HIV-1 introductions. Nearly all (98.9%) Central American sequences were of subtype B. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 437 (70%) sequences clustered within five significantly supported monophyletic clades formed essentially by Central American sequences. One clade contained 386 (62%) sequences from all six countries; the other four clades were smaller and more country specific, suggesting discrete subepidemics. The existence of one large well-supported Central American clade provides evidence that a single introduction of HIV-1 subtype B in Central America accounts for most current cases. An introduction during the early phase of the HIV-1 pandemic may explain its epidemiological success. Moreover, the smaller clades suggest a subsequent regional spread related to specific transmission networks within each country. PMID:23616665

  15. Brief communication: the Uto-Aztecan premolar in early hunter-gatherers from South-Central North America.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew S

    2012-10-01

    The Uto-Aztecan premolar is a discrete dental trait found in low frequency (<2%) among world populations. The highest frequencies of the trait have been found among the indigenous populations of North America and, to a lesser extent, South America. Because of the trait's relatively higher frequency in the Western Hemisphere, the antiquity and distribution of the feather is important for reconstructing the biocultural interactions of prehistoric populations. While early research concluded that the Uto-Aztecan premolar originated in the American Southwest around 4,000 years Before Present (BP), more recent studies have discovered the trait across the Americas and in parts of Europe and Asia. For this study, over 300 dentitions representing foragers and farmers in south-central North America were examined. The trait was found in relatively high frequency (over 11%) in Archaic hunter-gatherer populations from Central Texas, with high frequencies also found in the adjacent western Gulf Coastal Plain. The presence of this trait in Early Archaic populations suggests that the trait was present by 8,000 BP and persisted at a high frequency into the Late Archaic period. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Large scale patterns of genetic variation and differentiation in sugar maple from tropical Central America to temperate North America.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Rodriguez, Yalma L; Platt, William J; Urbatsch, Lowell E; Foltz, David W

    2015-11-19

    Geological events in the latter Cenozoic have influenced the distribution, abundance and genetic structure of tree populations in temperate and tropical North America. The biogeographical history of temperate vegetation that spans large ranges of latitude is complex, involving multiple latitudinal shifts that might have occurred via different migration routes. We determined the regional structuring of genetic variation of sugar maple (Acer saccharum subsp. saccharum) and its only subspecies in tropical America (Acer saccharum subsp. skutchii) using nuclear and chloroplast data. The studied populations span a geographic range from Maine, USA (46°N), to El Progreso, Guatemala (15°N). We examined genetic subdivisions, explored the locations of ancestral haplotypes, analyzed genetic data to explore the presence of a single or multiple glacial refugia, and tested whether genetic lineages are temporally consistent with a Pleistocene or older divergence. Nuclear and chloroplast data indicated that populations in midwestern USA and western Mexico were highly differentiated from populations in the rest of the sites. The time of the most recent common ancestor of the western Mexico haplotype lineage was dated to the Pliocene (5.9 Ma, 95% HPD: 4.3-7.3 Ma). Splits during the Pleistocene separated the rest of the phylogroups. The most frequent and widespread haplotype occurred in half of the sites (Guatemala, eastern Mexico, southeastern USA, and Ohio). Our data also suggested that multiple Pleistocene refugia (tropics-southeastern USA, midwestern, and northeastern USA), but not western Mexico (Jalisco), contributed to post-glacial northward expansion of ranges. Current southern Mexican and Guatemalan populations have reduced population sizes, genetic bottlenecks and tend toward homozygosity, as indicated using nuclear and chloroplast markers. The divergence of western Mexican populations from the rest of the sugar maples likely resulted from orographic and volcanic barriers

  17. Preface to the special issue on "Regional moment tensors and stress field in South and Central America"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Zahradnik, Jiri; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    This special issue follows from the Symposium ;Regional Moment Tensor Solutions: advances and new applications; held in Bogotá, Colombia, at the I Regional Assembly of the IASPEI's Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) in 2014. Seven papers are presented dealing with determination of moment tensors, focal mechanisms and the stress field in Central and South America. The study areas of each paper are indicated in the index Map of Fig. 1.

  18. Security Assistance to Central America: Assessment of U.S. Involvement in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    backyard" as was intended. Significant problems plague the six nations of Central America. Foremost is a history of chaotic self-government; El Salvador...questions as "Is this area worth the .i vestment’, "Can we expect these countries to support the U.S position in times of crisis?", and "Doesn’t history ...in the Geography, History , and Political Science Departments, University of Louisville Step one answered investigative question one and formed the

  19. Calibration of strong motion models for Central America region and its use in seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Climent, A.; Benito, M. B.; Piedra, R.; Lindholm, C.; Gaspar-Escribano, J.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a study aimed at choosing the more suitable strong-motion models for seismic hazard analysis in the Central America (CA) Region. After a careful revision of the state of the art, different models developed for subduction and volcanic crustal zones, in tectonic environment similar to those of CA, were selected. These models were calibrated with accelerograms recorded in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and El Salvador. The peak ground acceleration PGA and Spectral Acceleration SA (T) derived from the records were compared with the ones predicted by the models in similar conditions of magnitude, distance and soil. The type of magnitude (Ms, Mb, MW), distance (Rhyp, Rrup, etc) and ground motion parameter (maximum horizontal component, geometrical mean, etc ) was taken into account in the comparison with the real data. As results of the analysis, the models which present a best fit with the local data were identified. These models have been applied for carrying out seismic hazard analysis in the region, in the frame of the RESIS II project financed by the Norwegian Foreign Department and also by the Spanish project SISMOCAES. The methodology followed is based on the direct comparison between PGA and SA 5 % damped response values extracted from actual records with the corresponding acceleration values predicted by the selected ground-motion models for similar magnitude, distance and soil conditions. Residuals between observed and predicted values for PGA, and SA (1sec) are calculated and plotted as a function of distance and magnitude, analyzing their deviation from the mean value. Besides and most important, a statistical analysis of the normalized residuals was carry out using the criteria proposed by Scherbaum et al. (2004), which consists in categorizing ground motion models based in a likelihood parameter that reflects the goodness-of-fit of the median values as well as the shape of the underlying distribution of ground motion residuals. Considering

  20. Micro and Macroscale Drivers of Nutrient Concentrations in Urban Streams in South, Central and North America

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Steven A.; Gasparini Fernandes Cunha, Davi; Shupe, Scott; Valiente, Elsa; Rocha, Luciana; Heasley, Eleanore; Belmont, Patricia Pérez; Baruch, Avinoam

    2016-01-01

    Global metrics of land cover and land use provide a fundamental basis to examine the spatial variability of human-induced impacts on freshwater ecosystems. However, microscale processes and site specific conditions related to bank vegetation, pollution sources, adjacent land use and water uses can have important influences on ecosystem conditions, in particular in smaller tributary rivers. Compared to larger order rivers, these low-order streams and rivers are more numerous, yet often under-monitored. The present study explored the relationship of nutrient concentrations in 150 streams in 57 hydrological basins in South, Central and North America (Buenos Aires, Curitiba, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City and Vancouver) with macroscale information available from global datasets and microscale data acquired by trained citizen scientists. Average sub-basin phosphate (P-PO4) concentrations were found to be well correlated with sub-basin attributes on both macro and microscales, while the relationships between sub-basin attributes and nitrate (N-NO3) concentrations were limited. A phosphate threshold for eutrophic conditions (>0.1 mg L-1 P-PO4) was exceeded in basins where microscale point source discharge points (eg. residential, industrial, urban/road) were identified in more than 86% of stream reaches monitored by citizen scientists. The presence of bankside vegetation covaried (rho = –0.53) with lower phosphate concentrations in the ecosystems studied. Macroscale information on nutrient loading allowed for a strong separation between basins with and without eutrophic conditions. Most importantly, the combination of macroscale and microscale information acquired increased our ability to explain sub-basin variability of P-PO4 concentrations. The identification of microscale point sources and bank vegetation conditions by citizen scientists provided important information that local authorities could use to improve their management of lower order river

  1. Emerging deforestation trends in tropical dry forests ecoregions of Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, I. M.; Sievert, S. M.; Fogel, M. L.; Foustoukos, D.

    2014-12-01

    Neotropical dry forests (TDF) have experienced an unprecedented deforestation that is leading to the loss of tropical biodiversity at a rapid pace, but information on deforestation dynamics in TDF is scarce. In this study, we present a sub-continental and national level assessment of TDF loss patterns in Mexico and Central America at high spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing and GIS technologies. We used the Global Forest Change (GFC) dataset published by Hansen et al. (2013) which shows results from time-series analysis of Landsat images in characterizing global forest extent and change from 2000 through 2013. We analyzed forest loss within and around mapped TDF cover mapped by Portillo-Quintero et al. 2010. In order to minimize errors in source data, we overlaid a 25 x 25 km grid on top of the regional dataset and conducted a cell by cell and country by country inspection at multiple scales using high resolution ancillary data. We identified trends in the clustering of space-time TDF deforestation data using ArcGIS, categorizing trends in: new, consecutive, intensifying, persistent, diminishing, sporadic, oscillating and historical hotspots (high frequency of deforestation events) and cold spots (low frequency of deforestation). In general, the region is experiencing less frequent deforestation events with a higher number of intensifying and new cold spots across TDF landscapes. However, an important number of intensifying and persistent hotspots exist so no general trend in forest loss was detected for the period 2001-2013, except for El Salvador which shows a significant decreasing trend in forest loss. Mexico, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala are the major sources of intensifying, persistent and new deforestation hot spots. These were identified in the southern pacific coast and the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, northwestern Guatemala, both western and eastern Honduras and around Lake Nicaragua in Nicaragua.

  2. Behavioral problems and tobacco use among adolescents in Central America and the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Vittetoe, Kenneth; Lopez, Marsha F; Delva, Jorge; Wagner, Fernando; Anthony, James C

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between behavioral problems and tobacco use among adolescent students in six countries of Central America and in the Dominican Republic. Data were drawn from a multinational collaborative study that included questionnaire surveys of between 451 and 1,170 school-attending adolescents in each of the seven countries studied. Assessments were based on an adapted, Spanish-language version of the Drug Use Screening Inventory (DUSI). The conditional form of logistic regression was employed for analysis, matching students on type of school and area, with further statistical adjustments for sex, age, and selected risk factors. Occurrence of tobacco use was observed to vary dramatically from country to country. Nonetheless, for the combined group of countries, the estimated odds of tobacco use in youths at the highest levels of behavioral problems was more than five times that for youths at the lowest levels, after controlling for sex, age, lack of participation in recreational activities, level of irritability, and levels of problems with school, family, and mental health. Country-specific analyses show that youths at the highest levels of behavioral problems have a consistently greater occurrence of tobacco use as compared to youths at the lowest levels of behavioral problems. These findings are concordant with prior studies on tobacco use among adolescents with behavioral problems. Although the magnitude of observed associations varied according to the country of residence, the strength of these associations and their significance by conventional standards were observed in nearly all the countries sampled. This is the first study in these seven countries on potentially causal relationships such as these. More research is needed to augment our knowledge regarding the observed cross-country differences and ultimately to develop, implement, and evaluate effective tobacco preventive intervention programs.

  3. A Geodynamical Perspective on the Subduction of Cocos and Rivera plates beneath Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Manea, Marina; Ferrari, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The Middle America subduction zone (MASZ) is one of the world most complex convergent margins as it involves the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos young oceanic plates beneath the North American and Caribbean plates and is bounded by the Gulf of California rift and the Panama slab window. Characterized by contorted and unusual slab geometry, irregularly distributed seismicity and volcanism, exceptionally large slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors (NVT), this subduction system represents a great natural laboratory for better understanding geodynamic processes at a fundamental level. Based on a solid observational foundation, and incorporating the latest experimental results into a coherent geodynamical framework, we shed light on the main processes controlling the subduction system evolution in this region. The tectonics, volcanism, slab geometry and segmentation along the margin are reviewed from a geodynamical perspective. We proposed and discussed a series of evolutionary scenarios for the Mexican and Central American subduction zones, providing a coherent starting base for future geodynamical modeling studies tailored to this active margin. We discuss comparatively the recently discovered SSEs and NVTs along the MASZ, and try to differentiate among the proposed mechanisms responsible for these observations. Finally we discuss the recent seismic anisotropy observations in a geodynamic context, offering an integrated view of mantle flow pattern along the entire active margin. Although the MASZ as a whole may be considered a fairly complicated region with many unusual features and sometimes controversial interpretations, its complexity and unusual characteristics can improve our knowledge about the linkage between deep and surface processes associated with subduction zone dynamics.

  4. Analysis of VLF signals associated to AGILE Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detected over Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Lyu, Fanchao; Cummer, Steven; Ursi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of radio signals detected on ground and associated to Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have proven to be a successful tool to extract information on the TGF itself and the possible associated lightning process. Triangulation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals by means of the Time Of Arrival technique provides TGF location with few km accuracy. The AGILE satellite is routinely observing TGFs on a narrow band across the Equator, limited by the small satellite orbital inclination (2.5°). However, until recently it was not possible to provide firm associations between AGILE TGFs and radio signals, because of two main limiting factors. First, dead-time effects led to a bias towards long duration events in AGILE TGF sample, which are less likely associated to strong radio pulses. In addition, most VLF detection networks are less sensitive along the equatorial region. Since the end of March 2015 a major change in the AGILE MiniCalorimeter instrument configuration resulted in a ten fold increase in TGF detection rate, and in the detection of events as short as 20 microseconds. 14% of the events in the new sample resulted simultaneous (within 200 microseconds) to sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), therefore a source localisation is available for these events. We present here the first analysis of VLF waveforms associated to AGILE TGFs observed above Central America, detected by magnetic field sensors deployed in Puerto Rico. Among the seven TGFs with a WWLLN location at a distance lower than 10000 km from the sensors, four of them have detectable signals. These events are the closest to the sensors, with distance less than 7500 km. We present here the properties of these TGFs and the characteristics of the associated radio waveforms.

  5. Population amalgamation and genetic variation: observations on artificially agglomerated tribal populations of Central and South America.

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, R; Smouse, P E; Neel, J V

    1988-01-01

    The interpretation of data on genetic variation with regard to the relative roles of different evolutionary factors that produce and maintain genetic variation depends critically on our assumptions concerning effective population size and the level of migration between neighboring populations. In humans, recent population growth and movements of specific ethnic groups across wide geographic areas mean that any theory based on assumptions of constant population size and absence of substructure is generally untenable. We examine the effects of population subdivision on the pattern of protein genetic variation in a total sample drawn from an artificial agglomerate of 12 tribal populations of Central and South America, analyzing the pooled sample as though it were a single population. Several striking findings emerge. (1) Mean heterozygosity is not sensitive to agglomeration, but the number of different alleles (allele count) is inflated, relative to neutral mutation/drift/equilibrium expectation. (2) The inflation is most serious for rare alleles, especially those which originally occurred as tribally restricted "private" polymorphisms. (3) The degree of inflation is an increasing function of both the number of populations encompassed by the sample and of the genetic divergence among them. (4) Treating an agglomerated population as though it were a panmictic unit of long standing can lead to serious biases in estimates of mutation rates, selection pressures, and effective population sizes. Current DNA studies indicate the presence of numerous genetic variants in human populations. The findings and conclusions of this paper are all fully applicable to the study of genetic variation at the DNA level as well. PMID:3189334

  6. A geodynamical perspective on the subduction of Cocos and Rivera plates beneath Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Ferrari, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle America subduction zone (MASZ) is one of the world’ most complex convergent margins as it involves the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos young oceanic plates beneath the North American and Caribbean plates and is bounded by the Gulf of California rift and the Panama slab window. Characterized by contorted and unusual slab geometry, irregularly distributed seismicity and volcanism, exceptionally large slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors (NVT), this subduction system represents a great natural laboratory for better understanding geodynamic processes at a fundamental level. Based on a solid observational foundation, and incorporating the latest experimental results into a coherent geodynamical framework, we shed light on the main processes controlling the subduction system evolution in this region. The tectonics, volcanism, slab geometry and segmentation along the margin are reviewed from a geodynamical perspective. We proposed and discussed a series of evolutionary scenarios for the Mexican and Central American subduction zones, providing a coherent starting base for future geodynamical modeling studies tailored to this active margin. We discuss comparatively the recently discovered SSEs and NVTs along the MASZ, and try to differentiate among the proposed mechanisms responsible for these observations. Finally we discuss the recent seismic anisotropy observations in a geodynamic context, offering an integrated view of mantle flow pattern along the entire active margin. Although the MASZ as a whole may be considered a fairly complicated region with many unusual features and sometimes controversial interpretations, its complexity and unusual characteristics can improve our knowledge about the linkage between deep and surface processes associated with subduction zone dynamics.

  7. A Geodynamical Perspective on the Subduction of Cocos and Rivera plates beneath Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, V.; Manea, M.; Ferrari, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Middle America subduction zone (MASZ) is one of the world most complex convergent margins as it involves the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos young oceanic plates beneath the North American and Caribbean plates and is bounded by the Gulf of California rift and the Panama slab window. Characterized by contorted and unusual slab geometry, irregularly distributed seismicity and volcanism, exceptionally large slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremors (NVT), this subduction system represents a great natural laboratory for better understanding geodynamic processes at a fundamental level. Based on a solid observational foundation, and incorporating the latest experimental results into a coherent geodynamical framework, we shed light on the main processes controlling the subduction system evolution in this region. The tectonics, volcanism, slab geometry and segmentation along the margin are reviewed from a geodynamical perspective. We proposed and discussed a series of evolutionary scenarios for the Mexican and Central American subduction zones, providing a coherent starting base for future geodynamical modeling studies tailored to this active margin. We discuss comparatively the recently discovered SSEs and NVTs along the MASZ, and try to differentiate among the proposed mechanisms responsible for these observations. Finally we discuss the recent seismic anisotropy observations in a geodynamic context, offering an integrated view of mantle flow pattern along the entire active margin. Although the MASZ as a whole may be considered a fairly complicated region with many unusual features and sometimes controversial interpretations, its complexity and unusual characteristics can improve our knowledge about the linkage between deep and surface processes associated with subduction zone dynamics.

  8. Rainfall extremes in some selected parts of Central and South America: ENSO and other relationships reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, R. P.

    1999-03-01

    El Niños and anti-El Niños (La Niñas) are known to be associated with rainfall extremes in several parts of the globe. However, not all El Niños show good associations. Recently, a finer classification of El Niño events was attempted. It was noticed that Unambiguous ENSOW (El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Warm) events (years when El Niño existed, and the Tahiti minus Darwin pressure difference (T-D) minima and equatorial eastern Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) maxima occurred in the middle of the calendar year) were very well associated with droughts in India and southeast Australia (Tasmania). In addition, C (cold SST, La Niña) events showed reverse effects (excess rains) in these regions. In the present paper, rainfall in selected regions in Central and South America are examined. For the Southern Oscillation Core Region (low latitudes, 155°W-167°E) and for the Gulf-Mexico region, no finer classification was necessary. All El Niños were associated with excess rains and all La Niñas with droughts. As in India and Tasmania, Unambiguous ENSOW years were associated with droughts in some parts of northeast Brazil (Ceara, Rio grande do Norte, Paraiba, Pernambuco) and excess rains in Chile and Peru. C events did not have good associations except in Chile and Peru, where droughts occurred. The effect of El Niños showed some dependence on the month of commencement. In years when El Niños showed no effect, considerable influence of other factors (e.g. Atlantic SST on northeast Brazil rainfall) was noticed. Thus, predictions based on El Niño alone are likely to be erroneous, a fact which should be noted by the mass media. Effects of the recent El Niño of 1997-1998 are discussed.

  9. Comparison of GNSS integrated water vapor and NWM reanalysis data over Central and South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Laura Isabel; Mendoza, Luciano Pedro Oscar; Natali, María Paula; Meza, Amalia Margarita; Bianchi, Clara Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    Integrated water vapor (IWV) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Numerical Weather Models (NWM) reanalysis data were compared in order to assess the consistency between the different datasets over the extended geographical region of Central and South America. The investigation was performed for the seven-year period between 2007 and 2013. We analyzed two different reanalysis: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA Interim) and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA2) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The statistical analysis of the differences was performed in 110 GNSS sites (GPS +GLONASS), although the most interesting results came from the 73 sites which have more than 5 years of data. The study of the spatial distribution of the differences in the selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, and it is characterized by large temporal variability of the integrated total humidity content. The inter-comparison was also performed on several time scales: from hours to years. In this study, not only the IWV values given by the different reanalysis where compared with the respective GNSS derived values but also the numeric integral of the IWV. This is nothing but the total vertically integrated water vapor of a unit air column each station but considering its real geopotential height. To that end, multilevel data from each reanalysis was also used. Moreover, the scarce coverage of operational radio sounding stations is noticeable in large areas of the selected region. Hence the contribution of IWV-GNSS is essential to improve the weather understanding. Considering that the atmospheric water vapor has a highly variable and complex distribution which knowledge is essential for weather prediction and local meteorological studies, this study aims to provide IWV-GNSS observations able to be assimilated by operational

  10. Emerging deforestation trends in tropical dry forests ecoregions of Mexico and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, C. A.; Cao, G.; Smith, V.

    2015-12-01

    Neotropical dry forests (TDF) have experienced an unprecedented deforestation that is leading to the loss of tropical biodiversity at a rapid pace, but information on deforestation dynamics in TDF is scarce. In this study, we present a sub-continental and national level assessment of TDF loss patterns in Mexico and Central America at high spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing and GIS technologies. We used the Global Forest Change (GFC) dataset published by Hansen et al. (2013) which shows results from time-series analysis of Landsat images in characterizing global forest extent and change from 2000 through 2013. We analyzed forest loss within and around mapped TDF cover mapped by Portillo-Quintero et al. 2010. In order to minimize errors in source data, we overlaid a 25 x 25 km grid on top of the regional dataset and conducted a cell by cell and country by country inspection at multiple scales using high resolution ancillary data. We identified trends in the clustering of space-time TDF deforestation data using ArcGIS, categorizing trends in: new, consecutive, intensifying, persistent, diminishing, sporadic, oscillating and historical hotspots (high frequency of deforestation events) and cold spots (low frequency of deforestation). In general, the region is experiencing less frequent deforestation events with a higher number of intensifying and new cold spots across TDF landscapes. However, an important number of intensifying and persistent hotspots exist so no general trend in forest loss was detected for the period 2001-2013, except for El Salvador which shows a significant decreasing trend in forest loss. Mexico, Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala are the major sources of intensifying, persistent and new deforestation hot spots. These were identified in the southern pacific coast and the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, northwestern Guatemala, both western and eastern Honduras and around Lake Nicaragua in Nicaragua.

  11. Intellectual property and access to medicines: an analysis of legislation in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Cerón, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Globalization of intellectual property (IP) protection for medicines has been advancing during the past decade. Countries are obliged to adapt their legislation as a requirement of their membership to the World Trade Organization or as a condition of being part of international trade agreements. There is a growing recognition that, in low-income countries, stronger IP protection is a barrier to access to medicines. At the same time, the number of low-income countries writing national legislation to protect IP for pharmaceutical products is growing worldwide, but little research has been done on the ways in which this process is happening at the national level. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of the implementation of IP legislation at the national level by providing a comparative analysis of the countries that are part of the United States–Dominican Republic–Central America Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA). The analysis shows three trends. First, countries have often implemented stronger IP protection than required by trade agreements. Second, some countries have adopted IP protection before signing the trade agreements. Third, the process of ratification of DR-CAFTA increased public debate around these issues, which in some cases led to IP legislation that considers public health needs. These trends suggest that industrialized countries and the pharmaceutical industry are using more tactics than just trade agreements to push for increased IP protection and that the process of national legislation is a valid arena for confronting public health needs to those of the industry. PMID:19876546

  12. Micro and Macroscale Drivers of Nutrient Concentrations in Urban Streams in South, Central and North America.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Steven A; Gasparini Fernandes Cunha, Davi; Shupe, Scott; Valiente, Elsa; Rocha, Luciana; Heasley, Eleanore; Belmont, Patricia Pérez; Baruch, Avinoam

    Global metrics of land cover and land use provide a fundamental basis to examine the spatial variability of human-induced impacts on freshwater ecosystems. However, microscale processes and site specific conditions related to bank vegetation, pollution sources, adjacent land use and water uses can have important influences on ecosystem conditions, in particular in smaller tributary rivers. Compared to larger order rivers, these low-order streams and rivers are more numerous, yet often under-monitored. The present study explored the relationship of nutrient concentrations in 150 streams in 57 hydrological basins in South, Central and North America (Buenos Aires, Curitiba, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City and Vancouver) with macroscale information available from global datasets and microscale data acquired by trained citizen scientists. Average sub-basin phosphate (P-PO4) concentrations were found to be well correlated with sub-basin attributes on both macro and microscales, while the relationships between sub-basin attributes and nitrate (N-NO3) concentrations were limited. A phosphate threshold for eutrophic conditions (>0.1 mg L-1 P-PO4) was exceeded in basins where microscale point source discharge points (eg. residential, industrial, urban/road) were identified in more than 86% of stream reaches monitored by citizen scientists. The presence of bankside vegetation covaried (rho = -0.53) with lower phosphate concentrations in the ecosystems studied. Macroscale information on nutrient loading allowed for a strong separation between basins with and without eutrophic conditions. Most importantly, the combination of macroscale and microscale information acquired increased our ability to explain sub-basin variability of P-PO4 concentrations. The identification of microscale point sources and bank vegetation conditions by citizen scientists provided important information that local authorities could use to improve their management of lower order river ecosystems.

  13. The taxonomic status of Long-tailed shrews (Mammalia: genus Sorex) from Nuclear Central America.

    PubMed

    Matson, John O; Ordóñez-Garza, Nicté

    2017-02-23

    We examined 256 specimens of long-tailed shrews (Sorex) from 53 localities throughout the highlands of Nuclear Central America. We evaluate the efficacy of using three qualitative characteristics to identify populations of Sorex from Nuclear Central America: 1) the presence or the absence of a postmandibular foramen and canal; 2) relative size of U3 compared to U4; and, 3) the presence or absence of a pigmented ridge on the lingual side of each unicuspid tooth. In our data, the first character is invariable for the specimens we examined. Two species groups can be recognized based on the presence (S. salvini species group) or the absence of a postmandibular foramen and canal (S. veraepacis species group). The other two characteristics were useful, but not diagnostic. Based upon Principal Component Analysis we recognize nine species of Sorex in Nuclear Central America. Five species belong to the S. salvini species group: S. cristobalensis, S. salvini, S. sclateri, S. stizodon, and a new species from Honduras. Four species belong to the S. veraepacis species group: S. chiapensis, S. ibarrai, S. veraepacis, and a new species from western Guatemala. We also present evidence that the type locality (Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala) for S. veraepacis is not correct.

  14. Active mountain building and the distribution of “core” Maxillariinae species in tropical Mexico and Central America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, Stephen H.

    2011-01-01

    The observation that southeastern Central America is a hotspot for orchid diversity has long been known and confirmed by recent systematic studies and checklists. An analysis of the geographic and elevation distribution demonstrates that the most widespread species of “core” Maxillariinae are all adapted to life near sea level, whereas the most narrowly endemic species are largely distributed in wet highland environments. Drier, hotter lowland gaps exist between these cordilleras and evidently restrict the dispersal of the species adapted to wetter, cooler conditions. Among the recent generic realignments of “core” Maxillariinae based on molecular phylogenetics, the Camaridium clade is easily the most prominent genus in Central America and is largely restricted to the highlands of Costa Rica and Panama, indicating that this region is the ancestral home of this genus and that its dispersal limits are drier, lowland cordilleran gaps. The mountains of Costa Rica and Panama are among the geologically youngest topographic features in the Neotropics, reflecting the complex and dynamic interactions of numerous tectonic plates. From consideration of the available geological evidence, I conclude that the rapid growth of the mountain ranges in Costa Rica and Panama during the late Cenozoic times created, in turn, very rapid ranges in ecological life zones and geographic isolation in that part of the isthmus. Thus, I suggest that these recent geologic events were the primary drivers for accelerated orchid evolution in southeastern Central America.

  15. Conjugate and Non-conjugate Structures Observed in South and Central America Using Networks of GPS Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents results based on TEC values measured by the low-latitude ionospheric sensor network (LISN) GPS receivers and others that belong to several other networks that exist in South and Central America. We have developed numerical algorithms to study the characteristics of MSTIDs as indicated by their phase velocities, their propagation directions, and their scale-sizes. We have also constructed a method to automatically detect plasma depletions that exist in South and Central America. These two methods allow us to study the day-to-day variability and the conjugate characteristics of MSTIDs and depletions at low and mid-latitudes. We found that mid-latitude (magnetic latitude > 25°) TEC depletions occur mainly during magnetically active conditions, exhibit conjugate characteristics, persist for very long periods, and last up to afternoon hours when the Kp index is high (Kp > 5o). However, we have also detected some cases of mid-latitude TEC depletions that occur during quiet magnetic conditions. These events preferentially develop during the June solstice and do not map to the opposite hemisphere. MSTIDs occur in Central America and the Caribbean region quite often. They are defined to be conjugate when the peaks and valleys of their TEC distributions closely coincide in opposite hemispheres, their scale sizes are equal and their phase velocities are mirror images with respect to the magnetic equator. We also describe the statistics of MSTIDs that show conjugate properties.

  16. [Agrarian movements, development alternatives and food security in Central America: scenarios of transition].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Rojas, R

    1991-01-01

    This article, based on personal experiences with a network of organizations of small and medium agricultural producers in Central America, aims to present the views of peasant organizations concerning agrarian problems in the region. The 3 major sections of work define the place of peasant agriculture in the traditional agrarian structure and the new problems resulting from the structural adjustment programs of the 1980s; separately describe the new peasant movements emerging in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, identifying common themes an efforts at international collaboration; and explore the positions of the peasant organizations on the optimal strategies for agricultural development and agrarian change. Agriculture remains the backbone of the Central American economies. But because the economic model in the region is 1 of accumulation characterized by dependency, concentration of capital, and social marginalization, the agrarian structure is at the basis of social tensions. Efforts to develop peasant agriculture and to give small producers access to marketing and credit services have been weak and sporadic. The new peasant movements are less inclined than those of the past to employ tactics of confrontation in their efforts to secure access to land and better working conditions. The new movement is the expression of small market producers sometimes grouped into associations who are oriented to production of basic foodstuffs for the internal market. A new concern with adaptation and negotiation is evident. The new organizations have in common a belief in their ability to propose new solutions to regional problems. Their views are founded on a positive assessment of the ability of peasant agriculture to produce food and add dynamism to the regional economy after barriers to credit, technological progress, and modernization in general are removed. Signs of increased cooperation are evident between peasant organizations and other groups

  17. Along and across arc geochemical variations in NW Central America: Evidence for involvement of lithospheric pyroxenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydolph, Ken; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Bogaard, Paul van den; Portnyagin, Maxim; Bindeman, Ilya; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2012-05-01

    The Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) has been the subject of intensive research over the past few years, leading to a variety of distinct models for the origin of CAVA lavas with various source components. We present a new model for the NW Central American Volcanic Arc based on a comprehensive new geochemical data set (major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotope ratios) of mafic volcanic front (VF), behind the volcanic front (BVF) and back-arc (BA) lava and tephra samples from NW Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. Additionally we present data on subducting Cocos Plate sediments (from DSDP Leg 67 Sites 495 and 499) and igneous oceanic crust (from DSDP Leg 67 Site 495), and Guatemalan (Chortis Block) granitic and metamorphic continental basement. We observe systematic variations in trace element and isotopic compositions both along and across the arc. The data require at least three different endmembers for the volcanism in NW Central America. (1) The NW Nicaragua VF lavas require an endmember with very high Ba/(La, Th) and U/Th, relatively radiogenic Sr, Nd and Hf but unradiogenic Pb and low δ18O, reflecting a largely serpentinite-derived fluid/hydrous melt flux from the subducting slab into a depleted N-MORB type of mantle wedge. (2) The Guatemala VF and BVF mafic lavas require an enriched endmember with low Ba/(La, Th), U/Th, high δ18O and radiogenic Sr and Pb but unradiogenic Nd and Hf isotope ratios. Correlations of Hf with both Nd and Pb isotopic compositions are not consistent with this endmember being subducted sediments. Granitic samples from the Chiquimula Plutonic Complex in Guatemala have the appropriate isotopic composition to serve as this endmember, but the large amounts of assimilation required to explain the isotope data are not consistent with the basaltic compositions of the volcanic rocks. In addition, mixing regressions on Nd vs. Hf and the Sr and O isotope plots do not go through the data. Therefore, we propose that this

  18. Seasonal changes of extreme climate indices in Mexico and Central America during the 21st century using CMIP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazos, T.; de Grau, P.; Salinas, J. A.; Colorado, G.

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated historical (1961-2000) and climate change projections of temperature and precipitation from 15 general circulation models (GCMs) of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) for Mexico and Central America. Annual cycles, interannual variations and seasonal extreme percentiles (P10 and P90) of temperature and precipitation were validated with observed data from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU). Climate change scenarios for the mean GCM ensemble (ens_GCM) were obtained for the 2075-2099 period, relative to 1961-2000, for low (RCP4.5) and high (RCP8.5) radiating forcings. The ens_GCM was obtained by the Reliability Ensemble Averaging (REA) technique (Giorgi and Mearns 2001). Maximum temperature (Tmax) is underestimated (~2oC) by the ens_GCM in almost all Mexico, while minimum temperature (Tmin) is overestimated. Part of the underestimation may be related to the excess of rainfall that many models produce, especially in autumn and winter. For example, in the monsoon region, the models fail to produce the retreat of the summer rains in autumn, a feature also observed in the CMIP3 models. The ens_GCM overestimates rainfall in the semiarid regions of Northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States, but underestimates rainfall in southern Mexico and Central America, where extreme rainfall (P90 in JJA) can be larger than 8 mm d-1. Seasonal thresholds for extreme climatic indices (P90 and P10) were produced for Mexico and Central America. The largest observed P90 threshold for Tmax from the CRU dataset occurs in JJA along the US-Mexico border (~35-40oC), where the ens_GCM underestimates it by ~5oC; in some coastal regions of Central America the largest thresholds are between 30-35oC. The results for the RCP8.5 scenario show that the P90 threshold for Tmax in JJA may increase (>3oC) in almost all the study region, and >5oC along the Sierra Madre Occidental in the monsoon region. This may have important implications for the monsoon dynamics. The

  19. Miocene Mammals and Central American Seaways: Fauna of the Canal Zone indicates separation of Central and South America during most of the Tertiary.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, F C; Stewart, R H

    1965-04-09

    The presence of Miocene mammals of North American affinity in the Panama Canal Zone indicates that Central America was attached to North America. That this attachment was a broad and stable land mass is shown by the close relation of the Panama Miocene herbivores to the widely distributed Miocene herbivore fauna of North America. A continuous connection existed probably throughout the Tertiary, to the west and north of the isthmian region, but the tectonically active isthmus probably was broken up into an archipelago during most of Tertiary time. Between the islands ran the Strait of Panama; from time to time parts of the isthmian area were connected to the stable land to the west, allowing eastward migration of land animals. The mammals of North American affinity in the Cucaracha Formation were found only a few kilometers from the western end of the San Blas Area, a stable land mass in eastern Panama that was separated from South America by the Bolivar Trough during most of the interval between Oligocene and Pliocene time (16). The Strait of Panama was a less stable barrier than the Bolivar Trough; this being so, it is likely that the San Blas Area was inhabited by land animals of North American rather than South American affinity. Thus, the disappearance of the Bolivar seaway in Pliocene time would have allowed, probably for the first time, mingling of the North and South American mammal faunas.

  20. Neglected tropical diseases in Central America and Panama: review of their prevalence, populations at risk and impact on regional development.

    PubMed

    Hotez, Peter J; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2014-08-01

    A review of the literature since 2009 reveals a staggering health and economic burden resulting from neglected tropical diseases in Panama and the six countries of Central America (referred to collectively here as 'Central America'). Particularly at risk are the 10.2million people in the region who live on less than $2 per day, mostly in Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador. Indigenous populations are especially vulnerable to neglected tropical diseases. Currently, more than 8million Central American children require mass drug treatments annually (or more frequently) for their intestinal helminth infections, while vector-borne diseases are widespread. Among the vector-borne parasitic infections, almost 40% of the population is at risk for malaria (mostly Plasmodium vivax infection), more than 800,000 people live with Chagas disease, and up to 39,000 people have cutaneous leishmaniasis. In contrast, an important recent success story is the elimination of onchocerciasis from Central America. Dengue is the leading arbovirus infection with 4-5million people affected annually and hantavirus is an important rodent-borne viral neglected tropical disease. The leading bacterial neglected tropical diseases include leptospirosis and trachoma, for which there are no disease burden estimates. Overall there is an extreme dearth of epidemiological data on neglected tropical diseases based on active surveillance as well as estimates of their economic impact. Limited information to date, however, suggests that neglected tropical diseases are a major hindrance to the region's economic development, in both the most impoverished Central American countries listed above, as well as for Panama and Costa Rica where a substantial (but largely hidden) minority of people live in extreme poverty. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Molecular genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii from Central and South America revealed highly diverse populations and suggested possible different origins of the three archetypal lineages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most T. gondii strains in North America and Europe belong to three archetypal clonal lineages including the Type I, II and III but, isolates from Brazil are highly diverse. Here, we analyzed 164 T. gondii isolates from three countries in Central America (Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica), from one c...

  2. Active fault characterization throughout the Caribbean and Central America for seismic hazard modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styron, Richard; Pagani, Marco; Garcia, Julio

    2017-04-01

    The region encompassing Central America and the Caribbean is tectonically complex, defined by the Caribbean plate's interactions with the North American, South American and Cocos plates. Though active deformation over much of the region has received at least cursory investigation the past 50 years, the area is chronically understudied and lacks a modern, synoptic characterization. Regardless, the level of risk in the region - as dramatically demonstrated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake - remains high because of high-vulnerability buildings and dense urban areas home to over 100 million people, who are concentrated near plate boundaries and other major structures. As part of a broader program to study seismic hazard worldwide, the Global Earthquake Model Foundation is currently working to quantify seismic hazard in the region. To this end, we are compiling a database of active faults throughout the region that will be integrated into similar models as recently done in South America. Our initial compilation hosts about 180 fault traces in the region. The faults show a wide range of characteristics, reflecting the diverse styles of plate boundary and plate-margin deformation observed. Regional deformation ranges from highly localized faulting along well-defined strike-slip faults to broad zones of distributed normal or thrust faulting, and from readily-observable yet slowly-slipping structures to inferred faults with geodetically-measured slip rates >10 mm/yr but essentially no geomorphic expression. Furthermore, primary structures such as the Motagua-Polochic Fault Zone (the strike-slip plate boundary between the North American and Caribbean plates in Guatemala) display strong along-strike slip rate gradients, and many other structures are undersea for most or all of their length. A thorough assessment of seismic hazard in the region will require the integration of a range of datasets and techniques and a comprehensive characterization of epistemic uncertainties driving

  3. Conference report on tobacco taxes in Central America: current situation and opportunities to reduce prevalence and increase fiscal revenues.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Ana; Garcés, Miguel; Barnoya, Joaquin; Cabrera, Maynor; Sandoval, Rosa; Orozco, Juan Guillermo; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    As stated in Article 6 of Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), increasing tobacco prices through higher taxes is one of the most effective interventions to reduce tobacco use and to encourage smokers to quit. The potential for tax increases on tobacco products in Central America is ample. We aim to synthesize the current tobacco taxes situation and highlight research needs to strengthen taxation. In May 2012, a workshop was carried out with representatives from each Central American country to analyze the tobacco tax situation in each country and to identify key research gaps with experts in the field. Tobacco taxes in Central America fall far short of the levels recommended by FCTC. Moreover, the legal framework is complex and creates barriers for higher taxes that require further research and political will. Top research priorities are an in-depth analysis of tobacco tax legislation, impact of tax and price policies, analysis of costs associated to health care of tobacco-related diseases and lost productivity, and the feasibility of approaches to increasing tobacco taxes in certain contexts. An additional area of research is the interrelationship between human rights and tobacco control. Central American countries would benefit from increasing excise taxes on tobacco products. The lack of available data and research to counteract tobacco industry arguments are significant obstacles. Active leadership of civil society in support of the partnership of chronic disease interventions is vital in order to obtain tax increases on tobacco products.

  4. Magmatic evolution of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Alvarado, G. E.; Carr, M. J.; Obando, J.; Alfaro, A.

    2005-12-01

    The Sarapiqui Miocene Arc (22.2-11.4 Ma) is located in the modern back-arc region of northern Costa Rica, Central America. The arc basement is represented by serpentinized peridotites, Albian silicic pelagites, and Paleocene to Middle Eocene turbidites. Magmatic units vary from basalts to rhyolites and include lavas, pyroclastic deposits, and a few subvolcanic bodies. The magmatic evolution of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc consists of three distinct stages: 1) Jardin Basalts (22.2 Ma) showing a primary tendency with high MgO, Ni, Cr, and Nb, high initial La/Yb ratios, and low Ba/La which increase with the slab fluids addition; 2) Arrepentidos Basaltic-andesites, Chaparron Pyroclasts, Hito Sar Basalts, Boca Tapada Gabro, and Chamorro Andesites, that represent the island arc evolution from 17.2 to 11.4 Ma; and 3) Crucitas Rhyolites (14.3 Ma) characterizated by low TiO2 and very high Ba/La ratios represent non-cogenetic, but contemporaneous felsic magmas produced by remelting of pre-existing intrusives. The REE patterns indicate a plagioclase rich, amphibole bearing source for this last unit. The Zr/Nb ratios (7-36) are evidence of the coalescing of a minor OIB source with a dominant MORB source, both modified by subduction. 87Sr/86Sr correlate positively with Ba/La; however, they are still within the OIB field. An inverse model using the REEs of the mafic units is consistent with a source mantle composition of garnet peridotite. All but one of the units show LILE enrichments and HFSE depletions typical of the island arc environment. The exception is a suite of near primary magmas, included in the Jardin Basalts, which probably originated by decompression melting. The Ba/La and La/Yb ratios of the Sarapiqui Miocene Arc are very similar to those of the modern Northern Costa Rican Arc, suggesting that the subduction fluid composition and the degree of partial melting have not changed significantly in the last 20 Ma.

  5. Alternative (G-16v2) Ground Motion Prediction Equations for the Central and Eastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graizer, V.

    2016-12-01

    Introduced is the ground motion prediction equations model for the Central and Eastern North America that represents an alternative more physically justified approach to ground motion attenuation modeling then previous Graizer (2016) G-16 model. The new model has a bilinear slope of R-1 within 70 km from the fault with a slope of R-0.5 at larger distances corresponding to the geometrical spreading of body and surface waves. The new (G-16v2) model is based in part on the NGA-East database for the horizontal peak ground acceleration and 5%-damped pseudo spectral acceleration (SA) and also on comparisons with the Western U.S. data and ground motion simulations. Based on data, I estimated the average slope of the distance attenuation within the 50-70 km distance from the fault to be -1.0 at most of the frequencies supporting regular geometrical spreading of body waves. Multiple inversions are performed to estimate apparent (combined intrinsic and scattering) attenuation of SA amplitudes from the NGA-East database for incorporation into the model. These estimates demonstrate a difference between seismological Q(f) and the above mentioned attenuation factor that I recommend calling QSA(f). I adjusted previously developed site correction which was based on multiple runs of representative VS30 (time-averaged shear-wave velocity in the upper 30 m) profiles through SHAKE-type equivalent-linear codes. Site amplifications are calculated relative to the hard rock definition used in nuclear industry (VS=2800 m/s). These improvements resulted in a modest reduction in standard deviation in the new G-16v2 relative to the G-16 model. The number of model predictors is limited to a few measurable parameters: moment magnitude M, closest distance to fault rupture plane Rrup, VS30, and apparent attenuation factor QSA(f). The model is applicable for the stable continental regions and covers the following range: 4.0≤M≤8.5, 0≤Rrup≤1000 km, 450≤VS30≤2800 m/s and frequencies 0.1

  6. Active Forearc Response to CO-NZ-CA Triple Junction Migration, Southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morell, K.; Fisher, D.; Gardner, T. W.

    2007-12-01

    Southeast migration of the CO-NZ-CA triple junction at a rate of ~55 mm/yr results in an abrupt increase in convergence rate, slab thickness and subduction direction within the upper plate of the Central American convergent margin. At the triple junction, an active transform fault (the dextral Panama Fracture Zone) subducts beneath the Caribbean plate at the Middle America Trench, and juxtaposes the thick, orthogonal and shallow subduction of the Cocos plate against the thin, oblique and steeper subduction of the Nazca plate. New bedrock geology, Quaternary mapping and Ar/Ar dates of fluvial and volcanic deposits inboard of the triple junction provide evidence that both the outer and inner forearc of this system is actively responding to the dynamic changes presented by triple junction migration. Our results confirm that the Fila Costeña, a thin-skinned inner forearc thrust belt, is active and likely propagating in concert with triple junction migration. Mapping within the area overriding the Panama Fracture Zone indicates that thrusting develops only in those areas experiencing Cocos subduction; the thrust belt dies out coincident with the on-shore projection of the Panama Fracture Zone, and balanced cross-sections indicate a lateral gradient in the amount of shortening near the termination of the thrust belt. Along-strike variations in drainage basin morphometry suggest that drainage divides of the Fila Costeña are propagating to the southeast with the triple junction, resulting in hook-shaped drainage patterns and asymmetric basin shapes. A survey of a flight of 3-4 fluvial terraces along the Río Chiriquí Viejo indicates recent thrusting along a prominent thrust fault of the Fila Costeña. These terraces are also inset into multiple lahar flows with an upper surface tentatively constrained at ~507 ka based on an Ar/Ar hornblende plateau age. Recent work indicates that this thrust fault displaces surficial lahar deposits, suggesting that it must have become

  7. Comparative susceptibility of three species of Anopheles from Belize, Central America, to Plasmodium falciparum (NF-54).

    PubMed

    Grieco, John P; Achee, Nicole L; Roberts, Donald R; Andre, Richard G

    2005-09-01

    In August of 2000, a comparative susceptibility study was conducted using 3 species of Anopheles mosquitoes from Belize, Central America, and a standard species used in laboratory infection studies, Anopheles stephensi. Test populations were fed human blood infected with cultured Plasmodium falciparum (NF-54 strain) parasites via a membrane feeder. The control species, An. stephensi, exhibited the highest infections, with 73.8% of dissected specimens positive for sporozoites in the salivary glands. The control species also showed heavier sporozoite loads; 74.0% of positive glands having greater than 200 sporozoites. Of species from Belize, Anopheles darlingi was the most susceptibile, e.g., 41.0% of salivary glands were positive, with more than 200 sporozoites per gland. Anopheles vestitipennis had a low salivary gland infection rate (9.3%) and a moderate number of sporozoites in glands (i.e., 85.7% containing 50-250 sporozoites). Anopheles albimanus was the least susceptible species to infection. No specimens of An. albimanus from the Golden Stream population developed sporozoites in the salivary glands, yet 20.7% of dissected specimens had positive midgut infections. The An. albimanus Buena Vista population showed similar results with only a 2.2% salivary gland infection rate and a 21.5% midgut infection rate. Oocysts in An. stephensi increased in size by 20% after day 10. Development peaked at day 12, with a mean oocyst diameter of 58 microm at onset of oocyst differentiation. Oocysts developed more slowly in An. vestitipennis until day 10. After day 10, there was a 53% increase in oocyst development over the previous 10 days. Oocyst differentiation was not observed until day 13 postfeed. As with An. vestitipennis, both populations of An. albimanus showed similar slow rates of oocyst development; however, no dramatic growth increase occurred after day 10. The oocysts in the Golden Stream population exhibited a cessation of growth after day 10, peaking at a mean

  8. Constraining the Fore-Arc Flux Along the Central America Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Barry, P. H.; Ramirez, C. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Patel, B. S.; Blackmon, K.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of carbon to the deep mantle via subduction zones is interrupted by outputs via the fore-arc, volcanic front, and back-arc regions. Whereas output fluxes for the front and back-arc locales are well constrained for Central America (CA) [1], the fore-arc flux via cold seeps and groundwaters is virtually unknown. We present new He and CO2 data for the inner fore-arc of Costa Rica and western Panama to complement our study [2] of offshore CO2fluxes on the outer-forearc. On the Nicoya Peninsula, the Costa Rica Pacific coastline (including the Oso Peninsula) and the Talamanca Mountain Range, as well as coastal seeps in Panama, coupled CO2-He studies allow recognition of mantle (3He/4He up to 6RA) and crustal inputs to the volatile inventory. We associate the crustal component with CO2 derived from limestone (L) and organic sediments (S) on the subducting slab, and see a decrease in the L/S ratio trench-ward with the lowest values akin to those of diatomaceous ooze in the uppermost sequence of the subducting sediment package. This observation is consistent with the removal of the uppermost organic-rich sediment from deep subduction by under-plating. As the input carbon fluxes of the individual sedimentary layers are well constrained [3], we can limit the potential steady-state flux of carbon loss at the subaerial fore-arc to ~ 6 × 107 gCkm-1yr-1, equivalent to ~88% of the input flux of C associated with the ooze, or <4% of the total incoming sedimentary C. This study confirms that the greatest loss of slab-derived carbon at the CA margin occurs at the volcanic front with recycling efficiencies between 12% (Costa Rica) and 29% (El Salvador) of the sedimentary input [1]. It also demonstrates the utility of the coupled He-CO2approach for mass balance studies at subduction zones. [1] De Leeuw et al., EPSL, 2007; [2] Furi et al., G-cubed, 2010; [3] Li and Bebout, JGR, 2005.

  9. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Paul F.; White, David E.; Naftz, David L.; Cecil, L. DeWayne

    2000-02-27

    alpine regions of central North America may have occurred on a relatively short (decadal) timescale. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  10. Chronological refinement of an ice core record at Upper Fremont Glacier in south central North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, P.F.; White, D.E.; Naftz, D.L.; Cecil, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    The potential to use ice cores from alpine glaciers in the midlatitudes to reconstruct paleoclimatic records has not been widely recognized. Although excellent paleoclimatic records exist for the polar regions, paleoclimatic ice core records are not common from midlatitude locations. An ice core removed from the Upper Fremont Glacier in Wyoming provides evidence for abrupt climate change during the mid-1800s. Volcanic events (Krakatau and Tambora) identified from electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) and isotopic and chemical data from the Upper Fremont Glacier were reexamined to confirm and refine previous chronological estimates of the ice core. At a depth of 152 m the refined age-depth profile shows good agreement (1736 ± 10 A.D.) with the 14C age date (1729 ± 95 A.D.). The δ18O profile of the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core indicates a change in climate known as the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the sampling interval for δ18O is sufficiently large (20 cm) such that it is difficult to pinpoint the LIA termination on the basis of δ18O data alone. Other research has shown that changes in the δ18O variance are generally coincident with changes in ECM variance. The ECM data set contains over 125,000 data points at a resolution of 1 data point per millimeter of ice core. A 999-point running average of the ECM data set and results from f tests indicates that the variance of the ECM data decreases significantly at about 108 m. At this depth, the age-depth profile predicts an age of 1845 A.D. Results indicate the termination of the LIA was abrupt with a major climatic shift to warmer temperatures around 1845 A.D. and continuing to present day. Prediction limits (error bars) calculated for the profile ages are ±10 years (90% confidence level). Thus a conservative estimate for the time taken to complete the LIA climatic shift to present-day climate is about 10 years, suggesting the LIA termination in alpine regions of central North America may have

  11. Food Security and Extreme Events: Evidence from Smallholder Farmers in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saborio-Rodriguez, M.; Alpizar, F.; Harvey, C.; Martinez, R.; Vignola, R.; Viguera, B.; Capitan, T.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme weather events, which are expected to increase in magnitude and frequency due to climate change, are one of the main threats for smallholder farmers in Central America. Using a rich dataset from carefully selected subsistence farm households, we explore the determinants and severity of food insecurity resulting from extreme hydrometeorological hazards. In addition, we analyze farmerś coping strategies. Our analysis sheds light over food insecurity as an expression of vulnerability in a region that is expected to be increasingly exposed to extreme events and in a population already stressed by poverty and lack of opportunities. Regarding food insecurity, multivariate analyses indicate that education, having at least one migrant in the household, labor allocation, number of plots, and producing coffee are determinants of the probability of experiencing lack of food after an extreme weather event. Once the household is lacking food, the duration of the episode is related to access to credit, number of plots, producing coffee, ownership of land and gender of the head of the household. This results are in line with previous literature on the determinants of food insecurity in particular, and vulnerability, in general. Our dataset also allows us to analyze coping strategies. Households experiencing lack of food after an extreme weather event report mainly changes in their habits, as decreasing the amount of food consumed (54%) and modifying their diet (35%). A low proportion of household (between 10% and 15%, depending on the nature of the event) use their assets, by redirecting their savings, migrating, and selling items from the house. Asking money or food from family and friends or from an organization is reported for 4% of the households. This general results are connected to the specific coping strategies related to damages in crops, which are explored in detail. Our results indicate that there are patterns among the household experiencing lack of food

  12. Late Cretaceous Arc Initiation on the Edge of an Oceanic Plateau (Southern Central America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchs, D. M.; Baumgartner, P. O.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Caribbean Plate comprises one or several late Cretaceous oceanic plateaus imbricated between the Northern and Southern Americas. Uplifted portions of plateau(s) along plate boundaries have been recognized in many sites, including that underlying the south Central American Volcanic Arc. We provide new constraints for the role of the plateau in the evolution of this arc obtained by mapping of the uplifted forearc area between southern Costa Rica and western Panama. An oceanic plateau, accreted seamounts and arc rocks were identified, and a new tectono-stratigraphy defined. The arc basement is composed of a Coniacian oceanic plateau. In the outer margin, late Cretaceous-Eocene accreted seamounts are in contact with the plateau along tectonic mélanges and active faults. Campanian-Maastrichtian primitive arc rocks are found 40-110 km to the trench on the top of -or as dykes within- the plateau. The location of these rocks correlates to previous observations and indicates that the arc front migrated away from the trench during the late Cretaceous, potentially in response to subduction erosion or slab flattening [Lissinna et al., EGU 2006]. The first island arc lavas were deposited under sea level, over a broad area. They were quickly followed by more evolved intrusives and lavas, which were emplaced along a volcanic front during the late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Detrital and volcanic records along the Central American isthmus indicate that a continuous volcanic arc extended between eastern Panama and northern Costa Rica in this time. In southern Costa Rica (Golfito complex) and western Panama (Sona-Azuero-Coiba complex), the oceanic plateau consists mainly of pillowed and massive low Fe (tholeiitic) basalts. These rocks have a highly consistent geochemistry characterized by flat, primitive upper mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns with low Pb and high Nb-Ti contents. Primitive arc igneous samples are low-medium Fe basalts to trachyandesites found as pillow

  13. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  14. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  15. Medicinal plants used in the traditional management of diabetes and its sequelae in Central America: A review.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Peter; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Edwards, Sarah E

    2016-05-26

    Globally 387 million people currently have diabetes and it is projected that this condition will be the 7th leading cause of death worldwide by 2030. As of 2012, its total prevalence in Central America (8.5%) was greater than the prevalence in most Latin American countries and the population of this region widely use herbal medicine. The aim of this study is to review the medicinal plants used to treat diabetes and its sequelae in seven Central American countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. We conducted a literature review and extracted from primary sources the plant use reports in traditional remedies that matched one of the following disease categories: diabetes mellitus, kidney disease, urinary problems, skin diseases and infections, cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunctions, visual loss, and nerve damage. Use reports were entered in a database and data were analysed in terms of the highest number of use reports for diabetes management and for the different sequelae. We also examined the scientific evidence that might support the local uses of the most reported species. Out of 535 identified species used to manage diabetes and its sequelae, 104 species are used to manage diabetes and we found in vitro and in vivo preclinical experimental evidence of hypoglycaemic effect for 16 of the 20 species reported by at least two sources. However, only seven of these species are reported in more than 3 studies: Momordica charantia L., Neurolaena lobata (L.) R. Br. ex Cass., Tecoma stans (L.) Juss. ex Kunth, Persea americana Mill., Psidium guajava L., Anacardium occidentale L. and Hamelia patens Jacq. Several of the species that are used to manage diabetes in Central America are also used to treat conditions that may arise as its consequence such as kidney disease, urinary problems and skin conditions. This review provides an overview of the medicinal plants used to manage diabetes and its sequelae in Central America and of

  16. Plants used in the traditional medicine of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America) and the Caribbean for the treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Domínguez, Fabiola; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Carranza-Álvarez, Candy

    2015-12-04

    Obesity is a worldwide medical concern. New ethnobotanical information regarding the antiobesity effect of medicinal plants has been obtained in the last 30 years in response to socio-demographic changes and high-fat diets became common. This review provides a summary of medicinal plants used in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for the empirical treatment of obesity in terms of ethnobotany, toxicity, pharmacology, conservation status, trade and chemistry. Bibliographic investigation was performed by analyzing recognized books, undergraduate and postgraduate theses and peer-reviewed scientific articles, consulting worldwide accepted scientific databases from the last four decades. Medicinal plants used for the treatment of obesity were classified in two categories: (1) plants with pharmacological evidence and (2) plants without pharmacological evidence. A total of 139 plant species, belonging to 61 families, native to Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean that are used for the empirical treatment of obesity were recorded. From these plants, 33 were investigated in scientific studies, and 106 plants lacked scientific investigation. Medicinal plants were experimentally studied in vitro (21 plants) and in vivo (16 plants). A total of 4 compounds isolated from medicinal plants used for the empirical treatment of obesity have been tested in vitro (2 compounds) and in vivo (4 compounds) studies. No clinical trials on obese subjects (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) have been performed using the medicinal plants cited in this review. There are no herbal-based products approved in Mexico for the treatment of obesity. There are a limited number of scientific studies published on medicinal plants from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean used for the treatment of obesity. This review highlights the need to perform pharmacological, phytochemical, toxicological and ethnobotanical studies with medicinal flora to obtain new antiobesity agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  17. Mid-term evaluation of the NRECA (National Rural Electric Cooperative Association) Central America Rural Electrification Support Program (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D. ); Jones, H.G. ); Garcia, A. III . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Flores, E. , Guatemala City )

    1990-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory was requested by the Regional Office for Central America and Panama to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the Cares Project, which is being implemented by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. This evaluation was conducted over a three week period by a four person team. Overall, the project has had numerous successes and is highly valued by local counterpart utilities and USAID Missions. Notwithstanding the significant results of the project, changes can be made in certain operating procedures and in the direction of some programmatic activities that can lead to an even more effective project.

  18. Development and Validation of a Nutritional Education Pamphlet for Low-Literacy Pediatric Oncology Caregivers in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A.; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Background A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Methods The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and nurses validated the pamphlet’s content and design. Results and Conclusions Nurses expressed the need for nutrition-related pamphlets in developing countries. The pamphlet was validated positively by experts and nurses and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America. PMID:20300913

  19. Development and validation of a nutritional education pamphlet for low literacy pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa; Chismark, Elisabeth A; Mosby, Terezie; Day, Sara W

    2010-12-01

    A culturally appropriate nutrition education pamphlet was developed and validated for low-literacy caregivers in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. The pamphlet was developed after a preliminary survey of pediatric oncology nurses in the 3 countries to assess the need for education materials, caregiver literacy levels, and local eating habits. Experts in nutrition and low-literacy patient education and pediatric oncology nurses validated the pamphlet's content and design. The pamphlet was validated positively and has been circulated to pediatric oncology caregivers in Central America.

  20. Revision of the genus Lepidoblepharis (Reptilia: Squamata: Sphaerodactylidae) in Central America, with the description of three new species.

    PubMed

    Batista, Abel; Ponce, Marcos; Vesely, Milan; Mebert, Konrad; Hertz, Andreas; Köhler, Gunther; Carrizo, Arcadio; Lotzkat, Sebastian

    2015-07-31

    Based on morphological and molecular data, we describe three new species of the genus Lepidoblepharis with granular dorsals from Panama (Lepidoblepharis emberawoundule sp. nov., Lepidoblepharis rufigularis sp. nov., and Lepidoblepharis victormartinezi sp. nov.). The results of our molecular analyses confirm the existence of five deeply differentiated genealogical lineages among Panamanian Lepidoblepharis. We present detailed descriptions of their morphology, including some new valuable scalation characters (ventral and subfemoral escutcheon) and hemipenes, as well as comparisons with the other two species of the genus known to occur in Panama (L. sanctaemartae and L. xanthostigma) and their South American congeners. Last, we provide an updated identification key for the genus Lepidoblepharis in Central America.

  1. Design of climate scenarios with application to agriculture and forestry in central and eastern north America. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, P.J.; Richman, M.B.

    1996-06-01

    A research program supported by a USEPA cooperative agreement concentrated on statistical and climatological issues related to designing climate scenarios useful for agricultural and forestry in central and eastern North America. Results can be categorized into the areas of statistical techniques for scenario development and evaluation, climate system research, and data set development. A review of the meteorological use of clustering algorithms and an extensive comparison of cluster methods was undertaken. The last major methodological research was development of target analysis, which allows direct incorporation of climate scenarios into a data reduction and pattern matching algorithm. This was tested successfully on GCM output for realistic climate scenarios.

  2. Synthetic Minor NSR Permit: BP America Production Company - Salvador I/II Central Delivery Point

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains the response to public comments, the final synthetic minor NSR permit, and the administrative record for the BP America Production Company, Salvador I/II CDP, located on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation in La Plata County, CO.

  3. From East Gondwana to Central America: Historical biogeography of the Alstroemeriaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Southern South America and Australia/New Zealand share some 15 plant families more or less restricted to them. Understanding these Austral floristic links requires extensive sampling in both regions. For the Alstroemeriaceae, with 189 species in three South American genera, two in an Australian/Tasm...

  4. Recent viroid disease outbreaks in greenhouse tomatoes in North and Central America and their management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greenhouse tomato productions in North America have suffered from several high profile viroid disease outbreaks in recent years. In this presentation, I will summarize and briefly describe each of these viroid disease outbreak and their relationship. What are viroids and their transmission through ...

  5. Remote Sensing of the Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Clouds during TC4: Results from MAS, MASTER, MODIS, and MISR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Arnold, George T.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Frey, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) were used to obtain measurements of the bidirectional reflectance and brightness temperature of clouds at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.3 (12.9 m for MASTER). These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4) conducted over Central America and surrounding Pacific and Atlantic Oceans between July 17 and August 8, 2007. Multispectral images in eight distinct bands were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability of cloud) over land and ocean ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of this cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (liquid water, ice, or undetermined phase). Finally, the cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both liquid water and ice clouds that were detected during each flight, using a nearly identical algorithm as that implemented operationally to process MODIS cloud data from the Aqua and Terra satellites (Collection 5). This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS and MASTER date in TC4, is quite capable of distinguishing both liquid water and ice clouds during daytime conditions over both land and ocean. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals used three distinct bands of the MAS (or MASTER), and these results were compared with nearly simultaneous retrievals of MODIS on the Terra spacecraft. Finally, this MODIS-based algorithm was adapted to MISR data to infer the cloud optical thickness of liquid water clouds from MISR. Results of this analysis will be presented and discussed.

  6. Remote Sensing of Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Clouds During TC (sup 4): Results from MAS, MASTER, MODIS, and MISR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Arnold, G. Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS) and MODIS/Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Airborne Simulator (MASTER) were used to obtain measurements of the bidirectional reflectance and brightness temperature of clouds at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.2 microns (12.9 microns for MASTER). These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment conducted over Central America and surrounding Pacific and Atlantic Oceans between 17 July and 8 August 2007. Multispectral images in eleven distinct bands were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability Of cloud) over land and ocean ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of the cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (liquid water, ice, or undetermined phase). The cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both liquid water and ice clouds that were detected during each flight, using a nearly identical algorithm to that implemented operationally to process MODIS Cloud data from the Aqua and Terra satellites (Collection 5). This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS and MASTER data in TC(sup 4), is quite capable of distinguishing both liquid water and ice clouds during daytime conditions over both land and ocean. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals use five distinct bands of the MAS (or MASTER), and these results were compared with nearly simultaneous retrievals of marine liquid water clouds from MODIS on the Terra spacecraft. Finally, this MODIS-based algorithm was adapted to Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) data to infer the cloud optical thickness Of liquid water clouds from MISR. Results of this analysis are compared and contrasted.

  7. Remote Sensing of Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Clouds During TC (sup 4): Results from MAS, MASTER, MODIS, and MISR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Arnold, G. Thomas; Dominguez, Roseanne T.

    2010-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Airborne Simulator (MAS) and MODIS/Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Airborne Simulator (MASTER) were used to obtain measurements of the bidirectional reflectance and brightness temperature of clouds at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.2 microns (12.9 microns for MASTER). These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment conducted over Central America and surrounding Pacific and Atlantic Oceans between 17 July and 8 August 2007. Multispectral images in eleven distinct bands were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability Of cloud) over land and ocean ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of the cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (liquid water, ice, or undetermined phase). The cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both liquid water and ice clouds that were detected during each flight, using a nearly identical algorithm to that implemented operationally to process MODIS Cloud data from the Aqua and Terra satellites (Collection 5). This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS and MASTER data in TC(sup 4), is quite capable of distinguishing both liquid water and ice clouds during daytime conditions over both land and ocean. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals use five distinct bands of the MAS (or MASTER), and these results were compared with nearly simultaneous retrievals of marine liquid water clouds from MODIS on the Terra spacecraft. Finally, this MODIS-based algorithm was adapted to Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) data to infer the cloud optical thickness Of liquid water clouds from MISR. Results of this analysis are compared and contrasted.

  8. Remote Sensing of the Radiative and Microphysical Properties of Clouds during TC4: Results from MAS, MASTER, MODIS, and MISR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina; Arnold, George T.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Frey, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER) were used to obtain measurements of the bidirectional reflectance and brightness temperature of clouds at 50 discrete wavelengths between 0.47 and 14.3 (12.9 m for MASTER). These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4) conducted over Central America and surrounding Pacific and Atlantic Oceans between July 17 and August 8, 2007. Multispectral images in eight distinct bands were used to derive a confidence in clear sky (or alternatively the probability of cloud) over land and ocean ecosystems. Based on the results of individual tests run as part of this cloud mask, an algorithm was developed to estimate the phase of the clouds (liquid water, ice, or undetermined phase). Finally, the cloud optical thickness and effective radius were derived for both liquid water and ice clouds that were detected during each flight, using a nearly identical algorithm as that implemented operationally to process MODIS cloud data from the Aqua and Terra satellites (Collection 5). This analysis shows that the cloud mask developed for operational use on MODIS, and tested using MAS and MASTER date in TC4, is quite capable of distinguishing both liquid water and ice clouds during daytime conditions over both land and ocean. The cloud optical thickness and effective radius retrievals used three distinct bands of the MAS (or MASTER), and these results were compared with nearly simultaneous retrievals of MODIS on the Terra spacecraft. Finally, this MODIS-based algorithm was adapted to MISR data to infer the cloud optical thickness of liquid water clouds from MISR. Results of this analysis will be presented and discussed.

  9. Coastal Deformation Patterns Along the Nicoya Seismic Gap, Pacific Coast, Costa Rica, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.; Khaw, F.; Parra, J. G.; Annis, L. K.; Protti, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica provides a unique setting for the study of upper plate deformation along the Middle America convergent margin. Located 60-70 km inboard of the trench axis, this outer fore arc peninsula sits directly above the seismogenic zone. A sequence of emergent marine terraces along the Nicoya coast records the net pattern of late Quaternary uplift associated with the subduction cycle. The last major earthquake centered beneath the peninsula (Mw=7.7, 1950) produced widespread damage and generated 0.5-1.0 m of coseismic uplift along the peninsula's coast. With a large slip deficit since 1950, the Nicoya Peninsula is recognized as a high-potential seismic gap. Ongoing field study of uplifted Quaternary shorelines provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate local deformation patterns and large earthquake repeat times. Recent mapping of late Pleistocene marine terraces along the peninsula's northern coast allows for comparison with those previously mapped along the peninsula's southern tip. The "Iguanazul surface" on the northern coast between Tamarindo and Nosara encompasses at least three separate wave-cut treads that preserve paleo-shorelines at 10-12 m, 18-22 m, and 26-32 m elevation. Preliminary correlations with late Pleistocene sea level high stands at 80-330 ka (OIS 5-9) indicate net uplift rates of 0.1 - 0.3 m/k.y. Holocene beach rock horizons along the active beach yield calibrated radiocarbon ages of 1610 and 760 ybp (Playa Negra and Playa Lagarto), consistent with net Holocene uplift at less than 0.5 m/k.y. In contrast, the "Cobano surface" at the peninsula's southern tip (Cabo Blanco) includes at least five distinct Pleistocene terrace treads separated by well-defined risers at 30-220 m elevation. Holocene uplift rates here range from 1.0 - 6.0 m/k.y. along an emergent Holocene terrace (Cabuya surface). The order-of-magnitude difference in Quaternary uplift rates between the northern and southern Nicoya Peninsula may be linked to

  10. Tree-ring records of near-Younger Dryas time in central North America - Preliminary results from the Lincoln quarry site, central Illinois, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panyushkina, Irina P.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Wiedenhoeft, A.; Noggle, S.; Curry, B.; Grimm, E.

    2004-01-01

    The abrupt millennial-scale changes associated with the Younger Dryas (YD) event ("chronozone") near the dawn of the Holocene are at least hemispheric, if not global, in extent. Evidence for the YD cold excursion is abundant in Europe but fairly meager in central North America. We are engaged in an investigation of high-resolution environmental changes in mid-North America over several millennia (about 10,000 to 14,000 BP) during the Late Glacial-Early Holocene transition, including the YD interval. Several sites containing logs or stumps have been identified and we are in the process of initial sampling or re-sampling them for this project. Here, we report on a site in central Illinois containing a deposit of logs initially thought to be of YD age preserved in alluvial sands. The assemblage of wood represents hardwood (angiosperm) trees, and the ring-width characteristics are favorable to developing formal tree-ring chronologies. However, 4 new radiocarbon dates indicate deposition of wood may have taken place over at least 8000 14C yr (6000-14,000 BP). This complicates the effort to develop a single floating chronology of several hundred years at this site, but it may provide wood from a restricted region over a long period of time from which to develop a sequence of floating chronologies, the timing of deposition and preservation of which could be related to paleoclimatic events and conditions.

  11. Increased number of cases of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection imported from the Caribbean and Central America to northern Italy, 2014.

    PubMed

    Rossini, G; Gaibani, P; Vocale, C; Finarelli, A C; Landini, M P

    2016-07-01

    This report describes an increased number of cases of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection imported in northern Italy (Emilia-Romagna region) during the period May-September 2014, indicating that the recent spread of CHIKV and its establishment in the Caribbean and in central America, resulted in a high number of imported cases in Europe, thus representing a threat to public health. From May to September 2014, 14 imported cases of CHIKV infection were diagnosed; the patients were returning to Italy from Dominican Republic (n = 6), Haiti (n = 3), Guadeloupe (n = 2), Martinique (n = 1), Puerto Rico (n = 1) and Venezuela (n = 1). Phylogenetic analysis performed on the envelope protein (E1) gene sequences, obtained from plasma samples from two patients, indicated that the virus strain belongs to the Caribbean clade of the Asian genotype currently circulating in the Caribbean and Americas. The rise in the number of imported cases of CHIKV infection should increase healthcare professionals' awareness of the epidemiological situation and clinical presentation of CHIKV infection in order to enhance surveillance and early diagnosis in the forthcoming season of vector activity in Europe and North America.

  12. [Synopsis of the Seminar on Breast Feeding Promotion in Central America, Panama and the Dominican Republic. Isla Contadora, Panama, 1983].

    PubMed

    Delgado, H L; García, B; Valverde, V; Fischer, M; Praun, A; Townsend, J

    1985-03-01

    The most recent and reliable information on the status of breast-feeding in Central América, Panama and the Dominican Republic indicates that during the last decades, in all of these countries there has been a decrease in the prevalence and duration of breast-feeding. In some of them, this situation would seem to be reverting. Considering the importance that breast-feeding has on children's health and nutrition, the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), organized a Regional Seminar on the Promotion of Breast-feeding, which was held in Contadora Island, Panama, in April, 1983. Based on the discussions of the working groups, sectoral and integrated recommendations were formulated for the purpose of promoting breast-feeding. This document contains specific recommendations for each of the sectors represented in the Seminar.

  13. MODIS Land Data Products: Generation, Quality Assurance and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, Edward; Wolfe, Robert; Morisette, Jeffery; Sinno, Scott; Teague, Michael; Saleous, Nazmi; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Justice, Christopher; Nickeson, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on-board NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua Satellites are key instruments for providing data on global land, atmosphere, and ocean dynamics. Derived MODIS land, atmosphere and ocean products are central to NASA's mission to monitor and understand the Earth system. NASA has developed and generated on a systematic basis a suite of MODIS products starting with the first Terra MODIS data sensed February 22, 2000 and continuing with the first MODIS-Aqua data sensed July 2, 2002. The MODIS Land products are divided into three product suites: radiation budget products, ecosystem products, and land cover characterization products. The production and distribution of the MODIS Land products are described, from initial software delivery by the MODIS Land Science Team, to operational product generation and quality assurance, delivery to EOS archival and distribution centers, and product accuracy assessment and validation. Progress and lessons learned since the first MODIS data were in early 2000 are described.

  14. Evaluating Ultraviolet Radiation Exposures Determined from TOMS Satellite Data at Sites of Amphibian Declines in Central and South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many amphibian species have experienced substantial population declines, or have disappeared altogether, during the last several decades at a number of amphibian census sites in Central and South America. This study addresses the use of satellite-derived trends in solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-320 nm) radiation exposures at these sites over the last two decades, and is intended to demonstrate a role for satellite observations in determining whether UV-B radiation is a contributing factor in amphibian declines. UV-B radiation levels at the Earth's surface were derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data, typically acquired daily since 1979. These data were used to calculate the daily erythemal (sunburning) UV-B, or UV-B(sub ery), exposures at the latitude, longitude, and elevation of each of 20 census sites. The annually averaged UV-B(sub ery) dose, as well as the maximum values, have been increasing in both Central and South America, with higher levels received at the Central American sites. The annually averaged UV-B(sub ery) exposures increased significantly from 1979-1998 at all 11 Central American sites examined (r(exp 2) = 0.60 - 0.79; P<=0.015), with smaller but significant increases at five of the nine South American sites (r(exp 2) = 0.24-0.42; P<=0.05). The contribution of the highest UV-B(sub ery) exposure levels (>= 6750 J/sq m*d) to the annual UV-B(sub ery) total has increased from approx. 5% to approx. 15% in Central America over the 19 year period, but actual daily exposures for each species are unknown. Synergy among UV-B radiation and other factors, especially those associated with alterations of water chemistry (e.g., acidification) in aqueous habitats is discussed. These findings justify further research concerning whether UV-B(sub ery) radiation plays a role in amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  15. Evaluating Ultraviolet Radiation Exposures Determined from TOMS Satellite Data at Sites of Amphibian Declines in Central and South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many amphibian species have experienced substantial population declines, or have disappeared altogether, during the last several decades at a number of amphibian census sites in Central and South America. This study addresses the use of satellite-derived trends in solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B; 280-320 nm) radiation exposures at these sites over the last two decades, and is intended to demonstrate a role for satellite observations in determining whether UV-B radiation is a contributing factor in amphibian declines. UV-B radiation levels at the Earth's surface were derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data, typically acquired daily since 1979. These data were used to calculate the daily erythemal (sunburning) UV-B, or UV-B(sub ery), exposures at the latitude, longitude, and elevation of each of 20 census sites. The annually averaged UV-B(sub ery) dose, as well as the maximum values, have been increasing in both Central and South America, with higher levels received at the Central American sites. The annually averaged UV-B(sub ery) exposures increased significantly from 1979-1998 at all 11 Central American sites examined (r(exp 2) = 0.60 - 0.79; P<=0.015), with smaller but significant increases at five of the nine South American sites (r(exp 2) = 0.24-0.42; P<=0.05). The contribution of the highest UV-B(sub ery) exposure levels (>= 6750 J/sq m*d) to the annual UV-B(sub ery) total has increased from approx. 5% to approx. 15% in Central America over the 19 year period, but actual daily exposures for each species are unknown. Synergy among UV-B radiation and other factors, especially those associated with alterations of water chemistry (e.g., acidification) in aqueous habitats is discussed. These findings justify further research concerning whether UV-B(sub ery) radiation plays a role in amphibian population declines and extinctions.

  16. Introduction: seismology and earthquake engineering in Mexico and Central and South America.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espinosa, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    The results from seismological studies that are used by the engineering community are just one of the benefits obtained from research aimed at mitigating the earthquake hazard. In this issue of Earthquake Information Bulletin current programs in seismology and earthquake engineering, seismic networks, future plans and some of the cooperative programs with different internation organizations are described by Latin-American seismologists. The article describes the development of seismology in Latin America and the seismological interest of the OAS. -P.N.Chroston

  17. Delineating Surface Water Features In The Prairie Pothole Wetlands With MODIS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L.; Wylie, B. K.; Zhang, L.; Rover, J.; Tieszen, L. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), covered with thousands of shallow ponds known as potholes, is a large wetland area in central North America. The PPR wetlands are valuable because of the ecosystem services they provide, including water balance and flood mediation, habitat for migratory birds and waterfowl production, and carbon sequestration. During the last century, impacts of intense land use (agricultural and commercial development) and climate change have caused drastic reductions of surface water area and wetland habitat in the PPR. Spatial and temporal characterizations of the surface water dynamics are important for understanding the hydrological and ecological characteristics in the PPR wetlands. In this study, we use the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data processed as 8-day composites at 500-meter resolution from 2000 to 2006. The modified normalized difference water index [MNDWI = (band 4 ¡§C band 6)/(band 4 + band 6)] was computed to delineate water features. By adjusting the MNDWI threshold, we generated three land-cover classes: water, land, and water/land mixture. Additionally, we acquired 26 Landsat TM/ETM+ scenes, 14 to calibrate the MODIS MDNWI threshold and 12 to independently validate the MODIS water feature products. For the validation, the maps of percent water area derived from MODIS were compared with the maps generated from the Landsat images at a 5-kilometer grid level. The comparison illustrates a low root mean square error (0.0034 percent) and a high correlation coefficient (0.95), suggesting satisfactory accuracy of the MODIS water products. We have produced and illustrated the MODIS water feature maps for the U.S. portion of the PPR at 32-day intervals for the growing seasons from 2000 to 2006. The time series of MODIS-derived water feature maps are useful for delineating water features and monitoring water area dynamics in this area, and these products provide coarse resolution information

  18. Information to Act: Household Characteristics are Predictors of Domestic Infestation with the Chagas Vector Triatoma dimidiata in Central America

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Dulce María Bustamante; Hernández, Marianela Menes; Torres, Nuria; Zúniga, Concepción; Sosa, Wilfredo; de Abrego, Vianney; Escobar, María Carlota Monroy

    2015-01-01

    The interruption of vectorial transmission of Chagas disease by Triatoma dimidiata in central America is a public health challenge that cannot be resolved by insecticide application alone. In this study, we collected information on previously known household risk factors for infestation in 11 villages and more than 2,000 houses in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, and we constructed multivariate models and used multimodel inference to evaluate their importance as predictors of infestation in the region. The models had moderate ability to predict infested houses (sensitivity, 0.32–0.54) and excellent ability to predict noninfested houses (specificity higher than 0.90). Predictive ability was improved by including random village effects and presence of signs of infestation (insect feces, eggs, and exuviae) as fixed effects. Multimodel inference results varied depending on factors included, but house wall materials (adobe, bajareque, and palopique) and signs of infestation were among the most important predictive factors. Reduced models were not supported suggesting that all factors contributed to predictions. Previous knowledge and information from this study show that we have evidence to prioritize rural households for improvement to prevent house infestation with Triatoma dimidiata in Central America. House improvement will most likely have other health co-benefits. PMID:25870430

  19. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    PubMed

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  20. Method to Determine Appropriate Source Models of Large Earthquakes Including Tsunami Earthquakes for Tsunami Early Warning in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanioka, Yuichiro; Miranda, Greyving Jose Arguello; Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Fujii, Yushiro

    2017-08-01

    Large earthquakes, such as the Mw 7.7 1992 Nicaragua earthquake, have occurred off the Pacific coasts of El Salvador and Nicaragua in Central America and have generated distractive tsunamis along these coasts. It is necessary to determine appropriate fault models before large tsunamis hit the coast. In this study, first, fault parameters were estimated from the W-phase inversion, and then an appropriate fault model was determined from the fault parameters and scaling relationships with a depth dependent rigidity. The method was tested for four large earthquakes, the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake (Mw7.7), the 2001 El Salvador earthquake (Mw7.7), the 2004 El Astillero earthquake (Mw7.0), and the 2012 El Salvador-Nicaragua earthquake (Mw7.3), which occurred off El Salvador and Nicaragua in Central America. The tsunami numerical simulations were carried out from the determined fault models. We found that the observed tsunami heights, run-up heights, and inundation areas were reasonably well explained by the computed ones. Therefore, our method for tsunami early warning purpose should work to estimate a fault model which reproduces tsunami heights near the coast of El Salvador and Nicaragua due to large earthquakes in the subduction zone.

  1. Simulated influences of Lake Agassiz on the climate of central North America 11,000 years ago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Bartlein, P.J.; Clark, P.U.; Small, E.E.; Solomon, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Eleven thousand years ago, large lakes existed in central and eastern North America along the margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The large-scale North American climate at this time has been simulated with atmospheric general circulation models, but these relatively coarse global models do not resolve potentially important features of the mesoscale circulation that arise from interactions among the atmosphere, ice sheet, and proglacial lakes. Here we present simulations of the climate of central and eastern North America 11,000 years ago with a high-resolution, regional climate model nested within a general circulation model. The simulated climate is in general agreement with that inferred from palaeoecological evidence. Our experiments indicate that through mesoscale atmospheric feedbacks, the annual delivery of moisture to the Laurentide Ice Sheet was diminished at times of a large, cold Lake Agassiz relative to periods of lower lake stands. The resulting changes in the mass balance of the ice sheet may have contributed to fluctuations of the ice margin, thus affecting the routing of fresh water to the North Atlantic Ocean. A retreating ice margin during periods of high lake level may have opened an outlet for discharge of Lake Agassiz into the North Atlantic. A subsequent advance of the ice margin due to greater moisture delivery associated with a low lake level could have dammed the outlet, thereby reducing discharge to the North Atlantic. These variations may have been decisive in causing the Younger Dryas cold even.

  2. Changes in inter-annual variability of precipitation and temperature over Mexico and Central America from RegCM projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Franco, Ramon; Coppola, Erika; Tefera Diro, Gulilat; Giorgi, Filippo; Pavia, Edgar G.; Graef, Federico

    2013-04-01

    Future climate projections performed with the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) are used to analyze the future changes on inter-annual variability of precipitation and temperature over Mexico and Central America. Two different global circulation models from the Couple Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMPI5) are used as boundary conditions for two different RegCM4 configurations, which result in four different climate projections. Through a comparison of the precipitation annual cycles in reference period with future simulations, a shift in the annual cycle is found over Northwestern Mexico and Central America. During the rainy season (June to September), it is found an increase in the inter-annual variability of precipitation and temperature, together with a warming greater than 4°C in the mean seasonal temperature and a drying of more than 20%. An increased warming on the Eastern Pacific Ocean compared to the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean potentially generates a strengthened North Atlantic Subtropical High Pressure and also a stronger Caribbean Low Level Jet. This future ENSO-like state appears to be the mechanism driving the drying over the region

  3. Diet and habitat of toxodont megaherbivores (Mammalia, Notoungulata) from the late Quaternary of South and Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2005-09-01

    The toxodont megaherbivores Toxodon and Mixotoxodon were endemic to South and Central America during the late Quaternary. Isotopic signatures of 47 toxodont teeth were analyzed to reconstruct diet and ancient habitat. Tooth enamel carbon isotope data from six regions of South and Central America indicate significant differences in toxodont diet and local vegetation during the late Quaternary. Toxodonts ranged ecologically from C 3 forest browsers in the Amazon (mean δ 13C = -13.4‰), to mixed C 3 grazers and/or browsers living either in C 3 grasslands, or mixed C 3 forested and grassland habitats in Honduras (mean δ 13C = -9.3‰), Buenos Aires province, Argentina (δ 13C = -8.7‰), and Bahia, Brazil (mean δ 13C = -8.6‰), to predominantly C 4 grazers in northern Argentina (δ 13C = -4.4‰), to specialized C 4 grazers in the Chaco of Bolivia (δ 13C = -0.1‰). Although these toxodonts had very high-crowned teeth classically interpreted for grazing, the isotopic data indicate that these megaherbivores had the evolutionary capacity to feed on a variety of dominant local vegetation. In the ancient Amazon region, carbon isotope data for the toxodonts indicate a C 3-based tropical rainforest habitat with no evidence for grasslands as would be predicted from the Neotropical forest refugia hypothesis.

  4. Estimation of speciated and total mercury dry deposition at monitoring locations in eastern and central North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Blanchard, P.; Gay, D.A.; Prestbo, E.M.; Risch, M.R.; Johnson, D.; Narayan, J.; Zsolway, R.; Holsen, T.M.; Miller, E.K.; Castro, M.S.; Graydon, J.A.; St. Louis, V.L.; Dalziel, J.

    2012-01-01

    Dry deposition of speciated mercury, i.e., gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), particulate-bound mercury (PBM), and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), was estimated for the year 2008–2009 at 19 monitoring locations in eastern and central North America. Dry deposition estimates were obtained by combining monitored two- to four-hourly speciated ambient concentrations with modeled hourly dry deposition velocities (Vd) calculated using forecasted meteorology. Annual dry deposition of GOM+PBM was estimated to be in the range of 0.4 to 8.1 μg m−2 at these locations with GOM deposition being mostly five to ten times higher than PBM deposition, due to their different modeled Vd values. Net annual GEM dry deposition was estimated to be in the range of 5 to 26 μg m−2 at 18 sites and 33 μg m−2 at one site. The estimated dry deposition agrees very well with limited surrogate-surface dry deposition measurements of GOM and PBM, and also agrees with litterfall mercury measurements conducted at multiple locations in eastern and central North America. This study suggests that GEM contributes much more than GOM+PBM to the total dry deposition at the majority of the sites considered here; the only exception is at locations close to significant point sources where GEM and GOM+PBM contribute equally to the total dry deposition. The relative magnitude of the speciated dry deposition and their good comparisons with litterfall deposition suggest that mercury in litterfall originates primarily from GEM, which is consistent with the limited number of previous field studies. The study also supports previous analyses suggesting that total dry deposition of mercury is equal to, if not more important than, wet deposition of mercury on a regional scale in eastern North America.

  5. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  6. Mapping Crop Patterns in Central US Agricultural Systems from 2000 to 2014 Based on Landsat Data: To What Degree Does Fusing MODIS Data Improve Classification Accuracies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Radeloff, V.; Ives, A. R.; Barton, B.

    2015-12-01

    Deriving crop pattern with high accuracy is of great importance for characterizing landscape diversity, which affects the resilience of food webs in agricultural systems in the face of climatic and land cover changes. Landsat sensors were originally designed to monitor agricultural areas, and both radiometric and spatial resolution are optimized for monitoring large agricultural fields. Unfortunately, few clear Landsat images per year are available, which has limited the use of Landsat for making crop classification, and this situation is worse in cloudy areas of the Earth. Meanwhile, the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data has better temporal resolution but cannot capture fine spatial heterogeneity of agricultural systems. Our question was to what extent fusing imagery from both sensors could improve crop classifications. We utilized the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) algorithm to simulate Landsat-like images at MODIS temporal resolution. Based on Random Forests (RF) classifier, we tested whether and by what degree crop maps from 2000 to 2014 of the Arlington Agricultural Research Station (Wisconsin, USA) were improved by integrating available clear Landsat images each year with synthetic images. We predicted that the degree to which classification accuracy can be improved by incorporating synthetic imagery depends on the number and acquisition time of clear Landsat images. Moreover, multi-season data are essential for mapping crop types by capturing their phenological dynamics, and STARFM-simulated images can be used to compensate for missing Landsat observations. Our study is helpful for eliminating the limits of the use of Landsat data in mapping crop patterns, and can provide a benchmark of accuracy when choosing STARFM-simulated images to make crop classification at broader scales.