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Sample records for central artery stiffness

  1. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  2. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  3. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  4. Central artery stiffness, baroreflex sensitivity, and brain white matter neuronal fiber integrity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Tarumi, Takashi; de Jong, Daan L K; Zhu, David C; Tseng, Benjamin Y; Liu, Jie; Hill, Candace; Riley, Jonathan; Womack, Kyle B; Kerwin, Diana R; Lu, Hanzhang; Munro Cullum, C; Zhang, Rong

    2015-04-15

    Cerebral hypoperfusion elevates the risk of brain white matter (WM) lesions and cognitive impairment. Central artery stiffness impairs baroreflex, which controls systemic arterial perfusion, and may deteriorate neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among brain WM neuronal fiber integrity, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), and central artery stiffness in older adults. Fifty-four adults (65 ± 6 years) with normal cognitive function or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were tested. The neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM was assessed from diffusion metrics acquired by diffusion tensor imaging. BRS was measured in response to acute changes in blood pressure induced by bolus injections of vasoactive drugs. Central artery stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). The WM diffusion metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and radial (RD) and axial (AD) diffusivities, BRS, and cfPWV were not different between the control and MCI groups. Thus, the data from both groups were combined for subsequent analyses. Across WM, fiber tracts with decreased FA and increased RD were associated with lower BRS and higher cfPWV, with many of the areas presenting spatial overlap. In particular, the BRS assessed during hypotension was strongly correlated with FA and RD when compared with hypertension. Executive function performance was associated with FA and RD in the areas that correlated with cfPWV and BRS. These findings suggest that baroreflex-mediated control of systemic arterial perfusion, especially during hypotension, may play a crucial role in maintaining neuronal fiber integrity of brain WM in older adults. PMID:25623500

  5. Effects of smoking cessation on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Smoking affects arterial stiffness, thus causing an elevation in central blood pressure (CBP). The present study was designed to examine whether smoking cessation treatment improved CBP and arterial stiffness. Patients and methods: We conducted an observational study of 70 patients receiving smoking cessation treatment. Before and 60 weeks after the start of a 12-week varenicline treatment, we measured brachial blood pressure, CBP, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), normalized radial augmentation index (rAIx@75), left ventricular weight, and left ventricular diastolic function of each patient. The data were compared between the patients who succeeded in quitting smoking (smoking cessation group; n = 37) and those who failed to quit smoking (smoking group; n = 33). Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Brachial blood pressure remained unchanged in both groups. CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75 decreased significantly in the smoking cessation group, while these parameters showed no significant change in the smoking group. Thus, CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75 showed greater decrease in the smoking cessation group than in the smoking group (CBP, −7.1 ± 1.4 mmHg vs 1.2 ± 2.7 mmHg; P < 0.01; baPWV, −204 ± 64 cm/s vs −43 ± 72 cm/s; P < 0.01; rAIx@75, −6.4 ± 2.8% vs −1.0 ± 3.9%; P < 0.01). Left ventricular weight and left ventricular diastolic function remained unchanged in both groups. Conclusion: Patients in the smoking cessation group showed significant improvement in CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75. These results indicate that smoking cessation can improve arterial stiffness and CBP. PMID:22102787

  6. Arterial Stiffness Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Catherine; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality in various clinical conditions. The aim of this review is to focus on the arterial stiffness gradient, to discuss the integrated role of medium-sized muscular conduit arteries in the regulation of pulsatile pressure and organ perfusion and to provide a rationale for integrating their mechanical properties into risk prediction. Summary The physiological arterial stiffness gradient results from a higher degree of vascular stiffness as the distance from the heart increases, creating multiple reflective sites and attenuating the pulsatile nature of the forward pressure wave along the arterial tree down to the microcirculation. The stiffness gradient hypothesis simultaneously explains its physiological beneficial effects from both cardiac and peripheral microcirculatory points of view. The loss or reversal of stiffness gradient leads to the transmission of a highly pulsatile pressure wave into the microcirculation. This suggests that a higher degree of stiffness of medium-sized conduit arteries may play a role in protecting the microcirculation from a highly pulsatile forward pressure wave. Using the ratio of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) to carotid-radial PWV, referred to as PWV ratio, a recent study in a dialysis cohort has shown that the PWV ratio is a better predictor of mortality than the classical carotid-femoral PWV. Key Messages Theoretically, the use of the PWV ratio seems more logical for risk determination than aortic stiffness as it provides a better estimation of the loss of stiffness gradient, which is the unifying hypothesis that explains the impact of aortic stiffness both on the myocardium and on peripheral organs. PMID:27195235

  7. The acute effect of maximal exercise on central and peripheral arterial stiffness indices and hemodynamics in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Melo, Xavier; Fernhall, Bo; Santos, Diana A; Pinto, Rita; Pimenta, Nuno M; Sardinha, Luís B; Santa-Clara, Helena

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the effects of a bout of maximal running exercise on arterial stiffness in children and adults. Right carotid blood pressure and artery stiffness indices measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index α and β (echo-tracking), contralateral carotid blood pressure, and upper and lower limb and central/aortic PWV (applanation tonometry) were taken at rest and 10 min after a bout of maximal treadmill running in 34 children (7.38 ± 0.38 years) and 45 young adults (25.22 ± 0.91 years) having similar aerobic potential. Two-by-two repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were used to detect differences with exercise between groups. Carotid pulse pressure (PP; η(2) = 0.394) increased more in adults after exercise (p < 0.05). Compliance (η(2) = 0.385) decreased in particular in adults and in those with high changes in distending pressure, similarly to stiffness index α and β. Carotid PWV increased more in adults and was related to local changes in PP but not mean arterial pressure (MAP). Stiffness in the lower limbs decreased (η(2) = 0.115) but apparently only in those with small MAP changes (η(2) = 0.111). No significant exercise or group interaction effects were found when variables were adjusted to height. An acute bout of maximal exercise can alter arterial stiffness and hemodynamics in the carotid artery and within the active muscle beds. Arterial stiffness and hemodynamic response to metabolic demands during exercise in children simply reflect their smaller body size and may not indicate a particular physiological difference compared with adults. PMID:26842667

  8. Longitudinal perspective on the conundrum of central arterial stiffness, blood pressure, and aging.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Morrell, Christopher H; Orrù, Marco; Strait, James B; Tarasov, Kirill V; Ferreli, Liana Anna Pina; Loi, Francesco; Pilia, Maria Grazia; Delitala, Alessandro; Spurgeon, Harold; Najjar, Samer S; AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    The age-associated increase in arterial stiffness has long been considered to parallel or to cause the age-associated increase in blood pressure (BP). Yet, the rates at which pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness, and BP trajectories change over time within individuals who differ by age and sex have not been assessed and compared. This study determined the evolution of BP and aortic PWV trajectories during a 9.4-year follow-up in >4000 community-dwelling men and women of 20 to 100 years of age at entry into the SardiNIA Study. Linear mixed effects model analyses revealed that PWV accelerates with time during the observation period, at about the same rate over the entire age range in both men and women. In men, the longitudinal rate at which BP changed over time, however, did not generally parallel that of PWV acceleration: at ages>40 years the rates of change in systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) increase plateaued and then declined so that SBP, itself, also declined at older ages, whereas PP plateaued. In women, SBP, diastolic BP, and mean BP increased at constant rates across all ages, producing an increasing rate of increase in PP. Therefore, increased aortic stiffness is implicated in the age-associated increase in SBP and PP. These findings indicate that PWV is not a surrogate for BP and that arterial properties other than arterial wall stiffness that vary by age and sex also modulate the BP trajectories during aging and lead to the dissociation of PWV, PP, and SBP trajectories in men.

  9. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  10. Body Weight and Not Exercise Capacity Determines Central Systolic Blood Pressure, a Surrogate for Arterial Stiffness, in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jan; Meyer, Joanna; Elmenhorst, Julia; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2016-08-01

    Cardiopulmonary fitness benefits cardiovascular health. Various studies have shown a strong negative correlation between exercise capacity and arterial stiffness in adults. However, evidence for this connection in children and adolescents is scarce. About 320 healthy children and adolescents (252 male, 14.0±2.1 years) were evaluated with regard to their demographic, anthropometric and hemodynamic parameters, and their peak oxygen uptake. Peripheral and central systolic blood pressures were measured with patients in a supine position using an oscillometric device. Peak oxygen uptake was assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In multivariate regression, only peripheral systolic blood pressure (β=0.653, P<.001) and body weight (β=0.284, P<.001) emerged as independent determinants for central systolic blood pressure. Body weight therefore determines central systolic blood pressure in children and adolescents rather than measures of cardiorespiratory fitness. The prevention of overweight in childhood is necessary to reduce stiffening of the arteries and delay the onset of cardiovascular disease.

  11. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  12. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions.

  13. Comparison of the effects of antihypertensive agents on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness in isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Isla S; McEniery, Carmel M; Dhakam, Zahid; Brown, Morris J; Cockcroft, John R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2009-08-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and results primarily from elastic artery stiffening. Although various drug therapies are used to lower peripheral blood pressure (BP) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, the effects of the 4 major classes of antihypertensive agents on central BP, pulse pressure (PP) amplification, and arterial stiffness in this condition are not clear. Fifty-nine patients over the age of 60 years with untreated isolated systolic hypertension (systolic BP > or =140 mm Hg and diastolic BP central PP was only reduced significantly by perindopril, lercanidipine, and bendrofluazide, whereas atenolol had no effect. Lercanidipine reduced the augmentation index, whereas atenolol increased it. Aortic pulse wave velocity was not changed by any of the drugs. In summary, despite similar reductions in peripheral systolic and PPs with the 4 classes of drug, changes in central pressure and augmentation index varied. Because central PP and increased wave reflections are considered important risk factors in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, the choice of therapy may be influenced by these findings in the future.

  14. Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging and the number of old people is continuously increasing. Arterial structure and function change with age, progressively leading to arterial stiffening. Arterial stiffness is best characterized by measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV), which is its surrogate marker. It has been shown that PWV could improve cardiovascular event prediction in models that included standard risk factors. Consequently, it might therefore enable better identification of populations at high-risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present review is focused on a survey of different pharmacological therapeutic options for decreasing arterial stiffness. The influence of several groups of drugs is described: antihypertensive drugs (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and nitrates), statins, peroral antidiabetics, advanced glycation end-products (AGE) cross-link breakers, anti-inflammatory drugs, endothelin-A receptor antagonists, and vasopeptidase inhibitors. All of these have shown some effect in decreasing arterial stiffness. Nevertheless, further studies are needed which should address the influence of arterial stiffness diminishment on major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE). PMID:25170513

  15. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  16. Arterial stiffness is increased in young normotensive subjects with high central blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Silvia; Khoury, Philip R; Kimball, Thomas R; Dolan, Lawrence M; Urbina, Elaine M

    2015-04-01

    Information on high central blood pressure (CBP; HCP) in normotensive subjects (NT) and its relation to target organ damage (TOD) is not well established in young subjects. This study aimed to elucidate determinants of HCP and its relation with TOD. Anthropometrics, lab, brachial, and CBP were obtained on 430 normotensive subjects (NT; 16-24 years, 34% male, 44% Caucasian, 27% type 2 diabetes). HCP was defined as elevated CBP, with normal brachial BP. Subjects with HCP (prevalence, 16%) were more frequently female and African American, and had a higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes, a more adverse metabolic profile, higher levels of inflammation, brachial BP, central pulse pressure, and heart rate compared with NT. HCP also had evidence for TOD with a significant higher carotid intima media thickness, left ventricular mass, augmentation index, pulse wave velocity, and lower brachial distensibility than NT. HCP is related to early cardiac and vascular dysfunction and remain an independent predictor of TOD even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25891361

  17. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  18. The Effect of High Dose Cholecalciferol on Arterial Stiffness and Peripheral and Central Blood Pressure in Healthy Humans: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bressendorff, Iain; Brandi, Lisbet; Schou, Morten; Nygaard, Birgitte; Frandsen, Niels Erik; Rasmussen, Knud; Ødum, Lars; Østergaard, Ove Vyff; Hansen, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    Background Low levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D are associated with increased arterial stiffness and hypertension. Supplementation with vitamin D precursors has been proposed as a treatment option for these conditions. We examined the effect of oral cholecalciferol on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in healthy normotensive adults. Methods 40 healthy adults were randomised in this double-blinded study to either oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day or matching placebo and were followed for 16 weeks to examine any effects on pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), peripheral and central blood pressure and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Results 22 subjects in the cholecalciferol arm and 18 subjects in the placebo arm completed the 16 weeks of follow-up. There was no difference in changes in PWV, AIx corrected for heart rate or central or peripheral blood pressure between the two groups. There was no correlation between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and any of these parameters. Conclusions Oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day does not affect arterial stiffness or blood pressure after 16 weeks of treatment in healthy normotensive adults. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952562 PMID:27509187

  19. Longitudinal changes in central artery stiffness with lifestyle modification, washout, and drug treatment in individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kunihiko; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Overend, Tom J; Petrella, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    We assessed 17 middle-aged and older individuals (58.0 +/- 7.9 years, 7 females) at risk for cardiovascular disease regarding: (1) Whether carotid artery stiffness (cAS) would be reduced with a 1-year lifestyle modification program, (2) to what degree cAS would return following washout (mean of 26.9 +/- 4.0 months) from the active intervention, and (3) whether a 24-week telmisartan treatment would reduce cAS more than our lifestyle modification program. cAS by Doppler ultrasound, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and exercise capacity were assessed at three points: Following the 1-year lifestyle modification, following the washout period, and following a 24-week telmisartan treatment. Following telmisartan, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly decreased (114.8 +/- 12.3 mmHg) compared to baseline (127.9 +/- 12.7 mmHg) and following the washout period (126.1 +/- 14.9 mmHg). Similarly, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was significantly lower following telmisaratn than following the washout period. Exercise capacity was increased following lifestyle modification but returned to the baseline level following the washout period. Following the lifestyle modification program, cAS was significantly reduced, and this reduction was maintained following the washout period. Conversely, the subsequent telmisartan treatment did not change cAS despite a significant blood pressure reduction. These results suggest that the reduced cAS achieved with lifestyle modification may not necessarily disappear following a cessation of the active program, indicating a possible role that family physicians can play in their clinical practice, and also providing a further rationale to promote lifestyle modification as an initial therapy for this population. In contrast, no additional benefit of telmisartan beyond our lifestyle intervention was observed in this study.

  20. Effect of A Reduction in glomerular filtration rate after NEphrectomy on arterial STiffness and central hemodynamics: Rationale and design of the EARNEST study☆

    PubMed Central

    Moody, William E.; Tomlinson, Laurie A.; Ferro, Charles J.; Steeds, Richard P.; Mark, Patrick B.; Zehnder, Daniel; Tomson, Charles R.; Cockcroft, John R.; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Townend, Jonathan N.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence of an association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. To date, however, proof that a reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a causative factor in cardiovascular disease is lacking. Kidney donors comprise a highly screened population without risk factors such as diabetes and inflammation, which invariably confound the association between CKD and cardiovascular disease. There is strong evidence that increased arterial stiffness and left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, rather than atherosclerotic disease, mediate the adverse cardiovascular effects of CKD. The expanding practice of live kidney donation provides a unique opportunity to study the cardiovascular effects of an isolated reduction in GFR in a prospective fashion. At the same time, the proposed study will address ongoing safety concerns that persist because most longitudinal outcome studies have been undertaken at single centers and compared donor cohorts with an inappropriately selected control group. Hypotheses The reduction in GFR accompanying uninephrectomy causes (1) a pressure-independent increase in aortic stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity) and (2) an increase in peripheral and central blood pressure. Methods This is a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal, parallel group study of 440 living kidney donors and 440 healthy controls. All controls will be eligible for living kidney donation using current UK transplant criteria. Investigations will be performed at baseline and repeated at 12 months in the first instance. These include measurement of arterial stiffness using applanation tonometry to determine pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, office blood pressure, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and a series of biomarkers for cardiovascular and bone mineral disease. Conclusions These data will prove valuable by characterizing the direction of causality between cardiovascular and renal disease. This

  1. Effect of whole-body mild-cold exposure on arterial stiffness and central haemodynamics: a randomised, cross-over trial in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    King, Sibella G; Ahuja, Kiran D K; Wass, Jezreel; Shing, Cecilia M; Adams, Murray J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E; Williams, Andrew D

    2013-05-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) are independent predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality, but little is known about the effect of air temperature changes on these variables. Our study investigated the effect of exposure to whole-body mild-cold on measures of arterial stiffness (aortic and brachial PWV), and on central haemodynamics [including augmented pressure (AP), AIx], and aortic reservoir components [including reservoir and excess pressures (P ex)]. Sixteen healthy volunteers (10 men, age 43 ± 19 years; mean ± SD) were randomised to be studied under conditions of 12 °C (mild-cold) and 21 °C (control) on separate days. Supine resting measures were taken at baseline (ambient temperature) and after 10, 30, and 60 min exposure to each experimental condition in a climate chamber. There was no significant change in brachial blood pressure between mild-cold and control conditions. However, compared to control, AP [+2 mmHg, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.36-4.36; p = 0.01] and AIx (+6 %, 95 % CI 1.24-10.1; p = 0.02) increased, and time to maximum P ex (a component of reservoir function related to timing of peak aortic in-flow) decreased (-7 ms, 95 % CI -15.4 to 2.03; p = 0.01) compared to control. Yet there was no significant change in aortic PWV (+0.04 m/s, 95 % CI -0.47 to 0.55; p = 0.87) or brachial PWV (+0.36 m/s; -0.41 to 1.12; p = 0.35) between conditions. We conclude that mild-cold exposure increases central haemodynamic stress and alters timing of peak aortic in-flow without differentially affecting arterial stiffness.

  2. [Impact of aortic stiffness on central hemodynamics and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Bulas, J; Potočárová, M; Filková, M; Simková, A; Murín, J

    2013-06-01

    Arterial stiffness increases as a result of degenerative processes accelerated by aging and many risk factors, namely arterial hypertension. Basic clinical examination reveals increased pulse pressure as its hemodynamic manifestation. The most serious consequence of increased vascular stiffness, which cannot be revealed by clinical examination, is a change of central hemodynamics leading to increased load of left ventricle, left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and to overall increase of cardiovascular risk. This review aimed to point at some patophysiological mechanisms taking part in the development of vascular stiffness, vascular remodeling and hemodynamic consequences of these changes. This work also gives an overview of noninvasive examination methods and their characteristics enabling to evaluate the local, regional and systemic arterial stiffness and central pulse wave analysis and their meaning for central hemodynamics and heart workload. PMID:23808736

  3. Elastin in large artery stiffness and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P

    2012-06-01

    Large artery stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity, is correlated with high blood pressure and may be a causative factor in essential hypertension. The extracellular matrix components, specifically the mix of elastin and collagen in the vessel wall, determine the passive mechanical properties of the large arteries. Elastin is organized into elastic fibers in the wall during arterial development in a complex process that requires spatial and temporal coordination of numerous proteins. The elastic fibers last the lifetime of the organism but are subject to proteolytic degradation and chemical alterations that change their mechanical properties. This review discusses how alterations in the amount, assembly, organization, or chemical properties of the elastic fibers affect arterial stiffness and blood pressure. Strategies for encouraging or reversing alterations to the elastic fibers are addressed. Methods for determining the efficacy of these strategies, by measuring elastin amounts and arterial stiffness, are summarized. Therapies that have a direct effect on arterial stiffness through alterations to the elastic fibers in the wall may be an effective treatment for essential hypertension.

  4. Experimental exposure to diesel exhaust increases arterial stiffness in man

    PubMed Central

    Lundbäck, Magnus; Mills, Nicholas L; Lucking, Andrew; Barath, Stefan; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Sandström, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Vascular dysfunction reduces arterial compliance and increases central arterial pressure and left ventricular after-load. We determined the effect of diesel exhaust exposure on arterial compliance using a validated non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness. Methods In a double-blind randomized fashion, 12 healthy volunteers were exposed to diesel exhaust (approximately 350 μg/m3) or filtered air for one hour during moderate exercise. Arterial stiffness was measured using applanation tonometry at the radial artery for pulse wave analysis (PWA), as well as at the femoral and carotid arteries for pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWA was performed 10, 20 and 30 min, and carotid-femoral PWV 40 min, post-exposure. Augmentation pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx) and time to wave reflection (Tr) were calculated. Results Blood pressure, AP and AIx were generally low reflecting compliant arteries. In comparison to filtered air, diesel exhaust exposure induced an increase in AP of 2.5 mmHg (p = 0.02) and in AIx of 7.8% (p = 0.01), along with a 16 ms reduction in Tr (p = 0.03), 10 minutes post-exposure. Conclusion Acute exposure to diesel exhaust is associated with an immediate and transient increase in arterial stiffness. This may, in part, explain the increased risk for cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure. If our findings are confirmed in larger cohorts of susceptible populations, this simple non-invasive method of assessing arterial stiffness may become a useful technique in measuring the impact of real world exposures to combustion derived-air pollution. PMID:19284640

  5. Arterial stiffness: pathophysiology and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guerin, Alain P; Pannier, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The ill effects of hypertension are usually attributed to a reduction in the caliber or the number of arterioles, resulting in an increase in total peripheral resistance (TPR). This definition does not take into account the fact that BP is a cyclic phenomenon with systolic and diastolic BP being the limits of these oscillations. The appropriate term to define the arterial factor(s) opposing LV ejection is aortic input impedance which depends on TPR, arterial distensibility (D), and wave reflections (WR). D defines the capacitive properties of arterial stiffness, whose role is to dampen pressure and flow oscillations and to transform pulsatile flow and pressure in arteries into a steady flow and pressure in peripheral tissues. Stiffness is the reciprocal value of D. These parameters are BP dependent, and arteries become stiffer at high pressure. In to D which provides information about the of artery as a hollow structure, the elastic incremental modulus (Einc) characterizes the properties of the arterial wall biomaterials, independently of vessel geometry. As an alternative, arterial D can be evaluated by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) which increases with the stiffening of arteries. Arterial stiffening increases left ventricular (LV) afterload and alters the coronary perfusion. With increased PWV, the WR impacts on the aorta during systole, increasing systolic pressures and myocardial oxygen consumption, and decreasing diastolic BP and coronary flow. The arterial stiffness is altered primarily in association with increased collagen content and alterations of extracellular matrix (arteriosclerosis) as classically observed during aging or in arterial hypertension. The arterial stiffening estimated by changes in aortic PWV and intensity of WR are independent predictors of survival in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and general population. Improvement of arterial stiffening could be obtained by antihypertensive treatmen as observed with the calcium

  6. Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Daniel A.; Gyan, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background. Increased arterial stiffness is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in diabetes patients and general population. However, the contribution of diabetes to arterial stiffness is often masked by coexistent obesity and hypertension. In this study, we assessed arterial stiffness in nonhypertensive, nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in Ghana. Methods. In case-control design, 166 nonhypertensive, nonobese participants, comprising 96 T2DM patients and 70 nondiabetes controls, were recruited. Peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) indices were measured, and arterial stiffness was assessed as aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVao), augmentation index (AIx), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (haPWV). Results. With similar peripheral and central BP indices, T2DM patients had higher PWVao (8.3 ± 1 versus 7.8 ± 1.3, p = 0.044) and CAVI (7.9 ± 1.2 versus 6.9 ± 0.7, p = 0.021) than nondiabetic control. AIx and haPWV were similar between T2DM and nondiabetic controls. Multiple regression models showed that, in the entire study participants, the major determinants of PWVao were diabetes status, age, gender, systolic BP, and previous smoking status (β = 0.22, 0.36, 0.48, 0.21, and 0.25, resp.; all p < 0.05); the determinants of CAVI were diabetes status, age, BMI, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and previous smoking status (β = 0.21, 0.38, 0.2, 0.18, 0.24. 0.2, −0.19, and 0.2, resp.; all p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our findings suggest that nonhypertensive, nonobese T2DM patients have increased arterial stiffness without appreciable increase in peripheral and central pressure indices. PMID:27774104

  7. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra A.; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo I.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  8. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension.

  9. Hypertension and arterial stiffness in heart transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Neto, João David; de Oliveira, Ítalo Martins; Lima-Rocha, Hermano Alexandre; Oliveira-Lima, José Wellington; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Post-transplantation hypertension is prevalent and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and subsequent graft dysfunction. The present study aimed to identify the factors associated with arterial stiffness as measured by the ambulatory arterial stiffness index. METHODS: The current study used a prospective, observational, analytical design to evaluate a group of adult heart transplantation patients. Arterial stiffness was obtained by monitoring ambulatory blood pressure and using the ambulatory arterial stiffness index as the surrogate outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to control confounding. RESULTS: In a group of 85 adult heart transplantation patients, hypertension was independently associated with arterial stiffness (OR 4.98, CI 95% 1.06-23.4) as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure averages and nighttime descent. CONCLUSIONS: Measurement of ambulatory arterial stiffness index is a new, non-invasive method that is easy to perform, may contribute to better defining arterial stiffness prognosis and is associated with hypertension. PMID:27652829

  10. The conundrum of arterial stiffness, elevated blood pressure, and aging.

    PubMed

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Lakatta, Edward G

    2015-02-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is a major health burden that is expanding with the aging of our population. There is evidence that central arterial stiffness contributes to the rise in systolic blood pressure (SBP); at the same time, central arterial stiffening is accelerated in patients with increased SBP. This bidirectional relationship created a controversy in the field on whether arterial stiffness leads to hypertension or vice versa. Given the profound interdependency of arterial stiffness and blood pressure, this question seems intrinsically challenging, or probably naïve. The aorta's function of dampening the pulsatile flow generated by the left ventricle is optimal within a physiological range of distending pressure that secures the required distal flow, keeps the aorta in an optimal mechanical conformation, and minimizes cardiac work. This homeostasis is disturbed by age-associated, minute alterations in aortic hemodynamic and mechanical properties that induce short- and long-term alterations in each other. Hence, it is impossible to detect an "initial insult" at an epidemiological level. Earlier manifestations of these alterations are observed in young adulthood with a sharp decline in aortic strain and distensibility accompanied by an increase in diastolic blood pressure. Subsequently, aortic mechanical reserve is exhausted, and aortic remodeling with wall stiffening and dilatation ensue. These two phenomena affect pulse pressure in opposite directions and different magnitudes. With early remodeling, there is an increase in pulse pressure, due to the dominance of arterial wall stiffness, which in turn accelerates aortic wall stiffness and dilation. With advanced remodeling, which appears to be greater in men, the effect of diameter becomes more pronounced and partially offsets the effect of wall stiffness leading to plateauing in pulse pressure in men and slower increase in pulse pressure (PP) than that of wall stiffness in women. The complex nature of

  11. Arterial Stiffness in Children: Pediatric Measurement and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Savant, Jonathan D.; Furth, Susan L.; Meyers, Kevin E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a natural consequence of aging, accelerated in certain chronic conditions, and predictive of cardiovascular events in adults. Emerging research suggests the importance of arterial stiffness in pediatric populations. Methods There are different indices of arterial stiffness. The present manuscript focuses on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, although other methodologies are discussed. Also reviewed are specific measurement considerations for pediatric populations and the literature describing arterial stiffness in children with certain chronic conditions (primary hypertension, obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, hypercholesterolemia, genetic syndromes involving vasculopathy, and solid organ transplant recipients). Conclusions The measurement of arterial stiffness in children is feasible and, under controlled conditions, can give accurate information about the underlying state of the arteries. This potentially adds valuable information about the functionality of the cardiovascular system in children with a variety of chronic diseases well beyond that of the brachial artery blood pressure. PMID:26587447

  12. “Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621

  13. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  14. Arterial stiffness is higher in older adults with increased perceived fatigue and fatigability during walking.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; Wiberg, Matthew; Defferari, Elizabeth; Proctor, David N

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether central and/or peripheral arterial stiffness contributes to increased perceived fatigue during walking in mobility-intact older adults. Arterial stiffness of the common carotid artery and superficial femoral artery (SFA) was measured using Doppler-ultrasound in 45 community-dwelling women and men (60-78yrs). The change in perceived fatigue was measured after a fast-pace 400meter walk test. Adults that rated feeling more tired after walking (n=10) had higher SFA stiffness (p<0.01), but not carotid artery stiffness, than adults that reported feeling more energetic after walking (n=22). The change in perceived fatigue rating was normalized to energy expenditure during walking to determine perceived fatigability. Adults were divided into lower and higher perceived fatigability groups (n=22 per group). Carotid artery stiffness was not different between perceived fatigability groups after adjusting for age, sex, body fat, systolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, daily physical activity levels, and resting diameter. However, SFA stiffness was significantly elevated in the higher as compared to lower perceived fatigability group (β-index: 20.7±1.3 vs. 15.3±1.4U; p=0.02) after adjusting for the abovementioned variables. Moreover, stepwise regression identified SFA β-index to be an independent predictor of perceived fatigability (r(2)=0.38, p<0.01). These results suggest that peripheral arterial stiffness is independently associated with perceived fatigue and fatigability in older adults. PMID:25482474

  15. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined. PMID:26468262

  16. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined.

  17. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  18. Effects of Moderate-to-Severe Impairment of the Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate and of Proteinuria on the Central Hemodynamics and Arterial Stiffness in Middle-Aged Healthy Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Odaira, Mari; Matsumoto, Chisa; Yamada, Jiko; Yoshida, Masanobu; Shiina, Kazuki; Yamashina, Akira

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of moderate-to-severe impairment of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR: 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and of proteinuria on the central hemodynamics and the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 2244 middle-aged healthy Japanese men who were not receiving any medications for cardiovascular diseases or cardiovascular risk factors. The adjusted value of the radial augmentation index was higher in the subjects with proteinuria than in those without proteinuria. On the other hand, this value was similar between the subjects with and without moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR. Not only proteinuria but also moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR was associated with increase in the adjusted value of the brachial-ankle PWV. Thus, proteinuria was found to be an independent risk factor for abnormal central hemodynamics and increased stiffness of the large- to middle-sized arteries, while moderate-to-severe impairment of the eGFR was associated with an increase of the arterial stiffness, but not with abnormality of the central hemodynamics. PMID:21423551

  19. Arterial stiffness and its clinical implications in women.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Thais

    2014-07-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women is increasing, and CVD presently kills more North American women than men, highlighting the need for sex-specific research aimed at disentangling the complex interactions between sex, aging, and cardiovascular health. In the past decade, arterial stiffness has emerged as an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and mortality, and its noninvasive, safe evaluation makes it an attractive tool for a snapshot assessment of cardiovascular health. An increasing number of reports have documented greater aortic stiffness in older women than men, which appears to have close relationships with blood pressure control, diastolic dysfunction, impaired ventricular coupling, and left ventricular remodelling in women. Thus, arterial stiffness is thought to play a role in the female predominance of several diseases such as isolated systolic hypertension, refractory hypertension, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and paradoxical low-flow, low-gradient, normal ejection fraction severe aortic stenosis. Furthermore, greater arterial stiffness is a common characteristic of women who develop hypertensive complications of pregnancy. Thus, better understanding sex differences in arterial stiffness and aging might provide valuable insights into CVD in women, and help identify novel risk stratification tools and therapeutic targets. To this end, the present review aims at describing sex differences in arterial stiffness, exploring the potential role of sex hormones and menopause on arterial aging, and highlighting the role of arterial stiffness in specific CVDs that preferentially affect women.

  20. Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

  1. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  2. Estimation of Stiffness Parameter on the Common Carotid Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koya, Yoshiharu; Mizoshiri, Isao; Matsui, Kiyoaki; Nakamura, Takashi

    The arteriosclerosis is on the increase with an aging or change of our living environment. For that reason, diagnosis of the common carotid artery using echocardiogram is doing to take precautions carebropathy. Up to the present, several methods to measure stiffness parameter of the carotid artery have been proposed. However, they have analyzed at the only one point of common carotid artery. In this paper, we propose the method of analysis extended over a wide area of common carotid artery. In order to measure stiffness parameter of common carotid artery from echocardiogram, it is required to detect two border curves which are boundaries between vessel wall and blood. The method is composed of two steps. The first step is the detection of border curves, and the second step is the calculation of stiffness parameter using diameter of common carotid artery. Experimental results show the validity of the proposed method.

  3. Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina and arterial stiffness. Development and validation of a tool. The Vaso risk study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) shows a better correlation to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality than office blood pressure. A loss of arterial elasticity and an increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. Tools have been developed that allow estimation of the retinal arteriovenous index but not all studies coincide and there are contradictory results in relation to the evolution of the arteriosclerotic lesions and the caliber of the retinal vessels. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between peripheral and central arterial pressure (clinic and ambulatory) and vascular structure and function as evaluated by the carotid artery intima-media thickness, retina arteriovenous index, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial index in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. In turn, software is developed and validated for measuring retinal vessel thickness and automatically estimating the arteriovenous index. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study involving a control group will be made, with a posterior 4-year follow-up period in primary care. The study patients will be type 2 diabetics, with a control group of non-diabetic individuals. Consecutive sampling will be used to include 300 patients between 34-75 years of age and no previous cardiovascular disease, one-half being assigned to each group. Main measurements: age, gender, height, weight and abdominal circumference. Lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria, blood glucose, HbA1c, blood insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and endothelial dysfunction markers. Clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Carotid ultrasound to evaluate IMT, and retinography to evaluate the arteriovenous index. ECG to assess left ventricle hypertrophy, ankle-brachial index, and pulse wave analysis (PWA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) with the Sphigmocor System. Discussion We

  4. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  5. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision.

  6. Therapeutic modification of arterial stiffness: An update and comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Fen; Liu, Pang-Yen; Wu, Tsung-Jui; Hung, Yuan; Yang, Shih-Ping; Lin, Gen-Min

    2015-11-26

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a marker of cardiovascular disease and associated with long-term worse clinical outcomes in several populations. Age, hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia, known as traditional vascular risk factors, as well as diabetes, obesity, and systemic inflammation lead to both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. Targeting multiple modifiable risk factors has become the main therapeutic strategy to improve arterial stiffness in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Additionally to life style modifications, long-term ω-3 fatty acids (fish oil) supplementation in diet may improve arterial stiffness in the population with hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Pharmacological treatment such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, metformin, and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors were useful in individuals with hypertension and diabetes. In obese population with obstructive sleep apnea, weight reduction, aerobic exercise, and continuous positive airway pressure treatment may also improve arterial stiffness. In the populations with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, a use of antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha could work effectively. Other therapeutic options such as renal sympathetic nerve denervation for patients with resistant hypertension are investigated in many ongoing clinical trials. Therefore our comprehensive review provides knowledge in detail regarding many aspects of pathogenesis, measurement, and management of arterial stiffness in several populations, which would be helpful for physicians to make clinical decision. PMID:26635922

  7. Severity of Osteoarthritis Is Associated with Increased Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Kals, Jaak; Zilmer, Mihkel; Paapstel, Kaido; Märtson, Aare

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality. Evidence is lacking about whether arterial stiffness is involved in OA. The objective of our study was to find out associations between OA, arterial stiffness, and adipokines. Design. Seventy end-stage knee and hip OA patients (age 62 ± 7 years) and 70 asymptomatic controls (age 60 ± 7 years) were investigated using the applanation tonometry to determine their parameters of arterial stiffness. Serum adiponectin, leptin, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) levels were determined using the ELISA method. Correlation between variables was determined using Spearman's rho. Multiple regression analysis with a stepwise selection procedure was employed. Results. Radiographic OA grade was positively associated with increased carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) (r = 0.272, p = 0.023). We found that OA grade was also associated with leptin and MMP-3 levels (rho = −0.246, p = 0.040 and rho = 0.235, p = 0.050, resp.). In addition, serum adiponectin level was positively associated with augmentation index and inversely with large artery elasticity index (rho = 0.293, p = 0.006 and rho = −0.249, p = 0.003, resp.). Conclusions. Our results suggest that OA severity is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness and is correlated with expression of adipokines. Thus, increased arterial stiffness and adipokines might play an important role in elevated cardiovascular risk in end-stage OA. PMID:27493667

  8. Right Ventricular Myocardial Stiffness in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Andersen, Stine; Najafi, Aref; Gammelgaard Schultz, Jacob; da Silva Gonçalves Bós, Denielli; Handoko, M. Louis; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; Andersen, Asger; van der Velden, Jolanda; Ottenheijm, Coen A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contribution of fibrosis-mediated and myofibril-mediated stiffness in rats with mild and severe right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Methods and Results— By performing pulmonary artery banding of different diameters for 7 weeks, mild RV dysfunction (Ø=0.6 mm) and severe RV dysfunction (Ø=0.5 mm) were induced in rats. The relative contribution of fibrosis- and myofibril-mediated RV stiffness was determined in RV trabecular strips. Total myocardial stiffness was increased in trabeculae from both mild and severe RV dysfunction in comparison to controls. In severe RV dysfunction, increased RV myocardial stiffness was explained by both increased fibrosis-mediated stiffness and increased myofibril-mediated stiffness, whereas in mild RV dysfunction, only myofibril-mediated stiffness was increased in comparison to control. Histological analyses revealed that RV fibrosis gradually increased with severity of RV dysfunction, whereas the ratio of collagen I/III expression was only elevated in severe RV dysfunction. Stiffness measurements in single membrane-permeabilized RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated a gradual increase in RV myofibril stiffness, which was partially restored by protein kinase A in both mild and severe RV dysfunction. Increased expression of compliant titin isoforms was observed only in mild RV dysfunction, whereas titin phosphorylation was reduced in both mild and severe RV dysfunction. Conclusions— RV myocardial stiffness is increased in rats with mild and severe RV dysfunction. In mild RV dysfunction, stiffness is mainly determined by increased myofibril stiffness. In severe RV dysfunction, both myofibril- and fibrosis-mediated stiffness contribute to increased RV myocardial stiffness. PMID:27370069

  9. Arterial Stiffness: A Novel Risk Factor for Kidney Injury Progression?

    PubMed

    Georgianos, Panagiotis I; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Liakopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-08-01

    Arterial stiffness is typical feature of vascular remodeling in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Increased arterial stiffness raises flow and pressure pulsatility and is considered the principle pathogenic mechanism of isolated systolic hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, and congestive heart failure. Apart from the impact of arterial stiffness on left ventricular afterload, downstream transmission of pressure pulsatility to the level of microcirculation is suggested to promote injury of other susceptible organs. This may be of particular importance for kidney injury progression, since passive renal perfusion along with low resistance and input impedance in renal microvessels make kidneys particularly vulnerable to the damaging effect of systemic pulsatile pressure. Recent studies have provided evidence that arterial stiffness culminates in elevated pulsatility and resistance in renal microvasculature, promoting structural damage of small intra-renal arterioles. Further, prospective observational studies have shown that reduced aortic compliance is closely associated with the annual rate of renal function decline and represents independent predictor of kidney injury progression to end-stage renal disease among patients with CKD. This article provides insights into the cross-talk between macrocirculation and renal microcirculation and summarizes the currently available clinical evidence linking increased arterial stiffness with kidney disease progression.

  10. Skinfold thickness as a predictor of arterial stiffness: obesity and fatness linked to higher stiffness measurements in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Ali; Bulucu, Fatih; Kalafat, Firdevs; Cakar, Mustafa; Demirbas, Seref; Karaman, Murat; Ay, Seyid Ahmet; Saglam, Kenan; Balta, Sevket; Demirkol, Sait; Arslan, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have strong evidence of endothelial dysfunction. Some novel endothelial dysfunction parameters such as pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), and central aortic pressure (CAP) have been investigated as predictive markers of atherosclerosis. It is well known that obesity has relationships with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate relationships between anthropometric measurements and arterial stiffness parameters in essentially hypertensive patients. The study population included 100 patients (56 females, 44 males) newly or formerly diagnosed as essentially hypertensive in an outpatient clinic. Arterial stiffness measurements, including PWV, AIx, CAP, and body mass index (BMI); waist circumference, hip circumference; waist/hip ratio; and triceps, biceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfold thicknesses were also applied to all the study patients. Then, the relationships between BMI, anthropometric measurements, and arterial stiffness parameters were investigated. The mean systolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 135.85 ± 15.27 mm Hg and the mean diastolic arterial blood pressure of the study population was 84.17 ± 9.58 mm Hg. The parameters such as PWV, AIx, and CAP measured for arterial stiffness had correlations between BMI and different anthropometric measurements. The statistically significant correlations were present between PWV and triceps skinfold thickness (TST) (r = 0.377, P < .001) and it was also seen when regression analysis was performed (PWV = 6.41 + [0.072 × TST]; R(2) = 0.142, F[1-98] = 16.23, P < .001). Triceps skinfold thickness among these correlations may be used to estimate the carotid-femoral PWV, which is an indicator of subclinical organ damage due to hypertension.

  11. Modifiable Risk Factors for Increased Arterial Stiffness in Outpatient Nephrology

    PubMed Central

    Elewa, Usama; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz; Alegre, Raquel; Sanchez-Niño, Maria D.; Mahillo-Fernández, Ignacio; Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; El-Fishawy, Hussein; Belal, Dawlat; Ortiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. Arterial stiffness increases with age. However, modifiable risk factors such as smoking, BP and salt intake also impact on PWV. The finding of modifiable risk factors may lead to the identification of treatable factors, and, thus, is of interest to practicing nephrologist. We have now studied the prevalence and correlates of arterial stiffness, assessed by PWV, in 191 patients from nephrology outpatient clinics in order to identify modifiable risk factors for arterial stiffness that may in the future guide therapeutic decision-making. PWV was above normal levels for age in 85/191 (44.5%) patients. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, systolic BP, diabetes mellitus, serum uric acid and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy or calcium-containing medication were independent predictors of PWV. A new parameter, Delta above upper limit of normal PWV (Delta PWV) was defined to decrease the weight of age on PWV values. Delta PWV was calculated as (measured PWV) - (upper limit of the age-adjusted PWV values for the general population). Mean±SD Delta PWV was 0.76±1.60 m/sec. In multivariate analysis, systolic blood pressure, active smoking and calcium polystyrene sulfonate therapy remained independent predictors of higher delta PWV, while age, urinary potassium and beta blocker therapy were independent predictors of lower delta PWV. In conclusion, arterial stiffness was frequent in nephrology outpatients. Systolic blood pressure, smoking, serum uric acid, calcium-containing medications, potassium metabolism and non-use of beta blockers are modifiable factors associated with increased arterial stiffness in Nephrology outpatients. PMID:25880081

  12. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  13. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4-15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4-8; 8-12; 12-15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children.

  14. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  15. The Contribution of Osteoprogenitor Cells to Arterial Stiffness and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pikilidou, Maria; Yavropoulou, Maria; Antoniou, Maria; Yovos, John

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension, the major cause of cardiovascular disease, is bidirectionally linked to arterial stiffness. Evidence shows that vascular calcification, either medial or intimal, induces arterial stiffening further worsening hypertension parallel to substantially increasing cardiovascular risk. The disturbance in the bone-vascular axis that leads to the increase of calcium deposition in the arterial wall may be the result of a shift in the functionality of bone marrow-derived circulating stem cells with a calcifying potential, namely osteoprogenitor cells. These cells deposit bone matrix proteins in the vascular wall that can subsequently become mineralized. The current notion is that these cells derive from diverse cell lines. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of progenitor cells with a calcifying potential on arterial calcification, stiffness and hypertension.

  16. Acute Effect on Arterial Stiffness after Performing Resistance Exercise by Using the Valsalva Manoeuvre during Exertion

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Wai Yip Vincent; Lai, Wai Keung Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background. Performing resistance exercise could lead to an increase in arterial stiffness. Objective. We investigate the acute effect on arterial stiffness by performing Valsalva manoeuvre during resistance exercise. Materials and Methods. Eighteen healthy young men were assigned to perform bicep curls by using two breathing techniques (exhalation and Valsalva manoeuvre during muscle contraction) on two separate study days. Carotid pulsed wave velocity (cPWV) was measured as an indicator to reflect the body central arterial stiffness using a high-resolution ultrasound system, and its value was monitored repeatedly at three predefined time intervals: before resistance exercise, immediately after exercise, and 15 minutes after exercise. Results. At the 0th minute after resistance exercise was performed using the Valsalva manoeuvre during exertion, a significant increase in cPWV (4.91 m/s ± 0.52) compared with the baseline value (4.67 m/s ± 0.32, P = 0.008) was observed, and then it nearly returned to its baseline value at the 15th minute after exercise (4.66 m/s ± 0.44, P = 0.010). These findings persisted after adjusting for age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Conclusion. Our result suggests short duration of resistance exercise may provoke a transient increase in central arterial stiffness in healthy young men. PMID:26539481

  17. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (P<0.0001). In 348 randomly recruited Chinese subjects, AASI correlated (P<0.0001) with CAIx (r=0.48), PAIx (r=0.50), and central pulse pressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (P<0.0001) closely with CAIx and PAIx than 24-hour pulse pressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively. PMID:16432048

  18. Genetic impact dominates over environmental effects in development of carotid artery stiffness: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Osztovits, János; Pintér, Alexandra; Littvay, Levente; Cseh, Domonkos; Tárnoki, Adám D; Tárnoki, Dávid L; Jermendy, Adám L; Steinbach, Rita; Métneki, Júlia; Schillaci, Giuseppe; Kollai, Márk; Jermendy, György

    2014-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and all-cause mortality. Quantifying the genetic influence on the stiff arterial phenotype allows us to better predict the development of arterial stiffness. In this study, we aimed to determine the heritability of carotid artery stiffness in healthy twins. We studied 98 twin pairs of both sexes. We determined carotid artery stiffness locally using echo tracking and applanation tonometry. We estimated the heritability of stiffness parameters using structural equation modeling. The carotid distensibility coefficient showed the highest heritability (64%, 95% confidence interval 45-77%). The incremental elastic modulus, compliance and stiffness index β also showed substantial heritability (62%, 61% and 58%, respectively). The remaining 36-42% phenotypic variance was attributed to unshared environmental effects. Genetic influence appears to dominate over environmental factors in the development of carotid artery stiffness. Environmental factors may have an important role in favorably influencing the genetic predisposition for accelerated arterial stiffening.

  19. Effect of Simvastatin on Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Statin Myalgia

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Kevin D.; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.; Taylor, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce arterial stiffness but are also associated with mild muscle complaints. It is unclear whether individuals with muscle symptoms experience the same vascular benefit or whether statins affect striated and smooth muscle cells differently. We examined the effect of simvastatin treatment on arterial stiffness in patients who did versus those who did not exhibit muscle symptoms. Patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints (n = 115) completed an 8 wk randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial of daily simvastatin 20 mg and placebo. Serum lipids and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were assessed before and after each treatment. Muscle symptoms with daily simvastatin treatment were reported by 38 patients (33%). Compared to baseline, central PWV decreased (P = 0.01) following simvastatin treatment but not placebo (drug ∗ time interaction: P = 0.047). Changes in central PWV with simvastatin treatment were not influenced by myalgia status or time on simvastatin (P ≥ 0.15). Change in central PWV after simvastatin treatment was inversely correlated with age (r = −0.207, P = 0.030), suggesting that advancing age is associated with enhanced statin-mediated arterial destiffening. In patients with a history of statin-related muscle complaints, the development of myalgia with short-term simvastatin treatment did not attenuate the improvement in arterial stiffness. PMID:26257959

  20. Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Arterial Stiffness in Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Nichols, Wilmer W.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease, is increased in aging, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) may contribute to oxidative stress and arterial stiffness in healthy older adults. To test the hypothesis that short-term MR blockade may reduce oxidative stress and improve arterial stiffness, we conducted a randomized, double blind, crossover study using the selective MR blocker Eplerenone or placebo in 23 older adults (age, 64±1 years; mean±SE) free from overt cardiovascular and other clinical disease (e.g, diabetes, renal and liver disease). In response to MR blockade, brachial and carotid blood pressure decreased (P≤0.01). However, MR blockade had no effect on oxidative stress (oxidized LDL, 61.2±6.8 vs. 62.4±7.4 U/L, P=0.9; placebo vs. Eplerenone) and arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), 9.17±1.19 vs. 8.92±1.19 m/sec, P=0.5; leg PWV, 13.45±0.45 vs. 12.81±0.47 m/sec, P=0.3; arm PWV, 11.43±0.62 vs. 11.73±0.68 m/sec, P=0.7; carotid artery compliance, 0.150±0.013 vs. 0.149±0.014 mm2/mmHg, P=0.8; distensibility, 23.1±1.8 vs. 23.3±1.7 10−3/kPa, P=0.8; β stiffness index, 3.5±0.3 vs. 3.6±0.3, P=0.6; and augmentation index, 16.0±2.2 vs. 15.6±2.8 %, P=0.8). These results provide the first evidence that MR do not appear to contribute to oxidative stress in human aging and that short-term MR blockade does not result in reduced oxidative stress and improved arterial stiffness. PMID:23707930

  1. Cystatin C Associates with Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Madero, Magdalena; Wassel, Christina L.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Najjar, Samer S.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Fried, Linda; Canada, Robert; Newman, Anne; Shlipak, Michael G.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Large arteries commonly become stiff in kidney failure, but few studies have investigated arterial stiffness in earlier stages of kidney disease. We evaluated the association between kidney function and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and its potential modification by race, diabetes, or coronary heart disease in older adults. We measured aPWV in 2468 participants in the Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study; mean age was 73.7 yr, 40% were black, and 24% had diabetes. After categorizing kidney function into three groups on the basis of cystatin C level, multivariable analysis revealed that the medium and high cystatin C groups associated with a 5.3% (95% confidence interval 0.8 to 10.0%) and 8.0% (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 14.1%) higher aPWV than the low cystatin C group; however, chronic kidney disease, as defined by estimated GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, did not significantly associate with aPWV. We did not identify interactions between cystatin C and race, diabetes, or coronary heart disease. In conclusion, stiffness of large arteries, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, may partially mediate the association between cystatin C and cardiovascular risk in older adults. PMID:19357259

  2. Arterial Stiffness, Oxidative Stress, and Smoke Exposure in Wildland Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Denise M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Hughes, Michael D.; Chang, Chiung-Yu; Law, Brandon F.; Campbell, Corey R.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Kales, Stefanos F.; Chertok, Marcia; Kobzik, Lester; Nguyen, Phuongson; O’Donnell, Carl R.; Kiefer, Max; Wagner, Gregory R.; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between exposure, oxidative stress, symptoms, and cardiorespiratory function in wildland firefighters. Methods We studied two Interagency Hotshot Crews with questionnaires, pulse wave analysis for arterial stiffness, spirometry, urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the smoke exposure marker (urinary levoglucosan). Arterial stiffness was assessed by examining levels of the aortic augmentation index, expressed as a percentage. An oxidative stress score comprising the average of z-scores created for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane was calculated. Results Mean augmentation index % was higher for participants with higher oxidative stress scores after adjusting for smoking status. Specifically for every one unit increase in oxidative stress score the augmentation index % increased 10.5% (95% CI: 2.5, 18.5%). Higher mean lower respiratory symptom score was associated with lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity. Conclusions Biomarkers of oxidative stress may serve as indicators of arterial stiffness in wildland firefighters. PMID:24909863

  3. Aerobic, resistance and combined exercise training on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlei; Hanssen, Henner; Cordes, Mareike; Rossmeissl, Anja; Endes, Simon; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has different effects on arterial stiffness according to training modalities. The optimal exercise modality for improvement of arterial function in normotensive and hypertensive individuals has not been well established. In this review, we aim to evaluate the effects of aerobic, resistance and combined aerobic and resistance training on arterial stiffness in individuals with and without hypertension. We systematically searched the Pubmed and Web of Science database from 1985 until December 2013 for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The data were extracted by one investigator and checked by a second investigator. The training effects on arterial stiffness were estimated using weighted mean differences of the relative changes (%) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We finally reviewed the results from 17 RCTs. The available evidence indicates that aerobic exercise tends to have a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive patients, but does not affect arterial stiffness in patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Resistance exercise has differing effects on arterial stiffness depending on type and intensity. Vigorous resistance training is associated with an increase in arterial stiffness. There seem to be no unfavourable effects on arterial stiffness if the training is of low intensity, in a slow eccentric manner or with lower limb in healthy individuals. Combined training has neutral or even a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness. In conclusion, our review shows that exercise training has varying effects on arterial stiffness depending on the exercise modalities.

  4. Aerobic, resistance and combined exercise training on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive adults: A review.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlei; Hanssen, Henner; Cordes, Mareike; Rossmeissl, Anja; Endes, Simon; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has different effects on arterial stiffness according to training modalities. The optimal exercise modality for improvement of arterial function in normotensive and hypertensive individuals has not been well established. In this review, we aim to evaluate the effects of aerobic, resistance and combined aerobic and resistance training on arterial stiffness in individuals with and without hypertension. We systematically searched the Pubmed and Web of Science database from 1985 until December 2013 for relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The data were extracted by one investigator and checked by a second investigator. The training effects on arterial stiffness were estimated using weighted mean differences of the relative changes (%) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We finally reviewed the results from 17 RCTs. The available evidence indicates that aerobic exercise tends to have a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness in normotensive and hypertensive patients, but does not affect arterial stiffness in patients with isolated systolic hypertension. Resistance exercise has differing effects on arterial stiffness depending on type and intensity. Vigorous resistance training is associated with an increase in arterial stiffness. There seem to be no unfavourable effects on arterial stiffness if the training is of low intensity, in a slow eccentric manner or with lower limb in healthy individuals. Combined training has neutral or even a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness. In conclusion, our review shows that exercise training has varying effects on arterial stiffness depending on the exercise modalities. PMID:25251989

  5. The physiological impact of the nonlinearity of arterial elasticity in the ambulatory arterial stiffness index.

    PubMed

    Craiem, Damian; Graf, Sebastian; Salvucci, Fernando; Chironi, Gilles; Megnien, Jean-Louis; Simon, Alain; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2010-07-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is claimed to be a new estimator for arterial rigidity. It was recently defined as one minus the slope of the linear regression of systolic to diastolic ambulatory pressure during 24 h. Although several reports testify its clinical relevance, the explanation of how this new index is conceptually associated with arterial stiffness remains controversial. In this work we hypothesize that nonlinear arterial elasticity is behind AASI physiological principles. To that end, random number generators were used to emulate arterial cross-sectional area (CSA) during 24 h. Pressure values were calculated using linear and nonlinear elasticity models for rigid and compliant arteries. The AASI was calculated from simulated pressures and also analytically predicted for each model. Additionally, invasive aortic pressure and CSA were continuously measured in a conscious sheep during 24 h to test the nonlinear model. We found that analytical solutions agreed with simulation outcomes; for the nonlinear model, the AASI was higher in rigid arteries with respect to compliant arteries (0.51 versus 0.38) and the linear model systematically predicted AASI = 0. For in vivo pressure measurements, AASI was 0.31. Using the measured pulsatile CSA and an estimation of the elastic constant for the nonlinear model, the AASI was accurately predicted with errors below 5%. We conclude that the AASI is higher in stiffer arteries due to the nonlinear behavior of the arterial wall. With a nonlinear arterial function, the slope of the linear regression of diastolic to systolic pressures during 24 h depends on the product of an elastic constant by the pulsatile CSA. As the elastic constant dominates the product, the reported associations between the AASI and arterial stiffness indices now have a consistent explanation.

  6. Effect of passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers versus non-smokers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, N. E.; Ganio, M. S.; Burchfield, J. M.; Tucker, M. A.; Gonzalez, M. A.; Dougherty, E. K.; Robinson, F. B.; Ridings, C. B.; Veilleux, J. C.

    2016-04-01

    In non-smokers, passive heat stress increases shear stress and vasodilation, decreasing arterial stiffness. Smokers, who reportedly have arterial dysfunction, may have similar improvements in arterial stiffness with passive heat stress. Therefore, we examined the effects of an acute bout of whole-body passive heat stress on arterial stiffness in smokers vs. non-smokers. Thirteen smokers (8.8 ± 5.5 [median = 6] cigarettes per day for >4 years) and 13 non-smokers matched for age, mass, height, and exercise habits (27 ± 8 years; 78.8 ± 15.4 kg; 177.6 ± 6.7 cm) were passively heated to 1.5 °C core temperature ( T C) increase. At baseline and each 0.5 °C T C increase, peripheral (pPWV) and central pulse wave velocity (cPWV) were measured via Doppler ultrasound. No differences existed between smokers and non-smokers for any variables (all p > 0.05), except cPWV slightly increased from baseline (526.7 ± 81.7 cm · s-1) to 1.5 °C Δ T C (579.7 ± 69.8 cm · s-1; p < 0.005), suggesting heat stress acutely increased central arterial stiffness. pPWV did not change with heating (grand mean: baseline = 691.9 ± 92.9 cm · s-1; 1.5 °C Δ T C = 691.9 ± 79.5 cm · s-1; p > 0.05). Changes in cPWV and pPWV during heating correlated ( p < 0.05) with baseline PWV in smokers (cPWV: r = -0.59; pPWV: r = -0.62) and non-smokers (cPWV: r = -0.45; pPWV: r = -0.77). Independent of smoking status, baseline stiffness appears to mediate the magnitude of heating-induced changes in arterial stiffness.

  7. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 ± 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 ± 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 ± 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 ± 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 ± 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 ± 1.1 vs 6.8 ± 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease. PMID:26761621

  8. Increased arterial wall stiffness and thickness in medium-sized arteries in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, T; Neubauer, B

    1988-01-01

    By means of ultrasonography, arterial wall stiffness, arterial wall thickness, and the elastic modulus of the common femoral artery were estimated in a group of 19 young insulin-dependent diabetics. The ultrasound technique for determination of these parameters is described as well as the echo-anatomy of the arterial wall. In accordance with a previous investigation a significant rise in arterial wall stiffness was found. Furthermore, there was a highly significant correlation between the stiffness and the thickness of the arterial wall. The elastic modulus also correlated to the stiffness. It is concluded that the diabetic macroangiopathy is characterized by an increased stiffness of the arterial wall caused by increased thickness as well as by progressive alterations of the elastic characteristics of the wall tissue. Possible pathogenetic reasons are discussed.

  9. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness.

  10. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. PMID:27651842

  11. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. PMID:27651842

  12. Arterial Stiffness in Patients Taking Second-generation Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Fındıklı, Ebru; Gökçe, Mustafa; Nacitarhan, Vedat; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Hüseyin Avni; Kardaş, Selçuk; Şahin, Merve Coşgun; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objective That treatment with second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) causes metabolic side effects and atherosclerosis in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) is well-known. Increased arterial stiffness is an important marker of arteriosclerosis and has been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We measured pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arteriosclerosis in patients with schizophrenia and BD who use SGAs. Methods Patients and controls were collected from our psychiatry outpatient clinics or family medicine. Mental illness was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. Mean age, gender, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Framingham risk score (FRS), etc. were determined. Simultaneous electrocardiography and pulse wave were recorded with an electromyography device. The photo-plethysmographic method was used to record the pulse wave. Inclusion criteria included use of SGAs for at least the last six months. Patients with diseases that are known to cause stiffness and the use of typical antipsychotics were excluded. Results Ninety-six subject (56 patients, 40 controls) were included in our study. There were 49 females, 47 males. Patients had schizophrenia (n=17) and BD (n=39). Their treatments were quetiapine (n=15), risperidone (n=13), olanzapine (n=15), and aripiprazole (n=13). Although differences in mean age, gender, and FRS in the patient and control groups were not statistically significant (p=1), PWV was greater in patients in the antipsychotic group (p=0.048). Conclusion This study supported the liability to stiffness in patients with schizophrenia and BD. Using SGAs may contribute to arterial stiffness in these patients. PMID:27776389

  13. The effects of single hemodialysis session on arterial stiffness in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Öğünç, Handan; Akdam, Hakan; Alp, Alper; Gencer, Fatih; Akar, Harun; Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz

    2015-07-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in hemodialysis patients is a strong predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), which are markers of arterial stiffness, were used to determine the severity of vascular damage noninvasively. This study aimed to investigate the effects of solute volume removal and hemodynamic changes on PWV and AIx of a single hemodialysis session. Thirty hemodialysis patients were enrolled in the study. Before initiation of hemodialysis, every 15 minutes during hemodialysis, and 30 minutes after the completion of the session, measurements of PWV and AIx@75 (normalized with heart rate 75 bpm) were obtained from each patient. Body composition was analyzed by bioimpedance spectroscopy device before and 30 minutes after completion of the hemodialysis session. During the hemodialysis, no significant change was observed in AIx@75. However, PWV decreased steadily during the session reaching statistically significant level at 135th minute (P = 0.026), with a maximal drop at 210th minute (P < 0.001). At 210th minute, decrease in PWV correlated positively with the decrease in central systolic blood pressure, central diastolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, augmentation pressure, and AIx@75. Multiple regression analysis showed that decrease in PWV at 210th minute was associated with decrease in central systolic blood pressure and central pulse pressure. Ultrafiltration during hemodialysis had no significant effect on PWV and AIx@75. Delta urea correlated positively with delta PWV at 240th minute. A significant decrease in PWV was observed during hemodialysis and correlated with urea reduction; however, we were unable to document any effect of volume removal on arterial stiffness.

  14. An update on the role of adipokines in arterial stiffness and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Andréa R; Fontana, Vanessa; Laurent, Stephane; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-03-01

    Adipokines are hormones produced by adipocytes and have been involved in multiple pathologic pathways, including inflammatory and cardiovascular complications in essential hypertension. Arterial stiffness is a frequent vascular complication that represents increased cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. Adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin, might be implicated in hypertension, as well as in vascular alterations associated with this condition. Arterial stiffness has proven to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. Obesity and target-organ damage such as arterial stiffness are features associated with hypertension. This review aims to update the association between adipokines and arterial stiffness in essential and resistant hypertension (RHTN).

  15. Aerobic exercise training increases plasma Klotho levels and reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Tomoko; Miyaki, Asako; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Ra, Song-Gyu; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Satoshi; Maeda, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The Klotho gene is a suppressor of the aging phenomena, and the secretion as well as the circulation of Klotho proteins decrease with aging. Although habitual exercise has antiaging effects (e.g., a decrease in arterial stiffness), the relationship between Klotho and habitual exercise remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of habitual exercise on Klotho, with a particular focus on arterial stiffness. First, we examined the correlation between plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and β-stiffness index) or aerobic exercise capacity [oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (VT)] in 69 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) by conducting a cross-sectional study. Second, we tested the effects of aerobic exercise training on plasma Klotho concentrations and arterial stiffness. A total of 19 healthy, postmenopausal women (50-76 years old) were divided into two groups: control group and exercise group. The exercise group completed 12 wk of moderate aerobic exercise training. In the cross-sectional study, plasma Klotho concentrations positively correlated with carotid artery compliance and VT and negatively correlated with the β-stiffness index. In the interventional study, aerobic exercise training increased plasma Klotho concentrations and carotid artery compliance and decreased the β-stiffness index. Moreover, the changes in plasma Klotho concentration and arterial stiffness were found to be correlated. These results suggest a possible role for secreted Klotho in the exercise-induced modulation of arterial stiffness.

  16. Linking systemic arterial stiffness among adolescents to adverse childhood experiences.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; O'Leary, Deborah D; Cairney, John; Wade, Terrance J

    2016-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked with cardiovascular disease and early mortality among adults. Most research examines this relationship retrospectively. Examining the association between ACEs and children's cardiovascular health is required to understand the time course of this association. We examined the relationship between ACEs exposure and ECG-to-toe pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of systemic arterial stiffness that is strongly related to cardiovascular mortality among adults. PWV (distance/transit time; m/s) was calculated using transit times from the ECG R-wave to the pulse wave contour at the toe. Transit times were collected over 15 heartbeats and the distance from the sternal notch to the left middle toe was used. A total of 221 children (119 females) aged 10-14 years participated in data collection of PWV, hemodynamic and anthropometric variables. Parents of these children completed a modified inventory of ACEs taken from the Childhood Trust Events Survey. Multivariable regression assessed the relationship between ACEs group (<4 ACEs versus ≥4 ACEs) and PWV. Analyses yielded an ACEs group by sex interaction, with males who experienced four or more ACEs having higher PWV (p<0.01). This association was independent of hemodynamic, anthropometric and sociodemographic variables (R(2)=0.346; p<0.01). Four or more ACEs is associated with greater arterial stiffness in male children aged 10-14 years. Addressing stress and trauma exposure in childhood is an important target for public health interventions to reduce early cardiovascular risk. PMID:27107504

  17. Blood pressure and arterial stiffness in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hvidt, Kristian Nebelin

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, elevated blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness are risk factors for cardiovascular disease. A strong relationship exists between obesity and elevated BP in both children and adults. Obesity and elevated BP in childhood track into adult life increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ambulatory BP is the most precise measure to evaluate the BP burden, whereas carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating arterial (i.e. aortic) stiffness. These measures might contribute to a better understanding of obesity's adverse impact on the cardiovascular system, and ultimately a better prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to investigate arterial stiffness and 24-hour BP in obese children and adolescents, and evaluate whether these measures are influenced by weight reduction. The present PhD thesis is based on four scientific papers.  In a cross-sectional design, 104 severe obese children and adolescents with an age of 10-18 years were recruited when newly referred to the Children's Obesity Clinic, Holbæk University Hospital, and compared to 50 normal weighted age and gender matched control individuals. Ambulatory BP was measured, and cfPWV was investigated in two ways in respect to the distance measure of aorta; the previously recommended length - the so called subtracted distance, and the currently recommended length - the direct distance. In a longitudinal design, the obese patients were re-investigated after one-year of lifestyle intervention at the Children's Obesity Clinic in purpose of reducing the degree of obesity. In the cross-sectional design, the obese group had higher measures of obesity, while matched for age, gender and height, when compared to the control group. In the longitudinal design, 74% of the 72 followed up obese patients experienced a significant weight reduction. CfPWV was dependent on the method used to measure the

  18. Can arterial stiffness parameters be measured in the sitting position?

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, Jens; Michalski, Rene; Türk, Tobias R; Opazo Saez, Anabelle; Witzke, Oliver; Kribben, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Despite the introduction of arterial stiffness measurements in the European recommendation, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are still not used routinely in clinical practice. It would be of advantage if such measurements were done in the sitting position as is done for blood pressure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there is a difference in stiffness parameters in sitting vs. supine position. Arterial stiffness was measured in 24 healthy volunteers and 20 patients with cardiovascular disease using three different devices: SphygmoCor (Atcor Medical, Sydney, Australia), Arteriograph (TensioMed, Budapest, Hungary) and Vascular Explorer (Enverdis, Jena, Germany). Three measurements were performed in supine position followed by three measurements in sitting position. Methods were compared using correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. There was a significant correlation between PWV in supine and sitting position (Arteriograph: P<0.0001, r=0.93; Vascular Explorer; P<0.0001, r=0.87). There were significant correlations between AI sitting and AI supine using Arteriograph (P<0.0001, r=0.97), Vascular Explorer (P<0.0001, r=0.98) and SphygmoCor (P<0.0001, r=0.96). When analyzed by Bland-Altman, PWV and AI measurements in supine vs. sitting showed good agreement. There was no significant difference in PWV obtained with the three different devices (Arteriograph 7.5±1.6 m s(-1), Vascular Explorer 7.3±0.9 m s(-1), SphygmoCor 7.0±1.8 m s(-1)). AI was significantly higher using the Arteriograph (17.6±15.0%) than Vascular Explorer and SphygmoCor (10.2±15.1% and 10.3±18.1%, respectively). The close agreement between sitting and supine measurements suggests that both PWV and AI can be reliably measured in the sitting position.

  19. Effects of Allopurinol on Arterial Stiffness: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Qiu, Zhandong; Li, Dayong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have tested the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness, but the results have been inconclusive. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to investigate the impacts of allopurinol treatment on arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx). Material/Methods Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of allopurinol on arterial stiffness were identified through searching PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library for Central Register of Clinical Trials, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure up to December 2015. The primary endpoints were the change of PWV and AIx after allopurinol treatment. The weighted mean difference (WMD) or standardized mean difference (SMD) and the 95% confidence interval (CI) of each study were pooled for meta-analysis. Results A total of 11 RCTs met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final meta-analysis. Eight RCTs with 1,111 patients were pooled for PWV; eight RCTs with 397 patients were pooled for PWV. Allopurinol administration did not significantly change PWV (WMD=−0.19 m/s, 95% CI: −0.49 to 0.12, Z=1.21, p=0.23), but significantly reduced AIx (SMD=−0.34, 95% CI: −0.54 to −0.14, Z=3.35, p=0.0008). Conclusions Although our meta-analysis showed some favorable effects of allopurinol treatment on improving AIx, its impact on arterial stiffness must be tested in more large-scale RCTs. PMID:27110924

  20. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  1. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  2. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  3. Non-dipping blood pressure patterns and arterial stiffness parameters in patients with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gulperi; Yilmaz, Sema; Ergulu Esmen, Serpil

    2015-12-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis involving veins and arteries of various sizes. Non-dipping status, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity are important determinants of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the non-dipping status and arterial stiffness in patients with Behcet's disease. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the vascular parameters of 96 patients with Behcet's disease (53% female) and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The non-dipping status and arterial distensibility were assessed using a Mobil-O-Graph Arteriograph, an automatic oscillometric device. In total, 65.6% of 96 patients were systolic non-dippers, and 34.4% exhibited high augmentation indices. Ten percent of the control subjects were systolic non-dippers, and 11.7% exhibited high augmentation indices. Nocturnal decreases in systolic blood pressure correlated with central systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, as well as nocturnal decreases in diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, non-dipper patients with Behcet's disease exhibited higher nocturnal cardiac outputs than did dipper patients with Behcet's disease. Augmentation index correlated negatively with C-reactive protein and correlated positively with both 24 h and nocturnal peripheral resistance, as well as 24 h pulse wave velocity. The patients with high augmentation indices exhibited lower creatinine clearance, as well as lower nocturnal cardiac outputs, higher 24 h peripheral resistance and higher 24 h pulse wave velocities. Non-dipping status and arterial stiffness may exacerbate the harmful cardiovascular effects of the other. In addition to conventional risk factors, non-dipping status and arterial stiffness should be examined during the follow-up evaluations of patients with Behcet's disease.

  4. Cardiac Organ Damage and Arterial Stiffness in Autonomic Failure: Comparison With Essential Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Valeria; Maule, Simona; Di Stefano, Cristina; Tosello, Francesco; Totaro, Silvia; Veglio, Franco; Milan, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic failure (AF) is characterized by orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, and increased blood pressure (BP) variability. AF patients develop cardiac organ damage, similarly to essential hypertension (EH), and have higher arterial stiffness than healthy controls. Determinants of cardiovascular organ damage in AF are not well known: both BP variability and mean BP values may be involved. The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac organ damage, arterial stiffness, and central hemodynamics in AF, compared with EH subjects with similar 24-hour BP and a group of healthy controls, and to evaluate determinants of target organ damage in patients with AF. Twenty-seven patients with primary AF were studied (mean age, 65.7±11.2 years) using transthoracic echocardiography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, central hemodynamics, and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. They were compared with 27 EH subjects matched for age, sex, and 24-hour mean BP and with 27 healthy controls. AF and EH had similar left ventricular mass (101.6±33.3 versus 97.7±28.1 g/m(2), P=0.59) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (9.3±1.8 versus 9.2±3.0 m/s, P=0.93); both parameters were significantly lower in healthy controls (P<0.01). Compared with EH, AF patients had higher augmentation index (31.0±7.6% versus 26.1±9.2%, P=0.04) and central BP values. Nighttime systolic BP and 24-hour systolic BP predicted organ damage, independent of BP variability. AF patients develop hypertensive heart disease and increased arterial stiffness, similar to EH with comparable mean BP values. Twenty-four-hour and nighttime systolic BP were determinants of cardiovascular damage, independent of BP variability.

  5. A review of genetics, arterial stiffness, and blood pressure in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer L; Duprez, Daniel A; Barac, Ana; Rich, Stephen S

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans in the USA is among the highest in the world and increasing. The identification of genes and pathways regulating blood pressure in African Americans has been challenging. An early predictor of hypertension is arterial stiffness. The prevalence of arterial stiffness is significantly higher in African Americans compared to Caucasians. Approximately 20 % of the variance in arterial stiffness is estimated to be heritable. Identifying genes and biological pathways regulating arterial stiffness may provide insight into the genetics underlying the increased risk of hypertension in African Americans. This paper reviews the genetic findings to date in the area of arterial stiffness and blood pressure in African Americans with an emphasis on the current limitations and new efforts to move the field forward.

  6. Long Sleep Duration Associated With a Higher Risk of Increased Arterial Stiffness in Males

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsai-Chen; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: We aimed to examine the association between sleep duration and arterial stiffness among adults of different ages, because to date there has been only one study on this relationship, which was confined to middle-aged civil servants. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A health examination center in National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Taiwan. Participants: A total of 3,508 subjects, age 20–87 y, were enrolled after excluding those with a history of cerebrovascular events, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and taking lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensives, hypoglycemic agents, and anti-inflammatory drugs, from October 2006 to August 2009. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Sleep duration was classified into three groups: short (< 6 h), normal (6–8 h) and long (> 8 h). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV), and increased arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV ≥ 1400 cm/sec. The sleep duration was different for subjects with and without increased arterial stiffness in males, but not in females. In the multivariate analysis for males, long sleepers (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, P = 0.034) but not short sleepers (OR 0.98, P = 0.92) had a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness. In addition, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, cigarette smoking, and exercise were also independently associated factors. However, in females, neither short nor long sleep duration was associated with increased arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Long sleep duration was associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. Short sleepers did not exhibit a significant risk of increased arterial stiffness in either sex. Citation: Tsai TC, Wu JS, Yang YC, Huang YH, Lu FH, Chang CJ. Long sleep duration associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. SLEEP 2014

  7. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  8. Clinical assessment of arterial stiffness with cardio-ankle vascular index: theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Takahara, Akira; Shirai, Kohji

    2015-09-01

    Arterial stiffness is often assessed in clinical medicine, because it is not only an important factor in the pathophysiology of blood circulation but also a marker for the diagnosis and the prognosis of cardiovascular diseases. Many parameters have so far been proposed to quantitatively represent arterial stiffness and distensibility, such as pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep), stiffness parameter (β), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and vascular compliance (Cv). Among these, PWV has been most frequently applied to clinical medicine. However, this is dependent on blood pressure at the time of measurement, and therefore it is not appropriate as a parameter for the clinical evaluation of arterial stiffness, especially for the studies on hypertension. On the contrary, stiffness parameter β is an index reflecting arterial stiffness without the influence of blood pressure. Recently, this parameter has been applied to develop a new arterial stiffness index called cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). Although this index is obtained from the PWV between the heart and the ankle, it is essentially similar to the stiffness parameter β, and therefore it does not depend on blood pressure changes during the measurements. CAVI is being extensively used in clinical medicine as a measure for the evaluation of cardiovascular diseases and risk factors related to arteriosclerosis. In the present article, we will explain the theoretical background of stiffness parameter β and the process to obtain CAVI. And then, the clinical utility of CAVI will be overviewed by reference to recent studies.

  9. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  10. Stiffness Indices and Fractal Dimension relationship in Arterial Pressure and Diameter Time Series in-Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cymberknop, L.; Legnani, W.; Pessana, F.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The advent of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, is associated to significant alterations in the physical properties of arterial vessels. Evaluation of arterial biomechanical behaviour is related to the assessment of three representative indices: arterial compliance, arterial distensibility and arterial stiffness index. Elasticity is the most important mechanical property of the arterial wall, whose natures is strictly non-linear. Intervention of elastin and collagen fibres, passive constituent elements of the arterial wall, is related to the applied wall stress level. Concerning this, appropriate tools are required to analyse the temporal dynamics of the signals involved, in order to characterize the whole phenomenon. Fractal geometry can be mentioned as one of those techniques. The aim of this study consisted on arterial pressure and diameter signals processing, by means of nonlinear techniques based on fractal geometry. Time series morphology was related to different arterial stiffness states, generated by means of blood flow variations, during experiences performed in vitro.

  11. Acute effects of firefighting on arterial stiffness and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant; Rossow, Lindy M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Echols, George; Smith, Denise; Horn, Gavin P; Rowland, Thomas; Lane, Abbi; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac events are responsible for 40-50% of line-of-duty firefighter fatalities, yet the exact cause of these events is unknown. Likely, combinations of thermal, physical, and mental factors impair cardiovascular function and trigger such events. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of firefighting activities on vascular function. Sixty-nine young (28 ± 1 years) male firefighters underwent 3 hours of firefighting activities. Carotid, aortic, and brachial blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index (AIx), wave reflection timing (TR), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm reactive hyperemia (RH) were measured before and after firefighting activities. Paired samples t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) increases in aortic diastolic BP, HR, AIx, PWV, RH, and FBF, and significant decreases in brachial and aortic pulse pressure and TR following firefighting activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that 3 hours of firefighting activities increase both arterial stiffness and vasodilation.

  12. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness, Volume, and Nutritional Status in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Czyzewski, Lukasz; Wyzgal, Janusz; Czyzewska, Emilia; Kurowski, Andrzej; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Truszewski, Zenon; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2016-02-01

    Reduction of cardiovascular death might have a significant effect on the long-term survival rates of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). The aim of the study was to assess the relation between arterial stiffness and graft function, adipose tissue content, and hydration status in patients after kidney transplantation (KTx).The study included 83 RTR patients (mean age: 55 ± 13 years) who had been admitted to a nephrology-transplantation outpatient clinic 0.5 to 24 years after KTx. Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed and eGFR was calculated with the CKD-EPI formula. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all RTRs with pulse wave propagation velocity (PWV) with the use of a complior device. In addition, fluid and nutritional status was assessed with a Tanita BC 418 body composition analyzer. The control group consisted of 31 hospital workers who received no medication and had no history of cardiovascular disease.Multivariable linear regression analysis, with PWV as a dependent variable, retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) (B = 0.323; P = 0.004), age (B = 0.297; P = 0.005), tacrolimus therapy (B = -0.286; P = 0.004), and central DBP (B = 0.185; P = 0.041). Multivariable linear regression analysis with eGFR as a dependent variable retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model; creatinine concentration (B = -0.632; P = 0.000), hemoglobin (B = 0.280; P = 0.000), CRP (B = -0.172; P = 0.011), tacrolimus therapy (B = 0.142; P = 0.039), and triglycerides (B = -0.142; P = 0.035).Our data indicates that: kidney transplant recipients can present modifiable CVD risk factors linked to increased arterial stiffness, DBP, waist circumference, SCr, time on dialysis, CyA therapy, and visceral fat mass; RDW is a parameter associated with arterial stiffness; and parameters such as CyA therapy, time on

  13. A knowledge-based approach to arterial stiffness estimation using the digital volume pulse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae-Geun; Farooq, Umar; Park, Seung-Hun; Goh, Choong-Won; Hahn, Minsoo

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a knowledge based approach for arterial stiffness estimation. The proposed new approach reliably estimates arterial stiffness based on the analysis of age and heart rate normalized reflected wave arrival time. The proposed new approach reduces cost, space, technical expertise, specialized equipment, complexity, and increases the usability compared to recently researched noninvasive arterial stiffness estimators. The proposed method consists of two main stages: pulse feature extraction and linear regression analysis. The new approach extracts the pulse features and establishes a linear prediction equation. On evaluating proposed methodology with pulse wave velocity (PWV) based arterial stiffness estimators, the proposed methodology offered the error rate of 8.36% for men and 9.52% for women, respectively. With such low error rates and increased benefits, the proposed approach could be usefully applied as low cost and effective solution for ubiquitous and home healthcare environments.

  14. Arterial stiffness: a novel cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Georgianos, Panagiotis I; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; Lasaridis, Anastasios N

    2015-01-01

    Prospective observational studies have shown that arterial stiffness is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. Recent evidence further supports that arterial hardening predicts cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in peritoneal dialysis patients, renal transplant recipients and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) not on dialysis. Of note, dissociation of arterial stiffness with blood pressure reduction were related to worsened cardiovascular outcome in kidney disease patients, suggesting that arterial stiffness may not only be a predictor, but also a true risk factor, representing a specific and potentially reversible pattern of outward arterial remodeling in these individuals. On this basis, arterial stiffness has emerged as a novel therapeutic target for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with CKD; specific interventions, such as renin-angiotensin-system blockade, use of statins, and decrease of calcium- phosphate product may delay the progression of arteriosclerotic process. This article summarizes the accumulated evidence from clinical and epidemiological studies regarding the prognostic significance of arterial stiffening on cardiovascular outcomes and provides insights on possible treatment strategies for arterial stiffness attenuation in patients with CKD.

  15. Arterial Stiffness and Trace Elements in Apparently Healthy Population- A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Subrahmanyam, Gangapatnam; Ramalingam, Krishnan; Indira, Selvam Armugam; Kantha, Katari; Soren, Bhemasen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Stiffening of arteries is a natural ageing process. Any diseases/disorders or risk factors that escalate oxidative stress, microvascular inflammation and endothelial damage may promote to premature vascular stiffening. Any imbalance in these trace element levels may independently contribute to the changes in the components in the arterial wall and thus, arterial stiffness via one or more mechanisms. Aim To evaluate the severity of arterial stiffness in apparently healthy population and also to evaluate role of various risk factors and trace elements in the severity of arterial stiffness Materials and Methods Male and female subjects living in urban and rural areas of Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, India, between 20-60 years, apparently normal as judged by the clinician basing on clinical and laboratory findings, were studied. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity (cf-PWV) a marker of arterial stiffness was assessed using non-invasive blood pressure curve monitoring (periscope). Furthermore, we also estimated serum levels of Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn), Selenium (Se), chromium (Cr), Aluminium (Al), silicon (Si), Manganese (Mn), Molybdenum (Mb), Vanadium (Vn) and lead (Pb) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. ANOVA and Chi-Square test were used to study the clinical correlations between severity of arterial stiffness, risk factors and trace elements. Results A total of 737 apparently healthy subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. Of the total 542 (73.5%) were from rural and the remaining 195 (26.5%) were living in urban areas, 328 (44.5%) were males, and 409 (55.5%) were females. A 63.5% (468/737) had normal arterial stiffness followed by 14.5% (107/737) with mild stiffness, 7% (57/737) had moderate stiffness and 14.2% (105/737) had severe arterial stiffness. Smoking, alcohol, blood pressures, fasting blood sugar, and total cholesterol, Cu, Al and Vn correlated (p<0.05) with different grades of arterial stiffness. Conclusion A 36.5% had

  16. SFAs do not impair endothelial function and arterial stiffness123

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Thomas AB; Lewis, Fiona J; Goff, Louise M; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is uncertain whether saturated fatty acids (SFAs) impair endothelial function and contribute to arterial stiffening. Objective: We tested the effects of replacing SFAs with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or carbohydrates on endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Design: With the use of a parallel-designed randomized controlled trial in 121 insulin-resistant men and women, we measured vascular function after 1 mo of consumption of a high-SFA (HS) diet and after 24 wk after random assignment to the HS diet or diets that contained <10% SFAs and were high in either MUFAs or carbohydrates. The primary outcome was a change in flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and secondary outcomes were changes in carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentrations. Results: For 112 participants with data available for analysis on the specified outcomes, no significant differences were shown. FMD with the HS reference diet was 6.7 ± 2.2%, and changes (95% CIs) after 6 mo of intervention were +0.3 (−0.4, 1.1), −0.2 (−0.8, 0.5), and −0.1 (−0.6, 0.7) with HS, high-MUFA (HM), and high-carbohydrate (HC) diets, respectively. After consumption of the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) PWV was 7.67 ± 1.62 m/s, and mean percentages of changes (95% CIs) were −1.0 (−6.2, 4.3) with the HS diet, 2.7 (−1.4, 6.9) with the HM diet, and −1.0 (−5.5, 3.4) with the HC diet. With the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentration was 176 ± 85 pmol/L, and mean percentage of changes (95% CIs) were 1 (−12, 14) with the HS diet, 6 (−5, 16) with the HM diet, and 4 (−7, 16) with the HC diet. Conclusion: The replacement of SFAs with MUFAs or carbohydrates in healthy subjects does not affect vascular function. This trial was registered at Current Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN) as ISRCTN 29111298. PMID:23964054

  17. Arterial stiffness during acute and recovery phases of children with rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, N N I N; Jaafar, H; Rasool, A H; Wong, A R

    2016-02-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is associated with systemic inflammation and arterial stiffness during the acute stage. It has not been reported if arterial stiffness remains after recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the arterial stiffness during acute stage and 6 months after recovery from ARF. Arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 23 ARF patients during the acute stage of ARF and 6 months later. Simultaneously, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and other anthropometric measurements were taken during both stages. There was a significant reduction in PWV; 6.5 (6.0, 7.45) m/s to 5.9 (5.38, 6.48) m/s, p=0.003 6 months after the acute stage of ARF. Similarly, ESR was also significantly reduced from 92.0 (37.5, 110.50) mm/hr to 7.0 (5.0, 16.0) mm/hr, p=0.001. In conclusion, arterial stiffness improved 6 months after the acute stage with routine aspirin treatment; this correlates well with the reduction in systemic inflammation. PMID:27130739

  18. Lower Body vs. Upper Body Resistance Training and Arterial Stiffness in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Bopp, M; Botta, F; Nussbaumer, M; Schäfer, J; Roth, R; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Hanssen, H

    2015-11-01

    Resistance training has been shown to increase arterial stiffness. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the systemic arterial stiffness responses to acute lower body (LRT) and upper body (URT) resistance training. 20 healthy young men [median age: 26 years (interquartile range 23, 32)] underwent LRT, URT and whole body resistance training (WRT). Before and immediately after, as well as 20, 40 and 60 min after each training session, we measured the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) using VaSera VS-1500 N. We used mixed models for repeated measurements to estimate the post-exercise differences in CAVI and baPWV between the 3 resistance training modes. Immediately after exercise cessation, both CAVI and baPWV were lower for LRT compared with URT [CAVI: - 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] - 1.15, - 0.70); baPWV: - 2.08 m/s (95% CI - 2.48, - 1.67)]. Differences between LRT and URT gradually decreased during follow-up. Compared with WRT, LRT induced a decrease and URT an increase in arterial stiffness across all time points. In conclusion, LRT presents more favorable post-exercise arterial stiffness than URT. Our results suggest that LRT or WRT may be preferred over URT in individuals with impaired arterial stiffness. PMID:26212244

  19. Arterial Stiffness, Lipoprotein Particle Size, and Lipoprotein Particle Concentration in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Lisa M; Silverstein, Janet H.; Shuster, Jonathan J; Haller, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if lipoprotein particle abnormalities correlate with arterial stiffness in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). STUDY DESIGN In this case-control study, we evaluated 70 children, 35 with T1D and 35 controls, ages 10–18 years, matched for age, sex, race, and BMI. Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial tonometry (AI75) and blood was collected for lipoprotein subclass analysis. RESULTS T1D subjects had increased AI75, decreased small LDL particle concentration (P=0.0067), increased large LDL particle concentration (P=0.007), increased large HDL particle concentration (P=0.0012), increased mean LDL particle size (P=0.0028), and increased mean HDL particle size (P<0.0001) compared to controls. No significant correlations were found between lipoprotein subclasses and arterial stiffness in T1D subjects. CONCLUSIONS T1D subjects have increased arterial stiffness when compared to controls, despite a less pro-atherogenic lipoprotein profile, indicating the need to identify other risk factors that correlate with arterial stiffness in T1D youth. PMID:20857838

  20. Hypertension, Diabetes Type II, and Their Association: Role of Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Smulyan, Harold; Lieber, Ari; Safar, Michel E

    2016-01-01

    In patients with both hypertension and type II diabetes, the systolic blood pressure (SBP) increases linearly with age, while that of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) declines curvilinearly as early as age 45, all suggesting the development of increased arterial stiffness. Increased stiffness is an important, independent, and significant risk predictor in subjects with hypertension and diabetes. In patients with both diseases, stiffness assessed at the same mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in diabetic patients. Arterial stiffness is related to age, heart rate (HR), and MAP, but in diabetic patients, it also related to diabetes duration and insulin treatment (IT). In the metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), diabetes also acts on the small arteries through capillary rarefaction to reduce the effective length of the arterial tree, increases the reflected pulse wave and thus the pulse pressure (PP). These studies indicate that diabetes and hypertension additively contribute to increased pulsatility and suggest that any means to reduce stiffness would be beneficial in these conditions.

  1. Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic function in individuals with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and frequency of complications in persons with arterial hypertension has been poorly investigated. This study aimed at evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of an increased local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The studies included 105 men (mean age: 44.47 {+-} 9.12 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I - men occupationally exposed to lead (n = 53), and group II - men not exposed to lead (n = 52). In echocardiographic examination, the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was diagnosed significantly more frequently in group I than in group II. In eTracking examination mean values of stiffness parameter ({beta}), augmentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV-{beta}) were significantly higher and mean values of arterial compliance (AC) were significantly lower in group I than in group II. The logistic regression showed that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead a more advanced age, higher blood lead concentration and higher mean values of augmentation index represent independent risk factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The multifactorial regression showed that amongst persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead higher blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration, a more advanced age and higher value of body mass index (BMI) represent independent risk factors of an increased local arterial stiffness. In summary, we should note that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead the study has demonstrated a significantly more frequent manifestation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and an increase in local arterial stiffness. - Highlights: > Amongst persons with AH exposed to Pb higher ZnPP represent independent risk factor of increased local arterial stiffness

  2. Review of ‘the potential role of arterial stiffness in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease’

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy M; Craft, Suzanne; Lopez, Oscar L

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Arterial stiffness is emerging as an important risk marker for poor brain aging and dementia through its associations with cerebral small vessel disease, stroke, β-amyloid deposition, brain atrophy and cognitive impairment. Arterial stiffness directly relates the detrimental effects of hypertension on peripheral organs with dire consequences for the extensive microvasculature structure of the kidneys and brain. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking arterial stiffness, hypertension and brain structural abnormalities in older adults. In particular, we discuss the potential mechanisms linking arterial stiffness to brain β-amyloid deposition and dementia and potential therapeutic strategies to prevent hypertension’s adverse effects on the brain. PMID:25894876

  3. The Impact of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Arterial Stiffness and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Zagidullin, Naufal; Scherbakova, Elena; Safina, Yuliana; Zulkarneev, Rustem; Zagidullin, Shamil

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is the set of ischemia episodes that protects against subsequent periods of prolonged ischemia through the cascade of adaptive responses; however, the mechanisms of RIPC are not entirely clear. Here, we aimed to study the impact of RIPC in patients with stable angina pectoris and compare it with healthy individuals with respect to arterial stiffness and heart rate variability. In the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover blind design study, a group of 30 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (63.9 ± 1.6 years) with stable angina pectoris NYHA II-III and a control group of 20 healthy individuals (58.2 ± 2.49) were both randomly allocated for remote RIPC or sham RIPC. Arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity (Spygmacor, Australia), and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded before and after the procedure followed by the crossover examination. In the group of healthy individuals, RIPC showed virtually no impact on the cardiovascular parameters, while, in the CHD group, the systolic and central systolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, and augmentation decreased, and total power of HRV improved. We conclude that ischemic preconditioning reduces not only systolic blood pressure, but also reduces central systolic blood pressure and improves arterial compliance and heart rate modulation reserve, which may be associated with the antianginal effect of preconditioning. PMID:27348009

  4. The Impact of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Arterial Stiffness and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Angina Pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Zagidullin, Naufal; Scherbakova, Elena; Safina, Yuliana; Zulkarneev, Rustem; Zagidullin, Shamil

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is the set of ischemia episodes that protects against subsequent periods of prolonged ischemia through the cascade of adaptive responses; however, the mechanisms of RIPC are not entirely clear. Here, we aimed to study the impact of RIPC in patients with stable angina pectoris and compare it with healthy individuals with respect to arterial stiffness and heart rate variability. In the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover blind design study, a group of 30 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (63.9 ± 1.6 years) with stable angina pectoris NYHA II-III and a control group of 20 healthy individuals (58.2 ± 2.49) were both randomly allocated for remote RIPC or sham RIPC. Arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity (Spygmacor, Australia), and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded before and after the procedure followed by the crossover examination. In the group of healthy individuals, RIPC showed virtually no impact on the cardiovascular parameters, while, in the CHD group, the systolic and central systolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, and augmentation decreased, and total power of HRV improved. We conclude that ischemic preconditioning reduces not only systolic blood pressure, but also reduces central systolic blood pressure and improves arterial compliance and heart rate modulation reserve, which may be associated with the antianginal effect of preconditioning. PMID:27348009

  5. The Impact of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning on Arterial Stiffness and Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Zagidullin, Naufal; Scherbakova, Elena; Safina, Yuliana; Zulkarneev, Rustem; Zagidullin, Shamil

    2016-06-23

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is the set of ischemia episodes that protects against subsequent periods of prolonged ischemia through the cascade of adaptive responses; however, the mechanisms of RIPC are not entirely clear. Here, we aimed to study the impact of RIPC in patients with stable angina pectoris and compare it with healthy individuals with respect to arterial stiffness and heart rate variability. In the randomized, sham-controlled, crossover blind design study, a group of 30 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients (63.9 ± 1.6 years) with stable angina pectoris NYHA II-III and a control group of 20 healthy individuals (58.2 ± 2.49) were both randomly allocated for remote RIPC or sham RIPC. Arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity (Spygmacor, Australia), and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded before and after the procedure followed by the crossover examination. In the group of healthy individuals, RIPC showed virtually no impact on the cardiovascular parameters, while, in the CHD group, the systolic and central systolic blood pressure, central pulse pressure, and augmentation decreased, and total power of HRV improved. We conclude that ischemic preconditioning reduces not only systolic blood pressure, but also reduces central systolic blood pressure and improves arterial compliance and heart rate modulation reserve, which may be associated with the antianginal effect of preconditioning.

  6. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness.

  7. Development of easy operating arterial stiffness assessment instrument for home care.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Yao, Cheng-Tso; Wu, Tsang-Chih; Liu, An-Bang

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 41 asymptomatic subjects (22 men and 19 women, 20 to 60 years of age) were enrolled. The PWV was measured both by dual-channel PPG (PWV-DVP) and by the proposed PWV instrument, Pulse Wave Velocity by Digital Volume Pulse Easy (PWV-DVPE). The developed system recorded digital volume pulse simultaneously from both the finger and ear. Time of pulse transition was measured on the time delay difference between two digital volume pulses. The PWV was calculated by dividing the distance between finger and ear by that of transit time. PWV-DVPE's capability of precise self-monitoring arterial stiffness is being proven in this study. In home care area, only few minutes is needed for self arterial stiffness assessment. Therefore, early self-monitoring of cardio-vascular dys-function and arterial stiffness is easily and effectively achieved. PMID:18003349

  8. Serum Sclerostin as an Independent Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bang-Gee; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Ho, Guan-Jin; Lee, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is thought to be implicated in the development of arterial stiffness and vascular calcification. As a Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor, it is interesting to investigate whether sclerostin or dickkopf-1 (DKK1) level is correlated with arterial stiffness in renal transplant (RT) recipients. Fasting blood samples were obtained for biochemical data, sclerostin, DKK1, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) determinations. In this study, we applied automatic pulse wave analyzer (VaSera VS-1000) to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and either sides of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value, which greater than 14.0 m/s was determined as high arterial stiffness. Among 68 RT recipients, 30 patients (44.1%) were in the high arterial stiffness group. Compared with patients in the low arterial stiffness group, patients in the high arterial stiffness group had higher prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.002), diabetes (P < 0.001), metabolic syndrome (P = 0.025), longer posttransplant duration (P = 0.005), higher systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.018), and higher fasting glucose (P = 0.004), total cholesterol (P = 0.042), blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.020), phosphorus (P = 0.042), and sclerostin levels (P = 0.001). According to our multivariable forward stepwise linear regression analysis, age (β = 0.272, P = 0.014), phosphorus (β = 0.308, P = 0.007), and logarithmically-transformed OPG (log-OPG; β = 0.222, P = 0.046) were positively associated with sclerostin levels, and multivariate logistic regression analysis, sclerostin (odds ratio 1.052, 95% confidence interval 1.007–1.099, P = 0.024), and posttransplant duration (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.004–1.045, P = 0.019) were the independent predictors of peripheral arterial stiffness in RT recipients. In this study, serum sclerostin level, but not DKK1, was

  9. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  10. Does short-term whole-body vibration training affect arterial stiffness in chronic stroke? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yule, Christie E; Stoner, Lee; Hodges, Lynette D; Cochrane, Darryl J

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have shown that stroke is associated with increased arterial stiffness that can be diminished by a program of physical activity. A novel exercise intervention, whole-body vibration (WBV), is reported to significantly improve arterial stiffness in healthy men and older sedentary adults. However, little is known about its efficacy in reducing arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Six participants with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of WBV training or control followed by cross-over after a 2-week washout period. WBV intervention consisted of 3 sessions of 5 min intermittent WBV per week for 4 weeks. Arterial stiffness (carotid arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity [PWV], pulse and wave analysis [PWA]) were measured before/after each intervention. [Results] No significant improvements were reported with respect to carotid arterial stiffness, PWV, and PWA between WBV and control. However, carotid arterial stiffness showed a decrease over time following WBV compared to control, but this was not significant. [Conclusion] Three days/week for 4 weeks of WBV seems too short to elicit appropriate changes in arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. However, no adverse effects were reported, indicating that WBV is a safe and acceptable exercise modality for people with chronic stroke.

  11. Does short-term whole-body vibration training affect arterial stiffness in chronic stroke? A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Yule, Christie E.; Stoner, Lee; Hodges, Lynette D.; Cochrane, Darryl J.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Previous studies have shown that stroke is associated with increased arterial stiffness that can be diminished by a program of physical activity. A novel exercise intervention, whole-body vibration (WBV), is reported to significantly improve arterial stiffness in healthy men and older sedentary adults. However, little is known about its efficacy in reducing arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Six participants with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to 4 weeks of WBV training or control followed by cross-over after a 2-week washout period. WBV intervention consisted of 3 sessions of 5 min intermittent WBV per week for 4 weeks. Arterial stiffness (carotid arterial stiffness, pulse wave velocity [PWV], pulse and wave analysis [PWA]) were measured before/after each intervention. [Results] No significant improvements were reported with respect to carotid arterial stiffness, PWV, and PWA between WBV and control. However, carotid arterial stiffness showed a decrease over time following WBV compared to control, but this was not significant. [Conclusion] Three days/week for 4 weeks of WBV seems too short to elicit appropriate changes in arterial stiffness in chronic stroke. However, no adverse effects were reported, indicating that WBV is a safe and acceptable exercise modality for people with chronic stroke. PMID:27134400

  12. Taking the pulse of a sick kidney: arterial stiffness in glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Anke; Schaefer, Franz

    2011-02-01

    Arterial stiffness is an increasingly recognized independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity. Vessel volume and wall texture are the main determinants of pulse wave velocity (PWV), the most commonly used indicator of arterial elasticity. Hence, measurements of PWV will be affected by the site of measurement and the overall dimensions of the vascular tree as well as by alterations of vascular morphology. In children, methodological heterogeneity and the lack of pediatric reference values complicate the interpretation of PWV. Arterial elasticity is altered in numerous clinical conditions such as vasculitis, end-stage renal disease, and diabetes. Novel evidence suggests that acute postinfectious glomerulonephritis, but not pyelonephritis, is also associated with increased arterial stiffness, the persistence of which may predict the emergence of chronic kidney disease. We review the potential mechanisms underlying the link between acute and chronic kidney disease and impaired arterial elasticity. These might include activation of the renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic hyperactivation, and a subclinical state of inflammation. In view of the excessive cardiovascular comorbidity associated with kidney disease, the increasing evidence of the prognostic relevance of arterial stiffness should encourage further research investigating the usefulness of PWV as a biomarker in acute and chronic kidney disorders.

  13. Chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension increases main pulmonary artery stiffness and adventitial remodeling in fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Matthew R.; Galambos, Csaba; Hunter, Kendall S.; Abman, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a clinical syndrome that is characterized by high pulmonary vascular resistance due to changes in lung vascular growth, structure, and tone. PPHN has been primarily considered as a disease of the small pulmonary arteries (PA), but proximal vascular stiffness has been shown to be an important predictor of morbidity and mortality in other diseases associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The objective of this study is to characterize main PA (MPA) stiffness in experimental PPHN and to determine the relationship of altered biomechanics of the MPA with changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) content and orientation of collagen and elastin fibers. MPAs were isolated from control and PPHN fetal sheep model and were tested by planar biaxial testing to measure stiffness in circumferential and axial vessel orientations. Test specimens were fixed for histological assessments of the vascular wall ECM constituents collagen and elastin. MPAs from PPHN sheep had increased mechanical stiffness (P < 0.05) and altered ECM remodeling compared with control MPA. A constitutive mathematical model and histology demonstrated that PPHN vessels have a smaller contribution of elastin and a greater role for collagen fiber engagement compared with the control arteries. We conclude that exposure to chronic hemodynamic stress in late-gestation fetal sheep increases proximal PA stiffness and alters ECM remodeling. We speculate that proximal PA stiffness further contributes to increased right ventricular impedance in experimental PPHN, which contributes to abnormal transition of the pulmonary circulation at birth. PMID:25326575

  14. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. PMID:27456517

  15. A cohort evaluation on arterial stiffness and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are associated with systemic endothelial dysfunction leading to impaired physiological vasodilation. Recent evidence has shown central aortic pressures obtained through pulse wave analysis, at less than 14 weeks of gestation, to be predictive of pre-eclampsia. In light of this, we aimed to evaluate the role of central aortic stiffness in the prediction and discrimination of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Methods A cohort study of women with viable, singleton pregnancies at less than 14 weeks of amenorrhoea, and without multiple pregnancies, autoimmune or renal disease, diagnosed with aneuploidy or fetal anomaly will be recruited from a single maternity hospital and followed up till delivery and puerperium. A targeted sample size of 1000 eligible pregnant women will be enrolled into the study from antenatal clinics. Main exposure under study is central aortic pulse pressure using radial pulse wave recording, and the outcomes under follow-up are gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia. Other measures include lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical exercise, psychometric evaluations, vasoactive factors, uterine artery pulsatility index, height and weight measurements. These measures will be repeated over 4 antenatal visits at 11-14, 18-22, 28-32 and above 34 weeks of gestation. Double data entry will be performed on Microsoft Access, and analysis of data will include the use of random effect models and receiver operating characteristic curves on Stata 11.2. Discussion The proposed study design will enable a longitudinal evaluation of the central aortic pressure changes as a marker for vascular compliance during pregnancy. As measures are repeated over time, the timing and severity of changes are detectable, and findings may yield important information on how aberrant vascular responses occur and its role in the early detection and prediction of hypertensive disorders. PMID:23268774

  16. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  17. Roles of Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure in Hypertension-Associated Cognitive Decline in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Hajjar, Ihab; Goldstein, Felicia C; Martin, Greg S; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2016-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence that hypertension leads to cognitive decline, especially in the executive domain, the relationship between blood pressure and cognition has been conflicted. Hypertension is characterized by blood pressure elevation and increased arterial stiffness. We aimed at investigating whether arterial stiffness would be superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline and explaining the hypertension-executive decline association. A randomly selected asymptomatic population (n=591, age=49.2 years, 70% women, 27% black, and education=18 years) underwent annual vascular and cognitive assessments. Cognition was assessed using computerized versions commonly used cognitive tests, and principal component analysis was used for deriving cognitive scores for executive function, memory, and working memory. Arterial stiffness was measured by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Higher PWV, but not blood pressure, was associated with a steeper decline in executive (P=0.0002), memory (P=0.05), and working memory (P=0.02) scores after adjusting for demographics, education, and baseline cognitive performance. This remained true after adjusting for hypertension. Hypertension was associated with greater decline in executive score (P=0.0029) and those with combined hypertension and elevated PWV (>7 m/s) had the greatest decline in executive score (P value hypertension×PWV=0.02). PWV explained the association between hypertension and executive function (P value for hypertension=0.0029 versus 0.24 when adjusting for PWV). In healthy adults, increased arterial stiffness is superior to blood pressure in predicting cognitive decline in all domains and in explaining the hypertension-executive function association. Arterial stiffness, especially in hypertension, may be a target in the prevention of cognitive decline.

  18. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure and arterial stiffness: a fully controlled dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, L; Dower, J I; Mensink, M; Siebelink, E; Bakker, S J L; Geleijnse, J M

    2015-10-01

    We performed a randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine the effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and arterial stiffness in untreated (pre)hypertensive individuals. During the study, subjects were on a fully controlled diet that was relatively low in sodium and potassium. After a 1-week run-in period, subjects received capsules with supplemental sodium (3 g d(-1), equals 7.6 g d(-1) of salt), supplemental potassium (3 g d(-1)) or placebo, for 4 weeks each, in random order. Fasting office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and measures of arterial stiffness were assessed at baseline and every 4 weeks. Of 37 randomized subjects, 36 completed the study. They had a mean pre-treatment BP of 145/81 mm Hg and 69% had systolic BP ⩾140 mm Hg. Sodium excretion was increased by 98 mmol per 24 h and potassium excretion by 63 mmol per 24 h during active interventions, compared with placebo. During sodium supplementation, office BP was significantly increased by 7.5/3.3 mm Hg, 24-h BP by 7.5/2.7 mm Hg and central BP by 8.5/3.6 mm Hg. During potassium supplementation, 24-h BP was significantly reduced by 3.9/1.6 mm Hg and central pulse pressure by 2.9 mm Hg. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were not significantly affected by sodium or potassium supplementation. In conclusion, increasing the intake of sodium caused a substantial increase in BP in subjects with untreated elevated BP. Increased potassium intake, on top of a relatively low-sodium diet, had a beneficial effect on BP. Arterial stiffness did not materially change during 4-week interventions with sodium or potassium.

  19. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation.

  20. Manipulation of arterial stiffness, wave reflections, and retrograde shear rate in the femoral artery using lower limb external compression

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Kasprowicz, Ari G; Tarzia, Brendan J; Thijssen, Dick H; Brutsaert, Tom D

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the arterial wall to retrograde shear acutely leads to endothelial dysfunction and chronically contributes to a proatherogenic vascular phenotype. Arterial stiffness and increased pressure from wave reflections are known arbiters of blood flow in the systemic circulation and each related to atherosclerosis. Using distal external compression of the calf to increase upstream retrograde shear in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), we examined the hypothesis that changes in retrograde shear are correlated with changes in SFA stiffness and pressure from wave reflections. For this purpose, a pneumatic cuff was applied to the calf and inflated to 0, 35, and 70 mmHg (5 min compression, randomized order, separated by 5 min) in 16 healthy young men (23 ± 1 years of age). Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis was used to measure SFA retrograde shear rate, reflected pressure wave intensity (negative area [NA]), elastic modulus (Ep), and a single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) during acute cuff inflation. Cuff inflation resulted in stepwise increases in retrograde shear rate (P < 0.05 for main effect). There were also significant cuff pressure-dependent increases in NA, Ep, and PWV across conditions (P < 0.05 for main effects). Change in NA, but not Ep or PWV, was associated with change in retrograde shear rate across conditions (P < 0.05). In conclusion, external compression of the calf increases retrograde shear, arterial stiffness, and pressure from wave reflection in the upstream SFA in a dose-dependent manner. Wave reflection intensity, but not arterial stiffness, is correlated with changes in peripheral retrograde shear with this hemodynamic manipulation. PMID:24303111

  1. Effect of eplerenone on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and arterial stiffness in patients with resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Beata; Miazga, Angelika; Cofta, Szczepan; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Trafas, Tomasz; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-27

    INTRODUCTION    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be one of the major causes of resistant arterial hypertension (RAH). Apnea episodes cause hypoxia, which triggers the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This leads to water retention and swelling in the neck region, exacerbating OSA symptoms. It is assumed that the use of eplerenone may reduce the swelling and thus alleviate the severity of OSA. OBJECTIVES    We aimed to prospectively assess the impact of eplerenone on the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 31 patients with RAH and OSA. The exclusion criteria were as follows: secondary hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke 6 months prior to the study, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney failure, alcohol or drug addiction, and active cancer. In all patients, the following tests were performed: blood pressure (BP) measurement (traditionally and using ambulatory BP measuring [ABPM]), applanation tonometry, polysomnography, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) calculation. The tests were done before and after 3 months of eplerenone therapy. Patients received 50 mg of oral eplerenone daily, along with other hypertensive drugs. RESULTS    The mean age of participants was 57.76 ±6.16 years. After 3 months of eplerenone therapy, we observed a significant reduction in the AHI, neck circumference, BP, aortic pulse wave, and arterial wall stiffness. There were significant correlations between the AHI and mean BP measured by ABPM and between the AHI and arterial stiffness parameters. CONCLUSIONS    Our results provide evidence for the clinical significance of eplerenone, not only as an antihypertensive medication but also as a drug that may reduce the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH and OSA.

  2. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys.

  3. Invited Commentary: Hypertension and Arterial Stiffness--Origins Remain a Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, David R; Duprez, Daniel A; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of the Journal, Chen et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2016;183(7):599-608) present repeated measures of aorto-femoral pulse wave velocity, capacitive compliance (C1), and oscillatory compliance (C2) in the Bogalusa Heart Study, with the purpose of addressing which comes first: blood pressure elevation or arterial stiffening. After an average follow-up period of 7 years (2000-2010), the authors found that blood pressure at a mean age of 36 years predicted change in arterial stiffening by a mean age of 43 years, but not the reverse. Essential hypertension results from a mosaic of pathological mechanisms. It has been theorized that biological pathways involving increased sympathetic tone, insulin resistance, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone activation, and inflammation lead to hyperkinetic circulation, volume overload, and vascular remodeling. The resultant accelerated vascular aging may be assessed by determining the degree of arterial stiffness. The findings of Chen et al. add important empirical information to the literature but do not solve the dilemma regarding the origins of essential hypertension, partly because there are many techniques for estimating the many aspects of arterial stiffness which are not fully understood. Mathematical features of estimates might not be uniform across the age range. There is a need for tracking blood pressure and different aspects of arterial stiffness from childhood onward, with an aim of preventing hypertension in adult life.

  4. Associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness in adolescents: The European Youth Hearts Study.

    PubMed

    Ried-Larsen, M; Grøntved, A; Østergaard, L; Cooper, A R; Froberg, K; Andersen, L B; Møller, N C

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the associations between bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness, independent of objectively measured moderate-and-vigorous physical activity. This cross-sectional study included 375 adolescents (age 15.7 ± 0.4 years) from the Danish site of the European Youth Heart Study. Total frequency of bicycle usage was assessed by self-report, and carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using B-mode ultrasound. After adjusting for pubertal status, body height, and objectively measured physical activity and other personal lifestyle and demographic factors, boys using their bicycle every day of the week displayed a higher carotid arterial compliance {standard beta 0.47 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-0.87]} and distension [standard beta 0.38 (95% CI -0.04 to 0.81)]. Boys using their bicycle every day of the week furthermore displayed a lower Young's elastic modulus [standard beta -0.48 (95% CI -0.91 to -0.06)]. Similar trends were observed when investigating the association between commuter bicycling and carotid arterial stiffness. These associations were not observed in girls. Our observations suggest that increasing bicycling in adolescence may be beneficial to carotid arterial health among boys. PMID:25156494

  5. Increased arterial stiffness and extracellular matrix reorganization in intrauterine growth–restricted fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Reuben Blair; Rozance, Paul J.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Petrash, Carson C.; Shoemaker, Lauren G.; Hunter, Kendall S.; Ferguson, Virginia L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in increased placental resistance to blood flow, fetal hypertension, and increased pulsatility stresses shown to lead to vascular remodeling. We tested our hypothesis that IUGR causes decreased compliance in the carotid and umbilical arteries due to altered extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and structure. METHODS A sheep model of placental insufficiency–induced IUGR (PI-IUGR) was created by exposure of the pregnant ewe to elevated ambient temperatures. Umbilical and carotid arteries from near-term fetuses were tested with pressure–diameter measurements to compare passive compliance in control and PI-IUGR tissues. ECM composition was measured via biochemical assay, and the organization was determined by using histology and second-harmonic generation imaging. RESULTS We found that PI-IUGR increased arterial stiffness with increased collagen engagement, or transition stretch. PI-IUGR carotid arteries exhibited increased collagen and elastin quantity, and PI-IUGR umbilical arteries exhibited increased sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Histomorphology showed altered collagen-to-elastin ratios with altered cellular proliferation. Increased stiffness indicates altered collagen-to-elastin ratios with less elastin contribution leading to increased collagen engagement. CONCLUSION Because vessel stiffness is a significant predictor in the development of hypertension, disrupted ECM deposition in IUGR provides a potential link between IUGR and adult hypertension. PMID:23154756

  6. In vivo and in vitro measurements of pulmonary arterial stiffness: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2012-01-01

    During the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH), proximal pulmonary arteries (PAs) undergo remodeling such that they become thicker and the elastic modulus increases. Both of these changes increase the vascular stiffness. The increase in pulmonary vascular stiffness contributes to increased right ventricular (RV) afterload, which causes RV hypertrophy and eventually failure. Studies have found that proximal PA stiffness or its inverse, compliance, is strongly related to morbidity and mortality in patients with PH. Therefore, accurate in vivo measurement of PA stiffness is useful for prognoses in patients with PH. It is also important to understand the structural changes in PAs that occur with PH that are responsible for stiffening. Here, we briefly review the most common parameters used to quantify stiffness and in vivo and in vitro methods for measuring PA stiffness in human and animal models. For in vivo approaches, we review invasive and noninvasive approaches that are based on measurements of pressure and inner or outer diameter or cross-sectional area. For in vitro techniques, we review several different testing methods that mimic one, two or several aspects of physiological loading (e.g., uniaxial and biaxial testing, dynamic inflation-force testing). Many in vivo and in vitro measurement methods exist in the literature, and it is important to carefully choose an appropriate method to measure PA stiffness accurately. Therefore, advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed. PMID:23372936

  7. Increased arterial stiffness in young adults with end-stage renal disease since childhood.

    PubMed

    Groothoff, Jaap W; Gruppen, Mariken P; Offringa, Martin; de Groot, Eric; Stok, Willem; Bos, Willem Jan; Davin, Jean Claude; Lilien, Marc R; Van de Kar, Nicole Caj; Wolff, Eric D; Heymans, Hugo S

    2002-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is a risk factor for mortality in adults over 40 yr of age with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). As no data exist on vascular changes in young adults with ESRD since childhood, a long-term outcome study was performed. All living Dutch adult patients with onset of ESRD between 1972 and 1992 at age 0 to 14 yr were invited for carotid artery and cardiac ultrasound and BP measurements. Data on clinical characteristics were collected by review of all medical charts. Carotid ultrasound data were compared with those of 48 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls. Carotid artery and cardiac ultrasound was performed in 130 out of 187 eligible patients. Mean age was 29.0 (20.7 to 40.6) yr. Compared with controls, patients had a similar intima media thickness but a reduced mean arterial wall distensibility DC (40.0 versus 45.0 kPa(-1). 10(-3); 95% CI, -9.1 to -0.8; P < 0.001), an increased stiffness parameter beta (4.2 versus 3.8; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.68; P = 0.02), an increased elastic incremental modulus E(inc) (0.35 versus 0.27 kPa. 10(3); 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.12; P < 0.001). Multiple regression analyses in all subjects revealed that ESRD was associated with an increase in beta and E(inc). Arterial wall properties of patients currently on dialysis and transplanted patients were comparable. In all patients, current systolic hypertension was associated with increased E(inc) and decreased DC. In conclusion, carotid arterial wall stiffness is increased in young adult patients with pediatric ESRD. Hypertension is a main determinant and might be a target for treatment of these potentially lethal arterial wall changes.

  8. Influence of Postprandial Hyperglycemic Conditions on Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tuomikangas, Jaana; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Paavonen, Karri; Steckel-Hamann, Birgit; Vandenhende, Francois; Nicolaou, Loizos; Pavo, Imre; Koivisto, Veikko

    2016-01-01

    Context: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether postprandial hyperglycemia affects arterial function in T2D. Design: A single-center, open-label study of three groups of men were studied: 1) T2D patients with albuminuria (n = 22), 2) T2D patients without albuminuria (n = 24), and 3) nondiabetic controls (n = 25). Patients were randomized to a two-period crossover study schedule, ingesting breakfast, with or without insulin lispro (to induce low or high postprandial glycemia). Main Outcome Measures: Arterial stiffness was assessed by calculating pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index using applanation tonometry, and endothelial dysfunction was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry, 30 minutes before breakfast and up to 240 minutes after breakfast. Results: At baseline, arterial stiffness was increased in patients. When adjusted for age and body mass index, in a combined group of patients with and without albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher during low (P = .032) and high (P = .038) postprandial glycemia vs controls. These differences were driven by the albuminuria group vs controls during low (P = .014) and high (P = .018) postprandial glycemia. No differences were observed in aortic PWV, augmentation index, or peripheral arterial tonometry ratio between patients and controls. Endothelin-1 and IL-6 were higher, and superoxide dismutase was lower, during postprandial hyperglycemia in T2D patients vs controls. Conclusions: In patients with T2D and albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher under postprandial hyperglycemic conditions, relative to controls. These data suggest that hyperglycemia induces an increase in stiffness of intermediate-sized arteries. We found no changes in other parts of the arterial bed. PMID:26731258

  9. A Novel Echocardiographic Method for Assessing Arterial Stiffness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Gunbatar, Hulya; Asker, Muntecep; Babat, Naci; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Yaman, Mehmet; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether the color M-mode-derived propagation velocity of the descending thoracic aorta (aortic velocity propagation, AVP) was an echocardiographic marker for arterial stiffness in OSAS. Subjects and Methods The study population included 116 patients with OSAS and 90 age and gender-matched control subjects. The patients with OSAS were categorized according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as follows: mild to moderate degree (AHI 5-30) and severe degree (AHI≥30). Aortofemoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and AVP were measured to assess arterial stiffness. Results AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to controls (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were increased in the OSAS group compared to controls (p<0.001). Moreover, AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in the severe OSAS group compared to the mild to moderate OSAS group (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were significantly increased in the severe group compared to the mild to moderate group (p<0.001). AVP was significantly positively correlated with FMD (r=0.564, p<0.001). However, it was found to be significantly inversely related to PWV (r=-0.580, p<0.001) and CIMT (r=-0.251, p<0.001). Conclusion The measurement of AVP is a novel and practical echocardiographic method, which may be used to identify arterial stiffness in OSAS. PMID:26617653

  10. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β′-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. PMID:27482523

  11. Association of Parental Hypertension With Arterial Stiffness in Nonhypertensive Offspring: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Quiroz, Rene; Enserro, Danielle; Larson, Martin G; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mitchell, Gary F; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2016-09-01

    High arterial stiffness seems to be causally involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that offspring of parents with hypertension may display higher arterial stiffness before clinically manifest hypertension, given that hypertension is a heritable condition. We compared arterial tonometry measures in a sample of 1564 nonhypertensive Framingham Heart Study third-generation cohort participants (mean age: 38 years; 55% women) whose parents were enrolled in the Framingham Offspring Study. A total of 468, 715, and 381 participants had 0 (referent), 1, and 2 parents with hypertension. Parental hypertension was associated with greater offspring mean arterial pressure (multivariable-adjusted estimate=2.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-3.9, and 4.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 2.9-5.5, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P<0.001 for both) and with greater forward pressure wave amplitude (1.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.7, and 1.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-3.2, for 1 and 2 parents with hypertension, respectively; P=0.003 for both). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and augmentation index displayed similar dose-dependent relations with parental hypertension in sex-, age-, and height-adjusted models, but associations were attenuated on further adjustment. Offspring with at least 1 parent in the upper quartile of augmentation index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity had significantly higher values themselves (P≤0.02). In conclusion, in this community-based sample of young, nonhypertensive adults, we observed greater arterial stiffness in offspring of parents with hypertension. These observations are consistent with higher vascular stiffness at an early stage in the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:27456526

  12. Glycated Albumin is Independently Associated With Arterial Stiffness in Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Seung Kyo; Yun, Gi Young; Choi, Ah Ran; Lee, Jung Eun; Ha, Sung Kyu; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glycated albumin (GA) exhibits atherogenic effects and increased serum GA levels are associated with the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. GA production also increases with aging, oxidative stress, and renal dysfunction. We performed this study to further ascertain the association between GA and arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We enrolled 129 nondiabetic CKD patients. Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) using a volume plethysmographic instrument along with simultaneous measurements of GA. Insulin resistance was determined with the homeostatic model assessment. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using serum creatinine and cystatin C according to the CKD-EPI Creatinine-Cystatin C equation adjusted for age, sex, and race (eGFRcr-cys). Nondiabetic CKD patients with arterial stiffness (baPWV ≥1400 cm/s) showed higher GA levels than those without arterial stiffness (14.2 [8.7–20.2]% vs 13.0 [8.8–18.9]%, P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis, the patients who had both a higher GA level and a lower eGFRcr-cys, showed the highest baPWV compared with patients with a higher GA or a lower GFR alone. By Spearman's correlation analysis, GA correlated significantly with baPWV (r = +0.291, P = 0.001) and fasting serum glucose level (r = +0.191, P = 0.030), whereas The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance did not show any significant correlation with baPWV. Systolic blood pressure (r = +0.401 P < 0.001), age (r = +0.574, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level (r = −0.317, P < 0.001), and eGFRcr-cys (r = −0.285, P = 0.002) had a significant correlation with baPWV. According to multivariable logistic regression analysis, higher GA and systolic blood pressure were the independent risk factors affecting arterial stiffness. Our results suggest

  13. Glycated Albumin is Independently Associated With Arterial Stiffness in Non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Seung Kyo; Yun, Gi Young; Choi, Ah Ran; Lee, Jung Eun; Ha, Sung Kyu; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2016-04-01

    Glycated albumin (GA) exhibits atherogenic effects and increased serum GA levels are associated with the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. GA production also increases with aging, oxidative stress, and renal dysfunction. We performed this study to further ascertain the association between GA and arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We enrolled 129 nondiabetic CKD patients. Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) using a volume plethysmographic instrument along with simultaneous measurements of GA. Insulin resistance was determined with the homeostatic model assessment. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated using serum creatinine and cystatin C according to the CKD-EPI Creatinine-Cystatin C equation adjusted for age, sex, and race (eGFRcr-cys). Nondiabetic CKD patients with arterial stiffness (baPWV ≥1400 cm/s) showed higher GA levels than those without arterial stiffness (14.2 [8.7-20.2]% vs 13.0 [8.8-18.9]%, P = 0.004). In the subgroup analysis, the patients who had both a higher GA level and a lower eGFRcr-cys, showed the highest baPWV compared with patients with a higher GA or a lower GFR alone. By Spearman's correlation analysis, GA correlated significantly with baPWV (r = +0.291, P = 0.001) and fasting serum glucose level (r = +0.191, P = 0.030), whereas The homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance did not show any significant correlation with baPWV. Systolic blood pressure (r = +0.401 P < 0.001), age (r = +0.574, P < 0.001), high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level (r = -0.317, P < 0.001), and eGFRcr-cys (r = -0.285, P = 0.002) had a significant correlation with baPWV. According to multivariable logistic regression analysis, higher GA and systolic blood pressure were the independent risk factors affecting arterial stiffness. Our results suggest that serum GA is a

  14. Application of a four-channel vibrometer system for detection of arterial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Waz, Adam; Dudzik, Grzegorz; Dirckx, Joris; Abramski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CD) are the most important cause of death in the world and their prevalence is only rising. A significant aspect in the etiology of CD is the stiffening of the large arteries (arteriosclerosis) and plaque formation (atherosclerosis) in the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck. As shown by increasing evidence, both conditions can be detected by assessing pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the CCA, and several approaches allow local detection of PWV, including ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In previous studies, laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) was introduced as an approach to assess arterial stiffness. In the present work, a new, compact four-channel LDV system is used for PWV detection in four phantom arteries mimicking real life CCA conditions. The high sensitivity of the LDV system allowed PWV to be assessed, and even local changes in phantom architecture could be detected. This method has potential for cardiovascular screening, as it allows arteriosclerosis assessment and plaque detection.

  15. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group. PMID:26444929

  16. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group.

  17. Differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute exercise between young men and women.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Robert J; Mutter, Andrew; Egiziano, Giordano; Gomez, Yessica-Haydee; Daskalopoulou, Stella S

    2013-03-01

    There is controversy as to whether there are sex differences in arterial stiffness. Acute physical stress can elicit vascular abnormalities not present at rest. Our objective was to assess sex differences in arterial stiffness at rest and in response to acute physical stress. Healthy young men (n=67) and women (n=55) underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest and 2, 5, 10 and 15 min following an exercise test to exhaustion. At rest, aortic systolic, diastolic, pulse and mean pressures were all significantly higher in men as was aortic pulse pressure at 10 and 15 min post exercise and aortic systolic pressure at 15 min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was significantly higher in men (6.0±0.7 m s(-1) vs. 5.6±0.6 m s(-1), P=0.03) at rest and at all time points post exercise. Heart rate-adjusted augmentation index was significantly lower (-10.7±10.2% vs. -4.0±10.9, P<0.0001) and subendocardial viability ratio was significantly higher (176.2±43.8% vs. 163.4±40.9, P=0.04) in men at rest. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess sex differences in the arterial stiffness response to acute physical stress in young men and women. Although we were not able to elicit differences in vascular function after adjustment, which were not present at rest, we found that young men and women exhibit differences in arterial stiffness at rest and after acute physical stress.

  18. Influence of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Hiroya; Maeshima, Etsuko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effects of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes. [Subjects] Eighteen female university athletes requiring high endurance exercise capabilities were classified into 2 groups: 10 retired players (detraining group) and 8 active players (training group). [Methods] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, an index of arterial stiffness, was measured a total of 6 times: immediately before retirement of the detraining group and at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after retirement. [Results] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured in the training group at the same 6 points to allow comparison with the detraining group. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group increased significantly at 3 and 12 months as compared with that at 0 months and showed a significant increase at 12 months compared with that at 1 month. Moreover, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group was significantly higher at 3, 6, and 12 months than in the training group. [Conclusion] These results revealed that detraining may result in increased arterial stiffness from 3 months onward in endurance athletes. PMID:26834331

  19. Relation of Habitual Chocolate Consumption to Arterial Stiffness in a Community-Based Sample: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Georgina E.; Elias, Merrill F.; Alkerwi, Ala'a; Stranges, Saverio; Abhayaratna, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The consumption of chocolate and cocoa has established cardiovascular benefits. Less is known about the effects of chocolate on arterial stiffness, a marker of subclinical cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chocolate intakes are independently associated with pulse wave velocity (PWV), after adjustment for cardiovascular, lifestyle and dietary factors. Methods Prospective analyses were undertaken on 508 community-dwelling participants (mean age 61 years, 60% women) from the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS). Habitual chocolate intakes, measured using a food frequency questionnaire, were related to PWV, measured approximately 5 years later. Results Chocolate intake was significantly associated with PWV in a non-linear fashion with the highest levels of PWV in those who never or rarely ate chocolate and lowest levels in those who consumed chocolate once a week. This pattern of results remained and was not attenuated after multivariate adjustment for diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors and dietary variables (p = 0.002). Conclusions Weekly chocolate intake may be of benefit to arterial stiffness. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms that may mediate the observed effects of habitual chocolate consumption on arterial stiffness. PMID:27493901

  20. Tetrahydrobiopterin improves endothelial function and decreases arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, Amie; Deane, Kevin D.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms mediating arterial stiffening with aging and menopause are not completely understood. We determined whether administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for endothelial nitric oxide synthase to produce nitric oxide, would increase vascular endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone and decrease arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women. Additionally, we examined whether the beneficial effects of estrogen on vascular function were possibly related to BH4. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance) and endothelial-dependent vasodilation [brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] were measured in postmenopausal (n = 24; 57 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) and eumenorrheic premenopausal (n = 9; 33 ± 2 yr) women before and 3 h after the oral administration of BH4. Subsequently, in postmenopausal women, vascular testing (before and after BH4) was repeated following randomization to either 2 days of transdermal estradiol or placebo. Baseline carotid artery compliance and brachial artery FMD were lower in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women (P < 0.0001). BH4 administration increased carotid artery compliance (0.61 ± 0.05 to 0.73 ± 0.04 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1 vs. baseline, P < 0.0001) and brachial artery FMD (P < 0.001) in postmenopausal women but had no effect in premenopausal women (P = 0.62). Carotid artery compliance (0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.78 ± 0.06 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1, P < 0.001) and FMD increased in postmenopausal women in response to estradiol (P = 0.02) but were not further improved with the coadministration of BH4, possibly because estrogen increased BH4 bioavailability. Carotid artery compliance and FMD increased with BH4 in the placebo group (P = 0.02). Although speculative, these results suggest that reduced vascular BH4 may be an important contributor to arterial stiffening in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, related in part to reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone. PMID:22245769

  1. Abnormal structure and increased stiffness of the femoral arterial wall in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, T; Pedersen, E B

    1989-10-01

    Thickness, elastic modulus, and stiffness of the common femoral arterial wall were estimated in 11 patients with essential hypertension and in 11 age-matched normotensive control subjects by use of an in vivo, non-invasive, ultrasound time-motion display technique (M-mode). Hypertensive patients had significantly higher levels than normotensive subjects with regard to arterial wall thickness (0.23 cm vs. 0.18 cm, medians; P less than 0.01), elastic modulus (10.6 x 10(7) Pa vs. 6.18 x 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.05) and arterial wall stiffness (3.80 x 10(7) Pa vs. 2.07 +/- 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that structural changes in the wall of the large arteries contribute to the increase in arterial wall stiffness in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

  2. Increased Pulse Wave Velocity Reflecting Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Kwack, Won Gun; Lee, Youg-Sup; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    The obese patients with diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer as well as adenomas under the shared pathogenesis related to atherosclerosis. Here we determined the association between increased arterial stiffness and colorectal adenomas incorporating parameters including age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profiles, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. Subjects who simultaneously underwent colonoscopies and pulse wave velocity (PWV) determinations between July 2005 and September 2006 were analyzed, based on which the subjects were classified into two groups as patients group with colorectal adenomas (n = 49) and control group (n = 200) with normal, non-polypoid benign lesions or hyperplastic polyps. Uni- and multi-variate analyses were performed to calculate the odd ratio for colon adenomas. Based on uni-variate analysis, age, waist circumference, body mass index, heart-femoral PWV (hfPWV), and brachial-ankle PWV were significantly associated with adenomas (p<0.05) and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the heart-femoral PWV, waist circumference, and the levels of LDL-C were significant risk factor for colorectal adenoma. However, arterial stiffness did not affect the progression of colon adenoma. The finding that hfPWV, reflecting aortic stiffness, was increased in patients with colorectal adenomas lead to conclusion that patients who have prominently increased arterial stiffness can be recommended to undergo colonoscopic examinations and at the same time we also recommend counseling about the risk for atherosclerosis in those who have colorectal adenomas. PMID:21103036

  3. Relation of pulse pressure and arterial stiffness to concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in young men (from the Bogalusa Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Toprak, Ahmet; Reddy, Jagadeesh; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur; Berenson, Gerald

    2009-04-01

    Differences in geometric adaptation of the left ventricle and associated cardiovascular risk may reflect the differential effects of classic risk factors and arterial stiffness on the left ventricle. In the present study, the influence of cardiovascular risk factors and arterial stiffness indexes on left ventricular (LV) geometry types were studied in a large community-based cohort of young adults. As part of the Bogalusa Heart Study, echocardiographic examinations of the heart were performed on 786 black and white adults (age range 24 to 43 years, average 36; 42% men, 70% white). Arterial stiffness indexes of the study cohort included aorta-femoral pulse wave velocity, carotid artery elastic modulus, and arterial compliance using tonometry. Pulse pressure in young adults with concentric LV hypertrophy (47 +/- 11 mm Hg) was significantly higher than in those with eccentric LV hypertrophy (40 +/- 8 mm Hg) and normal geometry (37 +/- 7 mm Hg). Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that widened pulse pressure, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and increased body mass index were associated with concentric LV hypertrophy compared with normal geometry. Similarly, higher Peterson's and Young's elastic modulus of the carotid arteries and lower large- and small-artery compliance, in addition to increased body mass index, diabetes mellitus, and black race, were associated with concentric LV hypertrophy in young adults. In conclusion these data suggested that concentric LV hypertrophy was associated with widened pulse pressure, increased arterial stiffness, and decreased arterial compliance in young adults.

  4. Effects of dark chocolate and cocoa consumption on endothelial function and arterial stiffness in overweight adults.

    PubMed

    West, Sheila G; McIntyre, Molly D; Piotrowski, Matthew J; Poupin, Nathalie; Miller, Debra L; Preston, Amy G; Wagner, Paul; Groves, Lisa F; Skulas-Ray, Ann C

    2014-02-01

    The consumption of cocoa and dark chocolate is associated with a lower risk of CVD, and improvements in endothelial function may mediate this relationship. Less is known about the effects of cocoa/chocolate on the augmentation index (AI), a measure of vascular stiffness and vascular tone in the peripheral arterioles. We enrolled thirty middle-aged, overweight adults in a randomised, placebo-controlled, 4-week, cross-over study. During the active treatment (cocoa) period, the participants consumed 37 g/d of dark chocolate and a sugar-free cocoa beverage (total cocoa = 22 g/d, total flavanols (TF) = 814 mg/d). Colour-matched controls included a low-flavanol chocolate bar and a cocoa-free beverage with no added sugar (TF = 3 mg/d). Treatments were matched for total fat, saturated fat, carbohydrates and protein. The cocoa treatment significantly increased the basal diameter and peak diameter of the brachial artery by 6% (+2 mm) and basal blood flow volume by 22%. Substantial decreases in the AI, a measure of arterial stiffness, were observed in only women. Flow-mediated dilation and the reactive hyperaemia index remained unchanged. The consumption of cocoa had no effect on fasting blood measures, while the control treatment increased fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance (P= 0·01). Fasting blood pressure (BP) remained unchanged, although the acute consumption of cocoa increased resting BP by 4 mmHg. In summary, the high-flavanol cocoa and dark chocolate treatment was associated with enhanced vasodilation in both conduit and resistance arteries and was accompanied by significant reductions in arterial stiffness in women.

  5. Arterial stiffness and wave reflections in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lemogoum, Daniel; Van Bortel, Luc; Najem, Boutaina; Dzudie, Anasthase; Teutcha, Charles; Madu, Ernest; Leeman, Marc; Degaute, Jean-Paul; van de Borne, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that lower blood pressure and increased vasodilatation reported in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients with hemoglobin SS genotype (SS) are translated by lower arterial stiffness determined by pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wave reflections assessed by augmentation index (AI). We enrolled 20 SS (8 females; 12 male) patients closely matched for age, gender, height, and body mass index to 20 subjects with hemoglobin AA genotype (AA). Carotid-femoral PWV (PWV(CF)) and carotid-radial PWV (PWV(CR)) were recorded with the Complior device. Aortic AI was derived from pressure wave analysis (SphygmocoR). PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) were lower in SS than in AA (4.5+/-0.7 m/s versus 6.9+/-0.9 m/s, P<0.0001 and 6.6+/-1.2 m/s versus 9.5+/-1.4 m/s, P<0.0001, respectively). AI was lower in SS than in AA (2+/-14% versus 11+/-8%, P=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed that both PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) were negatively associated with hemoglobin SS type and positively related to mean arterial pressure (MAP), whereas AI was positively associated with MAP and total cholesterol (all P<0.0001). Multivariate analysis restricted to SS indicated a positive association between PWV(CF) and PWV(CR) with age but a negative association with MAP (R2=0.57 and 0.51, respectively, both P<0.001), whereas MAP and heart rate were independently associated with AI (R2=0.65, P<0.001). This study provides the first evidence that SCD is associated with both lower arterial stiffness and wave reflections. SS patients have a paradoxical negative association between PWV and MAP, suggesting that low MAP does not protect them against arterial stiffness impairment.

  6. Arterial Stiffness Is Increased in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Without Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Llauradó, Gemma; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Vilardell, Carme; Simó, Rafael; Freixenet, Núria; Vendrell, Joan; González-Clemente, José Miguel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between arterial stiffness and low-grade inflammation in subjects with type 1 diabetes without clinical cardiovascular disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Sixty-eight patients with type 1 diabetes and 68 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were evaluated. Arterial stiffness was assessed by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV). Serum concentrations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and soluble fractions of tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 and 2 (sTNFαR1 and sTNFαR2, respectively) were measured. All statistical analyses were stratified by sex. RESULTS Subjects with diabetes had a higher aPWV compared with healthy control subjects (men: 6.9 vs. 6.3 m/s, P < 0.001; women: 6.4 vs. 6.0 m/s, P = 0.023). These differences remained significant after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors. Men with diabetes had higher concentrations of hsCRP (1.2 vs. 0.6 mg/L; P = 0.036), IL-6 (0.6 vs. 0.3 pg/mL; P = 0.002), sTNFαR1 (2,739 vs. 1,410 pg/mL; P < 0.001), and sTNFαR2 (2,774 vs. 2,060 pg/mL; P < 0.001). Women with diabetes only had higher concentrations of IL-6 (0.6 vs. 0.4 pg/mL; P = 0.039). In men with diabetes, aPWV correlated positively with hsCRP (r = 0.389; P = 0.031) and IL-6 (r = 0.447; P = 0.008), whereas in women with diabetes no significant correlation was found. In men, multiple linear regression analysis showed that the following variables were associated independently with aPWV: age, BMI, type 1 diabetes, and low-grade inflammation (R2 = 0.543). In women, these variables were age, BMI, mean arterial pressure, and type 1 diabetes (R2 = 0.550). CONCLUSIONS Arterial stiffness assessed as aPWV is increased in patients with type 1 diabetes without clinical cardiovascular disease, independently of classical cardiovascular risk factors. In men with type 1 diabetes, low-grade inflammation is independently associated with arterial stiffness. PMID:22357186

  7. Albuminuria as a marker of arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalaitzidis, Rigas G; Karasavvidou, Despina P; Tatsioni, Athina; Pappas, Kosmas; Katatsis, Giorgos; Liontos, Angelos; Elisaf, Moses S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To access the association between albuminuria levels and arterial stiffness in non-diabetic patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1-2, treated with renin angiotensin blockade agents plus other hypertensive drugs when needed. METHODS: One hundred fifteen patients [median age 52 years (68% males)] were consequently enrolled in the study. For each patient, we recorded gender, age, body mass index (BMI), peripheral systolic blood pressure (pSBP), peripheral diastolic blood pressure, peripheral pulse pressure, central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), central diastolic blood pressure (cDBP), central pulse pressure (cPP), hematocrit, hemoglobin, hsCRP, total cholesterol triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-C, low-density lipoprotein-C, calcium, phosphorus, parathormone, and albumin, as well as 24 h urine albumin excretion. According to 24-h urine albumin collection, patients were then classified as those with moderately increased albuminuria (formerly called macroalbuminuria) (≤ 300 mg/d) and those with severely increased albuminuria (formerly called macroaluminuria (> 300 mg/d). We considered aortic stiffness (AS) indices [carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVc-f) and augmentation index (AIx)] as primary outcomes of the study. We explored potential correlations between severely increased albuminuria and AS indices using a multiple linear regression model. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients were included in the moderately increased albuminuria group and 57 in the severely increased albuminuria. Blood pressure measurements of the study population were 138 ± 14/82 ± 1.3 mmHg (systolic/diastolic). There were no significant differences in age, sex, and BP measurements between the two groups. Patients with severely increased albuminuria had higher PWV and AIx than patients with moderately increased albuminuria (P < 0.02, P < 0.004, respectively). In addition these patients exhibited higher BMI (P < 0.03), hsCRP (P < 0.001), and fibrinogen

  8. ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND INFLUENCES OF THE METABOLIC SYNDROME: A CROSS-COUNTRIES STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Scuteri, Angelo; Cunha, Pedro Guimaraes; Cucca, Francesco; Cockcroft, John; Raso, Francesco U Mattace; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Ryliškytė, Ligita; Rietzschel, Ernst; Strait, James; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Laurent, Stephane; Nilsson, Peter M; Lakatta, Edward G

    2015-01-01

    Specific clusters of metabolic syndrome (MetS) components impact differentially on arterial stiffness, indexed as pulse wave velocity (PWV). Of note, in several population-based studies participating in the MARE (Metabolic syndrome and Arteries REsearch) Consortium the occurrence of specific clusters of MetS differed markedly across Europe and the US. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether specific clusters of MetS are consistently associated with stiffer arteries in different populations. We studied 20,570 subjects from 9 cohorts representing 8 different European countries and the US participating in the MARE Consortium. MetS was defined in accordance with NCEP ATPIII criteria as the simultaneous alteration in ≥3 of the 5 components: abdominal obesity (W), high triglycerides (T), low HDL cholesterol (H), elevated blood pressure (B), and elevated fasting glucose (G). PWV measured in each cohort was “normalized” to account for different acquisition methods. MetS had an overall prevalence of 24.2% (4,985 subjects). MetS accelerated the age-associated increase in PWV levels at any age, and similarly in men and women. MetS clusters TBW, GBW, and GTBW are consistently associated with significantly stiffer arteries to an extent similar or greater than observed in subjects with alteration in all the five MetS components – even after controlling for age, sex, smoking, cholesterol levels, and diabetes mellitus – in all the MARE cohorts. In conclusion, different component clusters of MetS showed varying associations with arterial stiffness (PWV). PMID:24561493

  9. Main pulmonary arterial wall shear stress correlates with invasive hemodynamics and stiffness in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Dunning, Jamie; Shandas, Robin; Buckner, J. Kern; Browning, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Hunter, Kendall S.; Fenster, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with proximal pulmonary arterial remodeling characterized by increased vessel diameter, wall thickening, and stiffness. In vivo assessment of wall shear stress (WSS) may provide insights into the relationships between pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling. We investigated the relationship between main pulmonary artery (MPA) WSS and pulmonary hemodynamics as well as markers of stiffness. As part of a prospective study, 17 PH patients and 5 controls underwent same-day four-dimensional flow cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (4-D CMR) and right heart catheterization. Streamwise velocity profiles were generated in the cross-sectional MPA in 45° increments from velocity vector fields determined by 4-D CMR. WSS was calculated as the product of hematocrit-dependent viscosity and shear rate generated from the spatial gradient of the velocity profiles. In-plane average MPA WSS was significantly decreased in the PH cohort compared with that in controls (0.18 ± 0.07 vs. 0.32 ± 0.08 N/m2; P = 0.01). In-plane MPA WSS showed strong inverse correlations with multiple hemodynamic indices, including pulmonary resistance (ρ = −0.74, P < 0.001), mean pulmonary pressure (ρ = −0.64, P = 0.006), and elastance (ρ = −0.70, P < 0.001). In addition, MPA WSS had significant associations with markers of stiffness, including capacitance (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001), distensibility (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.013), and elastic modulus (ρ = −0.54, P = 0.01). In conclusion, MPA WSS is decreased in PH and is significantly associated with invasive hemodynamic indices and markers of stiffness. 4-D CMR–based assessment of WSS may represent a novel methodology to study blood-vessel wall interactions in PH. PMID:27076906

  10. Causal estimation of neural and overall baroreflex sensitivity in relation to carotid artery stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lipponen, Jukka A; Tarvainen, Mika P; Laitinen, Tomi; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Vanninen, Joonas; Koponen, Timo; Laitinen, Tiina M

    2013-12-01

    Continuous electrocardiogram, blood pressure and carotid artery ultrasound video were analyzed from 15 diabetics and 28 healthy controls. By using these measurements artery elasticity, overall baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) assessed between RR and systolic blood pressure variation, and neural BRS assessed between RR and artery diameter variation were estimated. In addition, BRS was estimated using traditional and causal methods which enable separation of feedforward and feedback variation. The aim of this study was to analyze overall and neural BRS in relation to artery stiffness and to validate the causal BRS estimation method in assessing these two types of BRS within the study population. The most significant difference between the healthy and diabetic groups (p < 0.0007) was found for the overall BRS estimated using the causal method. The difference between the groups was also significant for neural BRS (p < 0.0018). However neural BRS was normal in some old diabetics, which indicates normal functioning of autonomic nervous system (ANS), even though the elasticity in arteries of these subjects was reduced. The noncausal method overestimated neural BRS in low BRS values when compared to causal BRS. In conclusion, neural BRS estimated using the causal method is proposed as the best marker of ANS functioning. PMID:24168896

  11. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S; Laugesen, Esben; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Winther, Simon; Buus, Niels H

    2016-10-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) can be assessed noninvasively based on radial tonometry and may potentially be a better predictor of clinical outcome than brachial BP. However, the validity of noninvasively obtained estimates has never been examined in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared invasive aortic systolic BP (SBP) with estimated central SBP obtained by radial artery tonometry and examined the influence of renal function and arterial stiffness on this relationship. We evaluated 83 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and 41 controls without renal disease undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. BP in the ascending aorta was measured through the angiography catheter and simultaneously estimated using radial tonometry. The mean difference between estimated central and aortic SBP was -13.2 (95% confidence interval -14.9 to -11.4) mm Hg. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and was significantly increased in CKD patients compared with (versus) control patients (mean 10.7 vs. 9.3 m/s). The difference in BP significantly increased 1.0 mm Hg for every 10 ml/min decrease in eGFR and by 1.6 mm Hg per 1 m/s increase in cfPWV. Using multivariate regression analysis including both eGFR and cfPWV, the difference between estimated central and invasive aortic SBP was significantly increased by 0.7 mm Hg. For the entire cohort brachial SBP significantly better reflected invasive SBP than estimated SBP. Thus, tonometry-based estimates of central BP progressively underestimate invasive central SBP with decreasing renal function and increasing arterial stiffness in CKD patients.

  12. Developing an effective arterial stiffness monitoring system using the spring constant method and photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ching-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a fast and effective arterial stiffness monitoring system for diabetic patients using the spring constant method and photoplethysmography (PPG). The experimental group comprised 70 patients (4 type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and 66 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients); 23 participants suffered from atherosclerosis. All were subjected to the measurements of both the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and the spring constants evaluated using the PPG pulse as well as the radial pulse. The control group comprised 70 normal participants (39 men and 31 women) who did not have diabetes mellitus, with an age range of 40-84 years. All control group members were only subjected to the measurement by the spring constant method. For the experimental group, statistical analysis indicated a significantly high correlation between the spring constants computed using PPG and the radial pulse (p < 0.001, correlation coefficient =0.89). The result also showed a significant negative correlation between the cfPWV and the spring constant of PPG (p < 0.001, correlation coefficient = - 0.72); multivariate analysis similarly indicated a close relationship. In addition, we used Student's t test to examine the difference between the experimental and control groups for the spring constant of PPG. A P value less than 0.05 confirmed that the difference between the two groups was statistically significant. In the receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve (=0.82) indicates a good discrimination, and a spring constant of PPG below 516 (g/s (2)) may imply a risk of arterial stiffness for diabetic patients. These findings imply that the spring constant of PPG could effectively identify normal versus abnormal characteristics of elasticity in normal and diabetic participants. As a result of some excellent characteristics in clinical monitoring, the spring constant computed using PPG shows the effectiveness and feasibility in the monitoring system of

  13. Bone Strength and Arterial Stiffness Impact on Cardiovascular Mortality in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Avramovska, Maja; Sikole, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis and increased arterial stiffness independently have been found to be associated with higher cardiovascular events rates in the general population (GP). We examined 558 patients from GP by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) measurements at baseline, with 36-month follow-up period. DXA assessed bone mineral density of femoral neck (BMD FN) and lumbar spine (BMD LS). Carotid-femoral PWV was assessed by pulsed-Doppler. The aim of our study is to find correlation between bone strength and arterial stiffness and their impact on cardiovascular mortality in GP. The mean ± SD of BMD FN, BMD LS, and PWV was 0.852 ± 0.1432 g/cm2, 0.934 ± 0.1546 g/cm2, and 9.209 ± 1.9815 m/s. In multiple regression analysis we found BMD FN (βst = −6.0094, p < 0.0001), hypertension (βst = 1.7340, p < 0.0091), and diabetes (βst = 0.4595, p < 0.0046). With Cox-regression analysis, after 17 cardiovascular events, the significant covariates retained by the backward model were BMD FN (b = −2.4129, p = 0.015) and PWV (b = 0.2606, p = 0.0318). The cut-off values were PWV = 9.4 m/s, BMD FN = 0.783 g/cm2, and BMD LS = 0.992 g/cm2. The results for BMD FN and PWV hazard ratio risk were 1.116 and 1.297, respectively. BMD FN as a measure of bone strength and PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in GP. PMID:27047700

  14. Effect of Lysyl Oxidase Inhibition on Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Hypertension, Remodeling, and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Eberson, Lance S.; Sanchez, Pablo A.; Majeed, Beenish A.; Tawinwung, Supannikar; Secomb, Timothy W.; Larson, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces altered vascular stiffness through responses including both structural and material remodeling. Concurrent with remodeling is the induction of the enzyme lysyl oxidase (LOX) through which ECM proteins are cross-linked. The study objective was to determine the effect of LOX mediated cross-linking on vascular mechanical properties. Three-month old mice were chronically treated with Ang II with or without the LOX blocker, β -aminopropionitrile (BAPN), for 14 days. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) from Doppler measurements of the aortic flow wave was used to quantify in vivo vascular stiffness in terms of an effective Young’s modulus. The increase in effective Young’s modulus with Ang II administration was abolished with the addition of BAPN, suggesting that the material properties are a major controlling element in vascular stiffness. BAPN inhibited the Ang II induced collagen cross-link formation by 2-fold and PWV by 44% (P<0.05). Consistent with this observation, morphometric analysis showed that BAPN did not affect the Ang II mediated increase in medial thickness but significantly reduced the adventitial thickness. Since the hypertensive state contributes to the measured in vivo PWV stiffness, we removed the Ang II infusion pumps on Day 14 and achieved normal arterial blood pressures. With pump removal we observed a decrease of the PWV in the Ang II group to 25% above that of the control values (P=0.002), with a complete return to control values in the Ang II plus BAPN group. In conclusion, we have shown that the increase in vascular stiffness with 14 day Ang II administration results from a combination of hypertension-induced wall strain, adventitial wall thickening and Ang II mediated LOX ECM cross-linking, which is a major material source of vascular stiffening, and that the increased PWV was significantly inhibited with co-administration of BAPN. PMID:25875748

  15. Arterial stiffness and blood flow adaptations following eight weeks of resistance exercise training in young and older women.

    PubMed

    Rossow, Lindy M; Fahs, Christopher A; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Kim, Daeyeol; Mouser, James G; Shore, Erin A; Beck, Travis W; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2014-05-01

    Resistance training is recommended for all adults of both sexes. The arterial stiffness and limb blood flow responses to resistance training in young and older women have not been well-studied. The purpose of this study was to examine arterial stiffness and blood flow adaptations to high-intensity resistance exercise training in young and older women. Young (aged 18-25) and older (aged 50-64) women performed full-body high-intensity resistance exercise three times per week for eight weeks. The following measurements were performed twice prior to training and once following training: carotid to femoral and femoral to tibialis posterior pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, heart rate, resting forearm blood flow and forearm reactive hyperemia. Data was analyzed by ANOVAs with alpha set at 0.05. Correlations were also examined between changes in arterial stiffness and baseline arterial stiffness values. Older subjects had higher carotid-femoral PWV than younger subjects. No significant effects were found for femoral-tibialis posterior PWV or for resting forearm blood flow. Changes in carotid-femoral and femoral-tibialis posterior PWV correlated significantly with their respective baseline values. Older subjects increased peak forearm blood flow while young subjects showed no change. Total hyperemia increased significantly in both groups. In conclusion, in both young and older women, eight weeks of high-intensity resistance training appeared to improve microvascular forearm function while not changing carotid-femoral or femoral-tibialis posterior arterial stiffness. However, a large degree of individual variation was found and arterial stiffness adaptations appeared positively related to the initial stiffness values. PMID:24566193

  16. Associations of Triiodothyronine Levels with Carotid Atherosclerosis and Arterial Stiffness in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kircelli, Fatih; Asci, Gulay; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Gungor, Ozkan; Demirci, Meltem Sezis; Ozbek, Suha Sureyya; Ceylan, Naim; Ozkahya, Mehmet; Toz, Huseyin; Ok, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives End-stage renal disease is linked to alterations in thyroid hormone levels and/or metabolism, resulting in a high prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism and low triiodothyronine (T3) levels. These alterations are involved in endothelial damage, cardiac abnormalities, and inflammation, but the exact mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between serum free-T3 (fT3) and carotid artery atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness, and vascular calcification in prevalent patients on conventional hemodialysis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements 137 patients were included. Thyroid-hormone levels were determined by chemiluminescent immunoassay, carotid artery–intima media thickness (CA-IMT) by Doppler ultrasonography, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV), and augmentation index by Sphygmocor device, and coronary artery calcification (CAC) scores by multi-slice computerized tomography. Results Mean fT3 level was 3.70 ± 1.23 pmol/L. Across decreasing fT3 tertiles, c-f PWV and CA-IMT values were incrementally higher, whereas CACs were not different. In adjusted ordinal logistic regression analysis, fT3 level (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 0.97), age, and interdialytic weight gain were significantly associated with CA-IMT. fT3 level was associated with c-f PWV in nondiabetics but not in diabetics. In nondiabetics (n = 113), c-f PWV was positively associated with age and systolic BP but negatively with fT3 levels (odds ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.83). Conclusions fT3 levels are inversely associated with carotid atherosclerosis but not with CAC in hemodialysis patients. Also, fT3 levels are inversely associated with surrogates of arterial stiffness in nondiabetics. PMID:21836150

  17. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  18. The Role of Monitoring Arterial Stiffness with Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in the Control of Lifestyle-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kohji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao

    2015-09-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. One of the difficulties in controlling those diseases is the lack of a suitable indicator of arteriosclerosis or arterial injury in routine clinical practice. Arterial stiffness was supposed to be one of the monitoring indexes of arteriosclerosis. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is reflecting the stiffness of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and one of the features of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at a measuring time. When doxazosin, an α1-adrenergic blocker, was administered, CAVI decreased, indicating that arterial stiffness is composed of both organic stiffness and functional stiffness, which reflects the contraction of arterial smooth muscle. CAVI shows a high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases, and is also high in persons possessing main coronary risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and smoking. Furthermore, when the most of those risk factors were controlled by proper methods, CAVI improved. Furthermore, the co-relationship between CAVI and heart function was demonstrated during treatment of heart failure. This paper reviews the principle and rationale of CAVI, and discusses the meaning of monitoring CAVI in following up so-called lifestyle-related diseases and cardiac dysfunction in routine clinical practice. PMID:26587461

  19. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2).

  20. Future Treatment of Hypertension: Shifting the Focus from Blood Pressure Lowering to Arterial Stiffness Modulation?

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Cruickshank, J Kennedy

    2015-08-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is the commonest form of hypertension from middle age onwards. Achieving target systolic blood pressure (BP) control remains difficult in everyday clinical practice and even under clinical trial conditions. Most antihypertensive medicines were designed to lower peripheral vascular resistance, which was considered the haemodynamic determinant of hypertension; most are effective in reducing steady but not pulsatile components of BP. Arterial stiffness, defined via aortic length-specific pulse wave velocity (PWV), is thought to be an important determinant of pulse pressure widening through its effects on the timing and amplitude of pressure wave reflection, and/or the aorta's Windkessel function, or its excess 'reservoir' pressure. Whereas pulse pressure is neither an independent nor consistent cardiovascular risk factor, particularly below the age of about 60 years, PWV has become the most powerful predictor of cardiovascular outcomes including mortality, independent of systolic, pulse, mean or other BP components. PWV is therefore a more direct target for treatment. This review addresses the potential therapeutic options for targeting arterial stiffness and the role of pulse pressure.

  1. Increased aortic stiffness and related factors in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2013-10-01

    A number of conditions have been associated with functional changes of large arteries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with aortic stiffness in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The authors studied 86 patients with PAD (ankle-brachial pressure index [ABPI] ≤0.9) and 86 controls. Aortic stiffness was determined by pulse wave velocity (aPWV) using applanation tonometry. In PAD patients, aPWV was higher compared with controls (11 ± 3 vs 9.8 ± 1.8; P=.002). In multiple regression analysis, aPWV was independently associated with pulse pressure (β=0.05, P=.01) in the PAD patients and with age in the control group (β=0.08, P=.0005). The results of this study confirm an aPWV increase in patients with PAD and emphasize the association between blood pressure and aPWV. Further studies are necessary to assess whether higher aortic stiffening adds prognostic value to ABPI, which is the most powerful prognostic indicator in PAD. PMID:24088278

  2. Different Contributions of Physical Activity on Arterial Stiffness between Diabetics and Non-Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jiro; Watanabe, Masafumi; Murasawa, Takahide; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Background We compared the contribution of physical activity to the change in arterial stiffness between patients with and without diabetes in ischemic heart disease. Methods We studied 96 (diabetes) and 109 (without diabetes) patients with ischemic heart disease treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Arterial stiffness was assessed by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) at the first diagnosis of significant coronary ischemia and 6 months after PCI and optimal medical therapy. Physical activity was evaluated using the long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Results CAVI values increased more for diabetic patients than for non-diabetic. The IPAQ scores did not differ between the two groups. During follow-up, CAVI values did not significantly change in either group. In diabetic patients, the CAVI score for 48 patients did not change (NC-group) and 48 patients improved (Improved-group). Physical activity scores were 937.9 ± 923.2 and 1524.6 ± 1166.2 in the NC- and Improved-groups, respectively. IPAQ scores and uric acid levels significantly affect CAVI improvement after adjusting for age, sex, baseline CAVI, total cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusion Determining factors influencing CAVI improvement during follow-up were significantly different between patients with and without diabetes. IPAQ scores and uric acid levels were significantly correlated with CAVI changes. PMID:27508936

  3. Factors associated with arterial stiffness in children aged 9-10 years

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Milena Santos; Mill, José Geraldo; Pereira, Taisa Sabrina Silva; Fernandes, Carolina Dadalto Rocha; Molina, Maria del Carmen Bisi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with stiffness of the great arteries in prepubertal children. METHODS This study with convenience sample of 231 schoolchildren aged 9-10 years enrolled in public and private schools in Vitória, ES, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010-2011. Anthropometric and hemodynamic data, blood pressure, and pulse wave velocity in the carotid-femoral segment were obtained. Data on current and previous health conditions were obtained by questionnaire and notes on the child’s health card. Multiple linear regression was applied to identify the partial and total contribution of the factors in determining the pulse wave velocity values. RESULTS Among the students, 50.2% were female and 55.4% were 10 years old. Among those classified in the last tertile of pulse wave velocity, 60.0% were overweight, with higher mean blood pressure, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. Birth weight was not associated with pulse wave velocity. After multiple linear regression analysis, body mass index (BMI) and diastolic blood pressure remained in the model. CONCLUSIONS BMI was the most important factor in determining arterial stiffness in children aged 9-10 years. PMID:25902563

  4. Arterial stiffness, endothelial function and microcirculatory reactivity in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Scholten, H J; Schilder, J C M; Elsen, B M; Hanselaar, W; Kroner, C I; Draijer, R; Kastelein, J J P; Stok, W; Karemaker, J; de Groot, E

    2008-09-01

    Large (C1) and small (C2) arterial stiffness has been suggested to parallel endothelial reactivity and has led researchers to suggest parameters of arterial stiffness may be alternative measures to brachial sonographic assessments of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). However, past studies comparing these measures can be criticized. In addition to %FMD responses, we recorded concurrent hyperaemic responses of the microcirculation and both were compared with C1 and C2. Twenty-nine subjects 18-30 years of age were investigated. Radial blood pressure was recorded with a tonometer. Pulse waveform analysis was performed to calculate C1 and C2. These were compared with %FMD responses and responses of finger flux measured by laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF); pulsatile finger volume measured by photoplethysmography (PPG); and palm skin temperature measured by infrared thermography (Tpalm) (i.e. microcirculatory responses). Responses were determined as % changes from control. We only found weak relationships between C1 and %FMD (r=0.4, P=0.04); C2 and %PPG (r=0.38, P=0.07); and C2 and %LDFdorsal (r=-0.38; P=0.04). Responses of %FMD weakly parallel those of C1. Neither C2 nor C1 are viable indicators of endothelial or microcirculatory reactivity (i.e. hyperaemic or venous constriction) in healthy, resting young males. These findings refute the claims that C1 and C2 are substitute measures to sonographic assessments of brachial FMD. PMID:18445071

  5. High-Dose versus Low-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation and Arterial Stiffness among Individuals with Prehypertension and Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Amanda; Panza, Gregory; Swales, Heather; Arora, Pankaj; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Wang, Thomas; Thompson, Paul D.; Taylor, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the onset and progression of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, mechanisms underlying vitamin D deficiency-mediated increased risk of CVD remain unknown. We sought to examine the differential effect of high-dose versus low-dose vitamin D supplementation on markers of arterial stiffness among ~40 vitamin D deficient adults with prehypertension. Methods. Participants were randomized to high-dose (4000 IU/d) versus low-dose (400 IU/d) oral vitamin D3 for 6 months. 24 hr ambulatory blood pressure (BP), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and pulse wave analyses were obtained at baseline and after 6 months of vitamin D supplementation. Results. There were no changes in resting BP or pulse wave velocity over 6 mo regardless of vitamin D dose (all p > 0.202). High-dose vitamin D decreased augmentation index and pressure by 12.3 ± 5.3% (p = 0.047) and 4.0 ± 1.5 mmHg (p = 0.02), respectively. However, these decreases in arterial stiffness were not associated with increases in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D over 6 mo (p = 0.425). Conclusion. High-dose vitamin D supplementation appears to lower surrogate measures of arterial stiffness but not indices of central pulse wave velocity. Clinical Trial Registration. This trial is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (Unique Identifier: NCT01240512). PMID:26451070

  6. Hemi-central retinal artery occlusion in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Pukhraj; Rishi, Ekta; Sharma, Tarun; Mahajan, Sheshadri

    2010-01-01

    Amongst the clinical presentations of retinal artery occlusion, hemi-central retinal artery occlusion (Hemi-CRAO) is rarely described. This case series of four adults aged between 22 and 36 years attempts to describe the clinical profile, etiology and management of Hemi-CRAO. Case 1 had an artificial mitral valve implant. Polycythemia and malignant hypertension were noted in Case 2. The third patient had Leiden mutation while the fourth patient had Eisenmenger’s syndrome. Clinical examination and fundus fluorescein angiography revealed a bifurcated central retinal artery at emergence from the optic nerve head, in all cases. Color Doppler examination of the central retinal artery confirmed branching of the artery behind the lamina cribrosa. It is hypothesized that bifurcation of central retinal artery behind the lamina cribrosa may predispose these hemi-trunks to develop an acute occlusion if associated with underlying risk factors. The prognosis depends upon arterial recanalisation and etiology of the thromboembolic event. PMID:20689202

  7. [Clinical value and measurement of arterial stiffness for the assessment of cardiovascular risk in light of recent results].

    PubMed

    Nemcsik, János; Tislér, András; Kiss, István

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular risk stratification is fundamental for the development of effective prevention and therapeutic strategies. Although there are numerous scores and risk tables available, a difference still exists between the estimated and real number of cardiovascular events. Measurement of arterial stiffness can provide additional information to risk stratification. The most widely accepted parameter of arterial stiffness is aortic pulse wave velocity, which has been included in the guideline of the European Society of Hypertension in 2007 and 2013, although American guidelines still omit it. In this review the authors summarize the evidence with regards to the different steps required for clinical application of arterial stiffness measurement and they also discuss the questions that evolved from the methodological variability of different measurement techniques.

  8. The role of pulse transit time as an index of arterial stiffness during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kounalakis, S N; Geladas, N D

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, whether pulse transit time (PTT), a popular index of arterial stiffness at rest, can be also used as such, during steady state exercise. For this purpose, twelve male volunteers exercised on a cycle ergometer for 70 min on three separate occasions whereas, cycling cadence and workload were manipulated in order to produce diverse cardiorespiratory responses. PTT, blood pressure, cardiac output and respiratory frequency were measured during exercise. Resistance to systole and total peripheral resistance were calculated by the ratio of systolic pressure, and mean arterial pressure over cardiac output, respectively. All subjects across all conditions, showed a negative linear correlation (P < 0.01) between changes in PTT and systolic pressure (SP) (r = -0.66), changes in cardiac output (r = -0.76), and respiratory frequency (r = -0.40), whereas PTT was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with total peripheral resistance (r = 0.31), the SP to cardiac output ratio (r = 0.30) and plasma volume changes (r = 0.29). However, forward stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that 71% (P < 0.001) of PTT changes from rest (DeltaPTT) variability was attributed to changes in cardiac output, SP and SP to cardiac output ratio. In the same model, total peripheral resistance did not exert significant influence on DeltaPTT variability. In conclusion, PTT is a reflection not only of SP but also of cardiac output changes per se and in combination with cardiac output (SP to cardiac output ratio) and should not be used as a pure marker of arterial stiffness under marked exercise cardiovascular and respiratory perturbations.

  9. Determinants of the ambulatory arterial stiffness index in 7604 subjects from 6 populations.

    PubMed

    Adiyaman, Ahmet; Dechering, Dirk G; Boggia, José; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W; Kikuya, Masahiro; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Richart, Tom; Thijs, Lutgarde; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Dolan, Eamon; Imai, Yutaka; Sandoya, Edgardo; Ibsen, Hans; Wang, Jiguang; Lind, Lars; O'Brien, Eoin; Thien, Theo; Staessen, Jan A

    2008-12-01

    The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure recordings. We investigated whether the goodness-of-fit of the AASI regression line in individual subjects (r(2)) impacts on the association of AASI with established determinants of the relation between diastolic and systolic blood pressures. We constructed the International Database on the Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (7604 participants from 6 countries). AASI was unity minus the regression slope of diastolic on systolic blood pressure in individual 24-hour ambulatory recordings. AASI correlated positively with age and 24-hour mean arterial pressure and negatively with body height and 24-hour heart rate. The single correlation coefficients and the mutually adjusted partial regression coefficients of AASI with age, height, 24-hour mean pressure, and 24-hour heart rate increased from the lowest to the highest quartile of r(2). These findings were consistent in dippers and nondippers (night:day ratio of systolic pressure >or=0.90), women and men, and in Europeans, Asians, and South Americans. The cumulative z score for the association of AASI with these determinants of the relation between diastolic and systolic blood pressures increased curvilinearly with r(2), with most of the improvement in the association occurring above the 20th percentile of r(2) (0.36). In conclusion, a better fit of the AASI regression line enhances the statistical power of analyses involving AASI as marker of arterial stiffness. An r(2) value of 0.36 might be a threshold in sensitivity analyses to improve the stratification of cardiovascular risk.

  10. Arterial stiffness in kidney transplantation: a single center case-control study comparing belatacept versus calcineurin inhibitor immunosuppressive based regimen.

    PubMed

    Melilli, Edoardo; Bestard-Matamoros, Oriol; Manonelles-Montero, Anna; Sala-Bassa, Neus; Mast, Richard; Grinyó-Boira, Josep M; Cruzado, Josep M

    2015-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is nowadays a well-accepted predictor of cardiovascular mortality in general population; as well as in kidney transplant recipient population. The femoral-carotid pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is the widest used method to assess the arterial stiffness. The aim of this study was to test whether CNI-free immunosuppression based on belatacept was associated with lower cf-PWV, as a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness, than CNI. This was a retrospective case-control study. We included all the cases treated with belatacept as a maintenance immunosuppression in our center (n=20). An appropriate control group of patients (n=20) treated with CNI was selected to achieve match for key factors associated with arterial stiffness. After a follow-up of 5 years after transplantation, the Belatacept group had a reduced prevalence of patients with a cf-PWV higher than 8.1m/s (50% in BLC vs. 25% in CNI, p=0.08). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk of high cf-PWV was correlated with age (OR 1.24; p<0.03) and renal resistive index (OR 1.25; p<0.05). Belatacept treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of cf-PWV (OR 0.008; P=0.045). Belatacept-based maintenance immunosuppression could improve kidney transplant recipient’s survival by reducing cardiovascular events related to stiffness. PMID:25611834

  11. Increased postflight carotid artery stiffness and inflight insulin resistance resulting from 6-mo spaceflight in male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Richard L; Robertson, Andrew D; Arbeille, Philippe; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rush, James W E; Fraser, Katelyn S; Greaves, Danielle K

    2016-03-01

    Removal of the normal head-to-foot gravity vector and chronic weightlessness during spaceflight might induce cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations related to changes in arterial pressure and reduction in physical activity. We tested hypotheses that stiffness of arteries located above the heart would be increased postflight, and that blood biomarkers inflight would be consistent with changes in vascular function. Possible sex differences in responses were explored in four male and four female astronauts who lived on the International Space Station for 6 mo. Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (P = 0.005) and β-stiffness index (P = 0.006) reflected 17-30% increases in arterial stiffness when measured within 38 h of return to Earth compared with preflight. Spaceflight-by-sex interaction effects were found with greater changes in β-stiffness index in women (P = 0.017), but greater changes in pulse wave transit time in men (P = 0.006). Several blood biomarkers were changed from preflight to inflight, including an increase in an index of insulin resistance (P < 0.001) with a spaceflight-by-sex term suggesting greater change in men (P = 0.034). Spaceflight-by-sex interactions for renin (P = 0.016) and aldosterone (P = 0.010) indicated greater increases in women than men. Six-month spaceflight caused increased arterial stiffness. Altered hydrostatic arterial pressure gradients as well as changes in insulin resistance and other biomarkers might have contributed to alterations in arterial properties, including sex differences between male and female astronauts.

  12. Increased postflight carotid artery stiffness and inflight insulin resistance resulting from 6-mo spaceflight in male and female astronauts.

    PubMed

    Hughson, Richard L; Robertson, Andrew D; Arbeille, Philippe; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Rush, James W E; Fraser, Katelyn S; Greaves, Danielle K

    2016-03-01

    Removal of the normal head-to-foot gravity vector and chronic weightlessness during spaceflight might induce cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations related to changes in arterial pressure and reduction in physical activity. We tested hypotheses that stiffness of arteries located above the heart would be increased postflight, and that blood biomarkers inflight would be consistent with changes in vascular function. Possible sex differences in responses were explored in four male and four female astronauts who lived on the International Space Station for 6 mo. Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (P = 0.005) and β-stiffness index (P = 0.006) reflected 17-30% increases in arterial stiffness when measured within 38 h of return to Earth compared with preflight. Spaceflight-by-sex interaction effects were found with greater changes in β-stiffness index in women (P = 0.017), but greater changes in pulse wave transit time in men (P = 0.006). Several blood biomarkers were changed from preflight to inflight, including an increase in an index of insulin resistance (P < 0.001) with a spaceflight-by-sex term suggesting greater change in men (P = 0.034). Spaceflight-by-sex interactions for renin (P = 0.016) and aldosterone (P = 0.010) indicated greater increases in women than men. Six-month spaceflight caused increased arterial stiffness. Altered hydrostatic arterial pressure gradients as well as changes in insulin resistance and other biomarkers might have contributed to alterations in arterial properties, including sex differences between male and female astronauts. PMID:26747504

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Vitamin D Supplementation on Arterial Stiffness and Aortic Blood Pressure in Native American Women

    PubMed Central

    Gepner, Adam D.; Haller, Irina V.; Krueger, Diane C.; Korcarz, Claudia E.; Binkley, Neil; Stein, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is unclear if vitamin D supplementation improves central blood pressure or arterial stiffness in Native American (NA) women. Methods Healthy postmenopausal NA women were randomized to receive 400 IU or 2,500 IU of vitamin D for 6 months. Central systolic blood pressure (cSBP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and aortic augmentation index (AIx) were estimated by tonometry at baseline and after 6 months. Results Study volunteers (n=98) were 61 (7.3) years old. 25(OH)D was 26.4 (11.0) ng/mL. 25(OH)D was similar between the two treatment groups (p=0.291), as were baseline cSBP, cPP, and CVD risk factors (all p>0.1). Treatment with 2,500 IU of daily vitamin D3 did not affect cSBP, cPP, or AIx (all p>0.1) compared to 400 IU daily. Conclusions Despite low serum 25(OH)D at baseline, 6 months of vitamin D supplementation did not improve central blood pressure parameters or arterial stiffness in NA women. PMID:25955191

  14. Nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism (G894T) influences arterial stiffness in adults: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Bond, M Gene; Tang, Rong; Urbina, Elaine M; Li, Shengxu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Berenson, Gerald S

    2004-07-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene is known to influence the regulation of blood pressure (BP) levels. However, whether the eNOS gene locus influences arterial stiffness independently of BP is unknown. This study examines the independent effect of the eNOS gene polymorphism (G894T) on arterial stiffness in 118 African American and 285 white young adults, aged 25 to 37 years. Arterial stiffness was measured from M-mode ultrasounds of common carotid artery using Peterson's (Ep) and Young's (YEM) elastic modulus. African Americans displayed a lower frequency of the T allele than did whites (0.131 v 0.321, P <.001). The T allele was associated with lower systolic BP in African Americans (P =.04) but not in whites. African Americans showed significantly higher values of Ep (that is, increased stiffness) than did whites (49.9 kPa vs 45.5 kPa, P =.003), whereas no such difference in ethnicity was found for YEM, a measure of elasticity adjusted for relative wall thickness. After controlling for sex, age, body mass index, insulin, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure, the T allele was associated with significantly lower values of Ep (P =.037) and YEM (P =.068) in African Americans. Although the genotype effect on Ep and YEM was not significant in whites, trends were similar to those in African Americans. In the total sample, including ethnicity as an additional covariate, the G894T genotype was significantly associated with Ep (P =.046) and YEM (P =.035). These results suggest that the allelic variation (G894T) of the eNOS gene or a locus closely linked to it is associated with lower arterial wall stiffness, adjusting for BP levels, in young adults.

  15. Infant Arterial Stiffness and Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy: A UK Birth Cohort (Baby VIP Study)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen A.; Cade, Janet E.; McArdle, Harry J.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hayes, Helen E.; Ciantar, Etienne; Simpson, Nigel A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In animal studies, iron deficiency during pregnancy has been linked to increased offspring cardiovascular risk. No previous population studies have measured arterial stiffness early in life to examine its association with maternal iron status. Objective This study aimed to examine the association between maternal iron status in early pregnancy with infant brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods The Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular Health and Iron in Pregnancy) study is a UK-based birth cohort which recruited 362 women after delivery from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals postnatal wards. Ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester. Infant brachio-femoral PWV was measured during a home visit at 2–6 weeks. Results Iron depletion (ferritin <15 µg/l) was detected in 79 (23%) women in early pregnancy. Infant PWV (mean = 6.7 m/s, SD = 1.3, n = 284) was neither associated with maternal ferritin (adjusted change per 10 µg/l = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01, 0.1), nor with iron depletion (adjusted change = −0.2, 95% CI: −0.6, 0.2). No evidence of association was observed between maternal serum transferrin receptor level and its ratio to ferritin with infant PWV. Maternal anaemia (<11 g/dl) at <20 weeks’ gestation was associated with a 1.0-m/s increase in infant PWV (adjusted 95% CI: 0.1, 1.9). Conclusion This is the largest study to date which has assessed peripheral PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness in infants. There was no evidence of an association between markers of maternal iron status early in pregnancy and infant PWV. PMID:25790854

  16. Racial and socioeconomic disparities in arterial stiffness and intima media thickness among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Thurston, Rebecca C; Matthews, Karen A

    2009-03-01

    Racial and socioeconomic status (SES) disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk are well established among adults. However, little is known about disparities in CVD risk among adolescents, particularly considering indices of subclinical CVD. Our aim was to examine socioeconomic and racial disparities in subclinical CVD indices among adolescents. We hypothesized that African American and lower SES adolescents would show greater arterial stiffness and intima media thickness compared to Caucasian and higher SES adolescents, respectively. Participants were 81 African American and 78 Caucasian adolescents (mean age=17.8) from two schools in Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Measures of subclinical CVD were pulse wave velocity and intima media thickness, as assessed by Doppler and B-mode ultrasound, respectively. SES indices included parental education, family income, family assets, subjective social status, and census-derived neighborhood SES. Hypotheses were evaluated in multiple linear regression models with the covariates age, gender, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure. Results indicated that African American adolescents were more often in low SES positions than Caucasians. When considered individually, racial and SES disparities in pulse wave velocity, and to a lesser extent, intima media thickness, were evident. When race and SES were considered together, high school education, low or medium income, and low neighborhood SES were associated with higher pulse wave velocity. Fewer assets were associated with higher intima media thickness. In conclusion, racial and SES disparities in indices of subclinical CVD were observed, with findings most pronounced for SES disparities in pulse wave velocity. This study extends previous findings in adults to adolescents, indicating that disparities in arterial stiffness and intima media thickness occur as early as adolescence. Efforts to reduce socioeconomic and racial disparities in CVD should target disparities early in life.

  17. Effect of a tart cherry juice supplement on arterial stiffness and inflammation in healthy adults: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Anthony; Mathew, Shilpa; Moore, Chris T; Russell, Jean; Robinson, Emma; Soumpasi, Vithleem; Barker, Margo E

    2014-06-01

    Tart cherries are a particularly rich source of anthocyanins. Evidence indicates that dietary intake of anthocyanins is inversely associated with arterial stiffness. We conducted an open-label randomised placebo controlled study to determine whether a tart cherry juice concentrate (Cherry Active) reduced arterial stiffness, inflammation and risk markers for cardiovascular disease in 47 healthy adults (30-50 years). Participants consumed 30 ml of cherry concentrate diluted to a volume of 250 ml with water or the same volume of an energy matched control drink daily for six weeks. Measurements were taken at baseline and at the end of the intervention. There was no effect of the intervention on arterial stiffness (P = 0.218), c-reactive protein (P = 0.220), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.163), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.121), total cholesterol (P = 0.342) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.127). At the end of the intervention, plasma antioxidant capacity (measured as the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP)) was significantly higher in the intervention group than the control group (P = 0.012). We conclude that a tart cherry juice concentrate rich in anthocyanins has no effect on arterial stiffness, c-reactive protein and risk markers for cardiovascular disease, but evokes a minor increase in antioxidant status in healthy adults. PMID:24570273

  18. Association between plasma sLOX-1 concentration and arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takeshi; Maeda, Seiji; Mukai, Jun; Ohki, Makoto; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-09-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is implicated in vascular endothelial function. Vascular endothelial function is a potent regulator of arterial stiffness, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether LOX-1 is associated with arterial stiffness. Plasma concentrations of soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, an index of arterial stiffness) were measured in 143 individuals between 51 and 83 years of age. Plasma sLOX-1 concentration was correlated with baPWV (r = 0.288, p = 0.0005). In stepwise regression analysis, plasma sLOX-1 concentration was associated with baPWV, after adjusting for age; body mass index; blood pressure; heart rate; blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin; sex; and use of antihypertensives, lipid-lowering agents, and other medications (R (2) = 0.575, p<0.0001). Multiple logistic regression demonstrated that plasma sLOX-1 concentration was independently associated with elevated baPWV (≥14.0 m/s; odds ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.03; p = 0.03). These results suggest that LOX-1 is associated with arterial stiffness. PMID:26388674

  19. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim, Eon-Ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60-80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  20. Effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of female patients with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seol-Jung; Kim,, Eon-ho; Ko, Kwang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness or female patients with metabolic syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=12) or a control group (n=11). Subjects in the exercise group performed aerobic exercise at 60–80% of maximum heart rate for 40 min 5 times a week for 12 weeks. The changes in metabolic syndrome risk factors, resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness were measured and analyzed before and after initiation of the exercise program to determine the effect of exercise. Arterial stiffness was assessed based on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV). [Results] Compared to the control group; The metabolic syndrome risk factors (weight, % body fat, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and HDL-Cholesterol) were significantly improved in the exercise: resting heart rate was significantly decreased; VO2max, muscle strength and muscle endurance were significantly increased; and ba-PWV was significantly decreased. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise had beneficial effects on the resting heart rate, physical fitness, and arterial stiffness of patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27390411

  1. Influence of metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its age-related change in young adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Berenson, Gerald S

    2005-06-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with risk variables of metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and older adults. However, information regarding the influence of the metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its rate of change with age in young adults is limited. These aspects were examined in a sample of 806 asymptomatic, healthy young adults aged 24-44 years from a black-white community. Brachial to ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measured by an oscillometric method was used as an index of arterial stiffness. baPWV increased with the increasing number of metabolic syndrome components, defined by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (1256, 1314, and 1422 cm/s for those with 0, 1-2, and 3-5 components, respectively, P for trend <0.001). Furthermore, the rate of change (slope) of baPWV with age increased as the number of metabolic syndrome components increased (4.1, 10.7, and 18.7 cm/s per year for those with 0, 1-2, and 3-5 components, respectively; P for comparison of slopes <0.001). These findings by showing the deleterious effects of metabolic syndrome on arterial stiffness and its age-related increase in young adults underscore the importance of this syndrome in cardiovascular risk assessment even in a younger population. Further longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the current cross-sectional findings.

  2. Stiffness of the large arteries in individuals with and without Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Anabel N; Coelho, Luan Cesar; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves; Vasconcellos, Maria José Rossi; Cunha, Roberto S; Abreu, Glaucia R

    2011-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome is known to cause premature aging in several organ systems. However, it remains unclear whether this aging effect also affects the structure and function of the large arterial trunks. In this controlled study, the possibility of changes in the large arteries due to aging was evaluated in patients with Down syndrome. Methods: Eighty-two subjects of both genders were selected. The Down syndrome group had 41 active subjects consisting of 19 males and 22 females (mean age 21 ± 1, range 13–42 years) without cardiovascular complications and who did not use vasoactive drugs. The control group consisted of 41 healthy individuals without trisomy 21 of the same gender and age as the Down syndrome group and who did not use vasoactive medication. Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity was obtained as an index of aortic stiffness using an automatic noninvasive method. Results: Individuals with Down syndrome had significantly lower blood pressure than those in the control group. Systolic blood pressure for the Down syndrome group and control group was 106 ± 2 mmHg vs 117 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001), respectively; diastolic blood pressure was 66 ± 2 mmHg vs 77 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001); and mean arterial pressure was 80 ± 1 mmHg vs 90 ± 1 mmHg (P < 0.001). Only age and systolic blood pressure were shown to correlate significantly with pulse wave velocity, but the slopes of the linear regression curves of these two variables showed no significant difference between the two study groups. Pulse wave velocity, which was initially significantly lower in the Down syndrome group (7.51 ± 0.14 m/s vs 7.84 ± 0.12 m/s; P <0.05), was similar between the groups after systolic blood pressure adjustment (7.62 ± 0.13 m/s vs 7.73 ± 0.13 m/s). Conclusion: Despite evidence in the literature that patients with Down syndrome undergo early aging, this process does not seem to affect the large arterial trunks, given that values of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were

  3. Maraviroc Reduces Arterial Stiffness in PI-Treated HIV-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piconi, Stefania; Pocaterra, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Cossu, Maria; Masetti, Michela; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Clerici, Mario; Trabattoni, Daria

    2016-01-01

    The Δ32-CCR5 deletion of the CCR5 receptor is protective toward coronary artery pathology and myocardial infarction. Maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, was recently introduced in the therapy of HIV infection; we evaluated whether this drug could modulate the atherosclerotic burden in aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals who underwent MVC intensification. Thus, the effect of MVC on intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, metabolic parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and microbial traslocation markers was analyzed in 6 aviremic PI-treated HIV-positive individuals and were compared to those obtained in 9 additional aviremic PI-treated subjects that were enrolled retrospectively from our outpatients cohort. MVC intensification resulted in a significant reduction in intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity and triglycerides compared to baseline. Notably, MVC was also associated with a significant reduction of IL-6, microbial translocation indexes, sICAM and sVCAM; these changes were maintained throughout the 6 months of MVC intensification. No significant modifications were observed in CD4 counts, HIV viral load, and cholesterolemia. Results herein support a role of CCR5 antagonists in reducing the cardiovascular risk in HIV-infection. The hampering of inflammation, microbial translocation and the improvement of endothelial function could justify the protective role of CCR5 antagonists on atherosclerotic burden. PMID:27352838

  4. Noninvasive pulse transit time measurement for arterial stiffness monitoring in microgravity.

    PubMed

    McCall, Corey; Rostosky, Rea; Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2015-01-01

    The use of a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor to estimate arterial stiffness, by measurement of pulse transit time (PTT), was demonstrated in microgravity. The monitor's utility for space applications was shown by establishing the correlation between ground-based and microgravity-based measurements. The system consists of a scale-based ballistocardiogram (BCG) and a toe-mounted photoplethysmogram (PPG). PTT was measured from the BCG I-wave to the intersecting tangents of the first trough and maximum first derivative of the PPG waveforms of each subject. The system was tested on a recent series of parabolic flights in which the PTT of nine subjects was measured on the ground and in microgravity. An average of 60.2 ms PTT increase from ground to microgravity environments was shown, and was consistent across all test subjects (standard deviation = 32.9 ms). This increase in PTT could be explained by a number of factors associated with microgravity and reported in previous research, including elimination of hydrostatic pressure, reduction of intrathoracic pressure, and reduction of mean arterial pressure induced by vasodilation. PMID:26737764

  5. Effect of probe contact pressure on the photoplethysmographic assessment of conduit artery stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Rubins, Uldis; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars

    2013-02-01

    Currently, photoplethysmography (PPG) is a frequently studied optical blood pulsation detection technique among biophotonic and biomedical researchers due to the fact that it shows high potential for estimating the arterial stiffness (AS). The extraction of diagnostically useful information requires standardized measurement procedure with good repeatability. However, the effects of a crucially important factor-the optimal contact pressure (CP) of the probe-are often ignored. Also, CP values are not reported to evaluate those effects. It is hypothesized that AS estimated from PPG pulse wave 2nd derivative parameter b/a is strongly inconsistent when recorded at nonoptimal probe CP. Our pilot study confirmed this during in vivo PPG recordings from conduit artery sites on five healthy subjects at variable probe CP (0 to 15 kPa) by using 880 nm reflectance type sensor, force transducer, and PPG alternating current (AC) signal pulse area derived optimal CP criterion. The b/a values, calculated from PPG with variable CP, showed variation >300 percent. In contrast, at the optimal CP, the b/a showed high repeatability (coefficient of variability <5 percent). The effect has been explained with exponential pulse pressure-volume relationship model which indicates the optimal CP range.

  6. Noninvasive pulse transit time measurement for arterial stiffness monitoring in microgravity.

    PubMed

    McCall, Corey; Rostosky, Rea; Wiard, Richard M; Inan, Omer T; Giovangrandi, Laurent; Cuttino, Charles Marsh; Kovacs, Gregory T A

    2015-01-01

    The use of a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor to estimate arterial stiffness, by measurement of pulse transit time (PTT), was demonstrated in microgravity. The monitor's utility for space applications was shown by establishing the correlation between ground-based and microgravity-based measurements. The system consists of a scale-based ballistocardiogram (BCG) and a toe-mounted photoplethysmogram (PPG). PTT was measured from the BCG I-wave to the intersecting tangents of the first trough and maximum first derivative of the PPG waveforms of each subject. The system was tested on a recent series of parabolic flights in which the PTT of nine subjects was measured on the ground and in microgravity. An average of 60.2 ms PTT increase from ground to microgravity environments was shown, and was consistent across all test subjects (standard deviation = 32.9 ms). This increase in PTT could be explained by a number of factors associated with microgravity and reported in previous research, including elimination of hydrostatic pressure, reduction of intrathoracic pressure, and reduction of mean arterial pressure induced by vasodilation.

  7. Effect of whole-body vibration for 3 months on arterial stiffness in the middle-aged and elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chung-Liang; Chen, Han-Yu; Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Liao, Wan-Chun; Liu, Bing-Tang; Lee, Meng-Chih; Chen, Hsin-Shui

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common problem of middle-aged and older adults. Increased arterial stiffness is a CVD risk factor. Whole-body vibration (WBV) is a simple and convenient exercise for middle-aged and older adults; however, there have been few studies investigating the effect of WBV on arterial stiffness. This study mainly investigated the effect of WBV on arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults. Methods A total of 38 (21 women and 17 men) middle-aged and elderly subjects (average age, 61.9 years) were randomly divided into the WBV group and the control group for a 3-month trial. The WBV group received an intervention of 30 Hz and 3.2 g WBV in a natural full standing posture at a sports center. The brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of systemic arterial stiffness, and blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the intervention. Results After 3 months, there were no significant changes in blood pressure or heart rate in both groups. However, the bilateral baPWV was significantly reduced in the WBV group (decreased by 0.65 m/second [P=0.014]; 0.63 m/second [P=0.041] in either side), but not in the control group. The comparison between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion This study found that 3 months of WBV had a positive effect on arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults and could therefore be regarded as a supplementary exercise. Larger-scale studies are needed to confirm the effects of WBV in the future. PMID:24872684

  8. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  9. Arterial Stiffness Is Associated With Cardiovascular, Renal, Retinal, and Autonomic Disease in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Theilade, Simone; Lajer, Maria; Persson, Frederik; Joergensen, Christel; Rossing, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In patients with type 1 diabetes, we investigated the association between arterial stiffness and diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study including 676 Caucasian patients with type 1 diabetes (374 [55%] men, aged 54 ± 13 years [mean ± SD]) and 51 nondiabetic controls (28 [55%] men, aged 47 ± 13 years). Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with SphygmoCor (AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia) for 635 patients and all 51 controls. RESULTS PWVs (mean ± SD) in patients and controls were 10.4 ± 3.4 and 7.6 ± 1.9 m/s, respectively (P < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment, PWV correlated with age, diabetes duration, urinary albumin excretion rate, heart rate, and blood pressure (P < 0.05 for all). ANCOVA was used for comparisons between groups and adjusted for gender, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, heart rate, HbA1c, and 24-h mean arterial pressure. PWVs in normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric, and macroalbuminuric patients were 9.5 ± 3.2, 11.0 ± 3.6, and 11.4 ± 3.0 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). PWV in patients with previous cardiovascular disease, versus patients without, was 12.1 ± 3.5 vs. 10.0 ± 3.2 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). PWVs in patients with high (≥140/90 mmHg) versus intermediate (130–40/80–89 mmHg) and low (<130/80 mmHg) blood pressure were 11.8 ± 3.6, 10.0 ± 3.0, and 9.8 ± 3.3 m/s, respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). Furthermore, PWV increased with increasing degree of retinopathy: 8.0 ± 2.5 m/s (nil), 10.0 ± 2.8 m/s (simplex), 12.1 ± 3.5 m/s (proliferative), and 12.7 ± 2.4 m/s (blind), respectively (adjusted P < 0.001). Finally, PWV increased with abnormal heart rate variability: 11.5 ± 3.3 m/s vs. 10.1 ± 3.1 m/s (borderline) and 8.1 ± 2.1 m/s (normal) (adjusted P = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS Arterial stiffness increased with presence and duration of type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, PWV increased with all the investigated diabetes complications

  10. Altered Arterial Stiffness and Subendocardial Viability Ratio in Young Healthy Light Smokers after Acute Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Robert J.; Scheffler, Patrick; Yu, Alice; Egiziano, Giordano; Mutter, Andrew; Bacon, Simon; Carli, Franco; Daskalopoulos, Marios E.; Daskalopoulou, Stella S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies showed that long-standing smokers have stiffer arteries at rest. However, the effect of smoking on the ability of the vascular system to respond to increased demands (physical stress) has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of smoking on arterial stiffness and subendocardial viability ratio, at rest and after acute exercise in young healthy individuals. Methods/Results Healthy light smokers (n = 24, pack-years = 2.9) and non-smokers (n = 53) underwent pulse wave analysis and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at rest, and 2, 5, 10, and 15 minutes following an exercise test to exhaustion. Smokers were tested, 1) after 12h abstinence from smoking (chronic condition) and 2) immediately after smoking one cigarette (acute condition). At rest, chronic smokers had higher augmentation index and lower aortic pulse pressure than non-smokers, while subendocardial viability ratio was not significantly different. Acute smoking increased resting augmentation index and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with non-smokers, and decreased subendocardial viability ratio compared with the chronic condition. After exercise, subendocardial viability ratio was lower, and augmentation index and aortic pulse pressure were higher in non-smokers than smokers in the chronic and acute conditions. cfPWV rate of recovery of was greater in non-smokers than chronic smokers after exercise. Non-smokers were also able to achieve higher workloads than smokers in both conditions. Conclusion Chronic and acute smoking appears to diminish the vascular response to physical stress. This can be seen as an impaired ‘vascular reserve’ or a blunted ability of the blood vessels to accommodate the changes required to achieve higher workloads. These changes were noted before changes in arterial stiffness or subendocardial viability ratio occurred at rest. Even light smoking in young healthy individuals appears to have

  11. Correlates of carotid artery stiffness in young adults: The Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Urbina, E M; Srinivasan, S R; Kieltyka, R L; Tang, R; Bond, M G; Chen, W; Berenson, G S

    2004-09-01

    Decreased arterial elasticity, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular (C-V) disease, is associated with C-V risk factors in middle-aged and older individuals. However, information is limited in this regard in young adults. This aspect was examined in a community-based sample of 516 black and white subjects aged 25-38 years (71% white, 39% male). The common carotid artery elasticity was measured from M-mode ultrasonography as Peterson's elastic modulus (Ep) and relative wall thickness-adjusted Young's elastic modulus (YEM). Blacks and males had higher Ep (P < 0.05); males had higher YEM (P < 0.0001); and blacks had higher wall thickness (P < 0.01). For the entire sample adjusted for race and gender both Ep and YEM correlated significantly (P < 0.05-0.0001) with age, BMI, waist, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, product of heart rate and pulse pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol ratio, insulin and glucose. In a multivariate regression model that included hemodynamic variables, systolic blood pressure, product of heart rate and pulse pressure, age, triglycerides, BMI, and male gender (for YEM only) were independent correlates of Ep (R2 = 0.38) and YEM (R2 = 0.25). When the hemodynamic variables were excluded from the model, age, triglycerides, BMI, black race (Ep only), male gender, parental history of hypertension, HDL cholesterol (inverse association), and insulin (marginal significance) remained independent correlates of Ep (R2 = 0.20) and YEM (R2 = 16). Both Ep and YEM increased (P for trend P < 0.0001) with increasing number of independent continuous risk factors (defined as values above or below the age, race, and gender-specific extreme quintiles) that were retained in the regression models. The observed increasing arterial stiffness (or decreased elasticity) with increasing number of risk factors related to insulin resistance syndrome in free-living, asymptomatic young adults has important implications for

  12. Assessment of Pulmonary Artery Stiffness of Repaired Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namheon; Banerjee, Rajit; Taylor, Michael; Hor, Kan

    2012-10-01

    Surgical correction or palliation of congenital heart disease (CHD) often requires augmenting the main pulmonary artery (MPA) with non-native material or placing a cylindrical graft. The degree to which this intervention affects PA compliance is largely unknown. In this study, the MPA stiffness characteristics were assessed by its compliance, distensibility, and pressure-strain modulus. Coregistered velocity encoded phase-contrast MRI and cardiac catheterization data were available for a cohort of repaired CHD patients (n=8) and controls (n=3). All patients were repaired with either an RV-PA conduit or a RV outflow tract patch. We measured the MPA area change by MRI and MPA pressure during the cath. The measurements were taken through or just distal to the conduit. The MPA compliance and distensibility for the patients were significantly lower than the controls: compliance (9.8±10.8 vs 28.3±7.7mm^2/mmHg, p<0.05), distensibility (2.2±1.5 vs 6.6±2.1%Area change/mmHg, p=0.05). The patients had a significantly higher pressure-strain modulus (152.3±116.4mmHg, p<0.05) than the controls (35.8±10.6mmHg). The abnormally elevated PA stiffness due to the rigidity of the conduit or patch material may cause a compliance mismatch resulting in high stress levels contributing to the observed progressive PA dilatation. This may be a factor in the progressive RV dilatation seen in this cohort of repaired CHD patients.

  13. Arterial stiffness is regulated by nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor during changes in blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Bellien, Jeremy; Favre, Julie; Iacob, Michele; Gao, Ji; Thuillez, Christian; Richard, Vincent; Joannidès, Robinson

    2010-03-01

    Cytochrome-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids may be important endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors, opening calcium-activated potassium channels, but their involvement in the regulation of arterial stiffness during changes in blood flow in humans is unknown. In healthy volunteers, we measured arterial pressure, radial artery diameter, wall thickness, and flow (NIUS02) during hand skin heating in the presence of saline or inhibitors of NO synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine), calcium-activated potassium channels (tetraethylammonium), and cytochrome epoxygenases (fluconazole). Arterial compliance and elastic modulus were calculated and fitted as functions of midwall stress to suppress the confounding influence of geometric changes. Under saline infusion, heating induced an upward shift of the compliance-midwall stress curve and a downward shift of the modulus-midwall stress curve demonstrating a decrease in arterial tone and stiffness when blood flow increases. These shifts were reduced by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine and abolished by the combinations of N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine+tetraethylammonium and N(G)-monomethyl arginine+fluconazole. In parallel, in isolated mice coronary arteries, fluconazole and tetraethylammonium reduced the relaxations to acetylcholine. However, fluconazole did not affect the relaxations to the openers of calcium-activated potassium channels of small- and intermediate-conductance NS309 and of large-conductance NS1619 excluding a direct effect on these channels. Moreover, tetraethylammonium reduced the relaxations to NS1619 but not to NS309, suggesting that the endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor involved mainly acts on large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. These results show in humans that, during flow variations, arterial stiffness is regulated by the endothelium through the release of both NO and cytochrome-related endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor.

  14. Stress phase angle depicts differences in arterial stiffness: phantom and in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Lili; Meng, Long; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qiwen; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-06-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining of a blood vessel wall are exposed to both the wall shear stress (WSS) of blood flow and the circumferential strain (CS) of pulsing artery wall motion. Both WSS and CS keep involved in the modulation of ECs’ biochemical response and function and the temporal phase angle between the two is called stress phase angle (SPA). Previous studies at the cellular level have indicated that SPA is highly negative at sites that are prone to atherosclerosis, and hypothesized that large SPA may contribute to atherogenesis. Till now, there is no experimental data to support this hypothesis, probably due to the lack of a proper tool for measuring WSS and CS simultaneously and real time. In this study, a non-invasive ultrasonic biomechanics method was utilized to quantitatively calculate the SPA and experimentally evaluate the role of SPA in predicting early atherosclerosis. Three silicon tubes with a stiffness of 1.15, 3.62, 9.38 MPa were assembled in a pulsatile flow circuit and the values of SPA were measured to be -101.86 ± 3.65°,-170.19 ± 17.77° and -260.63 ± 18.62°, respectively. For the PVA-c phantoms, stiffness was 162.45, 235.68 and 374.24 kPa, the SPA corresponding to -170.32 ± 17.55°,-207.56 ± 10.78° and -261.08 ± 10.90°, respectively. Both phantom studies results demonstrated that SPA was highly negative in stiffer arteries. Further, experiments were taken in healthy living rats as control group (n = 3), atherosclerotic model group (n = 3), and drug treated group (n = 3), and the results showed that SPA was most negative in the model group, and SPA was least negative in the control group. Together, this study suggested that highly negative SPA appeared to be a prominent mechanical feature of vessels prone to atherosclerotic disease.

  15. Derived Arterial Stiffness is Increased in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Drakatos, Panagis; Higgins, Sean; Pengo, Martino F.; Kent, Brian D.; Muza, Rex; Karkoulias, Kiriakos; Leschziner, Guy; Williams, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Both periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). OSA has also been linked to increased large arterial stiffness, which is considered an independent risk factor for CVD. We utilized a previously validated index of large artery stiffness (SIDVP) derived from the digital volume pulse (DVP) to seek comparison in patients with PLMS and OSA. Methods: Forty-nine adult male subjects, without known comorbidities that could affect arterial stiffness or on vasoactive medication, were retrospectively identified and categorized into controls (n = 8), PLMS (n = 13), OSA (n = 17), and OSA/PLMS (n = 11). The cutoff for PLMS was a periodic limb movement index (PLMI) > 15 events/h, and for OSA an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 10 events/h. SIDVP was derived from the raw data of photoplethysmography of the nocturnal polysomnography, averaged for 2 min prior to sleep study initiation (baseline), after completion in the morning, and every half hour after sleep onset. Results: The groups were age/body mass index-matched. Controls showed lower baseline, morning, and overall SIDVP compared to the other groups (p < 0.01). Patients with PLMS (PLMI: 50.69 ± 9.7 events/h) and the OSA group (AHI: 29.7 ± 2 events/h) demonstrated similar overall SIDVP (6.78 ± 0.08 versus 6.94 ± 0.04, respectively, p = 0.5), whereas the OSA/PLMS (AHI: 29.35 ± 8, PLMI: 50.63 ± 7.2) group demonstrated the highest (7.40 ± 0.06, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Based on an easily reproducible and applicable marker of large arterial stiffness, patients with significant PLMS had higher SIDVP when compared to controls and comparable to those with moderate/severe OSA. The OSA/PLMS group had the highest SIDVP, implying a possible additive effect of OSA and PLMS on arterial stiffness. Citation: Drakatos P, Higgins S, Pengo MF, Kent BD, Muza R, Karkoulias K, Leschziner G, Williams A. Derived arterial

  16. Urinary Albumin Excretion is Increased in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Associated with Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Becetti, Karima; Oeser, Annette; Ormseth, Michelle; Solus, Joseph F.; Raggi, Paolo; Stein, C. Michael; Chung, Cecilia P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High urinary albumin excretion is a risk factor for CVD in the general population, but its role in atherosclerosis in patients with RA is not well defined. Methods We determined the urine albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) in 136 patients with RA and 79 controls. Individuals with diabetes or a clinical history of CVD were excluded. We measured coronary artery calcium (CAC) with electron beam computer tomography and augmentation index (AIX) using pulse wave analysis. In patients with RA, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and concentrations of vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), interleukin-10 (IL-10), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cystatin-C were measured and results correlated with UACR. Results Patients with RA had higher UACR [median (IQR): 7.6 (4.0-15.5) mg/g than control subjects: 5.6 (3.3-9.0)mg/g, p=0.02]. The presence of CAC was not associated with UACR in RA or control subjects. In patients with RA, UACR was significantly correlated with AIX (rho=0.24, p=0.01), higher levels of VCAM-1 (rho=0.2, p=0.01) and lower levels of IL-10 (rho=-0.2, p=0.02). The association between AIX and higher UACR remained significant in multivariate analysis [β coefficient of 1.9 (95% CI 0.4-3.4), p=0.01 that adjusted for age, sex, and race]. Conclusion Urinary albumin excretion was higher in RA patients than controls and correlated with increased arterial stiffness, higher VCAM-1, and lower IL-10 concentrations. PMID:25641887

  17. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  18. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed. PMID:25972093

  19. Arterial stiffness depends on serum ionized calcium levels during dialysis with regional citrate anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Moor, Matthias B; Kruse, Anja; Uehlinger, Dominik E; Eisenberger, Ute

    2013-05-01

    Hemodynamic effects related to changes in serum ionized calcium (iCa) are difficult to determine during conventional hemodialysis (HD) using a fixed dialysate concentration of calcium. Regional citrate anticoagulation (RCA) allows the study of the effects of predefined iCa changes on arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) during a single dialysis session. In a crossover study, 15 patients with end-stage renal disease underwent two HD sessions with RCA. Each session was divided into two study phases in which iCa was titrated either to 0.8-1.0 mm or to 1.1-1.4 mm. The sequence of phases was randomly chosen and alternated for the second session. After reaching a stable iCa level, pulse wave velocity (PWV), arterial BP, and heart rate were measured. iCa levels were modified during sequence 1 (iCa low-high) from a predialysis baseline value of 1.15 ± 0.09 mm, first to 0.92 ± 0.05 mm (time point 1; P < 0.001 vs. baseline) and then to 1.18 ± 0.05 (time point 2; ns). During sequence 2 (iCa high-low), iCa levels were modified from 1.15 ± 0.12 mm first to 1.20 ± 0.05 mm (time point 1; ns vs. baseline) and then to 0.93 ± 0.03 (time point 2; P < 0.001). Assuming a basic linear repeated measures model, PWV was positively related to iCa levels (P < 0.03) independent of systolic or diastolic BP, heart rate, or ultrafiltration rate. PWV is closely related to acute changes in serum iCa levels in HD patients using RCA. RCA provides an interesting opportunity to study the effects of acute iCa changes during one dialysis procedure.

  20. Proinflammation of aging central arteries: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyi; Monticone, Robert E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is a cornerstone of organismal aging. The central arterial wall structurally and functionally remodels under chronic proinflammatory stress over a lifetime. The low-grade proinflammation that accompanies advancing age causes arterial wall thickening and stiffening. These structural and functional alterations are consequences of adverse molecular and cellular events, e.g. an increase in local angiotensin II signaling that induces an inflammatory phenotypic shift of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, interventions to restrict proinflammatory signaling are a rational approach to delay or prevent age-associated adverse arterial remodeling.

  1. Exploring the associations between arterial stiffness and spinal cord impairment: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Miyatani, Masae; Szeto, Maggie; Moore, Cameron; Oh, Paul I.; McGillivray, Colleen F.; Catharine Craven, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective Elevated aortic arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity: aPWV) is an independent coronary artery disease predictor among the general population. The purpose of this study was to: (1) report aPWV values in a representative cohort of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI); (2) to compare aPWV values in people with SCI based on neurological level of injury; and (3) to contrast the reported aPWV values with available normal values for the general population. Methods Adults with chronic SCI (n = 87) were divided into two groups (TETRA group, n = 37 and PARA group, n = 50). aPWV and potential confounders of aPWV were assessed. Analysis of covariance was used for comparisons between groups and adjusted for the confounders. Subjects’ aPWV values were contrasted with reference values for general population determined by “The Reference value for arterial stiffness’ collaboration” and prevalence of abnormal aPWV defined as greater than or equal to the age-specific 90th percentile was reported. Results Prevalence of abnormal aPWV in the cohort was 25.3%. After adjusting for covariates, the mean aPWV values were significantly different between two groups (TETRA: 8.0 (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.5–8.6) m/second, PARA: 9.0 (95% CI: 8.5–9.4) m/second, P = 0.010). The prevalence of abnormal aPWV was significantly higher in the PARA group (36%) compared to the TETRA group (11%) (P = 0.012). Conclusions One-quarter of the total cohort had an abnormal aPWV. Subjects with paraplegia had higher aPWV values and a higher frequency of abnormal aPWV than subjects with tetraplegia. Elevated aPWV in people with SCI, particularly those with paraplegia, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences. PMID:25229737

  2. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; Proctor, David N.; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M.; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Jacques, Paul F.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; West, Sheila G.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of cardiovascular disease. Intervention studies suggest that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relations between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large, cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex-, and cohort-adjusted analyses, higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with lower resting flow velocity, hyperemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation. In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of higher DGAI-2010 with lower baseline flow and augmentation index persisted (β=−0.002, P=0.003 and β=−0.05 ± 0.02, P<0.001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relation of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection but not flow-mediated dilation. Our results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favorable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  3. Aortic and Carotid Arterial Stiffness and Epigenetic Regulator Gene Expression Changes Precede Blood Pressure Rise in Stroke-Prone Dahl Salt-Sensitive Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Victoria L.; Decano, Julius L.; Giordano, Nicholas; Moran, Ann Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Multiple clinical studies show that arterial stiffness, measured as pulse wave velocity (PWV), precedes hypertension and is an independent predictor of hypertension end organ diseases including stroke, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. Risk factor studies for arterial stiffness implicate age, hypertension and sodium. However, causal mechanisms linking risk factor to arterial stiffness remain to be elucidated. Here, we studied the causal relationship of arterial stiffness and hypertension in the Na-induced, stroke-prone Dahl salt-sensitive (S) hypertensive rat model, and analyzed putative molecular mechanisms. Stroke-prone and non-stroke-prone male and female rats were studied at 3- and 6-weeks of age for arterial stiffness (PWV, strain), blood pressure, vessel wall histology, and gene expression changes. Studies showed that increased left carotid and aortic arterial stiffness preceded hypertension, pulse pressure widening, and structural wall changes at the 6-week time-point. Instead, differential gene induction was detected implicating molecular-functional changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) structural constituents, modifiers, cell adhesion, and matricellular proteins, as well as in endothelial function, apoptosis balance, and epigenetic regulators. Immunostaining testing histone modifiers Ep300, HDAC3, and PRMT5 levels confirmed carotid artery-upregulation in all three layers: endothelial, smooth muscle and adventitial cells. Our study recapitulates observations in humans that given salt-sensitivity, increased Na-intake induced arterial stiffness before hypertension, increased pulse pressure, and structural vessel wall changes. Differential gene expression changes associated with arterial stiffness suggest a molecular mechanism linking sodium to full-vessel wall response affecting gene-networks involved in vascular ECM structure-function, apoptosis balance, and epigenetic regulation. PMID:25229245

  4. Adiponectin and arterial stiffness in youth with type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amy S.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Lauer, Abigail; Davis, Cralen; Dabelea, Dana; Daniels, Stephen R.; Hamman, Richard F.; Marcovina, Santica; Wadwa, R. Paul; Urbina, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Persons with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing vascular disease. Adiponectin concentrations may play an intermediate role in this process. We sought to determine whether adiponectin is correlated with vascular stiffness in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Plasma adiponectin, pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx-75), and brachial distensibility (BrachD) were collected in 225 adolescents. Outcomes were evaluated by sex, and regression models were used to determine whether adiponectin was an independent determinant of arterial stiffness. Males had lower adiponectin levels and stiffer vessels (lower BrachD, p<0.01) than females. Unadjusted correlations revealed that adiponectin was correlated with BrachD (p<0.01) but not PWV and AIx-75. After adjustment, adiponectin was not a significant predictor of BrachD. The most consistent predictors of increased stiffness were age, male sex, blood pressure, obesity, and total cholesterol (p<0.05). Adiponectin’s contributions to arterial stiffness appear to be masked by other cardiovascular risk factors in persons with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23155699

  5. Biomechanical phenotyping of central arteries in health and disease: advantages of and methods for murine models.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, J; Bersi, M R; Humphrey, J D

    2013-07-01

    The stiffness and structural integrity of the arterial wall depends primarily on the organization of the extracellular matrix and the cells that fashion and maintain this matrix. Fundamental to the latter is a delicate balance in the continuous production and removal of structural constituents and the mechanical state in which such turnover occurs. Perturbations in this balance due to genetic mutations, altered hemodynamics, or pathological processes result in diverse vascular phenotypes, many of which have yet to be well characterized biomechanically. In this paper, we emphasize the particular need to understand regional variations in the biaxial biomechanical properties of central arteries in health and disease and, in addition, the need for standardization in the associated biaxial testing and quantification. As an example of possible experimental methods, we summarize testing protocols that have evolved in our laboratory over the past 8 years. Moreover, we note advantages of a four fiber family stress-stretch relation for quantifying passive biaxial behaviors, the use of stored energy as a convenient scalar metric of the associated material stiffness, and the utility of appropriate linearizations of the nonlinear, anisotropic relations both for purposes of comparison across laboratories and to inform computational fluid-solid-interaction models. We conclude that, notwithstanding prior advances, there remain many opportunities to advance our understanding of arterial mechanics and mechanobiology, particularly via the diverse genetic, pharmacological, and surgical models that are, or soon will be, available in the mouse.

  6. Identification of artery wall stiffness: in vitro validation and in vivo results of a data assimilation procedure applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction model.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, Cristóbal; Barber, David; Gaddum, Nicholas; Valverde, Israel; Rutten, Marcel; Beerbaum, Philipp; Moireau, Philippe; Hose, Rodney; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2014-03-21

    We consider the problem of estimating the stiffness of an artery wall using a data assimilation method applied to a 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model. Recalling previous works, we briefly present the FSI model, the data assimilation procedure and the segmentation algorithm. We present then two examples of the procedure using real data. First, we estimate the stiffness distribution of a silicon rubber tube from image data. Second, we present the estimation of aortic wall stiffness from real clinical data.

  7. Effect of abdominal aortic grafts on aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lantelme, Pierre; Dzudie, Anastase; Milon, Hugues; Bricca, Giampiero; Legedz, Liliana; Chevalier, Jean-Michel; Feugier, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    Graft-prosthesis and stentgraft placements are effective modalities for treating abdominal aortic aneurysm, but related changes in arterial stiffness are not well established. The present study sought to assess aortic stiffness after aneurism repair by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV). The graft-related variation of carotid-femoral PWV was compared with that of carotid-radial PWV, the latter being unaffected by vascular treatment. The secondary objective was to evaluate potential differences between graft-prosthesis and stentgraft in terms of aortic stiffness and augmentation index, a composite indicator integrating wave reflexion. Fifty patients were included (39 had a graft-prosthesis and 11 had a stentgraft). In the whole group and after a median postoperative follow-up of 47 days, carotid-femoral PWV increased by +1.0 m/s [-12.3, +10.3], while carotid-radial PWV slightly decreased by -0.3 m/s [-4.4; +3.5] (P = 0.001). The effect of the type of prosthesis on the PWV was not significant. Nevertheless, the augmentation index increased after stentgraft implantation (+4% [-10; +17]) and decreased after graft-prosthesis placement (-8.5% [-47; +17]) (P < 0.01). This difference was not explained by a heart rate or a treatment effect and was likely attributable to the prosthesis per se. This study demonstrates the impact of aortic grafts on aortic stiffness. Besides, it suggests that stentgraft increases reflected waves more than graft-prostheses. These changes of vascular properties may influence the outcomes after surgery. PMID:19342960

  8. Pediatric Atorvastatin in Diabetes Trial (PADIT): A Pilot Study to Determine the Effect of Atorvastatin on Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Michael J.; Stein, Jennifer M.; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Theriaque, Douglas; Samyn, Margaret M.; Pepine, Carl; Silverstein, Janet H.

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-one children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) participated in a double blinded, randomized, cross-over pilot study to determine whether 12 weeks of daily atorvastatin (20 mg daily) would reduce arterial stiffness and improve endothelial function. Secondary analysis demonstrated potential reduction of arterial stiffness following atorvastatin therapy (p = 0.06). Additional long-term prospective studies with larger numbers of patients are needed. PMID:19344076

  9. Adiposity, obesity, and arterial aging: longitudinal study of aortic stiffness in the Whitehall II cohort.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Tabak, Adam G; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Marmot, Michael G; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-08-01

    We sought to determine whether adiposity in later midlife is an independent predictor of accelerated stiffening of the aorta. Whitehall II study participants (3789 men; 1383 women) underwent carotid-femoral applanation tonometry at the mean age of 66 and again 4 years later. General adiposity by body mass index, central adiposity by waist circumference and waist:hip ratio, and fat mass percent by body impedance were assessed 5 years before and at baseline. In linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and mean arterial pressure, all adiposity measures were associated with aortic stiffening measured as increase in pulse wave velocity (PWV) between baseline and follow-up. The associations were similar in the metabolically healthy and unhealthy, according to Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria excluding waist circumference. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels accounted for part of the longitudinal association between adiposity and PWV change. Adjusting for chronic disease, antihypertensive medication and risk factors, standardized effects of general and central adiposity and fat mass percent on PWV increase (m/s) were similar (0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.24, P=0.003; 0.17, 0.08-0.27, P<0.001; 0.14, 0.05-0.22, P=0.002, respectively). Previous adiposity was associated with aortic stiffening independent of change in adiposity, glycaemia, and lipid levels across PWV assessments. We estimated that the body mass index-linked PWV increase will account for 12% of the projected increase in cardiovascular risk because of high body mass index. General and central adiposity in later midlife were strong independent predictors of aortic stiffening. Our findings suggest that adiposity is an important and potentially modifiable determinant of arterial aging. PMID:26056335

  10. Sprint interval and traditional endurance training induce similar improvements in peripheral arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilation in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Rakobowchuk, Mark; Tanguay, Sophie; Burgomaster, Kirsten A; Howarth, Krista R; Gibala, Martin J; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2008-07-01

    Low-volume sprint interval training (SIT), or repeated sessions of brief, intense intermittent exercise, elicits metabolic adaptations that resemble traditional high-volume endurance training (ET). The effects of these different forms of exercise training on vascular structure and function remain largely unexplored. To test the hypothesis that SIT and ET would similarly improve peripheral artery distensibility and endothelial function and central artery distensibility, we recruited 20 healthy untrained subjects (age: 23.3 +/- 2.8 yr) and had them perform 6 wk of SIT or ET (n = 5 men and 5 women per group). The SIT group completed four to six 30-s "all-out" Wingate tests separated by 4.5 min of recovery 3 days/wk. The ET group completed 40-60 min of cycling at 65% of their peak oxygen uptake (Vo2peak) 5 days/wk. Popliteal endothelial function, both relative and normalized to shear stimulus, was improved after training in both groups (main effect for time, P < 0.05). Carotid artery distensibility was not statistically altered by training (P = 0.29) in either group; however, popliteal artery distensibility was improved in both groups to the same degree (main effect, P < 0.05). We conclude that SIT is a time-efficient strategy to elicit improvements in peripheral vascular structure and function that are comparable to ET. However, alterations in central artery distensibility may require a longer training stimuli and/or greater initial vascular stiffness than observed in this group of healthy subjects.

  11. Low Serum Vitamin D Levels Are Associated With Increased Arterial Stiffness in Youth With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Pranati; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Khoury, Philip R.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Kimball, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult studies demonstrate that low vitamin D (25[OH]D) is an independent risk factor for arterial stiffness. Similar studies have not been conducted in youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The objective was to elicit the association between 25[OH]D and arterial stiffness in obese youth with and without T2DM. We hypothesized that 25[OH]D would be inversely correlated with arterial stiffness indices, including pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), and brachial distensibility (BrachD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional analysis was conducted in Cincinnati, OH, from 2004 to 2010. 25[OH]D, PWV, AIx, and BrachD were measured in 190 youth with T2DM, 190 obese control subjects without T2DM, and 190 lean control subjects without T2DM. Multivariate analyses were conducted to elicit the independent association between 25[OH]D and arterial stiffness indices by group. RESULTS The mean age was 17.9 ± 3.4 years, 55% were African American, and 34% were male. The mean 25[OH]D levels were 21.27, 14.29, and 14.13 ng/mL in lean individuals, obese individuals, and obese individuals with T2DM, respectively (P < 0.01). PWV, AIx, and BrachD worsened from lean to obese to T2DM (P < 0.01). General linear models found that 25[OH]D level was independently associated with PWV in lean individuals and with AIx in the group with T2DM such that a 3 ng/mL increase in 25[OH]D was associated with an AIx decrease of 1% (baseline AIx = 5.7 ± 12.0%). CONCLUSIONS 25[OH]D is inversely associated with some measures of arterial stiffness in lean adolescents and obese adolescents with T2DM but not in obese normoglycemic adolescents. Future studies are needed to determine if supplemental 25[OH]D is important for cardiovascular health. PMID:26015556

  12. Intra-arterial thrombolysis for central retinal artery occlusion: two cases report.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Gyojun; Woo, Se Joon; Jung, Cheolkyu; Park, Kyu Hyung; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kwon, O-Ki

    2010-06-01

    Central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) causes severe visual loss in affected eye and vision does not recover in more than 90% of the patients. It is believed that it occurs by occlusion of the central retinal artery with small emboli from atherosclerotic plaque of internal cerebral artery. Retina is a part of the brain, thus basically CRAO is corresponding to acute occlusion of intracerebral artery and retinal ischemia is to cerebral stroke. Therefore, intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT) has been considered as a treatment method in CRAO. Recently, we treated 2 patients diagnosed as CRAO and could achieve complete recanalization on fundus fluorescein angiogram with IAT. Of them, one recovered visual acuity to 20/25. We report our 2 CRAO cases treated with IAT and discuss technical aspects for IAT and management of patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Korean report of IAT for CRAO. PMID:20514326

  13. Relationship Between Determinants of Arterial Stiffness Assessed by Diastolic and Suprasystolic Pulse Oscillometry

    PubMed Central

    Teren, Andrej; Beutner, Frank; Wirkner, Kerstin; Löffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are independent predictors of cardiovascular health. However, the comparability of multiple oscillometric modalities currently available for their assessment was not studied in detail. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between indices of arterial stiffness assessed by diastolic and suprasystolic oscillometry. In total, 56 volunteers from the general population (23 males; median age 70 years [interquartile range: 65–72 years]) were recruited into observational feasibility study to evaluate the carotid-femoral/aortic PWV (cf/aoPWV), brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), and AI assessed by 2 devices: Vicorder (VI) applying diastolic, right-sided oscillometry for the determination of all 3 indices, and Vascular explorer (VE) implementing single-point, suprasystolic brachial oscillometry (SSBO) pulse wave analysis for the assessment of cfPWV and AI. Within- and between-device correlations of measured parameters were analyzed. Furthermore, agreement of repeated measurements, intra- and inter-observer concordances were determined and compared for both devices. In VI, both baPWV and cfPWV inter-correlated well and showed good level of agreement with bilateral baPWV measured by VE (baPWV[VI]–baPWV[VE]R: overall concordance correlation coefficient [OCCC] = 0.484, mean difference = 1.94 m/s; cfPWV[VI]–baPWV[VE]R: OCCC = 0.493, mean difference = 1.0 m/s). In contrast, SSBO-derived aortic PWA (cf/aoPWA[VE]) displayed only weak correlation with cfPWV(VI) (r = 0.196; P = 0.04) and ipsilateral baPWV (cf/aoPWV[VE]R–baPWV[VE]R: r = 0.166; P = 0.08). cf/aoPWA(VE) correlated strongly with AI(VE) (right-sided: r = 0.725, P < 0.001). AI exhibited marginal between-device agreement (right-sided: OCCC = 0.298, mean difference: 6.12%). All considered parameters showed good-to-excellent repeatability giving OCCC > 0.9 for 2-point-PWV modes and right-sided AI

  14. No association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation or arterial stiffness in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Liese, Angela D.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Marcovina, Santica; Reynolds, Kristi; Shah, Amy S.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To examine the association of dietary fiber intake with inflammation and arterial stiffness among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the US. Methods Data are from youth ≥ 10 years old with clinically diagnosed T1D for ≥ 3 months and ≥ 1 positive diabetes autoantibody in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. Fiber intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire with measurement error (ME) accounted for by structural sub-models derived using additional 24-hour dietary recall data in a calibration sample and the respective exposure-disease model covariates. Markers of inflammation, measured at baseline, included IL-6 (n=1405), CRP (n=1387), and fibrinogen (n=1340); markers of arterial stiffness, measured approximately 19 months post-baseline, were available in a subset of participants and included augmentation index (n=180), pulse wave velocity (n=184), and brachial distensibility (n=177). Results Mean (SD) T1D duration was 47.9 (43.2) months; 12.5% of participants were obese. Mean (SD) ME-adjusted fiber intake was 15 (2.8) g/day. In multivariable analyses, fiber intake was not associated with inflammation or arterial stiffness. Conclusion Among youth with T1D, fiber intake does not meet recommendations and is not associated with measures of systemic inflammation or vascular stiffness. Further research is needed to evaluate whether fiber is associated with these outcomes in older individuals with T1D or among individuals with higher intakes than those observed in the present study. PMID:24613131

  15. Associations of Novel and Traditional Vascular Biomarkers of Arterial Stiffness: Results of the SAPALDIA 3 Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Caviezel, Seraina; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Dratva, Julia; Schindler, Christian; Künzli, Nino; Bachler, Martin; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is a lack of evidence concerning associations between novel parameters of arterial stiffness as cardiovascular risk markers and traditional structural and functional vascular biomarkers in a population-based Caucasian cohort. We examined these associations in the second follow-up of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA 3). Methods Arterial stiffness was measured oscillometrically by pulse wave analysis to derive the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), brachial-ankle (baPWV) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), and amplitude of the forward and backward wave. Carotid ultrasonography was used to measure carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and carotid lumen diameter (LD), and to derive a distensibility coefficient (DC). We used multivariable linear regression models adjusted for several potential confounders for 2,733 people aged 50–81 years. Results CAVI, aPWV and the amplitude of the forward and backward wave were significant predictors of cIMT (p < 0.001). All parameters were significantly associated with LD (p < 0.001), with aPWV and the amplitude of the forward wave explaining the highest proportion of variance (2%). Only CAVI and baPWV were significant predictors of DC (p < 0.001), explaining more than 0.3% of the DC variance. Conclusion We demonstrated that novel non-invasive oscillometric arterial stiffness parameters are differentially associated with specific established structural and functional local stiffness parameters. Longitudinal studies are needed to follow-up on these cross-sectional findings and to evaluate their relevance for clinical phenotypes. PMID:27685325

  16. Central arterial pressure assessment with intensity POF sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Gonçalves, Steve; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; Pinto, João. L.; André, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The central pressure monitoring is considered a new key factor in hypertension assessment and cardiovascular prevention. In this work, it is presented the central arterial systolic pressure assessment with an intensity based POF sensor. The device was tested in four subjects, and stable pulse waves were obtained, allowing the calculation of the central pressure for all the subjects. The results shown that the sensor performs reliably, being a simple and low-cost solution to the intended application.

  17. Maternal alcohol consumption in pregnancy enhances arterial stiffness and alters vasodilator function that varies between vascular beds in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Parkington, Helena C; Kenna, Kelly R; Sozo, Foula; Coleman, Harold A; Bocking, Alan; Brien, James F; Harding, Richard; Walker, David W; Morley, Ruth; Tare, Marianne

    2014-06-15

    While the impact of alcohol consumption by pregnant women on fetal neurodevelopment has received much attention, the effects on the cardiovascular system are not well understood. We hypothesised that repeated exposure to alcohol (ethanol) in utero would alter fetal arterial reactivity and wall stiffness, key mechanisms leading to cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Ethanol (0.75 g (kg body weight)(-1)) was infused intravenously into ewes over 1 h daily for 39 days in late pregnancy (days 95-133 of pregnancy, term ∼147 days). Maternal and fetal plasma ethanol concentrations at the end of the hour were ∼115 mg dl(-1), and then declined to apparent zero over 8 h. At necropsy (day 134), fetal body weight and fetal brain-body weight ratio were not affected by alcohol infusion. Small arteries (250-300 μm outside diameter) from coronary, renal, mesenteric, femoral (psoas) and cerebral beds were isolated. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation sensitivity was reduced 10-fold in coronary resistance arteries, associated with a reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA (P = 0.008). Conversely, vasodilatation sensitivity was enhanced 10-fold in mesenteric and renal resistance arteries. Arterial stiffness was markedly increased (P = 0.0001) in all five vascular beds associated with an increase in elastic modulus and, in cerebral vessels, with an increase in collagen Iα mRNA. Thus, we show for the first time that fetal arteries undergo marked and regionally variable adaptations as a consequence of repeated alcohol exposure. These alcohol-induced vascular effects occurred in the apparent absence of fetal physical abnormalities or fetal growth restriction.

  18. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  19. The Association of Endothelin-1 with Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Black South African Women: The SABPA Study

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Hugo Willem; Kruger, Ruan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Limited data exist regarding endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoactive contributor in vascular tone, in a population subjected to early vascular deterioration. We compared ET-1 levels and explored its association with markers of arterial stiffness in black and white South Africans. Methodology. This cross-sectional substudy included 195 black (men: n = 99; women: n = 95) and 197 white (men: n = 99; women: n = 98) South Africans. Serum ET-1 levels were measured as well as markers of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, and arterial compliance). ET-1 levels were higher in black men and white women compared to their counterparts after adjusting for C-reactive protein. In both single and partial (adjusting for body mass index and gamma glutamyl transferase) regression analyses ET-1 correlated with age, interleukin-6, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity in black women. In multivariate regression analyses the independent association of ET-1 with systolic blood pressure (Adj. R2 = 0.13; β = 0.28, p < 0.01) and pulse pressure (Adj. R2 = 0.11; β = 0.27, p < 0.01) was confirmed in black women only. ET-1 additionally associated with interleukin-6 in black women (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Our result suggests that ET-1 and its link with subclinical arteriosclerosis are potentially driven by low-grade inflammation as depicted by the association with interleukin-6 in the black female cohort. PMID:26823980

  20. Evaluation of arterial stiffness with plasma GGT levels and pulse wave velocity measurement in patients with FMF

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Filiz; Ulu, Sena; Akcı, Önder; Ahsen, Ahmet; Demir, Kasım; Yüksel, Şeref

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive technique used to evaluate the arterial elasticity, which is an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Lately, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is considered a determiner of arterial stiffness (AS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between GGT levels and AS with PWV in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Material and Methods The study was conducted with 60 patients with FMF and 40 controls. Genetic analysis of the patients were performed. AS was assessed by PWV and, after the measurement of PWV, the presence of AS was determined. Results Mean PWV values and AS frequency were significantly higher in patients with FMF compared with the control group (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Mean GGT levels of FMF patients were higher than in the control group but the difference was not statistically different. In the correlation analysis, PWV and AS were positively correlated with FMF (r=0349, p<0.001; r=0.435, p<0.001, respectively). FMF duration and FMF were associated with GGT (r=0.300, p=0.02; r=0199, p=0.047, respectively). Conclusion Increased PWV values in FMF patients may indicate arterial stiffness. These patients may be followed closely with PWV as an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the cardiovascular risk can be determined in the early stages of disease and it may be possible to take necessary precautions. PMID:27708864

  1. Carotid arterial stiffness and its relationship to exercise intolerance in older patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Kitzman, Dalane W; Herrington, David M; Brubaker, Peter H; Moore, J Brian; Eggebeen, Joel; Haykowsky, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is the dominant form of heart failure in the older population. The primary chronic symptom in HFpEF is severe exercise intolerance; however, its pathophysiology and therapy are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that older patients with HFpEF have increased arterial stiffness beyond what occurs with normal aging and that this contributes to their severe exercise intolerance. Sixty-nine patients ≥60 years of age with HFpEF and 62 healthy volunteers (24 young healthy subjects ≤30 years and 38 older healthy subjects ≥60 years old) were examined. Carotid arterial stiffness was assessed using high-resolution ultrasound, and peak exercise oxygen consumption was measured using expired gas analysis. Peak exercise oxygen consumption was severely reduced in the HFpEF patients compared with older healthy subjects (14.1±2.9 versus 19.7±3.7 mL/kg per minute; P<0.001) and in both was reduced compared with young healthy subjects (32.0±7.2 mL/kg per minute; both P<0.001). In HFpEF compared with older healthy subjects, carotid arterial distensibility was reduced (0.97±0.45 versus 1.33±0.55×10(-3) mm Hg(-1); P=0.008) and Young's elastic modulus was increased (1320±884 versus 925±530 kPa; P<0.02). Carotid arterial distensibility was directly (0.28; P=0.02) and Young's elastic modulus was inversely (-0.32; P=0.01) related to peak exercise oxygen consumption. Carotid arterial distensibility is decreased in HFpEF beyond the changes attributed to normal aging and is related to peak exercise oxygen consumption. This supports the hypothesis that increased arterial stiffness contributes to exercise intolerance in HFpEF and is a potential therapeutic target.

  2. Does dairy food intake predict arterial stiffness and blood pressure in men?: Evidence from the Caerphilly Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Lovegrove, Julie A; Cockcroft, John R; Elwood, Peter C; Pickering, Janet E; Givens, D Ian

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease events and mortality, and like blood pressure, may be influenced by dairy food intake. Few studies have investigated the effects of consumption of these foods on prospective measures of arterial stiffness. The present analysis aimed to investigate the prospective relationship between milk, cheese, cream, and butter consumption and aortic pulse wave velocity, augmentation index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, as well as cross-sectional relationships between these foods and systolic and diastolic blood pressure and metabolic markers using data from the Caerphilly Prospective Study. Included in this cohort were 2512 men, aged 45 to 59 years, who were followed up at 5-year intervals for a mean of 22.8 years (number follow-up 787). Augmentation index was 1.8% lower in subjects in the highest quartiles of dairy product intake compared with the lowest (P trend=0.021), whereas in the highest group of milk consumption systolic blood pressure was 10.4 mm Hg lower (P trend=0.033) than in nonmilk consumers after a 22.8-year follow-up. Cross-sectional analyses indicated that across increasing quartiles of butter intake, insulin (P trend=0.011), triacylglycerol (P trend=0.023), total cholesterol (P trend=0.002), and diastolic blood pressure (P trend=0.027) were higher. Across increasing groups of milk intake and quartiles of dairy product intake, glucose (P trend=0.032) and triglyceride concentrations (P trend=0.031) were lower, respectively. The present results confirm that consumption of milk predicts prospective blood pressure, whereas dairy product consumption, excluding butter, is not detrimental to arterial stiffness and metabolic markers. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms that underpin these relationships.

  3. A pilot study of scanning acoustic microscopy as a tool for measuring arterial stiffness in aortic biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Riaz; Cruickshank, J. Kennedy; Zhao, Xuegen; Derby, Brian; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the use of scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) as a potential tool for characterisation of arterial stiffness using aortic biopsies. SAM data is presented for human tissue collected during aortic bypass graft surgery for multi-vessel coronary artery disease. Acoustic wave speed as determined by SAM was compared to clinical data for the patients namely, pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels. There was no obvious trend relating acoustic wave speed to PWV values, and an inverse relationship was found between systolic and diastolic blood pressure and acoustic wave speed. However, in patients with a higher cholesterol or glucose level, the acoustic wave speed increased. A more detailed investigation is needed to relate SAM data to clinical measurements. PMID:26985242

  4. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome presenting as bilateral central retinal artery occlusions.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Steven S; Patel, Yogin P; Desai, Ankit; Desai, Uday R

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy 22-year-old African American woman presented with bilateral vision loss associated with headache. Her ocular examination was significant for bilateral retinal arterial "boxcarring," retinal whitening, retinal hemorrhages, and cherry red spots. She was diagnosed with bilateral central retinal artery occlusions and was hospitalized due to concomitant diagnosis of stroke and hypercoagulable state. She was also found to be in heart failure and kidney failure. Rheumatology was consulted and she was diagnosed with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome in association with systemic lupus erythematosus. Approximately 7 months after presentation, the patient's vision improved and remained stable at 20/200 and 20/80. PMID:25722904

  5. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S{sub 1}↔S{sub 2}. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-τ. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-τ performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-τ is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-τ method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  6. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S1↔S2. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-τ. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-τ performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-τ is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-τ method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  7. Cardiovascular design in fin whales: high-stiffness arteries protect against adverse pressure gradients at depth.

    PubMed

    Lillie, M A; Piscitelli, M A; Vogl, A W; Gosline, J M; Shadwick, R E

    2013-07-15

    Fin whales have an incompliant aorta, which, we hypothesize, represents an adaptation to large, depth-induced variations in arterial transmural pressures. We hypothesize these variations arise from a limited ability of tissues to respond to rapid changes in ambient ocean pressures during a dive. We tested this hypothesis by measuring arterial mechanics experimentally and modelling arterial transmural pressures mathematically. The mechanical properties of mammalian arteries reflect the physiological loads they experience, so we examined a wide range of fin whale arteries. All arteries had abundant adventitial collagen that was usually recruited at very low stretches and inflation pressures (2-3 kPa), making arterial diameter largely independent of transmural pressure. Arteries withstood significant negative transmural pressures (-7 to -50 kPa) before collapsing. Collapse was resisted by recruitment of adventitial collagen at very low stretches. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis of depth-induced variation of arterial transmural pressure. Because transmural pressures depend on thoracic pressures, we modelled the thorax of a diving fin whale to assess the likelihood of significant variation in transmural pressures. The model predicted that deformation of the thorax body wall and diaphragm could not always equalize thoracic and ambient pressures because of asymmetrical conditions on dive descent and ascent. Redistribution of blood could partially compensate for asymmetrical conditions, but inertial and viscoelastic lag necessarily limits tissue response rates. Without pressure equilibrium, particularly when ambient pressures change rapidly, internal pressure gradients will develop and expose arteries to transient pressure fluctuations, but with minimal hemodynamic consequence due to their low compliance.

  8. Sex Differences in Predictors of Longitudinal Changes in Carotid Artery Stiffness: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Rebecca; Tattersall, Matthew C.; Gepner, Adam D.; Korcarz, Claudia E.; Kaufman, Joel; Colangelo, Laura A.; Liu, Kiang; Stein, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify sex differences in predictors of longitudinal changes in carotid arterial stiffness in a multi-ethnic cohort. Approach and Results Carotid artery distensibility coefficient (DC) and Young's Elastic Modulus (YEM) were measured in 2650 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants (45-84 years old and free of cardiovascular disease) at baseline and after a mean of 9.4 years. Predictors of changes in DC and YEM for each sex were evaluated using multivariable linear regression models. The 1236 men (46.6%) were 60.0 (standard deviation 9.3) years; 40% were White, 22% Black, 16% Chinese, and 22% Hispanic. The 1414 (53.4%) women were 59.8 (9.4) years old with a similar race distribution. Despite similar rates of change in DC and YEM, predictors of changes in distensibility markers differed by sex. In men, Chinese (p=0.002) and Black (p=0.003) race/ethnicity, systolic blood pressure (p=0.012), and diabetes mellitus (p=0.05) were associated with more rapidly decreasing DC (accelerated stiffening). Starting antihypertensive medication was associated with improved DC (p=0.03); stopping anti-hypertensives was associated with more rapid stiffening (increased YEM, p=0.05). In women, higher education was associated with slower stiffening (DC p=0.041; YEM p<0.001) as was use of lipid-lowering medication (p=0.03), whereas baseline use of antihypertensive medications (YEM p=0.01) and systolic blood pressure (DC p=0.02; p=0.04) predicted increasing stiffening in women. Conclusions Longitudinal changes in carotid artery stiffness are associated with systolic blood pressure and antihypertensive therapy in both sexes; however, race/ethnicity (in men) and level of education (in women) may have different contributions between the sexes. PMID:25477347

  9. Tributyltin chloride increases phenylephrine-induced contraction and vascular stiffness in mesenteric resistance arteries from female rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Júnior, Rogério Faustino; Marques, Vinicius Bermond; Nunes, Dieli Oliveira; Ronconi, Karoline de Sousa; de Araújo, Julia F P; Rodrigues, Paula Lopes; Padilha, Alessandra Simão; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Graceli, Jones B; Stefanon, Ivanita

    2016-03-15

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is an organotin compound that reduces estrogen levels in female rats. We aimed to investigate the effects of TBT exposure on vascular tonus and vascular remodelling in the resistance arteries of female rats. Rats were treated daily with TBT (500 ng/kg) for 15 days. TBT did not change arterial blood pressure but did modify some morpho-physiological parameters of third-order mesenteric resistance arteries in the following ways: (1) decreased lumen and external diameters; (2) increased wall/lm ratio and wall thickness; (3) decreased distensibility and increased stiffness; (4) increased collagen deposition; and (5) increased pulse wave velocity. TBT exposure increased the phenylephrine-induced contractile response in mesenteric resistance arteries. However, vasodilatation responses induced by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not modified by TBT. It is suggested that TBT exposure reduces vascular nitric oxide (NO) production, because:(1) L-NAME incubation did not cause a leftward shift in the concentration-response curve for phenylephrine; (2) both eNOS protein expression; (3) in situ NO production were reduced. Incubation with L-NAME; and (4) SOD shifted the phenylephrine response curve to the left in TBT rats. Tiron, catalase, ML-171 and VAS2870 decreased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine only in TBT rats. Moreover, increased superoxide anion production was observed in the mesenteric resistance arteries of TBT rats accompanied by an increase in gp91phox, catalase, AT1 receptor and total ERK1/2 protein expression. In conclusion, these findings show that TBT induced alterations are most likely due to a reduction of NO production combined with increased O2(-) production derived from NADPH oxidase and ERK1/2 activation. These findings offer further evidence that TBT is an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  10. Low-Grade Inflammation and Increased Arterial Stiffness in Chinese Youth and Adolescents with Newly-Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Deng, You Ping; Yang, Miao; Wu, Yu-Wen; Sun, Su-Xin; Sun, Jia-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between low-grade inflammation (LI) and increased arterial stiffness in Chinese youth and adolescents with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Ninety-eight subjects aged 10 to 24 years with newly-diagnosed T2DM were investigated for findings of general inflammation. Anthropometric measurements were taken. Data related to arterial stiffness [brachial artery distensibility (Branch D), augmentation index (AIx), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV)] were collected. The subjects were divided into a non-LI group (NLI, n=42) and a LI group (n=56) according to their high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP) levels. Results: There were no significant differences in age and gender between the LI group and the NLI group. CF-PWV and AIx values of the LI group were higher than those of the NLI group (p<0.01), while Branch D values were lower in the LI group (p<0.01). Branch D, CF-PWV, and AIx values correlated significantly with Hs-CRP overall (r=-0.32, 0.34, 0.33, all p<0.01). Multivariate models revealed that in either group (LI or NLI), Hs-CRP, as a continuous variable, was an independent determinant of arterial stiffness parameters even after adjusting for other risk factors. Conclusion: Newly-diagnosed T2DM youth and adolescents with LI present a more adverse cardiovascular disease risk profile and stiffer arteries. Hs-CRP levels correlated with arterial stiffness parameters and constituted an independent determinant of arterial stiffness. PMID:26777037

  11. Effect of Rg3-enriched Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng) on arterial stiffness and blood pressure in healthy individuals: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jovanovski, Elena; Bateman, Emma A; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Fairgrieve, Chris; Mucalo, Iva; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Ginsenoside Rg3, present in steamed ginseng (Panax Ginseng C.A. Meyer), is thought to be a potent modulator of vascular function. Our objective was to clinically evaluate acute effects of ginsenoside Rg3-enriched Korean red ginseng (Rg3-KRG) on measures of arterial stiffness and peripheral and central blood pressure (BP) parameters in healthy volunteers. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 23 individuals (9 males:14 females; age, 25 ± 2 years; body mass index, 22 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); systolic BP/diastolic BP, 113 ± 3/70 ± 2 mm Hg) were administered 400-mg Rg3-KRG extract or 400-mg wheat bran control on two separate visits with a 7-day washout period. Aortic augmentation index and central BP were measured using applanation tonometry by radial pulse wave analysis, and peripheral BP was evaluated oscillometrically. Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after intervention. Compared with control, there were significant reductions in augmentation index (-4.3 ± 8.9%, P = .03), central (-4.8 ± 6.8 mm Hg, P = .01) and brachial mean arterial pressure (-4.4 ± 6.6 mm Hg, P = .01), central systolic (-5.0 ± 7.9 mm Hg, P = .01) and diastolic BP (-3.9 ± 6.6 mm Hg, P = .01), and brachial systolic (-4.4 ± 10.0 mm Hg, P = .048) and diastolic BP (-3.6 ± 6.4 mm Hg, P = .01) at 3 hours after intervention compared with control. This study is the first to demonstrate Rg3-KRG extract acutely lowers central and peripheral arterial pressures in healthy adults. Further clinical evaluation is desired to quantify efficacy in higher risk individuals and in long-term settings.

  12. Aerobic exercise training-induced changes in serum adropin level are associated with reduced arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Shumpei; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Sato, Koji; Fujita, Satoshi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2015-11-15

    Aging-induced arterial stiffening is reduced by aerobic exercise training, and elevated production of nitric oxide (NO) participates in this effect. Adropin is a regulator of endothelial NO synthase and NO release, and circulating adropin level decreases with age. However, the effect of habitual aerobic exercise on circulating adropin levels in healthy middle-aged and older adults remains unclear. We sought to determine whether serum adropin level is associated with exercise training-induced changes in arterial stiffness. First, in a cross-sectional study, we investigated the association between serum adropin level and both arterial stiffness and cardiorespiratory fitness in 80 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (65.6 ± 0.9 yr). Second, in an intervention study, we examined the effects of 8-wk aerobic exercise training on serum adropin level and arterial stiffness in 40 healthy middle-aged and older subjects (67.3 ± 1.0 yr) divided into two groups: aerobic exercise training and sedentary controls. In the cross-sectional study, serum adropin level was negatively correlated with carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.437, P < 0.001) and positively correlated with plasma NOx level (r = 0.493, P < 0.001) and cardiorespiratory fitness (r = 0.457, P < 0.001). Serum adropin levels were elevated after the 8-wk aerobic exercise training intervention, and training-induced changes in serum adropin level were correlated with training-induced changes in carotid β-stiffness (r = -0.399, P < 0.05) and plasma NOx level (r = 0.623, P < 0.001). Thus the increase in adropin may participate in the exercise-induced reduction of arterial stiffness.

  13. Aortic stiffness is associated with the central retinal arteriolar equivalent and retinal vascular fractal dimension in a population along the southeastern coast of China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Zhu, Pengli; Huang, Feng; Li, Qiaowei; Yuan, Yin; Gao, Zhonghai; Yu, Peng; Lin, Jing; Chen, Falin

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of the central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE) and the retinal vascular fractal dimension, two quantitative parameters that reflect microcirculation, with aortic stiffness. In this cross-sectional study, we identified the cardiovascular risk factors in 2169 subjects using a health questionnaire, physical examinations and laboratory examinations. We evaluated the aortic stiffness using noninvasive brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and assessed the microcirculatory alterations with CRAE and retinal vascular fractal dimension, which were measured using fundus photography and semiautomatic quantitative software, respectively. The increase in baPWV (Q1-Q4) correlated with an increased likelihood of the central retinal artery narrowing and a reduction in the retinal vascular fractal dimension. Further adjustment of the cardiovascular risk factors diminished the association between baPWV and CRAE, but increased the association between baPWV and retinal vascular fractal dimension. Elevated baPWV correlates with reduced CRAE and retinal vascular fractal dimension. Such a finding supports macrocirculation- and microcirculation-associated hypotheses.

  14. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  15. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  16. Inactive Matrix Gla-Protein Is Associated With Arterial Stiffness in an Adult Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Pivin, Edward; Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ackermann, Daniel; Guessous, Idris; Ehret, Georg; Liu, Yan-Ping; Drummen, Nadja E A; Knapen, Marjo H J; Pechere-Bertschi, Antoinette; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vermeer, Cees; Staessen, Jan A; Vogt, Bruno; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-07-01

    Increased pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of aortic stiffness and an independent predictor of mortality. Matrix Gla-protein (MGP) is a vascular calcification inhibitor that needs vitamin K to be activated. Inactive MGP, known as desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP), can be measured in plasma and has been associated with various cardiovascular markers, cardiovascular outcomes, and mortality. In this study, we hypothesized that high levels of dp-ucMGP are associated with increased PWV. We recruited participants via a multicenter family-based cross-sectional study in Switzerland. Dp-ucMGP was quantified in plasma by sandwich ELISA. Aortic PWV was determined by applanation tonometry using carotid and femoral pulse waveforms. Multiple regression analysis was performed to estimate associations between PWV and dp-ucMGP adjusting for age, renal function, and other cardiovascular risk factors. We included 1001 participants in our analyses (475 men and 526 women). Mean values were 7.87±2.10 m/s for PWV and 0.43±0.20 nmol/L for dp-ucMGP. PWV was positively associated with dp-ucMGP both before and after adjustment for sex, age, body mass index, height, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate, renal function, low- and high-density lipoprotein, glucose, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, BP and cholesterol lowering drugs, and history of cardiovascular disease (P≤0.01). In conclusion, high levels of dp-ucMGP are independently and positively associated with arterial stiffness after adjustment for common cardiovascular risk factors, renal function, and age. Experimental studies are needed to determine whether vitamin K supplementation slows arterial stiffening by increasing MGP carboxylation.

  17. Relationship of serum osteoprotegerin with arterial stiffness, preclinical atherosclerosis, and disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Erdoğan, Turan; Türkyılmaz, Aysegül Kücükali; Devrimsel, Gül; Cüre, Medine Cumhur; Beyazal, Mehmet; Sahin, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) reportedly have a higher mortality and morbidity risk. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) was recently defined as an important cardiovascular (CV) marker in the general population. We aimed to assess the relationship of serum OPG levels with arterial stiffness, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and clinical and laboratory data in AS patients. We examined 60 AS patients without CV disease or risk factors and 50 healthy controls. Disease activity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS), whereas functional capacity was evaluated using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Serum OPG levels were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used as an indicator of arterial stiffness, whereas CIMT (examined via carotid ultrasonography) was used to evaluate preclinical atherosclerosis. The mean serum OPG level, PWV, and CIMT were significantly higher in AS patients than in controls (106.7 ± 50.9 vs. 58.1 ± 12.7 pg/mL; 7.4 ± 1.8 vs. 6.2 ± 1.2 m/s; 0.72 ± 0.13 vs. 0.57 ± 0.07 mm, respectively; P < 0.001 for all). In AS patients, the serum OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV and CIMT but were significantly correlated with erthrocyte sedimentation rate, BASFI, and ASDAS. AS patients without CV disease or risk exhibited high OPG levels and increased PWV and CIMT values. Although OPG levels were not significantly correlated with PWV or CIMT, future long-term follow-up studies will help define the predictive value of OPG in these patients.

  18. Recurrent transient monocular blindness from stenotic central retinal artery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo Young; Moon, Hye-Jin; Huh, Young-Eun; Yang, Hee Kyung; Woo, Se Joon; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kwon, O-Ki; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2013-11-01

    Transient monocular blindness (TMB) is caused by a temporary reduction of blood flow to the retina or optic nerve. Even though embolism from the ipsilateral carotid artery has been considered the main mechanism of TMB, the vascular pathology remains unknown in many patients. A 42-year-old man presented with recurrent transient visual loss in the left eye for 2 months. The attacks tended to develop more frequently when his head was bent down. Fluorescence angiography during an attack revealed hypoperfusion of the left central retinal artery (CRA) and cerebral angiography documented a focal isolated stenosis of the CRA at the origin. Aspirin and nimodipine reduced the attacks markedly. Stenosis of the CRA may be a cause of TMB. Intermittent vasospasm in addition to static hypoperfusion may have caused TMB in our patient with isolated CRA stenosis.

  19. Arterial stiffness and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in young healthy volunteers: the early vascular ageing Aristotle University Thessaloniki Study (EVA-ARIS Study).

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Vasilios; Stabouli, Stella; Karafillis, Ioannis; Papakatsika, Sofia; Rizos, Zoe; Miyakis, Spiros; Goulopoulou, Sofia; Parati, Gianfranco; Nilsson, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Differences in 24 h blood pressure (BP) monitoring parameters such as average 24 h BP, day to night BP ratio and BP variability could have an impact in arterial stiffness. The study hypothesis was that despite similar average BP values in ambulatory blood pressure monitoring subjects with increased 24 h BP variability may have increased arterial stiffness. The study population consisted of 115 consecutive young healthy volunteers. Carotid-femoral PWV was measured in all subjects. Clinic BP was measured and an appropriate cuff was fitted on the non-dominant arm of each subject for a 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring session. Waist to hip ratio as well as BMI was measured. Family history and smoking habits were recorded. In univariate analysis, estimated carotid-femoral PWV showed a significant correlation with age, weight, waist circumference, height, clinic systolic and diastolic BP, 24-h systolic and diastolic BP, 24-h pulse pressure, 24-h systolic and diastolic BP variability, daytime systolic and diastolic BP, daytime pulse pressure, daytime systolic and diastolic BP variability, nighttime systolic BP, nighttime pulse pressure and nighttime systolic BP variability. In multivariate regression analysis, age (B=0.95, P<0.001) and 24 h systolic BP variability (B=0.28, P<0.001) were independent determinanats of arterial stiffness. In conclusions, increased 24 h systolic BP variability is associated with arterial stiffness in young healthy volunteers. Pulse wave velocity in a young healthy population is useful to identify determinants of premature arterial stiffness, thus further elucidating the aspects of early vascular ageing.

  20. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    PubMed Central

    Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this “excess risk” in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from “risk” to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role. PMID:27540482

  1. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Faconti, Luca; Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this "excess risk" in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from "risk" to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role. PMID:27540482

  2. Do arterial stiffness and wave reflection underlie cardiovascular risk in ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Faconti, Luca; Nanino, Elisa; Mills, Charlotte E; Cruickshank, Kennedy J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that remarkable differences in cardiovascular risk between ethnic groups cannot be fully explained by traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes or dislipidemia measured in midlife. Therefore, the underlying pathophysiology leading to this "excess risk" in ethnic minority groups is still poorly understood, and one way to address this issue is to shift the focus from "risk" to examine target organs, particularly blood vessels and their arterial properties more directly. In fact, structural and functional changes of the vascular system may be identifiable at very early stages of life when traditional factors are not yet developed. Arterial stiffening, measured as aortic pulse wave velocity, and wave reflection parameters, especially augmentation index, seem to be an important pathophysiological mechanism for the development of cardiovascular disease and predict mortality independent of other risk factors. However, data regarding these arterial indices in ethnic minorities are relatively rare and the heterogeneity between populations, techniques and statistical methods make it difficult to fully understand their role.

  3. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  4. Non-contact measurement of carotid arterial stiffness by two-point heart-pulse laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Favalli, V.; Mariano, A.; Rebrova, N.; Consoli, A.; Ayadi, J.; Gilardi, L.; Perna, M.; Minzioni, P.; Arbustini, E.; Giuliani, G.

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness (AS) is a recognized predictor of cardiovascular risk and mortality, and a potential marker for monitoring the beneficial effects of medical treatments for arterial diseases. AS is typically evaluated indirectly, by assessing the so called pulse wave velocity (PWV), i.e. the speed at which the pressure wave created by the heart contraction travels along the aorta and other arteries. PWV is generally measured using piezoelectric transducers, or via a complex ultrasound technique, but in both cases it requires a direct contact with the patient, which could also modify the measured parameters. In the EU project "NISTAS" (Non-invasive screening of the status of the vascular system) [1], we develop a contactless system allowing to measure the PWV thanks to a technology derived from laser triangulation devices. The measurement principle consists in the detection of the small (around 100μm) displacement of the neck skin, induced by the transit of the pressure wave in the carotid. By simultaneously measuring the displacement caused by the pulse wave in two distinct points along the carotid, the time required by the pressure wave to travel a certain distance can be measured, and the PWV can then be easily calculated. The chosen technique for the skin displacement measurement is laser triangulation in its 2D variant (i.e. "laser profilometry"), which is robust to slight movements of the target, it does not suffer from speckle-pattern signal fading, and it can be conveniently implemented using low-cost optical components. Two light lines, emitted by two blue LEDs are projected on the target (the patient's neck skin), and the skin displacement versus time is measured using a high-frame-rate CMOS camera. In this manuscript we present the results obtained by measuring the PWV of 10 volunteers. It is foreseen that this technique can become a simple and widespread point-of-care method for large-scale cardiovascular system screening over large populations.

  5. Influence of adiposity and physical activity on arterial stiffness in healthy children: the lifestyle of our kids study.

    PubMed

    Sakuragi, Satoru; Abhayaratna, Katrina; Gravenmaker, Karen J; O'Reilly, Christine; Srikusalanukul, Wichat; Budge, Marc M; Telford, Richard D; Abhayaratna, Walter P

    2009-04-01

    Childhood obesity is increasingly prevalent in the community and is related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes during adulthood. In this study of healthy children, we evaluated the influence of adiposity and physical activity on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of arterial stiffness and a marker of cardiovascular risk in adults. In 573 community-based children (mean age: 10.1+/-0.3 years; 51% boys), we measured body mass index and waist circumference. Percentage body fat was quantitated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and physical activity levels were assessed using a 20-m shuttle run and 7-day pedometer count, respectively. PWV was estimated by applanation tonometry. In univariate analysis, PWV was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.34), waist circumference (r=0.32), and percentage body fat (r=0.32; P<0.001 for all) and negatively correlated with CRF (r=-0.23; P<0.001) and pedometer count (r=-0.08; P=0.046). In separate multivariable linear regression models, body mass index, waist circumference, and percentage of body fat were independently and positively associated with PWV (P<0.01 for all) after adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and CRF (P<0.01 for all). The influence of CRF on PWV was attenuated after adjusting for adiposity. In conclusion, increased body mass and adiposity and decreased CRF are associated with arterial stiffening in healthy prepubescent children.

  6. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  7. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response. PMID:26798761

  8. Digital image correlation for full-field time-resolved assessment of arterial stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Soons, Joris; Heuten, Hilde; Ennekens, Guy; Goovaerts, Inge; Vrints, Christiaan; Lava, Pascal; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arterial system is a very important parameter to evaluate cardiovascular health. Currently, however, there is no golden standard for PWV measurement. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used for full-field time-resolved assessment of displacement, velocity, acceleration, and strains of the skin in the neck directly above the common carotid artery. By assessing these parameters, propagation of the pulse wave could be tracked, leading to a new method for PWV detection based on DIC. The method was tested on five healthy subjects. As a means of validation, PWV was measured with ultrasound (US) as well. Measured PWV values were between 3.68 and 5.19 m/s as measured with DIC and between 5.14 and 6.58 m/s as measured with US, with a maximum absolute difference of 2.78 m/s between the two methods. DIC measurements of the neck region can serve as a test base for determining a robust strategy for PWV detection, they can serve as reference for three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, or they may even evolve into a screening method of their own. Moreover, full-field, time-resolved DIC can be adapted for other applications in biomechanics.

  9. Higher Physical Activity Is Associated With Lower Aortic Stiffness but Not With Central Blood Pressure: The ADDITION-Pro Study

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Anne Sofie Dam; Hansen, Anne-Louise Smidt; Wiinberg, Niels; Brage, Søren; Sandbæk, Annelli; Lauritzen, Torsten; Witte, Daniel R.; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Johansen, Nanna Borup

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical activity is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. However, improvements in conventional risk factors due to physical activity do not explain its full benefit. Therefore, we examined associations of objectively measured physical activity energy expenditure and intensity with central hemodynamics to provide new insight into the link between physical activity and cardiovascular disease. We analyzed data from 1816 Danes (median age: 66 years) without cardiovascular disease. Physical activity was estimated using combined accelerometry and heart rate monitoring. Aortic stiffness was assessed by applanation tonometry, as aortic pulse wave velocity, and central blood pressure was estimated from radial waveforms. Associations between physical activity energy expenditure and central hemodynamics were examined by linear regression. Furthermore, the consequence of substituting 1 hour sedentary behavior with 1 hour light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity on central hemodynamics was examined. Median physical activity energy expenditure was 28.0 kJ/kg/d (IQR: 19.8; 38.7). A 10 kJ/kg/d higher energy expenditure was associated with 0.75% lower aortic pulse wave velocity (CI: −1.47; −0.03). Associations with central systolic blood pressure and central pulse pressure were not statistically significant. We observed no difference in central hemodynamics when substituting 1 hour sedentary behavior with 1 hour light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. In this relatively inactive population, higher physical activity energy expenditure was associated with lower aortic stiffness, while there was no statistically significant association between substitution of activity intensity and central hemodynamics. This suggests that lower aortic stiffness is one of a number of health benefits attributed to higher habitual physical activity. PMID:25654392

  10. The Effects of Rituximab on Lipids, Arterial Stiffness and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine lipid profiles, arterial stiffness (AS), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), in 55 women with RA without overt cardiovascular disease (СVD) treated with rituximab (RTX).The following parameters were recorded before and 24 weeks after RTX therapy (2 infusions of 500 or 1,000 mg RTX intravenously, fortnightly): plasma total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, DAS 28-ESR, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), RF IgM, AS (SI - stiffness index, RI – reflection index) by digital volume pulse contour analysis (Micro Medical, UK), and common cIMT by high-resolution B-mode carotid ultrasound. Based on the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria, patients were divided into two groups: 1) moderate/good response to RTX therapy after 24 weeks (41 patients, 75%), 2) no response to RTX therapy (14 patients, 25%). Effective RTX therapy resulted in 9% increase in TC, 23% increase in HDL-C and 14% decrease in atherogenic index, 57% decrease in SI and 24% decrease in RI. We observed a 9% decrease of cIMTmax at 24 weeks. The improvement of cardiovascular parameters was accompanied by statistically significant decreases of CRP, ESR, RF IgM and DAS 28 in group 1 (P < 0.05). There were not significant changes in lipid profile, AS parameters, and cIMT in group 2. Two infusions of RTX in case of moderate/good EULAR effect of therapy exerted favorable effects on lipid profile, AS and cIMT in women with RA without overt CVD. PMID:26839473

  11. Differences in central systolic blood pressure and aortic stiffness between aerobically trained and sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Pierre; Marenco, Patrice; Castagna, Olivier; Smulyan, Harold; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate central (carotid) artery blood pressure (BP) in endurance athletes. Carotid-femoral (= aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV) together with radial and carotid tonometry and pulse wave analysis were performed at rest in 30 endurance athletes and 30 sedentary controls, all males matched for age, height, brachial systolic BP (SBP), and diastolic BP. Whereas brachial BP was similar in the two groups, carotid SBP and pulse pressure (PP) were higher in endurance athletes than in controls irrespective of age (123.1 ± 2.17 vs. 110.2 ± 1.29 mm Hg, and 50.9 ± 1.95 vs. 34.1 ± 1.01 mm Hg; P < .0001 for both). PP amplification evaluated from the brachial/carotid PP ratio was lower in athletes than in controls (1.05 ± 0.04 vs. 1.40 ± 0.02; P < .0001). When compared with controls, athletes had lower PWV (7.81 ± 0.17 vs. 9.8 ± 0.23 m/second; P < .0001), higher reflected wave transit time/left ventricular ejection time ratio (P = .02), and lower heart rate (52.03 ± 1.54 vs. 68.9 ± 1.72 beats/minute; P < .0001). When matched for brachial BP, central SBP and PP were higher in endurance athletes than in sedentary controls. The possible negative pathophysiological impact of increased central BP on the overall favorable effects of training deserves further study.

  12. Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Arterial Vasomotion, Stiffness and Endothelial Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chitalia, Nihil; Ismail, Tuan; Tooth, Laura; Boa, Frances; Hampson, Geeta; Goldsmith, David; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Banerjee, Debasish

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular events are frequent and vascular endothelial function is abnormal in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We demonstrated endothelial dysfunction with vitamin D deficiency in CKD patients; however the impact of cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular stiffness and vasomotor function, endothelial and bone biomarkers in CKD patients with low 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] is unknown, which this study investigated. Methods We assessed non-diabetic patients with CKD stage 3/4, age 17–80 years and serum 25(OH)D <75 nmol/L. Brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation (FMD), Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), Augmentation Index (AI) and circulating blood biomarkers were evaluated at baseline and at 16 weeks. Oral 300,000 units cholecalciferol was administered at baseline and 8-weeks. Results Clinical characteristics of 26 patients were: age 50±14 (mean±1SD) years, eGFR 41±11 ml/min/1.73 m2, males 73%, dyslipidaemia 36%, smokers 23% and hypertensives 87%. At 16-week serum 25(OH)D and calcium increased (43±16 to 84±29 nmol/L, p<0.001 and 2.37±0.09 to 2.42±0.09 mmol/L; p = 0.004, respectively) and parathyroid hormone decreased (10.8±8.6 to 7.4±4.4; p = 0.001). FMD improved from 3.1±3.3% to 6.1±3.7%, p = 0.001. Endothelial biomarker concentrations decreased: E-Selectin from 5666±2123 to 5256±2058 pg/mL; p = 0.032, ICAM-1, 3.45±0.01 to 3.10±1.04 ng/mL; p = 0.038 and VCAM-1, 54±33 to 42±33 ng/mL; p = 0.006. eGFR, BP, PWV, AI, hsCRP, von Willebrand factor and Fibroblast Growth Factor-23, remained unchanged. Conclusion This study demonstrates for the first time improvement of endothelial vasomotor and secretory functions with vitamin D in CKD patients without significant adverse effects on arterial stiffness, serum calcium or FGF-23. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02005718 PMID:24646518

  13. Treating Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Related to Arterial Stiffness. Can we Kill Two Birds With One Stone?

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Gossios, Thomas D; Vasilikos, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Arterial hypertension (AH), arterial stiffness (AS), older age, and female gender are the main determinants of HFpEF, but several cardiac or extra-cardiac pathologies are also possible causes. The combined ventricular-vascular stiffening (abnormal left atrium-left ventricle coupling related to AS) is the main contributor of the increased prevalence of HFpEF in elderly persons, particularly elderly women, and in younger persons with AH. The hospitalization and mortality rates of HFpEF are similar to those of heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF). However, although the prognosis of HFrEF has been substantially improved during the last 2 decades, the effective treatment of HFpEF remains an unmet need. Regimens effective in HFrEF have no substantial effect on HFpEF, because of different pathophysiologies of the 2 syndromes. Pipeline drugs seem promising, but it will take some years before they are commercially available. Aggressive treatment of noncardiac comorbidities seems to be the only option at hand. Treatment of anaemia, sleep disorders, chronic kidney disease (CKD), non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD), atrial fibrillation, diabetes, and careful use of diuretics to reduce preload are effective to some degree. Statin treatment, despite the presence of dyslipidaemia, deserves special attention because it has been proven, mainly in small studies or post hoc analyses of trials, that it offers a substantial improvement in quality of life and a reduction in mortality rates. We need to urgently utilize these recourses to relieve a considerable part of the general population suffering from HFpEF, a deadly disease.

  14. Effect of Spinach, a High Dietary Nitrate Source, on Arterial Stiffness and Related Hemodynamic Measures: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Jovanovski, Elena; Bosco, Laura; Khan, Kashif; Au-Yeung, Fei; Ho, Hoang; Zurbau, Andreea; Jenkins, Alexandra L; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events. However, the constituents responsible for this effect have not been well established. Lately, the attention has been brought to vegetables with high nitrate content with evidence that this might represent a source of vasoprotective nitric oxide. We hypothesized that short-term consumption of spinach, a vegetable having high dietary nitrate content, can affect the arterial waveform indicative of arterial stiffness, as well as central and peripheral blood pressure (BP). Using a placebo-controlled, crossover design, 27 healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either a high-nitrate (spinach; 845 mg nitrate/day) or low-nitrate soup (asparagus; 0.6 mg nitrate/day) for 7 days with a 1-week washout period. On days 1 and 7, profiles of augmentation index, central, and brachial BP were obtained over 180 min post-consumption in 4 fasted visits. A postprandial reduction in augmentation index was observed at 180 min on high-nitrate compared to low-nitrate intervention (-6.54 ± 9.7% vs. -0.82 ± 8.0%, p = 0.01) on Day 1, and from baseline on Day 7 (-6.93 ± 8.7%, p < 0.001; high vs. low: -2.28 ± 12.5%, p = 0.35), suggesting that the nitrate intervention is not associated with the development of tolerance for at least 7 days of continued supplementation. High vs. low-nitrate intervention also reduced central systolic (-3.39 ± 5.6 mmHg, p = 0.004) and diastolic BP (-2.60 ± 5.8 mmHg, p = 0.028) and brachial systolic BP (-3.48 ± 7.4 mmHg, p = 0.022) at 180 min following 7-day supplementation only. These findings suggest that dietary nitrate from spinach may contribute to beneficial hemodynamic effects of vegetable-rich diets and highlights the potential of developing a targeted dietary approach in the management of elevated BP. PMID:26251834

  15. Effect of Spinach, a High Dietary Nitrate Source, on Arterial Stiffness and Related Hemodynamic Measures: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovski, Elena; Bosco, Laura; Khan, Kashif; Au-Yeung, Fei; Ho, Hoang; Zurbau, Andreea; Jenkins, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables reduce risk of adverse cardiovascular events. However, the constituents responsible for this effect have not been well established. Lately, the attention has been brought to vegetables with high nitrate content with evidence that this might represent a source of vasoprotective nitric oxide. We hypothesized that short-term consumption of spinach, a vegetable having high dietary nitrate content, can affect the arterial waveform indicative of arterial stiffness, as well as central and peripheral blood pressure (BP). Using a placebo-controlled, crossover design, 27 healthy participants were randomly assigned to receive either a high-nitrate (spinach; 845 mg nitrate/day) or low-nitrate soup (asparagus; 0.6 mg nitrate/day) for 7 days with a 1-week washout period. On days 1 and 7, profiles of augmentation index, central, and brachial BP were obtained over 180 min post-consumption in 4 fasted visits. A postprandial reduction in augmentation index was observed at 180 min on high-nitrate compared to low-nitrate intervention (-6.54 ± 9.7% vs. -0.82 ± 8.0%, p = 0.01) on Day 1, and from baseline on Day 7 (-6.93 ± 8.7%, p < 0.001; high vs. low: -2.28 ± 12.5%, p = 0.35), suggesting that the nitrate intervention is not associated with the development of tolerance for at least 7 days of continued supplementation. High vs. low-nitrate intervention also reduced central systolic (-3.39 ± 5.6 mmHg, p = 0.004) and diastolic BP (-2.60 ± 5.8 mmHg, p = 0.028) and brachial systolic BP (-3.48 ± 7.4 mmHg, p = 0.022) at 180 min following 7-day supplementation only. These findings suggest that dietary nitrate from spinach may contribute to beneficial hemodynamic effects of vegetable-rich diets and highlights the potential of developing a targeted dietary approach in the management of elevated BP. PMID:26251834

  16. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness.

  17. Secondhand tobacco smoke, arterial stiffness, and altered circadian blood pressure patterns are associated with lung inflammation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Nicole J; Weber, Lynn P

    2012-02-01

    Chronic smoking and secondhand tobacco smoke exposure are major risk factors for cardiovascular disease that are known to adversely alter the structural and mechanical properties of arteries. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure on circadian blood pressure patterns, arterial stiffness, and possible sources of oxidative stress in conscious, unsedated radiotelemetry-implanted rats. Pulse wave change in pressure over time (dP/dt) was used an indicator of arterial stiffness and was compared with both structural (wall thickness) and functional (nitric oxide production and bioactivity and endothelin-1 levels) features of the arterial wall. In addition, histology of lung, heart, and liver was examined as well as pulmonary and hepatic detoxifying enzyme activity (cytochrome P450, specifically CYP1A1). Subchronic secondhand tobacco smoke exposure altered the circadian pattern of heart rate and blood pressure, with a loss in the normal dipping pattern of blood pressure during sleep. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure also increased pulse wave dP/dt in the absence of any structural modifications in the arterial wall. Furthermore, although nitric oxide production and endothelin-1 levels were not altered by secondhand tobacco smoke, there was increased inactivation of nitric oxide as indicated by peroxynitrite production. Increased lung neutrophils or pulmonary CYP1A1 may be responsible for the increase in oxidative stress in rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke. In turn, this may be related to the observed failure of blood pressure to dip during periods of sleep and a possible increase in arterial stiffness. PMID:22140051

  18. Pentraxin 3 Is a Predictor for Fibrosis and Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Kadir; Kurt, Omer; Dogan, Tolga; Ozen, Alptug; Demirci, Hakan; Yesildal, Fatih; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Turker, Turker; Guler, Ahmet Kerem; Karslioglu, Yıldırım; Altun, Battal; Uygun, Ahmet; Bagci, Sait

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether pentraxin 3 (PTX3) can be a new noninvasive marker for prediction of liver fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. We also aimed to evaluate the relationship between PTX3 and atherosclerosis in patients with NAFLD. Method. Fifty-four male patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 20 apparently healthy male volunteers were included. PTX3 levels were determined, using an ELISA method (R&D Sysytems, Quantikine ELISA, USA). To detect the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in NAFLD, measurements of CIMT, FMD, and cf-PWV levels were performed. Results. PTX3 levels in NAFLD patients with fibrosis were higher than both NAFLD patients without fibrosis and controls (P = 0.032 and P = 0.028, respectively), but there was no difference between controls and NAFLD patients without fibrosis in terms of PTX3 levels (P = 0.903). PTX3 levels were strongly correlated with cf-PWV (r = 0.359, P = 0.003), whereas no significant correlation was found with other atherosclerosis markers, CIMT and FMD. Conclusion. Elevated plasma PTX3 levels are associated with the presence of fibrosis in patients with NAFLD, independently of metabolic syndrome components. This study demonstrated that for the first time there is a close association between elevated PTX3 levels and increased arterial stiffness in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26997950

  19. Elevated pentraxin 3 level at the early stage of exercise training is associated with reduction of arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Zempo-Miyaki, A; Fujie, S; Sato, K; Hasegawa, N; Sanada, K; Maeda, S; Hamaoka, T; Iemitsu, M

    2016-09-01

    Regular exercise improves aging-induced deterioration of arterial stiffness, and is associated with elevated production of pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and anti-inflammatory as well as anti-atherosclerotic effects. However, the time-dependent effect of exercise training on arterial stiffness and PTX3 production remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of the association between the effects of training on the circulating PTX3 level and arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults. Thirty-two healthy Japanese subjects (66.2±1.3 year) were randomly divided into two groups: training (exercise intervention) and sedentary controls. Subjects in the training group completed 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training (60-70% peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) for 45 min, 3 days per week); during the training period, we evaluated plasma PTX3 concentration and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) every 2 wk. cfPWV gradually declined over the 8-week training period, and was significantly reduced after 6 and 8 week of exercise intervention (P<0.05). Plasma PTX3 level was significantly increased after 4 weeks of the intervention (P<0.05). In addition, the exercise training-induced reduction in cfPWV was negatively correlated with the percent change in plasma PTX3 level after 6 week (r=-0.54, P<0.05) and 8 weeks (r=-0.51, P<0.05) of the intervention, but not correlated at 4 weeks. Plasma PTX3 level was elevated at the early stage of the exercise training intervention, and was subsequently associated with training-induced alteration of arterial stiffness in middle-aged and older adults.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome-Associated Risk Factors and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Independently Predict Arterial stiffness in 9903 Subjects With and Without Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Sung-Sheng; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Hwang, Jawl-Shan; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic syndrome (MS), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are related to cardiovascular diseases. Although MS is common in CKD subjects, the contribution of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP to arterial stiffness in CKD has not been well studied. In this cross-sectional cohort study, we enrolled 9903 subjects who underwent brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) measurements from our database of Health Care Center. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Comparing those grouped with and without CKD, multivariate linear regression analyses were used. Overall, baPWV was found to have an inverse relationship with eGFR (P for trend <0.001), which increased progressively with the presence of CKD, increasing number of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP (P for trend <0.001). In the non-CKD group, age, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting glucose, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and hs-CRP independently predicted baPWV, whereas in CKD, eGFR, age, gender, body mass index, SBP, DBP, and fasting glucose remained predictors. The number of MS-associated risk factors and hs-CRP remains a determinant of arterial stiffness in both CKD and non-CKD groups. The decline of renal function contributes to arterial stiffness only in CKD but not in non-CKD. Our findings suggest that for CKD subjects, renal function, BP, and glycemic control are potential targets for further interventional studies of arterial stiffness. PMID:26356694

  1. Ocular neovascularization in eyes with a central retinal artery occlusion or a branch retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Mason, John O; Patel, Shyam A; Feist, Richard M; Albert, Michael A; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Thomley, Martin L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the ocular neovascularization (ONV) rate in eyes with a branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) or a central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), and to study factors that may influence the ONV rate secondary to CRAO. Methods This was a retrospective case series of consecutive patients (286 total eyes: 83 CRAOs and 203 BRAOs) who were diagnosed with a retinal artery occlusion from 1998 to 2013 at the Retina Consultants of Alabama and University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the association between hypothesized risk factors and ONV development. Results Twelve (14.5%) of the 83 eyes with a CRAO developed ONV. Eleven of 12 eyes (91.7%) had iris neovascularization, ten of 12 eyes (83.3%) had neovascular glaucoma, and two of 12 eyes (16.7%) had neovascularization of the optic disc. The average time for ONV development secondary to CRAO was 30.7 days, ranging from the date of presentation to 137 days. Only two (<1.0%) of the 203 eyes with a BRAO developed iris neovascularization. Diabetes mellitus type 2 was a risk factor for ONV development following a CRAO with an adjusted odds ratio of 5.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.4–19.8) (P=0.02). Conclusion ONV is an important complication of CRAO and is a less-frequent complication of BRAO. Patients with a CRAO, especially those with diabetes mellitus type 2, should be closely monitored for the first 6 months for ONV. PMID:26089631

  2. Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Ólafur; Garcia, Melissa; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-11-01

    Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, P<0.001). Carotid pulse pressure, pulsatility index and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, P<0.002). Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, P<0.001), grey matter (-0.079 ± 0.038 SD/SD, P = 0.038) and white matter (-0.128 ± 0.039 SD/SD, P<0.001) volumes. Carotid-femoral pulse

  3. Relationship Between Determinants of Arterial Stiffness Assessed by Diastolic and Suprasystolic Pulse Oscillometry: Comparison of Vicorder and Vascular Explorer.

    PubMed

    Teren, Andrej; Beutner, Frank; Wirkner, Kerstin; Löffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AI) are independent predictors of cardiovascular health. However, the comparability of multiple oscillometric modalities currently available for their assessment was not studied in detail. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between indices of arterial stiffness assessed by diastolic and suprasystolic oscillometry.In total, 56 volunteers from the general population (23 males; median age 70 years [interquartile range: 65-72 years]) were recruited into observational feasibility study to evaluate the carotid-femoral/aortic PWV (cf/aoPWV), brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), and AI assessed by 2 devices: Vicorder (VI) applying diastolic, right-sided oscillometry for the determination of all 3 indices, and Vascular explorer (VE) implementing single-point, suprasystolic brachial oscillometry (SSBO) pulse wave analysis for the assessment of cfPWV and AI. Within- and between-device correlations of measured parameters were analyzed. Furthermore, agreement of repeated measurements, intra- and inter-observer concordances were determined and compared for both devices.In VI, both baPWV and cfPWV inter-correlated well and showed good level of agreement with bilateral baPWV measured by VE (baPWV[VI]-baPWV[VE]R: overall concordance correlation coefficient [OCCC] = 0.484, mean difference = 1.94 m/s; cfPWV[VI]-baPWV[VE]R: OCCC = 0.493, mean difference = 1.0 m/s). In contrast, SSBO-derived aortic PWA (cf/aoPWA[VE]) displayed only weak correlation with cfPWV(VI) (r = 0.196; P = 0.04) and ipsilateral baPWV (cf/aoPWV[VE]R-baPWV[VE]R: r = 0.166; P = 0.08). cf/aoPWA(VE) correlated strongly with AI(VE) (right-sided: r = 0.725, P < 0.001). AI exhibited marginal between-device agreement (right-sided: OCCC = 0.298, mean difference: 6.12%). All considered parameters showed good-to-excellent repeatability giving OCCC > 0.9 for 2-point-PWV modes and right-sided AI(VE). Intra- and

  4. Effects of Renal Sympathetic Denervation on Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure Control in Resistant Hypertensive Patients: A Single Centre Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Matteo; Nava, Stefano; Giupponi, Luca; Meani, Paolo; Panzeri, Francesco; Varrenti, Marisa; Maloberti, Alessandro; Soriano, Francesco; Agrati, Antonio Maria; Ferraro, Giovanni; Colombo, Fabrizio; Rampoldi, Antonio; Mancia, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Klugmann, Silvio; Giannattasio, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Renal denervation (RD) is an intriguing treatment strategy for resistant hypertension. However, limited data are available about its long time efficacy as well as its effects on intermediate phenotypes like arterial stiffness and carotid IMT. 12 patients (9 males, mean 69 years) with resistant hypertension underwent bilateral RDN (Medtronic System) since April 2012 in Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital (Milan). Patients were studied before intervention, and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after RD. Carotid intima media thickness (Esaote Mylab) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (Complior, Alam medical) were assessed at each step. Compared to baseline, patients showed a marked reduction of office systolic blood pressure at each follow-up step (p < 0.05 versus baseline for all steps) as well as pulse wave velocity (p < 0.01 at 1 year versus baseline). Moreover, reduction in pulse wave velocity was higher than the expected value obtained only considering blood pressure drop. Conversely, no significant effect was observed on diastolic blood pressure as well as carotid intima-media thickness. In our study, renal denervation was a safe and effective procedure. The BP lowering effect was maintained during follow-up and a beneficial effect on arterial stiffness was observed, which implies that this effect can't passively originate from the BP fall but rather from an improvement of arterial mechanical properties, possibly related to a reduced sympathetic arterial drive.

  5. Compliance Index, a Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, may Predict Renal Function Decline in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Yang, Deng-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Meng-Fu; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compliance index derived from digital volume pulse (CI-DVP), measuring the relationship between volume and pressure changes in fingertip, is a surrogate marker of peripheral arterial stiffness. This study investigated if CI-DVP can predict renal function deterioration, cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 149 CKD patients were included for final analysis. CI-DVP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured, decline in renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated, including ≥50% eGFR decline, start of renal replacement therapy, and major adverse events. Results: Patients in CKD stages 3b to 5 had higher baPWV and lower CI-DVP values than those in patients with CKD stages 1 to 3a. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that lower CI-DVP (p =0.0001) and greater proteinuria (p =0.0023) were independent determinants of higher eGFR decline rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that CI-DVP (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00), baseline eGFR (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) and serum albumin (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42) were independent predictors for composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions: Compliance index, CI-DVP, was significantly associated with renal function decline in patients with CKD. A higher CI-DVP may have independent prognostic value in slower renal function decline and better composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:26180508

  6. Effects of amlodipine and candesartan on arterial stiffness estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index in patients with essential hypertension: A 24-week study

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Mie; Okura, Takafumi; Watanabe, Sanae; Irita, Jun; Enomoto, Daijiro; Johtoku, Masanori; Miyoshi, Ken-ichi; Koresawa, Mitsuko; Fukuoka, Tomikazu; Higaki, Jitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aortic stiffness assessed by brachio-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) can be used to predict cardiovascular events. However, baPWV is dependent on blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs have been reported to reduce baPWV; but it is difficult to determine if this effect is associated with lowered blood pressure or reduced arterial stiffness. Objectives: The primary end point of this study was to assess whether antihypertensive drugs reduce arterial stiffness as estimated by cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). The secondary end point was to compare the effects of 2 widely used drugs, the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine and the angiotensin II receptor blocker candesartan, on arterial stiffness. Methods: Between October 2005 and September 2006, consecutive Japanese outpatients with essential hypertension (EHT) (defined as using antihypertensive drugs at screening, systolic blood pressure [SBP] > 140 mm Hg, or diastolic BP [DBP] >90 mm Hg) were assigned to treatment for 24 weeks with either amlodipine (5–10 mg/d) or candesartan (8–12 mg/d). Arterial stiffness was evaluated with CAVI before and after 24 weeks of treatment. Relative change in arterial stiffness from baseline was also compared. The evaluator was blinded to treatment. Results: Twenty patients (11 men, 9 women; mean [SD] age, 62 [10] years) were included in the study. There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the 2 groups. At baseline, mean (SD) CAVI was not significantly different in the amlodipine group compared with the candesartan group (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.46 [1.34], respectively). During the 24-week treatment period, mean SBP and DBP decreased significantly in both the amlodipine (14/10 mm Hg; P = 0.006 and P = 0.005) and the candesartan groups (13/11 mm Hg; P = 0.033 and P = 0.005). Amlodipine was associated with a significant change in CAVI from baseline (8.93 [0.93] vs 8.60 [1.50]; P = 0.017), whereas candesartan was not (8.46 [1.34] vs 8.81 [1

  7. Effects of the small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104 on arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sowmya; Noh, Radzi M; Daga, Shruti; Langrish, Jeremy P; Mills, Nicholas L; Waterhouse, Brian R; Hoffmann, Ethan; Jacobson, Eric W; Lang, Ninian N; Frier, Brian M; Newby, David E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Arterial stiffness increases with age, and is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome including increased mortality. The effect of the oral small molecule SIRT1 activator, SRT2104, on arterial stiffness was examined in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods 24 otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and 15 people with stable type 2 diabetes were randomised in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial and received 28 days of oral SRT2104 (2.0 g/day) or matched placebo. Blood pressure was measured using non-invasive oscillatory sphygmomanometry. Pulse wave analysis and velocity were measured using applanation tonometry at baseline and the end of each treatment period. Owing to the small sample size and similar trends for both groups, data for the two groups were pooled (post hoc analysis). Results Compared to placebo, treatment with SRT2104 was associated with a significant reduction in augmentation pressure (p=0.0273) and a trend towards improvement in the augmentation index and corrected augmentation index (p>0.05 for both). However, no changes were observed in pulse wave velocity and time to wave reflection (p>0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures remained unchanged throughout the study. Treatment by cohort interaction was not significant for any of the pulse wave parameters, suggesting that the response to SRT2104 in otherwise healthy smokers and people with diabetes was consistent. Conclusions SRT2104 may improve measures of arterial stiffness in otherwise healthy cigarette smokers and in participants with type 2 diabetes. Definitive conclusions are not possible given the small sample size and exploratory nature of this analysis. Trial registration number NCT01031108. PMID:27239324

  8. A traveling "spot sign" in recurrent amaurosis fugax and central retinal artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Nedelmann, Max; Tanislav, Christian; Kaps, Manfred

    2014-10-01

    Sudden monocular blindness is frequently caused by central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) from embolic sources. Treatment options are insufficient, and spontaneous prognosis toward visual recovery is poor. In addition to ophthalmologic evaluation, transorbital sonographic assessment of the central retinal artery may help establish early diagnosis by Doppler sonographic proof of occlusion and, in some cases, by B-mode detection of an intra-arterial "spot sign". We report the case of a patient with recurrent amaurosis fugax and subsequent CRAO. Ultrasound examination after 2 incidences of amaurosis fugax demonstrated a patent but stenotic central retinal artery, with stenosis caused by an embolus visualized as a "spot sign". The following day, persisting amaurosis suddenly developed. Sonographic re-evaluation revealed downstream dislodgment of the "spot sign" and complete arterial occlusion. Thrombolytic treatment did not result in clinical improvement. In conclusion, this case report describes a single case of repeated amaurosis fugax and deterioration to CRAO via embolization into the central retinal artery and consecutive downstream dislodgment. It emphasizes that ultrasound may render valuable diagnostic information in patients with acute central retinal artery embolization toward its embolic etiology and its risk of subsequent deterioration. PMID:24957310

  9. Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Kim, Sohyeon; Hong, Soon Jun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Chi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Young; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-04-01

    Administration of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) is known to improve vascular endothelial function in patients at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated short-term effects of black raspberry on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 51) were prospectively randomized into the black raspberry group (n = 26, 750 mg/day) and placebo group (n = 25) during the 12-week follow-up. Central blood pressure, augmentation index, and EPCs, such as CD34/KDR(+), CD34/CD117(+), and CD34/CD133(+), were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Radial augmentation indexes were significantly decreased in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-5% ± 10% vs. 3% ± 14%, P < .05). CD34/CD133(+) cells at 12-week follow-up were significantly higher in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (19 ± 109/μL vs. -28 ± 57/μL, P < .05). Decreases from the baseline in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly greater in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-0.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 pg/mL, P < .05 and -5.4 ± 4.5 pg/mL vs. -0.8 ± 4.0 pg/mL, P < .05, respectively). Increases from the baseline in adiponectin levels (2.9 ± 2.1 μg/mL vs. -0.2 ± 2.5 μg/mL, P < .05) were significant in the black raspberry group. The use of black raspberry significantly lowered the augmentation index and increased circulating EPCs, thereby improving CV risks in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up.

  10. Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Kim, Sohyeon; Hong, Soon Jun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Chi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Young; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-04-01

    Administration of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) is known to improve vascular endothelial function in patients at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated short-term effects of black raspberry on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 51) were prospectively randomized into the black raspberry group (n = 26, 750 mg/day) and placebo group (n = 25) during the 12-week follow-up. Central blood pressure, augmentation index, and EPCs, such as CD34/KDR(+), CD34/CD117(+), and CD34/CD133(+), were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Radial augmentation indexes were significantly decreased in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-5% ± 10% vs. 3% ± 14%, P < .05). CD34/CD133(+) cells at 12-week follow-up were significantly higher in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (19 ± 109/μL vs. -28 ± 57/μL, P < .05). Decreases from the baseline in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly greater in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-0.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 pg/mL, P < .05 and -5.4 ± 4.5 pg/mL vs. -0.8 ± 4.0 pg/mL, P < .05, respectively). Increases from the baseline in adiponectin levels (2.9 ± 2.1 μg/mL vs. -0.2 ± 2.5 μg/mL, P < .05) were significant in the black raspberry group. The use of black raspberry significantly lowered the augmentation index and increased circulating EPCs, thereby improving CV risks in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up. PMID:26891216

  11. Central retinal artery occlusion as an iatrogenic complication of treatment of central giant cell granuloma of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Gauri; Gupta, Swati; Bhushan, Urvashi; Raina, Usha Kaul

    2015-05-01

    Although intralesional steroid injection as a management option for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) of the mandible is considered safe, central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) is a dreaded and previously unreported complication of this treatment modality. The present report discusses an iatrogenic case of CRAO that occurred during treatment of CGCG of the mandible. This complication occurred because of high injection pressure, which led to the opening of an anastomosis between the external and internal carotid arteries, leading to retrograde migration of steroid particles. This report also highlights the importance of being aware of such communications.

  12. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress.

  13. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  14. Relations of Digital Vascular Function, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Arterial Stiffness: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA‐Brasil) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brant, Luisa C. C.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ribeiro, Antonio L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is an early expression of atherosclerosis and predicts cardiovascular (CV) events. Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) evaluates basal pulse amplitude (BPA), endothelial function (PAT ratio), and wave reflection (PAT‐AIx) in the digital microvessels. In Brazilian adults, we investigated the correlations of PAT responses to CV risk factors and to carotid‐femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a measure of arterial stiffness. Methods and Results In a cross‐sectional study, 1535 participants of the ELSA‐Brasil cohort underwent PAT testing (52±9 years; 44% women). In multivariable analyses, more‐impaired BPA and PAT ratios were associated with male sex, higher body mass index (BMI), and total cholesterol/high‐density lipoprotein. Higher age and triglycerides were related to higher BPA, whereas lower systolic blood pressure, hypertension (HTN) treatment, and prevalent CV disease (CVD) were associated with lower PAT ratio. PAT‐AIx correlated positively with female sex, advancing age, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and smoking and inversely to heart rate, height, BMI, and prevalent CVD. Black race was associated with lower BPA, higher PAT ratio, and PAT‐AIx. Microvessel vasodilator function was not associated with PWV. Higher PAT‐AIx was modestly correlated to higher PWV and PAT ratio and inversely correlated to BPA. Conclusion Metabolic risk factors are related to impaired microvessel vasodilator function in Brazil. However, in contrast to studies from the United States, black race was not associated with an impaired microvessel vasodilator response, implying that vascular function may vary by race across populations. PAT‐AIx relates to HTN, may be a valid measure of wave reflection, and provides distinct information from arterial stiffness. PMID:25510401

  15. Salt loading and potassium supplementation: effects on ambulatory arterial stiffness index and endothelin-1 levels in normotensive and mild hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhendong; Peng, Jie; Lu, Fanghong; Zhao, Yingxin; Wang, Shujian; Sun, Shangwen; Zhang, Hua; Diao, Yutao

    2013-07-01

    The authors investigated effects of excessive salt intake and potassium supplementation on ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in salt-sensitive and non-salt-sensitive individuals. AASI and symmetric AASI (s-AASI) were used as indicators of arterial stiffness. Plasma ET-1 levels were used as an index of endothelial function. Chronic salt-loading and potassium supplementation were studied in 155 normotensive to mild hypertensive patients from rural northern China. After 3 days of baseline investigation, participants were maintained sequentially for 7 days each on diets of low salt (51.3 mmol/d), high salt (307.7 mmol/d), and high salt+potassium (60 mmol/d). Ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure (BP) and plasma ET-1 were measured at baseline and on the last 2 days of each intervention. High-salt intervention significantly increased BP, AASI, s-AASI (all P<.001); potassium supplementation reversed increased plasma ET-1 levels. High-salt-induced changes in BP, s-AASI, and plasma ET-1 were greater in salt-sensitive individuals. Potassium supplementation decreased systolic BP and ET-1 to a significantly greater extent in salt-sensitive vs non-salt-sensitive individuals (P<.001). Significant correlations were identified between s-AASI and ET-1 change ratios in response to both high-salt intervention and potassium supplementation (P<.001). Reducing dietary salt and increasing daily potassium improves arterial compliance and ameliorates endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Indirect measure of visceral adiposity ‘A Body Shape Index’ (ABSI) is associated with arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bouchi, Ryotaro; Asakawa, Masahiro; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Takato; Murakami, Masanori; Sasahara, Yuriko; Numasawa, Mitsuyuki; Minami, Isao; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective Among indirect measures of visceral adiposity, A Body Shape Index (ABSI), which is defined as waist circumference (WC)/(body mass index (BMI)2/3×height1/2), is unique in that ABSI is positively correlated with visceral adiposity and is supposed to be independent of BMI. ABSI has been also shown to be linearly and positively associated with visceral fat mass and all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population. It is, however, uncertain whether ABSI could be associated with arterial stiffness in patients with diabetes. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 607 patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age 64±12 years; 40.0% female). Visceral fat area (VFA, cm2) and subcutaneous fat area (SFA, cm2) were assessed with a dual-impedance analyzer. In order to estimate the risk for CVD, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, cm) was used for the assessment of arterial stiffness. Results ABSI was significantly and positively correlated with VFA (r=0.138, p=0.001) and negatively associated with BMI (r=−0.085, p=0.037). The correlation of z-score for ABSI with VFA remained significant (r=0.170, p<0.001) but not with BMI (r=0.009, p=0.820). ABSI (standardized β 0.095, p=0.043) but not WC (standardized β −0.060, p=0.200) was significantly and positively correlated with baPWV in the multivariate model including BMI as a covariate. Conclusions ABSI appears to reflect visceral adiposity independently of BMI and to be a substantial marker of arterial stiffening in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27026809

  17. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  18. Externalization of a stiff guide wire via the radial artery: a new technique to facilitate advancement of an Inoue balloon across the aortic valve in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Shoichi; Goto, Takuya; Haba, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with aortic stenosis underwent antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). After transseptal puncture, we introduced a 7-Fr wedge catheter into the left ventricle and across the aortic valve. We then inserted a 0.032-inch soft guide wire, and the tip of the guide wire was advanced into the brachial artery and exchanged for a stiff guide wire. We externalized the tip of the stiff guide wire from the radial artery. Finally, we advanced an Inoue balloon (Toray, Tokyo, Japan) across the aortic valve and inflated the balloon. Transradial externalization makes antegrade BAV an even less invasive procedure. PMID:25862651

  19. Abnormal peripheral circulation in type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index associates with coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Suzuki, Eiji; Egawa, Katsuya; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2005-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes arises from different aspects of vascular abnormalities even when accompanied by a normal ankle-brachial index (ABI>0.9). One hundred fourteen type 2 diabetic patients with normal ABI and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital were enrolled. The Agatston coronary artery calcium score (CACS), as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis, was obtained using electron-beam computed tomography. An automatic device was used to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as an index of arterial distensibility. Total flow volume and resistive index (RI), as a marker of peripheral vascular resistance, at the popliteal artery were evaluated using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Diabetic patients had baPWV (P<0.001) and RI (P<0.001) higher than those in the non-diabetic subjects, indicating that those parameters are characteristically altered in diabetic patients. When diabetic patients were grouped into three subgroups according to their levels of total flow volume, those with the lowest range showed the highest log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001) among the groups. Total flow volume was negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001). Waveform at the popliteal artery could be clearly separated into systolic and early and late diastolic blood flows, which were negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), RI (P<0.001), and baPWV (P<0.001), respectively. These results suggest that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes is attributable to coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance even when ABI is normal.

  20. Multimodal imaging of central retinal artery occlusion with retained cilioretinal perfusion.

    PubMed

    Walkden, Andrew; Kelly, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    A man aged 59 years old presented with sudden, painless, monocular visual loss due to central retinal artery occlusion. Central vision was retained and peripheral vision lost due to retained cilioretinal perfusion. Increased inner retinal thickening and reflectivity followed by subsequent reduction was documented by sequential imaging. This is the first report of such events monitored with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography where central visual acuity was maintained. PMID:27530879

  1. Low serum free thyroxine concentrations associate with increased arterial stiffness in euthyroid subjects: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xuqin; Sun, Min; Wang, Zhixiao; Fu, Qi; Shi, Yun; Cao, Mengdie; Zhu, Zhenxin; Meng, Chuchen; Mao, Jia; Yang, Fan; Huang, Xiaoping; Xu, Jingjing; Zhou, Hongwen; Duan, Yu; He, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Some studies suggest that even in euthyroid subjects, thyroid function may affect arteriosclerotic risk factors. We aimed to determine whether thyroid hormones or thyroid autoantibodies are associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged and elderly Chinese subjects with euthyroidism. A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Nanjing, China. A total of 812 euthyroid subjects (mean age [56.75 ± 8.34] years; 402 men) without vascular disease and major arteriosclerotic risk factors were included. Clinical factors, oral glucose tolerance test results, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) results, and serum levels of lipids, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid autoantibodies were measured. Arterial stiffness was assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). In Pearson correlation analyses, baPWV correlated inversely with FT4 (r = -0.146, P < 0.001), but not with FT3 (r = 0.008, P = 0.816) or TSH (r = 0.055, P = 0.118). Subsequently, a multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association of FT4 with baPWV in euthyroid subjects (β = -0.076, P = 0.005). After adjusting for potential cardiovascular risk factors, mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP), HOMA-IR, and baPWV levels decreased across increasing FT4 quartiles (DBP, P < 0.001; HOMA-IR, P < 0.001; baPWV, P = 0.003). No difference in baPWV was observed between the positive and the negative thyroid antibody groups (15.23 ± 3.30 m/s vs. 15.73 ± 3.05 m/s, P > 0.05). FT4 levels were inversely associated with arterial stiffness in euthyroid subjects. A prospective study is warranted to validate whether subjects with low-normal FT4 levels have a high incidence of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25987347

  2. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and aerobic exercise training on arterial stiffness and autonomic functions in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Dobšák, Petr; Tomandl, Josef; Spinarova, Lenka; Vitovec, Jiri; Dusek, Ladislav; Novakova, Marie; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Krejci, Jan; Hude, Petr; Honek, Tomáš; Siegelova, Jarmila; Homolka, Pavel

    2012-10-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of leg muscles has been introduced in clinical practice as a rehabilitation (RHB) method in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF); however, the role of NMES on the reduction of arterial stiffness and autonomic disbalance in these patients has not yet been studied. Sixty-one patients with stable CHF (mean age 58.9 [2.1] years; mean ejection fraction 31 [4.2]%, New York Heart Association II-III) were randomly assigned into two groups. Patients in (i) exercise training group (ET; n = 30) underwent 12 weeks of bicycle ET (3 × 40 min/week); (ii) group NMES (n = 31) performed 12 weeks of NMES of quadriceps and calf muscles (frequency 10 Hz, mode "20 s on-20 s off," intensity 60 mA), 2 × 60 min/day. Noninvasive assessment of arterial stiffness was done using the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). CAVI and heart rate variability (HRV) and ·VO(2peak) were evaluated before and after RHB program. Both types of RHB reduced significantly CAVI (ET from 9.6 [0.2] to 8.9 [0.2], P < 0.012; NMES from 9.3 [0.2] to 8.7 [0.2], P < 0.013), increased high frequency (HF) component of HRV (+65.6%; P = 0.001) and decreased ratio of low frequency (LF) component with HF component (LF/HF ratio) in group ET (-39.8%; P < 0.001). Changes of HRV parameters in group NMES were not significant; however, a marked tendency to autonomic stabilization was present. Both types of RHB led also to significant increase of ·VO(2peak) (ET from 18.7 [0.7] to 20.8 [0.7] mL/kg/min, P < 0.004; NMES from 17.3 [0.7] to 19.0 [0.7] mL/kg/min, P < 0.001). ET or NMES has been shown to improve significantly arterial stiffness and to stabilize autonomic balance.

  3. Sustained Improvement of Arterial Stiffness and Blood Pressure after Long-Term Rosuvastatin Treatment in Patients with Inflammatory Joint Diseases: Results from the RORA-AS Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikdahl, Eirik; Rollefstad, Silvia; Hisdal, Jonny; Olsen, Inge C.; Pedersen, Terje R.; Kvien, Tore K.; Semb, Anne Grete

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) have a high prevalence of hypertension and increased arterial stiffness. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of long-term rosuvastatin treatment on arterial stiffness, measured by augmentation index (AIx) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), and blood pressure (BP) in IJD patients with established atherosclerosis. Methods Eighty-nine statin naïve IJD patients with carotid atherosclerotic plaque(s) (rheumatoid arthritis n = 55, ankylosing spondylitis n = 23, psoriatic arthritis n = 11) received rosuvastatin for 18 months to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal ≤1.8 mmol/L. Change in AIx (ΔAIx), aPWV (ΔaPWV), systolic BP (ΔsBP) and diastolic BP (ΔdBP) from baseline to study end was assessed by paired samples t-tests. Linear regression was applied to evaluate associations between cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, rheumatic disease specific variables and medication, and ΔAIx, ΔaPWV, ΔsBP and ΔdBP. Results AIx, aPWV, sBP and dBP were significantly reduced from baseline to study end. The mean (95%CI) changes were: ΔAIx: -0.34 (-0.03, -0.65)% (p = 0.03), ΔaPWV: -1.69 (-0.21, -3.17)m/s2 (p = 0.03), ΔsBP: -5.27 (-1.61, -8.93)mmHg (p = 0.004) and ΔdBP -2.93 (-0.86, -5.00)mmHg (p = 0.01). In linear regression models, ∆aPWV was significantly correlated with ΔsBP and ΔdBP (for all: p<0.001). Conclusions There is an unmet need of studies evaluating CVD prevention in IJD patients. We have shown for the first time that long-term intensive lipid lowering with rosuvastatin improved arterial stiffness and induced a clinically significant BP reduction in patients with IJD. These improvements were linearly correlated and may represent novel insight into the pleiotropic effects by statins. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01389388 PMID:27093159

  4. Low serum free thyroxine concentrations associate with increased arterial stiffness in euthyroid subjects: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xuqin; Sun, Min; Wang, Zhixiao; Fu, Qi; Shi, Yun; Cao, Mengdie; Zhu, Zhenxin; Meng, Chuchen; Mao, Jia; Yang, Fan; Huang, Xiaoping; Xu, Jingjing; Zhou, Hongwen; Duan, Yu; He, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2015-11-01

    Some studies suggest that even in euthyroid subjects, thyroid function may affect arteriosclerotic risk factors. We aimed to determine whether thyroid hormones or thyroid autoantibodies are associated with arterial stiffness in middle-aged and elderly Chinese subjects with euthyroidism. A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted in Nanjing, China. A total of 812 euthyroid subjects (mean age [56.75 ± 8.34] years; 402 men) without vascular disease and major arteriosclerotic risk factors were included. Clinical factors, oral glucose tolerance test results, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) results, and serum levels of lipids, free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid autoantibodies were measured. Arterial stiffness was assessed using brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). In Pearson correlation analyses, baPWV correlated inversely with FT4 (r = -0.146, P < 0.001), but not with FT3 (r = 0.008, P = 0.816) or TSH (r = 0.055, P = 0.118). Subsequently, a multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association of FT4 with baPWV in euthyroid subjects (β = -0.076, P = 0.005). After adjusting for potential cardiovascular risk factors, mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP), HOMA-IR, and baPWV levels decreased across increasing FT4 quartiles (DBP, P < 0.001; HOMA-IR, P < 0.001; baPWV, P = 0.003). No difference in baPWV was observed between the positive and the negative thyroid antibody groups (15.23 ± 3.30 m/s vs. 15.73 ± 3.05 m/s, P > 0.05). FT4 levels were inversely associated with arterial stiffness in euthyroid subjects. A prospective study is warranted to validate whether subjects with low-normal FT4 levels have a high incidence of cardiovascular disease.

  5. No influence of lower leg heating on central arterial pulse pressure in young men.

    PubMed

    Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Central arterial pulse pressure (PP), a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, mainly consists of an incident wave generated by left ventricular ejection and a late-arriving reflected wave emanating from the lower body. We have tested the hypothesis that a reduction in leg vascular tone by heat treatment of the lower leg attenuates the central arterial PP. Pressure and wave properties of the peripheral and central arteries were measured in eight young men before and after heat treatment of the lower leg (temperature approx. 43 °C) for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Following the lower leg heat trial, leg (femoral-ankle) pulse wave velocity (PWV) was significantly decreased, but aortic (carotid-femoral) PWV and parameters of wave reflection and carotid arterial PP did not change significantly. No significant changes were observed in these parameters in the control trial. These results suggest that the reduction in leg vascular tone induced by heat treatment of the lower leg may not affect wave reflection and central arterial PP in young men.

  6. Use of CPAP to reduce arterial stiffness in moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnoea, without excessive daytime sleepiness (STIFFSLEEP): an observational cohort study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mineiro, Maria Alexandra; Marques da Silva, Pedro; Alves, Marta; Virella, Daniel; Marques Gomes, Maria João; Cardoso, João

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sleepiness is a cardinal symptom in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) but most patients have unspecific symptoms. Arterial stiffness, evaluated by pulse wave velocity (PWV), is related to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular (CV) risk. Arterial stiffness was reported to be higher in patients with OSA, improving after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). This study aims to assess whether the same effect occurs in patients with OSA and without sleepiness. Methods and analysis This observational study assesses the CV effect of CPAP therapy on a cohort of patients with moderate-to-severe OSA; the effect on the subcohorts of sleepy and non-sleepy patients will be compared. A systematic and consecutive sample of patients advised CPAP therapy will be recruited from a single outpatient sleep clinic (Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central—CHLC, Portugal). Eligible patients are male, younger than 65 years, with confirmed moderate-to-severe OSA and apnoea–hypopnea index (AHI) above 15/hour. Other sleep disorders, diabetes or any CV disease other than hypertension are exclusion criteria. Clinical evaluation at baseline includes Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and sleepiness is defined as ESS above 10. OSA will be confirmed by polygraphic study (cardiorespiratory, level 3). Participants are advised to undertake an assessment of carotid-femoral PWV (cf-PWV) and 24 hours evaluation of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), at baseline and after 4 months of CPAP therapy. Compliance and effectiveness of CPAP will be assessed. The main outcome is the variation of cf-PWV over time. Ethics and dissemination This protocol was approved by the Ethics Committees of CHLC (reference number 84/2012) and NOVA Medical School (number36/2014/CEFCM), Lisbon. Informed, written consent will be obtained. Its results will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02273089; Pre-results. PMID:27406645

  7. Unilateral sequential papillophlebitis and central retinal artery occlusion in a young healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Demirok, Gülizar; Kocamaz, Mehmet Fatih; Topalak, Yasemin; Şengün, Ahmet; Hasanreisoğlu, Berati

    2015-01-01

    A 23-year-old girl presented to the clinic with metamorphopsia and photopsia in her left eye. After detailed ophthalmic examination, central retinal vein occlusion with optic disc edema was detected in that eye. Three days after diagnosis, the patient returned to our clinic with visual acuity decrease. Central retinal artery occlusion sparing cilioretinal artery was detected. All the laboratory tests were normal except for heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation (A1298C genotypes) and an indefinite Lyme disease seropositivity. Symptoms and visual disturbance recovered without any further treatment other than acetylsalicylic acid for prophylaxis. PMID:26862099

  8. Stiff Person Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Renu; Goyal, Laxmikant; Yadav, Rn; Agrawal, Abhishek; Mital, Pradeep; Patel, Bhavesh

    2015-08-01

    Stiff-person syndrome or Moersch-Woltmann is a very rare and disabling neurologic disorder characterized by muscle rigidity and episodic spasms involving axial and limb musculature. It is an autoimmune disorder resulting in a malfunction of aminobutyric acid mediated inhibitory networks in the central nervous system. We describe a patient of stiff person syndrome. PMID:27604442

  9. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio–ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight – a case with 8 years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio–ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient’s conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  10. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio-ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight - a case with 8 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient's conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  11. Validation of the pulse decomposition analysis algorithm using central arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a significant need for continuous noninvasive blood pressure (cNIBP) monitoring, especially for anesthetized surgery and ICU recovery. cNIBP systems could lower costs and expand the use of continuous blood pressure monitoring, lowering risk and improving outcomes. The test system examined here is the CareTaker® and a pulse contour analysis algorithm, Pulse Decomposition Analysis (PDA). PDA’s premise is that the peripheral arterial pressure pulse is a superposition of five individual component pressure pulses that are due to the left ventricular ejection and reflections and re-reflections from only two reflection sites within the central arteries. The hypothesis examined here is that the model’s principal parameters P2P1 and T13 can be correlated with, respectively, systolic and pulse pressures. Methods Central arterial blood pressures of patients (38 m/25 f, mean age: 62.7 y, SD: 11.5 y, mean height: 172.3 cm, SD: 9.7 cm, mean weight: 86.8 kg, SD: 20.1 kg) undergoing cardiac catheterization were monitored using central line catheters while the PDA parameters were extracted from the arterial pulse signal obtained non-invasively using CareTaker system. Results Qualitative validation of the model was achieved with the direct observation of the five component pressure pulses in the central arteries using central line catheters. Statistically significant correlations between P2P1 and systole and T13 and pulse pressure were established (systole: R square: 0.92 (p < 0.0001), diastole: R square: 0.78 (p < 0.0001). Bland-Altman comparisons between blood pressures obtained through the conversion of PDA parameters to blood pressures of non-invasively obtained pulse signatures with catheter-obtained blood pressures fell within the trend guidelines of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation SP-10 standard (standard deviation: 8 mmHg(systole: 5.87 mmHg, diastole: 5.69 mmHg)). Conclusions The results indicate that arterial

  12. Characterization and calibration of the central arterial pressure waveform obtained from vibrocardiographic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.; Casaccia, S.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.; Scalise, L.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been demonstrated to be a non-contact technique with high sensitivity, able to measure the skin vibrations related to cardiac activity. The obtainable mechanical signal (i.e. a velocity signal), VibroCardioGram (VCG), is able to provide significant physiological parameters, such as Heart Rate (HR). In this work, the authors aim to present a non-contact measurement method to obtain the arterial blood pressure signal from the mechanical vibrations assessed by LDV, in a central district of the arterial tree, such as carotid artery. In fact, in this way it is possible to indirectly assess Central Arterial Blood Pressure (CABP), which indicates the hemodynamic load on the heart, so that it is considered an important index predicting the cardiac risk of a subject. The measurement setup involves the use of an oscillometric cuff, to measure peripheral blood pressure at the radial artery level. Diastolic and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) at radial level were used to calibrate the integrated LDV signal (i.e. a displacement signal). As regard calibration, an exponential mathematical model was adopted to derive the pressure waveform from the displacement of the vessel detected by LDV. Results show an average difference of around 20% between systolic pressure measured at brachial level (i.e. peripheral pressure value) and systolic pressure derived from VCG signal measured over the carotid artery (i.e. central pressure). This is a physiological difference, consistent with the literature about the physiological increase of Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Pressure Pulse (PP) at increased distances from the heart. However, this non-contact technique is affected by movement artifacts and by reflection phenomena not related to the studied vessel and so it is necessary to account of such issues in the results.

  13. [The concentration of free lidocaine in arterial, central venous and peripheral vein plasma following intravenous injection].

    PubMed

    Nolte, H; al Saydali, B; Weissenberg, W

    1990-03-01

    Ten intensive care patients and five healthy volunteers each received a bolus injection of lidocaine HCl (100 mg, 2%) over an injection period of 5 s. After 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 15 and 25 min arterial, central venous and peripheral venous blood samples were collected. In four of the volunteers, arterial and central venous samples were also taken about 10 s after the end of injection. The fluorescence polarization method by means of the Abbott-TDx system was used, and plasma concentrations of lidocaine were determined. The measurements showed that lidocaine levels in central venous plasma 10 s after the end of administration were higher than those in arterial plasma. By 30 s after administration the opposite situation had developed, so that arterial concentrations were higher than those in central venous plasma. This relation did not change throughout the study, though the two levels became closer, as is shown by the ratios (Table 3, Fig. 2). Concentrations in peripheral venous plasma increased more slowly but remained far below those in arterial and central venous plasma, at least for the first 8 min. After 15 min lidocaine levels were almost the same in all three samples. During the entire study there were no ECG changes, and neither heart rate nor blood pressure showed any significant deviation from the values obtained at the beginning. The volunteers had minor toxic manifestations, such as dizziness, tinnitus and a metallic taste in the mouth; one person had a sensation of pressure in his chest, which improved following oxygen administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Leptin acts in the central nervous system to produce dose-dependent changes in arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Correia, M L; Morgan, D A; Sivitz, W I; Mark, A L; Haynes, W G

    2001-03-01

    Systemic leptin increases energy expenditure through sympathetic mechanisms, decreases appetite, and increases arterial pressure. We tested the hypothesis that the pressor action of leptin is mediated by the central nervous system. The interaction of dietary salt with leptin was also studied. Leptin was infused for 2 to 4 weeks into the third cerebral ventricle of Sprague-Dawley rats. Arterial pressure was measured by radiotelemetry. To control for the effects of leptin on body weight, vehicle-treated rats were pair-fed to the leptin group. Intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin at 200 ng/h in salt-depleted rats caused a reduction in food intake, weight loss, tachycardia, and decreased arterial pressure. Leptin at 1000 ng/h caused further reduction in food intake, weight loss, and tachycardia and prevented the hypotensive effect of weight loss observed in pair-fed, vehicle-treated animals. Intracerebroventricular leptin at 1000 ng/h in high-salt-fed rats also caused a sustained pressor response (+3+/-1 mm Hg), but high-salt intake did not potentiate the pressor effect of leptin. Intracerebroventricular leptin potentiated the pressor effect of air-jet stress. Intravenous administration of the same dose of leptin (1000 ng/h) did not change weight or arterial pressure, suggesting a direct central nervous system action. In contrast, a high dose of intravenous leptin (18 000 ng/h) caused weight loss and prevented the depressor effect of weight loss. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that high-dose leptin increases arterial pressure and heart rate through central neural mechanisms but leptin does not enhance salt sensitivity of arterial pressure. Leptin appears to oppose the depressor effect of weight loss.

  15. Effect of aspirin on acute changes in peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function following exertional heat stress in firefighters: The factorial group results of the Enhanced Firefighter Rehab Trial.

    PubMed

    Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Hostler, David; Winger, Daniel G; Wang, Li; Reis, Steven E

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function, which are independent predictors of cardiac events, are abnormal in firefighters. We examined the effects of aspirin on peripheral arterial stiffness and endothelial function in firefighters. Fifty-two firefighters were randomized to receive daily 81 mg aspirin or placebo for 14 days before treadmill exercise in thermal protection clothing, and a single dose of 325 mg aspirin or placebo immediately following exertion. Peripheral arterial augmentation index adjusted for a heart rate of 75 (AI75) and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) were determined immediately before, and 30, 60, and 90 minutes after exertion. Low-dose aspirin was associated with lower AI75 (-15.25±9.25 vs -8.08±10.70, p=0.014) but not RHI. On repeated measures analysis, treatment with low-dose aspirin before, but not single-dose aspirin after exertion, was associated with lower AI75 following exertional heat stress (p=0.018). Low-dose aspirin improved peripheral arterial stiffness and wave reflection but not endothelial function in firefighters.

  16. Reproducibility of arterial stiffness and wave reflections in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the contribution of lung hyperinflation and a comparison of techniques.

    PubMed

    Stone, Ian S; John, Leonette; Petersen, Steffen E; Barnes, Neil C

    2013-11-01

    Significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality exists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arterial stiffness is raised in COPD and may be a mechanistic link. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness has the potential to be a surrogate outcome measure, although no reproducibility data exists in COPD patients. Two studies (23 and 33 COPD patients) were undertaken to 1) assess the Vicorder reproducibility of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and Augmentation index in COPD; 2) compare it to SphygmoCor; and 3) assess the contribution of lung hyperinflation to measurement variability. There were excellent correlations and good agreement between repeat Vicorder measurements for carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (r = 0.96 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = -0.03 ± 0.36 m/s (p = 0.65); co-efficient of reproducibility = 4.02%; limits of agreement = -0.68-0.75 m/s). Augmentation index significantly correlated (r = 0.736 (p < 0.001); mean difference ±SD = 0.72 ± 4.86% (p = 0.48), however limits of agreement were only 10.42-9.02%, with co-efficient of reproducibility of 27.93%. Comparing devices, Vicorder values were lower but there was satisfactory agreement. There were no correlation between lung hyperinflation (as measured by residual volume percent predicted, total lung capacity percent predicted or the ratio of inspiratory capacity to residual volume) and variability of measurements in either study. In COPD, measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is highly reproducible, not affected by lung hyperinflation and suitable as a surrogate endpoint in research studies. Day-to-day variation in augmentation index highlights the importance of such studies prior to the planning and undertaking of clinical COPD research.

  17. Effects of different types of antihypertensive agents on arterial stiffness: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiahuan; Huang, Bo; Li, Xueying

    2015-01-01

    Background This system review and meta-analysis was conducted to systematically review and analyze the clinical benefits of different antihypertensive agents in improving arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. Methods PubMed database was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) or other types of antihypertensive agents on pulse wave velocity (PWV). The main indicators were the improvements of PWV and augmentation index (AI) before and after randomized treatments with antihypertensive agents. For the studies that only provided the mean and standard deviation of the indicators before and after randomization, the standardized mean difference (SMD) method was directly applied to combine the mean and standard deviation of various indicators after the treatment. For the studies provided the mean and standard deviation of the changes of the indicators, the weighted mean difference (MD) method was applied to combine the mean and standard deviation of the therapeutic effect. Results Ten RCT studies were included and the sample sizes range from 40 to 201 (total: 938). Four studies provided the changes of PWV before and after randomization, the pooled analysis showed that the changes of PWV in ARB group were not significantly higher than other antihypertensive agents [MD: 125.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): −78.70 to 330.23, P=0.23]; 4 studies provided the PWV values before and after randomization, the PWV values in ARB group were not significantly superior (SMD: 0.04, 95% CI: −0.16 to 0.24, P=0.71). Three studies provided the changes of AI before and after randomization, the ability of ARB to lower the level of the AI was superior to other antihypertensive agents (MD: 8.94, 95% CI: 2.18–5.71, P=0.01); 2 studies provided the AI value after randomization, the abilities of ARB and other anti-hypertensive agents to improve the AI were similar (SMD: 0.03, 95% CI: −1.20 to 1.26, P=0

  18. A case of central retinal artery occlusion following embolization procedure for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Alireza; Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Moghadasi, Habibollah; Taheri, Morteza S; Parsafar, Hiva

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old male patient with right nasal Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) developed Central Retinal Artery Occlusion (CRAO) during embolization of the tumor using polyvinyl alcohol particles before endoscopic excision. Classic CRAO management was initiated by an ophthalmologist after 12 h. Retrospective evaluation of the angiograms revealed a tiny communication between the external carotid and ophthalmic arteries which had not been noticed before embolization. During endoscopic excision, the tumor was found to originate extraordinarily from midline structures. It was concluded that CRAO might be a rare complication of JNA embolization. Careful preoperative angiographic evaluations to detect communicating arteries and immediate ophthalmologic consultation in case of developing visual symptoms during the procedure are necessary. PMID:20689199

  19. A case of central retinal artery occlusion following embolization procedure for juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Alireza; Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Moghadasi, Habibollah; Taheri, Morteza Sanei; Parsafar, Hiva

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old male patient with right nasal Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma (JNA) developed Central Retinal Artery Occlusion (CRAO) during embolization of the tumor using polyvinyl alcohol particles before endoscopic excision. Classic CRAO management was initiated by an ophthalmologist after 12 h. Retrospective evaluation of the angiograms revealed a tiny communication between the external carotid and ophthalmic arteries which had not been noticed before embolization. During endoscopic excision, the tumor was found to originate extraordinarily from midline structures. It was concluded that CRAO might be a rare complication of JNA embolization. Careful preoperative angiographic evaluations to detect communicating arteries and immediate ophthalmologic consultation in case of developing visual symptoms during the procedure are necessary.

  20. Central Retinal and Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion After Intralesional Injection of Sclerosant to Glabellar Subcutaneous Hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study is to describe vision loss caused by central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery occlusion as a consequence of sclerotherapy with a polidocanol injection to a glabellar hemangioma. An 18-year-old man underwent direct injection with a 23-gauge needle of 1 mL of a polidocanol-carbon dioxide emulsion into the glabellar subcutaneous hemangioma under ultrasound visualization of the needle tip by radiologists. He developed lid swelling the next day, and 3 days later at referral, the visual acuity in the left eye was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed central retinal artery occlusion and fluorescein angiography disclosed no perfusion at all in the left fundus, indicating concurrent posterior ciliary artery occlusion. The patient also showed mydriasis, blepharoptosis, and total external ophthalmoplegia on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the swollen medial rectus muscle. In a month, blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia resolved but the visual acuity remained no light perception. Sclerosing therapy for facial hemangioma may develop a severe complication such as permanent visual loss.

  1. The effects of 12-week psyllium fibre supplementation or healthy diet on blood pressure and arterial stiffness in overweight and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Khossousi, Alireza; Binns, Colin; Dhaliwal, Satvinder; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and increased arterial stiffness occur early in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome and they are both powerful independent predictors of cardiovascular risk. A high-fibre diet has been correlated with lower BMI and a lower incidence of hyperlipidaemia, CVD, hypertension and diabetes. The present randomised, parallel-design study compared the effects of fibre intake from a healthy diet v. fibre supplement diets on blood pressure (BP) and vascular function over 12 weeks. Overweight and obese adults were randomised to one of three groups: control (with placebo), fibre supplement (FIB) or healthy eating group with placebo (HLT). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was lower in the FIB group compared with the control group at week 6, but not at week 12. However, SBP was lower in the HLT group compared with control group at week 12. At week 6, the FIB group presented lower diastolic blood pressure and augmentation index compared with the control group, but this result did not persist to the end of the study. The present study did not show any improvements in BP or vascular function in overweight and obese individuals with psyllium fibre supplementation over 12 weeks of intervention. However, a healthy diet provided the greatest improvements in BP in overweight and obese subjects. Further research with hypertensive individuals is necessary to elucidate whether increased fibre consumption in the form of psyllium supplementation may provide a safe and acceptable means to reduce BP, vascular function and the risk of developing CVD.

  2. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25507120

  3. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25417392

  4. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  5. Incidence and Clinical Features of Neovascularization of the Iris following Acute Central Retinal Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Ho; Ahn, Seong Joon; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kyu Hyung; Han, Moon-Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the incidence of neovascularization of the iris (NVI) and clinical features of patients with NVI following acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). Methods A retrospective review of 214 consecutive CRAO patients who visited one tertiary hospital between January 2009 and January 2015 was conducted. In total, 110 patients were eligible for this study after excluding patients with arteritic CRAO, a lack of follow-up, iatrogenic CRAO secondary to cosmetic filler injection, or NVI detected before CRAO attack. Fluorescein angiography (FA) was applied until retinal arterial reperfusion was achieved, typically within 1 to 3 months. Results The incidence of NVI was 10.9% (12 out of 110 patients). Neovascular glaucoma was found in seven patients (6.4%). The mean time to NVI diagnosis after CRAO events was 3.0 months (range, 1 week to 15 months). The cumulative incidence was 5.5% at 3 months, 7.3% at 6 months, and 10.9% at 15 months. Severely narrowed ipsilateral carotid arteries were observed in only three patients (27.3%). The other nine patients (75.0%) showed no predisposing conditions for NVI, such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy or central retinal vein occlusion. Reperfusion rate and prevalence of diabetes were significantly different between patients with NVI and patients without NVI (reperfusion: 0% [NVI] vs. 94.7% [no NVI], p < 0.001; diabetes: 50.0% [NVI] vs. 17.3% [no NVI], p = 0.017). Conclusions CRAO may lead to NVI and neovascular glaucoma caused by chronic retinal ischemia from reperfusion failure. Our results indicate that follow-up fluorescein angiography is important to evaluate retinal artery reperfusion after acute CRAO events, and that prophylactic treatment such as panretinal photocoagulation should be considered if retinal arterial perfusion is not recovered. PMID:27729755

  6. An integrative model of the cardiovascular system coupling heart cellular mechanics with arterial network hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-08-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements.

  7. Central retinal artery occlusion by proxy: a cause for sudden blindness in an airline passenger.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D; Rugaber, Christopher; Kohn, Gary; Arenstein, Ronald; Fallon, William F

    2002-04-01

    The use of gas media in ophthalmologic procedures is relatively commonplace. Scleral buckle and pneumatic retinopexy procedures using air-gas mediums are a widely accepted treatment for retinal detachment. We present a patient who had a scleral buckle with pneumatic retinopexy performed and subsequently flew in a commercial airliner 2 wk later. The patient experienced sudden blindness due to central retinal artery occlusion brought about by expansion of the air bubble when the aircraft reached cruise altitude and a cabin pressure of 8000 ft. The intraocular pressure exceeded the central artery pressure thereby collapsing the artery. The patient's symptoms were relieved when an onboard flight surgeon identified the problem and the cabin pressure was reset to 2000 ft. Flying after an ophthalmic procedure that incorporates intraocular gas may have complications due to the bubble expansion in accordance with Boyle's Law. The ophthalmologic surgeon must be diligent in forewarning patients of the potential complications of flying for weeks to months after a procedure that utilizes intraocular gas. PMID:11952061

  8. Central retinal artery occlusion by proxy: a cause for sudden blindness in an airline passenger.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D; Rugaber, Christopher; Kohn, Gary; Arenstein, Ronald; Fallon, William F

    2002-04-01

    The use of gas media in ophthalmologic procedures is relatively commonplace. Scleral buckle and pneumatic retinopexy procedures using air-gas mediums are a widely accepted treatment for retinal detachment. We present a patient who had a scleral buckle with pneumatic retinopexy performed and subsequently flew in a commercial airliner 2 wk later. The patient experienced sudden blindness due to central retinal artery occlusion brought about by expansion of the air bubble when the aircraft reached cruise altitude and a cabin pressure of 8000 ft. The intraocular pressure exceeded the central artery pressure thereby collapsing the artery. The patient's symptoms were relieved when an onboard flight surgeon identified the problem and the cabin pressure was reset to 2000 ft. Flying after an ophthalmic procedure that incorporates intraocular gas may have complications due to the bubble expansion in accordance with Boyle's Law. The ophthalmologic surgeon must be diligent in forewarning patients of the potential complications of flying for weeks to months after a procedure that utilizes intraocular gas.

  9. Whole-body vibration attenuates the increase in leg arterial stiffness and aortic systolic blood pressure during post-exercise muscle ischemia.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Gil, Ryan; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Marcos A

    2011-07-01

    Exercise with whole-body vibration (WBV) decreases brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a marker of systemic arterial stiffness. To examine the effect of WBV on arterial responses, 12 young men underwent three experimental trials: (1) no-exercise control (CON), (2) static squat with WBV, and (3) static squat without WBV (no-WBV). Bilateral baPWV and femoral-ankle PWV (faPWV), carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV), augmentation index (AIx), first (P1) and second (P2) systolic peaks, aortic systolic blood pressure (aSBP), and heart rate (HR) were assessed at rest, during 4-min post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) on the left thigh, and 4-min recovery. During PEMI, right faPWV increased (P < 0.05) after no-WBV and did not change after CON and WBV. Right baPWV, P2, and aSBP increased (P < 0.05) after both exercise trials, but the increase was lower (P < 0.05) after WBV than no-WBV. The increases in cfPWV (P < 0.05), AIx (P < 0.05), P1 (P < 0.01), and HR (P < 0.05) were similar in both trials during PEMI. During recovery, right faPWV and baPWV remained similar than rest after WBV and CON, but remained elevated (P < 0.05) after no-WBV. Aortic SBP, P1, and P2 remained elevated (P < 0.05) in both exercise trials during recovery, but the levels were lower (P < 0.05) than PEMI. Left faPWV and baPWV were reduced (P < 0.05) from rest in the three trials. CfPWV, AIx, and HR returned to resting levels in both exercises. WBV prevents the increases in faPWV and attenuates the increase in baPWV and aSBP induced by post-static squat muscle ischemia due to an attenuated P2 response.

  10. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter III, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least −60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  11. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-06-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least -60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  12. Visual Improvement after Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Does Not Correlate with Time to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Page, Paul S.; Cambon, Alexander C.; James, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intra-arterial thrombolysis (IAT) for the treatment of acute central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) has demonstrated variable results for improving visual acuity and remains controversial. Despite limited evidence, time from symptom onset to thrombolysis is believed to be an important factor in predicting visual improvement after IAT. Methods A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted and individual subject level data were extracted from relevant studies. From these, a secondary analysis was performed. Initial and final logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) scores were either abstracted directly from relevant studies or converted from provided Snellen chart scores. Change in logMAR scores was used to determine overall treatment efficacy. Results Data on 118 patients undergoing IAT from five studies were evaluated. Median logMAR improvement in visual acuity was −0.400 (p < 0.001). There was no significant association between logMAR change and time to treatment when time (hours) was described as a continuous variable or described categorically [0–4, 4–8, 8–12, 12+ h; or 0–6, 6–12, 12+ h]. Conclusion The visual improvement observed in this series had no relationship to the time from symptom onset to treatment with IAT. This suggests that patients may have the possibility for improvement even with delayed presentation to the neurointerventionalist. Other factors, such as completeness of retinal occlusion, may be more important than time to treatment. Additional studies to determine optimal patient selection criteria for the endovascular treatment of acute CRAO are needed.

  13. Associations of dietary intake patterns identified using reduced rank regression with markers of arterial stiffness among youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Archana P.; Liese, Angela D.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Dabelea, Dana; Black, Mary Helen; Merchant, Anwar T.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) are at substantially increased risk for adverse vascular outcomes, but little is known about the influence of dietary behavior on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile. We aimed to identify dietary intake patterns associated with CVD risk factors and evaluate their impact on arterial stiffness (AS) measures collected thereafter in a cohort of youth with T1DM. SUBJECTS/METHODS Baseline diet data from a food frequency questionnaire and CVD risk factors (triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, systolic BP, HbA1c, C-reactive protein and waist circumference) were available for 1,153 youth aged ≥10 years with T1DM from the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study. A dietary intake pattern was identified using 33 food-groups as predictors and six CVD risk factors as responses in reduced rank regression (RRR) analysis. Associations of this RRR-derived dietary pattern with AS measures [augmentation index(AIx75), n=229; pulse wave velocity(PWV), n=237; and brachial distensibility(BrachD), n=228] were then assessed using linear regression. RESULTS The RRR-derived pattern was characterized by high intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and diet soda, eggs, potatoes and high-fat meats, and low intakes of sweets/desserts and low-fat dairy; major contributors were SSB and diet soda. This pattern captured the largest variability in adverse CVD risk profile and was subsequently associated with AIx75 (β=0.47; p<0.01). The mean difference in AIx75 concentration between the highest and the lowest dietary pattern quartiles was 4.3% in fully adjusted model. CONCLUSIONS Intervention strategies to reduce consumption of unhealthful foods and beverages among youth with T1DM may significantly improve CVD risk profile and ultimately reduce the risk for AS. PMID:24865480

  14. Low-sodium dietary approaches to stop hypertension diet reduces blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress in hypertensive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Scott L; Seymour, E Mitchell; Brook, Robert D; Kolias, Theodore J; Sheth, Samar S; Rosenblum, Hannah R; Wells, Joanna M; Weder, Alan B

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction contribute to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). In salt-sensitive HFPEF animal models, diets low in sodium and high in potassium, calcium, magnesium, and antioxidants attenuate oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would have similar effects in human hypertensive HFPEF. Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD for 21 days (all food/most beverages provided). The DASH/SRD reduced clinic systolic (155-138 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (79-72 mm Hg; P=0.04), 24-hour ambulatory systolic (130-123 mm Hg; P=0.02) and diastolic blood pressure (67-62 mm Hg; P=0.02), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (12.4-11.0 m/s; P=0.03). Urinary F2-isoprostanes decreased by 31% (209-144 pmol/mmol Cr; P=0.02) despite increased urinary aldosterone excretion. The reduction in urinary F2-isoprostanes closely correlated with the reduction in urinary sodium excretion on the DASH/SRD. In this cohort of HFPEF patients with treated hypertension, the DASH/SRD reduced systemic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and oxidative stress. These findings are characteristic of salt-sensitive hypertension, a phenotype present in many HFPEF animal models and suggest shared pathophysiological mechanisms linking these 2 conditions. Further dietary modification studies could provide insights into the development and progression of hypertensive HFPEF.

  15. NAFLD and Increased Aortic Stiffness: Parallel or Common Physiopathological Mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A.; Leite, Nathalie C.; Cardoso, Claudia R. L.; Salles, Gil F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. Liver inflammation and fibrosis related to NAFLD contribute to disease progression and increasing liver-related mortality and morbidity. Increasing data suggest that NAFLD may be linked to atherosclerotic vascular disease independent of other established cardiovascular risk factors. Central arterial stiffness has been recognized as a measure of cumulative cardiovascular risk marker load, and the measure of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) is regarded as the gold standard assessment of aortic stiffness. It has been shown that increased aortic stiffness predicts cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, a well-known condition associated with advanced stages of NAFLD. Furthermore, recently-published studies reported a strong association between NAFLD and increased arterial stiffness, suggesting a possible link in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and NAFLD. We sought to review the published data on the associations between NAFLD and aortic stiffness, in order to better understand the interplay between these two conditions and identify possible common physiopathological mechanisms. PMID:27104526

  16. Hilum-to-hilum Gore-Tex tube replacement of central pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Konstantinov, Igor E; Brizard, Christian P; d'Udekem, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Patients born with hypoplastic pulmonary arteries require recurrent procedures of shunting, patch reconstructions, balloon dilatations, and occasionally stenting to achieve adult-size vessels. We have applied a hilum-to-hilum Gore-Tex conduit replacement for the stenosed central pulmonary arteries to 12 consecutive patients with a Gore-Tex tube of 14 mm (9 patients) or 12 mm (3 patients) at a median age of 6.7 years (range, 1.6 to 16.9). There were 8 patients with biventricular repair (2 patients with heart transplantation) and 4 patients with Fontan completions. After a follow-up time of 25 ± 22 months, there was no mortality, reintervention, or restenosis.

  17. The association between oxidative stress, activator protein-1, inflammatory, total antioxidant status and artery stiffness and the efficacy of olmesartan in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunwei; Han, Limin; Du, Qiufan; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Shenghua; Shen, Xiangqian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the change of oxidative stress, activator protein-1 (AP-1), inflammatory, total antioxidant status (TAS) and artery stiffness, and explored the relationship between these characteristics and the efficacy of olmesartan intervention in elderly patients with mild-to-moderate essential hypertension (EH). In total, 386 elderly patients with EH and 353 normotensive controls were recruited. All study subjects had oxidative stress markers, AP-1, inflammatory factors, TAS and brancial-ankle artery pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) measured. In total, 193 elderly patients with EH were randomized to olmesartan and were matched with 193 normotensive controls to observe the change of index above mentioned before and after the treatment. Compared with the controls, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and TAS were significantly reduced in patients with EH, and malondialdehyde (MDA), AP-1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1), heart rate, endothelin-1 (ET-1), TAS and ba-PWV were significantly increased (P < 0.01 for all). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that SOD and TAS were negatively related to AP-1 (P < 0.05 for all), and that blood pressure (BP), age, MDA, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1 were positively related to AP-1 (P < 0.01 for all). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that BP, SOD, MDA, AP-1, Hs-CRP, MCP-1, ET-1, TAS, heart rate and age were independent risk factors for ba-PWV. After treatment with olmesartan, SOD and TAS were increased, while BP, heart rate, AP-1 and inflammatory factors were reduced with significant improvement in ba-PWV (P < 0.05 for all). More increase of arterial stiffness was reported in elderly hypertensive patients with greater oxidative stress, inflammatory, AP-1, heart rate, and lower TAS. Higher oxidative stress, AP-1 and inflammatory may predict higher arterial stiffness. Olmesartan may increase TAS, yet inhibit oxidative stress, AP-1, inflammatory, and heart rate with

  18. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia.

  19. Estrogen synthesis in the central nucleus of the amygdala following middle cerebral artery occlusion: role in modulating neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Saleh, T M; Connell, B J; Legge, C; Cribb, A E

    2005-01-01

    Stroke-induced lesions of the insular cortex in the brain have been linked to autonomic dysfunction (sympathoexcitation) leading to arrhythmogenesis and sudden cardiac death. In experimental models, systemic estrogen administration in male rats has been shown to reduce stroke-induced cell death in the insular cortex as well as prevent sympathoexcitation. The central nucleus of the amygdala has been postulated to mediate sympathoexcitatory output from the insular cortex. We therefore set out to determine if endogenous estrogen levels within the central nucleus of the amygdala are altered following stroke and if microinjection of estrogen into the central nucleus of the amygdala modulates autonomic tone. Plasma estrogen concentrations were not altered by middle cerebral artery occlusion (22.86+/-0.14 pg/ml vs. 21.24+/-0.33 pg/ml; P>0.05). In contrast, estrogen concentrations in the central nucleus of the amygdala increased significantly following middle cerebral artery occlusion (from 20.83+/-0.54 pg/ml to 76.67+/-1.59 pg/ml; P<0.05). Local infusion of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, into the central nucleus of the amygdala at the time of middle cerebral artery occlusion prevented the increase in estrogen concentration suggesting that this increase was dependent on aromatization from testosterone. Furthermore, bilateral microinjection of estrogen (0.5 microM in 200 nl) directly into the central nucleus of the amygdala significantly decreased arterial pressure and sympathetic tone and increased baroreflex sensitivity, and these effects were enhanced following co-injection with either an N-methyl-D-aspartate or non-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. Taken together, the results suggest that middle cerebral artery occlusion resulted in synthesis of estrogen within the central nucleus of the amygdala and that this enhanced estrogen level may act to attenuate overstimulation of central nucleus of the amygdala neurons to prevent middle cerebral artery occlusion

  20. Differential actions of charybdotoxin on central and daughter branch arteries of the rabbit isolated ear

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Rodney S; Griffith, Tudor M

    1997-01-01

    By use of rabbit isolated perfused intact ears and isolated perfused segments of central and first generation daughter branch ear arteries, we investigated the actions of charybdotoxin (ChTX), a blocker of calcium-activated K+ channels (KCa channels), and Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on pressure-flow and diameter-flow relationships.ChTX (1 nM) induced an upwards shift in the pressure-flow curve in the rabbit intact isolated ear preconstricted with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 100 nM) with subsequent administration of L-NAME (100 μM) inducing a further upwards shift. L-NAME itself induced an upwards shift in the pressure-flow curve, but subsequent administration of ChTX was without significant effect.Microangiographic analysis revealed a tendency of ChTX (1 nM) to decrease vessel diameter in the central ear artery (G0) with little effect on the first two generations of daughter branch arteries (G1 and G2) in the intact ear. Subsequent addition of L-NAME (100 μM) did not significantly further decrease vessel diameter in G0, but did decrease vessel diameter in G1 and G2. L-NAME itself showed a tendency to decrease vessel diameter in G0, G1 and G2 vessels with subsequent addition of ChTX being without significant effect.In an isolated G0 preparation which was preconstricted with 5-HT (100 nM), ChTX (1 nM) caused an upwards shift in the pressure-flow curve which was augmented by subsequent addition of L-NAME (100 μM). L-NAME (100 μM) itself caused an upwards shift in the pressure-flow curve but subsequent addition of ChTX (1 nM) had no significant effect.In comparison, in an isolated G1 preparation which was preconstricted with 5-HT (100 nM), ChTX (1 nM) had no significant effect on the pressure-flow curve relative to control, but subsequent addition of L-NAME (100 μM) caused an upwards shift. L-NAME (100 μM) itself induced an upwards shift in the pressure-flow curve with subsequent addition of ChTX (1 nM) being without

  1. RI in central retinal artery as assessed by CDI does not correspond to retinal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Polska, E; Kircher, K; Ehrlich, P; Vecsei, P V; Schmetterer, L

    2001-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ultrasound Doppler measurements of resistive index (RI) in the central retinal artery and retinal vascular resistance (R) assessed with laser Doppler velocimetry, vessel size measurement, and calculation of ocular perfusion pressure (PP) in healthy subjects. An increase in vascular resistance was induced by inhalation of 100% O(2). During hyperoxia no significant changes in PP were observed. Mean flow velocity in main retinal veins was reduced by -27.5 +/- 2.0%. The average decrease in diameter was -11.5 +/- 1.0%. R, which was calculated as the ratio of PP to flow rate, increased by 97.6 +/- 7.7%. RI increased as well, but the effect was much smaller (6.6 +/- 2.2%). In addition, a negative correlation was found between baseline values of R and RI (r = -0.83). During hyperoxia R and RI were not associated. In conclusion, our data indicate that RI as assessed with color Doppler imaging in the central retinal artery is not an adequate measure of R.

  2. [Central hemodynamics and cerebrovascular disorders in patients with idiopathic arterial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Foniakin, A V; Mashin, V Vl; Ataian, A S; Saprygina, L V

    2012-01-01

    A total of 65 patients (mean age 40.2 +/- 8.1 yr) with neurologic and neuropsychological disorders associated with long-term idiopathic arterial hypotension (IAH) were studied to estimate the state of their central blood circulation. Neuropsychological conditions were estimated from the state of higher psychic functions, such as memory speech, gnosis, praxis, cognition, attention, counting, writing, and reading abilities. Central hemodynamics was studied by 24 hr monitoring arterial pressure and echocardiography. Group 1 included patients without neurologic problems (n = 19), group 2 consisted of patients with early manifestations of chronic cerebrovascular insufficiency (n = 46, 71%). They were older than patients of group 1 and had a long history of IAH. It was shown that most patients presented with stably reduced systolic and diastolic AP and non-dipper type of low 24-hour SAD index. The cardiac index was elevated due to increased left ventricular ejection fraction (group 1) or increased heart rate (group 2). The severity of neuropsychic disorder was negatively related to SAD and DAD indices and positively to systolic hypotension time. PMID:23516869

  3. Effect of Improving Dietary Quality on Arterial Stiffness in Subjects with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: A 12 Months Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Kristina S.; Clifton, Peter M.; Lister, Natalie; Keogh, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    People with diabetes have accelerated arterial stiffening. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of increasing fruit, vegetable and dairy intake for 12 months on carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), augmentation index (AIx), and central blood pressure (cBP), compared to a usual diet control, in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In a 12 months randomised controlled trial, cfPWV, AIx and cBP were measured every 3 months. The intervention group received dietary counselling to increase consumption of fruit (+1 serving/day; 150 g/day), vegetables (+2 servings/day; 150 g/day) and dairy (+1 serving/day; 200–250 g/day) at baseline, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. The control group continued on their usual diet. One hundred and nine participants were randomised and 92 (intervention n = 45; control n = 47) completed. At 3 months, fruit (184 g/day; p = 0.001) and dairy (83 g/day; p = 0.037) intake increased in the intervention group compared with the control group but this increase was not maintained at 12 months. After adjustment for baseline measurements there was no time by treatment effect for central systolic or diastolic BP, AIx or cfPWV. A time effect existed for AIx which modestly increased over time. Peripheral diastolic BP and central pulse pressure were improved in the intervention group compared with the control group at 12 months. In the cohort with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, improving dietary quality by increasing consumption of fruit, vegetables and dairy did not improve cBP, AIx or cfPWV, compared with a control group continuing on their usual diet, after 12 months. PMID:27338467

  4. In the trail of a fiber Bragg grating sensor to assess the central arterial pressure wave profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; André, Paulo; Pinto, João. L.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the primary causes of death in the world. Hemodynamics is the study of the blood propagation and the physics aspects concerned to it, relating pressure, flow and resistance. One of the most important topics on hemodynamics is the evaluation of arterial wave reflections. Recently this physical parameter of the pressure wave propagation through the arterial tree was considered as a novel strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Arterial pressure reflections can be quantified by central pressure profile analysis. In this work we study in the trial of an optical fibre Bragg grating based sensor of assess the central pressure profile, with the goal of to achieve a superior sensitivity, with a better signal quality than electromechanical probes, measured directly in the carotid artery.

  5. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Cineangiography in the Demonstration of Central Pulmonary Arteries in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Taneja, Karuna; Sharma, Sanjiv; Kumar, Krishan; Rajani, Mira

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) for central pulmonary artery pathology in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) and right ventricular outflow obstruction. Methods: We compared contrast-enhanced CT and cine pulmonary arteriography in 24 patients with CCHD to assess central pulmonary arteries including the confluence. Both investigations were interpreted by a cardiac radiologist in a double-blinded manner at an interval of 3 weeks. Angiography was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The sensitivity for visualization of main pulmonary artery (MPA), right pulmonary artery (RPA), left pulmonary artery (LPA), and confluence on CT was 94%, 100%, 92.8%, and 92.8%, respectively. Diagnostic specificity for the same entities was 28.5%, 100%, 80%, and 50%, respectively. The positive predictive value for each was 76.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. The low specificity of CT in the evaluation of the MPA and the confluence is perhaps due to distorted right ventricular outflow anatomy in CCHD. Large aortopulmonary collaterals in this region were mistaken for the MPA in some patients with pulmonary atresia. Conclusion: CT is a useful, relatively noninvasive, imaging technique for the central pulmonary arteries in selected patients. It can supplement diagnostic information from angiography but cannot replace it. LPA demonstration on axial images alone is inadequate.

  6. Finger Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Oosterhoff, Thijs C H; Nota, Sjoerd P F T; Ring, David

    2015-06-01

    Background Finger stiffness varies substantially in patients with hand and upper extremity illness and can be notably more than expected for a given pathophysiology. In prior studies, pain intensity and magnitude of disability consistently correlate with coping strategies such as catastrophic thinking and kinesiophobia, which can be characterized as overprotectiveness. In this retrospective study we address the primary research question whether patients with finger stiffness are more often overprotective when the primary pathology is outside the hand (e.g. distal radius fracture) than when it is located within the hand. Methods In an orthopaedic hand surgery department 160 patients diagnosed with more finger stiffness than expected for a given pathophysiology or time point of recovery between December 2006 and September 2012 were analyzed to compare the proportion of patients characterized as overprotective for differences by site of pathology: (1) inside the hand, (2) outside the hand, and (3) psychiatric etiology (e.g. clenched fist). Results Among 160 subjects with more finger stiffness than expected, 132 (82 %) were characterized as overprotective including 88 of 108 (81 %) with pathology in the hand, 39 of 44 (89 %) with pathology outside the hand, and 5 of 8 (63 %) with psychiatric etiology. These differences were not significant. Conclusions Overprotectiveness is common in patients with more finger stiffness than expected regardless the site and type of primary pathology. It seems worthwhile to recognize and treat maladaptive coping strategies early during recovery to limit impairment, symptoms, and disability. PMID:26078497

  7. Evidence for an enduring ischaemic penumbra following central retinal artery occlusion, with implications for fibrinolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David; Beatty, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    The rationale behind hyperacute fibrinolytic therapy for cerebral and retinal arterial occlusion is to rescue ischaemic cells from irreversible damage through timely restitution of tissue perfusion. In cerebral stroke, an anoxic tissue compartment (the "infarct core") is surrounded by a hypoxic compartment (the "ischaemic penumbra"). The latter comprises electrically-silent neurons that undergo delayed apoptotic cell death within 1-6 h unless salvaged by arterial recanalisation. Establishment of an equivalent hypoxic compartment within the inner retina following central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) isn't widely acknowledged. During experimental CRAO, electroretinography reveals 3 oxygenation-based tissue compartments (anoxic, hypoxic and normoxic) that contribute 32%, 27% and 41% respectively to the pre-occlusion b-wave amplitude. Thus, once the anoxia survival time (≈2 h) expires, the contribution from the infarcted posterior retina is irreversibly extinguished, but electrical activity continues in the normoxic periphery. Inbetween these compartments, an annular hypoxic zone (the "penumbra obscura") endures in a structurally-intact but functionally-impaired state until retinal reperfusion allows rapid recovery from electrical silence. Clinically, residual circulation of sufficient volume flow rate generates the heterogeneous fundus picture of "partial" CRAO. Persistent retinal venous hypoxaemia signifies maximal extraction of oxygen by an enduring "polar penumbra" that permeates or largely replaces the infarct core. On retinal reperfusion some days later, the retinal venous oxygen saturation reverts to normal and vision improves. Thus, penumbral inner retina, marginally oxygenated by the choroid or by residual circulation, isn't at risk of delayed apoptotic infarction (unlike hypoxic cerebral cortex). Emergency fibrinolytic intervention is inappropriate, therefore, once the duration of CRAO exceeds 2 h. PMID:26113210

  8. Evidence for an enduring ischaemic penumbra following central retinal artery occlusion, with implications for fibrinolytic therapy.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David; Beatty, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    The rationale behind hyperacute fibrinolytic therapy for cerebral and retinal arterial occlusion is to rescue ischaemic cells from irreversible damage through timely restitution of tissue perfusion. In cerebral stroke, an anoxic tissue compartment (the "infarct core") is surrounded by a hypoxic compartment (the "ischaemic penumbra"). The latter comprises electrically-silent neurons that undergo delayed apoptotic cell death within 1-6 h unless salvaged by arterial recanalisation. Establishment of an equivalent hypoxic compartment within the inner retina following central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) isn't widely acknowledged. During experimental CRAO, electroretinography reveals 3 oxygenation-based tissue compartments (anoxic, hypoxic and normoxic) that contribute 32%, 27% and 41% respectively to the pre-occlusion b-wave amplitude. Thus, once the anoxia survival time (≈2 h) expires, the contribution from the infarcted posterior retina is irreversibly extinguished, but electrical activity continues in the normoxic periphery. Inbetween these compartments, an annular hypoxic zone (the "penumbra obscura") endures in a structurally-intact but functionally-impaired state until retinal reperfusion allows rapid recovery from electrical silence. Clinically, residual circulation of sufficient volume flow rate generates the heterogeneous fundus picture of "partial" CRAO. Persistent retinal venous hypoxaemia signifies maximal extraction of oxygen by an enduring "polar penumbra" that permeates or largely replaces the infarct core. On retinal reperfusion some days later, the retinal venous oxygen saturation reverts to normal and vision improves. Thus, penumbral inner retina, marginally oxygenated by the choroid or by residual circulation, isn't at risk of delayed apoptotic infarction (unlike hypoxic cerebral cortex). Emergency fibrinolytic intervention is inappropriate, therefore, once the duration of CRAO exceeds 2 h.

  9. The thrill of success: central arterial-venous anastomosis for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fudim, Marat; Stanton, Alice; Sobotka, Paul A; Dolan, Eamon; Krum, Henry

    2014-12-01

    Excess blood pressure remains the most important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. Poly pharmacy has been proved safe and effective under clinical trial circumstances; however, the majority of patients fail to sustain pharmaceutical persistence and adherence. The opportunity to offer patients a treatment or device in addition or perhaps instead of drug therapy alone may significantly broaden the options for patients and allow greater success in hypertensive therapy. In this review, we examine the potential of a fixed-volume central arterial-venous anastomosis to reduce blood pressure in hypertensive patients, review possible mechanisms by which the anastomosis may reduce blood pressure, and consider the unique clinical trial opportunities posed by this therapy.

  10. Central retinal artery occlusion following orbital tumor resection: Is rapid intervention effective?

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Naderan, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Seyed Ziaeddin Tabatabaei; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-08-01

    A 52-year-old male patient presented at our hospital with unilateral proptosis and vision loss in his left eye. Imaging evaluations showed orbital tumor, so the patient underwent surgery. About an hour later after tumor removal, patient developed sudden vision loss and became no light perception. Fundus evaluation revealed central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). The patient was treated immediately with ocular massage and anterior chamber paracentesis as well as systemic therapy with mannitol and intravenous administration of acetazolamide. After thirty minutes, he recovered perception to light and then hand motion and 2 h later, it was improved to 1 m counting finger. CRAO following orbital tumor has not been reported before. We recommend ocular examination in all patients that undergo orbital surgery immediately to 2-3 h after surgery. PMID:26576528

  11. Unusual presentation of a multiple sclerosis case involving central retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; R. Nowilaty, Sawsan

    2014-01-01

    The term intermediate uveitis (IU) refers to a subgroup of uveitis in which the vitreous is the site of greatest inflammation. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a greater frequency of IU compared with the general population. The IU associated with MS is characterized by the presence of pars planitis (occasionally accompanied by anterior uveitis) and the presence of peripheral retinal vasculitis in the form of periphlebitis (venous sheathing) in 6–26% of patients. We present a patient with an unusual initial presentation of MS involving central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) in the right eye (RE). Although retinal vascular changes are asymptomatic in the majority of MS patients, the spectrum of impairment ranges from simple peripheral retina periphlebitis to the presence of peripheral occlusive retinal vasculitis in 6.5% of patients. This atypical case may represent an extreme of the spectrum of retinal vasculitis associated with demyelinating disease. PMID:25892937

  12. Body fat is associated with reduced aortic stiffness until middle age.

    PubMed

    Corden, Ben; Keenan, Niall G; de Marvao, Antonio S M; Dawes, Timothy J W; Decesare, Alain; Diamond, Tamara; Durighel, Giuliana; Hughes, Alun D; Cook, Stuart A; O'Regan, Declan P

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiometabolic disease, but the effect of body composition on vascular aging and arterial stiffness remains uncertain. We investigated relationships among body composition, blood pressure, age, and aortic pulse wave velocity in healthy individuals. Pulse wave velocity in the thoracic aorta, an indicator of central arterial stiffness, was measured in 221 volunteers (range, 18-72 years; mean, 40.3±13 years) who had no history of cardiovascular disease using cardiovascular MRI. In univariate analyses, age (r=0.78; P<0.001) and blood pressure (r=0.41; P<0.001) showed a strong positive association with pulse wave velocity. In multivariate analysis, after adjustment for age, sex, and mean arterial blood pressure, elevated body fat% was associated with reduced aortic stiffness until the age of 50 years, thereafter adiposity had an increasingly positive association with aortic stiffness (β=0.16; P<0.001). Body fat% was positively associated with cardiac output when age, sex, height, and absolute lean mass were adjusted for (β=0.23; P=0.002). These findings suggest that the cardiovascular system of young adults may be capable of adapting to the state of obesity and that an adverse association between body fat and aortic stiffness is only apparent in later life.

  13. Effect of neuropeptide Y on the sympathetic contraction of the rabbit central ear artery during cooling.

    PubMed

    García-Villalón, A L; Padilla, J; Fernández, N; Monge, L; Martínez, M A; Gómez, B; Diéguez, G

    2000-08-01

    In order to analyse the effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on the cutaneous vascular response to sympathetic nerve stimulation during cooling, the isometric response of isolated 2-mm segments of the rabbit central ear (cutaneous) artery was recorded at 37 degrees C and during cooling (30 degrees C). Electrical field stimulation (4-16 Hz) at 37 degrees C produced a frequency-dependent contraction, which was reduced during cooling (45% for 16 Hz) and potentiated by NPY (10(-8), 3x10(-8) and 10(-7) M), this potentiation being greater at 30 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The NPY-induced potentiation of the contraction elicited by electrical field stimulation (8 Hz) was abolished by an antagonist of Y1 subtype NPY receptors, BIBP3226 (10(-6) M), at 37 degrees C and 30 degrees C, reduced by phentolamine (10(-6) M) at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C, was not modified by the purinoceptor antagonist PPADS (3x10(-5) M) and was reduced by application of both phentolamine and PPADS at both temperatures. Both NiCl2 (10(-3) M) and verapamil (10(-5) M) abolished the potentiating effect of NPY at 37 degrees C and reduced it at 30 degrees C. Neither application of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-Nomega-nitro-arginine (L-NOARG, 10(-4) M), nor endothelium removal modified the potentiating effect of NPY at 37 degrees C or 30 degrees C. NPY (10(-8), 3x10(-8) and 10(-7) M) potentiated in a concentration-dependent way the arterial contraction in response to exogenous noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-4) M) at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C, and it increased the response to ATP (10(-4)-10(-2) M) at both temperatures. Therefore, in cutaneous (ear) arteries: (1) NPY potentiates the sympathetic response at 37 degrees C and at 30 degrees C, (2) this potentiating effect of NPY was more marked at 30 degrees C than at 37 degrees C, probably because of greater potentiation of the alpha-adrenoceptor response during cooling, and (3) the potentiating effect of NPY at both temperatures is

  14. Stiff railguns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Bacon, J. L.; Weeks, D. A.; Zowarka, R. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stiff guns have been operated with both plasma and solid armatures. A performance gain was seen in the plasma railgun as stiffness was increased. A stiff gun will help to maintain the bore shape and preserve the integrity of the seam between rail and insulator under the extreme asymmetric loads sustained during high-pressure operation. The hydraulically preloaded moly and ceramic gun has been fired six times at pressures as high as 87 ksi, and the bore still holds roughing vacuum up to two hours after the test. The elimination of seam leakage helps control bore erosion associated with plasma reconstitution from the rail and plasma perturbation that might result in loss-initiating instabilities. Reduced rail deflection allows solid and transitioning armatures to track the bore surface. An analysis of the strain energy associated with the deflection of the railgun structure is presented, and this mechanism is found to be a small fraction of the energy associated with armature loss and the rail resistive loss.

  15. Neural control of circulation and exercise: a translational approach disclosing interactions between central command, arterial baroreflex, and muscle metaboreflex.

    PubMed

    Michelini, Lisete C; O'Leary, Donal S; Raven, Peter B; Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2015-08-01

    The last 100 years witnessed a rapid and progressive development of the body of knowledge concerning the neural control of the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The understanding of the complexity and the relevance of the neuroregulatory system continues to evolve and as a result raises new questions. The purpose of this review is to articulate results from studies involving experimental models in animals as well as in humans concerning the interaction between the neural mechanisms mediating the hemodynamic responses during exercise. The review describes the arterial baroreflex, the pivotal mechanism controlling mean arterial blood pressure and its fluctuations along with the two main activation mechanisms to exercise: central command (parallel activation of central somatomotor and autonomic descending pathways) and the muscle metaboreflex, the metabolic component of exercise pressor reflex (feedback from ergoreceptors within contracting skeletal muscles). In addition, the role of the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in modulating the resetting of arterial baroreflex is identified, and the mechanisms in the central nervous system involved with the resetting of baroreflex function during dynamic exercise are also described. Approaching a very relevant clinical condition, the review also presents the concept that the impaired arterial baroreflex function is an integral component of the metaboreflex-mediated exaggerated sympathetic tone in subjects with heart failure. This increased sympathetic activity has a major role in causing the depressed ventricular function observed during submaximal dynamic exercise in these patients. The potential contribution of a metaboreflex arising from respiratory muscles is also considered.

  16. Numerical assessment of the stiffness index.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Sally; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Elliott, Paul; Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Elevated systemic vascular stiffness is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It has been suggested that the time difference between the two characteristic peaks of the digital volume pulse (DVP) measured at the finger using photoplethysmography is related to the stiffness of the arterial tree, and inversely proportional to the stiffness index (SI). However, the precise physical meaning of the SI and its relation to aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) is yet to be ascertained. In this study we investigated numerically the effect of changes in arterial wall stiffness, peripheral resistances, peripheral compliances or peripheral wave reflections on the SI and aPWV. The SI was calculated from the digital area waveform simulated using a nonlinear one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in a 75-artery network, which includes the larger arteries of the hand. Our results show that aPWV is affected by changes in aortic stiffness, but the SI is primarily affected by changes in the stiffness of all conduit vessels. Thus, the SI is not a direct substitute for aPWV. Moreover, our results suggest that peripheral reflections in the upper body delay the time of arrival of the first peak in the DVP. The second peak is predominantly caused by the impedance mismatch within the 75 arterial segments, rather than by peripheral reflections.

  17. Stormwater permitting for a large construction project: NPDES and Boston's Central Artery/Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.B. )

    1993-01-01

    The promulgation of EPA's NPDES stormwater discharge regulations occurred during the latter planning stages for Boston's Central Artery/Tunnel Project, making this project, one of the largest single urban highway projects ever built, one of the first to be permitted under new regulations. The Project consists of 128 land miles of new highway, including numerous ramps and interchanges, and a harbor tunnel, with stormwater discharging during construction from at least 38 separate points. Complicating the permitting situation, stormwater is combined with dewatering discharges from excavations in filled and former industrial areas. Working closely with EPA Region 1 and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, the Massachusetts Highway Department submitted a permit application combining estimates of dewatering discharge quality derived from groundwater sampling with all the elements of a NPDES application for construction stormwater. The resulting permit contained two separate sets of monitoring requirements for the same discharge points, one for stormwater and one for dewatering. Quarterly monitoring was required for both dewatering and stormwater for metals, suspended solids, TPH, and VOC. Limits of 50 mg/1 TSS and 5 mg/1 TPH were established for dewatering only.

  18. Successful Retrieval of a Dismembered Central Venous Catheter Stuck to the Right Pulmonary Artery Using a Stepwise Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anticancer chemotherapy have resulted in an increase in the number of patients requiring a central venous port catheter, and the incidence of catheter pinch-off syndrome has been increasing. Catheter pinch-off syndrome is a rare and unusual complication. It is difficult to retrieve dislodged catheters from the pulmonary artery, especially if the catheter is stuck to the peripheral pulmonary artery. We herein describe the successful removal of a catheter stuck in the pulmonary artery with a stepwise approach. First, a pigtail catheter was used to tug the dislodged catheter in order to free the unilateral end. Then, a gooseneck snare was used to catch and pull the catheter out of the patient. The key to success is to free the end of the catheter. PMID:27668096

  19. Successful Retrieval of a Dismembered Central Venous Catheter Stuck to the Right Pulmonary Artery Using a Stepwise Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anticancer chemotherapy have resulted in an increase in the number of patients requiring a central venous port catheter, and the incidence of catheter pinch-off syndrome has been increasing. Catheter pinch-off syndrome is a rare and unusual complication. It is difficult to retrieve dislodged catheters from the pulmonary artery, especially if the catheter is stuck to the peripheral pulmonary artery. We herein describe the successful removal of a catheter stuck in the pulmonary artery with a stepwise approach. First, a pigtail catheter was used to tug the dislodged catheter in order to free the unilateral end. Then, a gooseneck snare was used to catch and pull the catheter out of the patient. The key to success is to free the end of the catheter.

  20. Successful Retrieval of a Dismembered Central Venous Catheter Stuck to the Right Pulmonary Artery Using a Stepwise Approach.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Keisuke; Nomura, Hidekimi; Isomura, Daichi; Sugiura, Ryo; Oka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in anticancer chemotherapy have resulted in an increase in the number of patients requiring a central venous port catheter, and the incidence of catheter pinch-off syndrome has been increasing. Catheter pinch-off syndrome is a rare and unusual complication. It is difficult to retrieve dislodged catheters from the pulmonary artery, especially if the catheter is stuck to the peripheral pulmonary artery. We herein describe the successful removal of a catheter stuck in the pulmonary artery with a stepwise approach. First, a pigtail catheter was used to tug the dislodged catheter in order to free the unilateral end. Then, a gooseneck snare was used to catch and pull the catheter out of the patient. The key to success is to free the end of the catheter. PMID:27668096

  1. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. Methods This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18–75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140–160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90–100 mmHg; increased brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Conclusion

  2. Lesions of the mitral valve as a cause of central retinal artery occlusion: presentation and discussion of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ayati, Maryam; Gori, Tommaso; Münzel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present two cases of mitral valve lesions that manifested with unilateral blindness caused by central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO): Case 1. A 68-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic for sudden blindness. Retinal artery angiogram showed CRAO. Transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) documented a mass attached to the ventricular side of the posterior mitral leaflet, which at pathology was identified as a blood cyst. Case 2. A 67-year-old man was admitted for a sudden unilateral painless loss of vision. Retinal angiogram documented CRAO, and TEE showed a highly mobile, spherical, lesion on the atrial side of anterior mitral leaflet. In this case, the pathological finding was a degenerated calcified thrombosis. We report on two cases of very rare abnormalities of the mitral valve presenting with a very rare embolic complication, i.e., CRAO. Like for cryptogenic stroke, transesophageal echocardiography plays a central role in the diagnosis of cardiogenic embolic sources. PMID:20070361

  3. Improving Residents' Knowledge of Arterial and Central Line Placement With a Web-Based Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Shilpa; Currier, Paul F.; Elinoff, Jason M.; Katz, Joel T.; McMahon, Graham T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Procedural skill is predicated on knowledge. We used a previously validated test to evaluate the impact of a web-based education program on medical residents' knowledge of 2 advanced medical procedures. Methods We enrolled 210 internal medicine residents at 3 residency programs in a randomized, controlled, educational trial. Study participants completed a 20-item, validated online test of their knowledge of central venous and arterial line (CVL and AL, respectively) placement at baseline and after performing their next 2 procedures (test 1 and test 2). Between test 1 and test 2, participants were randomized to online educational material for CVL insertion, AL insertion, both, or neither. The primary outcome of the study was the difference in test scores between test 1 and test 2 by randomization group. Results Though residents in the baseline cohort were confident about their knowledge of procedural technique, their mean test scores were low (62% and 58% in the CVL and AL tests, respectively). Baseline test score correlated with the number of prior procedures performed. Sixty-five residents completed all 3 CVL tests, and 85 residents completed all 3 AL tests. Access to the web-based procedure education was associated with a significant improvement in scores for both the CVL test (effect size, d  =  0.25, P  =  .01) and AL test (d  =  0.52, P < .001). Conclusions Web-based procedure training improves knowledge of procedures to a significantly greater extent than performing the procedure alone. Web-based curricula can effectively supplement other methods of skill development. PMID:22132276

  4. Impact of the augmentation time ratio on direct measurement of central aortic pressure in the presence of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Nishizaki, Yuji; Yamazoe, Masahiro; Komatsu, Ikki; Asano, Taku; Mitsuhashi, Hirotsugu; Nishi, Yutaro; Niwa, Koichiro; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    The augmentation index measured by using the central artery pressure is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, no study has examined the role of the time duration of the central artery pressure on CAD. Therefore, we evaluated the relationship between the central blood pressure time duration and the presence of CAD. All patients without a history of revascularization or prior myocardial infarction who underwent an elective coronary angiography at one of the two hospitals from January to September 2013 were analyzed. CAD was defined as a significant stenosis in one of the main coronary branches. The augmentation time ratio was defined as the ratio of the reflection to peak systolic time T2T1 duration divided by the peak systolic time to aortic notch T3T2 duration. We analyzed the relationship between the central pressure waveform (not only augmentation pressure) and the presence of CAD. A total of 146 (57.3%) out of 255 patients had a significant CAD. T2T1 duration was longer in the CAD group than the no CAD group, and the T3T2 duration was shorter in the CAD group than the no CAD group. The augmentation time ratio (T2T1/T3T2) was significantly larger in the CAD group than in the no CAD group. The augmentation index and augmentation pressure were lower in the no CAD group, but this difference was not statistically significant. The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to no CAD, especially in patients with a high augmentation index (odds ratio, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.63). The augmentation time ratio was an independent factor related to the presence of CAD.

  5. Inadvertent arterial insertion of a central venous catheter: delayed recognition with abrupt changes in pressure waveform during surgery -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Sun; Park, Ji Young; Kwak, Young Lan; Lee, Jong Wha

    2011-01-01

    We present a case of inadvertent arterial insertion of a central venous catheter, identified during a pericardiectomy procedure after observing abrupt changes in pressure waveform and confirmed via arterial blood gas analysis and transesophageal echocardiography. Central venous pressure measurement was initially 20 mmHg in supine, and then elevated to 30-40 mmHg in right lateral decubitus, presumably resulting from constrictive physiology of pericarditis. The pressure waveforms, however, abruptly changed from a venous to an arterial waveform during surgery. When visual discrimination between arterial and venous blood regurgitation is unreliable, anesthesiologists should confirm that using all the available methods one has on the scene, especially after at least two unsuccessful attempts or in patients with advanced age or clinical conditions resulting in jugular venous dilation. To prevent arterial catheterization, one should limit the leftward rotation of the head by <40° and consider using ultrasound-guided method after more than two unsuccessful attempts.

  6. Vision Loss due to Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Following Embolization in a Case of a Giant Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Mihir; Desai, Roshani J; Potdar, Nayana A; Shinde, Chhaya A; Ukirde, Vivek; Bhuta, Maunil; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan

    2015-07-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a benign, vascular, and locally aggressive tumor that arises in the nasal cavity, extending into the nasopharynx and often in to the orbit. It may rarely present to the ophthalmologist with proptosis and optic neuropathy. Preoperative embolization of JNA is done before surgical resection. In this communication, the authors report a rare occurrence of ipsilateral central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) following embolization with polyvinyl alcohol in a 13-year-old boy with right-sided JNA. Retrospective review of the angiograms pointed out to a suspicious communication between the external carotid artery and the ophthalmic vessels. Pre-embolization detailed study of the angiograms is necessary to avoid such devastating complications. Although rare, vision loss is a possible complication arising from embolization of nasopharyngeal and intracranial tumors, and all patients undergoing these procedures should be informed of the risk of visual loss because it has a lasting impact on the quality of life.

  7. Changes in purinergic responses of the rabbit isolated central ear artery after chronic electrical stimulation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, K. I.; Loesch, A.; Burnstock, G.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effect of chronic (4-16 days) electrical stimulation (5 Hz, 0.3 ms, 4-10 V) of the great auricular nerve in vivo on sympathetic cotransmission in the rabbit isolated central ear artery was examined. 2. Chronic stimulation had no significant effect on frequency-dependent (4-60 Hz) neurogenic contractions or contractile responses induced by exogenous noradrenaline (0.1-300 microM). 3. In contrast, contractions induced by exogenous alpha, beta-methylene ATP (10.0 microM) were significantly decreased in preparations from 16-day stimulated animals in comparison with sham-operated, 4-day and 8-day chronically stimulated animal groups. 4. It is concluded that chronic electrical stimulation of nerves supplying the ear artery may lead to the selective alteration of postjunctional P2x-purinoceptor mechanisms, while the effects mediated by post-junctional alpha 1-adrenoceptors remain unchanged. PMID:1335343

  8. Activation of Central Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors by Compound 21 Improves Arterial Baroreflex Sensitivity in Rats With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Juan; Zucker, Irving H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In a previous study we demonstrated that central administration of compound 21 (C21), a nonpeptide AT2R agonist, inhibited sympathetic tone in normal rats. In this study, we hypothesized that C21 exerts a similar effect in rats with coronary ligation–induced heart failure (HF). METHODS C21 was intracerebroventricularly infused for 7 days by osmotic mini pump. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by radiotelemetry in the conscious state to measure spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Urine was collected for measurement of norepinephrine excretion. On the last day of C21 treatment, renal sympathetic nerve activity, BP, and HR were directly recorded under anesthesia, and the induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated. Protein expressions of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, rostral ventrolateral medulla, and nucleus tractus solitarius were determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS C21-treated HF rats displayed significantly less norepinephrine excretion (2,385.6±121.1 vs. 3,677.3±147.6ng/24 hours; P < 0.05) and lower renal sympathetic nerve activity (50.2±1.9% of max vs. 70.9±8.2% of max; P < 0.05) than vehicle-treated HF rats. C21-treated rats also exhibited improved spontaneous arterial baroreflex sensitivity and induced arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Bolus intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II–evoked pressor and sympatho-excitatory responses were attenuated in the C21-treated HF rats, which displayed upregulated nNOS and downregulated AT1R expression in the subfornical organ, paraventricular nucleus, and rostral ventrolateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Activation of central angiotensin II type 2 receptor AT2R by C21 suppresses sympathetic outflow in rats with HF by improving baroreflex sensitivity and may provide important benefit in the HF syndrome. PMID:24687998

  9. Systemic-pulmonary artery shunts in infants: modified Blalock-Taussig and central shunt procedures.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Access is gained through a midline sternotomy, the thymus partially excised and the superior part of the pericardium is opened. The innominate vein is retracted and the innominate artery is mobilized up to the bifurcation. The aorta is retracted to the left, the superior vena cavae to the right and the right atrial appendage inferiorly. The adventitia around the right pulmonary artery (PA) is dissected, taking care to incise the bulky pericardial reflection between the superior vena cavae and the trachea. Heparin is administrated. An occlusive clamp is applied to the right PA to test for haemodynamic tolerance prior to proceeding with the interposition of a suitable size artificial vascular prosthesis, based on the weight of the patient, between the innominate artery, or proximal subclavian artery and the right PA. Alternatively, if a sufficient main PA is present and adequate flow from a patent ductus arteriosus an end-to-side interposition shunt may be constructed between the ascending aorta and the main PA, provided the patient is stable with the test occlusion of the main PA. The management of the patent arterial ductus depends on whether or not there is forward flow through the PA.

  10. Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Behçet's Disease by Using Noninvasive Radiological Methods such as Intima-Media Thickness of the Carotid, Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index, Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring, and Their Relation to Serum Fetuin-A Levels: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genç, Berhan; Akyıldız, Muhittin; Şahin, Neslin; Uyar, İhsan Sami; Saklamaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory systemic vasculitis. Evidence for increased atherosclerosis in BD has been observed. The relation between cardiovascular risk factors and increased atherosclerosis in patients with BD is still controversial. Objective We performed this study to evaluate arterial stiffness in patients with BD by using noninvasive radiological methods such as carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), coronary artery calcium score (CACaS), and their relation to serum fetuin-A levels, which was recently found to be important in vascular calcification. Methods This prospective study included 26 patients with BD and 25 control subjects. In all patients, the CIMT, ABPI, CACaS, and serum fetuin-A levels were examined. Results The CIMT and CACaS were statistically higher and the ABPI was statistically lower in BD patients than in the control group. All p-values were <0.001. Positive correlations were found between the CACaS and CIMT, and negative correlations were found between the CACaS and ABPI. Although the values of fetuin-A were higher in BD, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.064). However, the correlations found between fetuin-A levels and CIMT and between fetuin-A levels and CACaS were significant. Conclusion The CIMT, CACaS, and ABPI are all useful in detecting structural and functional vascular damage in BD. PMID:26719639

  11. Central role of RAGE-dependent neointimal expansion in arterial restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yan, Shi Fang; Yan, Shi Du; Belov, Dmitri; Rong, Ling Ling; Sousa, Monica; Andrassy, Martin; Marso, Steven P.; Duda, Stephan; Arnold, Bernd; Liliensiek, Birgit; Nawroth, Peter P.; Stern, David M.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Naka, Yoshifumi

    2003-01-01

    Cellular proliferation, migration, and expression of extracellular matrix proteins and MMPs contribute to neointimal formation upon vascular injury. Wild-type mice undergoing arterial endothelial denudation displayed striking upregulation of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the injured vessel, particularly in activated smooth muscle cells of the expanding neointima. In parallel, two of RAGE’s signal transducing ligands, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and S100/calgranulins, demonstrated increased deposition/expression in the injured vessel wall. Blockade of RAGE, employing soluble truncated receptor or antibodies, or in homozygous RAGE null mice, resulted in significantly decreased neointimal expansion after arterial injury and decreased smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration, and expression of extracellular matrix proteins. A critical role for smooth muscle cell RAGE signaling was demonstrated in mice bearing a transgene encoding a RAGE cytosolic tail-deletion mutant, specifically in smooth muscle cells, driven by the SM22α promoter. Upon arterial injury, neointimal expansion was strikingly suppressed compared with that observed in wild-type littermates. Taken together, these data highlight key roles for RAGE in modulating smooth muscle cell properties after injury and suggest that RAGE is a logical target for suppression of untoward neointimal expansion consequent to arterial injury. PMID:12671045

  12. A case of polyarteritis nodosa complicated by left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy, and retinal vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Emad, Y; Basaffar, S; Ragab, Y; Zeinhom, F; Gheita, T

    2007-05-01

    A 23-year-old single female patient developed constitutional manifestations in the form of fever, weight loss, anorexia, malaise, fatigue, and generalized aches in January 1995, 2 weeks after an attack of German measles. This was followed by painful, reddish, macular skin lesions over both legs which healed by dark pigmentation (leucocytoclastic vasculitis), mononeuritis multiplex, and Raynaud's phenomena of both hands and feet. Angiography of lower limbs was done to visualize the arterial tree of both lower limbs and revealed typical beading of distal arterial branches, a diagnosis compatible with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). At that time, the patient received prednisone (45 mg/day) and azatioprin (100 mg/day) and responded well to treatment. In a second presentation in June 2005, the patient developed sudden attack of loss of vision in her left eye. Ophthalmological examination of the patient revealed evidence of left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy. The patient received methyl prednisolone, 1 g IV infusion, daily infusion for three consecutive days followed by oral prednisolone, 30 mg/day. The patient received pulse cyclophosphamide IV infusion (0.6 g/m2) on the fourth day. One week after receiving therapy, the patient progressed from having light perception to counting of fingers from a distance of 1 m.

  13. Technical Validation of ARTSENS–An Image Free Device for Evaluation of Vascular Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Ravikumar; Kusmakar, Shitanshu; Thrivikraman, Arya Sree; Sivaprakasam, Mohanasankar

    2015-01-01

    Vascular stiffness is an indicator of cardiovascular health, with carotid artery stiffness having established correlation to coronary heart disease and utility in cardiovascular diagnosis and screening. State of art equipment for stiffness evaluation are expensive, require expertise to operate and not amenable for field deployment. In this context, we developed ARTerial Stiffness Evaluation for Noninvasive Screening (ARTSENS), a device for image free, noninvasive, automated evaluation of vascular stiffness amenable for field use. ARTSENS has a frugal hardware design, utilizing a single ultrasound transducer to interrogate the carotid artery, integrated with robust algorithms that extract arterial dimensions and compute clinically accepted measures of arterial stiffness. The ability of ARTSENS to measure vascular stiffness in vivo was validated by performing measurements on 125 subjects. The accuracy of results was verified with the state-of-the-art ultrasound imaging-based echo-tracking system. The relation between arterial stiffness measurements performed in sitting posture for ARTSENS measurement and sitting/supine postures for imaging system was also investigated to examine feasibility of performing ARTSENS measurements in the sitting posture for field deployment. This paper verified the feasibility of the novel ARTSENS device in performing accurate in vivo measurements of arterial stiffness. As a portable device that performs automated measurement of carotid artery stiffness with minimal operator input, ARTSENS has strong potential for use in large-scale screening. PMID:27170892

  14. Reduced large elastic artery stiffness with regular aerobic exercise in middle-aged and older adults: potential role of suppressed nuclear factor κ B signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kristen L.; Donato, Anthony J.; Fleenor, Bradley S.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Walker, Ashley E.; Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Ballak, Dov B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aortic pulse-wave velocity (aPWV) increases with age and is a strong independent predictor of incident cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in healthy middle-aged and older adults. aPWV is lower in middle-aged and older adults who perform regular aerobic exercise than in their sedentary peers. As exercise is associated with reduced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that suppression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κ B (NFκB) may mediate this process. Methods aPWV was measured in young sedentary [n =10, blood pressure (BP) 108 ± 3/59 ± 2 mmHg; mean ± SEM], middle-aged and older sedentary (n =9, 124 ± 7/73 ± 5 mmHg) and middle-aged and older aerobic exercise-trained (n =12, 110 ± 4/67 ± 2 mmHg) healthy, nonhypertensive men and women. Results Baseline aPWV increased with age [626 ± 14 (young sedentary) vs. 859 ± 49 (middle-aged and older sedentary) cm/s, P <0.001] but was 20% lower in middle-aged and older trained (686 ± 30 cm/s) than in middle-aged and older sedentary (P <0.005). Short-term (4 days × 2500–4500 mg) treatment with the NFκB inhibitor salsalate (randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design) reduced aPWV (to 783 ± 44 cm/s, P <0.05) without changing BP (P =0.40) or heart rate (P =0.90) in middle-aged and older sedentary, but had no effect in young sedentary (623 ± 19) or middle-aged and older trained (699 ± 30). Following salsalate treatment, aPWV no longer was significantly different in middle-aged and older sedentary vs. middle-aged and older trained (P =0.29). The reduction in aPWV with salsalate administration was inversely related to baseline (placebo) aPWV (r = −0.60, P <0.001). Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that suppressed NFκB signalling may partially mediate the lower aortic stiffness in middle-aged and older adults who regularly perform aerobic exercise. Because aPWV predicts incident cardiovascular events in this population, this suggests that tonic suppression of

  15. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  16. A long-term, comprehensive exercise program that incorporates a variety of physical activities improved the blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism, arterial stiffness, and balance of middle-aged and elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Terukazu; Sullivan, Corbet V; Ozoe, Naomi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Kawasaki, Junya

    2011-09-01

    A 6-month, twice-a-week exercise program emphasizing swimming was conducted for 11 men (57-73 years) and 24 women (51-68 years). The control group comprised 11 male (59-70 years) and 11 female (53-70) volunteers. The exercise program significantly improved the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) and lipid and glucose metabolism, with no change in the controls. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), as an index of systemic arterial stiffness, was measured during medical examinations before and after each exercise session using a volume-plethysmographic apparatus. SBP and DBP of the extremities were significantly decreased after exercise, but did not change in the controls. Average baPWV decreased significantly in the exercise group, from 1661±50 to 1581±40 cm per sec. No change was seen in the controls. The sway path of the center of balance was analyzed using a force plate. The length of postural sway, the length of postural sway per sec and the area of postural sway were measured with eyes open and eyes closed, and the rectangular area was calculated. The eyes open/eyes closed ratio (Romberg sign) was also calculated. All parameters of body sway were significantly lower after 6 months in the exercise group, with no change in the controls. The Romberg sign did not change for either group. In addition to promoting better health, as shown by the clinical data, this type of exercise program improves balance function, which could help prevent falls of the elderly.

  17. Comparison of the sterility of long-term central venous catheterization using single lumen, triple lumen, and pulmonary artery catheters.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; Venus, B; Mathru, M

    1984-08-01

    The incidence of thrombocytopenia and catheter-induced infection and colonization after the use of triple lumen (TLC), pulmonary artery (PA), and single lumen central venous (CVP) catheters was studied in 29 critically ill patients. Catheter-induced sepsis was documented in 7% of patients with TLC and 10% of patients with CVP and PA catheters. Thirty-three percent of TLC, 20% of PA and 10% of CVP catheters became contaminated during the study. Staphylococcus epidermidis most commonly caused catheter sepsis and contamination. Only patients with PA catheters showed significant decrease in their platelet count. We conclude that use of TLC catheters in critically ill patients does not appear to increase the risk of infectious disease and thrombocytopenia.

  18. Manifestations of central retinal artery occlusion revealed by fundus fluorescein angiography are associated with the degree of visual loss

    PubMed Central

    GONG, HONGXIA; SONG, QIUYING; WANG, LANHUI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between central visual impairment and the characteristics of fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) in patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). A total of 63 patients were diagnosed with CRAO by FFA. The visual dysfunction was classified into severe, mild and light degrees. Tropicamide was administered for mydriasis. FFA examination was performed using Heidelberg retinal tomography. The associations of age, gender and disease course with CRAO type were analyzed. Three types of manifestations were identified by FFA in 63 eyes, including poor perfusion (18 cases), exudation (22 cases) and mixed types (23 cases) of CRAO. No significant difference was found in age (F=0.171, P=0.844) and disease course (F=0.016, P=0.984) among the three types of CRAO. Similarly, no significant difference was found in gender among the three types of CRAO (χ2=0.176, P=0.916). The damage to vision caused by the exudation type of CRAO was not as severe as that caused by the poor perfusion and mixed types of CRAO. The distributions of damage severity caused by the poor perfusion and mixed types of CRAO were similar. In conclusion, the FFA observations for CRAO can be classified into three types of manifestations. The damage to vision in patients with CRAO is likely to be associated with poor perfusion in the retinal artery rather than exudation affecting the retina or optic disc. The patterns of clinical manifestations are not associated with age, gender or disease course. PMID:27313672

  19. Regional variation in arterial stiffening and dysfunction in Western diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Bender, Shawn B; Castorena-Gonzalez, Jorge A; Garro, Mona; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino C; Sowers, James R; DeMarco, Vincent G; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A

    2015-08-15

    Increased central vascular stiffening, assessed in vivo by determination of pulse wave velocity (PWV), is an independent predictor of cardiovascular event risk. Recent evidence demonstrates that accelerated aortic stiffening occurs in obesity; however, little is known regarding stiffening of other disease-relevant arteries or whether regional variation in arterial stiffening occurs in this setting. We addressed this gap in knowledge by assessing femoral PWV in vivo in conjunction with ex vivo analyses of femoral and coronary structure and function in a mouse model of Western diet (WD; high-fat/high-sugar)-induced obesity and insulin resistance. WD feeding resulted in increased femoral PWV in vivo. Ex vivo analysis of femoral arteries revealed a leftward shift in the strain-stress relationship, increased modulus of elasticity, and decreased compliance indicative of increased stiffness following WD feeding. Confocal and multiphoton fluorescence microscopy revealed increased femoral stiffness involving decreased elastin/collagen ratio in conjunction with increased femoral transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) content in WD-fed mice. Further analysis of the femoral internal elastic lamina (IEL) revealed a significant reduction in the number and size of fenestrae with WD feeding. Coronary artery stiffness and structure was unchanged by WD feeding. Functionally, femoral, but not coronary, arteries exhibited endothelial dysfunction, whereas coronary arteries exhibited increased vasoconstrictor responsiveness not present in femoral arteries. Taken together, our data highlight important regional variations in the development of arterial stiffness and dysfunction associated with WD feeding. Furthermore, our results suggest TGF-β signaling and IEL fenestrae remodeling as potential contributors to femoral artery stiffening in obesity.

  20. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Lampi, Marsha C; Faber, Courtney J; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  1. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  2. Anaesthetic management of coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with central core disease and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia on statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Johi, R R; Mills, R; Halsall, P J; Hopkins, P M

    2003-11-01

    Central core disease and malignant hyperthermia (MH) are both associated with mutations in the RYR1 gene. We report the anaesthetic management of one such patient presenting for coronary artery bypass grafting. Her medication included aspirin 75 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg, isosorbide mononitrate 60 mg, atenolol 25 mg and glyceryl trinitrite sublingual spray as required. The use of aprotinin, statins and moderate hypothermia in patients with central core disease and known susceptibility to MH has not been documented.

  3. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  4. [A contribution to "stiff man" syndrome].

    PubMed

    Belian, T; Harms, L

    1990-05-01

    A patient with the clinical symptoms of the "Stiff-man"-syndrome, but an atypical course was introduced. Symptoms and course were compared with similar cases mentioned in literature. The "Stiff-man"-syndrome is probably a disease of central origin affecting the relationship between inhibitory and excitatory regulation of the muscle tonus, especially the exteroceptive reflex mechanisms. Several pathological processes of the CNS can be held responsible for the disturbance of the balance in this regulatory system. PMID:2167489

  5. Acute benefits of the microbial-derived isoflavone metabolite equol on arterial stiffness in men prospectively recruited according to equol producer phenotype: a double-blind randomized controlled trial12

    PubMed Central

    Hazim, Sara; Curtis, Peter J; Schär, Manuel Y; Ostertag, Luisa M; Kay, Colin D; Minihane, Anne-Marie; Cassidy, Aedín

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is much speculation with regard to the potential cardioprotective benefits of equol, a microbial-derived metabolite of the isoflavone daidzein, which is produced in the large intestine after soy intake in 30% of Western populations. Although cross-sectional and retrospective data support favorable associations between the equol producer (EP) phenotype and cardiometabolic health, few studies have prospectively recruited EPs to confirm this association. Objective: The aim was to determine whether the acute vascular benefits of isoflavones differ according to EP phenotype and subsequently investigate the effect of providing commercially produced S-(–)equol to non-EPs. Design: We prospectively recruited male EPs and non-EPs (n = 14/group) at moderate cardiovascular risk into a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to examine the acute effects of soy isoflavones (80-mg aglycone equivalents) on arterial stiffness [carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (cfPWV)], blood pressure, endothelial function (measured by using the EndoPAT 2000; Itamar Medical), and nitric oxide at baseline (0 h) and 6 and 24 h after intake. In a separate assessment, non-EPs consumed 40 mg S-(–)equol with identical vascular measurements performed 2 h after intake. Results: After soy intake, cfPWV significantly improved in EPs at 24 h (cfPWV change from 0 h: isoflavone, −0.2 ± 0.2 m/s; placebo, 0.6 ± 0.2 m/s; P < 0.01), which was significantly associated with plasma equol concentrations (R = −0.36, P = 0.01). No vascular effects were observed in EPs at 6 h or in non-EPs at any time point. Similarly, no benefit of commercially produced S-(–)equol was observed in non-EPs despite mean plasma equol concentrations reaching 3.2 μmol/L. Conclusions: Acute soy intake improved cfPWV in EPs, equating to an 11–12% reduced risk of cardiovascular disease if sustained. However, a single dose of commercially produced equol had no cardiovascular benefits in non-EPs. These

  6. Exercise, Vascular Stiffness, and Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Sikka, Gautam; Jandu, Simran; Barodka, Viachaslau; Halushka, Marc K.; Flavahan, Nicholas A.; Belkin, Alexey M.; Nyhan, Daniel; Butlin, Mark; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular aging is closely associated with increased vascular stiffness. It has recently been demonstrated that decreased nitric oxide (NO)‐induced S‐nitrosylation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) contributes to age‐related vascular stiffness. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that exercise restores NO signaling and attenuates vascular stiffness by decreasing TG2 activity and cross‐linking in an aging rat model. Methods and Results Rats were subjected to 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise. Aging was associated with diminished phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and phosphorylated vasodilator‐stimulated phosphoprotein abundance, suggesting reduced NO signaling. TG2 cross‐linking activity was significantly increased in old animals, whereas TG2 abundance remained unchanged. These alterations were attenuated in the exercise cohort. Simultaneous measurement of blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) demonstrated increased aortic stiffness in old rats, compared to young, at all values of mean arterial pressure (MAP). The PWV‐MAP correlation in the old sedentary and old exercise cohorts was similar. Tensile testing of the vessels showed increased stiffness of the aorta in the old phenotype with a modest restoration of mechanical properties toward the young phenotype with exercise. Conclusions Increased vascular stiffness during aging is associated with decreased TG2 S‐nitrosylation, increased TG2 cross‐linking activity, and increased vascular stiffness likely the result of decreased NO bioavailability. In this study, a brief period of moderate aerobic exercise enhanced NO signaling, attenuated TG cross‐linking activity, and reduced ex vivo tensile properties, but failed to reverse functional vascular stiffness in vivo, as measured by PWV. PMID:24721796

  7. Combined Central Retinal Artery and Vein Occlusion Associated with Factor V Leiden Mutation and Treated with Hyperbaric Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, José Alberto; Teixeira, Carla; Carvalho, Rui; Fernandes, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    Background Combined central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is an uncommon retinal vascular disease which causes sudden visual acuity loss and is associated with poor prognosis and the development of severe complications. We report a very rare case of combined CRAO and CRVO in a patient with factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation (only 3 cases published). To our knowledge, this is the first case of combined CRAO and CRVO treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT). Case and Results A 49-year-old woman presented with complaints of sudden loss of vision in her left eye (LE), with best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 1/20. A complete ophthalmic evaluation with fundus angiography showed combined CRAO and CRVO. The patient was urgently treated with HBOT (she completed a total of 9 sessions in 7 days), with marked visual acuity and angiographic improvement (BCVA of 10/10). Forty-five days later, she developed a new LE CRVO, and BCVA decreased to 5/10 and later to <1/20 because of significant macular edema. A detailed investigation showed an abnormal resistance to activated protein C, and a genetic study showed homozygosity for FVL mutation. The patient was submitted to 3 monthly injections of 1.25 mg bevacizumab. After 10 months, the patient is in a stable condition with BCVA of 6/10. Conclusions Combined CRAO and CRVO in young adults should be investigated thoroughly for embolic sources, thrombophilic disorders and local ocular conditions. This is the first case of this severe disease that was treated with HBOT, and the visual result was very good. PMID:26955350

  8. Enhanced central and conduit pulmonary arterial reservoir function offsets reduced ductal systolic outflow during constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J; Penny, Daniel J; Mynard, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus (DA) has disparate effects on mean and phasic hemodynamics, as mean DA blood flow is preserved until constriction is severe, but DA systolic and diastolic blood velocities change with only mild constriction. To determine the basis of this disparity and its physiological significance, seven anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), DA, and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes. Blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses were performed at baseline and during mild, moderate, and severe DA constriction (defined as pulmonary-aortic mean pressure differences of 4, 8, and 14 mmHg, respectively), produced with an adjustable snare. With DA constriction, mean DA flow was initially maintained but decreased with severe constriction (P < 0.05) in conjunction with a reduction (P < 0.05) in PT flow (i.e., right ventricular output). By contrast, DA systolic flow fell progressively during DA constriction (P < 0.001), due to decreased transmission of both early and midsystolic proximal flow-enhancing forward-running compression waves into the DA. However, DA constriction was also accompanied by greater systolic storage of blood in the PT and main PA (P < 0.025), and increased retrograde diastolic flow from compliant major branch PA (P < 0.001). Transductal discharge of these central and conduit PA blood reservoirs in diastole offset systolic DA flow reductions. These data suggest that, during DA constriction in the fetus, enhanced central and conduit PA reservoir function constitutes an important compensatory mechanism that contributes to preservation of mean DA flow via a systolic-to-diastolic redistribution of phasic DA flow.

  9. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  10. Observation on therapeutic efficacy of rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis combined with compound anisodine injection on central retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Feng; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the clinical efficacy and safety of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) combined with compound anisodine in treating central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). Forty-eight patients diagnosed with CRAO were randomly divided into a treatment group (24 cases) and a control group (24 cases). For the control group, nitroglycerin, 654-2, methazolamide, puerarin and compound anisodine were used for the treatment, along with oxygen, massage and other conventional treatments. Besides conventional therapy, the treatment group was also given intravenous rt-PA thrombolysis. Visual acuity, fundus oculi, visual field changes were taken as indicators for efficacy evaluation. It was found that the total effective rate of the control group was 70.83%, while that for the treatment group was 91.67%, and the comparative difference between the two groups was of statistical significance (p<0.05). The visual field defect of the control group after treatment was approximately 74.26±12.91%, and the visual field defect of the treatment group after treatment approximately 35.08±16.33%; thus, the comparative difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). The comparative difference of the original contents of fibrous protein in blood in the treatment group before and after treatment was statistically significant (p<0.01). In conclusion, the result show that intravenous thrombolysis with rt-PA combined with compound anisodine is safe and effective in treating CRAO, which can significantly improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:27698763

  11. Observation on therapeutic efficacy of rt-PA intravenous thrombolysis combined with compound anisodine injection on central retinal artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Feng; Liu, Xu; Zhao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the clinical efficacy and safety of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) combined with compound anisodine in treating central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO). Forty-eight patients diagnosed with CRAO were randomly divided into a treatment group (24 cases) and a control group (24 cases). For the control group, nitroglycerin, 654-2, methazolamide, puerarin and compound anisodine were used for the treatment, along with oxygen, massage and other conventional treatments. Besides conventional therapy, the treatment group was also given intravenous rt-PA thrombolysis. Visual acuity, fundus oculi, visual field changes were taken as indicators for efficacy evaluation. It was found that the total effective rate of the control group was 70.83%, while that for the treatment group was 91.67%, and the comparative difference between the two groups was of statistical significance (p<0.05). The visual field defect of the control group after treatment was approximately 74.26±12.91%, and the visual field defect of the treatment group after treatment approximately 35.08±16.33%; thus, the comparative difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). The comparative difference of the original contents of fibrous protein in blood in the treatment group before and after treatment was statistically significant (p<0.01). In conclusion, the result show that intravenous thrombolysis with rt-PA combined with compound anisodine is safe and effective in treating CRAO, which can significantly improve the prognosis of patients.

  12. Prognostic Significance of Central Pulse Pressure for Mortality in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Receiving Repeated Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Hau-De; Lin, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a life-threatening medical emergency which needs urgent medical attention. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is common and necessary for patients with CAD, but it has not completely evaluated in cases with repeated PCI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the risk factors and prognosis in patients with CAD requiring repeated PCI. This is a prospective observational study. A total of 1126 patients with CAD requiring PCI took part in this study. Clinical parameters including baseline characteristics, hemodynamic data, location of vascular lesions, SYNTAX score, left ventricular ejection fraction, central pulse pressure (CPP), central aortic systolic pressure (CSP), risk factors, and invasive strategies were analyzed to identify the risk factors for patients requiring repeated PCI. We further analyzed the prognosis, including risk for myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular (CV) mortality, and all-cause mortality, in patients with repeated PCI. Among patients with PCI, 276 received repeated PCI. Patients in the repeated PCI group had a higher CPP (66.7 vs 62.5 mm Hg; P = 0.006), CSP (139.9 vs 135.9 mm Hg; P = 0.017), and male preponderance (P = 0.012). Drugs including diuretics, beta-blockers (BBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and aspirin were all used more frequently in the repeated PCI group (all P < 0.05). Freedom from MI was lower in the repeated PCI group than in the single PCI group (P < 0.001). Logistic regression revealed that CPP, CSP, number of diseased vessels, male sex, usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were all predictors for requiring repeated PCI (all P < 0.05). In addition, CPP was a predictor for MI attack, CV mortality, and all-cause mortality in the repeated PCI group (P = 0.010, P = 0.041, P = 0.004, respectively). Elevated CPP, CSP, male sex, multiple diseased vessels, and the usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI

  13. Prognostic Significance of Central Pulse Pressure for Mortality in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease Receiving Repeated Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Lin, Hau-De; Lin, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a life-threatening medical emergency which needs urgent medical attention. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is common and necessary for patients with CAD, but it has not completely evaluated in cases with repeated PCI. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the risk factors and prognosis in patients with CAD requiring repeated PCI. This is a prospective observational study. A total of 1126 patients with CAD requiring PCI took part in this study. Clinical parameters including baseline characteristics, hemodynamic data, location of vascular lesions, SYNTAX score, left ventricular ejection fraction, central pulse pressure (CPP), central aortic systolic pressure (CSP), risk factors, and invasive strategies were analyzed to identify the risk factors for patients requiring repeated PCI. We further analyzed the prognosis, including risk for myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular (CV) mortality, and all-cause mortality, in patients with repeated PCI. Among patients with PCI, 276 received repeated PCI. Patients in the repeated PCI group had a higher CPP (66.7 vs 62.5 mm Hg; P = 0.006), CSP (139.9 vs 135.9 mm Hg; P = 0.017), and male preponderance (P = 0.012). Drugs including diuretics, beta-blockers (BBs), angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and aspirin were all used more frequently in the repeated PCI group (all P < 0.05). Freedom from MI was lower in the repeated PCI group than in the single PCI group (P < 0.001). Logistic regression revealed that CPP, CSP, number of diseased vessels, male sex, usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were all predictors for requiring repeated PCI (all P < 0.05). In addition, CPP was a predictor for MI attack, CV mortality, and all-cause mortality in the repeated PCI group (P = 0.010, P = 0.041, P = 0.004, respectively). Elevated CPP, CSP, male sex, multiple diseased vessels, and the usage of diuretics, BBs, ACEIs, and MI were

  14. A database of virtual healthy subjects to assess the accuracy of foot-to-foot pulse wave velocities for estimation of aortic stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    While central (carotid-femoral) foot-to-foot pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be the gold standard for the estimation of aortic arterial stiffness, peripheral foot-to-foot PWV (brachial-ankle, femoral-ankle, and carotid-radial) are being studied as substitutes of this central measurement. We present a novel methodology to assess theoretically these computed indexes and the hemodynamics mechanisms relating them. We created a database of 3,325 virtual healthy adult subjects using a validated one-dimensional model of the arterial hemodynamics, with cardiac and arterial parameters varied within physiological healthy ranges. For each virtual subject, foot-to-foot PWV was computed from numerical pressure waveforms at the same locations where clinical measurements are commonly taken. Our numerical results confirm clinical observations: 1) carotid-femoral PWV is a good indicator of aortic stiffness and correlates well with aortic PWV; 2) brachial-ankle PWV overestimates aortic PWV and is related to the stiffness and geometry of both elastic and muscular arteries; and 3) muscular PWV (carotid-radial, femoral-ankle) does not capture the stiffening of the aorta and should therefore not be used as a surrogate for aortic stiffness. In addition, our analysis highlights that the foot-to-foot PWV algorithm is sensitive to the presence of reflected waves in late diastole, which introduce errors in the PWV estimates. In this study, we have created a database of virtual healthy subjects, which can be used to assess theoretically the efficiency of physiological indexes based on pulse wave analysis. PMID:26055792

  15. Hierarchies of plant stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brulé, Veronique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano; Western, Tamara L

    2016-09-01

    Plants must meet mechanical as well as physiological and reproductive requirements for survival. Management of internal and external stresses is achieved through their unique hierarchical architecture. Stiffness is determined by a combination of morphological (geometrical) and compositional variables that vary across multiple length scales ranging from the whole plant to organ, tissue, cell and cell wall levels. These parameters include, among others, organ diameter, tissue organization, cell size, density and turgor pressure, and the thickness and composition of cell walls. These structural parameters and their consequences on plant stiffness are reviewed in the context of work on stems of the genetic reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), and the suitability of Arabidopsis as a model system for consistent investigation of factors controlling plant stiffness is put forward. Moving beyond Arabidopsis, the presence of morphological parameters causing stiffness gradients across length-scales leads to beneficial emergent properties such as increased load-bearing capacity and reversible actuation. Tailoring of plant stiffness for old and new purposes in agriculture and forestry can be achieved through bioengineering based on the knowledge of the morphological and compositional parameters of plant stiffness in combination with gene identification through the use of genetics.

  16. Hierarchies of plant stiffness.

    PubMed

    Brulé, Veronique; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano; Western, Tamara L

    2016-09-01

    Plants must meet mechanical as well as physiological and reproductive requirements for survival. Management of internal and external stresses is achieved through their unique hierarchical architecture. Stiffness is determined by a combination of morphological (geometrical) and compositional variables that vary across multiple length scales ranging from the whole plant to organ, tissue, cell and cell wall levels. These parameters include, among others, organ diameter, tissue organization, cell size, density and turgor pressure, and the thickness and composition of cell walls. These structural parameters and their consequences on plant stiffness are reviewed in the context of work on stems of the genetic reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), and the suitability of Arabidopsis as a model system for consistent investigation of factors controlling plant stiffness is put forward. Moving beyond Arabidopsis, the presence of morphological parameters causing stiffness gradients across length-scales leads to beneficial emergent properties such as increased load-bearing capacity and reversible actuation. Tailoring of plant stiffness for old and new purposes in agriculture and forestry can be achieved through bioengineering based on the knowledge of the morphological and compositional parameters of plant stiffness in combination with gene identification through the use of genetics. PMID:27457986

  17. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery.

  18. Aortic stiffness determines diastolic blood flow reversal in the descending thoracic aorta: potential implication for retrograde embolic stroke in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2013-09-01

    Aortic stiffening often precedes cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain obscure. We hypothesized that such abnormalities could be attributable to altered central blood flow dynamics. In 296 patients with uncomplicated hypertension, Doppler velocity pulse waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta and carotid artery to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio and diastolic/systolic flow index, respectively. Tonometric waveforms were recorded on the radial artery to estimate aortic pressure and characteristic impedance (Z0) and to determine carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities. In all subjects, the aortic flow waveform was bidirectional, comprising systolic forward and diastolic reverse flows. The aortic reverse/forward flow ratio (35 ± 10%) was positively associated with parameters of aortic stiffness (including pulse wave velocity, Z0, and aortic/peripheral pulse wave velocity ratio), independent of age, body mass index, aortic diameter, and aortic pressure. The carotid flow waveform was unidirectional and bimodal with systolic and diastolic maximal peaks. There was a positive relationship between the carotid diastolic/systolic flow index (28 ± 9%) and aortic reverse/forward flow ratio, which remained significant after adjustment for aortic stiffness and other related parameters. The Bland-Altman plots showed a close time correspondence between aortic reverse and carotid diastolic flow peaks. In conclusion, aortic stiffness determines the extent of flow reversal from the descending aorta to the aortic arch, which contributes to the diastolic antegrade flow into the carotid artery. This hemodynamic relationship constitutes a potential mechanism linking increased aortic stiffness, altered flow dynamics, and increased stroke risk in hypertension.

  19. MIGRAINE, CAROTID STIFFNESS AND GENETIC POLYMORPHISM.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Basić; Jurasić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Corić, Lejla; Rotim, Kresimir

    2015-12-01

    Recently migraine has been associated with increased arterial stiffness, procoagulant state, increased incidence of cerebral white matter lesions (WML) and stroke. Our aim was to compare the characteristics of migraineurs to headache free controls regarding their functional carotid ultrasound parameters. Sixty patients (45 women) with migraine (mean age 40.42 ± 10.61 years) were compared with 45 controls (30 women) with no prior history of repeating headache (mean age 38.94 ± 5.46 years) using E-tracking software on Alpha 10 ultrasound platform. Student's t-test was used on statistical analysis with alpha < 0.05. All tested carotid vascular parameters were worse in patients with migraine including increased intima-media thickness, greater carotid diameter and carotid diameter change, as well as several arterial stiffness indices. Additionally, patients with migraine had greater incidence of homozygous mutations for procoagulant genes (MTHFR (C677T), PAI-1 and ACE I/D) than expected. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed WML in 11 patients, four of them migraine with aura patients. Since we established increased carotid stiffness and higher frequency of procoagulant gene mutations in migraineurs, we propose prospective ultrasound monitoring in such patients, especially those with detected WML, in order to timely commence more active and specific preventive stroke management strategies.

  20. Femoral artery remodeling after aerobic exercise training without weight loss in women

    PubMed Central

    Sabatier, Manning J; Schwark, Earl H; Lewis, Richard; Sloan, Gloria; Cannon, Joseph; McCully, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Background It is currently unclear whether reductions in adiposity mediate the improvements in vascular health that occur with aerobic exercise. The purpose of this longitudinal study of 13 healthy women (33 ± 4 years old) was to determine whether 14 weeks of aerobic exercise would alter functional measures of vascular health, namely resting aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV, an index of arterial stiffness), femoral artery diameter (DFA), and femoral artery blood flow (BFFA) independent of changes in adiposity. Methods Aerobic fitness was assessed as VO2peak normalized to fat-free mass, and adiposity (percent body fat) was determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Serum concentrations of proteins associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, including C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and leptin, were also measured. Subjects cycled for 50 minutes, 3 times per week. Results Aerobic fitness normalized to fat-free mass increased 6% (P = 0.03) whereas adiposity did not change. Resting DFA increased 12% (P < 0.001) and resting shear rate decreased 28% (P = 0.007). Aortic PWV, and serum sICAM-1, CRP and leptin did not change with training. Conclusion Significant reductions in adiposity were not necessary for aerobic exercise training to bring about improvements in aerobic fitness and arterial remodeling. Peripheral arterial remodeling occurred without changes in central arterial stiffness or markers of inflammation. PMID:18775082

  1. Sensitivity of overall vehicle stiffness to local joint stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, Choon T.

    1987-01-01

    How overall vehicle stiffness is affected by local joint stiffness is discussed. By using the principle of virtual work and the minimum strain energy theorem, a closed form expression for the sensitivity coefficient was derived. The insensitivity of the vehicle stiffness to a particular joint, when its stiffness exceeds a certain value (or threshold value), was proven mathematically. In order to investigate the sensitivity of the structure to the joint stiffness, a so-called stick model was created, and the modeling technique is briefly described. Some data on joint stiffness of tested vehicles are also presented.

  2. Carotid and Aortic Stiffness in Patients with Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Meshkov, Alexey N.; Rozhkova, Tatyana A.; Kalinina, Maria V.; Deev, Alexander D.; Rogoza, Anatoliy N.; Balakhonova, Tatyana V.; Boytsov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of plasma cholesterol in impairing arterial function and elasticity remains unclear. We evaluated arterial stiffness, measured locally in the common carotid artery by high-resolution echo-tracking, and aortic stiffness, using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) (the “gold-standard” measurement of arterial stiffness), in treatment-naive patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Methods The study included 66 patients with FH (10–66 years old) and 57 first-degree relatives without FH (11–61 years old). Carotid-femoral PWV was determined by SphygmoCor (AtCor, Australia). The parameters of carotid stiffness β-index, Peterson elastic modulus and local PWV were assessed with regard to the common carotid artery at a distance of 1cm from the bifurcation (AlokaProsound Alpha7, Japan). Results FH patients showed significantly higher β-index (6.3(4.8–8.2) vs. 5.2(4.2–6.4), p = 0.005), Ep (78(53–111) kPa vs. 62(48–79) kPa, p = 0.006), local PWV (5.4(4.5–6.4) m/c vs. 4.7(4.2–5.4) m/c, p = 0.005), but comparable values of carotid-femoral PWV (6.76(7.0–7.92) m/c vs. 6.48(6.16–7.12) m/c, p = 0.138). Carotid arteries and the aorta stiffened with age in patients with FH, but after 30 years, carotid arteries stiffened more significantly than the aorta. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that treatment-naive patients with FH had stiffer carotid arteries than their relatives, but showed no difference in aortic stiffness. We also found out that the rate of reduction of elasticity of the aorta and carotid arteries in FH patients varies: it is observed earlier in carotid arteries than in the aorta. PMID:27434535

  3. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. PMID:27642604

  4. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Lin; Xu, Hao; Miao, Nan-Dong; Ren, Yong-Jun; Liu, Kang; Min, Xu-Li; Yang, Ke; Yang, Shi; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing's tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients) or bilateral (one patient) femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. PMID:27642604

  5. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Mauban, Joseph R H; Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-06-15

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K(+) concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca(2+) waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca(2+) entry and promote vasoconstriction.

  6. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K+ concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca2+ waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca2+ entry and promote vasoconstriction. PMID:25888510

  7. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  8. Variable stiffness torsion springs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Polites, Michael E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In a torsion spring the spring action is a result of the relationships between the torque applied in twisting the spring, the angle through which the torsion spring twists, and the modulus of elasticity of the spring material in shear. Torsion springs employed industrially have been strips, rods, or bars, generally termed shafts, capabable of being flexed by twisting their axes. They rely on the variations in shearing forces to furnish an internal restoring torque. In the torsion springs herein the restoring torque is external and therefore independent of the shearing modulus of elasticity of the torsion spring shaft. Also provided herein is a variable stiffness torsion spring. This torsion spring can be so adjusted as to have a given spring constant. Such variable stiffness torsion springs are extremely useful in gimballed payloads such as sensors, telescopes, and electronic devices on such platforms as a space shuttle or a space station.

  9. METHOD OF HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS WITH STIFF RELAXATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. B. LOWRIE; J. E. MOREL

    2001-03-01

    Three methods are analyzed for solving a linear hyperbolic system that contains stiff relaxation. We show that the semi-discrete discontinuous Galerkin method, with a linear basis, is accurate when the relaxation time is unresolved (asymptotically preserving--AP). A recently developed central method is shown to be non-AP. To discriminate between AP and non-AP methods, we argue that one must study problems that are diffusion dominated.

  10. Intra-aortic balloon pumping reduces the increased arterial load caused by acute cardiac depression, modifying central and peripheral load determinants in a time- and flow-related way.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Cabrera-Fischer, Edmundo I; Zócalo, Yanina; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms that explain intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) effects are not completely understood, and attributing them only to pressure-associated changes in cardiac function would be an oversimplification. Since IABP modifies the aortic and systemic blood-flow pattern, flow-related effects could be expected. To characterize effects of acute heart failure (AHF) on the arterial biomechanics; IABP effects on the arterial biomechanics during AHF, and their potential time-dependence; the association between hemodynamics and biomechanical changes during AHF and IABP. Sheep (n = 6) aortic pressure, flow, and diameter were measured: (1) before (Basal) and (2) 1-3 (HF(1-3)) and 28-30 (HF(28-30)) min after starting halothane to induce AHF; and (3) at specific times (1-3, 14-15 and 28-30 min) during IABP assistance. Calculus: aortic characteristic impedance (Z(c)), beta stiffness (β), incremental (E(INC)) and pressure-strain elastic modulus (E(P)); total arterial compliance (C(G)), total systemic vascular resistance and wave propagation parameters. (1) AHF resulted in an acute increase in aortic and systemic stiffness (HF(28-30) % changes with respect to Basal conditions: β +217%, E (P) +143%, E(INC) +101%, Z(c) +52%, C(G) -13%), associated with the reduction in the aortic blood flow; (2) during AHF IABP resulted in acute beneficial changes aortic and systemic biomechanics (% changes in IABP(1-3) with respect HF(28-30): β -62%, E(P) -68%, E (INC) -66%, Z(c) -38%, C(G) 66%), and in wave propagation parameters, (3) IABP-related changes were time-dependent and associated with changes in aortic blood flow. Aortic and systemic biomechanical and impedance properties are detrimentally modified during AHF, being the changes rapidly reverted during IABP. IABP-related beneficial changes in arterial biomechanics were time-dependent and associated with IABP capability to increase blood flow.

  11. Central command: control of cardiac sympathetic and vagal efferent nerve activity and the arterial baroreflex during spontaneous motor behaviour in animals.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    Feedforward control by higher brain centres (termed central command) plays a role in the autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system during exercise. Over the past 20 years, workers in our laboratory have used the precollicular-premammillary decerebrate animal model to identify the neural circuitry involved in the CNS control of cardiac autonomic outflow and arterial baroreflex function. Contrary to the traditional idea that vagal withdrawal at the onset of exercise causes the increase in heart rate, central command did not decrease cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity but did allow cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity to produce cardiac acceleration. In addition, central command-evoked inhibition of the aortic baroreceptor-heart rate reflex blunted the baroreflex-mediated bradycardia elicited by aortic nerve stimulation, further increasing the heart rate at the onset of exercise. Spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses disappeared in animals decerebrated at the midcollicular level. These findings indicate that the brain region including the caudal diencephalon and extending to the rostral mesencephalon may play a role in generating central command. Bicuculline microinjected into the midbrain ventral tegmental area of decerebrate rats produced a long-lasting repetitive activation of renal sympathetic nerve activity that was synchronized with the motor nerve discharge. When lidocaine was microinjected into the ventral tegmental area, the spontaneous motor activity and associated cardiovascular responses ceased. From these findings, we conclude that cerebral cortical outputs trigger activation of neural circuits within the caudal brain, including the ventral tegmental area, which causes central command to augment cardiac sympathetic outflow at the onset of exercise in decerebrate animal models. PMID:21984731

  12. Thoracic epidural anesthesia during coronary artery bypass surgery: effects on cardiac sympathetic activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kirnö, K; Friberg, P; Grzegorczyk, A; Milocco, I; Ricksten, S E; Lundin, S

    1994-12-01

    The effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, myocardial blood flow and metabolism, and central hemodynamics were studied in 20 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). In 10 of the patients, TEA (T1-5 block) was used as an adjunct to a standardized fentanyl-nitrous oxide anesthesia. Hemodynamic measurements and blood sampling were performed after induction of anesthesia but prior to skin incision and after sternotomy. Assessment of total and cardiac sympathetic activity was performed by means of the norepinephrine kinetic approach. Prior to surgery, mean arterial pressure (MAP), great cardiac vein flow (GCVF), and regional myocardial oxygen consumption (Reg-MVO2) were lower in the TEA group compared to the control group. During sternotomy there was a pronounced increase in cardiac norepinephrine spillover, MAP, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), GCVF, and Reg-MVO2 in the control group. These changes were clearly attenuated in the TEA group. None of the patients in the TEA group had metabolic (lactate) or electrocardiographic signs of myocardial ischemia. Three patients in the control group had indices of myocardial ischemia prior to and/or during surgery. We conclude that TEA attenuates the surgically mediated sympathetic stress response to sternotomy, thereby preventing the increase in myocardial oxygen demand in the pre-bypass period without jeopardizing myocardial perfusion. PMID:7978429

  13. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Christopher B; Shahan, David W; Smith, Sloan P; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P

    2016-02-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness-based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  14. Bilateral central retinal artery occlusion associated with herpes simplex virus-associated acute retinal necrosis and meningitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Heather M; Biousse, Valerie; Schechter, Marcos Coutinho; Del Rio, Carlos; Yeh, Steven

    2015-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman with a history of recurrent headaches and blurred vision presented with bilateral optic disc edema. Optic neuritis was suspected, and intravenous methylprednisonlone was administered. Her vision declined to hand motions in both eyes, and subsequent evaluation revealed bilateral acute retinal necrosis with bilateral central retinal artery occlusions (CRAO). Aqueous humor polymerase chain reaction analysis was positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV), establishing a diagnosis of HSV-associated bilateral acute retinal necrosis (ARN) and meningitis. CRAO has rarely been reported in association with ARN, and a fulminant course with bilateral CRAO in association with ARN has not been previously reported. This case emphasizes the importance of careful peripheral examination in patients with presumptive optic neuritis, judicious use of systemic corticosteroid in this context, and the retinal vaso-obliterative findings that may be observed in the pathogenesis of ARN.

  15. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  16. The relationship between adiposity-associated inflammation and coronary artery and abdominal aortic calcium differs by strata of central adiposity: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    PubMed

    Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Wassel, Christina L; Jiménez, Jessica; Criqui, Michael H; Ix, Joachim H; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Budoff, Matthew J; Jenny, Nancy S; Allison, Matthew A

    2014-06-01

    Adipokines regulate metabolic processes linked to coronary artery (CAC) and abdominal aorta calcification (AAC). Because adipokine and other adiposity-associated inflammatory marker (AAIM) secretions differ between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue, we hypothesized that central adiposity modifies associations between AAIMs and CAC and AAC. We evaluated 1878 MESA participants with complete measures of AAIMs, anthropometry, CAC, and AAC. Associations of AAIMs with CAC and AAC prevalence and severity were analyzed per standard deviation of predictors (SD) using log binomial and linear regression models. The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was dichotomized at median WHR values based on sex/ethnicity. CAC and AAC prevalence were defined as any calcium (Agatston score >0). Severity was defined as ln (Agatston score). Analyses examined interactions with WHR and were adjusted for traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Each SD higher interleukin-6 (IL-6), fibrinogen and CRP was associated with 5% higher CAC prevalence; and each SD higher IL-6 and fibrinogen was associated with 4% higher AAC prevalence. Associations of IL-6 and fibrinogen with CAC severity, but not CAC prevalence, were significantly different among WHR strata. Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher IL-6 was associated with 24.8% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction=0.012). Median-and-above WHR: each SD higher fibrinogen was associated with 19.6% higher CAC severity. Below-median WHR: no association (p interaction=0.034). Adiponectin, leptin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were not associated with CAC or AAC prevalence or severity. These results support findings that adiposity-associated inflammation is associated with arterial calcification, and further add that central adiposity may modify this association. PMID:24907349

  17. Dynamically variable negative stiffness structures

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shahan, David W.; Smith, Sloan P.; Keefe, Andrew C.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Variable stiffness structures that enable a wide range of efficient load-bearing and dexterous activity are ubiquitous in mammalian musculoskeletal systems but are rare in engineered systems because of their complexity, power, and cost. We present a new negative stiffness–based load-bearing structure with dynamically tunable stiffness. Negative stiffness, traditionally used to achieve novel response from passive structures, is a powerful tool to achieve dynamic stiffness changes when configured with an active component. Using relatively simple hardware and low-power, low-frequency actuation, we show an assembly capable of fast (<10 ms) and useful (>100×) dynamic stiffness control. This approach mitigates limitations of conventional tunable stiffness structures that exhibit either small (<30%) stiffness change, high friction, poor load/torque transmission at low stiffness, or high power active control at the frequencies of interest. We experimentally demonstrate actively tunable vibration isolation and stiffness tuning independent of supported loads, enhancing applications such as humanoid robotic limbs and lightweight adaptive vibration isolators. PMID:26989771

  18. Robust pulse wave velocity estimation by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness and may permit continuous, non-invasive, and cuff-less monitoring of blood pressure. Here, robust PWV estimation was sought by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms. In this approach, the system that optimally couples the proximal waveform to the distal waveform is identified, and the time delay of this system is then used to calculate PWV. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, a standard identification technique was applied to non-invasive impedance cardiography and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from six humans subjected to progressive reductions in central blood volume induced by lower body negative pressure. This technique estimated diastolic pressure with an overall root-mean-squared-error of 5.2 mmHg. For comparison, the conventional detection method for estimating PWV yielded a corresponding error of 8.3 mmHg. PMID:21097042

  19. Pulmonary vascular wall stiffness: An important contributor to the increased right ventricular afterload with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhijie; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with structural and mechanical changes in the pulmonary vascular bed that increase right ventricular (RV) afterload. These changes, characterized by narrowing and stiffening, occur in both proximal and distal pulmonary arteries (PAs). An important consequence of arterial narrowing is increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Arterial stiffening, which can occur in both the proximal and distal pulmonary arteries, is an important index of disease progression and is a significant contributor to increased RV afterload in PH. In particular, arterial narrowing and stiffening increase the RV afterload by increasing steady and oscillatory RV work, respectively. Here we review the current state of knowledge of the causes and consequences of pulmonary arterial stiffening in PH and its impact on RV function. We review direct and indirect techniques for measuring proximal and distal pulmonary arterial stiffness, measures of arterial stiffness including elastic modulus, incremental elastic modulus, stiffness coefficient β and others, the changes in cellular function and the extracellular matrix proteins that contribute to pulmonary arterial stiffening, the consequences of PA stiffening for RV function and the clinical implications of pulmonary vascular stiffening for PH progression. Future investigation of the relationship between PA stiffening and RV dysfunction may facilitate new therapies aimed at improving RV function and thus ultimately reducing mortality in PH. PMID:22034607

  20. Relation of epicardial fat to central aortic pressure and left ventricular diastolic function in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Kenta; Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Wakami, Kazuaki; Goto, Toshihiko; Tani, Tomomitsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2014-10-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that epicardial fat may be associated with augmented central aortic pressure and impaired left ventricular (LV) function. We studied 134 consecutive patients undergoing left-sided cardiac catheterization for coronary artery disease (CAD) and examined the relation of epicardial fat volume measured by multi-detector computed tomography to ascending aortic pressure and LV ejection fraction determined by cardiac catheterization as well as indices of LV diastolic function assessed by Doppler echocardiography [early diastolic mitral annular velocity (e') and a ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow to annular velocities (E/e')]. Epicardial fat volume indexed to body surface area correlated positively with age (r = 0.24, P < 0.01), body mass index (r = 0.38, P < 0.001), systolic aortic pressure (r = 0.21, P < 0.05), aortic pulse pressure (r = 0.23, P < 0.01), LV ejection fraction (r = 0.22, P < 0.05) and E/e' (r = 0.24, P < 0.05) and did negatively with e' (r = -0.31, P < 0.05). In multivariate linear regression including potential confounders, increased epicardial fat volume index correlated with aortic systolic and pulse pressure and LV diastolic function indices, but not LV ejection fraction. In conclusion, we found that epicardial fat was associated with augmented central aortic pressure and LV diastolic dysfunction in patients with known or suspected CAD.

  1. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  2. Arterial Remodeling Associates with CKD Progression

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Cédric; Karras, Alexandre; Laurent, Stéphane; Bozec, Erwan; Jacquot, Christian; Stengel, Bénédicte; Houillier, Pascal; Froissart, Marc; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    In CKD, large arteries remodel and become increasingly stiff. The greater pulsatile pressure reaching the glomerulus as a result of increased aortic stiffness could induce renal damage, suggesting that the stiffening and remodeling of large arteries could affect the progression of CKD. We measured carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, aortic pressure and carotid remodeling and stiffness parameters in 180 patients with CKD (mean measured GFR, 32 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and followed them prospectively for a mean of 3.1 years. During follow-up, carotid stiffness significantly increased (+0.28 ± 0.05 m/s; P < 0.0001) but aortic stiffness did not. Carotid intima-media thickness decreased significantly during follow-up and the internal diameter of the carotid increased, producing increased circumferential wall stress (+2.08 ± 0.43 kPa/yr; P < 0.0001). In a linear mixed model, circumferential wall stress significantly associated with faster GFR decline after adjustment for risk factors of cardiovascular disease and progression of CKD. In a multivariable Cox model, carotid circumferential wall stress and pulse pressure independently associated with higher risk for ESRD. None of the arterial stiffness parameters associated with progression of CKD. In conclusion, maladaptive remodeling of the carotid artery and increased pulse pressure independently associate with faster decline of renal function and progression to ESRD. PMID:21493771

  3. Evaluation of aortic stiffness in children with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Bakiler, Ali Rahmi; Yavascan, Onder; Harputluoglu, Nilgun; Kara, Orhan Deniz; Aksu, Nejat

    2007-11-01

    The measurement of aortic stiffness (As) [aortic strain (S), pressure strain elastic modulus (Ep) and pressure strain normalized by diastolic pressure (Ep*)] is suggested as an excellent marker of subclinical arterial sclerosis. We aimed to investigate the presence of As and to determine the relationship between As and some risk factors in children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Twenty-six pre-dialysis (PreD) [female/male (F/M) 7/19] patients and 23 chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) (F/M 13/10) patients were assessed. Twenty-nine healthy children were selected as a control group (F/M 14/15). We determined anemia, abnormal calcium/phosphate metabolism, hypertension, diastolic dysfunction, increased left ventricular mass (LVM), hypertriglyceridemia, increased stiffness (Ep, Ep*), and decreased strain (S) in the CRF (PreD and CPD) group compared with the controls (P < 0.05). Presence of renal disease, LVM and usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) in all groups; female gender, duration of disease and the usage of anti-hypertensive drug therapy in CRF patients; and LVM and LVM index in healthy children were found to be independent predictors for aortic stiffness and/or strain. In conclusion, CRF is associated with significant arterial functional abnormalities in uremic children and not controlled by dialysis treatment. These results suggest that, even in young children, uremia has a profound impact on arterial function.

  4. Effect of angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension on the voltage-dependent contractions of mouse arteries.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Paul; Van Hove, Cor E; Leloup, Arthur J A; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; De Keulenaer, Gilles W

    2016-02-01

    Arterial hypertension (AHT) affects the voltage dependency of L-type Ca(2+) channels in cardiomyocytes. We analyzed the effect of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced AHT on L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated isometric contractions in conduit arteries. AHT was induced in C57Bl6 mice with AngII-filled osmotic mini-pumps (4 weeks). Normotensive mice treated with saline-filled osmotic mini-pumps were used for comparison. Voltage-dependent contractions mediated by L-type Ca(2+) channels were studied in vaso-reactive studies in vitro in isolated aortic and femoral arteries by using extracellular K(+) concentration-response (KDR) experiments. In aortic segments, AngII-induced AHT significantly sensitized isometric contractions induced by elevated extracellular K(+) and depolarization. This sensitization was partly prevented by normalizing blood pressure with hydralazine, suggesting that it was caused by AHT rather than by direct AngII effects on aortic smooth muscle cells. The EC50 for extracellular K(+) obtained in vitro correlated significantly with the rise in arterial blood pressure induced by AngII in vivo. The AHT-induced sensitization persisted when aortic segments were exposed to levcromakalim or to inhibitors of basal nitric oxide release. Consistent with these observations, AngII-treatment also sensitized the vaso-relaxing effects of the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker diltiazem during K(+)-induced contractions. Unlike aorta, AngII-treatment desensitized the isometric contractions to depolarization in femoral arteries pointing to vascular bed specific responses of arteries to hypertension. AHT affects the voltage-dependent L-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated contraction of conduit arteries. This effect may contribute to the decreased vascular compliance in AHT and explain the efficacy of Ca(2+) channel blockers to reduce vascular stiffness and central blood pressure in AHT.

  5. Nonlinear vibration of thick stiff fabric with small flexural stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-P.; Wang, S.-Z.; Wu, W.-Y.; Gu, H.-B.

    2008-02-01

    Dynamic behaviour of fabric is very complex during weaving, dyeing and finishing processes. Thick stiff fabric vibration has great influence not only on the fabric itself but also on the performance of machine. The theoretic analysis for the nonlinear free vibration of thick stiff fabric with small flexural stiffness is put forward in the paper. The nonlinear partial differential equation is derived by applying the flexible thin plate theory, and then transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equation by the Galerkin method. The approximate analytical solution is obtained by the homotopy perturbation method.

  6. The compensatory renin-angiotensin system in the central regulation of arterial pressure: new avenues and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Alberto; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is a widespread condition that affects millions of people around the world and has a major impact in public health. The classic renin-angiotensin system is a complex system comprised of multiple peptides and pathways that have been the driver of drug development over the years to control hypertension. However, there are still patients whose hypertension is very difficult to control with current drugs and strategies, thus motivating further research in this field. In the past two decades, important discoveries have expanded our knowledge of this system and new pathways are emerging that are helping us understand the complex interaction taking place not only in the periphery, but also in the central nervous system where the renin-angiotensin system is also very active. A new arm, called the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor axis, was shown to exert antihypertensive properties and serve as a counterbalance to the classic ACE/angiotensin II/AT1 receptor axis, in this way modulating or even counteracting the negative effects of angiotensin II in blood pressure regulation and water retention. Modulation of this new axis through ACE2 activation, ADAM17 regulation or AT1 receptor internalization are some of the novel avenues and challenges that have the potential to become a target for new drug research and development for the treatment of hypertension.

  7. Central venous line complications with chronic ambulatory infusion of prostacyclin analogues in pediatric patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Mary P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic infusion of prostacyclin (PGI2) via a Broviac central venous line (CVL) is attended by risk of CVL-related complications, but we know of only one report regarding CVL-associated bloodstream infection (BSI) with PGI2 in children and none regarding other complications. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension treated with chronic intravenous infusion of PGI2 at Boston Children’s Hospital and determined the rate (per 1,000 line-days) of various CVL-related complications. We also determined how often complications necessitated line replacement and hospitalization, time to replacement of CVLs, and interpatient variability in the incidence of complications. From 1999 until 2014, 26 patients meeting follow-up criteria had PGI2 infusion, representing 43,855 line-days; mean follow-up was 56 months (range, 1.4–161 months). The CVL complication rates (per 1,000 line-days) were as follows: CVL-BSI, 0.25; superficial line infection, 0.48; impaired integrity, 0.59; occlusion, 0.09; and malposition, 0.32. The total complication rate was 1.73 cases per 1,000 line-days. All CVL-BSI and malposition cases were treated with CVL removal and replacement. Of CVLs with impaired integrity, 23 could be repaired and 3 required replacement. Six of 21 superficial CVL infections required replacement of the CVL. Three of 4 occluded CVLs were replaced. CVL complications occasioned 65 hospitalizations. There was marked interpatient variability in the rate of complications, much but not all of which appeared to be related to duration of CVL placement. We conclude that non-BSI complications are very significant and that efforts to teach and emphasize other aspects of line care are therefore very important. PMID:26064457

  8. Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences.

    PubMed

    Curcio, S; García-Espinosa, V; Arana, M; Farro, I; Chiesa, P; Giachetto, G; Zócalo, Y; Bia, D

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods. 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4-28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results. No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4-8 years), but they started to appear at ~15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages.

  9. Growing-Related Changes in Arterial Properties of Healthy Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults Nonexposed to Cardiovascular Risk Factors: Analysis of Gender-Related Differences

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, S.; García-Espinosa, V.; Arana, M.; Farro, I.; Chiesa, P.; Giachetto, G.; Zócalo, Y.; Bia, D.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our work were to determine normal aging rates for structural and functional arterial parameters in healthy children, adolescents, and young adults and to identify gender-related differences in these aging rates. Methods. 161 subjects (mean: 15 years (range: 4–28 years), 69 females) were studied. Subjects included had no congenital or chronic diseases, nor had they been previously exposed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial parameters assessed were (1) central blood pressure (BP) and aortic pulse wave analysis, (2) arterial local (pressure-strain elastic modulus) and regional (pulse wave velocity, PWV) stiffness, and (3) arterial diameters and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Simple linear regression models (age as the independent variable) were obtained for all the parameters and the resulting rates of change were compared between genders. Results. No gender-related differences were found in mean values of arterial structural and functional parameters in prepubertal ages (4–8 years), but they started to appear at ~15 years. Boys showed a greater rate of change for central systolic BP, central pulse pressure, CIMT, and carotid-femoral PWV. Conclusion. Gender-related differences in arterial characteristics of adults can be explained on the basis of different growing-related patterns between boys and girls, with no existing differences in prepubertal ages. PMID:26989504

  10. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  11. Improved Pulse Wave Velocity Estimation Using an Arterial Tube-Load Model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mingwu; Zhang, Guanqun; Olivier, N. Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most important index of arterial stiffness. It is conventionally estimated by non-invasively measuring central and peripheral blood pressure (BP) and/or velocity (BV) waveforms and then detecting the foot-to-foot time delay between the waveforms wherein wave reflection is presumed absent. We developed techniques for improved estimation of PWV from the same waveforms. The techniques effectively estimate PWV from the entire waveforms, rather than just their feet, by mathematically eliminating the reflected wave via an arterial tube-load model. In this way, the techniques may be more robust to artifact while revealing the true PWV in absence of wave reflection. We applied the techniques to estimate aortic PWV from simultaneously and sequentially measured central and peripheral BP waveforms and simultaneously measured central BV and peripheral BP waveforms from 17 anesthetized animals during diverse interventions that perturbed BP widely. Since BP is the major acute determinant of aortic PWV, especially under anesthesia wherein vasomotor tone changes are minimal, we evaluated the techniques in terms of the ability of their PWV estimates to track the acute BP changes in each subject. Overall, the PWV estimates of the techniques tracked the BP changes better than those of the conventional technique (e.g., diastolic BP root-mean-squared-errors of 3.4 vs. 5.2 mmHg for the simultaneous BP waveforms and 7.0 vs. 12.2 mmHg for the BV and BP waveforms (p < 0.02)). With further testing, the arterial tube-load model-based PWV estimation techniques may afford more accurate arterial stiffness monitoring in hypertensive and other patients. PMID:24263016

  12. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Best, Lyle G; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-08-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians.

  13. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A; Best, Lyle G; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B; Roman, Mary J; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-08-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  14. Impact of biological aging on arterial aging in American Indians: findings from the Strong Heart Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Zhu, Yun; Yeh, Fawn; Cole, Shelley A.; Best, Lyle G.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Devereux, Richard B.; Roman, Mary J.; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Zhao, Jinying

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length, a marker of biological aging, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increased arterial stiffness, an indicator of arterial aging, predicts adverse CVD outcomes. However, the relationship between telomere length and arterial stiffness is less well studied. Here we examined the cross-sectional association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and arterial stiffness in 2,165 American Indians in the Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS). LTL was measured by qPCR. Arterial stiffness was assessed by stiffness index β. The association between LTL and arterial stiffness was assessed by generalized estimating equation model, adjusting for sociodemographics (age, sex, education level), study site, metabolic factors (fasting glucose, lipids, systolic blood pressure, and kidney function), lifestyle (BMI, smoking, drinking, and physical activity), and prevalent CVD. Results showed that longer LTL was significantly associated with a decreased arterial stiffness (β=-0.070, P=0.007). This association did not attenuate after further adjustment for hsCRP (β=-0.071, P=0.005) or excluding participants with overt CVD (β=-0.068, P=0.012), diabetes (β=-0.070, P=0.005), or chronic kidney disease (β=-0.090, P=0.001). In summary, shorter LTL was significantly associated with an increased arterial stiffness, independent of known risk factors. This finding may shed light on the potential role of biological aging in arterial aging in American Indians. PMID:27540694

  15. [Mechanical properties of the arteries. Effects of cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Rosset, E; Friggi, A; Rieu, R; Rolland, P; Novakovitch, G; Choux, R; Pellissier, J F; Pélissier, R; Branchereau, A

    1996-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of the arterial wall are responsible for the blood pressure wave propagation throughout the arterial system. Arterial diseases may cause disorders in this propagation. We have developed a mock circulation system that allows assessment of viscoelastic properties in fresh or cryopreserved human arteries. It includes the following components:--a hydrodynamic generator that can simulate physiological pressure variations in fresh segments of human arteries;--a lightweight miniature flexible probe that can be placed around the artery to measure changes in the external diameter during systolo-diastolic cycles;--a computer program to analyse pressure and diameter data measured during a cardiac cycle. Using this system, it is possible to evaluate the main viscoelastic properties of the arterial wall (arterial compliance, arterial stiffness, midwall aortic stress, Young elastic modulus, incremental modulus). Human arterial samples were collected during organ harvesting in subjects from 18 to 35 years of age. Correlation between viscoelastic properties, arterial wall status, and histological aspect in nitrogen vapor (-140 degree C) were established. No statistically significant difference was observed in femoral arteries characteristics. Compliance decreased, while stiffness increased with statistically significant difference after cryopreservation in carotid arteries. No histological difference was observed in both arteries before and after cryopreservation.

  16. Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Jorge; Gomez, Miguel M; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-04-01

    Stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) adversely affects outcome and impacts patient function. Various risk factors for stiffness after TKA have been identified, including reduced preoperative knee range of motion, history of prior knee surgery, etiology of arthritis, incorrect positioning or oversizing of components, and incorrect gap balancing. Mechanical and associated causes, such as infection, arthrofibrosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and heterotopic ossification, secondary gain issues have also been identified. Management of stiffness following TKA can be challenging. The condition needs to be assessed and treated in a staged manner. A nonsurgical approach is the first step. Manipulation under anesthesia may be considered within the first 3 months after the index TKA, if physical therapy fails to improve the range of motion. Beyond this point, consideration should be given to surgical intervention such as lysis of adhesions, either arthroscopically or by open arthrotomy. If the cause of stiffness is deemed to be surgical error, such as component malpositioning, revision arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the various aspects of management of stiffness after TKA.

  17. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  18. Distinct effects of losartan and atenolol on vascular stiffness in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; Buck, J Stewart; Zuflacht, Jonah P; Milian, Jessica; Kadivar, Samoneh; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Singh, Michael N; Creager, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial of losartan (100 mg QD) versus atenolol (50 mg QD) for 6 months in adults with Marfan syndrome. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), central augmentation index (AIx), aortic diameter and left ventricular (LV) function were assessed with arterial tonometry and echocardiography. Thirty-four subjects (18 female; median age 35 years, IQR 27, 45) were randomized. Central systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased comparably with atenolol and losartan (p = 0.64 and 0.31, respectively); heart rate decreased with atenolol (p = 0.02), but not with losartan. PWV decreased in patients treated with atenolol (-1.15 ± 1.68 m/s; p = 0.01), but not in those treated with losartan (-0.22 ± 0.59 m/s; p = 0.15; between-group difference p = 0.04). In contrast, AIx decreased in the losartan group (-9.6 ± 8.6%; p < 0.001) but not in the atenolol group (0.9 ± 6.2%, p = 0.57; between-group difference p < 0.001). There was no significant change in aortic diameters or LV ejection fraction in either treatment group. In adults with Marfan syndrome, 6 months of treatment with atenolol improves PWV, whereas losartan reduces the AIx. By improving vascular stiffness via distinct mechanisms of action, there is physiologic value to considering the use of both medications in individuals with Marfan syndrome.

  19. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  20. Role of Elastin in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Small Mesenteric Artery Remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Ana M; González, José M; Somoza, Beatriz; Giraldo, Jesús; Daly, Craig J; Vila, Elisabet; Carmen González, M; McGrath, John C; Arribas, Silvia M

    2003-01-01

    Chronic hypertension is associated with resistance artery remodelling and mechanical alterations. However, the contribution of elastin has not been thoroughly studied. Our objective was to evaluate the role of elastin in vascular remodelling of mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). MRA segments from Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHR were pressurised under passive conditions at a range of physiological pressures with pressure myography. Confocal microscopy was used to determine differences in the quantity and organisation of elastin in intact pressure-fixed arteries. To assess the contribution of elastin to MRA structure and mechanics, myograph-mounted vessels were studied before and after elastase incubation. When compared with WKY, MRA from SHR showed: (1) a smaller lumen, (2) decreased distensibility at low pressures, (3) a leftward shift of the stress-strain relationship, (4) redistribution of elastin within the internal elastic lamina (IEL) leading to smaller fenestrae but no change in fenestrae number or elastin amount. Elastase incubation (1) fragmented the structure of IEL in a concentration-dependent fashion, (2) abolished all the structural and mechanical differences between strains, and (3) decreased distensibility at low pressures. The study shows the overriding role of elastin in determining vascular dimensions and mechanical properties in a resistance artery. In addition, it informs hypertensive remodelling. MRA remodelling and increased stiffness are accompanied by elastin restructuring within the IEL and elastin degradation reverses structural and mechanical alterations of SHR MRA. Differences in elastin organisation are, therefore, a central element in small artery remodelling in hypertension. PMID:12844513

  1. Quantification of plaque stiffness by Brillouin microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci, Giuseppe; Pedrigi, Ryan; Krams, Rob; Török, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous Brillouin scattering is an inelastic scattering process arising from inherent thermal density fluctuations, or acoustic phonons, propagating in a medium. Over the last few years, Brillouin spectroscopy has shown great potential to become a reliable non-invasive diagnostic tool due to its unique capability of retrieving viscoelastic properties of materials such as strain and stiffness. The detection of the weak scattered light, in addition to the resolution of the Brillouin peaks (typically shifted by few GHz from the central peak) represent one of the greatest challenges in Brillouin. The recent development of high sensitivity CCD cameras has brought Brillouin spectroscopy from a point sampling technique to a new imaging modality. Furthermore, the application of Virtually Imaged Phased Array (VIPA) etalons has dramatically reduced insertion loss simultaneously allowing fast (<1s) collection of the entire spectrum. Hitherto Brillouin microscopy has been shown the ability to provide unique stiffness maps of biological samples, such as the human lens, in a non-destructive manner. In this work, we present results obtained using our Brillouin microscope to map the stiffness variations in the walls of blood vessels in particular when atherosclerotic plaques are formed. The stiffness of the membrane that covers the plaques is critical in developing acute myocardial infarction yet it is not currently possible to credibly assess its stiffness due to lack of suitable methods.

  2. Central blood pressure as an index of antihypertensive control: determinants and potential value.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Luc

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of central blood pressure has generated interest as a tool in predicting cardiovascular events. The purpose of this article is to review the meaning and measurement of the central blood pressure and consider its potential value as an index of the antihypertensive response. Indirect estimation of central aortic pressures is obtained by the study of the radial pulse wave compared with a central pulse wave contour measured at the carotid or femoral artery level. The sum of the forward pressure wave created by ventricular contraction and of the reflected pressure wave from the peripheral arterial system produce the peak systolic blood pressure in the aorta. Measurement of the peripheral reflected-wave contribution to aortic blood pressure can be quantified as the augmentation index. Also, the increase in the rapidity of this travelling wave can be measured as the pulse wave velocity. These 2 parameters are considered to be valid indices of the peripheral arterial stiffness. Along with the calculation of systolic and diastolic aortic pressures, these measurements can give a better understanding of the actual central blood pressure to which core organs like heart, brain, and kidneys are submitted. There is tantalizing evidence for the potential value of central blood pressure as a useful index of antihypertensive action, but until clear evidence is obtained, its use should continue to be considered exploratory. PMID:24750979

  3. Normal Pregnancy Is Associated with Changes in Central Hemodynamics and Enhanced Recruitable, but Not Resting, Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and reactive hyperemia-related changes in carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (ΔPWVcr%) could offer complementary information about both "recruitability" and "resting" endothelial function (EF). Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and pulse wave analysis-derived parameters (i.e., AIx@75) are the gold standard methods for noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics. If healthy pregnancy is associated with both changes in resting and recruitable EF, as well as in several arterial parameters, it remains unknown and/or controversial. Objectives. To simultaneously and noninvasively assess in healthy pregnant (HP) and nonpregnant (NP) women central parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF, employing new complementary approaches. Methods. HP (n = 11, 34.2 ± 3.3 weeks of gestation) and age- and cardiovascular risk factors-matched NP (n = 22) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), AIx@75, PWVcf, common carotid stiffness, and intima-media thickness, as well as FMD, L-FMC, and ΔPWVcr %, were measured. Results. Aortic BP, stiffness, and AIx@75 were reduced in HP. ΔPWVcr% and FMD were enhanced in HP in comparison to NP. No differences were found in L-FMC between groups. Conclusion. HP is associated with reduced aortic stiffness, central BP, wave reflections, and enhanced recruitable, but not resting, EF.

  4. Normal Pregnancy Is Associated with Changes in Central Hemodynamics and Enhanced Recruitable, but Not Resting, Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and reactive hyperemia-related changes in carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (ΔPWVcr%) could offer complementary information about both “recruitability” and “resting” endothelial function (EF). Carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and pulse wave analysis-derived parameters (i.e., AIx@75) are the gold standard methods for noninvasive evaluation of aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics. If healthy pregnancy is associated with both changes in resting and recruitable EF, as well as in several arterial parameters, it remains unknown and/or controversial. Objectives. To simultaneously and noninvasively assess in healthy pregnant (HP) and nonpregnant (NP) women central parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF, employing new complementary approaches. Methods. HP (n = 11, 34.2 ± 3.3 weeks of gestation) and age- and cardiovascular risk factors-matched NP (n = 22) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), AIx@75, PWVcf, common carotid stiffness, and intima-media thickness, as well as FMD, L-FMC, and ΔPWVcr %, were measured. Results. Aortic BP, stiffness, and AIx@75 were reduced in HP. ΔPWVcr% and FMD were enhanced in HP in comparison to NP. No differences were found in L-FMC between groups. Conclusion. HP is associated with reduced aortic stiffness, central BP