Science.gov

Sample records for central laser facility

  1. The Central Raman Laser Facility at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    medina, C.; Mayotte, E.; Wiencke, L. R.; Rizi, V.; Grillo, A.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the newly upgraded Central Raman Laser Facility (CRLF) located close to the center of the Piere Auger observatory (PAO) in Argentina. The CRLF features a Raman Lidar receiver, a 335 nm wavelength solid state laser, a robotic beam energy calibration system, and a weather station, all powered by solar energy and operated autonomously using a single board computer. The system optics are arranged to direct the laser beam into the atmosphere in steered and vertical modes with adjustable polarization settings,and it is measured in a bi-static configuration by the 4 fluorescence stations of the Pierre Auger observatory. Additionally the system optics can be easily switched to provide a fixed vertical beam that is measured by a Raman Lidar receiver in mono-static configuration,allowing an independent measurement of the aerosol optical depth τ(z,t) and other properties of the atmosphere. A description of the CLRF's installation, hardware and software integration, initial operations and examples of data collected, will also be presented.

  2. High energy diode-pumped solid-state laser development at the Central Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paul D.; Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Phillips, P. Jonathan; Butcher, Thomas; Smith, Jodie; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we review the development of high energy, nanosecond pulsed diode-pumped solid state lasers within the Central Laser Facility (CLF) based on cryogenic gas cooled multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. To date two 10J-scale systems, the DiPOLE prototype amplifier and an improved DIPOLE10 system, have been developed, and most recently a larger scale system, DiPOLE100, designed to produce 100 J pulses at up to 10 Hz. These systems have demonstrated amplification of 10 ns duration pulses at 1030 nm to energies in excess of 10 J at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate, and over 100 J at 1 Hz, with optical-to-optical conversion efficiencies of up to 27%. We present an overview of the cryo-amplifier concept and compare the design features of these three systems, including details of the amplifier designs, gain media, diode pump lasers and the cryogenic gas cooling systems. The most recent performance results from the three systems are presented along with future plans for high energy DPSSL development within the CLF.

  3. TACS Central Control Facility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-12

    Central Control Facility 6 3. System Management Data Flow 7 B. Hardware Operating Environment 9 1. Computer 9 2. TACS Interfaces 9 3. Other Central...TERMINATION TIMING 131 Appendix C SYSTEM MANAGEMENT DATA FORMATS 135 Appendix D FIVE- AND NINE-SLOT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION DIFFERENCES 147 Appendix E...control burst management ) 26 2-7 Call Progress Messages 29 2-8 Flowchart of Assignment/Blockage Decision Process for All-Member Net Requests 30 2-9

  4. Studying ignition schemes on European laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquemot, S.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S. D.; Chanteloup, J. C.; Labaune, C.; Koenig, M.; Michel, D. T.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoigt, H. P.; Canaud, B.; Cherfils Clérouin, C.; Debras, G.; Depierreux, S.; Ebrardt, J.; Juraszek, D.; Lafitte, S.; Loiseau, P.; Miquel, J. L.; Philippe, F.; Rousseaux, C.; Blanchot, N.; Edwards, C. B.; Norreys, P.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Breil, J.; Feugeas, J. L.; Hallo, L.; Lafon, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Santos, J. J.; Schurtz, G.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Debayle, A.; Honrubia, J. J.; Temporal, M.; Batani, D.; Davies, J. R.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Badziak, J.; Klimo, O.

    2011-09-01

    Demonstrating ignition and net energy gain in the near future on MJ-class laser facilities will be a major step towards determining the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), in Europe as in the United States. The current status of the French Laser MégaJoule (LMJ) programme, from the laser facility construction to the indirectly driven central ignition target design, is presented, as well as validating experimental campaigns, conducted, as part of this programme, on various laser facilities. However, the viability of the IFE approach strongly depends on our ability to address the salient questions related to efficiency of the target design and laser driver performances. In the overall framework of the European HiPER project, two alternative schemes both relying on decoupling target compression and fuel heating—fast ignition (FI) and shock ignition (SI)—are currently considered. After a brief presentation of the HiPER project's objectives, FI and SI target designs are discussed. Theoretical analysis and 2D simulations will help to understand the unresolved key issues of the two schemes. Finally, the on-going European experimental effort to demonstrate their viability on currently operated laser facilities is described.

  5. Laser Guide Star Facility Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S.; Calia, D. B.; Buzzoni, B.; Duhoux, P.; Fischer, G.; Guidolin, I.; Haimerl, A.; Hackenberg, W.; Hinterschuster, R.; Holzlöhner, R.; Jolley, P.; Pfrommer, T.; Popovic, D.; Alvarez, J.-L.; Beltran, J.; Girard, J.; Pallanca, L.; Riquelme, M.; Gonte, F.

    2014-03-01

    The Laser Guide Star Facility is part of VLT Unit Telescope 4 and provides a single centre-launched sodium beacon for the two adaptive optics instruments SINFONI and NACO. The original facility, installed in 2006, employed a high-power dye laser source, PARSEC, producing an output beam that was delivered via a single-mode optical fibre to launch optics located behind the telescope secondary mirror. We recently installed a new prototype laser source, PARLA, based on Raman optical fibre technology. Requirements for the new laser include start-up times compatible with flexible observing, an output beam appropriate for the existing fibre-delivery system and an on-sky power of up to 7 watts. This is the first time that this type of laser has been deployed at a major observing facility, and it has a pathfinder role for future adaptive optics systems. Reported here are the main results of the development, deployment and early operation since the resumption of science operation in February 2013.

  6. VLT laser guide star facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini, Domenico; Allaert, Eric; Araujo, Constanza; Brunetto, Enzo; Buzzoni, Bernard; Comin, Mauro; Cullum, Martin J.; Davies, Richard I.; Dichirico, Canio; Dierickx, Philippe; Dimmler, Martin; Duchateau, Michel; Egedal, Carsten; Hackenberg, Wolfgang K. P.; Hippler, Stefan; Kellner, Stefan; van Kesteren, Arno; Koch, Franz; Neumann, Udo; Ott, Thomas; Quattri, Marco; Quentin, Jutta; Rabien, Sebastian; Tamai, Roberto; Tapia, Mario; Tarenghi, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    We report on the ongoing VLT Laser Guide Star Facility project, which will allow the ESO UT4 telescope to produce an artificial reference star for the Adaptive Optics systems NAOS-CONICA and SINFONI. A custom developed dye laser producing >10W CW at 589nm is installed on-board of the UT4 telescope, then relayed by means of a single mode optical fiber behind the secondary mirror, where a 500mm diameter lightweight, f/1 launch telescope is projecting the laser beam at 90 km altitude. We described the design tradeoffs and provide some details of the chosen subsystems. This paper is an update including subsystems results, to be read together with our previous paper on LGSF design description.

  7. Sandia's Z-Backlighter Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Smith, I.; Kimmel, M.; Speas, C.; Shores, J.; Armstrong, D.; Bellum, J.; Field, E.; Kletecka, D.; Porter, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories was developed to enable high energy density physics experiments in conjunction with the Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on backlighting. Since the first laser system there became operational in 2001, the facility has continually evolved to add new capability and new missions. The facility currently has several high energy laser systems including the nanosecond/multi-kilojoule Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL), the sub-picosecond/kilojoule- class Z-Petawatt (ZPW) Laser, and the smaller nanosecond/100 J-class Chaco laser. In addition to these, the backlighting mission requires a regular stream of coated consumable optics such as debris shields and vacuum windows, which led to the development of the Sandia Optics Support Facility to support the unique high damage threshold optical coating needs described.

  8. Central Computational Facility CCF communications subsystem options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A MITRE study which investigated the communication options available to support both the remaining Central Computational Facility (CCF) computer systems and the proposed U1108 replacements is presented. The facilities utilized to link the remote user terminals with the CCF were analyzed and guidelines to provide more efficient communications were established.

  9. ESO VLT laser guide star facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang K.; Cullum, Martin J.; Brunetto, Enzo; Ott, Thomas; Quattri, Marco; Allaert, Eric; Dimmler, Martin; Tarenghi, Massimo; Van Kersteren, A.; Di Chirico, C.; Buzzoni, Bernard; Gray, Peter; Tamai, R.; Tapia, M.

    2002-02-01

    We report in this paper on the design and progress of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility. The project will create a user facility embedded in UT4, to produce in the Earth's Mesosphere Laser Guide Stars, which extend the sky coverage of Adaptive Optics systems on the VLT UT4 telescope. Embedded into the project are provisions for multiple LGS to cope with second generation MCAO instruments.

  10. Laser design basis for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.T.; Manes, K.R.; Murray, J.R.; Renard, P.A.; Sawicki, R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Williams, W.

    1994-06-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion initiated by highly intense laser beams has been the subject of experiment for many years. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) represents the culmination of design efforts to provide a laser facility that will successfully demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory. In this so-called inertial confinement approach, energetic driver beams (laser, X-ray, or charged particle) heat the outer surface of a spherical capsule containing deuterium and tritium (DT) fuel. As the capsule surface explosively evaporates, reaction pressure compresses the DT fuel causing the central core of the fuel to reach extreme density and temperature. When the central temperature is high enough, DT fusion reactions occur. The energy released from these reactions further heats the compressed fuel, and fusion burn propagates outward through the colder regions of the capsule much more rapidly than the inertially confined capsule can expand. The resulting fusion reactions yield many times more energy than was absorbed from the driver beams.

  11. Laser design basis for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.T.; Manes, K.R.; Murray, J.R.; Renard, P.A.; Sawicki, R.; Trenholme, J.B.; Williams, W.

    1994-11-01

    Controlled nuclear fusion initiated by highly intense laser beams has been the subject of experiment for many years. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) represents the culmination of design efforts to provide a laser facility that will successfully demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory. In this so-called inertial confinement approach, energetic driver beams (laser, X ray, or charged particle) heat the outer surface of a spherical capsule containing deuterium and tritium (DT) fuel. As the capsule surface explosively evaporates, reaction pressure compresses the DT fuel causing the central core of the fuel to reach extreme density and temperature. When the central temperature is high enough, DT fusion reactions occur. The energy released from these reactions further heats the compressed fuel, and fusion burn propagates outward through the colder regions of the capsule much more rapidly than the inertially confined capsule can expand. The resulting fusion reactions yield many times more energy than was absorbed from the driver beams.

  12. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Giesbrecht, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA) located in Butte County, Idaho at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell 1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell 2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell 3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5 acre land application site that utilizes a center pivot irrigation sprinkler system. The purpose of this current study is to update the analysis and conclusions of the December 2013 study. In this current study, the new seepage rate and influent flow rate data have been used to update the calculations, model, and analysis.

  13. Mineral facilities of Northern and Central Eurasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric; Soto-Viruet, Yadira

    2010-01-01

    This map displays almost 900 records of mineral facilities within the countries that formerly constituted the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2

  14. Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Dairy Facilities in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, A. S.; Ogunjemiyo, S. O.; Trabue, S.; Middala, S. R.; Ashkan, S.; Scoggin, K.; Vu, K. K.; Addala, L.; Olea, C.; Nana, L.; Scruggs, A. K.; Steele, J.; Shelton, T. C.; Osborne, B.; McHenry, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in Central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two Central California dairies during 2010 and 2011. Isolation flux chambers were used to measure direct emissions from specific dairy sources, and upwind/downwind ambient profiles were measured from ground level up to heights of 60 m. Samples were collected using a combination of canisters and sorbent tubes, and were analyzed by GC-MS. Additional in-situ measurements were made using infra-red photoaccoustic detectors and Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. Temperature and ozone profiles up to 250 m above ground level were also measured using a tethersonde. Substantial fluxes of a number of VOCs including alcohols, volatile fatty acids and esters were observed at both sites. Implications of these measurements for regional air quality will be discussed.

  15. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  16. Comprehensive description of the Orion laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopps, Nicholas; Oades, Kevin; Andrew, Jim; Brown, Colin; Cooper, Graham; Danson, Colin; Daykin, Simon; Duffield, Stuart; Edwards, Ray; Egan, David; Elsmere, Stephen; Gales, Steve; Girling, Mark; Gumbrell, Edward; Harvey, Ewan; Hillier, David; Hoarty, David; Horsfield, Colin; James, Steven; Leatherland, Alex; Masoero, Stephen; Meadowcroft, Anthony; Norman, Michael; Parker, Stefan; Rothman, Stephen; Rubery, Michael; Treadwell, Paul; Winter, David; Bett, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The Orion laser facility at the atomic weapons establishment (AWE) in the UK has been operational since April 2013, fielding experiments that require both its long and short pulse capability. This paper provides a full description of the facility in terms of laser performance, target systems and diagnostics currently available. Inevitably, this is a snapshot of current capability—the available diagnostics and the laser capability are evolving continuously. The laser systems consist of ten beams, optimised around 1 ns pulse duration, which each provide a nominal 500 J at a wavelength of 351 nm. There are also two short pulse beams, which each provide 500 J in 0.5 ps at 1054 nm. There are options for frequency doubling one short pulse beam to enhance the pulse temporal contrast. More recently, further contrast enhancement, based on optical parametric amplification (OPA) in the front end with a pump pulse duration of a few ps, has been installed. An extensive suite of diagnostics are available for users, probing the optical emission, x-rays and particles produced in laser-target interactions. Optical probe diagnostics are also available. A description of the diagnostics is provided.

  17. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  18. Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Brick Storage Vaults under Jones Street, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  19. NOVA laser facility for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.W.

    1983-11-30

    The NOVA laser consists of ten beams, capable of concentrating 100 to 150 kJ of energy (in 3 ns) and 100 to 150 TW of power (in 100 ps) on experimental targets by 1985. NOVA will also be capable of frequency converting the fundamental laser wavelength (1.05 ..mu..m) to its second (0.525 ..mu..m) or third (0.35 ..mu..m) harmonic. This additional capability (80 to 120 kJ at 0.525 ..mu..m, 40 to 70 kJ at 0.35 ..mu..m) was approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in April 1982. These shorter wavelengths are much more favorable for ICF target physics. Current construction status of the NOVA facility, intended for completion in the autumn of 1984, will be presented.

  20. Schwinger effect at modern laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Gevorgyan, N. T.; Panferov, A. D.; Smolyansky, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental investigation of physical processes in strong fields of different nature (electromagnetic, gravitational, etc.) is one of the important directions of modern physics. Particular interest is devoted to the area of extremely strong fields, in which qualitatively new effects become important due to the restructuring of the physical vacuum which accompanies the creation of matter from the vacuum at modern laser facilities. Such kind of time-dependent strong field vacuum effects can be appropriately described within a kinetic theory approach as an effective instrument of theoretical investigations. A short review of recent achievements in the direction of the dynamical Schwinger effect is given in this contribution.

  1. Accomplishments in the Trident Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-25

    Trident has been an extremely productive laser facility, despite its modest size and operating cost in the firmament of high-energy, high-power laser facilities worldwide. More than 150 peer-reviewed journal articles (in 39 different journals) have been published using Trident experimental data, many in high-impact journals such as Nature, Nature Physics, Nature Communications, and Physical Review Letters. More than 230 oral presentations involving research at Trident have been presented at national and international conferences. Trident publications have over 5000 citations in the literature with an h-index of 38. AT least 23 Los Alamos postdoctoral researchers have worked on Trident. In the period since its inception in 1992-2007, despite not issuing formal proposal calls for access nor functioning explicitly as a user facility until later, Trident has 170 unique users from more than 30 unique institutions, such as Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia national laboratories, various University of California campuses, General Atomic, Imperial College, and Ecole Polytechnique. To reinforce its role as an important Los Alamos point of connection to the external research community, at least 20 PhD students did a significant fraction of their thesis work on Trident. Such PhD students include Mike Dunne (Imperial College, 1995) - now director of LCLS and professor at Stanford; David Hoarty (IC, 1997) - scientist at Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK; Dustin Froula (UC Davis, 2002) - Plasma and Ultrafast Physics Group leader at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics and assistant professor at the Physics and Astronomy Department at the University of Rochester; Tom Tierney (UC Irvine, 2002) - scientist at Los Alamos; Eric Loomis (Arizona State U., 2005) - scientist at Los Alamos; and Eliseo Gamboa (University of Michigan, 2013) - scientist at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The work performed on Trident, besides its scientific impact, has also supported the Inertial

  2. Synchrotron Facilities and Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vaclav, Vylet; Liu, James; /SLAC

    2007-12-21

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle travels along a curved trajectory. Initially encountered as a nuisance around orbits of high energy synchrotron accelerators, it gradually became an indispensable research tool in many applications: crystallography, X-ray lithography, micromechanics, structural biology, microprobe X-ray experiments, etc. So-called first generation SR sources were exploiting SR in parasitic mode at electron accelerators built to study particle collisions. The second generation of SR sources was the first facilities solely devoted to SR production. They were optimized to achieve stable high currents in the accelerator ring to achieve substantially higher photon flux and to provide a large number of SR beam lines for users. Third generation sources were further optimized for increased brilliance, i.e. with photons densely packed into a beam of very small cross-sectional area and minimal angular divergence (see the Appendix for more detailed definitions of flux, brightness and brilliance) and makes extensive use of the insertion devices such as wigglers and undulators. Free Electron Lasers (FELs), the fourth generation SR sources, open new research possibilities by offering extremely short pulses of extremely bright and coherent radiation. The number of SR sources around the world now probably exceeds 100. These facilities vary greatly in size, energy of the electron (or positron) beams, range of photon energies and other characteristics of the photon beams produced. In what follows we will concentrate on describing some common aspects of SR facilities, their operation modes and specific radiation protection aspects.

  3. Volatile organic compound emissions from dairy facilities in central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from dairy facilities are thought to be an important contributor to high ozone levels in central California, but emissions inventories from these sources contain significant uncertainties. In this work, VOC emissions were measured at two central Califor...

  4. 12 CFR 741.210 - Central liquidity facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Central liquidity facility. 741.210 Section 741.210 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS... Unions That Also Apply to Federally Insured State-Chartered Credit Unions § 741.210 Central...

  5. The Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Fifth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual Omega users and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback to LLE management from the users about ways to improve the facility and future experimental campaigns.

  6. The Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-10-01

    A capacity gathering of over 100 researchers from 25 universities and laboratories met at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) for the Sixth Omega Laser Facility Users Group (OLUG) workshop. The purpose of the 2.5-day workshop was to facilitate communications and exchanges among individual OMEGA users, and between users and the LLE management; to present ongoing and proposed research; to encourage research opportunities and collaborations that could be undertaken at the Omega Laser Facility and in a complementary fashion at other facilities [such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) or the Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI)]; to provide an opportunity for students, postdoctoral fellows, and young researchers to present their research in an informal setting; and to provide feedback from the users to LLE management about ways to improve and keep the facility and future experimental campaigns at the cutting edge.

  7. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  8. First light of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini Calia, D.; Allaert, E.; Alvarez, J. L.; Araujo Hauck, C.; Avila, G.; Bendek, E.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Cullum, M.; Davies, R.; Dimmler, M.; Guidolin, I.; Hackenberg, W.; Hippler, S.; Kellner, S.; van Kesteren, A.; Koch, F.; Neumann, U.; Ott, T.; Popovic, D.; Pedichini, F.; Quattri, M.; Quentin, J.; Rabien, S.; Silber, A.; Tapia, M.

    2006-06-01

    Two teams of scientists and engineers at Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik and at the European Southern Observatory have joined forces to design, build and install the Laser Guide Star Facility for the VLT. The Laser Guide Star Facility has now been completed and installed on the VLT Yepun telescope at Cerro Paranal. In this paper we report on the first light and first results from the Commissioning of the LGSF.

  9. The progress of TMT Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Wei, Kai; Tang, Jinlong; Jiang, Changchun; Fan, Muwen; Chen, Feng; Rui, Daoman; Li, Xiqi; Boyer, Corinne; Wang, Lianqi; Ellerbroek, Brent; Xian, Hao; Rao, Changhui; Zhang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    The Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) is responsible for generating the artificial laser guide stars required by the TMT Laser Guide Star (LGS) AO systems. The LGSF uses multiple sodium lasers to generate and project several LGS asterisms from a laser launch telescope located behind the TMT secondary mirror. The LGSF includes 3 main subsystems: (1) the laser system, (2) the beam transfer optics (BTO) system, (3) the associated laser safety system. At present, the LGSF is in the preliminary design phase. During this phase, the laser launch telescope trade study, Beam transfer optical path trade study are compared carefully, and some critical components prototypes have been carried out to verify the requirements, such as the polarization status control and test, the Fast Steer Mirror (FSM) prototype test.

  10. ELECTRICAL LINES ARRIVE FROM CENTRAL FACILITIES AREA, SOUTH OF MTR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ELECTRICAL LINES ARRIVE FROM CENTRAL FACILITIES AREA, SOUTH OF MTR. EXCAVATION RUBBLE IN FOREGROUND. CONTRACTOR CRAFT SHOPS, CRANES, AND OTHER MATERIALS ON SITE. CAMERA FACES EAST, WITH LITTLE BUTTE AND MIDDLE BUTTE IN DISTANCE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 335. Unknown Photographer, 7/1/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Status of the Leopard Laser Project in Nevada Terawatt Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiewior, Piotr P.; Astanovitskiy, A.; Aubry, G.; Batie, S.; Caron, J.; Chalyy, O.; Cowan, T.; Haefner, C.; Le Galloudec, B.; Le Galloudec, N.; Macaulay, D.; Nalajala, V.; Pettee, G.; Samek, S.; Stepanenko, Y.; Vesco, J.

    2009-06-01

    Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) currently operates a high-intensity laser system—Leopard. NTF already operates a powerful z-pinch device, called Zebra, for plasma and High Energy Density physics research. The unique research opportunities arise from the combination of NTF's terawatt Zebra z-pinch with 50-terawatt-class Leopard laser. This combination also provides opportunities to address fundamental physics of inertial fusion and high energy density physics with intense laser beam. We report on the status, design and architecture of the Leopard laser project. A first experiments carried out with Leopard will be also briefly mentioned.

  12. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY BACKUP CENTRAL COMMUNICATIONS ROOM SPACE REQUIREMENTS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    B. SZALEWSKI

    2005-03-22

    The purpose of the Fuel Handling Facility Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements Calculation is to determine a preliminary estimate of the space required to house the backup central communications room in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF). This room provides backup communications capability to the primary communication systems located in the Central Control Center Facility. This calculation will help guide FHF designers in allocating adequate space for communications system equipment in the FHF. This is a preliminary calculation determining preliminary estimates based on the assumptions listed in Section 4. As such, there are currently no limitations on the use of this preliminary calculation. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Design and Engineering and are intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the FHF Backup Central Communications Room Space Requirements. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Design and Engineering should be consulted before the use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

  13. Bidirectional chaos communication between two outer semiconductor lasers coupled mutually with a central semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Wu, Jia-Gui; Wu, Zheng-Mao; Lin, Xiao-Dong; Deng, Dao; Liu, Yu-Ran; Xia, Guang-Qiong

    2011-11-21

    Based on a linear chain composed of a central semiconductor laser and two outer semiconductor lasers, chaos synchronization and bidirectional communication between two outer lasers have been investigated under the case that the central laser and the two outer lasers are coupled mutually, whereas there exists no coupling between the two outer lasers. The simulation results show that high-quality and stable isochronal synchronization between the two outer lasers can be achieved, while the cross-correlation coefficients between the two outer lasers and the central laser are very low under proper operation condition. Based on the high performance chaos synchronization between the two outer lasers, message bidirectional transmissions of bit rates up to 20 Gbit/s can be realized through adopting a novel decoding scheme which is different from that based on chaos pass filtering effect. Furthermore, the security of bidirectional communication is also analyzed.

  14. Upgrade of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Steffan; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Buzzoni, Bernard; Duhoux, Philippe; Fischer, Gert; Guidolin, Ivan; Hintershuster, Renate; Holzloehner, Ronald; Jolley, Paul; Pfrommer, Thomas; Popovic, Dan; Alvarez, Alvaro; Beltran, Juan; Girard, Julien; Gonte, Frederic

    2013-12-01

    The laser guide star facility (LGSF) is part of the fourth Unit Telescope, Yepun, at Paranal observatory. It provides a single centre-launched sodium beacon for the two adaptive optics instruments SINFONI and NACO located at Cassegrain and Nasmyth B respectively. The original facility, which was installed in 2006, comprised a high-power sodium-resonant dye laser source, PARSEC, producing an output beam that was delivered via a 27 metre long single-mode photonic crystal optical fibre to a launch system located behind the telescope secondary mirror. This dye laser was recently replaced with a laser system based on solid-state Raman fibre laser technology known as PARLA. Apart from the laser source, the design of the rest of the LGSF remained essentially unchanged during the upgrade. Requirements for the new laser system include start-up times consistent with the flexible observing strategy of the Paranal telescopes, and an output beam format compatible with the existing fibre-delivered launch system. Reported here are the main results of the design, integration and commissioning of the new laser system. Service mode observing using the LGSF restarted on February 20th 2013.

  15. Heliostat characterization at the Central Receiver Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. L.; Arvizu, D. E.

    1981-05-01

    The Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) operated for the Department of Energy by Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM was constructed for the purpose of evaluating solar central receiver design concepts. At this facility working experience with the CRTF heliostat field has been gained and an extensive heliostat evaluation capability has evolved. Valuable information has been gained at the CRTF that will help in the future design and specification of heliostats. This paper summarizes the work that led to the current state of heliostat evaluation capability and includes; a description of the CRTF heliostat, measurements of environmental degradation of mirror reflectance, heliostat beam measurements with an instrumented sweeping bar, beam quality and tracking accuracy data obtained with the newly developed Beam Characterization System (BCS) and comparisons of measured beam data with the heliostat computer model HELIOS.

  16. A Laser Based Fusion Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    particular Robert Lehmberg and Frank Hegeler for providing simulations of the new FTF amplifier. We thank Riccardo Betti and John Perkins for very...ROSE, et al, “Numerical modeling of large-area electron-beam diodes for KrF lasers,” Journal Appl Phys, 94, pp 5343-5349, (2003). 24 F. Hegeler ...et al. “Efficient Electron Beam Deposition in the Gas Cell of the Electra laser,” Physics of Plasmas, 11, pp 5010-5021 (2004). 25 F. HEGELER

  17. Status of Centralized Environmental Creep Testing Facility Preparation and Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Weiju; Battiste, Rick

    2006-10-01

    Because the ASME Codes do not cover environmental issues that are crucial in the design and construction of VHTR system, investigation of long-term impure helium effects on metallurgical stability and properties becomes very important. The present report describes the development of centralized environmental creep testing facility, its close collaborations with the experiments in low velocity helium recirculation loop, important lessons learned, upgrades in system design in FY06, and current status of the development.

  18. Operations aspects of the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.G.; Makara, J.N.

    1995-03-01

    The Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) facility consists of helium and nitrogen reliquefier plants operated 24 hours-a-day to supply LHe at 4.6{degrees}K and LN{sub 2} for the Fermilab Tevatron superconducting proton-antiproton collider ring and to recover warm return gases. Operating aspects of CHL, including different equipment and systems reliability, availability, maintenance experience, safety concerns, and economics aspects are discussed.

  19. Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

    1996-06-01

    This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

  20. Distributed computer control system in the Nova Laser Fusion Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The EE Technical Review has two purposes - to inform readers of various activities within the Electronics Engineering Department and to promote the exchange of ideas. The articles, by design, are brief summaries of EE work. The articles included in this report are as follows: Overview - Nova Control System; Centralized Computer-Based Controls for the Nova Laser Facility; Nova Pulse-Power Control System; Nova Laser Alignment Control System; Nova Beam Diagnostic System; Nova Target-Diagnostics Control System; and Nova Shot Scheduler. The 7 papers are individually abstracted.

  1. Conceptional design of the laser ion source based hadrontherapy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiu-Cui; Song, Ming-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Hu

    2014-04-01

    A laser ion source (LIS), which can provide a carbon beam with highly stripped state (C6+) and high intensity (several tens mA), would significantly change the overall design of the hadrontherapy facility. The proposed LIS based hadrontherapy facility has the advantages of short linac length, simple injection scheme, and small synchrotron size. With the experience from the DPIS and HITFiL projects that have been conducted in IMP, a conceptional design of the LIS based hadrontherapy facility will be presented, with special attention given to APF type IH DTL design and simulation.

  2. Development of a laser glass for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2007-04-01

    We review the development of a new glass formulation and manufacturing technology for a neodymium-doped phosphate based laser glass used in the LLNL National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the French Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). The glass development process built on both accumulated experience and the utilization of glass science principles, and the resultant new glass offers superior laser properties in combination with improvements in physical properties to enhance manufacturing yield. Essentially in parallel, a continuous melting production line was also conceived, designed and operated to meet both the schedule and cost targets of the NIF. Prior to 1997, phosphate laser glasses were manufactured by a discontinuous pot-melting process with limited production rate and associated high costs. The continuous melting process met several technical challenges, including producing glass with low residual water content and absence of inclusions which become damage sites when used in the NIF laser system.

  3. VLT Laser Guide Star Facility: from one to many LGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Cullum, Martin; Brunetto, E.; Quattri, Marco; Quentin, J.; Allaert, E.; Dimmler, M.; Tarenghi, Massimo; van Kesteren, A.; Di Chirico, C.; Egedal, C.; Buzzoni, Bernard; Tamai, Roberto; Tapia, M.; Sarazin, Marc; Pedichini, F.

    The ESO Laser Guide Star Facility is right now going through design phases, converging to an implementation foreseen in 2003. The LGSF has provisions for an upgrade to multiple LGS projection, foreseen in 2005/6 in the ESO Long Range Plan. We will tackle and discuss here the LGSF design choices, with an accent on the multiple LGS operation mode.

  4. A Laser Technology Test Facility for Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Campbell, R W; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Latkowski, J; Molander, W A; Sutton, S B; Telford, S; Caird, J A

    2009-10-06

    A LIFE laser driver needs to be designed and operated which meets the rigorous requirements of the NIF laser system while operating at high average power, and operate for a lifetime of >30 years. Ignition on NIF will serve to demonstrate laser driver functionality, operation of the Mercury laser system at LLNL demonstrates the ability of a diode-pumped solid-state laser to run at high average power, but the operational lifetime >30 yrs remains to be proven. A Laser Technology test Facility (LTF) has been designed to specifically address this issue. The LTF is a 100-Hz diode-pumped solid-state laser system intended for accelerated testing of the diodes, gain media, optics, frequency converters and final optics, providing system statistics for billion shot class tests. These statistics will be utilized for material and technology development as well as economic and reliability models for LIFE laser drivers.

  5. Solid-State Laser, Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (Rilis) and Laser Beam Transport at Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Izdebski, F.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The inception of laser resonance ionization spectroscopy and its application as a resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) took place merely 20 years ago with pulsed dye lasers [1-5]. By now next generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities are being planned or built. Understanding and considering the unique RILIS requirements in the layout of next generation RIB facilities will allow for cost-effective implementation of this versatile ion source. This discussion touches on laser beam transport and RILIS requirements not necessarily obvious to experts in conventional ion sources.

  6. Use Of Lasers At The Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, Michael E.

    1983-11-01

    An optical profilometer that uses a Techmet LaserMike scanning, focused, laser-beam, optical micrometer is installed in a remote alpha-gamma containment cell at the Los Alamos Hot-Cell Facility.1 A hot-cell extension chamber provides the nominal 30-cm (12-in.) working distance required by the LaserMike and, at the same time, keeps the LaserMike components outside the high-radiation-containment environment. This system provides measurement accu-racy better than±5 pm (0.0002 in.) on diameters between 2 and 13 mm (0.08 and 0.5 in.) at a rate of 33 measurements per second. The Hot-Cell Facility also uses a Korad 20-J-output ruby pulsed laser to drill a hole in reactor fuel element cladding to sample fission gas. The laser is then used to reweld the hole so that the fuel element will not be contaminated and may be stored without an alpha-containment barrier. The wall thickness of the fuel elements sampled varies from 0.25 to 0.50 mm (0.010 to 0.020 in.).

  7. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    1993-02-01

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  8. Laser fusion experiments, facilities and diagnostics at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-02-01

    The progress of the LLL Laser Fusion Program to achieve high gain thermonuclear micro-explosions is discussed. Many experiments have been successfully performed and diagnosed using the large complex, 10-beam, 30 TW Shiva laser system. A 400 kJ design of the 20-beam Nova laser has been completed. The construction of the first phase of this facility has begun. New diagnostic instruments are described which provide one with new and improved resolution, information on laser absorption and scattering, thermal energy flow, suprathermal electrons and their effects, and final fuel conditions. Measurements were made on the absorption and Brillouin scattering for target irradiations at both 1.064 ..mu..m and 532 nm. These measurements confirm the expected increased absorption and reduced scattering at the shorter wavelength. Implosion experiments have been performed which have produced final fuel densities over the range of 10x to 100x liquid DT density.

  9. Versatile laser glass inspection and damage testing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.E.; Greiner, G.J.; Campbell, J.H.; Chaffee, P.H.; Hildum, J.S.; Grens, J.Z.; Weinzapfel, C.L.; Winfree, S.M.; Milam, D.

    1986-01-17

    A test facility is described which detects small opaque inclusions in large transparent components by using a commercial laser which delivers high energy pulses to the test sample at moderate frequency in a small diameter beam. The sample is automatically scanned such that each point in the volume is irradiated with ten pulses at twice the inclusion damage threshold - an amount sufficient to cause visible damage at inclusion sites. This approach permits detection of opaque inclusions in the parts per trillion and lower concentration range. The specifics of the device design and its performance are discussed in the context of automatic inclusion inspection and mapping in large laser optics.

  10. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A; York, R C

    2012-07-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  11. Testing stellar opacities with laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, Maëlle; TURCK-CHIEZE, Sylvaine; RIBEYRE, Xavier; DUCRET, Jean-Eric; SALMON, Sébastien; BLANCARD, Christophe; COSSE, Philippe; MONDET, Guillaume; FAUSSURIER, Gérald; CONSORTIUM, OPAC

    2015-08-01

    Helio and asteroseismology (SoHo, KEPLER...) have produced observed acoustic oscillations of thousands of stars which characteristics are deeply linked to the transport of radiation inside the stars. However, the comparisons of seismic data with model predictions have led to significant discrepancies, which could be due to a bad knowledge of production and transport of energy.β-Cephei are pulsating stars, progenitor of supernovae and thus deeply linked to our understanding of stellar medium enrichment. Their study has shown some difficulty to predict the observed oscillation modes, which are directly linked to an opacity bump of the elements of the iron group (Cr, Fe, Ni) at log T=5.25 (κ-mechanism). We will show that several parameters of the stars (mass, age, metallicity) have a great influence on the amplitude of the bump, which impact their structure. We will then present the final results of an experiment conducted at LULI 2000 in 2011 on Cr, Fe and Ni compared to several opacity codes. We will show how to improve the opacity in the range of temperature around log T= 5.3.The Sun is a privilege place to test and validate physics. Since the recent update of the solar composition, there is a well established large discrepancy (Turck-Chièze et al. 2001) between solar models and seismic data, visible on the solar sound speed profile comparison.An explanation could be that the calculations of energy transport are not correctly taken into account.Unfortunately, there are very few experiments to validate these calculations (Bailey et al. 2014). That's why we are proposing an opacity experiment on a high-energy laser like LMJ, in the conditions of the radiative zone. We are exploiting in that purpose an approach called the Double Ablation Front to reach these high temperatures and densities at LTE and validate or not plasma effects and line widths. We will show the principle of this technique and the results of our simulations on several elements.In the mean time

  12. Research of time fiducial and imaging VISAR laser for Shenguang-III laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhenguo; Tian, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Dandan; Zhu, Na; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Mingzhong; Xu, Dangpeng; Dang, Zhao; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Time fiducial laser is an important tool for the precise measurement in high energy density physics experiments. The VISAR probe laser is also vital for shock wave diagnostics in ICF experiments. Here, time fiducial laser and VISAR light were generated from one source on SG-III laser facility. After generated from a 1064-nm DFB laser, the laser is modulated by an amplitude modulator driven by 10 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. Using time division multiplexing technology, the ten-pulse time fiducial laser and the 20-ns VISAR pulse were split by a 1×2 multiplexer and then chosen by two acoustic optic modulators. Using the technique, cost of the system was reduced. The technologies adopted in the system also include pulse polarization stabilization, high precision fiber coupling and energy transmission. The time fiducial laser generated synchronized 12-beam 2ω and 4-beam 3ω laser, providing important reference marks for different detectors and making it convenient for the analysis of diagnostic data. After being amplified by fiber amplifiers and Nd:YAG rod amplifiers, the VISAR laser pulse was frequency-converted to 532-nm pulse by a thermally controlled LBO crystal with final output energy larger than 20 mJ. Finally, the green light was coupled into a 1-mm core diameter, multimode fused silica optical fiber and propagated to the imaging VISAR. The VISAR laser has been used in the VISAR diagnostic physics experiments. Shock wave loading and slowdown processes were measured. Function to measure velocity history of shock wave front movement in different kinds of materials was added to the SG-III laser facility.

  13. Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  14. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  15. Next Generation Laser-Compton Gamma-ray Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) project in Romania and the HIGS upgrade project - HIGS2. Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light

  16. Central Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Facility Project-(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Takashima, Y.; Katoh, M.; Hosaka, M.; Takami, K.; Morimoto, H.; Hori, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Koda, S.; Ito, T.; Sakurai, I.; Hara, H.; Okamoto, W.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2010-06-01

    A synchrotron radiation facility that is used not only for basic research, but also for engineering and industrial research and development has been proposed to be constructed in the Central area of Japan. The key equipment of this facility is a compact electron storage ring that is able to supply hard X-rays. The circumference of the storage ring is 72 m with the energy of 1.2 GeV, the beam current of 300 mA, and the natural emittance of about 53 nm-rad. The configuration of the storage ring is based on four triple bend cells, and four of the twelve bending magnets are 5 T superconducting ones. The bending angle and critical energy are 12 degree and 4.8 keV, respectively. For the top-up operation, the electron beam will be injected from a booster synchrotron with the full energy. Currently, six beamlines are planned for the first phase starting from 2012.

  17. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  18. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  19. The Injection Laser System on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M; Burkhart, S; Cohen, S; Erbert, G; Heebner, J; Hermann, M; Jedlovec, D

    2006-12-13

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently the largest and most energetic laser system in the world. The main amplifiers are driven by the Injection Laser System comprised of the master oscillators, optical preamplifiers, temporal pulse shaping and spatial beam formatting elements and injection diagnostics. Starting with two fiber oscillators separated by up to a few angstroms, the pulse is phase modulated to suppress SBS and enhance spatial smoothing, amplified, split into 48 individual fibers, and then temporally shaped by an arbitrary waveform generator. Residual amplitude modulation induced in the preamplifiers from the phase modulation is also precompensated in the fiber portion of the system before it is injected into the 48 pre-amplifier modules (PAMs). Each of the PAMs amplifies the light from the 1 nJ fiber injection up to the multi-joule level in two stages. Between the two stages the pre-pulse is suppressed by 60 dB and the beam is spatially formatted to a square aperture with precompensation for the nonuniform gain profile of the main laser. The input sensor package is used to align the output of each PAM to the main laser and acquire energy, power, and spatial profiles for all shots. The beam transport sections split the beam from each PAM into four main laser beams (with optical isolation) forming the 192 beams of the NIF. Optical, electrical, and mechanical design considerations for long term reliability and availability will be discussed.

  20. Facile production of up-converted quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Raffaella; Fortunati, Ilaria; Todescato, Francesco; Gardin, Samuele; Bozio, Renato; Jasieniak, Jacek J; Martucci, Alessandro; Della Giustina, Gioia; Brusatin, Giovanna; Guglielmi, Massimo

    2011-10-05

    We report a facile production of an up-converted surface-emitting DFB laser, performed by exploiting the versatility of sol-gel chemistry, the intriguing properties of well designed graded CdSe-CdS-Cd(0.5)Zn(0.5)S-ZnS colloidal quantum dots, and the scalability of nanoimprinting. Our laser prototype operates in the visible region following efficient optical pumping by either direct one-photon excitation or through the up-conversion of near infrared (NIR) light. By achieving cavity mode Q-factors in excess of 650 and retaining high lasing stabilities in air, this work highlights the feasibility of creating integrated lasing devices through solution based methods.

  1. Laser Electron Gamma Source Facility biennial progress report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F. ); Hoblit, S. . Dept. of Physics); Whisnant, C.S. South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-01-01

    This report briefly discusses the Laser Electron Gamma Source facility and the following experiments conducted here: polarization in D(gamma, p)n and N-N tensor forces for energies less than 225 Mev; constraints on the nuclear tensor force from D(gamma, p)n for energies less than 315 Mev; the p(gamma, neutral pion) reaction and the E2 excitation of delta resonance; quasi-two- and three-body absorption in helium 3(gamma, N-N); and the delta-nucleon interaction in D(gamma,p-negative pion)p and D(gamma, p-n)neutral pions. (LSP).

  2. Laser Electron Gamma Source Facility biennial progress report, June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Caracappa, A.; Kuczewski, A.; Kistner, O.C.; Lincoln, F.; Hoblit, S.; Whisnant, C.S. |

    1992-08-01

    This report briefly discusses the Laser Electron Gamma Source facility and the following experiments conducted here: polarization in D(gamma, p)n and N-N tensor forces for energies less than 225 Mev; constraints on the nuclear tensor force from D(gamma, p)n for energies less than 315 Mev; the p(gamma, neutral pion) reaction and the E2 excitation of delta resonance; quasi-two- and three-body absorption in helium 3(gamma, N-N); and the delta-nucleon interaction in D(gamma,p-negative pion)p and D(gamma, p-n)neutral pions. (LSP).

  3. The injection laser system on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Mark; Burkhart, Scott; Cohen, Simon; Erbert, Gaylen; Heebner, John; Hermann, Mark; Jedlovec, Don

    2007-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently the largest and most energetic laser system in the world. The main amplifiers are driven by the Injection Laser System comprised of the master oscillators, optical preamplifiers, temporal pulse shaping and spatial beam formatting elements and injection diagnostics. Starting with two fiber oscillators separated by up to a few angstroms, the pulse is phase modulated to suppress SBS and enhance spatial smoothing, amplified, split into 48 individual fibers, and then temporally shaped by an arbitrary waveform generator. Residual amplitude modulation induced in the preamplifiers from the phase modulation is also pre-compensated in the fiber portion of the system before it is injected into the 48 pre-amplifier modules (PAMs). Each of the PAMs amplifies the light from the 1 nJ fiber injection up to the multi-joule level in two stages. Between the two stages the pre-pulse is suppressed by 60 dB and the beam is spatially formatted to a square aperture with pre-compensation for the nonuniform gain profile of the main laser. The input sensor package is used to align the output of each PAM to the main laser and acquire energy, power, and spatial profiles for all shots. The beam transport sections split the beam from each PAM into four main laser beams (with optical isolation) forming the 192 beams of the NIF. Optical, electrical, and mechanical design considerations for long term reliability and availability will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. On-shot laser beam diagnostics for high-power laser facility with phase modulation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X.; Veetil, S. P.; Liu, C.; Tao, H.; Jiang, Y.; Lin, Q.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.

    2016-05-01

    A coherent-modulation-imaging-based (CMI) algorithm has been employed for on-shot laser beam diagnostics in high-power laser facilities, where high-intensity short-pulsed lasers from terawatt to petawatt are designed to realize inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A single-shot intensity measurement is sufficient for wave-front reconstruction, both for the near-field and far-field at the same time. The iterative reconstruction process is computationally very efficient and was completed in dozens of seconds by the additional use of a GPU device to speed it up. The compact measurement unit—including a CCD and a piece of pre-characterized phase plate—makes it convenient for focal-spot intensity prediction in the target chamber. It can be placed almost anywhere in high-power laser facilities to achieve near-field wave-front diagnostics. The feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by conducting a series of experiments with diagnostic beams and seed pulses with deactivated amplifiers in our high-power laser system.

  5. Pulsed laser facilities operating from UV to IR at the Gas Laser Lab of the Lebedev Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, Andrei; Kholin, Igor; Vasil'Ev, Boris; Zvorykin, Vladimir

    2003-05-01

    Pulsed laser facilities developed at the Gas Lasers Lab of the Lebedev Physics Institute and their applications for different laser-matter interactions are discussed. The lasers operating from UV to mid-IR spectral region are as follows: e-beam pumped KrF laser (λ= 0.248 μm) with output energy 100 J; e-beam sustained discharge CO2(10.6 μm) and fundamental band CO (5-6 μm) lasers with output energy up to ~1 kJ; overtone CO laser (2.5-4.2 μm) with output energy ~ 50 J and N2O laser (10.9 μm) with output energy of 100 J; optically pumped NH3 laser (11-14 μm). Special attention is paid to an e-beam sustained discharge Ar-Xe laser (1.73 μm ~ 100 J) as a potential candidate for a laser-propulsion facility. The high energy laser facilities are used for interaction of laser radiation with polymer materials, metals, graphite, rocks, etc.

  6. Laser-based characterization and decontamination of contaminated facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.; Hunter, B.V.; Grace, J.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Leidich, H.F.; Kugler, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    This study examines the application of laser ablation to the characterization and decontamination of painted and unpainted concrete and metal surfaces that are typical of many facilities within the US Department of Energy complex. The utility of this promising technology is reviewed and the essential requirements for efficient ablation extracted. Recent data obtained on the ablation of painted steel surfaces and concrete are presented. The affects of beam irradiance, ablation speed and efficiency, and characteristics of the aerosol effluent are discussed. Characterization of the ablated components of the surface offers the ability of concurrent determination of the level of contamination. This concept can be applied online where the ablation endpoint can be determined. A conceptual system for the characterization and decontamination of surfaces is proposed.

  7. Ramp-wave compression experiment with direct laser illumination on Shen Guang III prototype Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Tao; Optical Team Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ramp-wave compression (RWC) experiment to balance the high compression pressure generation in aluminum and x-ray blanking effect in transparent window was demonstrated on Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility. A new target concept was proposed to develop a laser-driven shocks-RWC technique for studying material behavior under dynamic, high pressure conditions. As the ``little shocks'' in our experiment cannot be avoided, the effort to diminish the shock under a special level has been demonstrated with Al/Au/Al/LiF target. The highest pressure is about 500GPa after using the multilayer target design Al/Au/Al/LiF and about 1013W/cm2 laser pulse incident on the planer Al target, instantaneously affecting ablation layer located 500 μm away. As the x-ray generated by Al layer had been prevented by the Au layer, the width abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam (λ = 532 nm) in LiF window may be the limitation for this kind if RWC experiment during the experiment time scale for 30 μm thick step. With the design laser shape and target structure of Al/Au/Al/LiF, 500GPa may be the highest pressure after balance the preheat effect and ablation efficiency for laser direct-drive experiment.

  8. Plasma interpenetration study on the Omega laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Sebastien; Divol, Laurent; Ross, Steven; Wilks, Scott; Amendt, Peter; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Huser, Gael; Moody, John; MacKinnon, Andy; Meezan, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The Near Vacuum Campaign on the National Ignition Facility has sparked an interest on the nature of the gold/carbon interface at high velocity, high electron temperature, low-electron density. Indeed radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been unable to accurately reproduce the experimental shape of the hot spot resulting from implosion driven in Near Vacuum Holhraum. The experimental data are suggesting that the inner beams are freely propagating to the waist of the hohlraum when simulations predict that a density ridge at the gold/carbon interface blocks the inner beams. The discrepancy between experimental data and simulation might be explained by the fluid description of the plasma interface in a rad-hydro code which is probably not valid in when two plasma at high velocity, high temperature are meeting. To test our assumption, we went to the Omega laser facility to study gold/carbon interface in the relevant regime. Time resolved images of the self-emission as well as Thomson scattering data will be presented. For the first time, a transition from a multifluid to a single fluid is observed as plasmas are interacting. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. A central tower solar test facility /RM/CTSTF/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, S.; Gislon, R.

    The considered facility is intended for the conduction of test work in connection with studies of receivers, thermodynamic cycles, heliostats, components, and subassemblies. Major components of the test facility include a mirror field with a reflecting surface of 800 sq m, a 40 m tower, an electronic control system, a data-acquisition system, and a meteorological station. A preliminary experimental program is discussed, taking into account investigations related to facility characterization, an evaluation of advanced low-cost heliostats, materials and components tests, high-concentration photovoltaic experiments, and a study of advanced solar thermal cycles.

  10. Cleanliness improvements of NIF (National Ignition Facility) amplifiers as compared to previous large-scale lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, J

    2004-06-09

    Prior to the recent commissioning of the first NIF (National Ignition Facility) beamline, full-scale laser-amplifier-glass cleanliness experiments were performed. Aerosol measurements and obscuration data acquired using a modified flatbed scanner compare favorably to historical large-scale lasers and indicate that NIF is the cleanest large-scale laser built to date.

  11. The design and licensing status of the Central Interstate Compact facility: An above-grade LLRW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, J.E.; Sabbe, M.A.; Schulman, R.F.; DeOld, J.H.

    1997-07-01

    The Central Interstate Compact (CIC) low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facility being developed near Butte, Nebraska, is scheduled to be the first operational commercial above-grade LLRW disposal facility in the United States. The facility will dispose of LLRW generated by nuclear power plants, industrial facilities, hospitals, and universities from the CIC member states of Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The CIC Commission has contracted with US Ecology and its prime subcontractor, Bechtel National Inc., to develop this LLRW disposal facility. The facility is being sited, designed, constructed, operated, closed, and monitored in accordance with Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality Title 194, which is similar to 10 CFR 61 but has some additional requirements that are specific to the State of Nebraska. One of these is that Nebraska regulations specifically exclude the use of traditional shallow-land burial as practiced prior to 1979. The facility will use above-grade earth-mounded concrete structures for disposal of the LLRW. An environmental report (ER) has been prepared that follows the guidance contained in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 4.18. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) has been prepared that conforms to the guidance contained in NUREG 1199, Both the SAR and the ER were submitted in July 1990. Present plans calls for the facility to be operational approximately 2 years after receipt of the license.

  12. Neutron imaging with the short-pulse laser driven neutron source at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guler, N.; Volegov, P.; Favalli, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Falk, K.; Jung, D.; Tybo, J. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Croft, S.; Danly, C.; Deppert, O.; Devlin, M.; Fernandez, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, D.; Johnson, R. P.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Shimada, T.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Taddeucci, T.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Roth, M.

    2016-10-01

    Emerging approaches to short-pulse laser-driven neutron production offer a possible gateway to compact, low cost, and intense broad spectrum sources for a wide variety of applications. They are based on energetic ions, driven by an intense short-pulse laser, interacting with a converter material to produce neutrons via breakup and nuclear reactions. Recent experiments performed with the high-contrast laser at the Trident laser facility of Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated a laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism operating in the regime of relativistic transparency, featuring a volumetric laser-plasma interaction. This mechanism is distinct from previously studied ones that accelerate ions at the laser-target surface. The Trident experiments produced an intense beam of deuterons with an energy distribution extending above 100 MeV. This deuteron beam, when directed at a beryllium converter, produces a forward-directed neutron beam with ˜5 × 109 n/sr, in a single laser shot, primarily due to deuteron breakup. The neutron beam has a pulse duration on the order of a few nanoseconds with an energy distribution extending from a few hundreds of keV to almost 80 MeV. For the experiments on neutron-source spot-size measurements, our gated neutron imager was setup to select neutrons in the energy range of 2.5-35 MeV. The spot size of neutron emission at the converter was measured by two different imaging techniques, using a knife-edge and a penumbral aperture, in two different experimental campaigns. The neutron-source spot size is measured ˜1 mm for both experiments. The measurements and analysis reported here give a spatial characterization for this type of neutron source for the first time. In addition, the forward modeling performed provides an empirical estimate of the spatial characteristics of the deuteron ion-beam. These experimental observations, taken together, provide essential yet unique data to benchmark and verify theoretical work into the

  13. LLE 1998 annual report, October 1997--September 1998. Inertial fusion program and National Laser Users` Facility program

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), the operation of the National Laser Users` Facility (NLUF), and programs involving the education of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students for FY98. Research summaries cover: progress in laser fusion; diagnostic development; laser and optical technology; and advanced technology for laser targets.

  14. Electromagnetic Pulses Generated From Laser Target Interactions at Shenguang II Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinwen; Li, Tingshuai; Yi, Tao; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Ming; Yang, Weiming; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-10-01

    Significant electromagnetic pulses (EMP) can be generated by the intensive laser irradiating solid targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). To evaluate the EMP intensity and distribution in and outside the laser chamber, we designed and fabricated a discone antenna with ultra-wide bands of over 10 GHz. The return loss (S11 parameter) of this antenna was below -10 dB and could even achieve under -30 dB at 3.1 GHz. The EMP intensity in this study at 80 cm and 40 cm away from the target chamber center (TCC) reached 400 kV/m and 2000 kV/m. The current results are expected to offer preliminary information to study physics regarding laser plasma interactions and will also lay experimental foundation for EMI shielding design to protect various diagnostics. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. ZYGX2015J108) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575166 and 51581140)

  15. Optics clustered to output unique solutions: A multi-laser facility for combined single molecule and ensemble microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David T.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Coles, Benjamin C.; Needham, Sarah R.; Roberts, Selene K.; Rolfe, Daniel J.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Ward, Andrew D.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Yadav, Rahul; Zanetti-Domingues, Laura; Martin-Fernandez, Marisa L.

    2011-09-01

    Optics clustered to output unique solutions (OCTOPUS) is a microscopy platform that combines single molecule and ensemble imaging methodologies. A novel aspect of OCTOPUS is its laser excitation system, which consists of a central core of interlocked continuous wave and pulsed laser sources, launched into optical fibres and linked via laser combiners. Fibres are plugged into wall-mounted patch panels that reach microscopy end-stations in adjacent rooms. This allows multiple tailor-made combinations of laser colours and time characteristics to be shared by different end-stations minimising the need for laser duplications. This setup brings significant benefits in terms of cost effectiveness, ease of operation, and user safety. The modular nature of OCTOPUS also facilitates the addition of new techniques as required, allowing the use of existing lasers in new microscopes while retaining the ability to run the established parts of the facility. To date, techniques interlinked are multi-photon/multicolour confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging for several modalities of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and time-resolved anisotropy, total internal reflection fluorescence, single molecule imaging of single pair FRET, single molecule fluorescence polarisation, particle tracking, and optical tweezers. Here, we use a well-studied system, the epidermal growth factor receptor network, to illustrate how OCTOPUS can aid in the investigation of complex biological phenomena.

  16. Engineering design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial-confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W W; Godwin, R O; Hurley, C A; Wallerstein, E. P.; Whitham, K.; Murray, J. E.; Bliss, E. S.; Ozarski, R. G.; Summers, M. A.; Rienecker, F.; Gritton, D. G.; Holloway, F. W.; Suski, G. J.; Severyn, J. R.

    1982-01-25

    The design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is placed upon design-to-performance requirements as they impact the various subsystems that comprise this complex experimental facility.

  17. Structural biology at the European X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Altarelli, Massimo; Mancuso, Adrian P

    2014-07-17

    The European X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility, under construction in the Hamburg region, will provide high-peak brilliance (greater than 10(33) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) per 0.1% BW), ultrashort pulses (approx. 10 fs) of X-rays, with a high repetition rate (up to 27 000 pulses s(-1)) from 2016 onwards. The main features of this exceptional X-ray source, and the instrumentation developments necessary to exploit them fully, for application to a variety of scientific disciplines, are briefly summarized. In the case of structural biology, that has a central role in the scientific case of this new facility, the instruments and ancillary laboratories that are being planned and built within the baseline programme of the European XFEL and by consortia of users are also discussed. It is expected that the unique features of the source and the advanced features of the instrumentation will allow operation modes with more efficient use of sample materials, faster acquisition times, and conditions better approaching feasibility of single molecule imaging.

  18. Laser-based optical facility for determination of refractive index of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samedov, F.

    2006-02-01

    Refractive index knowledge is an important parameter when physical properties of liquids are investigated. For the easy and fast determination of refractive index of liquids, we established a computer-controlled optical facility in National Metrology Institute of Turkey, based on laser beam deviation technique. Basic components of the established facility are stabilized laser sources, temperature-controlled rectangular cells, servomotor-controlled knife edges and trap detectors. The facility was used to measure the refractive index of four liquids; pure water, acetone, methanol and n-propyl alcohol. Temperature and dispersion characterizations of each liquid were also investigated and are presented in this paper.

  19. The Four-Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO VLT Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenberg, W.; Bonaccini Calia, D.; Lewis, S.; Holzlohner, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Dupuy, C.; Guidolin, I. M.; Kern, L.; Quattri, M.; Quentin, J.; Ridings, R.; Argomedo, J.; Arsenault, R.; Conzelmann, R.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Downing, M.; Duchateau, M.; Hubin, N.; Igl, G.; Jochum, L.; Jolley, P.; Jost, A.; Kiekebusch, M.; Kolb, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Lizon, J.-L.; Le Louarn, M.; Madec, P.-Y.; Manescau, A.; Paufique, J.; Pirard, J.-F.; Reyes, J.; Silber, A.; Soenke, C.; Stroebele, S.; Stuik, R.; Tordo, S.; Vernet, E.; Collazos, R. Guzman

    2011-09-01

    The 4LGSF is to be installed as a subsystem of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4) of the VLT, to provide the AO systems GALACSI/MUSE and GRAAL/HAWK-I with four sodium laser guide stars. The 4LGSF will deploy four modular LGS Units at the UT4 Centrepiece. Two key aspects of the 4LGSF design are: (i) new industrial laser source (fibre lasers) with reduced volume, reduced need of maintenance, higher reliability, simpler operation and optimised spectral format for highly efficient sodium excitation, (ii) modular structure of the four LGS Units, composed of the laser and laser launch telescope, capable to operate independently of the others. The final design of the 4LGSF is now complete and the project has entered the manufacturing, assembly, integration and test phase. Furthermore, modular LGS units containing the laser emitter integrated on the launch telescope have already been demonstrated at ESO in the past years, and results will be presented. We believe that having the laser sources as an integral part of a modular unit together with the launching system offers many advantages at the system level, including the avoidance of beam relays, retaining the flexibility to use as many LGS as required independently, and the possibility of building redundancy into the system. We believe that many of these 4LGSF concepts can serve for ELT multi-LGS-assisted adaptive telescope designs and provide a valuable experience in advance of the E-ELT.

  20. Upgrade of the A0 photoinjector laser system for NML accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P., III; Santucci, J.K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The current Fermilab A0 Photoinjector laser system includes a seed laser, a flashlamp pumped multipass amplifier cavity, a flashlamp pumped 2-pass amplifier system followed by an Infra-Red (IR) to Ultra-Violet (UV) conversion stage. However the current system can only deliver up to 800 pulses due to the low efficiency of Nd:Glass used inside multi-pass cavity. In this paper we will report the effort to develop a new multi pass cavity based on Nd:YLF crystal end-pumped by diode laser. We will also discuss the foreseen design of the laser system for the NML accelerator test facility at Fermilab.

  1. Investigation into the electromagnetic impulses from long-pulse laser illuminating solid targets inside a laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Yang, Jinwen; Yang, Ming; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Weiming; Li, Tingshuai; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Xiao, Shaoqiu

    2016-09-01

    Emission of the electromagnetic pulses (EMP) due to laser-target interaction in laser facility had been evaluated using a cone antenna in this work. The microwave in frequencies ranging from several hundreds of MHz to 2 GHz was recorded when long-pulse lasers with several thousands of joules illuminated the solid targets, meanwhile the voltage signals from 1 V to 4 V were captured as functions of laser energy and backlight laser, where the corresponding electric field strengths were obtained by simulating the cone antenna in combination with conducting a mathematical process (Tiknohov Regularization with L curve). All the typical coupled voltage oscillations displayed multiple peaks and had duration of up to 80 ns before decaying into noise and mechanisms of the EMP generation was schematically interpreted in basis of the practical measuring environments. The resultant data were expected to offer basic know-how to achieve inertial confinement fusion.

  2. Economic analysis of a centralized LLRW storage facility in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Spath, J.P.; Voelk, H.; Brodie, H.

    1994-12-31

    In response to the possibility of no longer having access to out-of-State disposal facilities, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority) was directed by the New York State Legislature (1990-91 State Operation Budget Appropriations) to conduct a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) storage study. One of the objectives of this study was to investigate the economic viability of establishing a separate Centralized Storage Facility for Class A LLRW from medical and academic institutions. This resulted in the conceptual design of a nominal Centralized Storage Facility capable of storing 100,000 cubic feet of dry-solid and liquid wastes and freezer storage capacity of 20,000 cubic feet for biological wastes. The facility itself includes office and laboratory space as well as receipt, inspection, and health physics monitoring stations. The Conceptual Design was initially developed to define the scope and detail of the cost parameters to be evaluated. It established a basis for conducting comparisons of the cost of four alternative project approaches and the sensitivity of unit storage costs to siting-related costs. In estimating costs of a Centralized Storage Facility, four cases were used varying assumptions with respect to parameters such as volume projections and freezer capacity; siting costs; and site acquisition costs.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment: Central Issue Facility at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    United States Geological Survey UST Underground storage tank UXO Unexploded ordnance VOC Volatile organic carbon Final...Tons per year TSP Total suspended particulate U.S. United States USACE United States Army Corps of Engineers Final EA for the Central Issue...Facility May 2013 Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst ii USAR United States Army Reserve USEPA United States Environmental Protection

  4. Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Stanley

    2011-02-01

    This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

  5. Simultaneous Spectral Albedo Measurements Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM SGP) Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph J.; Min, Qilong; Barnard, James C.; Marchand, Roger T.; Pilewskie, Peter

    2003-04-30

    In this study, a data analysis is performed to determine the area-averaged, spectral albedo at ARM's SGP central facility site. The spectral albedo is then fed into radiation transfer models to show that the diffuse discrepancy is diminished when the spectral albedo is used (as opposed to using the broadband albedo).

  6. Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser The Heart of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, D F; Erbert, G V

    2003-12-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a world-class laser fusion machine that is currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The 192 laser beams that converge on the target at the output of the NIF laser system originate from a low power fiber laser in the Master Oscillator Room (MOR). The MOR is responsible for generating the single pulse that seeds the entire NIF laser system. This single pulse is phase-modulated to add bandwidth, and then amplified and split into 48 separate beam lines all in single-mode polarizing fiber. Before leaving the MOR, each of the 48 output beams are temporally sculpted into high contrast shapes using Arbitrary Waveform Generators. The 48 output beams of the MOR are amplified in the Preamplifier Modules (PAMs), split and amplified again to generate 192 laser beams. The 192 laser beams are frequency converted to the third harmonic and then focused at the center of a 10-meter diameter target chamber. The MOR is an all fiber-based system utilizing highly reliable Telecom-Industry type hardware. The nearly 2,000,000 joules of energy at the output of the NIF laser system starts from a single fiber oscillator that fits in the palm of your hand. This paper describes the design and performance of the laser source that provides the precision light to the National Ignition Facility. Shown below is a simplified diagram illustrating the MOR's basic functions.

  7. Highly mobile laser ranging facilities of the Crustal Dynamics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Technical specifications, performance, and applications of the NASA transportable laser ranging systems (TLRS-1 and -2) for use in the Crustal Dynamics Program are described. TLRS-1 is truck-mounted, with the laser deployed through the roof. Interacting with the LAGEOS satellite, TLRS has a photoelectric receiver for gathering data on the roundtrip time of the laser beam for calculations of the range gate. The laser has a 0.1 nsec pulse at 3.5 mJ/pulse. Range is measured to within an error of 9 cm. The TLRS-2 version is configured for ease of air transport and modular breakdown and assembly. It has been activated on Easter Island. TLRS-3 and -4 are in development to serve as mobile units in South America and the Mediterranean area.

  8. Solar Cogeneration Facility: Cimarron River Station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A site-specific conceptual design and evaluation of a solar central receiver system integrated with an existing cogeneration facility are described. The system generates electricity and delivers a portion of that electricity and process steam to a natural gas processing plant. Early in the project, tradeoff studies were performed to establish key system characteristics. As a result of these studies the use of energy storage was eliminated, the size of the solar facility was established at 37.13 MW (sub t), and other site-specific features were selected. The conceptual design addressed critical components and system interfaces. The result is a hybrid solar/fossil central receiver facility which utilizes a collector system of Department of Energy second generation heliostats.

  9. "Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    King, J J

    2010-12-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential

  10. High-energy Nd:glass laser facility for collisionless laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, C.; Constantin, C. G.; Schaeffer, D. B.; Tauschwitz, A.; Weiland, T.; Lucky, Z.; Gekelman, W.; Everson, E. T.; Winske, D.

    2012-03-01

    A kilojoule-class laser (Raptor) has recently been activated at the Phoenix-laser-facility at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) for an experimental program on laboratory astrophysics in conjunction with the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The unique combination of a high-energy laser system and the 18 meter long, highly-magnetized but current-free plasma will support a new class of plasma physics experiments, including the first laboratory simulations of quasi-parallel collisionless shocks, experiments on magnetic reconnection, or advanced laser-based diagnostics of basic plasmas. Here we present the parameter space accessible with this new instrument, results from a laser-driven magnetic piston experiment at reduced power, and a detailed description of the laser system and its performance.

  11. A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, David D.; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Hsu, Albert H.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Mares, Danielle; Oertel, John A.; Oades, Kevin; Kemshall, Paul; Thomas, Philip; Young, Trevor; Pederson, Neal

    2012-08-08

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  12. A new gated x-ray detector for the Orion laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David D.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Thomas; Fatherley, Valerie; Hsu, Albert; Jorgenson, Justin; Mares, Danielle; Oertel, John; Oades, Kevin; Kemshall, Paul; Thomas, Phillip; Young, Trevor; Pederson, Neal

    2012-10-01

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  13. Overview of laser systems for the Orion facility at the AWE.

    PubMed

    Hopps, Nicholas; Danson, Colin; Duffield, Stuart; Egan, David; Elsmere, Stephen; Girling, Mark; Harvey, Ewan; Hillier, David; Norman, Michael; Parker, Stefan; Treadwell, Paul; Winter, David; Bett, Thomas

    2013-05-20

    The commissioning of the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the UK has recently been completed. The facility is a twelve beam Nd:glass-based system for studying high energy density physics. It consists of ten frequency-tripled beam-lines operating with nanosecond pulses, synchronized with two beam-lines with subpicosecond pulses, each capable of delivering 500 J to target. One of the short pulse beams has the option of frequency doubling, at reduced aperture, to yield up to 100 J at 527 nm in a subpicosecond pulse with high temporal contrast. An extensive array of target diagnostics is provided. This article describes the laser design and commissioning and presents key performance data of the facility's laser systems.

  14. Exploration of the yield-ratio method at Shenguang II laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zongqing; Chen, Jiabin; Ding, Yongkun; Chen, Ming; Pu, Yikang

    2006-07-01

    In inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with the primary-neutron yield as low as 107, the method of yield ratio is proposed to diagnose the areal density ⟨ρR⟩ at Shenguang II laser facility. Considering the detection efficiency and the time response, a new detector for detecting the secondary-neutron signal is developed, which locates 50cm away from the target. According to Monte Carlo N-particle simulation, 5-cm-thick lead shield was placed in front of the detector to shield x rays. In the 2004 experiments, the highest primary-neutron yield is 3.18×106, which is an order lower than expected. Inspite of this fact, a secondary-neutron signal is measured for the first time at the Shenguang II laser facility, which proves the method's feasibility. The method will be used in the experiments at the prototype of Shenguang III laser facility.

  15. Laser Tracker Test Facility at SLAC - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, G.L.; Ruland, R.E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-22

    Physics experiments at SLAC require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser Tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. In order to improve and get a better understanding of laser tracker measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory with a rotary calibration table (Kugler GmbH) providing an accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. This paper gives an overview of the calibration table and its evaluation. Results of tests on two of our Laser Trackers utilizing the new rotary table as well as the SLAC interferometer bench are presented.

  16. 3w Transmitted Beam Diagnostic at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Piston, K; Knight, R; Alvarez, S; Griffith, R; Hargrove, D; Ross, J S; Dixit, S; Pollock, B; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Armstrong, W; Bahr, R; Thorp, K; Pien, G

    2006-04-24

    A 3{omega} transmitted beam diagnostic has been commissioned on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester [Soures et.al., Laser Part. Beams 11 (1993)]. Transmitted light from one beam is collected by a large focusing mirror and directed onto a diagnostic platform. The near field of the transmitted light is imaged; the system collects information from twice the original f-cone of the beam. Two gated optical cameras capture the near field image of the transmitted light. Thirteen spatial positions around the measurement region are temporally resolved using fast photodiodes to allow a measure of the beam spray evolution. The Forward stimulated Raman scattering and forward simulated Brillion scattering are spectrally and temporally resolved at 5 independent locations within twice the original f-cone. The total transmitted energy is measured in two spectral bands ({delta}{lambda} < 400 nm and {delta}{lambda} > 400 nm).

  17. Assessment and Mitigation of Radiation, EMP, Debris & Shrapnel Impacts at Megajoule-Class Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Eder, D C; Anderson, R W; Bailey, D S; Bell, P; Benson, D J; Bertozzi, A L; Bittle, W; Bradley, D; Brown, C G; Clancy, T J; Chen, H; Chevalier, J M; Combis, P; Dauffy, L; Debonnel, C S; Eckart, M J; Fisher, A C; Geille, A; Glebov, V Y; Holder, J; Jadaud, J P; Jones, O; Kaiser, T B; Kalantar, D; Khater, H; Kimbrough, J; Koniges, A E; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Masters, N D; MacPhee, A; Maddox, B R; Meyers, M; Osher, S; Prasad, R; Raffestin, D; Raimbourg, J; Rekow, V; Sangster, C; Song, P; Stoeckl, C; Stowell, M L; Teran, J M; Throop, A; Tommasini, R; Vierne, J; White, D; Whitman, P

    2009-10-05

    The generation of neutron/gamma radiation, electromagnetic pulses (EMP), debris and shrapnel at mega-Joule class laser facilities (NIF and LMJ) impacts experiments conducted at these facilities. The complex 3D numerical codes used to assess these impacts range from an established code that required minor modifications (MCNP - calculates neutron and gamma radiation levels in complex geometries), through a code that required significant modifications to treat new phenomena (EMSolve - calculates EMP from electrons escaping from laser targets), to a new code, ALE-AMR, that is being developed through a joint collaboration between LLNL, CEA, and UC (UCSD, UCLA, and LBL) for debris and shrapnel modelling.

  18. Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-airplane lasercom experiment: Airplane considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Ford

    1990-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of various airplanes for a Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-Airplane laser communications experiment. As supporting documentation, pertinent technical details are included about the potential use of airplanes located at Ames Research Center and Wallops Flight Facility. The effects and application of orbital mechanics considerations are also presented, including slant range, azimuth, elevation, and time. The pros and cons of an airplane equipped with a side port with a bubble window versus a top port with a dome are discussed.

  19. Study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas at future ELI-NP facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Anzalone, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Lamia, L.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Negoita, F.; Odorici, F.; Petrascu, H.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this contribution we will present the future activities that our collaboration will carry out at ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics), the new multi peta-watt Laser facility, currently under construction at Bucharest (Romania). The activities concerns the study of nuclear reactions in laser plasmas. In this framework we proposed the construction of a new, general-purpose experimental set-up able to detect and identify neutrons and charged particles.

  20. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M.

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse.

  1. Feasibility Study for a Remote Terminal Central Computing Facility Serving School and College Institutions. Volume I, Functional Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., White Plains, NY.

    The economic and technical feasibility of providing a remote terminal central computing facility to serve a group of 25-75 secondary schools and colleges was investigated. The general functions of a central facility for an educational cluster were defined to include training in computer techniques, the solution of student development problems in…

  2. Neutron Induced D Breakup in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Schroder, W. U.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution neutron spectroscopy is used to study the deuteron breakup reaction D(n,n ') np in the thermonuclear environment created in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the Omega Laser Facility. Neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV generated in the primary D-T fusion reactions scatter elastically and inelastically off the dense (cryogenic) D-T fuel assembly surrounding the central hot spot at peak fuel compression. These neutrons also induce a breakup of the fuel deuterons. The corresponding breakup cross section is measured relative to elastic n -D and n -T scattering, i.e., simultaneously in the same environment. Apart from astrophysical and technological interest, the neutron-induced deuteron breakup reaction is of interest to the physics of nucleon -nucleon forces. For example, theoretical calculations predict a noticeable influence of nucleonic three-body forces on the magnitude of the breakup cross section. Preliminary results from measurements of the neutron contribution in the 2- to 6-MeV range show reasonable agreement with the published ENDL 2008.2 semi-empirical cross-section. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. CAPER as central and crucial facility to support R/D with tritium at TLK

    SciTech Connect

    Demange, D.; Fanghaenel, E.; Fischer, S.; Le, T.L.; Priester, F.; Roellig, M.; Schloesser, M.; Simon, K.H.

    2015-03-15

    The CAPER facility at TLK (Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe) originally devoted to Research/Development on tokamak exhaust processing has been significantly upgraded over the last years. Beside new programs on highly tritiated water, CAPER is presently largely used to support satellite experiments, mainly those dedicated to research on advanced analytics. Mutation from Research/Development to part of the TLK tritium infrastructure necessitated new features to be installed in order to facilitate and optimize tritiated mixtures preparation and sample filling, and to enable satellites experiments to discharge their waste gas to CAPER for clean-up. This paper presents recent CAPER mutations to become a central and key facility at TLK. (authors)

  4. Inertial fusion program and national laser users facility program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-01-01

    This is the 1994 annual report for the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The report is presented as a series of research type reports. The titles emphasize the breadth of work carried out. They are: stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts; characterization of laser-produced plasma density profiles using grid image refractometry; transport and sound waves in plasmas with light and heavy ions; three-halves-harmonic radiation from long-scale-length plasmas revisited; OMEGA upgrade status report; target imaging and backlighting diagnosis; effect of electron collisions on ion-acoustic waves and heat flow; particle-in-cell code simulations of the interaction of gaussian ultrashort laser pulses with targets of varying initial scale lengths; characterization of thick cryogenic fuel layers: compensation for the lens effect using convergent beam interferometry; compact, multijoule-output, Nd:Glass, large-aperture ring amplifier; atomic force microscopy observation of water-induced morphological changes in Y2O3 monolayer coatings; observation of longitudinal acceleration of electrons born in a high-intensity laser focus; spatial intensity nonuniformities of an OMEGA beam due to nonlinear beam propagation; calculated X-ray backlighting images of mixed imploded targets; evaluation of cosmic rays for use in the monitoring of the MEDUSA scintillator-photomultiplier diagnostic array; highly efficient second-harmonic generation of ultra-intense Nd:Glass laser pulses multiple cutoff wave numbers of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ultrafast, all-silicon light modulator; angular dependence of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in homogeneous plasma; and femtosecond excited-state dynamics of a conjugated ladder polymer.

  5. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  6. Magnetooptical Faraday and Light-Scattering Diagnostics of Laser Plasma in Leopard Laser Facility at UNR/NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Yates, K.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Yasin, E.; Wiewior, P.; Astanovitsky, A.; Chaly, O.; Kindel, J.

    2009-11-01

    Laser plasma of the solid target on Leopard Laser Facility at University of Nevada Reno was investigated using polarimetry, interferometry and laser-scattering diagnostics. 50 TW Nd:glass Leopard laser operates on 1056 nm wavelength, 10 J energy and 1ns/400 fs pulse width. Power flux on a target surface varied from 10^14 to 10^19W/cm^2 with 20 μm focus spot from off-axis parabola. The diagnostic of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser plasma was carried out using three-channel polarinterferometer with Faraday, shadow and interferogram channels. Ultrafast two-frame shadowgrams/interferograms with two probing beams with orthogonal polarizations were used for investigation of fast moving plasma phenomena (jets, ionization front propagation). Continuous 1W green DPSS-laser with external modulation was used for light scattering experiments for investigation of the late-time micro-particles generation in laser plasma with expected large charge number of the grain Z ˜ 100-1000.

  7. High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF) Enhanced Laser and Range Operations. Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-16

    energy technologies for the DoD, other government agencies, industry, and academia. HELSTF represents a national investment of approximately $800 million...in high energy laser technology . As a result of the existing laser technologies and supporting infrastructure, which have an established record of...successful and innovative laser testing, research, and development, HELSTF is an important national asset to support continued laser technologies . It is

  8. Wavefront control of high power laser beams for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E; Feldman, M; Grey, A; Koch, J; Lund, L; Sacks, R; Smith, D; Stolz, C; Van Atta, L; Winters, S; Woods, B; Zacharias, R

    1999-09-22

    The use of lasers as the driver for inertial confinement fusion and weapons physics experiments is based on their ability to produce high-energy short pulses in a beam with low divergence. Indeed, the focus ability of high quality laser beams far exceeds alternate technologies and is a major factor in the rationale for building high power lasers for such applications. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large, 192-beam, high-power laser facility under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for fusion and weapons physics experiments. Its uncorrected minimum focal spot size is limited by laser system aberrations. The NIF includes a Wavefront Control System to correct these aberrations to yield a focal spot small enough for its applications. Sources of aberrations to be corrected include prompt pump-induced distortions in the laser amplifiers, previous-shot thermal distortions, beam off-axis effects, and gravity, mounting, and coating-induced optic distortions. Aberrations from gas density variations and optic manufacturing figure errors are also partially corrected. This paper provides an overview of the NIF Wavefront Control System and describes the target spot size performance improvement it affords. It describes provisions made to accommodate the NIF's high fluence (laser beam and flashlamp), large wavefront correction range, wavefront temporal bandwidth, temperature and humidity variations, cleanliness requirements, and exception handling requirements (e.g. wavefront out-of-limits conditions).

  9. The National Ignition Facility: the World's Largest Optics and Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I; Campbell, J H; Stolz, C J; Wuest, C R

    2003-01-27

    The National Ignition Facility, a center for the study of high energy density plasma physics and fusion energy ignition, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The heart of the NIF is a frequency tripled, flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass laser system comprised of 192 independent laser beams. The laser system is capable of generating output energies of 1.8MJ at 351nm and at peak powers of 500 TW in a flexible temporal pulse format. A description of the NIF laser system and its major components is presented. We also discuss the manufacture of nearly 7500 precision large optics required by the NIF including data on the manufactured optical quality vs. specification. In addition, we present results from an on-going program to improve the operational lifetime of optics exposed to high fluence in the 351-nm section of the laser.

  10. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  11. Central nervous system malformations in relation to two polyvinyl chloride production facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenman, K.D.; Rizzo, J.E.; Conomos, M.G.; Halpin, G.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A modified case-control study was conducted for selected birth defects that occurred among residents who lived in areas that surrounded two vinyl chloride polymerization facilities in New Jersey. Odds ratios for central nervous system defects (ICD 9, 740-742) decreased as the distance the mothers' residences were located from the facilities increased. Higher odds ratios for central nervous system birth defects were found in the areas around the plant that had higher vinyl chloride emissions. None of the odds ratios, however, were statistically significant. The differences in concentrations of emissions from the different plants may contribute to the discrepancies reported in previous studies wherein the risk of environmental exposure to vinyl chloride was assessed.

  12. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mike

    2014-09-01

    This renewal application for a Recycled Water Reuse Permit is being submitted in accordance with the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.17 “Recycled Water Rules” and the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 for continuing the operation of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant located at the Idaho National Laboratory. The permit expires March 16, 2015. The permit requires a renewal application to be submitted six months prior to the expiration date of the existing permit. For the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, the renewal application must be submitted by September 16, 2014. The information in this application is consistent with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater and discussions with Idaho Department of Environmental Quality personnel.

  13. [For the history of creation of central anatomicopathological facility of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Chirskiĭ, V S; Sibirev, S A; Bushurov, S E

    2012-12-01

    The system of anatomicopathological facilities was created in 30s of XX century and first years of the Great Patriotic War. The goal of this system was to increase the effectiveness of Sanitary Corps of the Red Army. These anatomicopathological facilities analyzed causes of death of injured soldiers during all stages of the system of treatment-evacuative support of troops and mistakes made by medical specialists during first aid treatment. Organisational forms of anatomicopathological activity were changed and developed according to acquired battle experience. The main stage of formation of anatomicopathological service of the Red Army, and in fact the finished period in organisational formation of anatomicopathological service, was establishment of Central anatomicopathological facility - main methodological, organisational, coordinating and monioring center of anatomicopathological activity of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.

  14. Producing National Ignition Facility (NIF)-quality beams on the Nova and Beamlet lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Widmayer, C.C.; Auerbach, J.M.; Ehrlich, R.B.

    1996-08-01

    The Nova and Beamlet lasers were used to simulate the beam propagation conditions that will be encountered during the National Ignition Facility operation. Perturbation theory predicts that there is a 5mm scale length propagation mode that experiences large nonlinear power growth. This mode was observed in the tests. Further tests have confirmed that this mode can be suppressed with improved spatial filtering.

  15. Current status of the superconducting RF linac driver for the JAERI Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Minehara, E.J.; Sugimoto, M.; Sawamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    The commissioning of the superconducting rf linac driver for the JAERI free electron laser facility has been successfully performed at 10{approx}20 MeV before the end of the 1994 Japanese fiscal year. The performance obtained during the commissioning and current status of the JAERI FEL program at Tokai will be reported in detail.

  16. Installation of the central production facilities deck for the Mokoko-Abana Field, Cameroon

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, A.W.

    1988-05-01

    To reduce development costs at the Mokoko-Abana field, all production equipment was installed in deck units during fabrication and the equipment was precommissioned in the contractors' yards before loadout. The 5,000-ton (4500-Mg) central production facilities deck, however, exceeded lifting capabilities of available marine equipment, so a unique installation technique was developed that uses tidal changes and rapid barge ballasting to lower the completed deck onto a specially designed jacket.

  17. ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss - Central Issue Facility (CIF) Local Tariff

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-14

    Number SP0103-02-D-0018 / Delivery Order 0014 ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss Prepared for: Defense Logistics Agency March...February 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) System at Ft. Bliss - Central Issue Facility (CIF) Local Tariff 5. FUNDING...Visibility System (AAVS) and other databases over the Internet, and AdvanTech established ARN Integrated Retail Module (IRM) at Ft. Bliss, TX Page

  18. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the central shops diesel storage facility at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful cleanups. Using innovative approaches, the central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination. Effective bioremediation techniques for cleaning up of the contaminant plume were established.

  19. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Laboratory, Idaho National

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State ofldaho Division of Environmental Quality (DEQ) issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit (WLAP) for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL, now the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory [INEEL]) Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Treatment Plant (STP). The permit expires August 7, 1999. In addition to the renewal application, this report was prepared to provide the following information as requested by DEQ.

  20. Fermilab Central Computing Facility: Energy conservation report and mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstulovich, S.F.

    1986-11-12

    This report is developed as part of the Fermilab Central Computing Facility Project Title II Design Documentation Update under the provisions of DOE Document 6430.1, Chapter XIII-21, Section 14, paragraph a. As such, it concentrates primarily on HVAC mechanical systems design optimization and cost analysis and should be considered as a supplement to the Title I Design Report date March 1986 wherein energy related issues are discussed pertaining to building envelope and orientation as well as electrical systems design.

  1. Article on Trident Laser Facility for NA-11 Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris W.

    2012-08-13

    The Trident Intermediate-Scale Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an extremely versatile Nd:glass laser system dedicated to high energy density laboratory physics and weapons physics research and fundamental laser-matter interactions. Trident is a three-beam, 200 J/beam at the second harmonic for glass (527 nm wavelength), facility with tremendous flexibility and high beam quality. Pulse durations varying over 6 orders of magnitude, from 0.5 picoseconds to 1.0 microsecs, can be directed to either of two different target chambers with changeable illumination geometries, including the ability to achieve near-diffraction limited focus. This provides a unique range of capability at one facility from sub-picosecond pulses (and high-intensity laser science) to nanosecond pulses (and LPI physics relevant to ICF) to microsecond pulses (and driving flyer plates for supported shock dynamic materials science.) When in short-pulse mode (less than picosecond pulse), a single beam can provide up to 200 TW of power with uniquely controllable and measured pre-pulse contrast of 10 orders of magnitude. A recent external capability review at Los Alamos concluded that 'Trident is generating excellent, cutting edge science and is a leading intermediate scale laser system worldwide.'

  2. The Potential of Fast Ignition and Related Experiments with A Petawatt Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Cowan, T.E.; Hatchett, S.P.; Henry, E.A.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; MacKinnon, A.; Offenberger, A.A.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M. D.; Phillips, T.J.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Tsukamoto, M.; Wharton, K.B.; Wilks, S.C.

    2000-04-06

    A model of energy gain induced by fast ignition of thermonuclear burn in compressed deuterium-tritium fuel, is used to show the potential for 300x gain with a driver energy of 1 M J, if the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were to be adapted for fast ignition. The physics of fast ignition has been studied using a petawatt laser facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Laser plasma interaction in a preformed plasma on a solid target leads to relativistic self-focusing evidenced by x-ray images. Absorption of the laser radiation transfers energy to an intense source of relativistic electrons. Good conversion efficiency into a wide angular distribution is reported. Heating by the electrons in solid density CD{sub 2} produces 0.5 to 1/keV temperature, inferred from the D-D thermo-nuclear neutron yield.

  3. Progress in fast ignitor research with the Nova petawatt laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T E; Hammel , B A; Hatchett, S P; Henry, E A; Key, M H; Kilkenny, J D; Koch, J A; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lee, R W; Moody, J D; Mora, M J; Offenberger, A A; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Phillips, T J; Sangster, T C; Singh, M S; Stoyer, M A; Tabak, M; Tsukamoto, M; Wharton, K; Wilks, S C

    1998-11-10

    The physics of fast ignition is being studied using a petawatt laser facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Performance of the PW laser with deformable mirror wavefront control giving intensities up to 3x10{sup 20} Wcm{sup {minus}2} is described. Measurements of the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to relativistic electrons and of their energy spectrum and angular distribution including an observed narrow beam angle of {+-}15{degree}, are reported. Heating by the electrons to near 1keV in solid density CD{sub 2} is inferred from the thermo-nuclear neutron yield. Estimates suggest an optimized gain of 300x if the National Ignition Facility were to be adapted for fast ignition.

  4. Atomic physics of relativistic high contrast laser-produced plasmas in experiments on Leopard laser facility at UNR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Safronova, U. I.; Wiewior, P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Wilcox, P.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Chalyy, O.; Paudel, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the recent experiments focused on study of x-ray radiation from multicharged plasmas irradiated by relativistic (I > 1019 W/cm2) sub-ps laser pulses on Leopard laser facility at NTF/UNR are presented. These shots were done under different experimental conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. In particular, the duration of the laser pulse was 350 fs or 0.8 ns and the contrast was varied from high (10-7) to moderate (10-5). The thin laser targets (from 4 to 750 μm) made of a broad range of materials (from Teflon to iron and molybden to tungsten and gold) were utilized. Using the x-ray diagnostics including the high-precision spectrometer with resolution R ˜ 3000 and a survey spectrometer, we have observed unique spectral features that are illustrated in this paper. Specifically, the observed L-shell spectra for Fe targets subject to high intensity lasers (˜1019 W/cm2) indicate electron beams, while at lower intensities (˜1016 W/cm2) or for Cu targets there is much less evidence for an electron beam. In addition, K-shell Mg features with dielectronic satellites from high-Rydberg states, and the new K-shell F features with dielectronic satellites including exotic transitions from hollow ions are highlighted.

  5. Observation of central wavelength dynamics in erbium-doped fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiwen; Lei, Dajun; Wen, Shuangchun; Fu, Xiquan; Zhang, Jinggui; Shao, Yufeng; Zhang, Lifu; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Dianyuan

    2008-05-12

    We report on the observation of central wavelength dynamics in an erbium-doped fiber ring laser by using the nonlinear polarization rotating technique. The evolution of central wavelength with the laser operation state was observed experimentally. Numerical simulations confirmed the experimental observation and further demonstrated that the dynamics of wavelength evolution is due to the combined effects of fiber birefringence, fiber nonlinearity, and cavity filter.

  6. 2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  7. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements in a turbine stator cascade facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) developed for mapping the flow velocity downstream from a 32-inch diameter annular cascade of turbine stator vanes in described. The LDV measurements were taken in a plane located approximately 0.5 inch downstream of the trailing edges of the vanes. Two components of the mean velocity (axial and circumferential) were measured. The flow velocities were in the high subsonic range. The LDV optics are of the dual scatter type with off-axis collection of the scattered light. The electronics system is based on the measurement of the time interval corresponding to eight periods of the Doppler signal and has a range of 10 to 80 MHz. The LDV measurements are compared with previous measurements made with a pressure probe.

  8. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements in a turbine stator cascade facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) developed for mapping the flow velocity downstream from a 32-inch diameter annular cascade of turbine stator vanes is described. The LDV measurements were taken in a plane located approximately 0.5 inch downstream of the trailing edges of the vanes. Two components of the mean velocity (axial and circumferential) were measured. The flow velocities were in the high subsonic range. The LDV optics are of the dual scatter type with off-axis collection of the scattered light. The electronics system is based on the measurement of the time interval corresponding to eight periods of the Doppler signal and has a range of 10 to 80 MHz. The LDV measurements are compared with previous measurements made with a pressure probe.

  9. New opacity measurement principle for LMJ-PETAL laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pennec, M.; Ribeyre, X.; Ducret, J.-E.; Turck-Chièze, S.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar seismology reveals some interior properties of thousands of solar-type stars but the solar seismic sound speed stays puzzling since a decade as it disagrees with the Standard Solar Model (SSM) prediction. One of the explanations of this disagreement may be found in the treatment of the transport of radiation from the solar core to the surface. As the same framework is used for other stars, it is important to check precisely the reliability of the interacting cross sections of photons with each species in order to ensure the energy transport for temperature T > 2-106 K and density ρ > 0.2 g/cm3. In this paper, we propose a new technique to reach the domain of temperature and density found in the solar radiative interior. This technique called the Double Ablation Front (DAF) is based on a high conversion of the laser energy into X-rays thanks to moderated Z material irradiated by laser intensity between 1.5 × 1015 W/cm2 and 4 × 1015 W/cm2. This high conversion creates, in addition to the electronic front a second ablation front in the moderated Z material. Between the two fronts there is a plateau of density and temperature that we exploit to heat a sample of iron or of oxide. The first simulations realized with the hydrodynamic code CHIC show that this technique allows to reach conditions equivalent to half the radiative zone of the Sun with high stability both in time and space. We examine the possibility to measure both iron and oxygen absorption spectra.

  10. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  11. Research of target uniform illumination on SG-III laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Jia, Huaiting; Geng, Yuanchao; Li, Ping; Liu, Lanqin; Tian, Xiaocheng; Yuan, Haoyu; Fan, Chen; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-10-01

    In the research of inertial confinement fusion, laser plasma interaction (LPI) is becoming a key problem that affects ignition. Here, multi-frequency modulation (Multi-FM) smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), continuous phase plate (CPP) and polarization smoothing (PS) were experimentally studied and equipped on SG-III laser facility. After using these technologies, the focal spots of SG-III laser facility can be adjusted, controlled and repeated accurately. Experiments on SG-III laser facility indicate when the number of color cycles adopts 1, imposing SSD with 3.3 times diffraction limit (TDL) did not lead to pinhole closure in the spatial filters of the preamplifier and the main amplifier with 30-TDL pinhole size. The nonuniformity of the focal spots using Multi-FM SSD, CPP and PS drops to 0.18, comparing to 0.26 with CPP+SSD, and 0.84 with CPP and wedged lens. Polarization smoothing using flat birefringent plate in the convergent beam of final optics assembly (FOA) was studied.

  12. LMJ/PETAL laser facility: Overview and opportunities for laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Caillaud, T.; Darbon, S.; Duval, A.; Thfouin, I.; Jadaud, J. P.; LeBreton, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Rosse, B.; Rosch, R.; Blanchot, N.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Miquel, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of high-power lasers facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and Laser Megajoule (LMJ) in the near future opens a new era in the field of High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics. The LMJ, keystone of the French Simulation Program, is under construction at CEA/CESTA and will deliver 1.5 MJ with 176 beamlines. The first physics experiments on LMJ will be performed at the end of 2014 with 2 quadruplets (8 beams). The operational capabilities (number of beams and plasma diagnostics) will increase gradually during the following years. We describe the current status of the LMJ facility and the first set of diagnostics to be used during the commissioning phase and the first experiments. The PETAL project (PETawatt Aquitaine Laser), part of the CEA opening policy, consists in the addition of one short-pulse (500 fs to 10 ps) ultra-high-power, high-energy beam (a few kJ compressed energy) to the LMJ facility. PETAL is focalized into the LMJ target chamber and could be used alone or in combination with LMJ beams. In the later case, PETAL will offer a combination of a very high intensity multi-petawatt beam, synchronized with the nanosecond beams of the LMJ. PETAL, which is devoted to the academic research, will also extend the LMJ diagnostic capabilities. Specific diagnostics adapted to PETAL capacities are being fabricated in order to characterize particles and radiation yields that can be created by PETAL. A first set of diagnostics will measure the particles (protons/ions/electrons) spectrum (0.1-200 MeV range) and will also provide point projection proton-radiography capability. LMJ/PETAL, like previously the LIL laser [X. Julien et al., Proc. SPIE 7916 (2011) 791610], will be open to the academic community. Laboratory astrophysics experiments have already been performed on the LIL facility, as for example radiative shock experiments and planetary interiors equation of state measurements.

  13. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  14. Hypervelocity launching of flyers at the SG-III prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shui, Min; Chu, Genbai; Zhu, Bin; He, Weihua; Xi, Tao; Fan, Wei; Xin, Jianting; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-01-21

    Experiments of laser-driven hypervelocity flyers have been conducted at the SG-III prototype laser facility. Using the continuum phase plate technique, four laser beams each with a 3-ns quadratic profile are configured to produce relatively uniform irradiated spots of diameter size either 500 μm or 2000 μm. With the former, specifically designed multi-layered flyers (polyimide/copper) were accelerated by shock impedance and reverberation techniques via direct laser ablation to a super-high averaged velocity of 55 km/s, much faster than recently reported results. Light-emission signals of shock breakout and flyer impact on flat or stepped windows were obtained that indicated good planarity and integrity for the flyer. In the latter, single-layered aluminum flyers were gradually accelerated to a terminal velocity of 11 km/s, as measured by optical velocimetry, without melting and vaporization. The results suggest that the SG-III prototype laser facility has the capability to launch high-speed flyers to create extreme conditions for investigating the science of shock compression and its equation of state.

  15. High-Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) Facility Completed for Quantitative Laser Diagnostics Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2002-01-01

    A gas-fueled high-pressure combustion facility with optical access, which was developed over the last 2 years, has just been completed. The High Pressure Gaseous Burner (HPGB) rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center can operate at sustained pressures up to 60 atm with a variety of gaseous fuels and liquid jet fuel. The facility is unique as it is the only continuous-flow, hydrogen-capable, 60-atm rig in the world with optical access. It will provide researchers with new insights into flame conditions that simulate the environment inside the ultra-high-pressure-ratio combustion chambers of tomorrow's advanced aircraft engines. The facility provides optical access to the flame zone, enabling the calibration of nonintrusive optical diagnostics to measure chemical species and temperature. The data from the HPGB rig enables the validation of numerical codes that simulate gas turbine combustors, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC). The validation of such numerical codes is often best achieved with nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques that meet these goals: information-rich (multispecies) and quantitative while providing good spatial and time resolution. Achieving these goals is a challenge for most nonintrusive optical diagnostic techniques. Raman scattering is a technique that meets these challenges. Raman scattering occurs when intense laser light interacts with molecules to radiate light at a shifted wavelength (known as the Raman shift). This shift in wavelength is unique to each chemical species and provides a "fingerprint" of the different species present. The facility will first be used to gather a comprehensive data base of laser Raman spectra at high pressures. These calibration data will then be used to quantify future laser Raman measurements of chemical species concentration and temperature in this facility and other facilities that use Raman scattering.

  16. Development of Thomson scattering system on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tao; Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Fang; Li, Ping; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic system, using a 263 nm laser as the probe beam, is designed and implemented on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The probe beam is provided by an additional beam line completed recently. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous measurements of both ion feature and red-shifted electron feature from plasmas in a high-temperature (≥2 keV) and high-density (≥10(21) cm(-3)) regime. Delicate design is made to satisfy the requirements for successful detection of the electron feature. High-quality ion feature spectra have already been diagnosed via this system in recent experiments with gas-filled hohlraums.

  17. Laser beam smoothing and backscatter saturation processes in plasmas relevant to National Ignition Facility hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R L; Cohen, B I; Decker, C D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Hinkel, D E; Kirkwood, R K; Langdon, A B; Lefebvre, E; MacGowan, B J; Moody, J D; Rothenberg, J E; Rousseuax, C; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1998-10-01

    We have used gas-filled targets irradiated at the Nova laser to simulate National Ignition Facility (NlF) hohlraum plasmas and to study the dependence of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) Scattering on beam smoothing at a range of laser intensities (3{omega}, 2 - 4 10{sup 15}Wcm{sup -2}) and plasma conditions. We have demonstrated the effectiveness of polarization smoothing as a potential upgrade to the NIF. Experiments with higher intensities and higher densities characteristic of 350eV hohlraum designs indicate that with appropriate beam smoothing the backscatter from such hohlraums may be tolerable.

  18. Wastewater Land Application Permit LA-000141 Renewal Information for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    On July 25, 1994, the State of ldaho Division of Environmental Quality issued a Wastewater Land Application Permit, #LA-000141-01, for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant. The permit expires August 7, 1999. This report is being submitted with the renewal application and specifically addresses; Wastewater flow; Wastewater characteristics; Impacts to vegetation in irrigation area; Impacts to soil in irrigation area; Evaluation of groundwater monitoring wells for Wastewater Land Application Permit purposes; Summary of trends observed during the 5-year reporting period; and Projection of changes and new processes.

  19. Response to Comment on "The National Ignition Facility Laser Performance Status"

    SciTech Connect

    Haynam, C A; Sacks, R A; Moses, E I; Manes, K; Haan, S; Spaeth, M L

    2007-12-11

    We appreciate Stephen Bodner's continuing interest in the performance of the NIF laser system. However, we find it necessary to disagree with the conclusions he reached in his comments [Appl. Opt. 47, XXX (2008)] on 'National Ignition Facility Laser Performance Status' [Appl. Opt. 46, 3276 (2007)]. In fact, repeated and ongoing tests of the NIF beamlines have demonstrated that NIF can be expected not only to meet or exceed its requirements as established in the mid-1990s in the document National Ignition Facility Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria [Revision 1.3, Report NIF-LLNL-93-058 (1994)], but also to have the flexibility that provides for successfully meeting an ever expanding range of mission goals, including those of ignition.

  20. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) for the dismantlement of nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallada, Marc R.; Seiffert, Stephan L.; Walter, Robert F.; Vetrovec, John

    2000-05-01

    The dismantlement of obsolete nuclear facilities is a major challenge for both the US Department of Energy and nuclear power utilities. Recent demonstrations have shown that lasers can be highly effective for size reduction cutting, especially for the efficient storage and recycling of materials. However, the full benefits of lasers can only be realized with high average power beams that can be conveniently delivered, via fiber optics, to remote and/or confined areas. Industrial lasers that can meet these requirements are not available now or for the foreseeable future. However, a military weapon laser, a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL), which has been demonstrated at over a hundred kilo Watts, could be adapted to meet these needs and enable entirely new industrial applications. An 'industrialized' COIL would enable rapid sectioning of thick and complex structures, such as glove boxes, reactor vessels, and steam generators, accelerating dismantlement schedules and reducing worker hazards. The full advantages of lasers in dismantlement could finally be realized with a portable COIL which is integrated with sophisticated robotics. It could be built and deployed in less than two years, breaking the paradigm of labor-intensive dismantlement operations and cutting processing times and costs dramatically.

  1. Near field intensity trends of main laser alignment images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R.; Beltsar, Ilona; Burkhart, Scott; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Salmon, Thad; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-02-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years and during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or `big data' archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements. Changes in light transmission from the NIF main laser over the three year time-frame are presented.

  2. Basic features of electromagnetic pulse generated in a laser-target chamber at 3-TW laser facility PALS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, M.; Pfeifer, M.; Krousky, E.; Krasa, J.; Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Nassisi, V.

    2014-04-01

    We describe the radiofrequency emission taking place when 300 ps laser pulses irradiate various solid targets with an intensity of 1016 W/cm2. The emission of intense electromagnetic pulses was observed outside the laser target chamber by two loop antennas up to 1 GHz. Electromagnetic pulses can be 800 MHz transients, which decay from a peak electromagnetic field of E0 ≊ 7 kV/m and H0 ≊ 15 A/m. The occurrence of these electromagnetic pulses is associated with generation of hard x-rays with photon energies extending beyond 1 MeV. This contribution reports the first observation of this effect at the PALS facility.

  3. 2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

  4. 2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

  5. Wavefront correction by target-phase-locking technology in a 500 TW laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. E.; Dai, W. J.; Zhou, K. N.; Su, J. Q.; Xue, Q.; Yuan, Q.; Zhang, X.; Deng, X. W.; Yang, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Xie, N.; Sun, L.; Hu, D. X.; Zhu, Q. H.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach termed target-phase-locking that could improve the entire beam wavefront quality of a 500 TW Nd3+:phosphate glass laser facility. The thermal and static wavefront from front-end to target is corrected by using one deformable mirror that receives feedback from both the focal-spot sensor and wavefront sensor, and only the main laser of the laser system is employed in the correction process, with auxiliary calibration light no longer necessary. As a result, a static focal spot with full width at half maximum of 8.87  ×  5.74 µm is achieved, the thermal wavefront induced by flash-lamp-pumped Nd3+:phosphate glass is compensated with PV from 3.54-0.43 µm, and a dynamic focal spot with intensity exceeding 1020 W cm-2 is precisely predicted at the target with such an approach.

  6. Spatial filter lens design for the main laser of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Korniski, R. J., Optics 1 Inc, Westlake Village, CA

    1998-06-05

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), being designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), comprises 192 laser beams The lasing medium is neodymium in phosphate glass with a fundamental frequency (1{omega}) of 1 053{micro}m Sum frequency generation in a pair of conversion crystals (KDP/KD*P) will produce 1 8 megajoules of the third harmonic light (3{omega} or {lambda}=351{micro}m) at the target The purpose of this paper is to provide the lens design community with the current lens design details of the large optics in the Main Laser This paper describes the lens design configuration and design considerations of the Main Laser The Main Laser is 123 meters long and includes two spatial filters one 13 5 meters and one 60 meters These spatial filters perform crucial beam filtering and relaying functions We shall describe the significant lens design aspects of these spatial filter lenses which allow them to successfully deliver the appropriate beam characteristic onto the target For an overview of NIF please see ``Optical system design of the National Ignition Facility,`` by R Edward English. et al also found in this volume.

  7. The National Ignition Facility: Laser System, Beam Line Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, R H

    2004-01-05

    The construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) building and laser beampaths at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. This 8-year design/construction effort has successfully erected a 450,000 sq ft building and filled its interior with a complex of large-scale optical benches. These benches support all of the large-aperture optic elements of the NIF and the environmentally controlled enclosures that protect each of the 192 laser beamlines as they propagate from the injection laser system, through large aperture amplification stages, and into the target chamber. Even though this facility is very large, nearly 200 m long, 100 m wide, and 30 m tall, stringent mechanical performance requirements have been achieved throughout including temperature control <0.3 C, laser-beam pointing stability on target < 50 {micro}rms, and level 100 surface cleanliness on internal components. This presentation will provide an historical perspective explaining the basis of the design, technical details describing the techniques of construction and a chronological progression of the construction activities from ground breaking to beampath completion.

  8. Development of experimental platform for high energy density sciences using high-intensity optical lasers at the SACLA x-ray free electron laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Yabashi, Makina; Inubushi, Yuichi; Kon, Akira; Togashi, Tadashi; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu

    2016-10-01

    Combinations of high intensity optical laser and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) open new frontiers in high energy density (HED) sciences. An experimental platform equipped with high-power Ti:Sapphire laser systems is under commissioning for HED sciences at the XFEL facility, SACLA. The Ti:Sapphire laser system is designed to deliver two laser beams with a maximum power of 500 TW in each to the sample chamber. A hard x-ray beamline of SACLA is also transported to the chamber with a beam focusing capability down to a few microns using sets of compound refractive lenses. The second optical laser pulse or the energetic particles and photons generated by the laser pulse can provide additional flexibilities for HED-related pump-probe experiments, which have been generally performed using single optical laser and XFEL. The development status and future perspectives of the experimental platform will be presented.

  9. Development of a pump-probe facility combining a far-infrared source with laser-like characteristics and a VUV free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faatz, B.; Fateev, A. A.; Feldhaus, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Pflueger, J.; Rossbach, J.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2001-12-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY is a facility producing sub-picosecond electron pulses for the generation of VUV or soft X-ray radiation in a free electron laser (FEL). The same electron pulses would also allow the direct production of high-power coherent radiation by passing the electron beam through an undulator. Intense, coherent far-infrared (FIR) undulator radiation can be produced from electron bunches at wavelengths longer than or equal to the bunch length. The source described in this paper provides, in the wavelength range 50- 300 μm, a train of about 1- 10 ps long radiation pulses, with about 1 mJ of optical energy per pulse radiated into the central cone. The average output power can exceed 50 W. In this conceptual design, we intend to use a conventional electromagnetic undulator with a 60 cm period length and a maximum field of 1.5 T. The FIR source will use the spent electron beam coming from the VUV FEL which allows one to significantly extend the scientific potential of the TTF without interfering with the main option of the TTF FEL operation. The pulses of the coherent FIR radiation are naturally synchronized with the VUV pulses from the main TTF FEL, enabling pump-probe techniques using either the FEL pulse as a pump or the FIR pulse as a probe, or vice versa.

  10. Pump-probe laser development for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, Max J.; Pergament, Mikhail; Kellert, Martin; Mendez, Cruz

    2012-10-01

    The successful implementation of superconducting LINAC technology at the European XFEL will boost the time averaged X-RAY power density substantially above current values. In fact, the XFEL will operate at repetition rates of up to 4.5MHz. However, this high pulse rate occurs only during 600μs long bursts of 10Hz repetition rate, rendering up to 27000 pulses per second. Matching this peculiar burst mode operation is a requirement also for the pump-probe femtosecond laser used in experiments. There is currently no commercially available femtosecond laser technology offering this kind of output at close to mJ-level energies per pulse and sub-20fs pulse width. We will outline the scheme of the pump-probe laser currently under development at the European XFEL. The laser design is based on a noncollinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) which will be pumped by sub-picosecond pulses from a high power, frequency-doubled Yb:YAG slab amplifier, delivering up to 20kW of fundamental average power during a burst. The design aims at highest possible flexibility regarding intra-burst rep-rates and pulse energies. Also, the use of uncompressed as well as compressed NOPA pump pulses at fundamental wavelength will enhance the flexibility in experiments.

  11. Near Field Intensity Trends of Main Laser Alignment Images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Beltsar, I; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Kamm, V M; Salmon, T; Wilhelmsen, K

    2015-01-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years; during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or ‘big data’ archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics over time performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements and was used to view potential trends. Results are presented for the NIF input and output sensor package trends and changes over the three year time-frame.

  12. Development of long-duration, laser driven, cold x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. Elijah; May, M. J.; Blue, B. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Thorn, D. B.; Brown, C. G.; Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Davis, J. F.; Seiler, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental and simulation results from an x-ray source development campaign on the National Ignition Facility laser that focused on temporally and spectrally tailoring the non-equilibrium x-ray emission from laser driven Xe gas-pipe targets. The goal of this work was to create a long-duration (> 10ns) x-ray environment that emulates 1keV blackbody emission. In one experiment, we investigated the use of sequentially driven 6ns trapezoidal pulses - which deliver more optimized laser performance than equivalent single pulse configurations - to create a 13ns total emission duration. While a successful demonstration of x-ray pulse shaping control, these sources resulted in too much low-photon-energy emission along the desired line-of-sight. Several filtering schemes were explored in subsequent experiments to remove the sub- 1.5keV emission, where we commissioned a new DIM-based, 16 channel, filtered x-ray diode array, SENTINEL, to assess line-of-sight filtering effectiveness. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Broad-band soft x-ray diagnostic instruments at the LLNL Novette laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tirsell, K.G.; Lee, P.H.Y.; Nilson, D.G.; Medecki, H.

    1983-09-15

    Complementary broad-band instruments have been developed to measure time dependent, absolute soft x-ray spectra at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nd glass laser irradiation facilities. Absolute flux measurements of x rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas are important for understanding laser absorption and energy transport. We will describe two new 10-channel XRD systems that have been installed at the LLNL Novette facility for use in the 0.15- to 1.5-keV range. Since XRD channel time response is limited by available oscilloscope performance to 120 ps, a soft x-ray streak camera has been developed for better time resolution (20 ps) and greater dynamic range (approx.10/sup 3/) in the same x-ray energy region. Using suitable filters, grazing incidence mirrors, and a gold or cesium-iodide transmission cathode, this streak camera instrument has been installed at Novette to provide one broad and four relatively narrow channels. It can also be used in a single channel, spatially discriminating mode by means of pinhole imaging. The complementary nature of these instruments has been enhanced by locating them in close proximity and matching their channel energy responses. As an example of the use of these instruments, we present results from Novette 2..omega..(0.53 ..mu..m) gold disk irradiations at 1 ns and 10/sup 14/ to 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  14. High-gain test facility driven by a multimegajoule solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, H.T.; Manes, K.R.; Hogan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    An ICF high-gain test facility (HGTF) will most certainly be in demand for other applications than ICF target physics. These will include advanced weapon physics, vulnerability and nuclear effects, and x-ray laser studies. These other applications will place additional demands on driver flexibility and will extend the desirable range of some of the driver variables (e.g., the desirable pulse length range would be 0.1 to 100 ns and the wavelength range would be 0.25 to 1.0 ..mu..m). It is also likely that to utilize the driver efficiently for the variety of applications foreseen will require multiple target chambers and experiment areas. Thus, it is important that the driver beams be efficiently transported to these different experimental areas. At the present time, the only driver capable of meeting this broad set of requirements is the Nd:glass laser. It has long been believed that an Nd:glass laser with the above requirements could be built but that it would be unreasonably expensive. There is still much work to be done. However, the progress to date and the track record for lowering system cost in past solid-state facilities, leads us to be optimistic that we can achieve our goal of building an affordable HGTF that will meet all the requirements.

  15. The National Ignition Facility: laser system, beam line design, and construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Richard H.

    2004-05-01

    The construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) building and laser beampaths at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been completed. This 8-year design/construction effort has successfully erected a 450,000 sq ft building and filled its interior with a complex of large-scale optical benches. These benches support all of the largeaperture optic elements of the NIF and the environmentally controlled enclosures that protect each of the 192 laser beamlines as they propagate from the injection laser system, through large aperture amplification stages, and into the target chamber. Even though this facility is very large, nearly 200 m long, 100 m wide, and 30 m tall, stringent mechanical performance requirements have been achieved throughout including temperature control <0.3°C, laserbeam pointing stability on target <50 μrms, and level 100 surface cleanliness on internal components. This presentation will provide an historical perspective explaining the basis of the design, technical details describing the techniques of construction and a chronological progression of the construction activities from ground breaking to beampath completion.

  16. The design of a Phase I non site-specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J.; Kane, D.

    1997-10-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) recently completed a Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR) for a Phase 1 non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF). The TSAR will be used in licensing the CISF when and if a site is designated. The combined Phase 1 and Phase 2 CISF will provide federal storage capability for 40,000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) under the oversight of the DOE. The Phase 1 TSAR was submitted to the NRC on May 1, 1997 and is currently under review having been docketed on June 10, 1997. This paper generally describes the Phase 1 CISF design and its operations as presented in the CISF TSAR.

  17. Centralization of dairy farming facilities for improved economics and environmental quality.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Rokuta; Furuichi, Tohru; Komatsu, Toshihiro; Tanikawa, Noboru; Ishii, Kazuei

    2009-01-01

    In Japan, most farm animal excreta has been stored directly on farmland. Runoff from this storage has often caused water pollution. Biogasification is anticipated as an important technology to manage excreta properly, but complex problems hinder its introduction. Economic aspects of management have been especially difficult for dairy farmers. For this study, structural problems regarding introduction of biogasification into dairy farming were identified. Subsequently, a desirable system of dairy farming including biogasification was suggested, and an evaluation model of the financial balance was constructed. A case study using current financial balances of several systems of dairy farming was evaluated using the constructed model and actual data. The systems were based on several policy alternatives including the suggested system mentioned above. Results show that a farmer can obtain sufficient income from a system featuring centralization of dairy housing and biogasification facilities and coordinated management by over six farmers.

  18. Feasibility of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility, energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The thermal-economic feasibility was studied of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility designed to serve five varied industries. Generation options included one dual-fuel diesel and one gas turbine, both with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired-boiler cases, also low-sulphur coal and municipal refuse. The fired-boiler cogeneration systems employed back-pressure steam turbines. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The refuse-fired cases utilized modular incinerators. The options provided for a wide range of steam and electrical capacities. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which could be displaced was assumed sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulator Policies Act). The facility was assumed operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users. The economic analysis was predicted on currently applicable energy-investment tax credits and accelerated depreciation for a January 1985 startup date. Based on 100% equity financing, the results indicated that the best alternative was the modular-incinerator cogeneration system.

  19. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. This result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  20. Two color satellite laser ranging upgrades at Goddard's 1.2m telescope facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Mcgarry, Jan F.; Degnan, John J.; Varghese, Thomas K.

    1993-01-01

    The ranging laboratory at Goddard's 1.2 m telescope tracking facility has recently been upgraded to include a single photoelectron sensitive Hamamatsu streak camera-based range receiver which uses doubled and tripled Nd:YAG frequencies for satellite laser ranging. Other ranging system upgrades include a new continuum laser, which will deliver up to 30 millijoules (mJ) at both 532 and 355 nm at a pulsewidth of 30 picoseconds (FWHM), and replacement of both ranging and tracking computers with COMPAQ 386 based systems. Preliminary results using a photomultiplier-tube based receiver and waveform digitizer indicate agreement within the accuracy of the measurement with the theoretical Marini and Murray model for atmospheric refraction. Two color streak camera measurements are used to further analyze the accuracy of these and other atmospheric refraction models.

  1. Summaries of FY16 LANL experimental campaigns at the OMEGA and EP Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, Eric Nicholas; Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Montgomery, David; Kim, Yong Ho; Murphy, Thomas Joseph; Johns, Heather Marie; Kline, John L.; Shah, Rahul C.; Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans W.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Flippo, Kirk Adler; Rasmus, Alexander Martin

    2016-10-25

    In FY16, Los Alamos National Laboratory carried out 22 shot days on the OMEGA and OMEGA- EP laser facilities in the areas of High Energy Density (HED) Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In HED our focus areas were on radiation flow, hydrodynamic turbulent mix and burn, warm dense matter equations of state, and coupled Kelvin-­Helmholtz (KH)/Richtmyer-­ Meshkov (RM) instability growth. For ICF our campaigns focused on the Priority Research Directions (PRD) of implosion phase mix and stagnation and burn, specifically as they pertain to Laser Direct Drive (LDD). We also had several focused shot days on transport properties in the kinetic regime. We continue to develop advanced diagnostics such as Neutron Imaging, Gamma Reaction History, and Gas Cherenkov Detectors. Below are a summary of our campaigns, their motivation, and main results from this year.

  2. Development of Thomson scattering system on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Ding, Yongkun Yang, Dong; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Fang; Li, Ping; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-15

    A Thomson scattering diagnostic system, using a 263 nm laser as the probe beam, is designed and implemented on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The probe beam is provided by an additional beam line completed recently. The diagnostic system allows simultaneous measurements of both ion feature and red-shifted electron feature from plasmas in a high-temperature (≥2 keV) and high-density (≥10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}) regime. Delicate design is made to satisfy the requirements for successful detection of the electron feature. High-quality ion feature spectra have already been diagnosed via this system in recent experiments with gas-filled hohlraums.

  3. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J. -E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2014-08-20

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. Furthermore, this result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  4. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Manuel, M. J. -E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; ...

    2014-08-20

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysicalmore » systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. Furthermore, this result is a topic of ongoing investigation.« less

  5. Laser irradiance scaling in polar direct drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T. J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Obrey, K. A. D.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Hoppe, M. L.; Nikroo, A.; Hohenberger, M.; McKenty, P. W.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-09-17

    Polar-direct-drive experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 54, 361 (2008)] performed at laser irradiance between 1 and 2×1015 W/cm2 exhibit increased hard x-ray emission, decreased neutron yield, and reduced areal density as the irradiance is increased. Experimental x-ray images at the higher irradiances show x-ray emission at the equator, as well as degraded symmetry, that is not predicted in hydrodynamic simulations using flux-limited energy transport, but that appear when non-local electron transport together with a model to account for cross beam energy transfer (CBET) is utilized. The reduction in laser power for equatorial beams required in the simulations to reproduce the effects of CBET on the observed symmetry also reproduces the yield degradation consistent with experimental data.

  6. Laser irradiance scaling in polar direct drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Murphy, T. J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; ...

    2015-09-17

    Polar-direct-drive experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 54, 361 (2008)] performed at laser irradiance between 1 and 2×1015 W/cm2 exhibit increased hard x-ray emission, decreased neutron yield, and reduced areal density as the irradiance is increased. Experimental x-ray images at the higher irradiances show x-ray emission at the equator, as well as degraded symmetry, that is not predicted in hydrodynamic simulations using flux-limited energy transport, but that appear when non-local electron transport together with a model to account for cross beam energy transfer (CBET) is utilized. The reduction in laser power for equatorialmore » beams required in the simulations to reproduce the effects of CBET on the observed symmetry also reproduces the yield degradation consistent with experimental data.« less

  7. Construction of the 1 kJ Nd: glass laser facility at KAERI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C.; Hong, S.-K.; Ko, K.; Jin, J.-T.; Kim, M.; Yun, D.-H.; Li, L.-J.; Lee, D.-W.; Lee, K.-T.; Kim, C.-J.

    2008-05-01

    We report on the design and present status of a 1 kJ Nd:Glass laser facility for basic research on quantum engineering at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). By applying a newly designed spatial filter with a serrated aperture, we improved the diffracted Gaussian spatial profile of an oscillator into a flat-top one. The laser system consists of 4 beam lines, each with the energies of more than 200 J at the nano-second regime. We measured the gain and spatial profiles of each amplification stage. A spectral shaping by a two-stage OPCPA (Optical Parametric Chirped Amplifier) for a pico-second front end was studied to compensate for gain narrowing in multi-stage amplifier chains.

  8. Design progress for the National Ignition Facility laser alignment and beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S W; Bliss, E S; Boege, S J; Boyd, R D; Bronisz, L; Bruker, J; C W Lauman, McCarville, T J; Chocol, C; Davis, D T; Demaret, R D; Feldman, M; Gates, A J; Holdener, F R; Hollis, J; Knopp, C F; Kyker, R; Miller, J L; Miller-Kamm, V J; Rivera, W E; Salmon, J T; Severyn, J R; Sheem, S K; Sheridan, T; Thompson, D Y; Wang, M F; Witaker, D; Yoeman, M F; Zacharias, R A

    1998-09-09

    Earlier papers have described approaches to NIF alignment and laser diagnostics tasks. 1,2,3 Now, detailed design of alignment and diagnostic systems for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is in its last year. Specifications are more detailed, additional analyses have been completed, Pro-E models have been developed, and prototypes of specific items have been built. In this paper we update top level concepts, illustrate specific areas of progress, and show design implementations as represented by prototype hardware. The alignment light source network has been fully defined. It utilizes an optimized number of lasers combined with fiber optic distribution to provide the chain alignment beams, system centering references, final spatial filter pinhole references, target alignment beams, and wavefront reference beams. The input and output sensors are being prototyped. They are located respectively in the front end just before beam injection into the full aperture chain and at the transport spatial filter, where the full energy infrared beam leaves the laser. The modularity of the input sensor is improved, and each output sensor mechanical package now incorporates instrumentation for four beams. Additional prototype hardware has been tested for function, and lifetime tests are underway. We report some initial results.

  9. Numerical analysis of the direct drive illumination uniformity for the Laser MegaJoule facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2014-01-01

    The illumination uniformity provided during the initial imprinting phase of the laser foot pulse in a direct drive scenario at the Laser MegaJoule facility has been analyzed. This study analyzes the quality of the illumination of a spherical capsule and concerns the uniformity of the first shock generate in the absorber of an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule. Four configurations making use of all or some of the 80 laser beams organized in the 20 quads of the cones at 49° and 131° with respect to the polar axis have been considered in order to assemble the foot pulse. Elliptical and circular super-gaussian laser intensity profiles taking into account beam-to-beam power imbalance (10%), pointing error (50 μm), and target positioning (20 μm) have been considered. It has been found that the use of the Polar Direct Drive technique can in some cases reduce the irradiation non-uniformity by a factor as high as 50%. In all cases, elliptical profile provides better results in comparison with the circular one and it is shown that the minimum of the non-uniformity is also a function of the capsule radius.

  10. Numerical analysis of the direct drive illumination uniformity for the Laser MegaJoule facility

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2014-01-15

    The illumination uniformity provided during the initial imprinting phase of the laser foot pulse in a direct drive scenario at the Laser MegaJoule facility has been analyzed. This study analyzes the quality of the illumination of a spherical capsule and concerns the uniformity of the first shock generate in the absorber of an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule. Four configurations making use of all or some of the 80 laser beams organized in the 20 quads of the cones at 49° and 131° with respect to the polar axis have been considered in order to assemble the foot pulse. Elliptical and circular super-gaussian laser intensity profiles taking into account beam-to-beam power imbalance (10%), pointing error (50 μm), and target positioning (20 μm) have been considered. It has been found that the use of the Polar Direct Drive technique can in some cases reduce the irradiation non-uniformity by a factor as high as 50%. In all cases, elliptical profile provides better results in comparison with the circular one and it is shown that the minimum of the non-uniformity is also a function of the capsule radius.

  11. 0.1-Hz 1-PW Ti:Sapphire Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong Ku; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Jeong, Tae Moon; Choi, Il Woo; Lee, Jongmin

    2010-04-01

    Ultrashort quantum beam facility (UQBF) project in Advanced Photonics Research Institute (APRI), GIST aims to develop a 0.1-Hz petawatt Ti:sapphire laser system based on chirped pulse amplification. Currently, the average output energy of 46.3 J has been reached at 0.1-Hz repetition rate. The output energy of 46.3 J corresponds to 1.1 PW, considering the pulse duration of 30 fs and the grating efficiency of 69.3%, which have been measured with a single-shot SPIDER and a preliminary pulse compressor. UQBF construction is on schedule for the first petawatt experiments in 2010.

  12. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  13. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use in Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Vineet; Montoya, Ana; Joshi, Darius; Becker, Carol; Brant, Amy; McGuirk, Helen; Clark, Jordyn; Harrod, Molly; Kuhn, Latoya; Mody, Lona

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe patterns of use, care practices, and outcomes related to peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) use in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Two community SNFs. PARTICIPANTS Adult SNF residents with PICCs (N = 56). MEASUREMENTS Information on indication for PICC use, device characteristics (e.g., lumens, gauge), and participant data (comorbidities, medications) were obtained from medical records. Care practices (e.g., frequency of flushing, dressing care) and problems related to PICCs were recorded. Major (central line–associated bloodstream infection, venous thromboembolism, catheter dislodgement) and minor (migration, dressing disruption, lumen occlusion, exit site infection) complications and process measures (flushing of PICC, assessment of necessity) were recorded. Bivariate analyses with t-tests, chi-square tests, or Fischer exact tests were used for continuous and categorical data. RESULTS Participants were enrolled from two SNFs. The most common indication for PICC use was intravenous antibiotic delivery. The average PICC dwell time was 43 days, and most devices were single-lumen PICCs. Major and minor complications were common and occurred in 11 (20%) and 18 (32%) participants, respectively. Occlusion (23%, n = 13), accidental dislodgement (12%, n = 7), and dressing disruption (11%, n = 6) were the commonest complications observed. Documentation regarding catheter care practices occurred in 41% of cases. CONCLUSION Quality improvement efforts that seek to benchmark practice, identify gaps, and institute efforts to improve PICC care and practice in SNFs appear necessary. PMID:26312402

  14. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  15. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  16. Er:YAG Laser Assisted Treatment of Central Odontogenic Fibroma of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Luis Silva; Martins, Marco; Pacheco, José Júlio; Salazar, Filomena; Magalhães, João; Vescovi, Paolo; Meleti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Central odontogenic fibroma is a very rare benign odontogenic tumour characterized by a fibrous mature stroma with variable strands or islands of inactive-looking odontogenic epithelium. Our aim is to report a case of a central odontogenic fibroma and describe the clinical usefulness of Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of this tumour. A 74-year-old woman presented with an expansive lesion located in a mandible with multilocular and mixed radiographic appearance. A conservative excision using Er:YAG laser was performed. Complete removal was obtained. There were no postoperative complications. The histopatologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of central odontogenic fibroma of rich-epithelium type. No recurrence was observed during follow-up. PMID:26457211

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Interaction of a smoothed laser beam with supercritical-density porous targets on the ABC facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strangio, C.; Caruso, A.; Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Rozanov, Vladislav B.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results of experiments on the interaction of laser radiation with low-density porous targets performed on the ABC facility at the ENEA Research Centre (Frascati, Italy). Porous plastic targets with densities of 5 and 20 mg cm-3 were irradiated by a focused neodymium-laser beam at the fundamental frequency (λ = 1.054 μm) at a radiation intensity of 1013 W cm-2 at the target. The beam was preliminarily allowed to pass through an optical system intended to spatially smooth the radiation intensity over the beam cross section. The use a smoothed beam was important to discover in the plasma and in the accelerated dense material the features related to the porous structure of the target under conditions which rule out the effect of the inhomogeneities of the heating beam itself. The spatial plasma structure in the laser beam—target interaction region and at the rear side of the target were investigated by using optical schlieren plasma photography. The time dependent transmission of the laser radiation through the target was also investigated by imaging the target in transmitted radiation to a properly masked photodiode.

  18. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stohr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating

  19. Application of the laser diode with central wavelength 975 nm for the therapy of neurofibroma and hemangiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańczyk, Jacek; Sawczak, Mirosław; Cenian, Witold; Karpienko, Katarzyna; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata; Cenian, Adam

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a newly developed dermatological laser (with a central wavelength 975 nm) for application in therapies requiring deep penetration of tissue, e.g., cutaneous (dermal) neurofibroma (von Recklinghausen disease) and hemangiomas. This laser can work either in pulses or continues wave mode. Laser radiation is transmitted toward the application region by optical fiber with a diameter of 0.6 mm. The compact design of the laser facilitates its transport and increases the comfort of use.

  20. First set of gated x-ray imaging diagnostics for the Laser Megajoule facility.

    PubMed

    Rosch, R; Trosseille, C; Caillaud, T; Allouche, V; Bourgade, J L; Briat, M; Brunel, P; Burillo, M; Casner, A; Depierreux, S; Gontier, D; Jadaud, J P; Le Breton, J P; Llavador, P; Loupias, B; Miquel, J L; Oudot, G; Perez, S; Raimbourg, J; Rousseau, A; Rousseaux, C; Rubbelynck, C; Stemmler, P; Troussel, P; Ulmer, J L; Wrobel, R; Beauvais, P; Pallet, M; Prevot, V

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility located at CEA/CESTA started to operate in the early 2014 with two quadruplets (20 kJ at 351 nm) focused on target for the first experimental campaign. We present here the first set of gated x-ray imaging (GXI) diagnostics implemented on LMJ since mid-2014. This set consists of two imaging diagnostics with spatial, temporal, and broadband spectral resolution. These diagnostics will give basic measurements, during the entire life of the facility, such as position, structure, and balance of beams, but they will also be used to characterize gas filled target implosion symmetry and timing, to study x-ray radiography and hydrodynamic instabilities. The design requires a vulnerability approach, because components will operate in a harsh environment induced by neutron fluxes, gamma rays, debris, and shrapnel. Grazing incidence x-ray microscopes are fielded as far as possible away from the target to minimize potential damage and signal noise due to these sources. These imaging diagnostics incorporate microscopes with large source-to-optic distance and large size gated microchannel plate detectors. Microscopes include optics with grazing incidence mirrors, pinholes, and refractive lenses. Spatial, temporal, and spectral performances have been measured on x-ray tubes and UV lasers at CEA-DIF and at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt BESSY II synchrotron prior to be set on LMJ. GXI-1 and GXI-2 designs, metrology, and first experiments on LMJ are presented here.

  1. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  2. First set of gated x-ray imaging diagnostics for the Laser Megajoule facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosch, R.; Trosseille, C.; Caillaud, T.; Allouche, V.; Bourgade, J. L.; Briat, M.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Le Breton, J. P.; Llavador, P.; Loupias, B.; Miquel, J. L.; Oudot, G.; Perez, S.; Raimbourg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Rousseaux, C.; Rubbelynck, C.; Stemmler, P.; Troussel, P.; Ulmer, J. L.; Wrobel, R.; Beauvais, P.; Pallet, M.; Prevot, V.

    2016-03-01

    The Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility located at CEA/CESTA started to operate in the early 2014 with two quadruplets (20 kJ at 351 nm) focused on target for the first experimental campaign. We present here the first set of gated x-ray imaging (GXI) diagnostics implemented on LMJ since mid-2014. This set consists of two imaging diagnostics with spatial, temporal, and broadband spectral resolution. These diagnostics will give basic measurements, during the entire life of the facility, such as position, structure, and balance of beams, but they will also be used to characterize gas filled target implosion symmetry and timing, to study x-ray radiography and hydrodynamic instabilities. The design requires a vulnerability approach, because components will operate in a harsh environment induced by neutron fluxes, gamma rays, debris, and shrapnel. Grazing incidence x-ray microscopes are fielded as far as possible away from the target to minimize potential damage and signal noise due to these sources. These imaging diagnostics incorporate microscopes with large source-to-optic distance and large size gated microchannel plate detectors. Microscopes include optics with grazing incidence mirrors, pinholes, and refractive lenses. Spatial, temporal, and spectral performances have been measured on x-ray tubes and UV lasers at CEA-DIF and at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt BESSY II synchrotron prior to be set on LMJ. GXI-1 and GXI-2 designs, metrology, and first experiments on LMJ are presented here.

  3. The development and operation of the international solar-terrestrial physics central data handling facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtonen, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program is committed to the development of a comprehensive, multi-mission ground data system which will support a variety of national and international scientific missions in an effort to study the flow of energy from the sun through the Earth-space environment, known as the geospace. A major component of the ISTP ground data system is an ISTP-dedicated Central Data Handling Facility (CDHF). Acquisition, development, and operation of the ISTP CDHF were delegated by the ISTP Project Office within the Flight Projects Directorate to the Information Processing Division (IPD) within the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate (MO&DSD). The ISTP CDHF supports the receipt, storage, and electronic access of the full complement of ISTP Level-zero science data; serves as the linchpin for the centralized processing and long-term storage of all key parameters generated either by the ISTP CDHF itself or received from external, ISTP Program approved sources; and provides the required networking and 'science-friendly' interfaces for the ISTP investigators. Once connected to the ISTP CDHF, the online catalog of key parameters can be browsed from their remote processing facilities for the immediate electronic receipt of selected key parameters using the NASA Science Internet (NSI), managed by NASA's Ames Research Center. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to describe how the ISTP CDHF was successfully implemented and operated to support initially the Japanese Geomagnetic Tail (GEOTAIL) mission and correlative science investigations, and (2) to describe how the ISTP CDHF has been enhanced to support ongoing as well as future ISTP missions. Emphasis will be placed on how various project management approaches were undertaken that proved to be highly effective in delivering an operational ISTP CDHF to the Project on schedule and

  4. 2015 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Michael George

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2014, through October 31, 2015.

  5. The Supreme Court Permits Religious Groups To Use Public School Facilities: Good News Club v. Milford Central School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews basis for U.S. Supreme Court's June 2001 decision in "Good News Club v. Milford Central School," where Court held that the Christian religious club for students had the Constitutional right under the Free Speech Clause to use public school facilities after school hours. Explains impact of decision on board of education policy.…

  6. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE PAGES

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; ...

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore » the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  7. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v⁹˙⁴. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v⁵˙⁹) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  8. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, the total yield ∼ v{sup 9.4}. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (∼v{sup 5.9}) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  9. Lineshape measurements of He-β spectra on the ORION laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.; Chung, H. K.; Hill, E.

    2016-10-01

    We have utilized a newly developed high-resolution X-ray spectrometer to measure the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility in the United Kingdom. We present measurements of the He-β spectra of chlorine and chromium from targets irradiated by either a long-pulse or a short-pulse laser beam. The experimental conditions provide a spread in plasma density ranging from about 1019 to about 1024 cm-3. We present spectral calculations that show that the relative intensities of the Li-like satellite lines can be used to infer the density in the lower range, especially if the lithiumlike satellite lines are well resolved. In addition, we use the Stark-broadened width of the He-β line to infer densities above about 1022 cm-3. In the case of a short-pulse irradiated chromium foil, we find that the He-like chromium is produced at a density of almost 8 g/cm3, i.e., solid density. In addition, we can infer the electron temperature from the observation of dielectronic recombination satellite lines.

  10. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  11. LEPS2 : the second Laser-Electron Photon facility at SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yosoi, M.

    2011-10-01

    A new project to construct the second beamline for the laser-electron photon beam at SPring-8 (LEPS2) has started. Based on the LEPS experience, the project aims to improve the intensity of the photon beam and to expand the detector acceptance by adopting the BNL-E949 detector, which is a hermetic detector in a large 1 T solenoid magnet. The central region of tracking chambers will be upgraded for the LEPS2. A new LEPS2 experimental building has just been constructed outside the experimental hall of the storage ring. The present status of the development of a frozen-spin polarized HD target is also reported.

  12. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  13. New laser setup for the selective isotope production and investigation in a laser ion source at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2012-02-15

    New laser installation for the resonance ionization spectroscopy in a laser ion source and for rare isotope production has been recently put into operation at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina). This is a significant improvement of a previous target-laser ion source device of the IRIS mass-separator, working on-line with 1 GeV proton beam of PNPI (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute) synchrocyclotron. It makes possible for us to get the isobarically clean radioactive isotope beams of a great number of chemical elements. New laser setup provides the two- or three-resonance step ionization in the range of wavelength of 265-850 nm. The first results obtained at the laser setup for Tl isotopes are presented.

  14. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  15. Computing multiple aggregation levels and contextual features for road facilities recognition using mobile laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Dong, Zhen; Liu, Yuan; Liang, Fuxun; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, updating the inventory of road infrastructures based on field work is labor intensive, time consuming, and costly. Fortunately, vehicle-based mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems provide an efficient solution to rapidly capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of road environments with high flexibility and precision. However, robust recognition of road facilities from huge volumes of 3D point clouds is still a challenging issue because of complicated and incomplete structures, occlusions and varied point densities. Most existing methods utilize point or object based features to recognize object candidates, and can only extract limited types of objects with a relatively low recognition rate, especially for incomplete and small objects. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper proposes a semantic labeling framework by combing multiple aggregation levels (point-segment-object) of features and contextual features to recognize road facilities, such as road surfaces, road boundaries, buildings, guardrails, street lamps, traffic signs, roadside-trees, power lines, and cars, for highway infrastructure inventory. The proposed method first identifies ground and non-ground points, and extracts road surfaces facilities from ground points. Non-ground points are segmented into individual candidate objects based on the proposed multi-rule region growing method. Then, the multiple aggregation levels of features and the contextual features (relative positions, relative directions, and spatial patterns) associated with each candidate object are calculated and fed into a SVM classifier to label the corresponding candidate object. The recognition performance of combining multiple aggregation levels and contextual features was compared with single level (point, segment, or object) based features using large-scale highway scene point clouds. Comparative studies demonstrated that the proposed semantic labeling framework significantly improves road facilities recognition

  16. Laser absorption measurements of OH concentration and temperature in pulsed facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Newfield, Mark E.; Loomis, Mark P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser absorption flow diagnostic application has been developed at the NASA Ames 16-inch Shock Tunnel for purposes of measuring the thermochemical state of OH in flow environments of interest. Research objectives include the investigation of high temperature, low pressure chemistry pertinent to scramjet combustors and high altitude flight. The system can be operated in either the fixed frequency mode or in the rapid wavelength scanning mode to measure species mole fraction and temperature. Emission diagnostics have been employed to determine shock tunnel flow quality and assist in the proper application of the diagnostic and its data interpretation. Rotational lines in the OH system were probed in the expanding facility nozzle flow, and time-resolved measurements of temperature and mole fraction are provided.

  17. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements laser {ampersand} target area building (LTAB) SSDR 1.2.2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-08-19

    This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB), including those that house and support the operation of high-energy laser equipment and the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the facility. This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the LTAB: Building structural systems for the Target Bay, Switchyards, Diagnostic Building, Decontamination Area, Laser Bays, Capacitor Bays and Operations Support Area, and the necessary space associated with building-support equipment; Architectural building features associated with housing the space and with the operational cleanliness of the functional operation of the facilities; Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facilities; Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants, plus stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater; Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facilities and their contents; Material handling systems for transporting personnel and heavy materials within the building areas; Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling and other service to experimental laser equipment and components; Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service and standby power to building and experimental equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities; Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Detailed requirements for building subsystems that are not addressed in this document (such as specific sizes, locations, or capacities) are included in detail-level NIP Project Interface Control Documents (ICDS).

  18. 75 FR 1819 - GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment LLC; (GLE Commercial Facility); Notice of Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ...-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH), which is a wholly owned subsidiary of GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy... construct and operate a laser enrichment facility. Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended... to 10 CFR 70.23a and Section 193 of the AEA, as amended by the Solar, Wind, Waste, and...

  19. Experimental observations of turbulent mixing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the OMEGA Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Schilling, O.; Wallace, R.; Elbaz, Y.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-09-15

    Shear-flow, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) turbulent mixing experiments were performed on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in which laser-driven shock waves propagated through a low-density plastic foam placed on top of a higher-density plastic foil. The plastic foil was comprised a thin iodine-doped plastic tracer layer bonded on each side to an undoped density-matched polyamide-imide plastic. Behind the shock front, lower-density foam plasma flowed over the higher-density plastic plasma, such that the interface between the foam and plastic was KH unstable. The initial perturbations consisted of pre-imposed, sinusoidal 2D perturbations, and broadband 3D perturbations due to surface roughness at the interface between the plastic and foam. KH instability growth was measured using side-on radiography with a point-projection 5-keV vanadium backlighter. Time-integrated images were captured on D-8 x-ray film. Spatial density profiles of iodine-doped plastic mixed with foam were inferred using x-ray radiographs. The mixing layer ensuing from the KH instability with layer width up to {approx}100 {mu}m was observed at a location {approx}1 mm behind the shock front. The measured mixing layer width was in good agreement with predictions based on a simple self-similar model of KH instability growth using an estimate of the shear velocity obtained from numerical simulations of the experiments.

  20. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, J.

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  1. Broadband High-Performance Infrared Antireflection Nanowires Facilely Grown on Ultrafast Laser Structured Cu Surface.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peixun; Bai, Benfeng; Long, Jiangyou; Jiang, Dafa; Jin, Guofan; Zhang, Hongjun; Zhong, Minlin

    2015-09-09

    Infrared antireflection is an essential issue in many fields such as thermal imaging, sensors, thermoelectrics, and stealth. However, a limited antireflection capability, narrow effective band, and complexity as well as high cost in implementation represent the main unconquered problems, especially on metal surfaces. By introducing precursor micro/nano structures via ultrafast laser beforehand, we present a novel approach for facile and uniform growth of high-quality oxide semiconductor nanowires on a Cu surface via thermal oxidation. Through the enhanced optical phonon dissipation of the nanowires, assisted by light trapping in the micro structures, ultralow total reflectance of 0.6% is achieved at the infrared wavelength around 17 μm and keeps steadily below 3% over a broad band of 14-18 μm. The precursor structures and the nanowires can be flexibly tuned by controlling the laser processing procedure to achieve desired antireflection performance. The presented approach possesses the advantages of material simplicity, structure reconfigurability, and cost-effectiveness for mass production. It opens a new path to realize unique functions by integrating semiconductor nanowires onto metal surface structures.

  2. Strategies for eye positioning after laser-related loss of central vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertera, J. H.

    1997-05-01

    Loss of foveal vision from exposure to laser light or retinal disease can seriously impair visual functions like reading and visual search. Central scotomas produce large losses in visually guided performance because central vision has the best visual resolution, compared to more peripheral retina, and is also important in the normal reflexive patten of eye movement. Relatively small central field scotomas can produce significant impairments in visual search if tasks require a high degree of foveal vision such as seeing fine detail or discriminating similar contours or letters. Subjects faced with the task of adapting to the loss of ventral vision sometimes position their eyes in ways which are either asymmetrical, not optimum, or seem to generate abnormal eye movements, even after extensive practice. Discussion includes oculomotor drift, error fixations, hyper-eccentric fixations and remedial eye positioning strategies.

  3. Development of Advanced Beam Halo Diagnostics at the Jefferson Lab Free-Electron-Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Dave Douglas, Frederick Wilson, Hao Zhang, Anatoly Shkvarunets, Ralph Fiorito

    2011-03-01

    High average current and high brightness electron beams are needed for many applications. At the Jefferson Lab FEL facility, the search for dark matter with the FEL laser beam has produced some interesting results, and a second very promising experiment called DarkLight, using the JLab Energy-recovery-linac (ERL) machine has been put forward. Although the required beam current has been achieved on this machine, one key challenge is the management of beam halo. At the University of Md. (UMD) we have demonstrated a high dynamic range halo measurement method using a digital micro-mirror array device (DMD). A similar system has been established at the JLab FEL facility as a joint effort by UMD and JLab to measure the beam halo on the high current ERL machine. Preliminary experiments to characterize the halo were performed on the new UV FEL. In this paper, the limitations of the present system will be analyzed and a discussion of other approaches (such as an optimized coronagraph) for further extending the dynamic range will be presented. We will also discuss the possibility of performing both longitudinal and transverse (3D) halo measurements together on a single system.

  4. Designing symmetric polar direct drive implosions on the Omega laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Cobble, James A.; Murphy, Thomas J.; Tregillis, Ian L.; Bradley, Paul A.; Hakel, Peter; Hsu, Scott C.; Kyrala, George A.; Obrey, Kimberly A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Baumgaertel, Jessica A.; Batha, Steven H.

    2014-04-15

    Achieving symmetric capsule implosions with Polar Direct Drive [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004); R. S. Craxton et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056304 (2005); F. J. Marshall et al., J. Phys. IV France 133, 153–157 (2006)] has been explored during recent Defect Induced Mix Experiment campaign on the Omega facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. To minimize the implosion asymmetry due to laser drive, optimized laser cone powers, as well as improved beam pointings, were designed using 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA [M. M. Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. Experimental back-lit radiographic and self-emission images revealed improved polar symmetry and increased neutron yield which were in good agreement with 2D HYDRA simulations. In particular, by reducing the energy in Omega's 21.4° polar rings by 16.75%, while increasing the energy in the 58.9° equatorial rings by 8.25% in such a way as to keep the overall energy to the target at 16 kJ, the second Legendre mode (P{sub 2}) was reduced by a factor of 2, to less than 4% at bang time. At the same time the neutron yield increased by 62%. The polar symmetry was also improved relative to nominal DIME settings by a more radical repointing of OMEGA's 42.0° and 58.9° degree beams, to compensate for oblique incidence and reduced absorption at the equator, resulting in virtually no P{sub 2} around bang time and 33% more yield.

  5. Direct-drive cryogenic-target implosion experiments on SGIII prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yudong; Huang, Tianxuan; Lei, Haile; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Jiahua; Yang, Zhiwen; Tang, Qi; Song, Zifeng; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun

    2015-04-15

    Directly driven cryogenic target implosion experiments are performed on the SGIII prototype laser facility. X-ray pinhole images reveal frozen condensation on the sealing film. The influence of the condensation on the delivery of laser energy to the capsule surface is then quantified experimentally. It is found that, with a carefully chosen pre-pulse duration, the influence can be reduced, and the neutron yield is increased by an order of magnitude. Subsequently, the cryogenic layered capsule and cryogenic gas-filled capsule are imploded using 6.5-kJ laser energy. The implosion performance is characterized by the neutron yield, the 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell, and the primary proton spectrum. The neutron yield is 2 × 10{sup 7} for the gas-filled capsule and 2.8 × 10{sup 7} for the layered capsule. The 2D self-emission images of the in-flight shell exhibit significant implosion asymmetry. The energy downshift of the proton spectrum is used to infer the areal density. For the gas-filled capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.1 MeV, yielding an areal density of 1–3 mg/cm{sup 2}. For the layered capsule, the spectrum is downshifted by 0.5 MeV, yielding an areal density of 4–6 mg/cm{sup 2}. Improving the implosion symmetry would help to further increase the areal density.

  6. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  7. Characterization and reclamation assessment for the Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Bledsoe, H.

    1993-10-01

    The contamination of subsurface terrestrial environments by organic contaminants is a global phenomenon. The remediation of such environments requires innovative assessment techniques and strategies for successful clean-ups. Central Shops Diesel Storage Facility at Savannah River Site was characterized to determine the extent of subsurface diesel fuel contamination using innovative approaches and effective bioremediation techniques for clean-up of the contaminant plume have been established.

  8. High-energy-density plasmas generation on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility for fast-ignition laser fusion studies and laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, S.; Zhang, Z.; Yamamoto, N.; Ohira, S.; Fujii, Y.; Ishihara, K.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Arikawa, Y.; Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Nakata, Y.; Kawanaka, J.; Nagatomo, H.; Shiraga, H.; Miyanaga, N.; Norimatsu, T.; Nishimura, H.; Azechi, H.

    2012-12-01

    The world's largest peta watt (PW) laser LFEX, which delivers energy up to 2 kJ in a 1.5 ps pulse, has been constructed beside the GEKKO XII laser at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. The GEKKO-LFEX laser facility enables the creation of materials having high-energy-density which do not exist naturally on the Earth and have an energy density comparable to that of stars. High-energy-density plasma is a source of safe, secure, environmentally sustainable fusion energy. Direct-drive fast-ignition laser fusion has been intensively studied at this facility under the auspices of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project. In this paper, we describe improvement of the LFEX laser and investigations of advanced target design to increase the energy coupling efficiency of the fast-ignition scheme. The pedestal of the LFEX pulse, which produces a long preformed plasma and results in the generation of electrons too energetic to heat the fuel core, was reduced by introducing an amplified optical parametric fluorescence quencher and saturable absorbers in the front-end system of the LFEX laser. Since fast electrons are scattered and stopped by the strong electric field of highly ionized high-Z (i.e. gold) ions, a low-Z cone was studied for reducing the energy loss of fast electrons in the cone tip region. A diamond-like carbon cone was fabricated for the fast-ignition experiment. An external magnetic field, which is demonstrated to be generated by a laser-driven capacitor-coil target, will be applied to the compression of the fuel capsule to form a strong magnetic field to guide the fast electrons to the fuel core. In addition, the facility offers a powerful means to test and validate astronomical models and computations in the laboratory. As well as demonstrating the ability to recreate extreme astronomical conditions by the facilities, our theoretical description of the laboratory experiment was compared with the generally accepted explanation

  9. High direct drive illumination uniformity achieved by multi-parameter optimization approach: a case study of Shenguang III laser facility.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Bo; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Liu, Dongxiao; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Weiwu; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-05-04

    The uniformity of the compression driver is of fundamental importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In this paper, the illumination uniformity on a spherical capsule during the initial imprinting phase directly driven by laser beams has been considered. We aim to explore methods to achieve high direct drive illumination uniformity on laser facilities designed for indirect drive ICF. There are many parameters that would affect the irradiation uniformity, such as Polar Direct Drive displacement quantity, capsule radius, laser spot size and intensity distribution within a laser beam. A novel approach to reduce the root mean square illumination non-uniformity based on multi-parameter optimizing approach (particle swarm optimization) is proposed, which enables us to obtain a set of optimal parameters over a large parameter space. Finally, this method is applied to improve the direct drive illumination uniformity provided by Shenguang III laser facility and the illumination non-uniformity is reduced from 5.62% to 0.23% for perfectly balanced beams. Moreover, beam errors (power imbalance and pointing error) are taken into account to provide a more practical solution and results show that this multi-parameter optimization approach is effective.

  10. Analysis of the X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas produced at the Phelix laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comet, M.; Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Piron, R.; Denis-Petit, D.; Méot, V.; Gosselin, G.; Morel, P.; Hannachi, F.; Gobet, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of X-ray emission spectra of copper, germanium and rubidium plasmas measured at the Phelix laser facility. The laser intensity was around 6×1014 W.cm-2. The analysis is based on the hypothesis of an homogeneous plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium using an effective temperature. This temperature is deduced from hydrodynamic simulations and collisional-radiative computations. Spectra are then calculated using the LTE opacity codes OPAMCDF and SCO-RCG and compared to experimental data.

  11. 2014 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Mike

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2013, through October 31, 2014. The report contains, as applicable, the following information; Site description; Facility and system description; Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; Status of compliance conditions and activities; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. The current permit expires on March 16, 2015. A permit renewal application was submitted to Idaho Department of Environmental Quality on September 15, 2014. During the 2014 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. Seepage testing of the three lagoons was performed between August 26, 2014 and September 22, 2014. Seepage rates from Lagoons 1 and 2 were below the 0.25 inches/day requirement; however, Lagoon 3 was above the 0.25 inches/day. Lagoon 3 has been isolated and is being evaluated for future use or permanent removal from service.

  12. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  13. The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High Energy Density Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuest, Craig R.

    2001-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500 Terawatt, 351 nm laser for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency to provide an experimental test bed for the US Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country’s nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program for NIF will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% of the shots will be dedicated to basic science research. Additionally, most of the shots on NIF will be conducted in unclassified configurations that will allow participation from the greater scientific community in planned applied physics experiments. This presentation will provide a look at the status of the construction project as well as a description of the scientific uses of NIF. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  14. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yang; Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan; Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao; Jin Fengtao

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  15. Commissioning of the collinear laser spectroscopy facility BECOLA at NSCL/MSU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamisono, K.; Barquest, B. R.; Bollen, G.; Cooper, K.; Hammerton, K.; Hughes, M.; Mantica, P. F.; Morrissey, D. J.; Ringle, R.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Ryder, C. A.; Rossi, D. M.; Schwarz, S.; Strum, R.; Sumithrarachchi, C.; Tarazona, D.

    2015-04-01

    The BEam COoler and LAser spectroscopy (BECOLA) facility at National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University has been commissioned online to determine charge radii and electromagnetic moments of radioactive isotopes. A radioactive 37K beam was used for the commissioning tests and a 1.29 μs beam bunch-width from the buncher and a bunch repetition rate of 2.5 Hz led to a background suppression factor of 3.1 × 105 in resonant photon detection measurements. The hyperfine structure of 37K and its isotope shift relative to the stable 39K were determined. The obtained hyperfine coupling constants A(2 S 1/2) = 120.3 ± 1.4 MHz, A(2 P 1/2) = 15.2 ± 1.1 MHz, and A(2 P 3/2) = 1.4 ± 8 MHz, and the isotope shift δ ν 39,37 = -264 ± 3 MHz are consistent with the previously determined values, where available.

  16. Counter-propagating radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayson, T.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Foster, J.; Skidmore, J.; Gumbrell, E.; Graham, P.; Danson, C.; Stehlé, C.; Singh, R. L.; Chaulagain, U.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Spindloe, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Orion high-power laser facility, at AWE Aldermaston UK, was used to produce hyper-sonic radiative shocks, travelling at 60km/s, in noble gases, between 0.1 and 1.0 bar. These experiments aimed to study the radiative precursor, a heat and ionization wave preceding the shock front, and dynamics of colliding radiative shocks. X-ray backlighting and optical self-emission streak imaging were used to study the shock front and collision dynamics, while multi-frame and streaked interferometry were used to simultaneously study the radiative precursor. These experiments compared the shock and collision dynamics in different gases (e.g. Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), while maintaining a constant mass density, to vary the strength of the radiative precursor. Some shocks exhibited features suggesting the formation of hydrodynamic or radiative instabilities. The experimental data is in good agreement with 2-D rad-hydro simulations and provides a new benchmark for codes to be tested against. Supported by Orion Academic Access, the Royal Society, EPSRC, Labex PLAS@PAR.

  17. Central Pain Processing in Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease: A Laser Pain fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Petschow, Christine; Scheef, Lukas; Paus, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Nadine; Schild, Hans H.; Klockgether, Thomas; Boecker, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objective Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson’s disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. Methods 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson’s disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects. Measurements included warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, and central pain processing with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (erfMRI) during laser-induced pain stimulation at lower (E = 440 mJ) and higher (E = 640 mJ) target energies. Additionally, electrodermal activity was characterized during delivery of 60 randomized pain stimuli ranging from 440 mJ to 640 mJ, along with evaluation of subjective pain ratings on a visual analogue scale. Results No significant differences in warmth perception thresholds, heat pain thresholds, electrodermal activity and subjective pain ratings were found between Parkinson’s disease patients and controls, and erfMRI revealed a generally comparable activation pattern induced by laser-pain stimuli in brain areas belonging to the central pain matrix. However, relatively reduced deactivation was found in Parkinson’s disease patients in posterior regions of the default mode network, notably the precuneus and the posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our data during pain processing extend previous findings suggesting default mode network dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease. On the other hand, they argue against a genuine pain-specific processing abnormality in early-stage Parkinson’s disease. Future studies are now required using similar multimodal experimental designs to examine pain processing in more advanced

  18. Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) Seismic Source Characterization (SSC) for Nuclear Facilities Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin J. Coppersmith; Lawrence A. Salomone; Chris W. Fuller; Laura L. Glaser; Kathryn L. Hanson; Ross D. Hartleb; William R. Lettis; Scott C. Lindvall; Stephen M. McDuffie; Robin K. McGuire; Gerry L. Stirewalt; Gabriel R. Toro; Robert R. Youngs; David L. Slayter; Serkan B. Bozkurt; Randolph J. Cumbest; Valentina Montaldo Falero; Roseanne C. Perman' Allison M. Shumway; Frank H. Syms; Martitia P. Tuttle

    2012-01-31

    This report describes a new seismic source characterization (SSC) model for the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). It will replace the Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States, EPRI Report NP-4726 (July 1986) and the Seismic Hazard Characterization of 69 Nuclear Plant Sites East of the Rocky Mountains, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Model, (Bernreuter et al., 1989). The objective of the CEUS SSC Project is to develop a new seismic source model for the CEUS using a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 3 assessment process. The goal of the SSHAC process is to represent the center, body, and range of technically defensible interpretations of the available data, models, and methods. Input to a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) consists of both seismic source characterization and ground motion characterization. These two components are used to calculate probabilistic hazard results (or seismic hazard curves) at a particular site. This report provides a new seismic source model. Results and Findings The product of this report is a regional CEUS SSC model. This model includes consideration of an updated database, full assessment and incorporation of uncertainties, and the range of diverse technical interpretations from the larger technical community. The SSC model will be widely applicable to the entire CEUS, so this project uses a ground motion model that includes generic variations to allow for a range of representative site conditions (deep soil, shallow soil, hard rock). Hazard and sensitivity calculations were conducted at seven test sites representative of different CEUS hazard environments. Challenges and Objectives The regional CEUS SSC model will be of value to readers who are involved in PSHA work, and who wish to use an updated SSC model. This model is based on a comprehensive and traceable process, in accordance with SSHAC guidelines in NUREG/CR-6372, Recommendations for Probabilistic

  19. Design of an XUV FEL Driven by the Laser-Plasma Accelerator at theLBNL LOASIS Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Fawley, W.M.; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.

    2006-09-01

    We present a design for a compact FEL source of ultrafast, high-peak flux, soft x-ray pulses employing a high-current, GeV-energy electron beam from the existing laser-plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS laser facility. The proposed ultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to the drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science with pulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing both to the high current ({approx} 10 kA) and reasonable charge/pulse ({approx} 0.1-0.5 nC) of the laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes are potentially 10{sup 13}--10{sup 14} photons/pulse. We examine devices based both on SASE and high-harmonic generated input seeds to give improved coherence and reduced undulator length, presenting both analytic scalings and numerical simulation results for expected FEL performance. A successful source would result in a new class of compact laser-driven FELs in which a conventional RF accelerator is replaced by a GeV-class laser-plasma accelerator whose active acceleration region is only a few cm in length.

  20. Modification of Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility for Rapid Testing of CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, Daniel R; Miller, John L; Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Kenney, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    This document describes preliminary design modifications to the CSMC Test Facility in JAEA, Naka, Japan that will allow rapid test and change-out of CS conductor samples while simultaneously achieving more precise and reliable characterization of those samples than is presently achievable elsewhere. The current philosophy for CS conductor testing is to test an Insert in CSMC followed by SULTAN testing. The SULTAN facility has very short length in field and a short length between the High Field Zone and the joints. This makes it difficult to obtain uniform distribution of current in the cable at low voltage levels, which defines the current sharing temperature. In a real magnet, like ITER CS, there is a long length of conductor in the highest field. Such conditions provide a more uniform current distribution near current sharing. The modified facility will serve as an economical tool for ITER conductor testing. The test item will be a three turn sample, approximately 15 m long, placed in the background field of the CSMC. This new mode of operation will reduce the time of cool-down, warm-up and installation of the sample into the CSMC facility, which should significantly reduce the cost of a test per sample.

  1. Repositioning the Facilities in Technical College Workshops for Efficiency: A Case Study of North Central Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umar, Ibrahim Y.; Ma'aji, Abdullahi S.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on assessing the facilities in Government Technical College workshops in the context of a developing country. A descriptive survey design was adopted. Two research questions and a hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. A 35-item questionnaire was developed based on the National Board for Technical Education (NBTE)…

  2. A facile preparation route for netlike microstructures on a stainless steel using an ethanol-mediated femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Hao; Yang, Qing; Liu, Hewei; Chen, Feng; Du, Guangqing; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2013-03-01

    Netlike or porous microstructures are highly desirable in metal implants and biomedical monitoring applications. However, realization of such microstructures remains technically challenging. Here, we report a facile and environmentally friendly method to prepare netlike microstructures on a stainless steel by taking the full advantage of the liquid-mediated femtosecond laser ablation. An unordered netlike structure and a quasi-ordered array of holes can be fabricated on the surface of stainless steel via an ethanol-mediated femtosecond laser line-scan method. SEM analysis of the surface morphology indicates that the porous netlike structure is in the micrometer scale and the diameter of the quasi-ordered holes ranges from 280 nm to 320 nm. Besides, we find that the obtained structures are tunable by altering the laser processing parameters especially scanning speed.

  3. Particle-in-cell simulations of magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma experiments on Shenguang-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui; Dong, Quanli; Zhu, Jianqiang; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Recently, magnetic reconnection has been realized in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas. Plasma bubbles with self-generated magnetic fields are created by focusing laser beams to small-scale spots on a foil. The bubbles expand into each other, which may then drive magnetic reconnection. The reconnection experiment in laser-produced plasmas has also been conducted at Shenguang-II (SG-II) laser facility, and the existence of a plasmoid was identified in the experiment [Dong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 215001 (2012)]. In this paper, by performing two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate such a process of magnetic reconnection based on the experiment on SG-II facility, and a possible explanation for the formation of the plasmoid is proposed. The results show that before magnetic reconnection occurs, the bubbles squeeze strongly each other and a very thin current sheet is formed. The current sheet is unstable to the tearing mode instability, and we can then observe the formation of plasmoid(s) in such a multiple X-lines reconnection.

  4. Fragmentation Under Extreme Conditions: Applications to Risk Assessment and Diagnostic Development at Mega-Joule Class Laser Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolken, James

    2013-06-01

    The development of Mega-Joule class laser facilities (NIF, USA; LMJ, France, SG-IV, China) has driven the need to understand, predict, and control the risks associated with experimental operations due to ablation, blast, and impact hazards. These hazards potentially jeopardize a broad range of facility assets, such as Targets, Laser Optics, Diagnostics, and other Infrastructure. This presentation shall focus on the application of high-performance computer modeling and simulation (M&S) to quantify and mitigate the risk posed by blast, ablation, and impact hazards. The overall risk management strategy is discussed and the role of M&S outlined. The M&S activities fall within two broad categories, Laser-Material interaction (LM) and Hydro-Structural (HS) simulations. The LM class of simulations addresses the high energy, short time phenomena including laser energy deposition, radiation, ablation, heat-flow, and hydrodynamic motion. The HS class of simulations addresses lower energy, longer time phenomena including hydrodynamic motion, heat-flow, material failure, fracture, and fragmentation. Recent efforts to assess and improve fragmentation simulation capabilities are reviewed. Existing simulations methodologies are evaluated and compared to high fidelity fragment data. Applications to diagnostic development and experimental design are reviewed.

  5. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I

    2002-01-11

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a $2.25B stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Agency and when completed will be the world's largest laser system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of extreme energy densities and pressures. In NIF up to 192 energetic laser beams will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for high power applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to exawatt power levels.

  6. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2002-10-16

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the University of California's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, 351-nm laser system and a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. NIF is being built by the National Nuclear Security Administration and when completed will be the world's largest laser experimental system, providing a national center to study inertial confinement fusion and the physics of matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF will provide 192 energetic laser beams that will compress small fusion targets to conditions where they will ignite and burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. NIF experiments will allow the study of physical processes at temperatures approaching 100 million K and 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions exist naturally only in the interior of stars and in nuclear weapons explosions. In the course of designing the world's most energetic laser system, a number of significant technology breakthroughs have been achieved. Research is also underway to develop a shorter pulse capability on NIF for very high power and extreme electromagnetic field research and applications. We discuss here the technology challenges and solutions that have made NIF possible, along with enhancements to NIF's design that could lead to near-exawatt power levels.

  7. Investigating Preterm Care at the Facility Level: Stakeholder Qualitative Study in Central and Southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gondwe, Austrida; Munthali, Alister; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Malawi is estimated to have one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world. However, care of preterm infants at facility level in Malawi has not been explored. We aimed to explore the views of health stakeholders about the care of preterm infants in health facilities and the existence of any policy protocol documents guiding the delivery of care to these infants. Methods We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with health stakeholders (11 service providers and 5 policy makers) using an interview guide and asked for any existing policy protocol documents guiding care for preterm infants in the health facilities in Malawi. The collected documents were reviewed and all the interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated. All data were analysed using content analysis approach. Results We identified four policy protocol documents and out of these, one had detailed information explaining the care of preterm infants. Policy makers reported that policy protocol documents to guide care for preterm infants were available in the health facilities but majority (63.6 %) of the service providers lacked knowledge about the existence of these documents. Health stakeholders reported several challenges in caring for preterm infants including lack of trained staff in preterm infant care, antibiotics, space, supervision and poor referral system. Conclusions Our study highlights that improving health care service provider knowledge of preterm infant care is an integral part in preterm child birth. Our findings suggests that policy makers and health decision makers should retain those trained in preterm new born care in the health facility's preterm unit.

  8. Recent progress in siting low-level waste disposal facilities in the Southwestern Compact and the Central Interstate Compact

    SciTech Connect

    DeOld, J.H.; Shaffner, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    US Ecology is the private contractor selected to develop and operate low-level waste disposal facilities in the Southwestern and the Central Interstate Compacts. These initiatives have been proceeding for almost a decade in somewhat different regulatory and political climates. This paper chronicles recent events in both projects. In both cases there is reason for continued optimism that low-level waste facilities to serve the needs of waste generators in these two compacts will soon be a reality. When the California Department of Health Services issued a license for the proposed Ward Valley LLRW disposal facility on September 16, 1993, it represented a significant step in implementation of a new generation of regional LLRW disposal facilities. While limited scope land transfer hearings were on the horizon, project beneficiaries were confident that the disposal site would be operational by 1995. Since then, however, political initiatives championed by Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) have clouded the federal land transfer process and left the commencement date of operations indeterminant. Since 1993, the biomedical community, waste generators most affected by delays, have been petitioning the current administration to emphasize the need for a timely solution. These efforts are aimed at Clinton administration officials responsible for current delays, who apparently have not recognized the importance of the Ward Valley facility to California`s economy, nor the national ramifications of their delaying actions. The current status of challenges to the Ward Valley license and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) documentation is also provided. The presentation also discusses the recently completed National Academy of Science evaluation of reports critical of the Ward Valley development process.

  9. Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E

    2009-08-06

    The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the creation

  10. Birefringence of the central cornea in children assessed with scanning laser polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsch, Kristina; Shah, Ashesh A.

    2012-08-01

    Corneal birefringence is a well-known confounding factor with all polarization-sensitive technology used for retinal scanning and other intraocular assessment. It has been studied extensively in adults, but little is known regarding age-related differences. Specifically, no information is available concerning corneal birefringence in children. For applications that are geared towards children, such as retinal birefringence scanning for strabismus screening purposes, it is important to know the expected range of both corneal retardance and azimuth in pediatric populations. This study investigated central corneal birefringence in children (ages three and above), by means of scanning laser polarimetry (GDx-VCC™, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc.). Children's measures of corneal retardance and azimuth were compared with those obtained in adults. As with previous studies in adults, corneal birefringence was found to vary widely in children, with corneal retardance ranging from 10 to 77 nm, and azimuth (slow axis) ranging from -11° to 71° (measured nasally downward). No significant differences in central corneal birefringence were found between children and adults, nor were significant age-related differences found in general. In conclusion, establishing knowledge of the polarization properties of the central cornea in children allows better understanding, exploitation, or bypassing of these effects in new polarization-sensitive pediatric ophthalmic applications.

  11. The CO2 gasdynamic laser as a high-intensity radiation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.; Otten, L. J.

    1975-01-01

    The basic theory of CO2 gasdynamic lasers is discussed and related to the design of the Ames laser, which is described in detail. Results of the experimental calibration of the laser are reported and compared with theoretical predictions, and the agreement is excellent. Finally, several applications of the laser as a radiation source for materials testing, both with and without air flow, are described.

  12. Advanced Splicing and High-Resolution Imaging Facility for High Power PCF Laser Fabrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    process, and integrate PCF’s into all-fiber high power laser systems. Specifically, a tabletop scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a CO2 laser ...PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total Number: ...... ...... Technology Transfer No technology transfers are reported during this project Final Report CO2 Laser ...characterize, process, and integrate PCF’s into all-fiber high power laser systems. Specifically, a tabletop scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a CO2

  13. Briefing paper for the proposed ultraviolet free-electron laser (UV- FEL) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.

    1992-07-15

    The proposed Brookhaven National Laboratory ultraviolet free-electron laser (UV-FEL) user facility will provide picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses of coherent ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths from 300 to 75 nm. Pulse width will be variable from about 7 ps to {approx} 200 fs, with repetition rates as high as l0{sup 4}Hz, single pulse energies > 1 NJ and hence peak pulse power > 200 MW and average beam power > 10 W. The facility will be capable of ``pump-probe`` experiments utilizing the FEL radiation with: (1) synchronized auxiliary lasers, (2) a second, independently tunable FEL beam, or (3) broad-spectrum, high-intensity x-rays from an insertion device in the x-ray ring of the adjacent National Synchrotron Light Source. The UV-FEL consists of a high repetition rate recirculating superconducting linear accelerator which feeds pulses of electrons to two magnetic wigglers. Within these two devices, photons from tunable ``conventional`` lasers are frequency multiplied and amplified. By synchronously tuning the seed laser and modulating the energy of the electron beam, tuning of as much as 60% in wavelength is possible between alternating pulses supplied to different experimental stations, with Fourier transform limited resolution. Thus, up to four independent experiments may operate at one time, each with independent control of the wavelength and pulse duration. A total of eight experimental stations are planned, with two currently assigned to general users, two each for solid state and chemical physics, and one each for atomic physics and biology. This document provides a few representative examples of experiments in these fields, as well as an introduction to the facility, its limitations, and its potential for future growth.

  14. Briefing paper for the proposed ultraviolet free-electron laser (UV- FEL) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.

    1992-07-15

    The proposed Brookhaven National Laboratory ultraviolet free-electron laser (UV-FEL) user facility will provide picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses of coherent ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths from 300 to 75 nm. Pulse width will be variable from about 7 ps to {approx} 200 fs, with repetition rates as high as l0{sup 4}Hz, single pulse energies > 1 NJ and hence peak pulse power > 200 MW and average beam power > 10 W. The facility will be capable of pump-probe'' experiments utilizing the FEL radiation with: (1) synchronized auxiliary lasers, (2) a second, independently tunable FEL beam, or (3) broad-spectrum, high-intensity x-rays from an insertion device in the x-ray ring of the adjacent National Synchrotron Light Source. The UV-FEL consists of a high repetition rate recirculating superconducting linear accelerator which feeds pulses of electrons to two magnetic wigglers. Within these two devices, photons from tunable conventional'' lasers are frequency multiplied and amplified. By synchronously tuning the seed laser and modulating the energy of the electron beam, tuning of as much as 60% in wavelength is possible between alternating pulses supplied to different experimental stations, with Fourier transform limited resolution. Thus, up to four independent experiments may operate at one time, each with independent control of the wavelength and pulse duration. A total of eight experimental stations are planned, with two currently assigned to general users, two each for solid state and chemical physics, and one each for atomic physics and biology. This document provides a few representative examples of experiments in these fields, as well as an introduction to the facility, its limitations, and its potential for future growth.

  15. Horizontal crustal motion in the central and eastern Mediterranean inferred from Satellite Laser Ranging measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Kolenkiewicz, Ron; Robbins, John W.; Dunn, Peter J.; Torrence, Mark H.

    1994-01-01

    Four campaigns to acquire Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements at sites in the Mediterranean region have been completed. These measurements to the LAGEOS satellite, made largely by mobile systems, cover a time span beginning in November 1985 and ending in June 1993. The range data from 18 sites in the central and eastern Mediterranean have been simultaneously analyzed with data acquired by the remainder of the global laser tracking network. Estimates of horizontal motion were placed into a regional, northern Europe-fixed, kinematic reference frame. Uncertainties are on the order of 5 mm/yr for sites having at least four occupations by mobile systems and approach 1 mm/yr for permanently located sites with long histories of tracking. The resulting relative motion between sites in the Aegean exhibit characteristics of broadly distributed pattern of radial extension, but at rates that are about 50% larger than those implied from studies of seismic strain rates based on seismicity of magnitude 6 or greater or across the region. The motion estimated for sites in Turkey exhibit velocity components associated with the westward motion of the Anatolian Block relative to Eurasia. These results provide a present-day 'snapshot' of ongoing deformational processes as experienced by the locations occupied by SLR systems.

  16. Change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility and Free Electron Laser, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    In this environmental assessment (EA), the US Department of Energy (DOE) reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from a proposed change in operating parameters of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), and operation of the Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility beyond the initial demonstration period. With this proposal, DOE intends to increase CEBAF operating range from its current operating maximum beam energy of 4.0 GeV [giga-(billion) electron volts] to 8.0 GeV at a beam power of no greater than 1,000 kW [1 megawatt (MW)], its maximum attainable level, based on current technology and knowledge, without significant, costly equipment modifications. DOE has prepared an EA for this action to determine the potential for adverse impacts from operation of CEBAF and the FEL at the proposed levels. Changing the operating parameters of CEBAF would require no new major construction and minor modifications to the accelerator, its support systems, the FEL, and onsite utility systems. Modifications and performance improvements would be made to (1) the accelerator housed in the underground tunnels, (2) its support systems located in the above ground service buildings, and (3) the water and equipment cooling systems both in the tunnel and at the ground surface. All work would be performed on previously disturbed land and in, on, or adjacent to existing buildings, structures, and equipment. With the proposed action, the recently constructed FEL facility at the Jefferson Lab would operate in concert with CEBAF beyond its demonstration period and up to its maximum effective electron beam power level of 210 kW. In this EA, DOE evaluates the impacts of the no-action alternative and the proposed action alternative. Alternatives considered, but dismissed from further evaluation, were the use of another accelerator facility and the use of another technology.

  17. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  18. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Perkoulidis, G.; Papageorgiou, A.; Karagiannidis, A.; Kalogirou, S.

    2010-07-15

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased

  20. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives.

    PubMed

    Perkoulidis, G; Papageorgiou, A; Karagiannidis, A; Kalogirou, S

    2010-07-01

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased

  1. Thermal Distortion Measurements of a Dual Gridded Antenna Reflector with Laser Radar System Integrated to a Thermal Vacuum Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Peter Jens; Doring, Daniel; Ihle, Alexander; Reichmann, Olaf; Maeyaert, Michiel

    2014-06-01

    A dual gridded reflector for Ku-Band applications (KuDGR) with two actually gridded shells made of single and individually shaped CFRP-rods (single carbon fibre reinforced plastic) has been developed by HPS. Due to the fact that these shells are made of CFRP-rods conventional methods for coordinate and thermal-distortion (TD) measuring could not be used. Therefore, the Laser Radar system (LR) was identified as best suitable measurement method for this application.The LR was chosen during the KaDGR study performed by HPS due to its capability to measure points contactless without targets and with high precision and a great number of measurement points in a short time. Furthermore, due to the gridded structure measurement systems using interferometric patterns (ESPI, Shearography) or structured light projection could not be applied.The performance of the Laser Radar system was tested during preliminary measurements on the KuDGR bread- board model. For the first environmental tests on the engineering model, the test methods at IABG were specifically adapted and qualified in order to verify that the Laser Radar system can handle the constrains set by a thermal-vacuum (TV) test facility. During the verification test run the objectives were to verify the compatibility of the LR with the positioning with respect to the chamber, the visibility, the test facilities viewport and setup inside the chamber as well as the achievable measurement accuracy. The general compatibility could be shown and optimisations regarding test setup and better accuracy were identified. Since the active surfaces of the reflector contains a multitude of single rods all with different shapes and lengths the vibration influences of the individual facility systems onto the reflector were investigated.The LR system is widely used in industrial applications but references regarding measuring thermo-elastic distortions in a TV test facility using this method are still rare. IABG has developed and

  2. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Reduction of wavefront aberrations and laser radiation divergence of the 'Luch' facility with the help of an adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronich, Ivan N.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zaretskii, Aleksei I.; Zimalin, B. G.; Kirillov, G. A.; Kulikov, S. M.; Manachinckii, A. N.; Murugov, Vasilii M.; Ogorodnikov, A. V.; Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Sukharev, Stanislav A.

    2005-02-01

    An adaptive system for the compensation of static and thermally induced wavefront aberrations of the amplification path of the 'Luch' laser facility is described. This system provided the reduction of the amplitude A of wavefront aberrations of high-power radiation and the standard deviation σ by a factor of ~3: from A = 9.6 μm, σ = 2.4 μm to A = 3.2 μm, σ = 0.6 μm, which decreased the radiation divergence by half.

  3. The effects of buffer strips and bioretention facilities on agricultural productivity and environmental quality in Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilroy, Kristin L.; McCuen, Richard H.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryLand degradation is a growing concern in Central Africa as poor management practices continue to cause erosion and increase water runoff in agricultural fields. The implementation of best management practices (BMPs) is needed; however, productivity is often indirectly related to the environmental benefits of such practices and resource constraints often exist. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bioretention facilities and buffer strips on environmental quality with productivity and resources as constraints. A water quantity and quality model for an agricultural field in Central Africa was developed. Analyses were conducted to assess the marginal benefits of each BMP, the effect of different BMP combinations on environmental quality and productivity, and the effect of data uncertainty and location uncertainty on model predictions. The results showed that bioretention pits were more effective than buffer strips in increasing environmental quality. Productivity was shown to be directly related to bioretention pits, thus environmental quality can be attained without sacrificing productivity. Data uncertainties resulted in changes in the environmental quality values, but trends remained the same. Guidelines were provided to assist design engineers in developing BMP scenarios that provide the greatest productivity and environmental quality for the constraints involved. The results of this study will bring awareness to the ability of attaining environmental quality without sacrificing productivity as well as the need for accurate data in Central Africa.

  4. High gain preamplifier module (PAM) engineering prototype for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Braucht, J; Browning, D; Crane, J K; Crawford, J; Deadrick, F J; Hawkins, S; Jones, B; Martinez, M; Penko, F; Skulina, M; Tilley, R; Wing, R

    1998-10-29

    We describe recent results and developments in the preamplifier module (PAM) engineering prototype located in NIF's front end or Optical Pulse Generation (OPG) system. This prototype uses the general laser design developed on a physics testbed and integrates NIP type packaging as well as controls and diagnostics. We will present laser, mechanical and electrical hardware designed and built to date as well as laser energetics measurements.

  5. National Ignition Facility, subsystem design requirements beam control {ampersand} laser diagnostics SSDR 1.7

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.

    1996-11-01

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Alignment subsystem (WBS 1.7.1), Beam Diagnostics (WBS 1.7.2), and the Wavefront Control subsystem (WBS 1.7. 3) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3). These three subsystems are collectively referred to as the Beam Control & Laser Diagnostics Subsystem. The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Laser Coupling to Reduced-Scale Targets at the Early Light Program of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D E; Schneider, M B; Baldis, H A; Bower, D; Campbell, K M; Celeste, J R; Compton, S; Costa, R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S; Eckart, M J; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Froula, D H; Glenzer, S H; Hargrove, D; Haynam, C A; Heeter, R F; Holder, J P; Holtmeier, G; James, L; Jancaitis, K S; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R L; Kimbrough, J; Kirkwood, R K; Koniges, A E; Kamperschroer, J; Landen, O L; Landon, M; Langdon, A B; Lee, F D; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; Manes, K R; May, M J; McDonald, J W; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Niemann, C; Pellinen, D; Rekow, V; Ruppe, J A; Schein, J; Shepherd, R; Singh, M S; Springer, P T; Still, C H; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Williams, E A; Young, B K; Young, P E

    2004-11-18

    A platform for analysis of material properties under extreme conditions, where a sample is bathed in radiation with a high temperature, is under development. This hot environment is produced with a laser by depositing maximum energy into a small, high-Z can. Such targets were recently included in an experimental campaign using the first four of the 192 beams of the National Ignition Facility, under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These targets demonstrate good laser coupling, reaching a radiation temperature of 340 eV. In addition, there is a unique wavelength dependence of the Raman backscattered light that is consistent with Brillouin backscatter of Raman forward scatter [A. B. Langdon and D. E. Hinkel, Physical Review Letters 89, 015003 (2002)]. Finally, novel diagnostic capabilities indicate that 20% of the direct backscatter from these reduced-scale targets is in the polarization orthogonal to that of the incident light.

  7. Design of FELiChEM, the first infrared free-electron laser user facility in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ting; Jia, Qi-Ka; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wang, Lin; Yang, Yong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    FELiChEM is a new experimental facility under construction at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC). Its core device is two free electron laser oscillators generating middle-infrared and far-infrared laser and covering the spectral range of 2.5-200 μm. It will be a dedicated infrared light source aiming at energy chemistry research. We present the brief design of the FEL oscillators, with the emphasis put on the middle-infrared oscillator. Most of the basic parameters are determined and the anticipated performance of the output radiation is given. The first light of FELiChEM is targeted for the end of 2017. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (21327901)

  8. Time transfer between the Goddard Optical Research Facility and the U.S. Naval Observatory using 100 picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, C. O.; Rayner, J. D.; Steggerda, C. A.; Mullendore, J. V.; Small, L.; Wagner, S.

    1983-01-01

    A horizontal two-way time comparison link in air between the University of Maryland laser ranging and time transfer equipment at the Goddard Optical Research Facility (GORF) 1.2 m telescope and the Time Services Division of the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) was established. Flat mirrors of 25 cm and 30 cm diameter respectively were placed on top of the Washington Cathedral and on a water tower at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Two optical corner reflectors at the USNO reflect the laser pulses back to the GORF. Light pulses of 100 ps duration and an energy of several hundred microjoules are sent at the rate of 10 pulses per second. The detection at the USNO is by means of an RCA C30902E avalanche photodiode and the timing is accomplished by an HP 5370A computing counter and an HP 1000 computer with respect to a 10 pps pulse train from the Master Clock.

  9. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Nuclear-nuclear collision centrality determination by the spectators calorimeter for the MPD setup at the NICA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, M. B.; Guber, F. F.; Ivashkin, A. P.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Kurepin, A. B.; Litvinenko, A. G. Litvinenko, E. I.; Migulina, I. I.; Peresedov, V. F.

    2013-01-15

    The work conditions of the hadron calorimeter for spectators registration (Zero Degree Calorimeter, ZDC) were studied for the heavy nuclei collisions with the several GeV invariant energy. The ZDC simulations were performed for the MPD (Multi-Purpose Detector) at the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) collider, which are under developement at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna). Taking into account the spectator nuclear fragments leads to a nonmonotonic dependence of the ZDC response on the impact parameter. The reason for this dependence studied with several event generators is the primary beam hole in the ZDC center. It is shown, that the ZDC signal should be combined with a data from other MPD-NICA detector subsystems to determine centrality.

  11. Coordination and establishment of centralized facilities and services of the University of Alaska ERTS survey of the Alaskan environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belon, A. E. (Principal Investigator); Miller, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The objective of this project is to provide a focus for the entire University of Alaska ERTS-1 effort (12 projects covering 10 disciplines and involving 8 research institutes and science departments). Activities have been concentrated on the implementation of the project's three primary functions: (1) coordination and management of the U of A ERTS-1 program, including management of the flow of data and data products; (2) acquisition, installation, test, operation, and maintanence of centralized facilities for processing ERTS-1, aircraft, and ground truth data; and (3) development of photographic and digital techniques for processing and interpreting ERTS-1 and aircraft data. With minor exceptions these three functions are now well-established and working smoothly.

  12. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ' polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  13. MLRS - A lunar/artificial satellite laser ranging facility at the McDonald Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experience from lunar and satellite laser ranging experiments carried out at McDonald Observatory has been used to design the McDonald Laser Ranging Station (MLRS). The MLRS is a dual-purpose installation designed to obtain observations from the LAGEOS satellite and lunar targets. The instruments used at the station include a telescope assembly 0.76 meters in diameter; a Q-switched doubled neodymium YAG laser with a pulse rate of three nanoseconds; and a GaAs photodetector with Fabry-Perot interferometric filter. A functional diagram of the system is provided. The operating parameters of the instruments are summarized in a table.

  14. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C

    2001-10-29

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

  15. A statistical method for determining the dimensions, tolerances and specification of optics for the Laser Megajoule facility (LMJ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, Vincent

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for determining the dimensions, tolerance and specifications of components for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Numerous constraints inherent to a large facility require specific tolerances: the huge number of optical components; the interdependence of these components between the beams of same bundle; angular multiplexing for the amplifier section; distinct operating modes between the alignment and firing phases; the definition and use of alignment software in the place of classic optimization. This method provides greater flexibility to determine the positioning and manufacturing specifications of the optical components. Given the enormous power of the Laser MegaJoule (over 18 kJ in the infrared and 9 kJ in the ultraviolet), one of the major risks is damage the optical mounts and pollution of the installation by mechanical ablation. This method enables estimation of the beam occultation probabilities and quantification of the risks for the facility. All the simulations were run using the ZEMAX-EE optical design software.

  16. W.M. Keck-Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser Center facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabella, William E.; Feng, Bibo; Kozub, John A.; Piston, David W.

    2002-04-01

    The W.M. Keck-Vanderbilt Free-electron Laser Center operates a reliable free-electron laser (FEL) that is used in human surgical trials, as well as in basic and applied sciences. The wavelength of the FEL is tunable from 2.1 micrometers to 9.6 micrometers , delivering above 50 mJ per macropulse with a repetition rate of 30 Hz. For soft tissue surgery, especially neurosurgery and surgery on the optic nerve, a wavelength of 6.45 micrometers has been found to ablate with little collateral damage. The free-electron laser beam is delivered to experiments approximately 2000 hours each year. The Center also supports several other tools useful for biomedical experiments: an optical parametric generator laser system with tunable wavelength similar to the free- electron laser except it has much lower average power; a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to characterize samples; several devices for in vivo imaging including an optical coherence tomography setup, a two-photon fluorescent confocal microscope, and a cooled, integrating camera capable of imaging luciferin-luciferase reactions within the body of a mouse. The Center also houses a tunable, monochromatic x-ray source based on Compton backscattering of a laser off of a relativistic electron beam.

  17. Systemic effects of low-power laser irradiation on the peripheral and central nervous system, cutaneous wounds, and burns

    SciTech Connect

    Rochkind, S.; Rousso, M.; Nissan, M.; Villarreal, M.; Barr-Nea, L.; Rees, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we direct attention to the systemic effect of low-power helium-neon (HeNe) laser irradiation on the recovery of the injured peripheral and central nervous system, as well as healing of cutaneous wounds and burns. Laser irradiation on only the right side in bilaterally inflicted cutaneous wounds enhanced recovery in both sides compared to the nonirradiated control group (P less than .01). Similar results were obtained in bilateral burns: irradiating one of the burned sites also caused accelerated healing in the nonirradiated site (P less than .01). However, in the nonirradiated control group, all rats suffered advanced necrosis of the feet and bilateral gangrene. Low-power HeNe laser irradiation applied to a crushed injured sciatic nerve in the right leg in a bilaterally inflicted crush injury, significantly increased the compound action potential in the left nonirradiated leg as well. The statistical analysis shows a highly significant difference between the laser-treated group and the control nonirradiated group (P less than .001). Finally, the systemic effect was found in the spinal cord segments corresponding to the crushed sciatic nerves. The bilateral retrograde degeneration of the motor neurons of the spinal cord expected after the bilateral crush injury of the peripheral nerves was greatly reduced in the laser treated group. The systemic effects reported here are relevant in terms of the clinical application of low-power laser irradiation as well as for basic research into the possible mechanisms involved.

  18. Femtosecond laser direct hard mask writing for selective facile micron-scale inverted-pyramid patterning of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; Lee, K. K. C.; Herman, P. R.; Nogami, J.; Kherani, N. P.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the fabrication of high-fidelity inverted-pyramids in crystalline silicon (c-Si) at the 1 μm scale through the selective removal of a silicon nitride (SiNx) hard-mask with a 522 nm femtosecond (fs) laser and subsequent alkaline potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching. Through a series of systematic experiments on a range of hard-mask thicknesses, the use of 20 nm thick SiNx film yielded a 0.6 μm diameter laser-ejected aperture in the hard-mask at a single pulse fluence of 0.45 J cm-2, resulting in 1 μm wide inverted-pyramid structure in c-Si after KOH etching. Anisotropic KOH etching of the partially amorphized c-Si underlying the fs-laser patterned hard mask was found to render clean (111) planes of c-Si. An array of inverted-pyramids on c-Si surfaces as large as 4 cm2 was produced with a defect density of less than 1 in 104. This facile, non-contact, and cleanroom-independent technique serves a variety of applications including anti-reflective texturing of thin c-Si for photovoltaics, wafer marking, labeling, and fabrication of microfluidic and optical devices or laboratories on silicon wafers.

  19. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Laser Imprint in National Ignition Facility Multi-FM Smoothing by Spectral Dispersion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydky, A.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Anderson, K. S.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McKenty, P. W.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.; Masse, L.

    2016-10-01

    Control of shell nonuniformities imprinted by a laser and amplified by hydrodynamic instabilities in an imploding target is critical for the success of direct-drive ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One-dimensional, multi-FM smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD), proposed to provide the required level of smoothing of the laser imprint, has been integrated into one quad of the NIF Laser System and used in recent experiments. The experiments employed flat CH foils driven with a single NIF quad with either the multi-FM or stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression SSD. Face-on x-ray radiography was used to measure optical-depth variations, from which the amplitudes of the foil areal-density modulations were obtained. Results of 3-D, radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA simulations of the growth of the imprint seeded perturbations are presented and compared with the experimental data. The effectiveness of the multi-FM SSD in reducing the imprint is evaluated. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Direct fabrication of compound-eye microlens array on curved surfaces by a facile femtosecond laser enhanced wet etching process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hao; Wei, Yang; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Fan; Du, Guangqing; Yong, Jiale; Hou, Xun

    2016-11-01

    We report a direct fabrication of an omnidirectional negative microlens array on a curved substrate by a femtosecond laser enhanced chemical etching process, which is utilized as a molding template for duplicating bioinspired compound eyes. The femtosecond laser treatment of the curved glass substrate employs a common x-y-z stage without rotating the sample surface perpendicular to the laser beam, and uniform, omnidirectional-aligned negative microlenses are generated after a hydrofluoric acid etching. Using the negative microlens array on the concave glass substrate as a molding template, we fabricate an artificial compound eye with 3000 positive microlenses of 95-μm diameter close-packed on a 5-mm polymer hemisphere. Compared to the transferring process, the negative microlenses directly fabricated on the curved mold by our method are distortion-free, and the duplicated artificial eye presents clear and uniform imaging capabilities. This work provides a facile and efficient route to the fabrication of microlenses on any curved substrates without complicated alignment and motion control processes, which has the potential for the development of new microlens-based devices and systems.

  1. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  2. Macular Cone Abnormalities in Retinitis Pigmentosa with Preserved Central Vision Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Yukiko; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Takayama, Kohei; Uji, Akihito; Oishi, Akio; Ogino, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess macular photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with preserved central vision using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO). Methods Fourteen eyes of 14 patients with RP (best-corrected visual acuity 20/20 or better) and 12 eyes of 12 volunteers underwent a full ophthalmologic examination, fundus autofluorescence, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), and imaging with a prototype AO-SLO system. Cone density and spatial organization of the cone mosaic were assessed using AO-SLO images. Results In 3 eyes with RP and preserved central vision, cones formed a mostly regular mosaic pattern with small patchy dark areas, and in 10 eyes, the cone mosaic patterns were less regular, and large dark regions with missing cones were apparent. Only one eye with RP demonstrated a normal, regular cone mosaic pattern. In eyes with RP, cone density was significantly lower at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea compared to normal eyes (P<0.001 and 0.021, respectively). At 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm from the center of the fovea, a decreased number of cones had 6 neighbors in eyes with RP (P = 0.002 for both). Greater decrease in cone density was related to disruption of the photoreceptor inner segment (IS) ellipsoid band on SD-OCT images (P = 0.044); however, dark regions were seen on AO-SLO even in areas of continuous IS ellipsoid on SD-OCT. Decreased cone density correlated thinner outer nuclear layer (P = 0.029) and thinner inner segment and outer segment thickness (P = 0.011) on SD-OCT. Conclusions Cone density is decreased and the regularity of the cone mosaic spatial arrangement is disrupted in eyes with RP, even when visual acuity and foveal sensitivity are good. AO-SLO imaging is a sensitive quantitative tool for detecting photoreceptor abnormalities in eyes with RP. PMID:24260224

  3. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE`s Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the US, is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly-skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of our nation`s nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of {plus_minus}60{degree} from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high-power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a reactor pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH TARGETS Tomographic imaging of a target directly irradiated in experiments on the Iskra-5 iodine laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Garanin, R. V.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Oreshkov, O. V.; Potapov, S. V.; Suslov, N. A.; Frolova, N. V.

    2010-12-01

    We set forth the data of experiments involving direct microtarget irradiation by the 12 second-harmonic beams (λ = 0.66 μm) of iodine laser radiation carried out on the Iskra-5 facility. For microtargets we employed glass shells ~500 μm in diameter with ~1-μm thick walls, which were filled with a DT mixture at a pressure pDT approx 3-4 atm. In one of these experiments, a tomographic image of the microtarget was recorded from the images obtained using pinhole cameras, which were arranged along seven different directions. The pinhole images were acquired in the X-ray radiation with photon energies above 1.5 keV. The procedure used for reconstructing the volume luminosity of the microtarget is described. An analysis of the tomographic image suggests that the compressed microtarget domain possesses a complex asymmetric shape; 20-30 μm sized structural elements being clearly visible. The resultant data set allowed us to estimate the initial nonuniformity of microtarget surface irradiation by the laser radiation. The rms nonuniformity of microtarget irradiance was estimated at ~60 %.

  5. Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

    1987-03-01

    A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs.

  6. Improved earthquake monitoring in the central and eastern United States in support of seismic assessments for critical facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, William S.; Benz, Harley M.; Herrmann, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of seismic monitoring capabilities in the central and eastern United States for critical facilities - including nuclear powerplants - focused on specific improvements to understand better the seismic hazards in the region. The report is not an assessment of seismic safety at nuclear plants. To accomplish the evaluation and to provide suggestions for improvements using funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey examined addition of new strong-motion seismic stations in areas of seismic activity and addition of new seismic stations near nuclear power-plant locations, along with integration of data from the Transportable Array of some 400 mobile seismic stations. Some 38 and 68 stations, respectively, were suggested for addition in active seismic zones and near-power-plant locations. Expansion of databases for strong-motion and other earthquake source-characterization data also was evaluated. Recognizing pragmatic limitations of station deployment, augmentation of existing deployments provides improvements in source characterization by quantification of near-source attenuation in regions where larger earthquakes are expected. That augmentation also supports systematic data collection from existing networks. The report further utilizes the application of modeling procedures and processing algorithms, with the additional stations and the improved seismic databases, to leverage the capabilities of existing and expanded seismic arrays.

  7. Combined fringe and Fabry-Perot laser anemometer for three component velocity measurements in turbine stator cascade facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.; Goldman, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    A laser anemometer is described that was developed for use in a 508 mm diameter annular turbine stator cascade facility. All three velocity components are measured through a single restricted optical port, both within the stator vane row and downstream of the vanes. The measurements are made through a cylindrical window in the casing that matches the tip radius of the cascade. The stator tested has a contoured hub endwall that results in a large radial flow near the hub. The anemometer uses a standard fringe configuration (LFA) with a fluorescent aerosol seed to measure the axial and circumferential velocity components. The radial component is measured with a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. The two configurations are combined in a single optical system and can operate simultaneously. Data are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  8. Experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in heated Al and Ge on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Garanin, Sergey G; Zhidkov, N V; Pinegin, A V; Suslov, N A

    2012-01-31

    We set forth the data of experimental investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients in the 1.1 - 1.6 keV photon energy range for Al and Ge specimens bulk heated by soft X-ray radiation. Two experimental techniques are described: with the use of one facility channel and the heating of specimens by the X-ray radiation from a plane burnthrough target, as well as with the use of four channels and the heating by the radiation from two cylindrical targets with internal input of laser radiation. The X-ray radiation absorption coefficients were studied by way of transmission absorption spectroscopy using backlighting X-ray radiation from a point source. The results of investigation of X-ray spectral absorption coefficients on the 1s - 2p transitions in Al atoms and the 2p - 3d transitions in Ge atoms are presented.

  9. Combined fringe and Fabry-Perot laser anemometer for 3 component velocity measurements in turbine stator cascade facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Goldman, Louis J.

    1986-01-01

    A laser anemometer is described that was developed for use in a 508 mm diameter annular turbine stator cascade facility. All three velocity components are measured through a single restricted optical port, both within the stator vane row and downstream of the vanes. The measurements are made through a cylindrical window in the casing that matches the tip radius of the cascade. The stator tested has a contoured hub endwall that results in a large radial flow near the hub. The anemometer uses a standard fringe configuration (LFA) with a fluorescent aerosol seed to measure the axial and circumferential velocity components. The radial component is measured with a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. The two configurations are combined in a single optical system and can operate simultaneously. Data are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  10. Blue-on-yellow perimetry with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope: small alterations in the central macula with aging.

    PubMed

    Remky, A; Elsner, A E; Morandi, A J; Beausencourt, E; Trempe, C L

    2001-07-01

    The sensitivity of short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) cone pathways was measured in the central fields of 74 normal subjects, aged 17-86 yr, with healthy maculas. The new fundus perimetry technique used a research scanning laser ophthalmoscope with a small entrance pupil to present blue static perimetry targets on a bright yellow background. Simultaneous infrared imaging aided target positioning and rapid assessment of potential pathology in elderly subjects. Targets were positioned peripheral to fixation, avoiding both the SWS-cone-free area and the peak macular pigment, determined in 11 subjects. Sensitivity declined 0.019 log unit per decade, while intraindividual variability across loci increased. The nasal-temporal asymmetry remained constant. Sensitivity of older subjects was relatively less for the most central targets but was unrelated to transmission through macular pigment. Retinal changes with age occur to differing extents or at differing rates and are readily detectable in the central macula.

  11. Cloud clearing with a CO(2) laser in a cirrus cloud simulation facility.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, A P; Radke, L F; Buonadonna, V; Dowling, D R

    1992-09-20

    We report experiments that confirm our prediction that clouds consisting of ice crystals with properties similar to those of cirrus clouds can be cleared with relatively low pulsed CO(2) laser energy density and that the cleared channel is resistant to obscuration by recondensation of the evaporated water. For the experiments reported here, we use a unique cloud-generating apparatus consisting of a low-speed wind tunnel with water spray injectors to generate water droplets or, with ice nucleus seeding at low temperatures, ice crystals. The air temperature can be controlled over the range of ambient to -40 degrees C. A significant clearing of ice crystal clouds was observed with pulsed CO(2) laser fluence in the range 0.2 to 1.5 J/cm(2) and, as expected, recondensation was found to depend on ice particle mass concentration. At ice particle concentrations similar to those found in cirrus clouds, recondensation did not occur.

  12. The NBS/NRL (National Bureau of Standards/Naval Research Laboratory) Free Electron Laser Facility,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    343eec... .. ba as a joint project with the Naval Research Laboratory. Theelectron beam source is the i35-MeV CW racetrack microtron (RTM) presently...materials sciences, and basic physics and chemistry. The driving accelerator is a 185-MeV CW racetrack microtron (RTM) now nearing completion. *This...JV Accelerator The electron accelerator of the NBS/NRL FEL facility is the NBS/Los Alamos Racetrack Microtron (RTM). A general description of the RTM

  13. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  14. Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

    2010-02-04

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

  15. The effect of laser spot shapes on polar-direct-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weilacher, F.; Radha, P. B. Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl and E. I. Moses, Phys. Plasmas 18, 050901 (2011)] use existing NIF hardware, including indirect-drive phase plates. This limits the performance achievable in these implosions. Spot shapes are identified that significantly improve the uniformity of PDD NIF implosions; outer surface deviation is reduced by a factor of 7 at the end of the laser pulse and hot-spot distortion is reduced by a factor of 2 when the shell has converged by a factor of ∼10. As a result, the neutron yield increases by approximately a factor of 2. This set of laser spot shapes is a combination of circular and elliptical spots, along with elliptical spot shapes modulated by an additional higher-intensity ellipse offset from the center of the beam. This combination is motivated in this paper. It is also found that this improved implosion uniformity is obtained independent of the heat conduction model. This work indicates that significant improvement in performance can be obtained robustly with the proposed spot shapes.

  16. A tip/tilt mirror with large dynamic range for the ESO VLT Four Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnveld, N.; Henselmans, R.; Nijland, B.

    2011-09-01

    One of the critical elements in the Four Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) for the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), consisting of a stable 20x laser beam expander and an active tip/tilt mirror, the Field Selector Mechanism (FSM). This paper describes the design and performance testing of the FSM. The driving requirement for the FSM is its large stroke of +/-6.1 mrad, in combination with less than 1.5 μrad RMS absolute accuracy. The FSM design consists of a Zerodur mirror, bonded to a membrane spring and strut combination to allow only tip and tilt. Two spindle drives actuate the mirror, using a stiffness based transmission to increase resolution. Absolute accuracy is achieved with two differential inductive sensor pairs. A prototype of the FSM is realized to optimize the control configuration and measure its performance. Friction in the spindle drive is overcome by creating a local velocity control loop between the spindle drives and the shaft encoders. Accuracy is achieved by using a cascaded low bandwidth control loop with feedback from the inductive sensors. The pointing jitter and settling time of the FSM are measured with an autocollimator. The system performance meets the strict requirements, and is ready to be implemented in the first OTA.

  17. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-03-01

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (Ln ≥ 500 μm) at the quarter-critical density (Nqc) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of Ln approaching ˜400 μm have been created; (2) the density scale length at Nqc scales as Ln(μm)≃(RDPP×I1/4/2); and (3) the electron temperature Te at Nqc scales as Te(keV)≃0.95×√I , with the incident intensity (I) measured in 1014 W/cm2 for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (RDPP) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons fhot is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [fhot≃fc×(Gc/4)6 for Gc < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, fhot≃fc×(Gc/4)1.2 for Gc ≥ 4, with the common wave gain is defined as Gc=3 × 10-2×IqcLnλ0/Te, where the laser intensity contributing to common-wave gain Iqc, Ln, Te at Nqc, and the laser wavelength λ0 are, respectively, measured in [1014 W/cm2], [μm], [keV], and [μm]. The saturation level fc is observed to be fc ≃ 10-2 at around Gc ≃ 4. The hot

  18. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B.

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Numerical simulation of three-dimensional X-ray and laser field inhomogeneities in experiments with spherical box converters on the Iskra-5 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, S. V.; Dolgoleva, G. V.; Novikova, E. A.

    2007-04-01

    The results of spectral calculations of the dynamics of laser radiation absorption and X-ray generation in a spherical box converter are presented for experiments on inertial fusion performed in the 1990s on the Iskra-5 facility. Numerical simulations were carried out taking into account the actual configuration of 12 laser beams and six apertures for introducing laser radiation. Calculations were performed in the sector approximation in which the inner surface of the box is divided into a certain number of regions or sectors. The movement of matter and radiation transport in each sector were calculated by using the one-dimensional spectral nonequilibrium dynamics program. Spectral calculations showed a strong inhomogeneity of irradiation of a capsule in the M-band region (2.7-2.9 keV). It is shown that the spectrum-averaged root-mean-square inhomogeneity of the X-ray energy flux on the capsule (during the time of its compression) is about 2.5% for laser beams of the same energy and is about 3% if the characteristic energy misbalance between the beams is taken into account.

  20. Simultaneous Laser-induced Fluorescence of Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen in the Hypersonic Materials Environment Test System Arcjet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Craig; Lincoln, Daniel; Bathel, Brett; Inman, Jennifer; Danehy, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitric oxide (NO) and atomic oxygen (O) laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in the Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The data serves as an experimental database for validation for chemical and thermal nonequilibrium models used in hypersonic flows. Measurements were taken over a wide range of stagnation enthalpies (6.7 - 18.5 MJ/kg) using an Earth atmosphere simulant with a composition of 75% N2, 20% O2, and 5% Ar (by volume). These are the first simultaneous measurements of NO and O LIF to be reported in literature for the HYMETS facility. The maximum O LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of approximately 12 MJ/kg while the maximum NO LIF mean signal intensity was observed at a stagnation enthalpy of 6.7 MJ/kg. Experimental results were compared to simple fluorescence model that assumes equilibrium conditions in the plenum and frozen chemistry in the isentropic nozzle expansion (Mach 5). The equilibrium calculations were performed using CANTERA v2.1.1 with 16 species. The fluorescence model captured the correlation in mean O and NO LIF signal intensities over the entire range of stagnation enthalpies tested. Very weak correlations between single-shot O and NO LIF intensities were observed in the experiments at all of the stagnation enthalpy conditions.

  1. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Guymer, T. M.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Thomas, C. A.; Wan, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a "hohlraum." The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3-5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum ("ViewFactor hohlraum") is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%-20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  2. A high accuracy femto-/picosecond laser damage test facility dedicated to the study of optical thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangote, B.; Gallais, L.; Zerrad, M.; Lemarchand, F.; Gao, L. H.; Commandré, M.; Lequime, M.

    2012-01-01

    A laser damage test facility delivering pulses from 100 fs to 3 ps and designed to operate at 1030 nm is presented. The different details of its implementation and performances are given. The originality of this system relies the online damage detection system based on Nomarski microscopy and the use of a non-conventional energy detection method based on the utilization of a cooled CCD that offers the possibility to obtain the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) with high accuracy. Applications of this instrument to study thin films under laser irradiation are presented. Particularly the deterministic behavior of the sub-picosecond damage is investigated in the case of fused silica and oxide films. It is demonstrated that the transition of 0-1 damage probability is very sharp and the LIDT is perfectly deterministic at few hundreds of femtoseconds. The damage process in dielectric materials being the results of electronic processes, specific information such as the material bandgap is needed for the interpretation of results and applications of scaling laws. A review of the different approaches for the estimation of the absorption gap of optical dielectric coatings is conducted and the results given by the different methods are compared and discussed. The LIDT and gap of several oxide materials are then measured with the presented instrument: Al2O3, Nb2O5, HfO2, SiO2, Ta2O5, and ZrO2. The obtained relation between the LIDT and gap at 1030 nm confirms the linear evolution of the threshold with the bandgap that exists at 800 nm, and our work expands the number of tested materials.

  3. Geochemical information for the West Chestnut Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1984-06-01

    Geochemical support activities for the Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF) project included characterization of site materials, as well as measurement of radionuclide sorption and desorption isotherms and apparent concentration limit values under site-relevant laboratory test conditions. The radionuclide sorption and solubility information is needed as input data for the pathways analysis calculations to model expected radioactivity releases from emplaced waste to the accessible environment under various release scenarios. Batch contact methodology was used to construct sorption and desorption isotherms for a number of radionuclides likely to be present in waste to be disposed of at the site. The sorption rates for uranium and europium were rapid (> 99.8% of the total radionuclide present was adsorbed in approx. 30 min). With a constant-pH isotherm technique, uranium, strontium, cesium, and curium exhibited maximum Rs values of 4800 to > 30,000 L/kg throughout the pH range 5 to 7. Sorption ratios were generally lower at higher or lower pH levels. Retardation factors for uranium, strontium, and cesium, explored by column chromatographic tests, were consistent with the high sorption ratios measured in batch tests for these radionuclides. The addition of as little as 0.01 M organic reagent capable of forming strong soluble complexes with metals (e.g., ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citric acid) was found to reduce the sorption ratio for uranium by as much as two orders of magnitude. Substitution of an actual low-level waste site trench water for groundwater in these tests was found to give a similar reduction in the sorption ratio.

  4. Radionuclide migration pathways analysis for the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge site

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Lee, D.W.; Cannon, J.B.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1984-10-01

    A dose-to-man pathways analysis is performed for disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the Central Waste Disposal Facility on the West Chestnut Ridge Site. Both shallow land burial (trench) and aboveground (tumulus) disposal methods are considered. The waste volumes, characteristics, and radionuclide concentrations are those of waste streams anticipated from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The site capacity for the waste streams is determined on the basis of the pathways analysis. The exposure pathways examined include (1) migration and transport of leachate from the waste disposal units to the Clinch River (via the groundwater medium for trench disposal and Ish Creek for tumulus disposal) and (2) those potentially associated with inadvertent intrusion following a 100-year period of institutional control: an individual resides on the site, inhales suspended particles of contaminated dust, ingests vegetables grown on the plot, consumes contaminated water from either an on-site well or from a nearby surface stream, and receives direct exposure from the contaminated soil. It is found that either disposal method would provide effective containment and isolation for the anticipated waste inventory. However, the proposed trench disposal method would provide more effective containment than tumuli because of sorption of some radionuclides in the soil. Persons outside the site boundary would receive radiation doses well below regulatory limits if they were to ingest water from the Clinch River. An inadvertent intruder could receive doses that approach regulatory limits; however, the likelihood of such intrusions and subsequent exposures is remote. 33 references, 31 figures, 28 tables.

  5. Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.K.; Sassaman, K.E.

    1993-11-01

    The project area for the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility on the Savannah River Site includes a six-acre tract along Fourmile Branch and 18 mi of trunk line corridors. Archaeological investigations of the six-acre parcel resulted in the discovery of one small prehistoric site designated 38AK465. This cultural resource does not have the potential to add significantly to archaeological knowledge of human occupation in the region. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) therefore recommends that 38AK465 is not eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and further recommends a determination of no effect. Archaeological survey along the trunk line corridors implicated previously recorded sites 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK415, 38AK417, 38AK419, and 38AK436. Past disturbance from construction had severely disturbed 38AK92 and no archaeological evidence of 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 was recovered during survey. Lacking further evidence for the existence of these sites, the SRARP recommends that 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 are not eligible for nomination to the NRHP and thus warrant a determination of no effect. Two of these sites, 38Ak415 and 38AK417, required further investigation to evaluate their archaeological significance. Both of the sites have the potential to yield significant data on the prehistoric period occupation of the Aiken Plateau and the SRARP recommends that they are eligible for nomination to the NRHP. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program recommends that adverse effects to sites 38AK415 and 38AK417 from proposed construction can be mitigated through avoidance.

  6. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM–4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat.

  7. Shielding activation of petawatt laser facilities in Romania: a FLUKA preliminary evaluation.

    PubMed

    Florescu, Gabriela M; Duliu, O G

    2016-03-01

    The FLUKA 2011.2c code was used to evaluate the activity induced in the irradiation chamber walls by secondary charged particles emitted during the interaction of 1 petawatt laser beam with the targets. The results have shown that, even in the most conservative approaches, i.e. 300 and 100 MeV secondary electrons and protons, respectively, the maximum equivalent dose rate, at 1 cm in front of the chamber wall, 1 min after the end of irradiation, was of ∼23 nSv h(-1). Three minutes later, it falls at ∼60 pSv h(-1), negligible with respect to the environmental radiation background of 90-110 nSv h(-1), as reported for Romania.

  8. A multipurpose TIM-based optical telescope for Omega and the Trident laser facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Berggren, R.R.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have recently designed and are building a telescope which acts as an imaging light collector relaying the image to an optical table for experiment dependent analysis and recording. The expected primary use of this instrument is a streaked optical pyrometer for witness plate measurements of Hohlraum drive temperature. The telescope is based on University of Rochester`s Ten-Inch Manipulator (TIM) which allows compatibility between Omega, Trident, and the NIF lasers. The optics capture a f/7 cone of light, have a field of view of 6-mm, have a spatial resolution of 5 to 7-{micro}m per line pair at the object plane, and are optimized for operation at 280-nm. The image is at a magnification of 11.7x, which is convenient for many experiments, but can be changed using additional optics that reside outside the TIM.

  9. Facile and scalable disposable sensor based on laser engraved graphene for electrochemical detection of glucose

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Farshad; Bavarian, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    A novel and highly sensitive disposable glucose sensor strip was developed using direct laser engraved graphene (DLEG) decorated with pulse deposited copper nanocubes (CuNCs). The high reproducibility (96.8%), stability (97.4%) and low cost demonstrated by this 3-step fabrication method indicates that it could be used for high volume manufacturing of disposable glucose strips. The fabrication method also allows for a high degree of flexibility, allowing for control of the electrode size, design, and functionalization method. Additionally, the excellent selectivity and sensitivity (4,532.2 μA/mM.cm2), low detection limit (250 nM), and suitable linear range of 25 μM–4 mM, suggests that these sensors may be a great potential platform for glucose detection within the physiological range for tear, saliva, and/or sweat. PMID:27306706

  10. Use of Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility as a high-intensity heat source for testing missile nose-cone (Radome) radar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.R.

    1981-09-01

    A series of tests at Sandia's Central Receiver Test Facility in support of the US Navy's SM-2 Blk 2 Radome Improvement Program is described. The CRTF was the source of high-intensity solar radiation for testing onboard radar-tracking systems under heating conditions intended to simulate those that occur in supersonic flight. Also discussed are the hardware used and the software developed at the CRTF.

  11. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  12. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility. Part II; Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Minnis, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Data collected at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) central facility are analyzed for determining the variability of cloud fraction and radiative forcing at several temporal scales between January 1997 and December 2002. Cloud fractions are estimated for total cloud cover and for single-layer low (0-3 km), middle (3-6 km), and high clouds (greater than 6 km) using ARM SGP ground-based paired lidar-radar measurements. Shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and net cloud radiative forcings (CRF) are derived from up- and down-looking standard precision spectral pyranometers and precision infrared radiometer measurements. The annual averages of total, and single-layer, nonoverlapped low, middle and high cloud fractions are 0.49, 0.11, 0.03, and 0.17, respectively. Total and low cloud amounts were greatest from December through March and least during July and August. The monthly variation of high cloud amount is relatively small with a broad maximum from May to August. During winter, total cloud cover varies diurnally with a small amplitude, mid-morning maximum and early evening minimum, and during summer it changes by more than 0.14 over the daily cycle with a pronounced early evening minimum. The diurnal variations of mean single-layer cloud cover change with season and cloud height. Annual averages of all-sky, total, and single-layer high, middle, and low LW CRFs are 21.4, 40.2, 16.7, 27.2, and 55.0 Wm(sup -2), respectively; and their SW CRFs are -41.5, -77.2, -37.0, -47.0, and -90.5 Wm(sup -2). Their net CRFs range from -20 to -37 Wm(sup -2). For all-sky, total, and low clouds, the maximum negative net CRFs of -40.1, -70, and -69.5 Wm(sup -2), occur during April; while the respective minimum values of -3.9, -5.7, and -4.6 Wm(sup -2), are found during December. July is the month having maximum negative net CRF of -46.2 Wm(sup -2) for middle clouds, and May has the maximum value of -45.9 Wm(sup -2) for high clouds. An

  13. Preliminary results of the redesigned Reshock experiment at the OMEGA laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Tiffany; di Stefano, Carlos; Merritt, Elizabeth; Doss, Forrest; Flippo, Kirk; Kline, John

    2016-10-01

    The redesigned LANL OMEGA Reshock campaign is exploring the effects of turbulent mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability as part of an ongoing effort to assess the LANL radiation-hydrocode the BHR mix model in the high-energy density regime. Platform improvements have been made to increase the precision of the instability growth measurements. The experiments are conducted in similar geometry to the previous Reshock campaigns. A cylindrical beryllium tube is filled with a low-density CH-foam (ρ 100-150 mg/cc) and a higher density tracer layer that is displaced from an endcap. Two tracer materials have been tested: a low-density plastic (ρ0 = 1.5 g/cc) layer 40µm thick, and an HDC layer (ρ0 = 3.2 g/cc) 15 µm thick. The tracer layers have been ρr matched to the previously used aluminum tracer (ρ0 = 2.43 g/cc). In this platform two shockwaves are generated from opposite ends of the shock tube by a 5 kJ laser pulse, with time delay Δt 3-6ns between them. The primary shockwave generates the initial mixing between the tracer layer and surrounding foam. The second shock leads to a compression of the initial mix layer and to increased turbulence. We will present both initial design simulations for shock timing and tracer choice and preliminary data from the first shot day.

  14. Implosion symmetry tuning with megajoule laser pulses on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Meezan, N.; Dixit, S.; Kyrala, G.; London, R.; Thomas, C.; Callahan, D.; Widmann, K.; Glenzer, S.; Suter, L.; Hinkel, D.; Williams, E.; Dewald, E.; Landen, O.; Edwards, J.; MacGowan, B.; Divol, L.; Haynam, C.; Kalantar, D.; Le Pape, S.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M.; Schneider, M.; Young, B.

    2010-11-01

    A key element for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion is tuning the implosion symmetry. Symmetric implosions maximize the transfer of kinetic energy to the hot spot. One technique to measure the drive symmetry is the symcap. A symcap is a surrogate capsule that replaces the DT fuel layer by an equivalent mass of ablator material to mimic the hydrodynamic behavior of the capsule. The symcaps are filled with gas that provides an x-ray self-emission flash upon stagnation and is used to diagnose the radiation drive based on the shape of the emission. Simulations indicate that the shape of the emission flash correlates well with an ignition capsule's core shape. Using this data, the radiation drive in the hohlraum can be tuned to achieve symmetric implosions. The current symmetry campaign sets the initial hohlraum conditions to provide symmetric implosions for the ignition campaign. Experimental results will be presented for symmetry tuning with laser energies up to 1.3 MJ. Work for DOE by LANL (DE-AC52-06NA25396 and by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344).

  15. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-02-11

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an

  16. Brief, Why the Launch Equipment Test Facility Needs a Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Shiu H.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) supports a wide spectrum of testing and development activities. This capability was originally established in the 1970's to allow full-scale qualification of Space Shuttle umbilicals and T-O release mechanisms. The LETF has leveraged these unique test capabilities to evolve into a versatile test and development area that supports the entire spectrum of operational programs at KSC. These capabilities are historically Aerospace related, but can certainly can be adapted for other industries. One of the more unique test fixtures is the Vehicle Motion Simulator or the VMS. The VMS simulates all of the motions that a launch vehicle will experience from the time of its roll-out to the launch pad, through roughly the first X second of launch. The VMS enables the development and qualification testing of umbilical systems in both pre-launch and launch environments. The VMS can be used to verify operations procedures, clearances, disconnect systems performance &margins, and vehicle loads through processing flow motion excursions.

  17. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M. B. MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  18. The use of beam propagation modeling of Beamlet and Nova to ensure a ``safe`` National Ignition Facility laser system design

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Renard, P.; Auerbach, J.

    1997-03-17

    An exhaustive set of Beamlet and Nova laser system simulations were performed over a wide range of power levels in order to gain understanding about the statistical trends in Nova and Beamlet`s experimental data sets, and to provide critical validation of propagation tools and design ``rules`` applied to the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The experiments considered for modeling were at 220-ps FWHM duration with unpumped booster slabs on Beamlet, and 100-ps FWHM with pumped 31.5-cm and 46-cm disk amplifiers on Nova. Simulations indicated that on Beamlet, the AB (the intensity pendent phase shift parameter characterizing the tendency towards beam filamentation) for the booster amplifier stage without pumping, would be nearly identical to the AB expected on NIF at the peak of a typical 20-ns long shaped pulse intended for ICF target irradiation. Therefore, with energies less than I kJ in short-pulses, we examined on Beamlet the comparable AB-driven filamentation conditions predicted for long ICF pulseshapes in the 18 kJ regime on the NIF, while avoiding fluence dependent surface damage. Various spatial filter pinhole configurations were examined on Nova and Beamlet. Open transport spatial filter pinholes were used in some experiments to allow the direct measurement of the onset of beam filamentation. Schlieren images on Beamlet of the far field irradiance measuring the scattered light fraction outside of 33-{micro}radians were also obtained and compared to modeled results.

  19. Observation of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion asymmetry on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang

    2016-10-01

    Three kinds of hohlraum lengths were used to study the symmetry scaling on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility. Hot spot radiography was taken by an x-ray framing camera and the hot spot ellipticity a/b which showd a ``P2 like'' implosion distortion was measured. The indirect-drive implosion asymmetry is determined by the hohlraum radiation uniformity. Most factors affecting hohlraum radiation uniformity can be taken into account by a view-factor code IRAD 3D, so time-resolved difference between polar and equatorial radiation flux can by calculated by IRAD 3D. Then, the time-resolved a/b evolution can be calculated by a simplified analytic model integrating the total difference between polar and equatorial radiation flux before each moment, because during the acceleration phase the capsule distortion at some time is the accumulation effect of total radiation drive before that time. The calculated results of the time-resolved implosion asymmetry are basically in agreement with experimental results. Meanwhile, the physical mechanism for how hohlraum radiation nonuniformity evolution induces the variations of implosion asymmetry with hohlraum length and time is analyzed.

  20. Analysis of laser altimeter waveforms for forested ecosystems of Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishampel, John F.; Harding, David J.; Boutet, Jeffry C., Jr.; Drake, Jason B.

    1997-07-01

    An experimental profiling airborne laser altimeter system developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was used to acquire vertical canopy data from several ecosystem types from The Nature Conservancy's Disney Wilderness Preserve, near Kissimmee, Florida. This laser altimeter, besides providing submeter accuracy of tree height, captures a profile of data which relates to the magnitude of reflectivity of the laser pulse as it penetrates different elevations of the forest canopy. This complete time varying amplitude of the return signal of the laser pulse, between the first (i.e., the canopy top) and last (i.e., the ground) returns, yields a waveform which is related to canopy architecture, specifically the nadir-projected vertical distribution of the surface of canopy components (i.e., foliage, twigs, and branches). Selected profile returns from representative covertypes (e.g., pine flatwoods, bayhead, and cypress wetland) were compared with ground truthed forest composition (i.e., species and size class distribution) and structural (i.e., canopy height, canopy closure, crown depth) measures to help understand how these properties contribute to variation in the altimeter waveform.

  1. Hohlraum-driven mid-Z (SiO2) double-shell implosions on the omega laser facility and their scaling to NIF.

    PubMed

    Robey, H F; Amendt, P A; Milovich, J L; Park, H-S; Hamza, A V; Bono, M J

    2009-10-02

    High-convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions of double-shell capsules using mid-Z (SiO2) inner shells have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These experiments provide an essential extension of the results of previous low-Z (CH) double-shell implosions [P. A. Amendt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005)] to materials of higher density and atomic number. Analytic modeling, supported by highly resolved 2D numerical simulations, is used to account for the yield degradation due to interfacial atomic mixing. This extended experimental database from OMEGA enables a validation of the mix model, and provides a means for quantitatively assessing the prospects for high-Z double-shell implosions on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner, Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  2. Upgrade of the resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility: New lasers and new ion beamsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, V. N.; Berg, L.-E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fink, D.; Launila, O. J.; Losito, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2012-02-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) produces beams for the majority of experiments at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. A substantial improvement in RILIS performance has been achieved through a series of upgrade steps: replacement of the copper vapor lasers by a Nd:YAG laser; replacement of the old homemade dye lasers by new commercial dye lasers; installation of a complementary Ti:Sapphire laser system. The combined dye and Ti:Sapphire laser system with harmonics is capable of generating beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. In total, isotopes of 31 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized and separated at ISOLDE, including recently developed beams of samarium, praseodymium, polonium, and astatine.

  3. Environmental assessment: Solid waste retrieval complex, enhanced radioactive and mixed waste storage facility, infrastructure upgrades, and central waste support complex, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action to: retrieve transuranic (TRU) waste because interim storage waste containers have exceeded their 20-year design life and could fail causing a radioactive release to the environment provide storage capacity for retrieved and newly generated TRU, Greater-than-Category 3 (GTC3), and mixed waste before treatment and/or shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP); and upgrade the infrastructure network in the 200 West Area to enhance operational efficiencies and reduce the cost of operating the Solid Waste Operations Complex. This proposed action would initiate the retrieval activities (Retrieval) from Trench 4C-T04 in the 200 West Area including the construction of support facilities necessary to carry out the retrieval operations. In addition, the proposed action includes the construction and operation of a facility (Enhanced Radioactive Mixed Waste Storage Facility) in the 200 West Area to store newly generated and the retrieved waste while it awaits shipment to a final disposal site. Also, Infrastructure Upgrades and a Central Waste Support Complex are necessary to support the Hanford Site`s centralized waste management area in the 200 West Area. The proposed action also includes mitigation for the loss of priority shrub-steppe habitat resulting from construction. The estimated total cost of the proposed action is $66 million.

  4. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 5: System design and specifications. Volume 6: Specification for EOS Central Data Processing Facility (CDPF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The specifications and functions of the Central Data Processing (CDPF) Facility which supports the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) are discussed. The CDPF will receive the EOS sensor data and spacecraft data through the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) and the Operations Control Center (OCC). The CDPF will process the data and produce high density digital tapes, computer compatible tapes, film and paper print images, and other data products. The specific aspects of data inputs and data processing are identified. A block diagram of the CDPF to show the data flow and interfaces of the subsystems is provided.

  5. Hanford facility dangerous waste Part A, Form 3 and Part B permit application documentation, Central Waste Complex (WA7890008967)(TSD: TS-2-4)

    SciTech Connect

    Saueressig, D.G.

    1998-05-20

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating, treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Central Waste Complex (this document, DOE/RL-91-17). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the Central Waste Complex permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this Central Waste Complex permit application documentation is current as of May 1998.

  6. Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory:. The National Ignition Facility, Inertial Fusion Energy, 100-1000 TW Lasers, and the Fast Igniter Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard Lowdermilk, W.

    The ultimate goal of worldwide research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to develop fusion as an inexhaustible, economic, environmentally safe source of electric power. Following nearly thirty years of laboratory and underground fusion experiments, the next step toward this goal is to demonstrate ignition and propagating burn of fusion fuel in the laboratory. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project is being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for just this purpose. NIF will use advanced Nd-glass laser technology to deliver 1.8 MJ of 0.35 μm laser light in a shaped pulse, several nanoseconds in duration, achieving a peak power of 500 TW. A national community of U.S. laboratories is participating in this project, now in its final design phase. France and the United Kingdom are collaborating on development of required technology under bilateral agreements with the US. This paper presents key aspects of the laser design, and descriptions of principal laser and optical components. Follow-on development of lasers to meet the demands of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant is reviewed. In parallel with the NIF Project and IFE developments, work is proceeding on ultrashort pulse lasers with peak power in the range of 100-1000 TW. A beamline on the Nova laser at LLNL recently delivered nearly 600 J of 1 μm light in a 0.5 ps duration pulse, for a peak power in excess of a petawatt (1015 W). This beamline, with advanced adaptive optics, will be capable of focused intensities in excess of 1021 W/cm2. Its primary purpose will be to test technological and scientific aspects of an alternate ignition concept, called the "Fast Igniter", that has the potential to produce higher fusion gain than conventional ICF.

  7. Chemical exposures and central nervous system cancers: a case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Tankersley, W.G.; Fry, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    In a nested case-control study of workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities, we evaluated the possible association of primary CNS cancers with occupational exposure to chemicals. Seventy-two white male and 17 white female workers who, according to the information on death certificates, died of primary CNS cancers were identified as cases. For each case, four controls were matched on race, sex, facility at which initially employed (cohort), year of birth, and year of hire. Each job title/department combination was subjectively evaluated for potential exposure to each of 26 chemicals or chemical groups. Statistically significant associations were not found between CNS cancer deaths and any of the 26 chemicals. An increased risk of CNS cancer occurrence was observed among subjects employed for more than 20 yr (OR = 7.0, 95% CI = 1.2,41.1, cases = 9).

  8. Recent laser upgrades at Sandia’s Z-backlighter facility in order to accommodate new requirements for magnetized liner inertial fusion on the Z-machine

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Armstrong, Darrell; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian; Shores, Jonathan; Geissel, Matthias; Kimmel, Mark; Porter, John

    2016-10-21

    The Z-backlighter laser facility primarily consists of two high energy, high-power laser systems. Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) (Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)) is a multi-kJ-class, nanosecond laser operating at 1054 nm which is frequency doubled to 527 nm in order to provide x-ray backlighting of high energy density events on the Z-machine. Z-Petawatt (ZPW) (Schwarz et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032020 (2008)) is a petawatt-class system operating at 1054 nm delivering up to 500 J in 500 fs for backlighting and various short-pulse laser experiments (see also Figure 10 for a facility overview). With the development of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z-machine, the primary backlighting missions of ZBL and ZPW have been adjusted accordingly. As a result, we have focused our recent efforts on increasing the output energy of ZBL from 2 to 4 kJ at 527 nm by modifying the fiber front end to now include extra bandwidth (for stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression). The MagLIF concept requires a well-defined/behaved beam for interaction with the pressurized fuel. Hence we have made great efforts to implement an adaptive optics system on ZBL and have explored the use of phase plates. We are also exploring concepts to use ZPW as a backlighter for ZBL driven MagLIF experiments. Alternatively, ZPW could be used as an additional fusion fuel pre-heater or as a temporally flexible high energy pre-pulse. All of these concepts require the ability to operate the ZPW in a nanosecond long-pulse mode, in which the beam can co-propagate with ZBL. Finally, some of the proposed modifications are complete and most of them are well on their way.

  9. Recent laser upgrades at Sandia’s Z-backlighter facility in order to accommodate new requirements for magnetized liner inertial fusion on the Z-machine

    DOE PAGES

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Armstrong, Darrell; ...

    2016-10-21

    The Z-backlighter laser facility primarily consists of two high energy, high-power laser systems. Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) (Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)) is a multi-kJ-class, nanosecond laser operating at 1054 nm which is frequency doubled to 527 nm in order to provide x-ray backlighting of high energy density events on the Z-machine. Z-Petawatt (ZPW) (Schwarz et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032020 (2008)) is a petawatt-class system operating at 1054 nm delivering up to 500 J in 500 fs for backlighting and various short-pulse laser experiments (see also Figure 10 for a facility overview). With the developmentmore » of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z-machine, the primary backlighting missions of ZBL and ZPW have been adjusted accordingly. As a result, we have focused our recent efforts on increasing the output energy of ZBL from 2 to 4 kJ at 527 nm by modifying the fiber front end to now include extra bandwidth (for stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression). The MagLIF concept requires a well-defined/behaved beam for interaction with the pressurized fuel. Hence we have made great efforts to implement an adaptive optics system on ZBL and have explored the use of phase plates. We are also exploring concepts to use ZPW as a backlighter for ZBL driven MagLIF experiments. Alternatively, ZPW could be used as an additional fusion fuel pre-heater or as a temporally flexible high energy pre-pulse. All of these concepts require the ability to operate the ZPW in a nanosecond long-pulse mode, in which the beam can co-propagate with ZBL. Finally, some of the proposed modifications are complete and most of them are well on their way.« less

  10. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  11. Geodetic Imaging Lidar: Applications for high-accuracy, large area mapping with NASA's upcoming high-altitude waveform-based airborne laser altimetry Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, J. B.; Rabine, D.; Hofton, M. A.; Citrin, E.; Luthcke, S. B.; Misakonis, A.; Wake, S.

    2015-12-01

    Full waveform laser altimetry has demonstrated its ability to capture highly-accurate surface topography and vertical structure (e.g. vegetation height and structure) even in the most challenging conditions. NASA's high-altitude airborne laser altimeter, LVIS (the Land Vegetation, and Ice Sensor) has produced high-accuracy surface maps over a wide variety of science targets for the last 2 decades. Recently NASA has funded the transition of LVIS into a full-time NASA airborne Facility instrument to increase the amount and quality of the data and to decrease the end-user costs, to expand the utilization and application of this unique sensor capability. Based heavily on the existing LVIS sensor design, the Facility LVIS instrument includes numerous improvements for reliability, resolution, real-time performance monitoring and science products, decreased operational costs, and improved data turnaround time and consistency. The development of this Facility instrument is proceeding well and it is scheduled to begin operations testing in mid-2016. A comprehensive description of the LVIS Facility capability will be presented along with several mission scenarios and science applications examples. The sensor improvements included increased spatial resolution (footprints as small as 5 m), increased range precision (sub-cm single shot range precision), expanded dynamic range, improved detector sensitivity, operational autonomy, real-time flight line tracking, and overall increased reliability and sensor calibration stability. The science customer mission planning and data product interface will be discussed. Science applications of the LVIS Facility include: cryosphere, territorial ecology carbon cycle, hydrology, solid earth and natural hazards, and biodiversity.

  12. Formation of a spatial laser-beam profile in a channel of high-power neodymium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bel'kov, S A; Voronich, I N; Garanin, S G; Zimalin, B G; Savkin, A V; Sharov, O A

    2015-06-30

    A system for one-dimensional spatial profiling of a laser beam is suggested, capable of compensating for the spatial laserbeam distortions that arise due to a nonuniform gain distribution over the aperture in the amplifying channel of high-power Nd:glass lasers with wide-aperture stages on disk active elements. The principle of operation, the approach to calculation of the key element parameters, and calculation and experimental results of studying the formation of spatial profiles of the laser beam intensity at the output from the system in question are described. Possible applications of the system both in single-beam and multi-beam optical schemes are considered. (lasers)

  13. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  14. Multi-keV X-ray Yields from High-Z Targets Fielded at the OMEGA Laser and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Fournier, Kevin; May, Mark; Colvin, Jeffrey; Thomas, Cliff; Marrs, Roscoe; Compton, Steven; Moody, John; Bond, Essex; Davis, John

    2010-11-01

    We report on measurements and modeling of fluxes from X-ray source targets recently shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and at the Omega laser. The targets were thin-walled pipes filled with mixtures of Xe and Ar gas at pressures of 1 to 1.5 atmospheres. The targets were irradiated with 3φ laser light, 20 kJ in 1 ns at Omega and 350 kJ in 5 ns at NIF. The emitted X-ray flux was monitored with multiple channels of X-ray-diode based DANTE instruments, and imaged with gated X-ray detectors. We compare predicted X-ray yields to measure yields. The current modeling appears to under-predict the yield of gas mixtures containing Ar. We also report on design and modeling of Fe foam-filled and stainless steel-lined targets.

  15. Thin layer chromatography/plasma assisted multiwavelength laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for facile separation and selective identification of low molecular weight compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jialing; Zhou, Zhigui; Yang, Jianwang; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2012-02-07

    A novel plasma assisted multiwavelength (1064, 532, and 355 nm) laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (PAMLDI-MS) system was fabricated and applied in the analysis of low molecular weight compounds through combination with thin layer chromatography (TLC). The TLC/PAMLDI-MS system successfully integrated TLC, the multiwavelength laser ablation, and the excitated state plasma from direct analysis in real time (DART) and was proved to be effective in the facile separation and selective identification of low molecular weight compounds. An automated three-dimensional platform was utilized to facilitate the analysis procedures with all the parameters of the TLC/PAMLDI-MS systematically optimized, and the desorption/ionization mechanisms were discussed. The successful combination of three-wavelength laser with DART based system extended the range of the analytes and provided broad possibilities for the compound desorption from the TLC. The experimental results clearly showed that the laser desorption was wavelength dependent. The PAMLDI-MS system was successfully applied in the detection of low molecular weight compounds from different kinds of samples separated on a normal-phase silica gel, such as dye mixtures, drug standards, and tea extract, with the detection level of 5 ng/mm(2).

  16. Optimization of the Diode-Pumped Solid State Nd:YLF Amplifier Chain for the 263 nm Drive Laser at the FAST Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Julie M.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Edstrom, Dean R., Jr.; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James K.

    The RF photoinjector of the 50 MeV superconducting electron linear accelerator at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility is driven by a phase-locked laser system. The neodymium-doped yttrium-lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) seed laser provides short (3 ps) infrared (1053 nm) pulses to an amplifier chain before conversion to ultraviolet (263 nm) through two frequency-doubling BBO crystals. The amplification section consists of seven diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) amplifiers, which increase the pulse energy of the seed laser using optically end-pumped Nd:YLF crystals. To maximize the total gain of the amplifier chain, each stage must be properly tuned with optimized optics, alignment, and laser beam characterization. In this paper we report on one of the single-pass amplifier improvements to achieve a consistent gain of 4.83 with stabilized output pulse trains for up to 1500 seed pulses. The final ultraviolet pulses imaged onto the Cs2Te photocathode of the RF electron gun have been doubled in energy to 10.2 μJ per pulse as a result of these alterations. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  17. Laboratory for Laser Energetics annual report, 1 October 1991--30 September 1992. Inertial Fusion Program and National Laser Users Facility Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is an annual report covering research progress on laser fusion and the OMEGA Upgrade design and development. In laser fusion, line-spectroscopy methods were demonstrated to be useful in diagnosing the core temperature and densities of polymer-shell targets; a theoretical analysis of nonlocal heat transport effects on filamentation of light in plasmas confirms that the principle mechanism driving filamentation is kinetic thermal rather than ponderomotive; a new method (spatial beam deflection) to produce laser pulses of arbitrary shape was developed; laser-plasma x-ray emission was measured using photodiode arrays; experiments on long-scale-length plasmas have shown that smoothing by spectral dispersion has proven effective in reducing Raman scattering; a method for increasing the gas-retention time of polymer shell targets was developed by overcoating them with aluminum. Experiments relating to the OMEGA Upgrade are described.

  18. Assessment of DNA replication in central nervous system by Laser Scanning Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominik; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tárnok, Attila

    2004-07-01

    μIn neurons of patients with Alzheimers's disease (AD) signs of cell cycle re-entry as well as polyploidy have been reported1, 2, indicating that the entire or a part of the genome of the neurons is duplicated before its death but mitosis is not initiated so that the cellular DNA content remains tetraploid. It was concluded, that this imbalance is the direct cause of the neuronal loss in AD3. Manual counting of polyploidal cells is possible but time consuming and possibly statistically insufficient. The aim of this study was to develop an automated method that detects the neuronal DNA content abnormalities with Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC).Frozen sections of formalin-fixed brain tissue of AD patients and control subjects were labelled with anti-cyclin B and anti-NeuN antibodies. Immunolabelling was performed using Cy5- and Cy2-conjugated secondary antibodies and biotin streptavidin or tyramid signal amplification. In the end sections of 20m thickness were incubated with propidium iodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC PI was used as trigger. Cells identified as neurons by NeuN expression were analyzed for cyclin B expression. Per specimen data of at least 10,000 neurons were acquired. In the frozen brain sections an automated quantification of the amount of nuclear DNA is possible with LSC. The DNA ploidy as well as the cell cycle distribution can be analyzed. A high number of neurons can be scanned and the duration of measuring is shorter than a manual examination. The amount of DNA is sufficiently represented by the PI fluorescence to be able to distinguish between eu- and polyploid neurons.

  19. A 1 GeV Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Experimental Progress at the l'OASIS Facility of LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, W. P.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, C. S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nagler, B.; Michel, P.; Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A.; Spence, D. J.; Hooker, S. M.; Filip, C.; Cowan, T.

    2004-11-01

    Experimental progress towards a 1 GeV laser-driven plasma-based accelerator will be discussed. The design of the 1 GeV accelerator module consists of two components: (1) an all-optical electron injector and (2) a plasma channel for laser guiding and electron acceleration to high energy via the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism. Experimental results on the injector development include the demonstration of laser guiding at relativistic intensities in preformed plasmas and production of quasi-monochromatic electron beams with energy around 100 MeV. Progress on guiding 100 TW laser pulses in capillary-discharge-based plasma channels will be discussed and integration of these channels with the all-optical injector will be reported.

  20. Neodymium yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser resection significantly improves quality of life in patients with malignant central airway obstruction due to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaric, B; Kovacevic, T; Stojsic, V; Sarcev, T; Kocic, M; Urosevic, M; Kalem, D; Perin, B

    2015-07-01

    Neodymium yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd : YAG) laser resection is one of the mostly used interventional pulmonology techniques for urgent desobstruction of malignant central airway obstruction (CAO). The major aim of this trial was to evaluate potential influence of Nd : YAG laser resection on overall quality of life (QoL) in patients with central lung cancer. Patients with malignant CAO scheduled for Nd : YAG laser resection were prospectively recruited in the trial. All patients were given European Organization for Research and Treatment, Quality of Life questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-30 v.3) before the procedure and approximately 2 weeks after the treatment. There were 37 male and 10 female patients, average age 54 ± 10 years. Most common tumour type was adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 51% of patients. Majority of patients were diagnosed in stage IIIB (53.2%) and stage IV (25.5%). Most common Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1 (72.3%). Nd : YAG laser resection significantly improved (P<0.0001) QoL and overall health according to EORTC QLQ-30. However, in some of the questions dealing with nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, family life, social activities and financial situation, we did not observe statistically significant improvement. Nd : YAG laser resection of malignant CAO significantly improves QoL and overall health in patients with lung cancer.

  1. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia. PMID:27625958

  2. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  3. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  4. Experimental capabilities of 0.4 PW, 1 shot/min Scarlet laser facility for high energy density science.

    PubMed

    Poole, P L; Willis, C; Daskalova, R L; George, K M; Feister, S; Jiang, S; Snyder, J; Marketon, J; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Van Woerkom, L; Freeman, R R; Chowdhury, E A

    2016-06-10

    We report on the recently completed 400 TW upgrade to the Scarlet laser at The Ohio State University. Scarlet is a Ti:sapphire-based ultrashort pulse system that delivers >10  J in 30 fs pulses to a 2 μm full width at half-maximum focal spot, resulting in intensities exceeding 5×1021  W/cm2. The laser fires at a repetition rate of once per minute and is equipped with a suite of on-demand and on-shot diagnostics detailed here, allowing for rapid collection of experimental statistics. As part of the upgrade, the entire laser system has been redesigned to facilitate consistent, characterized high intensity data collection at high repetition rates. The design and functionality of the laser and target chambers are described along with initial data from commissioning experimental shots.

  5. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  6. Cloud and aerosol characterization for the ARM central facility: Multiple remote sensor techniques development. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, K.

    1992-04-30

    This research project designed to investigate how atmospheric remote sensing technology can best be applied to the characterization of the cloudy atmosphere. Our research program addresses basic atmospheric remote sensing questions, but at the same time is clearly directed toward providing information crucial to the ARM (Atmospheric Remote Sensing) program and for application to the Clouds and Radiation Testbed (CART). The instrumentation that is being brought into play includes a variety of art-of-the-art sensors. Available at NOAA WPL are polarization Doppler K{sub a}-band (0.86 mm) and X-band (3.2 cm) radars, a C0{sub 2}(10.6 {mu}m) Doppler lidar with sequential ` polarization measurement capabilities, a three-channel (20.6, 31.65 and 90 GHz) microwave radiometer, and variety of visible and infrared radiometers. Instrumentation at the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) includes a polarization ruby (0.643 {mu}m) lidar, a narrow-beam (0.14{degree}) mid-infrared (9.5--11.5 {mu}m) radiometer coaligned with the lidar, several other radiometers in the visible and infrared spectral regions, and an advanced two-color (1.06 and 0.532 {mu}m), four-channel Polarization Diversity Lidar (PDL) and all-sky video imaging system that have only recently been developed under the ARM IDP.

  7. Distribution and health risk assessment of some organic and inorganic substances in a petroleum facility in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Serrano, R. M.; Torres, L. G.; Flores, C.; Castro, A.; Iturbe, R.

    An oil distribution and storage station was subjected to an Environmental Auditory and results showed soil contamination in part of the surface. An assessment of the site was required in order to fulfill a complete characterization of the contaminants present in soil and groundwater, as well as to establish the probable sources of contamination. Besides, a health risk assessment was performed to set remediation goals. The aim of this work is to show how the entire characterization and risk assessment process performed in this storage station from central Mexico, regarding to subsoil and groundwater. Thirty sample points were examined. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations in soil were in a very low range (20-268 mg/kg). Ethylbenzene, methyl tert-butyl ether, tert-amyl methyl ether, and lead were identified in one sampling point. Iron and zinc were found in all soil samples. There was no correlation between total petroleum hydrocarbons and any of the metals or between both metals. Only two out of four monitoring wells showed total petroleum hydrocarbons levels (1.4 and 66 mg/L, respectively). Regarding lead, all four monitored wells showed lead concentrations (0.043-0.15 mg/L). Results suggested that metal concentrations were not associated to petroleum contamination, but to iron scrap deposits placed over the soil; nevertheless more data is needed to make a clear conclusion. Health risk assessment showed that none of the evaluated contaminants represented a risk either for the on-site or the off-site receptors, since the hazardous quotients estimated did not exceed the acceptable values.

  8. Facile fabrication of a superhydrophobic cage by laser direct writing for site-specific colloidal self-assembled photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Kwon, Hyuk-Jun; Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Elhadj, Selim; Grigoropoulos, Costas P

    2016-04-08

    Micron-sized ablated surface structures with nano-sized 'bumpy' structures were produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film under ambient conditions. Upon just a single step, the processed surface exhibited hierarchical micro/nano morphology. In addition, due to the tribological properties of PTFE, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) could be replicated from the laser-ablated PTFE surface without anti-adhesive surface treatment. By controlling the design of the ablated patterns, tunable wettability and superhydrophobicity were achieved on both PTFE and PDMS replica surfaces. Furthermore, using fs laser ablation direct writing, a flexible superhydrophobic PDMS cage formed by superhydrophobic patterns encompassing the unmodified region was demonstrated for aqueous droplet positioning and trapping. Through evaporation-driven colloidal self-assembly in this superhydrophobic cage, a colloidal droplet containing polystyrene (PS) particles dried into a self-assembled photonic crystal, whose optical band gap could be manipulated by the particle size.

  9. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  10. High-energy (>70 keV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Martinez, D. A.; Di Nicola, P.; Tommasini, R.; Landen, O. L.; Alessi, D.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Brunton, G.; Budge, T.; Crane, J.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Döppner, T.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Fishler, B.; Halpin, J.; Hamamoto, M.; Heebner, J.; Hernandez, V. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Homoelle, D.; Honig, J.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; LaFortune, K.; Lawson, J.; Nagel, S. R.; Negres, R. A.; Novikova, L.; Orth, C.; Pelz, L.; Prantil, M.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, M.; Sherlock, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Wegner, P.; Widmayer, C.; Williams, G. J.; Williams, W.; Whitman, P.; Yang, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20-30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4-9 × 10-4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.

  11. High-energy (> 70 KeV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; ...

    2017-03-16

    Here, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20–30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4–9 × 10–4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70more » keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.« less

  12. A compact low cost "master-slave" double crystal monochromator for x-ray cameras calibration of the Laser MégaJoule Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, S.; Prévot, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA-CESTA, France) built a specific double crystal monochromator (DCM) to perform calibration of x-ray cameras (CCD, streak and gated cameras) by means of a multiple anode diode type x-ray source for the MégaJoule Laser Facility. This DCM, based on pantograph geometry, was specifically modeled to respond to relevant engineering constraints and requirements. The major benefits are mechanical drive of the second crystal on the first one, through a single drive motor, as well as compactness of the entire device. Designed for flat beryl or Ge crystals, this DCM covers the 0.9-10 keV range of our High Energy X-ray Source. In this paper we present the mechanical design of the DCM, its features quantitatively measured and its calibration to finally provide monochromatized spectra displaying spectral purities better than 98%.

  13. Laser-optical measurements of the velocities of the plasma jets formed from different gases in a kilojoule-range plasma focus facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, S. N.; Dzhamankulov, A. M.; Gurei, A. E.; Nikulin, V. Ya.; Peregudova, E. N.; Silin, P. V.

    2016-12-01

    The velocities of the plasma jets formed from Ne, N2, Ar, and Xe gases in plasma focus facilities were determined by means of laser-optical shadowgraphy of the shock waves generated at the jet leading edge. In spite of the almost tenfold ratio between the atomic weights of these gases, the outflow velocities of the plasma jets formed in experiments with these gases differ by less than twice, in the range of (0.7-1.1) × 107 cm/s under similar discharge conditions. The energies of the jet ions were found to vary from 0.7 keV for nitrogen to 4 keV for xenon.

  14. [Evaluation of the use of the CO2 laser in 134 patients with expansive processes in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Lovrić, D; Negovetić, L; Lupret, V; Vidović, D; Gnjidić, Z

    1989-01-01

    The laser began to be used in neurosurgery towards the end of the 60s. The early experience of their clinical use did not promise much; but from the first half of the 70s with the improvement of the laser and the accumulation of laboratory and clinical experiences, the new technology began irrepressibly to spread throughout the world. Three lasers are in use today: CO2, ND.YAG and Argon laser. Each one of them, due to their different wave length and electromagnetic radiation, gave separate characteristics of employment, i.e., the interaction between the biologic tissues and the radiation is different. Depending upon the type of intraoperative needs we will choose one of the lasers. Presently the CO2-laser is the most used in neurosurgery due to its characteristics of low penetration into the tissue and the vaporization of the tissue which is exposed to the radiation. That is why such a laser (Sharplan 1060) has been acquired by our clinic. During one year we performed 134 operations due to expansive processes in the CNS with a partial or complete use of the laser during every phase of the operation. The accumulated experiences showed that the laser is a fairly useful new tool during the various surgical situations with a wide use of the everyday work of the neurosurgeon; with its implementation we have significantly improved the surgical technique in the tumors of the CNS, both in terms of radicality as well as in sparing the healthy tissue. We believe that the laser has an absolute indication in all the glioma tumors regardless of the localization, thereafter in all remaining tumors which are not extremely supplied by blood, while at the same time reducing the time needed for the surgical procedure. In time we spread the use of the laser on arteriovenous malformations as well, which, until now, has not been suggested in literature. Our results on 4 smaller superficial angiomas fully justified the use of a laser in such cases. But it also showed us that generally

  15. Facile synthesis of AgCl/polydopamine/Ag nanoparticles with in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenqi; Wang, Lin; Wang, Feng; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    We reported a simple and fast method to prepare a composite material of polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core, which was inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (NPs), shortly named as AgCl/PDA/AgNPs. The resultant AgCl/PDA/AgNPs could be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in-situ detection and the SERS activity could be further greatly improved due to the production of more AgNPs upon laser irradiation. With 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as the probe molecule, the enhancement factor could reach 107. Additionally, such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility with relative standard deviation of 7.32% and long term stability (after storage for 100 days under ambient condition, SERS intensity decay is less than 25%). In-situ elevating SERS activity of AgCl/PDA/AgNPs induced by laser may be beneficial to sensitive analysis in practical fields.

  16. Facile and Chemically Pure Preparation of YVO4:Eu3+ Colloid with Novel Nanostructure via Laser Ablation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haohao; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    A YVO4:Eu3+ colloid with an interesting nanostructure was formed by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water without any additives or surfactants. Analyses of particle morphology, composition and optical properties were accomplished by SEM, TEM, EDS PL and UV-vis. Ovoid-like particles formed by the agglomeration of numerous nanocrystals were observed by SEM and TEM, while EDS with area-mode analysis revealed that the content of dopant ion was well retained within the nanoparticles. In addition, the formation mechanism is deduced and discussed for the first time in this research. The findings of this study could provide new insights into the understanding of laser-induced oxide materials and offer an opportunity for other research groups to pursue red emitting nanophosphors with outstandingly purity.

  17. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K; Epstein, C; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J; Milner, Richard; Moran, C; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J; Tschalar, C; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A; Benson, Stephen; Gould, Christopher; Biallas, George; Boyce, James; Coleman, James; Douglas, David; Ent, Rolf; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fenker, Howard; Gubeli, Joseph; Hannon, Fay; Huang, Jia; Jordan, Kevin; Legg, Robert; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn; Zhang, Shukui; Freytsis, M; Fiorito, Ralph; O'Shea, P; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R; Ovanesyan, G; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D S; Martoff, C J; Olvitt, D L; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Brinkmann, K; Zaunig, H

    2014-05-01

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  18. Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Short, R. W.; Shaw, J. G.; Regan, S. P.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interaction instabilities, such as two-plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by generated high-energy electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO has been used to design planar-target experiments that generate plasma and interaction conditions relevant to direct-drive-ignition designs (IL 1015 W / cm 2 , Te > 3 KeV density gradient scale lengths of Ln 600 μm) . The hot-electron temperature of 40to50keV and the fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons of 0.5to were inferred based on comparing the simulated and experimentally observed x-ray emission when the laser intensity at the quarter-critical surface increased from 6 to 15 ×1014 W / cm 2 . The measured SRS energy was sufficient to explain the observed total energy in hot electrons. Implications for ignition-scale direct-drive experiments and hot-electron preheat mitigation using mid- Z ablators will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  20. A computational study of x-ray emission from high-Z x-ray sources on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Fournier, Kevin B.; Kane, Jave; Langer, Steven; May, Mark J.; Scott, Howard A.

    2011-12-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15%-18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082701, 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, 17, 073111, 2010). In this paper we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  1. A Computational Study of X-ray Emissions from High-Z X-ray Sources on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey; Fournier, Kevin; Kane, Jave; May, Mark

    2010-11-01

    We have begun to use 350-500 kJ of 1/3-micron laser light from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser to create millimeter-scale, bright multi-keV x-ray sources. In the first set of shots we achieved 15% -18% x-ray conversion efficiency into Xe M-shell (˜1.5-2.5 keV), Ar K-shell (˜3 keV) and Xe L-shell (˜4-5.5 keV) emission (Fournier et al., Phys. Plasmas July 2010), in good agreement with the emission modeled using a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code incorporating a modern Detailed Configuration Accounting atomic model in non-LTE (Colvin et al., Phys. Plasmas, July 2010). In this presentation we first briefly review details of the computational model and comparisons of the simulations with the Ar/Xe NIF data. We then discuss a computational study showing sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various beam illumination details (beam configuration, pointing, peak power, pulse shape, etc.) and target parameters (size, initial density, etc.), and finally make some predictions of how the x-ray conversion efficiency expected from NIF shots scales with atomic number of the emitting plasma.

  2. Shock Experiments on the Nike Laser Facility Probe the Equation of State properties of Liquid Deuterium at High Pressures (1-6Mbar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostovych, Andrew

    2000-10-01

    The properties of hydrogen and its isotopes at high pressure and high density are important to current issues in ICF target design, the physics of condensed matter, and to current models of planetary structure. At high pressure, hydrogen is expected to change from a molecular phase to a metallic or strongly coupled plasma state. This transition region is not well understood and current theoretical models for the Equation-of-State (EOS) of hydrogen vary substantially in their predictions. These discrepancies are particularly important for shock compression because they may lead to a 40hydrogen and change the drive requirements for ICF fusion. Previous shock experiments at LLNL on the Nova Laser Facility have measured large increases in the compressibility of deuterium. These results are not well reproduced by the latest theory and there exists a need for independent experiments to resolve these discrepancies. New deuterium shock wave experiments to probe the EOS of deuterium were executed on the Nike facility at NRL. The Nike facility, with its ultra smooth ISI illumination, producing planar and steady drive, was well positioned to address this issue. Reflected shocks were utilized to increase the shock pressure and to enhance the sensitivity to differences in compressibility. The results of these experiments showed that liquid deuterium must have a much higher compressibility than is predicted by the SESAME EOS and have verified the initial LLNL results. New ICF target designs may also need to use deuterium wicked foams that will have an even more complicated EOS. We are examining shocks in such foams and other materials of ICF interest.

  3. Velocity surveys in a turbine stator annular-cascade facility using laser Doppler techniques. [flow measurement and flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to determine the flow conditions downstream of an annular cascade of stator blades operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.87. Two modes of LDV operation (continuous scan and discrete point) were investigated. Conventional pressure probe measurements were also made for comparison with the LDV results. Biasing errors that occur in the LDV measurement of velocity components were also studied. In addition, the effect of pressure probe blockage on the flow conditions was determined with the LDV. Photographs and descriptions of the test equipment used are given.

  4. Determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia, unmatched case -control study

    PubMed Central

    Seid, Omer; G/Mariam, Yemane; Fekadu, Abel; Wasihun, Yitbarek; Endris, Kedir; Bitew, Abebayehu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anemia affects around 38.2% and 22% of pregnant women at a global and national level respectively. In developing countries, women start pregnancy with already depleted body stores of iron and other vitamins with significant variation of anemia within and between regions. Objective To identify the determinants of anemia among pregnant mothers attending antenatal care in Dessie town health facilities, northern central Ethiopia. Methods A health facility based unmatched case control study was conducted among 112 cases and 336 controls from January to March 2016 G.C. The sample size was determined by using Epi Info version 7.1.5.2. Study subjects were selected using consecutive sampling technique. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, entered using Epi Data version 3.1 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Bivariable and multivariable logistic regression model was used to see the determinants of anemia. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and p-value<0.05 were used to see the significant association. Results Failure to take dark green leafy vegetables per two weeks (AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 2.16, 11.71), didn’t take chicken per two weeks (AOR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.22, 5.86), 1st trimester (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.12, 3.84), 3rd trimester (AOR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.53, 5.72), HIV infection (AOR = 6.78, 95% CI: 2.28, 20.18) and medication (AOR = 3.57 95% CI: 1.60, 7.98) were positively associated with anemia. Conclusions Inadequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables, inadequate consumption of chicken, trimester of the current pregnancy, HIV infection and medication were the determinants of anemia among pregnant women. Therefore, anemia prevention strategy should include promotion of adequate intake of dark green leafy vegetables and chicken, increase meal pattern during the entire pregnancy and strengthen the prevention of mother to child HIV transmission/antenatal care programs. PMID:28288159

  5. Mapping lake level changes using ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry data: a case study in arid regions of central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JunLi; Fang, Hui; Yang, Liao

    2011-12-01

    Lakes in arid regions of Central Asia act as essential components of regional water cycles, providing sparse but valuable water resource for the fragile ecological environments and human lives. Lakes in Central Asia are sensitive to climate change and human activities, and great changes have been found since 1960s. Mapping and monitoring these inland lakes would improve our understanding of mechanism of lake dynamics and climatic impacts. ICESat/GLAS satellite laser altimetry provides an efficient tool of continuously measuring lake levels in these poorly surveyed remote areas. An automated mapping scheme of lake level changes is developed based on GLAS altimetry products, and the spatial and temporal characteristics of 9 typical lakes in Central Asia are analyzed to validate the level accuracies. The results show that ICESat/GLAS has a good performance of lake level monitoring, whose patterns of level changes are the same as those of field observation, and the max differences between GLAS and field data is 3cm. Based on the results, it is obvious that alpine lakes are increasing greatly in lake levels during 2003-2009 due to climate change, while open lakes with dams and plain endorheic lakes decrease dramatically in water levels due to human activities, which reveals the overexploitation of water resource in Central Asia.

  6. Pneumatic Displacement with Perfluoropropane Gas and Intravitreal Tissue Plasminogen Activator for Subretinal Subfoveal Hemorrhage after Focal Laser Photocoagulation in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Juan V.; Lasave, Andres F.; Savino-Zari, Dario; Arevalo, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the visual and anatomic outcomes of pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Method. Interventional, retrospective case report of one eye (one patient). Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and size of the lesion at two weeks of followup. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) were used to measure anatomic outcomes. Results. A 35-year-old man with history of chronic CSCR received focal laser photocoagulation in the right eye two days before presentation. At initial examination, VA was 20/200 (ETDRS chart), CMT was 398 μ, and a subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage was seen. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 25 µg/0.1 mL was injected intravitreally before intravitreal C3F8 injection, and prone positioning was indicated postoperatively. At 24 hours, the hemorrhage had been displaced inferiorly and VA improved to 20/100. Two weeks later, VA improved to 20/80, CMT decreased to 225 μ, and the hemorrhage decreased without foveal involvement. Conclusions. The technique seems safe and effective in treating visually significant subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage. PMID:25485161

  7. Pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Al Rubaie, Khalid; Espinoza, Juan V; Lasave, Andres F; Savino-Zari, Dario; Arevalo, Fernando A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To report the visual and anatomic outcomes of pneumatic displacement with perfluoropropane (C3F8) gas and intravitreal tissue plasminogen activator (IVTPA) for subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage after focal laser photocoagulation in central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Method. Interventional, retrospective case report of one eye (one patient). Outcome measures included visual acuity (VA), central macular thickness (CMT), and size of the lesion at two weeks of followup. Fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) were used to measure anatomic outcomes. Results. A 35-year-old man with history of chronic CSCR received focal laser photocoagulation in the right eye two days before presentation. At initial examination, VA was 20/200 (ETDRS chart), CMT was 398 μ, and a subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage was seen. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) at a dose of 25 µg/0.1 mL was injected intravitreally before intravitreal C3F8 injection, and prone positioning was indicated postoperatively. At 24 hours, the hemorrhage had been displaced inferiorly and VA improved to 20/100. Two weeks later, VA improved to 20/80, CMT decreased to 225 μ, and the hemorrhage decreased without foveal involvement. Conclusions. The technique seems safe and effective in treating visually significant subretinal subfoveal hemorrhage.

  8. Laser safety program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

    PubMed

    Reif, Ronald H; Fraser, Leanora A; Liffers, Mark L

    2013-02-01

    Implementing a laser safety program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) presents many challenges and opportunities for improving safety performance. Getting all laser users to take ownership of safety and comply with all laser safety requirements are key ingredients of a successful laser safety program. WHOI's laser safety program includes the following elements: registration of high power lasers, hazard analysis of laser facilities, proper design of laser facilities, selection of hazard controls, laser safe operating procedures, laser safety training for all laser users, and routine inspections of laser facilities. Laser owners are required to sign the high power laser registration form and agree to comply with all applicable requirements. All laser users are required to sign the laser safe operating procedure that applies to their facility and follow the requirements. Laser users are included in the development of laser safe operating procedures, design of their facilities, review of hazard analysis calculations for their lasers, and in the selection of hazard controls. Laser safety training for new laser users includes a tour of established laser facilities, review of laser safe operating procedure, and a review of basic laser safety information. By engaging the laser users in all elements of the laser safety program, ownership of laser safety at the user level is more easily established and compliance with safety requirements is significantly improved. New laser owners and users are mentored by experienced laser users and are given an opportunity to observe the implementation of laser safety procedures at established laser facilities before operating their own high power lasers. Increased compliance with safety requirements has been demonstrated with fewer non-compliance items noted during annual laser safety inspections, more participation in initial and annual refresher training, and more requests from higher power laser users for assistance

  9. High-gradient C-band linac for a compact x-ray free-electron laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, T.; Kondo, C.; Maesaka, H.; Ohshima, T.; Otake, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Shirasawa, K.; Shintake, T.

    2014-08-01

    An electron linac using a C-band rf frequency, 5.712 GHz, has enabled us to obtain an acceleration gradient of more than 35 MV/m reliably. A C-band accelerator system has been developed and constructed for the compact x-ray FEL facility, SACLA, in order to fit within the available site length at SPring-8, and to reduce construction costs. An accelerator unit consists of two 1.8 m-long accelerator structures, a cavity-type rf pulse compressor and a 50 MW pulsed klystron. In order to achieve a compact rf source and to obtain extremely stable rf fields in the accelerator structures, an oil-filled, high-voltage pulse modulator combined with an extremely stable, inverter-type, high voltage charger was developed. SACLA uses 64 sets of these accelerator units in order to achieve a final beam energy of 8.5 GeV. After rf conditioning for 1 700 hours, the maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 38 MV/m. The typical trip rate for each accelerator unit at 35 MV/m and 30 pps is about once per day. Dark current from the accelerator structures is less than 5 pC, which causes a negligible effect on the beam monitors. The phase and amplitude stability of the rf fields were measured to be 0.03 degree and 0.01% rms, respectively, which is sufficient for the XFEL operation of SACLA. Since the first beam commissioning in 2011, the C-band accelerator has demonstrated fairly stable performance under continuous operation for 20 000 hours.

  10. The identification of autoionizing states of atomic chromium for the resonance ionization laser ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Chrysalidis, K.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into autoionizing states of atomic chromium, in the service of the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS): the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility based at CERN. The multi-step resonance photo-ionization process enables element selective ionization which, in combination with mass separation, allows isotope specific selectivity in the production of radioactive ion beams at ISOLDE. The element selective nature of the process requires a multi-step "ionization scheme" to be developed for each element. Using the method of in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy, an optimal three-step, three-resonance photo-ionization scheme originating from the 3d5(6S)4s a7S3 atomic ground state has been developed for chromium. The scheme uses an ionizing transition to one of the 15 newly observed autoionizing states reported here. Details of the spectroscopic studies are described and the new ionization scheme is summarized.

  11. Estimating Groundwater Concentrations from Mass Releases to the Aquifer at Integrated Disposal Facility and Tank Farm Locations Within the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2005-06-09

    This report summarizes groundwater-related numerical calculations that will support groundwater flow and transport analyses associated with the scheduled 2005 performance assessment of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at the Hanford Site. The report also provides potential supporting information to other ongoing Hanford Site risk analyses associated with the closure of single-shell tank farms and related actions. The IDF 2005 performance assessment analysis is using well intercept factors (WIFs), as outlined in the 2001 performance assessment of the IDF. The flow and transport analyses applied to these calculations use both a site-wide regional-scale model and a local-scale model of the area near the IDF. The regional-scale model is used to evaluate flow conditions, groundwater transport, and impacts from the IDF in the central part of the Hanford Site, at the core zone boundary around the 200 East and 200 West Areas, and along the Columbia River. The local-scale model is used to evaluate impacts from transport of contaminants to a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient from the IDF boundaries. Analyses similar to the regional-scale analysis of IDF releases are also provided at individual tank farm areas as additional information. To gain insight on how the WIF approach compares with other approaches for estimating groundwater concentrations from mass releases to the unconfined aquifer, groundwater concentrations were estimated with the WIF approach for two hypothetical release scenarios and compared with similar results using a calculational approach (the convolution approach). One release scenario evaluated with both approaches (WIF and convolution) involved a long-term source release from immobilized low-activity waste glass containing 25,550 Ci of technetium-99 near the IDF; another involved a hypothetical shorter-term release of {approx}0.7 Ci of technetium over 600 years from the S-SX tank farm area. In addition, direct simulation results for both release

  12. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-02-06

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5-ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  13. MTX/ELF II (Microwave Tokamak Experiment/ Electron Laser Facility II) microwave power measurements and calibration for the 2-GW, 140-GHZ, ELF II free-electron laser (FEL)

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, S.W.; Stever, R.; Throop, A.; Felker, B.; Franklin, R.

    1989-09-27

    We have developed techniques for measuring the power and frequency of the Electron Laser Facility (ELF) II free-electron laser (FEL) used for plasma heating experiments on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). We also have designed a multichannel, 140-GHz receiver capable of measuring FEL power levels from 10 mW to 0.1 {mu}W within an accuracy of {plus minus}1 dB with a 50-dB dynamic range and a 2-ns response time. By using calibrated attenuators, we can measure power levels from 10 GW to 0.1 {mu}W. We sample the microwave output of the FEL in a microwave load tank by using WR-8 or WR-28 stub waveguide antennas. Microwave turning mirrors are used to guide the microwave beam down an evacuated beam tube to the MTX. Stub, WR-8, fundamental-mode, waveguide antennas are used for beam detection on the microwave turning mirrors. Orthogonal, WR-8, stub waveguides are machined into the surfaces of the mirrors and used as directional couplers to measure forward and reflected power from the FEL. The microwave power is then transported to the microwave receiver via a low-loss, over-moded, WR-28 waveguide. A movable modes probe in the microwave load tank is used to scan across the microwave beam to determine the modes content of the beam. Frequency stability of the FEL is measured with a fast, frequency-modulation detector (FFMD) capable of measuring frequency shifts and modulation on a 2- to 4-ns time frame. 2 refs., 14 figs.

  14. System and method for tuning adjusting the central frequency of a laser while maintaining frequency stabilization to an external reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livas, Jeffrey (Inventor); Thorpe, James I. (Inventor); Numata, Kenji (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for stabilizing a laser to a frequency reference with an adjustable offset. The method locks a sideband signal generated by passing an incoming laser beam through the phase modulator to a frequency reference, and adjusts a carrier frequency relative to the locked sideband signal by changing a phase modulation frequency input to the phase modulator. The sideband signal can be a single sideband (SSB), dual sideband (DSB), or an electronic sideband (ESB) signal. Two separate electro-optic modulators can produce the DSB signal. The two electro-optic modulators can be a broadband modulator and a resonant modulator. With a DSB signal, the method can introduce two sinusoidal phase modulations at the phase modulator. With ESB signals, the method can further drive the optical phase modulator with an electrical signal with nominal frequency OMEGA(sub 1) that is phase modulated at a frequency OMEGA(sub 2)

  15. The Francium facility at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, S.; Behr, J. A.; Chen, G.; Collister, R.; Flambaum, V. V.; Gomez, E.; Gwinner, G.; Jackson, K. P.; Melconian, D.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Ruiz, M. C.; Sheng, D.; Shin, Y. H.; Sprouse, G. D.; Tandecki, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We present the current status of the Francium Trapping Facility at ISAC at TRIUMF. The facility will enable future experiments on the weak interaction with measurements of atomic parity non-conservation laser-cooled samples of artificially produced francium. These experiments require a precisely controlled environment, which the facility is designed to provide. The facility has been constructed and is being prepared for a series of commissioning runs.

  16. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  17. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  18. Nitroglycerin induces migraine headache and central sensitization phenomena in patients with migraine without aura: a study of laser evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Losito, Luciana; Sardaro, Michele; Cerbo, Rosanna

    2004-06-17

    In migraineurs nitroglycerin (NTG) induces severe delayed headache, resembling spontaneous migraine attacks. The aim of the present study was to evaluate NTG laser evoked potentials (LEP) features amplitude and pain sensation to laser stimuli during NTG-induced headache. Nine patients were selected. Headache was induced by oral administration of 0.6 mg of NTG; signals were recorded through disk electrodes placed at the vertex and referred to linked earlobes. CO(2)-LEPs delivered by stimulation of the dorsum of both hands and the right and left supraorbital zones were evaluated after the onset of moderate or severe headache resembling spontaneous migraine and at least 72 h after the end of the headache phase. Patients exhibited a significant heat pain threshold reduction and an LEPs amplitude increment during headache when both the supraorbital zones were stimulated. NTG appeared to support a reliable experimental model of migraine, based on the neuronal effects on the integrative-nociceptive structures. The LEPs facilitation during NTG-induced headache may be subtended by a hyperactivity of nociceptive cortex as well as by a failure of pain-inhibitory control.

  19. Industrial Processes to Reduce Generation of Hazardous Waste at DoD Facilities. Phase III Report. Appendix C. Workshop Manual Centralized Vehicle Wash Racks and Scheduled Maintenance Facilities, Fort Lewis, Washington.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    facility described above are centrallyo one settled, treated by an oil removal device, and subjected to intermittent sand filtration. The sludges from the...solids and grease and oil content. e. Solid Waste Disposal: (1) Special Wastes Developed: sludges from sedimentation chambers and periodic scrapings...to - collect the waste oil from vehicles and place it directly into a storage tank . To eliminate the need for detergents and maintenance cleaning, low

  20. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  1. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  2. Development of a model for geomorphological assessment at U.S. DOE chemical/radioactive waste disposal facilities in the central and eastern United States; Weldon spring site remedial action project, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rockaway, J.D.; Smith, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Landform development and long-term geomorphic stability is the result of a complex interaction of a number of geomorphic processes. These processes may be highly variable in intensity and duration under different physiographic settings. This limitation has influenced the applicability of previous geomorphological stability assessments conducted in the arid or semi-arid western United States to site evaluations in more temperate and humid climates. The purpose of this study was to develop a model suitable for evaluating both long-term and short-term geomorphic processes which may impact landform stability and hence the stability of disposal facilities located in the central and eastern United States. The model developed for the geomorphological stability assessment at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) near St. Louis, Missouri, included an evaluation of existing landforms and consideration of the impact of both long-term and short-term geomorphic processes. These parameters were evaluated with respect to their impact and contribution to three assessment criteria considered most important with respect to the stability analysis; evaluation of landform age, evaluation of present geomorphic process activity and ; determination of the impact of the completed facility on existing geomorphic processes. The geomorphological assessment at the Weldon Spring site indicated that the facility is located in an area of excellent geomorphic stability. The only geomorphic process determined to have a potential detrimental effect on long-term facility performance is an extension of the drainage network. A program of mitigating measures has been proposed to minimize the impact that future gully extension could have on the integrity of the facility.

  3. National Ignition Facility system design requirements conventional facilities SDR001

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, J.

    1996-04-09

    This System Design Requirements (SDR) document specifies the functions to be performed and the minimum design requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) site infrastructure and conventional facilities. These consist of the physical site and buildings necessary to house the laser, target chamber, target preparation areas, optics support and ancillary functions.

  4. Simulation study of 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, G. E.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3-5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (˜nc/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using Hydra, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from Cretin, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3-5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ˜100-150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (˜20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3-5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  5. Simulation study of 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiency from Ar K-shell vs. Ag L-shell targets on the National Ignition Facility laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, G. E. Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B.; May, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Patel, M. V.; Scott, H. A.; Marinak, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    Tailored, high-flux, multi-keV x-ray sources are desirable for studying x-ray interactions with matter for various civilian, space and military applications. For this study, we focus on designing an efficient laser-driven non-local thermodynamic equilibrium 3–5 keV x-ray source from photon-energy-matched Ar K-shell and Ag L-shell targets at sub-critical densities (∼n{sub c}/10) to ensure supersonic, volumetric laser heating with minimal losses to kinetic energy, thermal x rays and laser-plasma instabilities. Using HYDRA, a multi-dimensional, arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian, radiation-hydrodynamics code, we performed a parameter study by varying initial target density and laser parameters for each material using conditions readily achievable on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. We employ a model, benchmarked against Kr data collected on the NIF, that uses flux-limited Lee-More thermal conductivity and multi-group implicit Monte-Carlo photonics with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, detailed super-configuration accounting opacities from CRETIN, an atomic-kinetics code. While the highest power laser configurations produced the largest x-ray yields, we report that the peak simulated laser to 3–5 keV x-ray conversion efficiencies of 17.7% and 36.4% for Ar and Ag, respectively, occurred at lower powers between ∼100–150 TW. For identical initial target densities and laser illumination, the Ag L-shell is observed to have ≳10× higher emissivity per ion per deposited laser energy than the Ar K-shell. Although such low-density Ag targets have not yet been demonstrated, simulations of targets fabricated using atomic layer deposition of Ag on silica aerogels (∼20% by atomic fraction) suggest similar performance to atomically pure metal foams and that either fabrication technique may be worth pursuing for an efficient 3–5 keV x-ray source on NIF.

  6. Evaluating the Impact of Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding on NASA Centers and Facilities by Implementing Terrestrial Laser Scanning Surveys to Improve Coastal Digital Elevation and Inundation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, K.; Meertens, C.; Lestak, L.; Masters, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sea level is rising in response to climate change. Currently the global mean rate is a little over 3 mm/year, but it is expected to accelerate significantly over this century. This will have a profound impact on coastal populations and infrastructure, including NASA centers and facilities. A detailed study proposed by the University of Colorado's Center for Astrodynamics Research on the impact of sea level rise on several of NASA's most vulnerable facilities was recently funded by NASA. Individual surveys at several high-risk NASA centers were conducted and used as case studies for a broader investigation that needs to be done for coastal infrastructure around the country. The first two years of this study included implementing and conducting a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and GPS survey at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. We are currently using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data and TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) data to construct detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) of the facilities that we have assessed. The TLS data acquired at each center provides a very dense point cloud that is being used to improve the detail and accuracy of the digital elevation models currently available. We are also using GPS data we acquired at each center to assess the rate of vertical land movement at the facilities and to tie the DEM to tide gauges and other reference points. With completed, detailed DEMs of the topography and facilities at each center, a series of simple inundation models will then be applied to each area. We will use satellite altimeter data from TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 to assess the sea level changes observed near these NASA facilities over the last 20 years along with sea level projections from global climate models (GCMs) and semi-empirical projections to make detailed maps

  7. The application of terrestrial laser scanner and photogrammetry in measuring erosion and deposition processes in humid badlands in the Central Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal-Romero, E.; Revuelto, J.; Errea, P.; López-Moreno, J. I.

    2015-04-01

    Erosion and deposition processes in badland areas are usually estimated using traditional observations of topographic changes, measured by erosion pins or profile meters (invasive techniques). In recent times, geomatic techniques (non-invasive) have been routinely applied in geomorphology studies, especially in erosion studies. These techniques provide the opportunity to build high-resolution topographic models at subcentimeter accuracy. By comparing different 3-D point clouds of the same area, obtained at different time intervals, the variations in the terrain and temporal dynamics can be analyzed. The aim of this study is to assess and compare the functioning of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS, RIEGL LPM-321) and close range photogrammetry techniques (Camera FUJIFILM, Finepix x100 and Software PhotoScan by AgiSoft), to evaluate erosion and deposition processes in a humid badland area in the Central Spanish Pyrenees. Results show that TLS data sets and photogrammetry techniques provide new opportunities in geomorphological erosion studies. The data we recorded over one year demonstrated that north-facing slopes experienced more intense and faster changing geomorphological dynamics than south-facing slopes as well as the highest erosion rates. Different seasonal processes were observed, with the highest topographic differences observed during winter periods and the high intensity rainfalls in summer. While TLS provided the highest resolution models, photogrammetry was still a faster methodology in the field and precise at short distances. Both techniques do not require direct contact with the soil and thus prevent the usual surface disturbance of traditional and invasive methods.

  8. Facility Microgrids

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  9. Design of a 50 TW/20 J chirped-Pulse Amplification Laser for High-Energy-Density Plasma Physics Experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, A C; Astanovitskiy, A; Batie, S; Bauer, B; Bayramian, A; Caird, J A; Cowan, T; Ebbers, C; Fuchs, J; Faretto, H; Glassman, J; Ivanov, V; LeGalloudec, B; LeGalloudec, N; Letzring, S; Payne, S; Stuart, B

    2003-09-07

    We have developed a conceptual design for a 50 TW/20 J short-pulse laser for performing high-energy-density plasma physics experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility of the University of Nevada, Reno. The purpose of the laser is to develop proton and x-ray radiography techniques, to use these techniques to study z-pinch plasmas, and to study deposition of intense laser energy into both magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. Our design uses a commercial diode-pumped Nd:glass oscillator to generate 3-nJ. 200-fs mode-locked pulses at 1059 m. An all-reflective grating stretcher increases pulse duration to 1.1 ns. A two-stage chirped-pulse optical parametric amplifier (OPCPA) using BBO crystals boosts pulse energy to 12 mJ. A chain using mixed silicate-phosphate Nd:glass increases pulse energy to 85 J while narrowing bandwidth to 7.4 nm (FWHM). About 50 J is split off to the laser target chamber to generate plasma while the remaining energy is directed to a roof-mirror pulse compressor, where two 21 cm x 42 cm gold gratings recompress pulses to {approx}350 fs. A 30-cm-focal-length off-axis parabolic reflector (OAP) focuses {approx}20 J onto target, producing an irradiance of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} in a 10-{micro}m-diameter spot. This paper describes planned plasma experiments, system performance requirements, the laser design, and the target area design.

  10. The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G H

    2003-12-19

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10'' bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5 ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper discusses NIF's current and future experimental capability, plans for diagnostics, cryogenic target systems, specialized optics for experiments, and potential enhancements to NIF such as multi-color laser operation and high-energy short pulse operation.

  11. Short Pulse Laser Applications Design

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Clark, D S; Kemp, A J; Lasinski, B F; Tabak, M

    2008-02-11

    We are applying our recently developed, LDRD-funded computational simulation tool to optimize and develop applications of Fast Ignition (FI) for stockpile stewardship. This report summarizes the work performed during a one-year exploratory research LDRD to develop FI point designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These results were sufficiently encouraging to propose successfully a strategic initiative LDRD to design and perform the definitive FI experiment on the NIF. Ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will begin in 2010 using the central hot spot (CHS) approach, which relies on the simultaneous compression and ignition of a spherical fuel capsule. Unlike this approach, the fast ignition (FI) method separates fuel compression from the ignition phase. In the compression phase, a laser such as NIF is used to implode a shell either directly, or by x rays generated from the hohlraum wall, to form a compact dense ({approx}300 g/cm{sup 3}) fuel mass with an areal density of {approx}3.0 g/cm{sup 2}. To ignite such a fuel assembly requires depositing {approx}20kJ into a {approx}35 {micro}m spot delivered in a short time compared to the fuel disassembly time ({approx}20ps). This energy is delivered during the ignition phase by relativistic electrons generated by the interaction of an ultra-short high-intensity laser. The main advantages of FI over the CHS approach are higher gain, a lower ignition threshold, and a relaxation of the stringent symmetry requirements required by the CHS approach. There is worldwide interest in FI and its associated science. Major experimental facilities are being constructed which will enable 'proof of principle' tests of FI in integrated subignition experiments, most notably the OMEGA-EP facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory of Laser Energetics and the FIREX facility at Osaka University in Japan. Also, scientists in the European Union have recently proposed the construction of a new FI

  12. Rendezvous facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.H.; Roome, W.D.

    1988-11-01

    The concurrent programming facilities in both Concurrent C and the Ada language are based on the rendezvous concept. Although these facilities are similar, there are substantial differences. Facilities in Concurrent C were designed keeping in perspective the concurrent programming facilities in the Ada language and their limitations. Concurrent C facilities have also been modified as a result of experience with its initial implementations. In this paper, the authors compare the concurrent programming facilities in Concurrent C and Ada, and show that it is easier to write a variety of concurrent programs in Concurrent C than in Ada.

  13. Evaluation of the mineralization degree of the vestibular surface of the upper central incisors with a 655-nm diode laser in mouth breathers: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro Ladalardo, Thereza C. C. G.; Cappellette, Mario, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Anthero de Azevedo, Ramiro; Pignatari, Shirley; Weckx, Luc L. M.

    2003-06-01

    Mouth breathing unbalances the physiological mechanisms of the dental surface hydration by compromising lip closure, and, very often, causing the vestibular positioning of upper incisors. That variance leads to the interruption of the dental demineralization and remineralization feedback, prevailing a demineralized condition of the dental surface which increases caries risk. The laser fluorescence examination allows an early demineralization diagnosis, thus it makes possible through preventive measures to minimize the risk factor - dental mineral structure loss - in the bacterial infection of the demineralized area, and hence, preventing invasive therapeutical procedures. A DIAGNOdent apparatus was used to evaluate the mineralization degree of the upper central incisors in 40 patients - twenty of them with a mouth breathing diagnosis; the remaining twenty were nasal breathers (control group). Age ranging from 6 to 12 years, both male and female. To measure the vestibular surface of the incisors, it was divided into 3 segments: cervical, medial and incisal. The average of the results pertaining to the mouth breathing patients was as follows: tooth 11 cervical third - 5.45, medial third - 7.15, incisal third - 7.95, and tooth 21 - cervical third - 5.95, medial third - 7.25, incisal third - 8.15. The control patients, nasal breathers, presented the following results: tooth 11 cervical third - 1.75, medial third - 2.30, incisal third - 1.85, and tooth 21 - cervical third - 1.80, medial third - 2.20, incisal third - 2.15. The mouth breathing patients showed demineralization in the teeth examined at the initial stage, subclinical, comparing with the control patients, nasal breathers, who did not present any mineral deficit in these teeth.

  14. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  15. Demonstration of rapid-scan two-dimensional laser velocimetry in the Langley Vortex Research Facility for research in aerial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.; Jordan, F. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were conducted to demonstrate a rapid scan two dimensional laser velocimeter (LV) measurement technique for aerial applications research. The LV system is capable of simultaneously measuring both vertical and axial flow velocity components in a near or far field vortex system. Velocity profiles were successfully measured in the wake vortex of a representative agricultural aircraft model, with the vortex system rapidly transporting in ground effect. Results indicate that the laser velocimetry technique can provide quantitative information of wake vortex characteristics in ground effect.

  16. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  17. 40Ar-39Ar laser dating of ductile shear zones from central Corsica (France): Evidence of Alpine (middle to late Eocene) syn-burial shearing in Variscan granitoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Grande, Antonietta; Prosser, Giacomo; Cavazza, William; DeCelles, Peter G.

    2016-10-01

    The island of Corsica (France) plays a central role in any reconstruction of Western Mediterranean geodynamics and paleogeography but several key aspects of its geological evolution are still uncertain. The most debated topics include the interpretation of the Corsican orogen as the result of an east- or west-directed subduction, and the actual involvement of the Variscan basement of Corsica in the Alpine orogenic cycle. This study integrates 40Ar-39Ar laserprobe, mesostructural, microtextural, and microchemical analyses and places relevant constraints on the style, P-T conditions, and timing of Alpine-age, pervasive ductile shear zones which affected the Variscan basement complex of central Corsica, a few kilometers to the west of the present-day front of the Alpine nappes. Shear zones strike NNE-SSW, dip at a high angle, and are characterized by a dominant sinistral strike-slip component. Two of the three investigated shear zones contain two texturally and chemically resolvable generations of white mica, recording a prograde (burial) evolution: (1) deformed celadonite-poor relicts are finely overgrown by (2) a celadonite-rich white mica aligned along the main foliation. White mica from a third sample of another shear zone, characterized by a significantly lower porphyroclast/matrix ratio, exhibits a nearly uniform high-celadonite content, compositionally matching the texturally younger phengite from the nearby shear zones. Mineral-textural analysis, electron microprobe data, and pseudosection modeling constrain P-T conditions attained during shearing at 300 °C and minimum pressures of 0.6 GPa. In-situ 40Ar-39Ar analyses of coexisting low- and high-celadonite white micas from both shear zones yielded a relatively wide range of ages, 45-36 Ma. Laser step-heating experiments gave sigmoidal-shaped age profiles, with step ages in line with in-situ spot dates. By contrast, the apparently chemically homogenous high-celadonite white mica yielded concordant in-situ ages

  18. Temperature dependent BRDF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airola, Marc B.; Brown, Andrea M.; Hahn, Daniel V.; Thomas, Michael E.; Congdon, Elizabeth A.; Mehoke, Douglas S.

    2014-09-01

    Applications involving space based instrumentation and aerodynamically heated surfaces often require knowledge of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of an exposed surface at high temperature. Addressing this need, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) developed a BRDF facility that features a multiple-port vacuum chamber, multiple laser sources covering the spectral range from the longwave infrared to the ultraviolet, imaging pyrometry and laser heated samples. Laser heating eliminates stray light that would otherwise be seen from a furnace and requires minimal sample support structure, allowing low thermal conduction loss to be obtained, which is especially important at high temperatures. The goal is to measure the BRDF of ceramic-coated surfaces at temperatures in excess of 1000°C in a low background environment. Most ceramic samples are near blackbody in the longwave infrared, thus pyrometry using a LWIR camera can be very effective and accurate.

  19. Laser Programs Highlight 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.R.

    1997-01-31

    Our contributions to laser science and technology and corresponding applications range from concept to design of the National Ignition Facility, transfer of Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation technology to the private sector, and from new initiatives in industry and defense to micro-optics for improving human vision.

  20. Laser programs highlights 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

  1. Study of the hydrodynamics of the formation of flows caused by the interaction of a shock wave with two-dimensional density perturbations on the Iskra-5 laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanov, A. V.; Barinov, M. A.; Barinov, S. P.; Garanin, R. V.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Kalmykov, N. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Kokorin, S. N.; Pinegin, A. V.; Solomatina, E. Yu.; Solomatin, I. I.; Suslov, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    The hydrodynamics of the flow formation due to the interaction of a shock wave with two-dimensional density perturbations is experimentally investigated on the Iskra-5 laser facility. Shadow images of a jet arising as a result of the impact of a shock wave (formed by a soft X-ray pulse from a target-illuminator) on a flat aluminium target with a blind cylindrical cavity are recorded in experiments with point-like X-ray backlighting having a photon energy of ~4.5 keV. The sizes and mass of the jet ejected from the aluminium cavity by this shock wave are estimated. The experimental data are compared with the results of numerical simulation of the jet formation and dynamics according to the two-dimensional MID-ND2D code.

  2. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RADINFO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Radiation Information Database (RADINFO). RADINFO contains information about facilities that are regulated by EPA for radiation and radioactivity. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RADINFO facilities once the RADINFO data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  3. Laser Safety for the Experimental Halls at SLAC_s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; Anthony, Perry; Barat, Ken; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Greg; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2009-01-15

    The LCLS at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be the world's first source of an intense hard x-ray laser beam, generating x-rays with wavelengths of 1nm and pulse durations less than 100fs. The ultrafast x-ray pulses will be used in pump-probe experiments to take stop-motion pictures of atoms and molecules in motion, with pulses powerful enough to take diffraction images of single molecules, enabling scientists to elucidate fundamental processes of chemistry and biology. Ultrafast conventional lasers will be used as the pump. In 2009, LCLS will deliver beam to the Atomic Molecular and Optical (AMO) Experiment, located in one of 3 x-ray Hutches in the Near Experimental Hall (NEH). The NEH includes a centralized Laser Hall, containing up to three Class 4 laser systems, three x-ray Hutches for experiments and vacuum transport tubes for delivering laser beams to the Hutches. The main components of the NEH laser systems are a Ti:sapphire oscillator, a regen amplifier, green pump lasers for the oscillator and regen, a pulse compressor and a harmonics conversion unit. Laser safety considerations and controls for the ultrafast laser beams, multiple laser controlled areas, and user facility issues are discussed.

  4. Regional Instrumentation Facilities Established by NSF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Analytical Chemistry, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This article describes the six regional instrumentation facilities established by the National Science Foundation. These centers make available to scientists state-of-the-art instrumentation such as: gas chromatographs; lasers; NMR spectrometers; X-rays; and others. (CS)

  5. National direct-drive program on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. N.; Regan, S. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harding, D. R.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; Michel, D. T.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Gatu-Johnson, M.

    2017-01-01

    A major advantage of the laser direct-drive (DD) approach to ignition is the increased fraction of laser drive energy coupled to the hot spot and relaxed hot-spot requirements for the peak pressure and convergence ratios relative to the indirect-drive approach at equivalent laser energy. With the goal of a successful ignition demonstration using DD, the recently established national strategy has several elements and involves multiple national and international institutions. These elements include the experimental demonstration on OMEGA cryogenic implosions of hot-spot conditions relevant for ignition at MJ-scale energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and developing an understanding of laser-plasma interactions and laser coupling using DD experiments on the NIF. DD designs require reaching central stagnation pressures in excess of 100 Gbar. The current experiments on OMEGA have achieved inferred peak pressures of 56 Gbar (Regan et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 117 025001). Extensive analysis of the cryogenic target experiments and two- and three-dimensional simulations suggest that power balance, target offset, and target quality are the main limiting factors in target performance. In addition, cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been identified as the main mechanism reducing laser coupling. Reaching the goal of demonstrating hydrodynamic equivalence on OMEGA includes improving laser power balance, target position, and target quality at shot time. CBET must also be significantly reduced and several strategies have been identified to address this issue.

  6. Quantifying the Growth of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the Omega Laser and National Ignition Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires multiple overlapping laser beams that can drive the cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) instability. This instability is of primary concern because it can reduce the laser energy coupling and can affect the symmetry in a polar-direct-drive (PDD) configuration. An experiment was designed to determine the CBET growth by measuring the angularly resolved mass ablation rate and ablation-front trajectory in a PDD configuration. Adding a thin layer of Si over a CH shell generates two peaks in x-ray self-emission images that are measured with a time-resolved pinhole imager. The inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak is used to measure the time for the laser to burn through the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material. The mass ablation rate was measured by varying the thickness of the outer silicon layer. The shell trajectory and mass ablation rate measured in PDD on the pole, where CBET has little effect, were compared with simulations to validate the electron thermal-transport model. Excellent agreement was obtained when using a 2-D nonlocal transport model, and these observables could not be reproduced with flux-limited models. A similar comparison was performed on the equator where the CBET growth is large. Without the CBET model, the shell velocity and mass ablation rate were significantly overestimated by the simulation. Adding the CBET model reduced the drive on the equator and reproduced the experimental results. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. In collaboration with, D. Cao, D. T. Michel, M. Hohenberger, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, I. V. Igumenshchev, J. A. Marozas, D. D. Meyerhofer, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, T. C

  7. Physics of short-wavelength-laser design

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    The physics and design of vuv and soft x-ray lasers pumped by ICF class high intensity infrared laser drivers are described (for example, the SHIVA laser facility at LLNL). Laser design and physics issues are discussed in the case of a photoionization pumping scheme involving Ne II and line pumping schemes involving H-like and He-like neon.

  8. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  9. UCLA Neptune Facility for Advanced Accelerator Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, Sergei Ya.; Clayton, Christopher E.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Rosenzweig, James B.; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2004-12-07

    The Neptune Laboratory at UCLA is being used for exploring concepts useful for advanced accelerators. This facility hosts a TW-class CO2 laser system and a high-brightness photoinjector producing a 14 MeV electron beam. The goal for the laboratory is to carry out experiments on high-gradient acceleration of externally injected electrons in both laser-driven relativistic plasma waves and EM laser field in vacuum. Experiments on plasma beat-wave acceleration using a prebunched electron beam, a high-energy gain 10-{mu}m inverse free electron laser accelerator, longitudinal electron beam shaping and laser based light-sources are planned.

  10. Facile synthesis of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide semiconducting nanocomposite using pulsed laser ablation technique and its performance in photovoltaic dye sensitized solar cell and photocatalytic water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, M. A.; Ilyas, A. M.; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Separation of photo-generated charge carriers (electron and holes) is a major approach to improve the photovoltaic and photocatalytic performance of metal oxide semiconductors. For harsh environment like high temperature applications, ceramic like silicon carbide is very prominent. In this work, 10%, 20% and 40% by weight of pre-oxidized silicon carbide was coupled with titanium dioxide (TiO2) to form nanocomposite semiconductor via elegant pulsed laser ablation in liquid technique using second harmonic 532 nm wavelength of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG) laser. In addition, the effect of silicon carbide concentration on the performance of silicon carbide-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as photo-anode in dye sensitized solar cell and as photocatalyst in photodegradation of methyl orange dye in water was also studied. The result obtained shows that photo-conversion efficiency of the dye sensitized solar cell was improved from 0.6% to 1.65% and the percentage of methyl orange dye removed was enhanced from 22% to 77% at 24 min under ultraviolet-visible solar spectrum in the nanocomposite with 10% weight of silicon carbide. This remarkable performance enhancement could be due to the improvement in electron transfer phenomenon by the presence of silicon carbide on titanium dioxide.

  11. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored

  12. Laser driven radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Sefcik, J.; Cowan, T.

    1997-12-20

    Intense laser (> 1021 W/cm{sup 3}) driven hard x-ray sources offer a new alternative to conventional electron accelerator Bremsstrahlung sources. These laser driven sources offer considerable simplicity in design and potential cost advantage for multiple axis views. High spatial and temporal resolution is achievable as a result of the very small source size (<100 um) and short-duration of the laser pulse. We have begun a series of experiments with the Petawatt laser at LLNL to determine the photon flux achievable with these sources and assess their potential for Stewardship applications. Additionally, we are developing a conceptual design and cost estimate of a multi-pulse, multi-axis (up to five) radiographic facility utilizing the Contained Firing Facility at site 300 and existing laser hardware.

  13. National Ignition Facility for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Murray, J.R.

    1997-10-08

    The National Ignition Facility for inertial confinement fusion will contain a 1.8 MJ, 500 TW frequency-tripled neodymium glass laser system that will be used to explore fusion ignition and other problems in the physics of high temperature and density. We describe the facility briefly. The NIF is scheduled to be completed in 2003.

  14. Central-Office Real Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Describes how to upgrade a school district's central-office facilities without incurring taxpayer enmity. Includes case studies from Harford County, Maryland; Orange and Broward Counties, Florida; South Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Mt. Baker, Washington; Chicago, Illinois; and Rochester, New Hampshire. (PKP)

  15. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  16. An ultra short pulse reconstruction software applied to the GEMINI high power laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galletti, Mario; Galimberti, Marco; Hooker, Chris; Chekhlov, Oleg; Tang, Yunxin; Bisesto, Fabrizio Giuseppe; Curcio, Alessandro; Anania, Maria Pia; Giulietti, Danilo

    2016-09-01

    The GRENOUILLE traces of Gemini pulses (15 J, 30 fs, PW, shot per 20 s) were acquired in the Gemini Target Area PetaWatt at the Central Laser Facility (CLF), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). A comparison between the characterizations of the laser pulse parameters made using two different types of algorithms: Video Frog and GRenouille/FrOG (GROG), was made. The temporal and spectral parameters came out to be in great agreement for the two kinds of algorithms. In this experimental campaign it has been showed how GROG, the developed algorithm, works as well as VideoFrog algorithm with the PetaWatt pulse class.

  17. Facility Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Ben E.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews recommendations on policies for leasing surplus school space made during the Council of Educational Facility Planners/International conference. A case study presentation of a Seattle district's use of lease agreements is summarized. (MJL)

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): SDWIS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS). SDWIS contains information about public water systems and their violations of EPA's drinking water regulations. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to SDWIS facilities once the SDWIS data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website http://www.epa.gov/enviro/html/fii/index.html.

  19. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grames, Joseph; Higinbotham, Douglas; Montgomery, Hugh

    2010-09-08

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

  20. SINBAD-The accelerator R&D facility under construction at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, U.; Assmann, R.; Brinkmann, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Hüning, M.; Kärtner, F.; Fallahi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Nie, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at DESY) is a long-term dedicated accelerator research and development facility currently under construction at DESY. It will be located in the premises of the old DORIS accelerator complex and host multiple independent experiments cost-effectively accessing the same central infrastructure like a central high power laser. With the removal of the old DORIS accelerator being completed, the refurbishment of the technical infrastructure is currently starting up. The presently ongoing conversion of the area into the SINBAD facility and the currently foreseen layout is described. The first experiment will use a compact S-band linac for the production of ultra-short bunches at hundred MeV. Once established, one of the main usages will be to externally inject electrons into a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator to boost the energy to GeV-level while maintaining a usable beam quality, ultimately aiming to drive an FEL. The second experiment already under planning is the setup of an attosecond radiation source with advanced technology. Further usage of the available space and infrastructure is revised and national and international collaborations are being established.

  1. Canastota Renewable Energy Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Jillian; Hunt, Allen

    2013-12-13

    The project was implemented at the Madison County Landfill located in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York. Madison County has owned and operated the solid waste and recycling facilities at the Buyea Road site since 1974. At the onset of the project, the County owned and operated facilities there to include three separate landfills, a residential solid waste disposal and recycled material drop-off facility, a recycling facility and associated administrative, support and environmental control facilities. This putrescible waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition within the waste mass and generates landfill gas, which is approximately 50% methane. In order to recover this gas, the landfill was equipped with gas collection systems on both the east and west sides of Buyea Road which bring the gas to a central point for destruction. In order to derive a beneficial use from the collected landfill gases, the County decided to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the future use of the generated gas.

  2. The National Ignition Facility: Transition to a User Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Keane, C.; MacGowan, B.; Patterson, R.; Spaeth, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Kauffman, R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density science (HEDS), national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The facility is on track to perform over 200 target shots this year in support of all of its user communities. The facility has nearly 60 diagnostic systems operational and has shown flexibility in laser pulse shape and performance to meet the requirements of its multiple users. Progress continues on its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. It has performed over 40 indirect-drive experiments with cryogenic-layered capsules. New platforms are being developed for HEDS and fundamental science. Equation-of-state and material strength experiments have been done on a number of materials with pressures of over 50 MBars obtained in diamond, conditions never previously encountered in the laboratory and similar to those found in planetary interiors. Experiments are also in progress investigating radiation transport, hydrodynamic instabilities, and direct drive implosions. NIF continues to develop as an experimental facility. Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) is now being installed on NIF for producing high-energy radiographs of the imploded cores of ignition targets and for short pulse laser-plasma interaction experiments. One NIF beam is planned for conversion to two picosecond beams in 2014. Other new diagnostics such as x-ray Thomson scattering, low energy neutron spectrometer, and multi-layer reflecting x-ray optics are also planned. Incremental improvements in laser performance such as improved optics damage performance, beam balance, and back reflection control are being pursued.

  3. VIEW LOOKING DOWN DUNCAN STREET FROM AYRES STREET, WITH FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW LOOKING DOWN DUNCAN STREET FROM AYRES STREET, WITH FACILITY 712 ON RIGHT AND FACILITY 713 ON LEFT (CENTRAL-ENTRY SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING TYPE). VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Wilikina Drive & Kunia Road, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  4. VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BUILDING 122 EXAMINATION FACILITIES THAT SUPPORT ROUTINE EMPLOYEE AND SUBCONTRACTOR PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS. (10/85) - Rocky Flats Plant, Emergency Medical Services Facility, Southwest corner of Central & Third Avenues, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Observation of a Reflected Shock in an Indirectly Driven Spherical Implosion at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N. B.; Casey, D.; Frenje, J.; Herrmann, H.; McNaney, J.; Ma, T.; Widmann, K.; Pak, A.; Grimm, G.; Knauer, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    A 200 μm radius hot spot at more than 2 keV temperature, 1 g/cm3 density has been achieved on the National Ignition Facility using a near vacuum hohlraum. The implosion exhibits ideal one-dimensional behavior and 99% laser-to-hohlraum coupling. The low opacity of the remaining shell at bang time allows for a measurement of the x-ray emission of the reflected central shock in a deuterium plasma. Comparison with 1D hydrodynamic simulations puts constraints on electron-ion collisions and heat conduction. Results are consistent with classical (Spitzer-Harm) heat flux.

  6. Lasers and avionic integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willams, J. S.

    1983-07-01

    Interrogative applications of laser technology are considered, taking into account the extent to which a centralized source of information can be used to service a number of functions which need to be performed in an airframe, and, in addition, also the potential of the laser as probing device. Aspects of laser technology and air vehicle communications are discussed along with laser based techniques for processing and storage of information. Attention is given to data transmission within the aircraft, communications external to the air vehicle, Fourier optics, holographic methods, real-time processing, Bragg cells and spectrum analysis, optical bistable devices, and optical data storage.

  7. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  8. Facilities Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents responses from Matt McGovern, "School Planning and Management's" Maintenance and Operations columnist, on the issue of school facility maintenance. McGovern does not believe schools will ever likely meet acceptable levels of maintenance, nor use infrared thermography for assessing roofs, outsource all maintenance work, nor find…

  9. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  10. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  11. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  12. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  13. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  14. A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident

    SciTech Connect

    Brumburgh, G.

    1994-08-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

  15. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  16. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  17. Qualification and Selection of Flight Diode Lasers for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebe, Carl C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Gontijo, Ivair; Forouhar, Siamak; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Cooper, Mark S.; Meras, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability and lifetime of laser diodes is critical to space missions. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission includes a metrology system that is based upon laser diodes. An operational test facility has been developed to qualify and select, by mission standards, laser diodes that will survive the intended space environment and mission lifetime. The facility is situated in an electrostatic discharge (ESD) certified clean-room and consist of an enclosed temperature-controlled stage that can accommodate up to 20 laser diodes. The facility is designed to characterize a single laser diode, in addition to conducting laser lifetime testing on up to 20 laser diodes simultaneously. A standard laser current driver is used to drive a single laser diode. Laser diode current, voltage, power, and wavelength are measured for each laser diode, and a method of selecting the most adequate laser diodes for space deployment is implemented. The method consists of creating histograms of laser threshold currents, powers at a designated current, and wavelengths at designated power. From these histograms, the laser diodes that illustrate a performance that is outside the normal are rejected and the remaining lasers are considered spaceborne candidates. To perform laser lifetime testing, the facility is equipped with 20 custom laser drivers that were designed and built by California Institute of Technology specifically to drive NuSTAR metrology lasers. The laser drivers can be operated in constant-current mode or alternating-current mode. Situated inside the enclosure, in front of the laser diodes, are 20 power-meter heads to record laser power throughout the duration of lifetime testing. Prior to connecting a laser diode to the current source for characterization and lifetime testing, a background program is initiated to collect current, voltage, and resistance. This backstage data collection enables the operational test facility to have full laser diode

  18. Comparative shock wave analysis during corneal ablation with an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Ronald R.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1995-05-01

    With the event of topographic steep central islands following excimer laser surgery and the potential damage to the corneal endothelium, shock waves are playing an increasingly important role in laser refractive surgery. With this in mind, we performed a comparative shock wave analysis in corneal tissue using an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser. We used a Lambda Physik excimer laser at 308 nm wavelength, a Nd:YLF picosecond laser at 1053 nm wavelength and a synchronously pumped linear cavity femtosecond laser at 630 nm wavelength. The pulse widths of the corresponding lasers were 8 ns, 18 ps, 150 fs, respectively. The energy density of irradiation was 2.5 to 8 times the threshold level being 2 J/cm2 (excimer laser), 86 J/cm2 (picosecond laser) and 10.3 J/cm2 (femtosecond laser). Shock wave dynamics were analyzed using time-resolved photography on a nanosecond time scale using the picosecond laser in corneal tissue, water and air. Shock wave dynamics using the femtosecond laser were studied in water only while the excimer laser induced shock wave during corneal ablation was studied in air only. We found the dynamics of shock waves to be similar in water and corneal tissue indicating that water is a good model to investigate shock wave effects in the cornea. The magnitude of the shock wave velocity and pressure decays over time to that of a sound wave. The distance over which it decays is 3 mm in air with the excimer laser and 600 - 700 micrometers in air with the picosecond laser. In water, the picosecond laser shock wave decays over a distance of 150 micrometers compared to the femtosecond laser shock wave which decays over a distance of 30 micrometers . Overall the excimer laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the picosecond laser and the picosecond laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the femtosecond laser. In this preliminary comparison, the time and distance for shock wave decay appears to be directly

  19. Automatic Rejection Of Multimode Laser Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Esproles, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic modulation detected, enabling rejection of multimode signals. Monitoring circuit senses multiple longitudinal mode oscillation of transversely excited, atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser. Facility developed for inclusion into coherent detection laser radar (LIDAR) system. However, circuit described of use in any experiment where desireable to record data only when laser operates in single longitudinal mode.

  20. Shuttle Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack L.; Harding, David J.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment that has flown twice; first on STS-72 in January 1996 and then on STS-85 in August 1997. Both missions produced successful laser altimetry and surface lidar data products from approximately 80 hours per mission of SLA data operations. A total of four Shuttle missions are planned for the SLA series. This paper documents SLA mission results and explains SLA pathfinder accomplishments at the mid-point in this series of Hitchhiker missions. The overall objective of the SLA mission series is the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for NASA operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future laser altimeter sensors will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA, including the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA) and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). MBLA is the land and vegetation laser sensor for the NASA Earth System Sciences Pathfinder Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) Mission, and GLAS is the Earth Observing System facility instrument on the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter, now well into a multi-year mapping mission at the red planet, is also directly benefiting from SLA data analysis methods, just as SLA benefited from MOLA spare parts and instrument technology experience [5] during SLA construction in the early 1990s.

  1. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  2. Laser Safety Inspection Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2005-06-13

    A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers references this requirement through several sections. One such reference is Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''. The composition, frequency and rigor of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms It is common for audit findings from one inspector or inspection to the next to vary even when reviewing the same material. How often has one heard a comment, ''well this area has been inspected several times over the years and no one ever said this or that was a problem before''. A great number of audit items, and therefore findings, are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the auditor to particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage, to one set of eyes might be completely adequate, while to another, inadequate. In order to provide consistency, the Laser Safety Office of the National Ignition Facility Directorate has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. The criteria are distributed to laser users. It serves two broad purposes; first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor. Second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items, such as labelling of beam blocks.

  3. Laser system for isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirayama, Shimpey; Mikatsura, Takefumi; Ueda, Hiroaki; Konagai, Chikara

    1990-06-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J), a joint Japanese utility companies research organization, was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment. Based on research results obtained from Japanese National Labs, and Universities , Laser-J is now constructing an AVLIS experimental facility at Tokai-mura. It is planned to have a 1-ton swu capacity per year in 1991. Previous to the experimental facility construction , Toshiba proceeded with the preliminary testing of an isotope separation system, under contract with Laser-J. Since the copper vapor laser (CVL) and the dye laser (DL) form a good combination , which can obtain high power tunable visible lights ,it is suitable to resonate uranium atoms. The laser system was built and was successfully operated in Toshiba for two years. The system consist of three copper vapor lasers , three dye lasers and appropriate o Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is regarded as the most promising method to obtain srightly enriched economical nuclear fuel for a nuclear power plant. However, achieving a high power laser seems to be the bottle neck in its industrialization. In 1985, after successful development of high power lasers, the U.S. announced that AVLIS would be used for future methods of uranium enrichment. In Japan , Laser Atomic Separation Enrichment Research Associates of Japan (LASER-J) , a joint Japanese utility companies research organization , was founded in April, 1987, to push a development program for laser uranium enrichment

  4. Future Flight Central

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA 'Future Flight Central,' the world's first full-scale virtual airport control tower, opened December 13, 1999 at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Constructed at a cost of $10 million, the two story facility was jointly funded by NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The facility is designed to test ways to solve potential air and ground traffic problems at commercial airports under realistic airport conditions and configurations. The facility provides an opportunity for airlines and airports to mitigate passenger delays by fine tuning airport hub operations, gate management, ramp movement procedures, and various other airport improvements. Twelve rear projection screens provide a seamless 360 degree high- resolution view of the airport or other screens being depicted. The imaging system, powered by supercomputers, provides a realistic view of weather conditions, enviromental and seasonal effects and the movement of up to 200 active aircraft and ground vehicles.

  5. Overview of the SACLA facility

    PubMed Central

    Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    In March 2012, SACLA started user operations of the first compact X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. SACLA has been routinely providing users with stable XFEL light over a wide photon energy range from 4 to 15 keV and an ultrafast pulse duration below 10 fs. The facility supports experimental activities in broad fields by offering high-quality X-ray optics and diagnostics, as well as reliable multiport charge-coupled-device detectors, with flexible experimental configurations. A two-stage X-ray focusing system was developed that enables the highest intensity of 1020 W cm−2. Key scientific results published in 2013 and 2014 in diverse fields are reviewed. The main experimental systems developed for these applications are summarized. A perspective on the facility upgrade is presented. PMID:25931056

  6. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  7. The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, K.

    1992-09-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility comprises a 50 MeV traveling wave electron linear accelerator utilizing a high gradient, photo-excited, raidofrequency electron gun as an injector and an experimental area for study of new acceleration methods or advanced radiation sources using free electron lasers. Early operation of the linear accelerator system including calculated and measured beam parameters are presented together with the experimental program for accelerator physics and free electron laser studies.

  8. An endolithic microbial community in dolomite rock in central Switzerland: characterization by reflection spectroscopy, pigment analyses, scanning electron microscopy, and laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Horath, T; Neu, T R; Bachofen, R

    2006-04-01

    A community of endolithic microorganisms dominated by phototrophs was found as a distinct band a few millimeters below the surface of bare exposed dolomite rocks in the Piora Valley in the Alps. Using in situ reflectance spectroscopy, we detected chlorophyll a (Chl a), phycobilins, carotenoids, and an unknown type of bacteriochlorophyll-like pigment absorbing in vivo at about 720 nm. In cross sections, the data indicated a defined distribution of different groups of organisms perpendicular to the rock surface. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of pigments extracted with organic solvents confirmed the presence of two types of bacteriochlorophylls besides chlorophylls and various carotenoids. Spherical organisms of varying sizes and small filaments were observed in situ with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (one- and two-photon technique). The latter allowed visualization of the distribution of phototrophic microorganisms by the autofluorescence of their pigments within the rock. Coccoid cyanobacteria of various sizes predominated over filamentous ones. Application of fluorescence-labeled lectins demonstrated that most cyanobacteria were embedded in an exopolymeric matrix. Nucleic acid stains revealed a wide distribution of small heterotrophs. Some biological structures emitting a green autofluorescence remain to be identified.

  9. A simple approach to industrial laser safety.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Michael A; Hinz, Michael W

    2005-02-01

    Industrial applications of lasers include marking, welding, cutting, and other material processing. Lasers used in these ways have significant power output but are generally designed to limit operator exposure to direct or scattered laser radiation to harmless levels in order to meet the Federal Laser Product Performance Standard (21CFR1040) for Class 1 laser products. Interesting challenges occur when companies integrate high power lasers into manufacturing or process control equipment. A significant part of the integration process is developing engineering and administrative controls to produce an acceptable level of laser safety while balancing production, maintenance, and service requirements. 3M Company uses a large number of high power lasers in numerous manufacturing processes. Whether the laser is purchased as a Class 1 laser product or whether it is purchased as a Class 4 laser and then integrated into a manufacturing application, 3M Company has developed an industrial laser safety program that maintains a high degree of laser safety while facilitating the rapid and economical integration of laser technology into the manufacturing workplace. This laser safety program is based on the requirements and recommendations contained in the American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers, ANSI Z136.1. The fundamental components of the 3M program include hazard evaluation, engineering, administrative, and procedural controls, protective equipment, signs and labels, training, and re-evaluation upon change. This program is implemented in manufacturing facilities and has resulted in an excellent history of laser safety and an effective and efficient use of laser safety resources.

  10. Laser Cooling and Slowing of a Diatomic Molecule

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    or suppressed by external fields. Cold chemical reactions are central to modern astrophysics and take place during the formation of stars, planets...diatomic molecule Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. It has been roughly three decades since laser cooling techniques...06520 -8047 1 ABSTRACT Laser cooling and slowing of a diatomic molecule Report Title Laser cooling and trapping are central to modern atomic physics. It

  11. Overview of the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Brereton, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. The NIF is a 192-beam, Nd-glass laser facility that is capable of producing 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, and over 50 times more energetic than other existing ICF facilities. The NIF construction began in 1997, and the facility, which was completed in 2009, is now fully operational. The facility is capable of firing up to 192 laser beams onto a target placed at the center of a 10-m-diameter spherical target chamber. Experiments involving the use of tritium have been underway for some time. These experiments present radiological issues: prompt neutron/gamma radiation, neutron activation, fission product generation, and decay radiation. This paper provides an introduction to the NIF facility and its operation, describes plans for the experimental program, and discusses radiological issues associated with the NIF's operations.

  12. Downgrading Nuclear Facilities to Radiological Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jarry, Jeffrey F.; Farr, Jesse Oscar; Duran, Leroy

    2015-08-01

    Based on inventory reductions and the use of alternate storage facilities, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) downgraded 4 SNL Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) nuclear facilities to less-than-HC-3 radiological facilities. SNL’s Waste Management and Pollution Prevention Department (WMPPD) managed the HC-3 nuclear facilities and implemented the downgrade. This paper will examine the downgrade process,

  13. Development of a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system for time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at an X-ray free-electron laser facility.

    PubMed

    Oura, Masaki; Wagai, Tatsuya; Chainani, Ashish; Miyawaki, Jun; Sato, Hiromi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Eguchi, Ritsuko; Kiss, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Nakatani, Yasuhiro; Togashi, Tadashi; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Kanade; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Tamasaku, Kenji; Shin, Shik; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    In order to utilize high-brilliance photon sources, such as X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), for advanced time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TR-PES), a single-shot CCD-based data acquisition system combined with a high-resolution hemispherical electron energy analyzer has been developed. The system's design enables it to be controlled by an external trigger signal for single-shot pump-probe-type TR-PES. The basic performance of the system is demonstrated with an offline test, followed by online core-level photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy in 'single-shot image', 'shot-to-shot image (image-to-image storage or block storage)' and `shot-to-shot sweep' modes at soft X-ray undulator beamline BL17SU of SPring-8. In the offline test the typical repetition rate for image-to-image storage mode has been confirmed to be about 15 Hz using a conventional pulse-generator. The function for correcting the shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations of the exciting photon beam, an important requirement for the TR-PES experiments at FEL sources, has been successfully tested at BL17SU by measuring Au 4f photoelectrons with intentionally controlled photon flux. The system has also been applied to hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) in `ordinary sweep' mode as well as shot-to-shot image mode at the 27 m-long undulator beamline BL19LXU of SPring-8 and also at the SACLA XFEL facility. The XFEL-induced Ti 1s core-level spectrum of La-doped SrTiO3 is reported as a function of incident power density. The Ti 1s core-level spectrum obtained at low power density is consistent with the spectrum obtained using the synchrotron source. At high power densities the Ti 1s core-level spectra show space-charge effects which are analysed using a known mean-field model for ultrafast electron packet propagation. The results successfully confirm the capability of the present data acquisition system for carrying out the core-level HAXPES studies of condensed matter induced by the XFEL.

  14. INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTHEAST. - NASA Industrial Plant, Systems Integration & Checkout Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Operations on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Brereton, Sandra J.; Burr, Robert F.; Folta, Peg; ...

    2014-03-24

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a fully operational high energy density physics experimental user facility that focuses 192 laser beams onto a small target at the center of a target chamber. This paper describes how we execute experimental shots on the NIF, both from the user perspective and from the facility perspective. We review the planning processes and tools used to facilitate operations. Safety and radiological aspects of NIF’s operations are discussed. We also describe efforts to continuously improve operations and further increase shot rate.

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): TRI

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) System. TRI is a publicly available EPA database reported annually by certain covered industry groups, as well as federal facilities. It contains information about more than 650 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment, and includes information about waste management and pollution prevention activities. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to TRI facilities once the TRI data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  17. The National Ignition Facility Performance Status

    SciTech Connect

    Haynam, C; Auerbach, J; Nicola, J D; Dixit, S; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Jancaitis, K; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mehta, N; Nostrand, M; Orth, C; Sacks, R; Shaw, M; Sutton, S; Wegner, P; Williams, W; Widmayer, C; White, R; Yang, S; Van Wonterghem, B

    2005-08-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has been designed to support high energy density science (HEDS), including the demonstration of fusion ignition through Inertial Confinement. NIF operated a single ''quad'' of 4 beams from December 2002 through October 2004 in order to gain laser operations experience, support target experiments, and demonstrate laser performance consistent with NIF's design requirement. During this two-year period, over 400 Main Laser shots were delivered at 1{omega} to calorimeters for diagnostic calibration purposes, at 3{omega} to the Target Chamber, and at 1{omega}, 2{omega}, and 3{omega} to the Precision Diagnostics System (PDS). The PDS includes its own independent single beam transport system, NIF design frequency conversion hardware and optics, and laser sampling optics that deliver light to a broad range of laser diagnostics. Highlights of NIF laser performance will be discussed including the results of high energy 2{omega} and 3{omega} experiments, the use of multiple focal spot beam conditioning techniques, the reproducibility of laser performance on multiple shots, the generation on a single beam of a 3{omega} temporally shaped ignition pulse at full energy and power, and recent results on full bundle (8 beamline) performance. NIF's first quad laser performance meets or exceeds NIF's design requirements.

  18. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the

  19. Chromatism compensation of the PETAL multipetawatt high-energy laser.

    PubMed

    Néauport, J; Blanchot, N; Rouyer, C; Sauteret, C

    2007-03-20

    High-energy petawatt lasers use series of spatial filters in their amplification section. The refractive lenses employed introduce longitudinal chromatism that can spatially and temporally distort the ultrafast laser beam after focusing. To ensure optimum performances of petawatt laser facilities, these distortions need to be corrected. Several solutions using reflective, refractive, or diffractive optical components can be addressed. We give herein a review of these various possibilities with their application to the PETAL (Petawatt Aquitaine Laser at the Laser Integration Line facility) laser beamline and show that diffractive-based corrections appear to be the most promising.

  20. Engineering the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J; Hackel, R; Larson, D; Manes, K; Murray, J; Sawicki, R

    1998-08-19

    The engineering team of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has developed a highly optimized hardware design that satisfies stringent cost, performance and schedule requirements. After a 3-year effort, the design will culminate at the end of FY98 with the completion of major Title II design reviews. Every element of the facility from optic configuration, facility layout and hardware specifications to material selection, fabrication techniques and part tolerancing has been examined to assure the minimum cost per joule of laser energy delivered on target. In this paper, the design of the major subsystems will be discussed from the perspective of this optimization emphasis. Focus will be placed on the special equipment hardware which includes laser, beam transport, opto-mechanical , system control and target area systems. Some of the unique features in each of these areas will be discussed to highlight how significant cost savings have been achieved while maintaining reasonable and acceptable performance risk. Key to the success has also been a vigorous development program that commenced nearly 4 years ago and has been highly responsive to the specific needs of the NIF project. Supporting analyses and prototyping work that evolved from these parallel activities will also be discussed.

  1. Measuring Gravitomagnetic Effects by Means of Ring Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    Light is a good probe for general relativistic effects. Exploiting the asymmetry of the propagation in the vicinity of a central rotating mass it is possible to use a ring laser in order to measure the frame dragging of the reference frames by the gravitational field of the Earth (Lense-Thirring effect). I shall present the G-GranSasso experiment whose objective is precisely to measure the Lense-Thirring and the de Sitter effects in a terrestrial laboratory. The experimental apparatus will be made of a set of at least three, differently oriented, ring lasers rigidly attached to a central "monument". The signal will be in the form of the beat frequency produced in the annular cavity of each laser by the rotational anisotropy. The laboratory will be located underground in the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso facility, in Italy. The required sensitivity is just one order of magnitude below the performance of the best existing instruments and the new design will attain it.

  2. Breadboard Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    In the sixties, Chrysler was NASA's prime contractor for the Saturn I and IB test launch vehicles. The company installed and operated at Huntsville what was known as the Saturn I/IB Development Breadboard Facility. "Breadboard," means an array of electrical and electronic equipment for performing a variety of development and test functions. This work gave Chrysler a broad capability in computerized testing to assure quality control in development of solid-state electronic systems. Today that division is manufacturing many products not destined for NASA, most of them being associated with the company's automotive line. A major project is production and quality-control testing of the "lean-burn" engine, one that has a built-in Computer to control emission timing, and allow the engine to run on a leaner mixture of fuel and air. Other environment-related products include vehicle emission analyzers. The newest of the line is an accurate, portable solid state instrument for testing auto exhaust gases. The exhaust analyzers, now being produced for company dealers and for service

  3. Indoor Lighting Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Koji; Saito, Yoshinori; Ichikawa, Shigenori; Kawauchi, Takao; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Hirano, Rika; Tazuke, Fuyuki

    According to the statistics by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, the total floor space of all building construction started was 188.87 million m2 (1.5% increase y/y), marking the fourth straight year of increase. Many large-scale buildings under construction in central Tokyo become fully occupied by tenants before completion. As for office buildings, it is required to develop comfortable and functional office spaces as working styles are becoming more and more diversified, and lighting is also an element of such functionalities. The total floor space of construction started for exhibition pavilions, multipurpose halls, conference halls and religious architectures decreased 11.1% against the previous year. This marked a decline for 10 consecutive years and the downward trend continues. In exhibition pavilions, the light radiation is measured and adjusted throughout the year so as not to damage the artworks by lighting. Hospitals, while providing higher quality medical services and enhancing the dwelling environment of patients, are expected to meet various restrictions and requirements, including the respect for privacy. Meanwhile, lighting designs for school classrooms tend to be homogeneous, yet new ideas are being promoted to strike a balance between the economical and functional aspects. The severe economic environment continues to be hampering the growth of theaters and halls in both the private and public sectors. Contrary to the downsizing trend of such facilities, additional installations of lighting equipment were conspicuous, and the adoption of high efficacy lighting appliances and intelligent function control circuits are becoming popular. In the category of stores/commercial facilities, the construction of complex facilities is a continuing trend. Indirect lighting, high luminance discharge lamps with excellent color rendition and LEDs are being effectively used in these facilities, together with the introduction of lighting designs

  4. Facility management in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gudat, H

    2000-04-01

    Facility management and optimum building management offer for hospitals a chance to reduce costs and to increase quality, process sequences, employee motivation and customer satisfaction. Some years ago simple services such as cleaning, catering or laundry were outsourced. Now, German hospitals progress to more complex fields such as building and medical technology, clinical support processes such as pharmacy, central laboratory and sterilization, goods and logistics services.

  5. Site survey for optimum location of Optical Communication Experimental Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Site survey was made to determine the optimum location for an Optical Communication Experimental Facility /OCEF/ and to recommend several sites, graded according to preference. A site was desired which could perform two-way laser communication with a spacecraft and laser tracking with a minimum of interruption by weather effects.

  6. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  7. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a User Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Christopher

    2012-10-01

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL, operational since March 2009, is conducting experiments in ICF ignition and other scientific areas. The NIF ignition program is conducted by the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). In addition to execution of the ignition program, the NIC is providing the necessary infrastructure for operation of NIF as a user facility open to both US and international scientists. NIF has made significant progress towards operation as a user facility. The NIF laser has demonstrated the necessary performance, including energy, power, precision, and reproducibility, to support NIC and other experiments. NIF has demonstrated full energy and power (1.8 MJ, 500 TW) operation at 0.35-μm. Over 50 diagnostics are operational, and a broad range of target fabrication capabilities is in place. Initial experiments by university users and other scientists external to the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratory system have been conducted, and additional experiments developed by the broader user community are in process and planned. A governance model has been established, and a NIF User Group has been formed. This presentation will discuss implementation of NIF as a user facility, with emphasis on activities at NIF in fundamental science and other areas carried out in addition to the NIC.

  8. Diode-laser-based therapy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udrea, Mircea V.; Nica, Adriana S.; Florian, Mariana; Poenaru, Daniela; Udrea, Gabriela; Lungeanu, Mihaela; Sporea, Dan G.; Vasiliu, Virgil V.; Vieru, Roxana

    2004-10-01

    A new therapy laser device is presented. The device consists of a central unit and different types of laser probes. The laser probe model SL7-650 delivers seven red (650 nm), 5 mW diode lasers convergent beams. The beams converge at about 30 cm in front of the laser probe and the irradiated area might be varied by simple displacement of the laser probe with respect to the target. The laser probe SL1-808 emits single infrared laser beam up to 500 mW. The efficiency of the use of this device in physiotherapy, and rheumatology, has been put into evidence after years of testing. Dermatology and microsurgery are users of infrared powerful laser probes. The device has successfully passed technical and clinical tests in order to be certified. The laser device design and some medical results are given.

  9. Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

  10. Laser safety at high profile projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barat, K.

    2011-03-01

    Laser Safety at high profile laser facilities tends to be more controlled than in the standard laser lab found at a research institution. The reason for this is the potential consequences for such facilities from incidents. This ranges from construction accidents, to equipment damage to personnel injuries. No laser user wants to sustain a laser eye injury. Unfortunately, many laser users, most commonly experienced researchers and inexperienced graduate students, do receive laser eye injuries during their careers. . More unforgiveable is the general acceptance of this scenario, as part of the research & development experience. How do senior researchers, safety personnel and management stop this trend? The answer lies in a cultural change that involves institutional training, user mentoring, hazard awareness by users and administrative controls. None of these would inhibit research activities. As a matter of fact, proper implementation of these controls would increase research productivity. This presentation will review and explain the steps needed to steer an institution, research division, group or individual lab towards a culture that should nearly eliminate laser accidents. As well as how high profile facilities try to avoid laser injuries. Using the definition of high profile facility as one who's funding in the million to billions of dollars or Euros and derives form government funding.

  11. The National Ignition Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Boyes, J.D.; Kumpan, S.A.; Sorem, M.

    1996-06-01

    The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KD0), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 {mu}m) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, the authors completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program`s site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994. Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. This article presents an overview of the NIF project.

  12. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RCRA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of hazardous waste facilities that link to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information System (RCRAInfo). EPA's comprehensive information system in support of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984, RCRAInfo tracks many types of information about generators, transporters, treaters, storers, and disposers of hazardous waste. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RCRAInfo hazardous waste facilities once the RCRAInfo data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  13. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RBLC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the RACT/BACT/LAER Clearinghouse (RBLC). The RBLC database contains case-specific information on the air pollution technologies that have been required to reduce the emission of air pollutions from stationary sources. RACT, or Reasonably Available Control Technology, is required on existing sources in areas that are not meeting national ambient air quality standards. BACT, or Best Available Control Technology, is required on major new or modified sources in clean areas. LAER, or Lowest Achievable Emission Rate, is required on major new or modified sources in non-attainment areas. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RBLC facilities once the RBLC data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  14. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): RMP

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Risk Management Plan (RMP) database. RMP stores the risk management plans reported by companies that handle, manufacture, use, or store certain flammable or toxic substances, as required under section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA). FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to RMP facilities once the RMP data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  15. The GALATEA Test-facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Doenmez, B.; Garbini, L.; Irlbeck, S.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.

    GALATEA is a test-facility designed to study the properties of Germanium detectors in detail. It is a powerful high precision tool to investigate bulk and surface effects in germanium detectors. A vacuum tank houses an infrared screened volume with a cooled detector inside. A system of three stages allowa a complete scan of the detector. At the moment, a 19-fold segmented Germanium detector is under investigation. The main feature of GALATEA is that there is no material between source and detector. This allows the usage of alpha and beta sources as well as of a laser beam to study surface effects. The experimental setup is described.

  16. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  17. Tunable compensation of GVD-induced FM-AM conversion in the front end of high-power lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rao; Fan, Wei; Jiang, Youen; Qiao, Zhi; Zhang, Peng; Lin, Zunqi

    2017-02-01

    Group velocity dispersion (GVD) is one of the main factors leading to frequency modulation (FM) to amplitude modulation (AM) conversion in the front end of high-power lasers. In order to compensate the FM-AM modulation, the influence of GVD, which is mainly induced by the phase filter effect, is theoretically investigated. Based on the theoretical analysis, a high-precision, high-stability, tunable GVD compensatory using gratings is designed and experimentally demonstrated. The results indicate that the compensator can be implemented in high-power laser facilities to compensate the GVD of fiber with a length between 200-500 m when the bandwidth of a phase-modulated laser is 0.34 nm or 0.58 nm and the central wavelength is in the range of 1052.3217-1053.6008 nm. Due to the linear relationship between the dispersion and the spacing distance of the gratings, the compensator can easily achieve closed-loop feedback controlling. The proposed GVD compensator promises significant applications in large laser facilities, especially in the future polarizing fiber front end of high-power lasers.

  18. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  19. Ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lindl, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    The goal of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to produce significant thermonuclear burn from a target driven with a laser or ion beam. To achieve that goal, the national ICF Program has proposed a laser capable of producing ignition and intermediate gain. The facility is called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This article describes ignition targets designed for the NIF and their modeling. Although the baseline NIF target design, described herein, is indirect drive, the facility will also be capable of doing direct-drive ignition targets - currently being developed at the University of Rochester.

  20. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2014-03-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  1. Laser Driven, Extreme Compression Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Extreme-compression science is blessed by a number of new techniques and facilities that are shattering previous experimental limitations: static pressures above 600 GPa, equation of state (EOS) experiments on pulsed-power machines, picosecond-resolved x-ray diffraction on free-electron lasers, and many new experiments on high-energy lasers. Our goals, using high-energy lasers, have been to push the limits of high pressure accessible to measurement and to bridge the gap between static- and dynamic-compression experiments by exploring off-Hugoniot states. I will review laser techniques for both shock- and ramp-compression experiments, and discuss a variety of diagnostics. I will present recent results including: impedance-matching Hugoniot experiments, absolute-Hugoniot implosive-shock radiography, coupled radiometry and velocimetry, ramp-compression EOS, and in-situ x-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy into the TPa regime. As the National Ignition Facility (NIF) transitions to a laser user facility for basic and applied science, we are transferring many of these techniques. The unprecedented quality and variety of diagnostics available, coupled with exquisite pulse-shaping predictability and control make the NIF a premier facility for extreme-compression experiments.

  2. Laser program annual report, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, L.W.; Krupke, W.F.; Strack, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    Volume 1 provides a Program Overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the Program, a summary of activities carried out under the Glass Laser Experiments Lead Laboratory Program, as well as discussions of Program resources and facilities. Section 2, also in the first volume, covers the work on solid state Nd:glass lasers, including systems operations, Nova and Novette system development, and supporting research and development activities.

  3. Qualification testing for a central station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrester, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Qualification testing for a Central Station Photovoltaic (PV) Facility depends to a great extent on the system design, (fixed versus tracking), and the level of data acquisition/control which is incorporated into the system. The basic elements which require qualification tests include: dc power production/collection; tracker conversion systems; ac utility interface; system level control; and data acquisition/reporting. The qualification tests from the Lungo (ARCO) 1 MW Facility which were completed in January 1983 are discussed. The philosophy and many of the procedures are applicable to any central station PV facility.

  4. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AQS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Air Quality System (AQS). The AQS contains ambient air pollution data collected by EPA, State, Local, and Tribal air pollution control agencies from thousands of monitoring stations. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated facilities that link to monitoring stations once the AQS data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs.

  5. Guide to research facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  6. Photoinjector drive laser of the FLASH FEL.

    PubMed

    Will, Ingo; Templin, Horst I; Schreiber, Siegfried; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2011-11-21

    The upgraded photoinjector drive laser of the free-electron laser facility FLASH at DESY Hamburg is described in this paper. This laser produces trains of 800 and 2400 ultraviolet picosecond pulses at 1 MHz and 3 MHz repetition rate in the trains, respectively. The amplifying elements of the system are Nd:YLF-rods, which are pumped by fiber-coupled semiconductor diodes. Compared to the flashlamp-pumped photocathode laser previously used at FLASH, the new diode-pumped laser features a better reliability and a significantly improved stability of its pulse parameters.

  7. 32 CFR 154.41 - Central adjudication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM REGULATION Adjudication § 154.41 Central adjudication. (a) To ensure uniform... Defense Agencies shall establish a single Central Adjudication Facility for his/her component. The... to act on behalf of the head of the Component concerned with respect to personnel...

  8. 32 CFR 154.41 - Central adjudication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM REGULATION Adjudication § 154.41 Central adjudication. (a) To ensure uniform... Defense Agencies shall establish a single Central Adjudication Facility for his/her component. The... to act on behalf of the head of the Component concerned with respect to personnel...

  9. History of lasers.

    PubMed

    Gross, Andreas J; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2007-06-01

    The developments of laser technology from the cradle of modern physics in 1900 by Planck to its latest medical boundaries is an exciting example of how basic physics finds its way into clinical practice. This article merits the protagonists and their contribution to the steps in this development. The competition between the different research groups finally led to the award of the Nobel Prize to Townes, Basov and Prokhorov in 1964 for the scientific basis on quantum electronics, which led to the construction of oscillators and amplifiers based on the laser-maser principle. Forty-three years after Einstein's first theories Maiman introduced the first ruby laser for commercial use. This marked the key step for the laser application and pioneered fruitful cooperations between basic and clinical science. The pioneers of lasers in clinical urology were Parsons in 1966 with studies in canine bladders and Mulvany 1968 with experiments in calculi fragmentation. The central technological component for the triumphal procession of lasers in urology is the endoscope. Therefore lasers are currently widely used, being the tool of choice in some areas, such as endoscopical lithotriptic stone treatment or endoluminal organ-preserving tumor ablation. Furthermore they show promising treatment alternatives for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia.

  10. Laser decontamination of the radioactive lightning rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potiens, A. J.; Dellamano, J. C.; Vicente, R.; Raele, M. P.; Wetter, N. U.; Landulfo, E.

    2014-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1980 Brazil experienced a significant market for radioactive lightning rods (RLR). The device consists of an air terminal with one or more sources of americium-241 attached to it. The sources were used to ionize the air around them and to increase the attraction of atmospheric discharges. Because of their ineffectiveness, the nuclear regulatory authority in Brazil suspended the license for manufacturing, commerce and installation of RLR in 1989, and determined that the replaced RLR were to be collected to a centralized radioactive waste management facility for treatment. The first step for RLR treatment is to remove the radioactive sources. Though they can be easily removed, some contaminations are found all over the remaining metal scrap that must decontaminated for release, otherwise it must be treated as radioactive waste. Decontamination using various chemicals has proven to be inefficient and generates large amounts of secondary wastes. This work shows the preliminary results of the decontamination of 241Am-contaminated metal scrap generated in the treatment of radioactive lightning rods applying laser ablation. A Nd:YAG nanoseconds laser was used with 300 mJ energy leaving only a small amount of secondary waste to be treated.

  11. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  12. Sports Facility Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marcia L., Ed.; Stotlar, David K., Ed.

    The numbers of both sports facility management college courses and sport and exercise facilities are increasing, along with the need for an understanding of the trends and management concepts of these facilities. This book focuses exclusively on managing facilities where sporting events occur and includes examples in physical education, athletics,…

  13. National Ignition Facility: Experimental plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    As part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE), and EG&G formed an NIF Target Diagnostics Working Group. The purpose of the Target Diagnostics Working Group is to prepare conceptual designs of target diagnostics for inclusion in the facility CDR and to determine how these specifications impact the CDR. To accomplish this, a subgroup has directed its efforts at constructing an approximate experimental plan for the ignition campaign of the NIF CDR. The results of this effort are contained in this document, the Experimental Plan for achieving fusion ignition in the NIF. This group initially concentrated on the flow-down requirements of the experimental campaign leading to ignition, which will dominate the initial efforts of the NIF. It is envisaged, however, that before ignition, there will be parallel campaigns supporting weapons physics, weapons effects, and other research. This plan was developed by analyzing the sequence of activities required to finally fire the laser at the level of power and precision necessary to achieve the conditions of an ignition hohlraum target, and to then use our experience in activating and running Nova experiments to estimate the rate of completing these activities.

  14. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  15. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-03-27

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics.

  16. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  17. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed. PMID:27583542

  18. National Ignition Facility Comes to Life

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, E

    2003-09-01

    First conceived of nearly 15 years ago, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is up and running and successful beyond almost everyone's expectations. During commissioning of the first four laser beams, the laser system met design specifications for everything from beam quality to energy output. NIF will eventually have 192 laser beams. Yet with just 2% of its final beam configuration complete, NIF has already produced the highest energy laser shots in the world. In July, laser shots in the infrared wavelength using four beams produced a total of 26.5 kilojoules of energy per beam, not only meeting NIF's design energy requirement of 20 kilojoules per beam but also exceeding the energy of any other infrared laser beamline. In another campaign, NIF produced over 11.4 kilojoules of energy when the infrared light was converted to green light. An earlier performance campaign of laser light that had been frequency converted from infrared to ultraviolet really proved NIF's mettle. Over 10.4 kilojoules of ultraviolet energy were produced in about 4 billionths of a second. If all 192 beamlines were to operate at these levels, over 2 megajoules of energy would result. That much energy for the pulse duration of several nanoseconds is about 500 trillion watts of power, more than 500 times the US peak generating power.

  19. The Mercury Laser Advances Laser Technology for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Caird, J; Moses, E

    2009-01-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is on target to demonstrate 'breakeven' - creating as much fusion-energy output as laser-energy input. NIF will compress a tiny sphere of hydrogen isotopes with 1.8 MJ of laser light in a 20-ns pulse, packing the isotopes so tightly that they fuse together, producing helium nuclei and releasing energy in the form of energetic particles. The achievement of breakeven will culminate an enormous effort by thousands of scientists and engineers, not only at Livermore but around the world, during the past several decades. But what about the day after NIF achieves breakeven? NIF is a world-class engineering research facility, but if laser fusion is ever to generate power for civilian consumption, the laser will have to deliver pulses nearly 100,000 times faster than NIF - a rate of perhaps 10 shots per second as opposed to NIF's several shots a day. The Mercury laser (named after the Roman messenger god) is intended to lead the way to a 10-shots-per-second, electrically-efficient, driver laser for commercial laser fusion. While the Mercury laser will generate only a small fraction of the peak power of NIF (1/30,000), Mercury operates at higher average power. The design of Mercury takes full advantage of the technology advances manifest in its behemoth cousin (Table 1). One significant difference is that, unlike the flashlamp-pumped NIF, Mercury is pumped by highly efficient laser diodes. Mercury is a prototype laser capable of scaling in aperture and energy to a NIF-like beamline, with greater electrical efficiency, while still running at a repetition rate 100,000 times greater.

  20. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  1. Energy Consumption Series: Assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This study originally had two primary objectives: (1) to improve EIA`s estimates of district heat consumption for commercial buildings in the CBECS sample that lacked individual metering and (2) to provide a basis for estimating primary fuel consumption by central plants serving commercial buildings. These objectives were expanded to include additional questions relating to these central plants. Background information is provided on the CBECS and on district heating and cooling, which is the most important type of energy-related service provided by multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapters 2 and 3 present data results on multibuilding facilities from the 1989 CBECS and the pilot Facility Survey. Chapter 2 presents the characteristics of multibuilding facilities and the individual buildings located on these facilities. Chapter 3 provides estimates of energy inputs and outputs of multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapter 4 assesses the quality of the pilot Facility Survey and includes recommendations for future work in this area. The appendices provide more detailed information on the Facility Survey itself, in particular the limitations on the use of these results. Appendix B, ``Data Quality``, provides detailed information relating to the limitations of the data and the conclusions presented in this report. As a pilot study, the 1989 Facility Survey has some serious flaws and limitations which are recognized in this report.

  2. Laser fusion experiments at LLL

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-06-16

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLL. Two other chapters, one authored by K.A. Brueckner and the other by C. Max, present the theoretical implosion physics and laser plasma interaction physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first is an introductory section which provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  3. 77 FR 13367 - General Electric-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment, LLC, Proposed Laser-Based Uranium Enrichment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... COMMISSION General Electric-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment, LLC, Proposed Laser-Based Uranium Enrichment...- Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment, LLC (GLE) Uranium Enrichment Facility. On June 26, 2009, GLE submitted a license application that proposes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a...

  4. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  5. Orion: a high contrast user facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. I.; Danson, C. N.; Duffield, S. J.; Egan, D. A.; Elsmere, S. P.; Girling, M. T.; Harvey, E. J.; Hopps, N. W.; Norman, M. J.; Parker, S. J. F.; Treadwell, P. T.; Winter, D. N.; Bett, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Orion facility consists of two synchronized laser systems: two CPA (Chirped Pulse Amplification) beamlines each deliver 500J to target in a 0.5ps pulse (1PW) at 1054nm; and ten long pulse beamlines each deliver 500J in 0.1-5ns temporally shaped pulse at 351nm. One of the CPA beamlines has the option to be frequency doubled at sub-aperture to produce 100J laser pulses with a nanosecond contrast of ∼ 1014. Further work is under way to enhance the contrast of both CPA beamlines in the first harmonic.

  6. National Ignition Facility system alignment.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, S C; Bliss, E; Di Nicola, P; Kalantar, D; Lowe-Webb, R; McCarville, T; Nelson, D; Salmon, T; Schindler, T; Villanueva, J; Wilhelmsen, K

    2011-03-10

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest optical instrument, comprising 192 37 cm square beams, each generating up to 9.6 kJ of 351 nm laser light in a 20 ns beam precisely tailored in time and spectrum. The Facility houses a massive (10 m diameter) target chamber within which the beams converge onto an ∼1 cm size target for the purpose of creating the conditions needed for deuterium/tritium nuclear fusion in a laboratory setting. A formidable challenge was building NIF to the precise requirements for beam propagation, commissioning the beam lines, and engineering systems to reliably and safely align 192 beams within the confines of a multihour shot cycle. Designing the facility to minimize drift and vibration, placing the optical components in their design locations, commissioning beam alignment, and performing precise system alignment are the key alignment accomplishments over the decade of work described herein. The design and positioning phases placed more than 3000 large (2.5 m×2 m×1 m) line-replaceable optics assemblies to within ±1 mm of design requirement. The commissioning and alignment phases validated clear apertures (no clipping) for all beam lines, and demonstrated automated laser alignment within 10 min and alignment to target chamber center within 44 min. Pointing validation system shots to flat gold-plated x-ray emitting targets showed NIF met its design requirement of ±50 μm rms beam pointing to target chamber. Finally, this paper describes the major alignment challenges faced by the NIF Project from inception to present, and how these challenges were met and solved by the NIF design and commissioning teams.

  7. NASA Dryden flow visualization facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delfrate, John H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the Flow Visualization Facility at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This water tunnel facility is used primarily for visualizing and analyzing vortical flows on aircraft models and other shapes at high-incidence angles. The tunnel is used extensively as a low-cost, diagnostic tool to help engineers understand complex flows over aircraft and other full-scale vehicles. The facility consists primarily of a closed-circuit water tunnel with a 16- x 24-in. vertical test section. Velocity of the flow through the test section can be varied from 0 to 10 in/sec; however, 3 in/sec provides optimum velocity for the majority of flow visualization applications. This velocity corresponds to a unit Reynolds number of 23,000/ft and a turbulence level over the majority of the test section below 0.5 percent. Flow visualization techniques described here include the dye tracer, laser light sheet, and shadowgraph. Limited correlation to full-scale flight data is shown.

  8. FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M

    2006-11-03

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

  9. Characterisation of Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) laser targets by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddock, D.; Parker, T.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2016-04-01

    The search for target materials suitable for High Power Laser Experiments at ultralow thicknesses (below ten nanometres) is ongoing. Diamond-Like Carbon is investigated as an answer for a low-Z material that can survive target chamber pump-down and laser prepulse. DLC was produced using Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition, using with varying gas flow mixtures of argon and methane. The methane plasma deposits amorphous carbon onto the substrate and the argon plasma re-sputters the weakly bonded carbon leaving a high proportion of diamond-like bonding. Bonding natures were probed using Raman spectroscopy; analysis of the resulting spectrum showed that flow rates of 40sccm/60sccm methane to argon produced DLC films with a diamond-like (sp 3) content of ∼20%. Increasing the methane gas flow decreased this value to less than 5%. DLC foils were processed into laser targets by method of float off; using a sodium chloride release layer and lowering into water, this was then lifted onto an array of apertures allowing for laser irradiation of the material with no backing. DLC with 20% sp 3 content showed superior yield when compared to other materials such as metals and some plastics of the same thickness, with ∼70% of the target positions surviving the float off procedure at <10nm. As a result of this work DLC targets have been available for a number of experiments at the Central Laser Facility.

  10. A Parameter Optimization for a National SASE FEL Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yavas, O.; Yigit, S.

    2007-04-23

    The parameter optimization for a national SASE FEL facility was studied. Turkish State Planing Organization (DPT) gave financial support as an inter-universities project to begin technical design studies and test facility of National Accelerator Complex starting from 2006. In addition to a particle factory, the complex will contain a linac based free electron laser, positron ring based synchrotron radiation facilities and a proton accelerator. In this paper, we have given some results of main parameters of SASE FEL facility based on 130 MeV linac, application potential in basic and applied research.

  11. Composite analysis E-area vaults and saltstone disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents the Composite Analysis (CA) performed on the two active Savannah River Site (SRS) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults (EAV) Disposal Facility. The analysis calculated potential releases to the environment from all sources of residual radioactive material expected to remain in the General Separations Area (GSA). The GSA is the central part of SRS and contains all of the waste disposal facilities, chemical separations facilities and associated high-level waste storage facilities as well as numerous other sources of radioactive material. The analysis considered 114 potential sources of radioactive material containing 115 radionuclides. The results of the CA clearly indicate that continued disposal of low-level waste in the saltstone and EAV facilities, consistent with their respective radiological performance assessments, will have no adverse impact on future members of the public.

  12. CHRONICLE: Conference on Laser Fusion, Leipzig, December 11-14, 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Rode, A. V.

    1981-03-01

    A brief review is given of the papers presented at the Thirteenth European Conference on Laser-Matter Interaction and Laser Fusion, held in Leipzig in 1979. An analysis is made of papers reporting research on high-power laser facilities, theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations of laser compression and thermonuclear combustion of targets, problems relating to the physics of interaction of high-power laser radiation with high-temperature plasma, as well as the technology of laser fusion targets.

  13. Laser program annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, L.W.; Strack, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    This volume provides a program overview, presenting highlights of the technical accomplishments of the elements of the program, as well as discussions of program resources and facilities. Also covered are the work of the Solid-State Laser program element, which includes systems operations, Nova, and research and development activities. (MOW)

  14. Refining analgesia strategies using lasers.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Victoria

    2015-08-01

    Sound programs for the humane care and use of animals within research facilities incorporate experimental refinements such as multimodal approaches for pain management. These approaches can include non-traditional strategies along with more established ones. The use of lasers for pain relief is growing in popularity among companion animal veterinary practitioners and technologists. Therefore, its application in the research sector warrants closer consideration.

  15. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): ICIS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link to the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS). When complete, ICIS will provide a database that will contain integrated enforcement and compliance information across most of EPA's programs. The vision for ICIS is to replace EPA's independent databases that contain enforcement data with a single repository for that information. Currently, ICIS contains all Federal Administrative and Judicial enforcement actions and a subset of the Permit Compliance System (PCS), which supports the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). ICIS exchanges non-sensitive enforcement/compliance activities, non-sensitive formal enforcement actions and NPDES information with FRS. This web feature service contains the enforcement/compliance activities and formal enforcement action related facilities; the NPDES facilities are contained in the PCS_NPDES web feature service. FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on f

  17. Benzene contamination at a metal plating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, B. A.; Burston, M. R.

    2005-08-01

    A metal plating facility in central Kentucky was required to complete a RCRA Facility Investigation to address a number of Solid Waste Management Units at the site. Twenty monitoring wells were installed at the facility. Ground water from the wells was sampled for total and dissolved metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid extractable compounds, base neutral compounds, and volatile organic compounds. Unexpectedly, relatively large concentrations of benzene, up to 120 μg/l, were detected in samples from some of the wells, including wells that should have been hydraulically upgradient from the facility. As a result of the detection of benzene, the facility completed an investigation to identify the source. A nearby facility had completed a gasoline underground storage tank (UST) closure at about the time of the installation of the 20 wells. Reportedly the UST had small holes when removed. Three potential pathways of migration (a ditch, sanitary sewer, and a sink hole) from the nearby facility to the metal-plating facility and residual soils with very large concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been identified.

  18. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): LANDFILL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of non-hazardous waste sites that link to the Landfill dataset. The Landfill dataset provides detailed operating statistics, geographic locations, and facility information for waste processing and disposal operations in the United States, compiled by the Waste Business Journal, Directory of Non-Hazardous Waste Sites (Date Published: November 5th, 2007). FRS identifies and geospatially locates facilities, sites or places subject to environmental regulations or of environmental interest. Using vigorous verification and data management procedures, FRS integrates facility data from EPA's national program systems, other federal agencies, and State and tribal master facility records and provides EPA with a centrally managed, single source of comprehensive and authoritative information on facilities. This data set contains the subset of FRS integrated sites that link to the Landfill dataset once the Landfill data has been integrated into the FRS database. Additional information on FRS is available at the EPA website https://www.epa.gov/enviro/facility-registry-service-frs

  19. Facility No. 201, view of enclosed loggia (now a study) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Facility No. 201, view of enclosed loggia (now a study) - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Marine Corps Officers' Quarters, Russell Avenue, between Central Avenue and Salvor Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. FACILITY 713, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM IN LEFT BACKGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 713, DINING ROOM WITH LIVING ROOM IN LEFT BACKGROUND, VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Central-Entry Single-Family Housing Type, Between Bragg & Grime Streets near Ayres Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI