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Sample records for central limit theory

  1. Illustrating the Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    Statistics is enjoying some well-deserved limelight across mathematics curricula of late. Some statistical concepts, however, are not especially intuitive, and students struggle to comprehend and apply them. As an AP Statistics teacher, the author appreciates the central limit theorem as a foundational concept that plays a crucial role in…

  2. Illustrating the Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    Statistics is enjoying some well-deserved limelight across mathematics curricula of late. Some statistical concepts, however, are not especially intuitive, and students struggle to comprehend and apply them. As an AP Statistics teacher, the author appreciates the central limit theorem as a foundational concept that plays a crucial role in…

  3. Visualizing the Central Limit Theorem through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Central Limit Theorem is one of the most important concepts taught in an introductory statistics course, however, it may be the least understood by students. Sure, students can plug numbers into a formula and solve problems, but conceptually, do they really understand what the Central Limit Theorem is saying? This paper describes a simulation…

  4. Visualizing the Central Limit Theorem through Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggieri, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Central Limit Theorem is one of the most important concepts taught in an introductory statistics course, however, it may be the least understood by students. Sure, students can plug numbers into a formula and solve problems, but conceptually, do they really understand what the Central Limit Theorem is saying? This paper describes a simulation…

  5. Limitations of quasilinear transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R. )

    1992-01-01

    The anomalous fluxes are evaluated in the simplest possible geometric situation: drift waves in a shearless slab geometry, in the presence of density and temperature gradients. It is shown that, within the strict quasilinear framework, the linear transport equations relating the fluxes to the thermodynamic forces have serious limitations. Such a linear relation does not even exist for the ion energy flux. For all the fluxes, the first correction'' has a singularity whose location depends on the relative value of the density gradient and of the ion temperature gradient: its existence seriously restricts the domain of validity of the quasilinear transport theory. The semiempirical quasilinear'' formulas used in the comparisons with experiments are also discussed.

  6. A central theory of biology.

    PubMed

    Torday, John S

    2015-07-01

    The history of physiologic cellular-molecular interrelationships can be traced all the way back to the unicellular state by following the pathway formed by lipids ubiquitously accommodating calcium homeostasis, and its consequent adaptive effects on oxygen uptake by cells, tissues and organs. As a result, a cohesive, mechanistically integrated view of physiology can be formulated by recognizing the continuum comprising conception, development, physiologic homeostasis and death mediated by soluble growth factor signaling. Seeing such seemingly disparate processes as embryogenesis, chronic disease and dying as the gain and subsequent loss of cell-cell signaling provides a novel perspective for physiology and medicine. It is emblematic of the self-organizing, self-referential nature of life, starting from its origins. Such organizing principles obviate the pitfalls of teleologic evolution, conversely providing a way of resolving such seeming dichotomies as holism and reductionism, genotype and phenotype, emergence and contingence, proximate and ultimate causation in evolution, cells and organisms. The proposed approach is scale-free and predictive, offering a Central Theory of Biology.

  7. A Central Theory of Biology

    PubMed Central

    Torday, John S.

    2015-01-01

    The history of physiologic cellular–molecular interrelationships can be traced all the way back to the unicellular state by following the pathway formed by lipids ubiquitously accommodating calcium homeostasis, and its consequent adaptive effects on oxygen uptake by cells, tissues and organs. As a result, a cohesive, mechanistically integrated view of physiology can be formulated by recognizing the continuum comprising conception, development, physiologic homeostasis and death mediated by soluble growth factor signaling. Seeing such seemingly disparate processes as embryogenesis, chronic disease and dying as the gain and subsequent loss of cell–cell signaling provides a novel perspective for physiology and medicine. It is emblematic of the self-organizing, self-referential nature of life, starting from its origins. Such organizing principles obviate the pitfalls of teleologic evolution, conversely providing a way of resolving such seeming dichotomies as holism and reductionism, genotype and phenotype, emergence and contingence, proximate and ultimate causation in evolution, cells and organisms. The proposed approach is scale-free and predictive, offering a Central Theory of Biology. PMID:25911556

  8. "Dealing" with the Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matz, David C.; Hause, Emily L.

    2008-01-01

    We describe an easy-to-employ, hands-on demonstration using playing cards to illustrate the central limit theorem. This activity allows students to see how a collection of sample means drawn from a nonnormally distributed population will be normally distributed. Students who took part in the demonstration reported it to be helpful in understanding…

  9. Central limit theorems under special relativity.

    PubMed

    McKeague, Ian W

    2015-04-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior.

  10. Central limit theorems under special relativity

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Ian W.

    2015-01-01

    Several relativistic extensions of the Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution have been proposed, but they do not explain observed lognormal tail-behavior in the flux distribution of various astrophysical sources. Motivated by this question, extensions of classical central limit theorems are developed under the conditions of special relativity. The results are related to CLTs on locally compact Lie groups developed by Wehn, Stroock and Varadhan, but in this special case the asymptotic distribution has an explicit form that is readily seen to exhibit lognormal tail behavior. PMID:25798020

  11. Extensions of theories from soft limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachazo, Freddy; Cha, Peter; Mizera, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    We study a variety of field theories with vanishing single soft limits. In all cases, the structure of the soft limit is controlled by a larger theory, which provides an extension of the original one by adding more fields and interactions. Our main example is the U( N ) non-linear sigma model in its CHY representation. Its extension is a theory in which the NLSM Goldstone bosons interact with a cubic biadjoint scalar. Other theories we study and extend are the special Galileon and Born-Infeld theory, including its maximally supersymmetric version in four dimensions, the DBI-Volkov-Akulov theory. In all the cases, we propose the CHY representation of the complete tree-level S-matrix of the extended theories. In fact, CHY formulas are the key technique for studying the single soft limit behavior of the original theories. As a byproduct, we show that the tree-level S-matrix of the extended NLSM theory can be constructed using a very compact BCFW-like recursion relation, where physical poles are at most linear in the deformation parameter.

  12. Central Limit Theorem: New SOCR Applet and Demonstration Activity.

    PubMed

    Dinov, Ivo D; Christou, Nicolas; Sanchez, Juana

    2008-07-01

    Modern approaches for information technology based blended education utilize a variety of novel instructional, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically linked, interactive content and multifaceted learning environments, which may facilitate student comprehension and information retention. In this manuscript, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools for improving student motivation and learning of the theory, practice and usability of the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) in probability and statistics courses. Our approach is based on harnessing the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (SOCR) to design a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the meaning and the power of the CLT. The CLT applet and activity have clear common goals; to provide graphical representation of the CLT, to improve student intuition, and to empirically validate and establish the limits of the CLT. The SOCR CLT activity consists of four experiments that demonstrate the assumptions, meaning and implications of the CLT and ties these to specific hands-on simulations. We include a number of examples illustrating the theory and applications of the CLT. Both the SOCR CLT applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://www.socr.ucla.edu/htmls/SOCR_Experiments.html and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_GeneralCentralLimitTheorem).

  13. Orientifold limit of F-theory vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, A. |

    1997-06-01

    We show how an F theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau (n+1)-fold in an appropriate weak coupling limit reduces formally to an orientifold of type IIB theory compactified on an auxiliary complex n-fold. In some cases (but not always) if the original (n+1)-fold is singular, then the auxiliary n-fold is also singular. We illustrate this by analyzing F theory on elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau three-folds on base F{sub n}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Finding Horndeski theories with Einstein gravity limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, Ryan; Lombriser, Lucas; Peñarrubia, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    The Horndeski action is the most general scalar-tensor theory with at most second-order derivatives in the equations of motion, thus evading Ostrogradsky instabilities and making it of interest when modifying gravity at large scales. To pass local tests of gravity, these modifications predominantly rely on nonlinear screening mechanisms that recover Einstein's Theory of General Relativity in regions of high density. We derive a set of conditions on the four free functions of the Horndeski action that examine whether a specific model embedded in the action possesses an Einstein gravity limit or not. For this purpose, we develop a new and surprisingly simple scaling method that identifies dominant terms in the equations of motion by considering formal limits of the couplings that enter through the new terms in the modified action. This enables us to find regimes where nonlinear terms dominate and Einstein's field equations are recovered to leading order. Together with an efficient approximation of the scalar field profile, one can then further evaluate whether these limits can be attributed to a genuine screening effect. For illustration, we apply the analysis to both a cubic galileon and a chameleon model as well as to Brans-Dicke theory. Finally, we emphasise that the scaling method also provides a natural approach for performing post-Newtonian expansions in screened regimes.

  15. Illustrating the Central Limit Theorem through Microsoft Excel Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, David H.; Powell, John E.

    2005-01-01

    Using Microsoft Excel, several interactive, computerized learning modules are developed to demonstrate the Central Limit Theorem. These modules are used in the classroom to enhance the comprehension of this theorem. The Central Limit Theorem is a very important theorem in statistics, and yet because it is not intuitively obvious, statistics…

  16. Central limit theorems for percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J. Theodore; Grimmett, Geoffrey

    1981-06-01

    Let p ≠ 1/2 be the open-bond probability in Broadbent and Hammersley's percolation model on the square lattice. Let W x be the cluster of sites connected to x by open paths, and let γ(n) be any sequence of circuits with interiors|γ limits^ circ (n)| to infty . It is shown that for certain sequences of functions { f n },S_n = sum _{x in γ limits^ circ (n)} f_n (W_x ) converges in distribution to the standard normal law when properly normalized. This result answers a problem posed by Kunz and Souillard, proving that the number S n of sites inside γ(n) which are connected by open paths to γ(n) is approximately normal for large circuits γ(n).

  17. Kinetic theory of diffusion-limited nucleation.

    PubMed

    Philippe, T; Bonvalet, M; Blavette, D

    2016-05-28

    We examine binary nucleation in the size and composition space {R,c} using the formalism of the multivariable theory [N. V. Alekseechkin, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 124512 (2006)]. We show that the variable c drops out of consideration for very large curvature of the new phase Gibbs energy with composition. Consequently nuclei around the critical size have the critical composition, which is derived from the condition of criticality for the canonical variables and is found not to depend on surface tension. In this case, nucleation kinetics can be investigated in the size space only. Using macroscopic kinetics, we determine the general expression for the condensation rate when growth is limited by bulk diffusion, which accounts for both diffusion and capillarity and exhibits a different dependence with the critical size, as compared with the interface-limited regime. This new expression of the condensation rate for bulk diffusion-limited nucleation is the counterpart of the classical interface-limited result. We then extend our analysis to multicomponent solutions.

  18. Index Theory and Adiabatic Limit in QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzycki, Jarosław

    2013-08-01

    The paper has the form of a proposal concerned with the relationship between the three mathematically rigorous approaches to quantum field theory: (1) local algebraic formulation of Haag, (2) Wightman formulation and (3) the perturbative formulation based on the microlocal renormalization method. In this project we investigate the relationship between (1) and (3) and utilize the known relationships between (1) and (2). The main goal of the proposal lies in obtaining obstructions for the existence of the adiabatic limit ( confinement problem in the phenomenological standard model approach). We extend the method of deformation of Dütsch and Fredenhagen (in the Bordeman-Waldmann sense) and apply Fedosov construction of the formal index—an analog of the index for deformed symplectic manifolds, generalizing the Atiyah-Singer index. We present some first steps in realization of the proposal.

  19. Superstring limit of Yang-Mills theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenfeld, Olaf; Popov, Alexander D.

    2016-11-01

    It was pointed out by Shifman and Yung that the critical superstring on X10 =R4 ×Y6, where Y6 is the resolved conifold, appears as an effective theory for a U(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs system with four fundamental Higgs scalars defined on Σ2 ×R2, where Σ2 is a two-dimensional Lorentzian manifold. Their Yang-Mills model supports semilocal vortices on R2 ⊂Σ2 ×R2 with a moduli space X10. When the moduli of slowly moving thin vortices depend on the coordinates of Σ2, the vortex strings can be identified with critical fundamental strings. We show that similar results can be obtained for the low-energy limit of pure Yang-Mills theory on Σ2 × Tp2, where Tp2 is a two-dimensional torus with a puncture p. The solitonic vortices of Shifman and Yung then get replaced by flat connections. Various ten-dimensional superstring target spaces can be obtained as moduli spaces of flat connections on Tp2, depending on the choice of the gauge group. The full Green-Schwarz sigma model requires extending the gauge group to a supergroup and augmenting the action with a topological term.

  20. Strong-coupling limit of Eliashberg theory

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.

    1995-05-01

    We study the strong-coupling limit of the Eliashberg theory of superconductivity, where the coupling strength {lambda} goes to infinity and the critical temperature gets large compared to a typical phonon energy. This limit is of interest because it is both universal and simple, and we may hope to obtain from this study a deeper understanding of the conventional strong-coupling regime of superconductivity. Our work on this problem is both analytical and numerical. At {ital T}=0, we find that the excitation spectrum is discrete. We interpret physically the excited states as bound states due to a type of polaronic effect. We show that one can solve the Eliashberg equations essentially analytically by working fully on the real frequency axis. At finite temperature we find a thermal smearing of the {ital T}=0 structure. Since the critical temperature is small compared to the zero-temperature gap, thermal effects can be treated as a kind of perturbation over almost all the temperature range. In this spirit, we give a simple approximate solution which reproduces almost quantitatively the exact numerical results.

  1. Liouville theory with a central charge less than one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribault, Sylvain; Santachiara, Raoul

    2015-08-01

    We determine the spectrum and correlation functions of Liouville theory with a central charge less than (or equal) one. This completes the definition of Liouville theory for all complex values of the central charge. The spectrum is always spacelike, and there is no consistent timelike Liouville theory. We also study the non-analytic conformal field theories that exist at rational values of the central charge. Our claims are supported by numerical checks of crossing symmetry. We provide Python code for computing Virasoro conformal blocks, and correlation functions in Liouville theory and (generalized) minimal models.

  2. The Limits of Subsistence: Agriculture and Industry in Central Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pudup, Mary Beth

    Current interpretations of central Appalachia's chronic poverty focus on the region's economic dependence on the bituminous coal industry, controlled by absentee investors and serving an external market. Such theories overlook the ways in which the agricultural sector shaped subsequent industrial development. By analyzing the farm economy of 16…

  3. The Limits of Subsistence: Agriculture and Industry in Central Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pudup, Mary Beth

    Current interpretations of central Appalachia's chronic poverty focus on the region's economic dependence on the bituminous coal industry, controlled by absentee investors and serving an external market. Such theories overlook the ways in which the agricultural sector shaped subsequent industrial development. By analyzing the farm economy of 16…

  4. Central limit theorem: the cornerstone of modern statistics

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    According to the central limit theorem, the means of a random sample of size, n, from a population with mean, µ, and variance, σ2, distribute normally with mean, µ, and variance, σ2n. Using the central limit theorem, a variety of parametric tests have been developed under assumptions about the parameters that determine the population probability distribution. Compared to non-parametric tests, which do not require any assumptions about the population probability distribution, parametric tests produce more accurate and precise estimates with higher statistical powers. However, many medical researchers use parametric tests to present their data without knowledge of the contribution of the central limit theorem to the development of such tests. Thus, this review presents the basic concepts of the central limit theorem and its role in binomial distributions and the Student's t-test, and provides an example of the sampling distributions of small populations. A proof of the central limit theorem is also described with the mathematical concepts required for its near-complete understanding. PMID:28367284

  5. ABJ theory in the higher spin limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Shinji; Honda, Masazumi; Okuyama, Kazumi; Shigemori, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    We study the conjecture made by Chang, Minwalla, Sharma, and Yin on the duality between the {N}=6 Vasiliev higher spin theory on AdS4 and the {N}=6 Chern-Simons-matter theory, so-called ABJ theory, with gauge group U( N) × U( N + M). Building on our earlier results on the ABJ partition function, we develop the systematic 1 /M expansion, corresponding to the weak coupling expansion in the higher spin theory, and compare the leading 1 /M correction, with our proposed prescription, to the one-loop free energy of the {N}=6 Vasiliev theory. We find an agreement between the two sides up to an ambiguity that appears in the bulk one-loop calculation.

  6. Limit loads for centrally cracked square plates under biaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graba, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the determination of limit loads for centrally cracked square plates subjected to biaxial tension. It briefly discusses the concept of limit loads and some aspects of numerical modelling. It presents results of numerical calculations conducted for two-dimensional (plane strain state and plane stress state) and three-dimensional cases. It also considers the relationship between the limit load and the crack length, the specimen thickness, the yield strength and the biaxial load factor, defined for the purpose of this work. The paper includes approximation formulae to calculate the limit load.

  7. Simplifying Central Place Theory Using GIS and GPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theo, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A constant struggle for teachers at all levels is finding ways to successfully teach students complex theories and concepts. Student comprehension is often enhanced by applying these theories and concepts to real world situations. This project demonstrates central place theory by examining highway billboard signs along major Wisconsin highways. In…

  8. Simplifying Central Place Theory Using GIS and GPS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theo, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    A constant struggle for teachers at all levels is finding ways to successfully teach students complex theories and concepts. Student comprehension is often enhanced by applying these theories and concepts to real world situations. This project demonstrates central place theory by examining highway billboard signs along major Wisconsin highways. In…

  9. Improving Conceptions in Analytical Chemistry: The Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Margarita; Carrasquillo, Arnaldo, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the central limit theorem (CLT) and its relation to analytical chemistry. The pedagogic rational, which argues for teaching the CLT in the analytical chemistry classroom, is discussed. Some analytical chemistry concepts that could be improved through an understanding of the CLT are also described. (Contains 2 figures.)

  10. Understanding the Sampling Distribution and the Central Limit Theorem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Charla P.

    The sampling distribution is a common source of misuse and misunderstanding in the study of statistics. The sampling distribution, underlying distribution, and the Central Limit Theorem are all interconnected in defining and explaining the proper use of the sampling distribution of various statistics. The sampling distribution of a statistic is…

  11. Analytical relation between peripheral and central density limit on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Tudisco, O.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Esposito, B.; Giovannozzi, E.; Marocco, D.; Ramogida, G.; Sattin, F.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.

    2017-08-01

    The commonly adopted scaling for the maximum achievable plasma density in tokamak fusion devices, the so-called ‘Greenwald limit’, refers to the line-averaged density along a central chord and depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Furthermore, the Greenwald limit has been obtained for fixed density profiles, so that the scaling can be very different when introducing density profile dependencies on plasma parameters. Dedicated density limit experiments were performed in recent years on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade, exploring the high density domain in a wide range of values of plasma current, toroidal magnetic field and edge safety factor. New data were collected in the latest experimental campaigns, extending the study of the density limit towards lower values of toroidal magnetic field and plasma current. These experiments confirmed the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling was obtained for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord, while a clear scaling of the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord with the toroidal magnetic field only was found and successfully interpreted as due to interplay between the peripheral Greenwald limit and the specific density profile behavior when approaching the density limit. In particular, an analytical relation between the peripheral and the central density limit was derived for the first time, with the introduction of a generalized parabolic density profile with the peaking factor dependent on the plasma parameters.

  12. Metasemantics: On the Limits of Semantic Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, T.

    2009-01-01

    METASEMANTICS is a wake-up call for semantic theory: It reveals that some semantic questions have no adequate answer. (This is meant to be the "epistemic" point that certain semantic questions cannot be "settled"--not a metaphysical point about whether there is a fact-of-the-matter.) METASEMANTICS thus checks our default "optimism" that any…

  13. Metasemantics: On the Limits of Semantic Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, T.

    2009-01-01

    METASEMANTICS is a wake-up call for semantic theory: It reveals that some semantic questions have no adequate answer. (This is meant to be the "epistemic" point that certain semantic questions cannot be "settled"--not a metaphysical point about whether there is a fact-of-the-matter.) METASEMANTICS thus checks our default "optimism" that any…

  14. Competition explains limited attention and perceptual resources: implications for perceptual load and dilution theories

    PubMed Central

    Scalf, Paige E.; Torralbo, Ana; Tapia, Evelina; Beck, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Both perceptual load theory and dilution theory purport to explain when and why task-irrelevant information, or so-called distractors are processed. Central to both explanations is the notion of limited resources, although the theories differ in the precise way in which those limitations affect distractor processing. We have recently proposed a neurally plausible explanation of limited resources in which neural competition among stimuli hinders their representation in the brain. This view of limited capacity can also explain distractor processing, whereby the competitive interactions and bias imposed to resolve the competition determine the extent to which a distractor is processed. This idea is compatible with aspects of both perceptual load and dilution models of distractor processing, but also serves to highlight their differences. Here we review the evidence in favor of a biased competition view of limited resources and relate these ideas to both classic perceptual load theory and dilution theory. PMID:23717289

  15. Range-limited centrality measures in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N.; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Toroczkai, Zoltán

    2012-06-01

    Here we present a range-limited approach to centrality measures in both nonweighted and weighted directed complex networks. We introduce an efficient method that generates for every node and every edge its betweenness centrality based on shortest paths of lengths not longer than ℓ=1,...,L in the case of nonweighted networks, and for weighted networks the corresponding quantities based on minimum weight paths with path weights not larger than wℓ=ℓΔ, ℓ=1,2...,L=R/Δ. These measures provide a systematic description on the positioning importance of a node (edge) with respect to its network neighborhoods one step out, two steps out, etc., up to and including the whole network. They are more informative than traditional centrality measures, as network transport typically happens on all length scales, from transport to nearest neighbors to the farthest reaches of the network. We show that range-limited centralities obey universal scaling laws for large nonweighted networks. As the computation of traditional centrality measures is costly, this scaling behavior can be exploited to efficiently estimate centralities of nodes and edges for all ranges, including the traditional ones. The scaling behavior can also be exploited to show that the ranking top list of nodes (edges) based on their range-limited centralities quickly freezes as a function of the range, and hence the diameter-range top list can be efficiently predicted. We also show how to estimate the typical largest node-to-node distance for a network of N nodes, exploiting the afore-mentioned scaling behavior. These observations were made on model networks and on a large social network inferred from cell-phone trace logs (˜5.5×106 nodes and ˜2.7×107 edges). Finally, we apply these concepts to efficiently detect the vulnerability backbone of a network (defined as the smallest percolating cluster of the highest betweenness nodes and edges) and illustrate the importance of weight-based centrality measures in

  16. Central Perspectives and Debates in Organization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astley, W. Graham; Van de Ven, Andrew H.

    1983-01-01

    Classifies organizational theories, by analytical level and assumptions about human nature, into four perspectives (system-structural, strategic choice, natural selection, collective action), each with different concepts of organizational structure, behavior, change, and managerial roles. Identifies six debates generated among the perspectives and…

  17. Central Perspectives and Debates in Organization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astley, W. Graham; Van de Ven, Andrew H.

    1983-01-01

    Classifies organizational theories, by analytical level and assumptions about human nature, into four perspectives (system-structural, strategic choice, natural selection, collective action), each with different concepts of organizational structure, behavior, change, and managerial roles. Identifies six debates generated among the perspectives and…

  18. Entropy Inequalities for Stable Densities and Strengthened Central Limit Theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toscani, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    We consider the central limit theorem for stable laws in the case of the standardized sum of independent and identically distributed random variables with regular probability density function. By showing decay of different entropy functionals along the sequence we prove convergence with explicit rate in various norms to a Lévy centered density of parameter λ >1 . This introduces a new information-theoretic approach to the central limit theorem for stable laws, in which the main argument is shown to be the relative fractional Fisher information, recently introduced in Toscani (Ricerche Mat 65(1):71-91, 2016). In particular, it is proven that, with respect to the relative fractional Fisher information, the Lévy density satisfies an analogous of the logarithmic Sobolev inequality, which allows to pass from the monotonicity and decay to zero of the relative fractional Fisher information in the standardized sum to the decay to zero in relative entropy with an explicit decay rate.

  19. The AdS central charge in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Jan

    2011-11-01

    We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an AdS3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.

  20. Effective Field Theories from Soft Limits of Scattering Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Clifford; Kampf, Karol; Novotny, Jiri; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-06-05

    We derive scalar effective field theories-Lagrangians, symmetries, and all-from on-shell scattering amplitudes constructed purely from Lorentz invariance, factorization, a fixed power counting order in derivatives, and a fixed order at which amplitudes vanish in the soft limit. These constraints leave free parameters in the amplitude which are the coupling constants of well-known theories: Nambu-Goldstone bosons, Dirac-Born-Infeld scalars, and Galilean internal shift symmetries. Moreover, soft limits imply conditions on the Noether current which can then be inverted to derive Lagrangians for each theory. We propose a natural classification of all scalar effective field theories according to two numbers which encode the derivative power counting and soft behavior of the corresponding amplitudes. In those cases where there is no consistent amplitude, the corresponding theory does not exist.

  1. Plato's Child and the Limit-Points of Educational Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bernadette

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes how the figure of the child has been used to authorize a series of boundaries that have been constituted the limit points of educational theories or philosophies. Concludes that the meaning-space that the child can occupy has been important to depicting Utopian and cosmological imaginings at different historical moments. (Contains 37…

  2. Planetary Accretion, Oxygen Isotopes and the Central Limit Theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Hill, Hugh G. M.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of presolar dust into increasingly larger aggregates (CAIs and Chondrules, Asteroids, Planets) should result in a very drastic reduction in the numerical spread in oxygen isotopic composition between bodies of similar size, in accord with the Central Limit Theorem. Observed variations in oxygen isotopic composition are many orders of magnitude larger than would be predicted by a simple, random accumulation model that begins in a well-mixed nebula - no matter which size-scale objects are used as the beginning or end points of the calculation. This discrepancy implies either that some as yet unspecified process acted on the solids in the Solar Nebula to increase the spread in oxygen isotopic composition during each and every stage of accumulation or that the nebula was heterogeneous and maintained this heterogeneity throughout most of nebular history. Large-scale nebular heterogeneity would have significant consequences for many areas of cosmochemistry, including the application of some well-known isotopic systems to the dating of nebular events or the prediction of bulk compositions of planetary bodies on the basis of a uniform cosmic abundance.

  3. The use and limitations of attachment theory in child psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilberstein, Karen

    2014-03-01

    Attachment theory and research has proliferated in recent years, spawning new ideas and applications to child therapy. Some of those interventions are creative and useful and rest on solid theory and research, whereas others derive from tenuous assumptions. As an important developmental construct, attachment plays a role in every therapy, but defining that role can be difficult. Therapists must recognize the significance of attachment in treatment but not at the expense of recognizing and treating other issues. This article provides an overview of attachment theory and attachment-based interventions and discusses how to apply those constructs to therapeutic work with children. It reviews attachment theory, assessment, and treatments, and discusses how attachment-focused interventions can be combined with other therapeutic needs and methods. It also considers limitations in the current clinical application of attachment and makes recommendations for further research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Some steps toward a central theory of ecosystem dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ulanowicz, Robert E

    2003-12-01

    Ecology is said by many to suffer for want of a central theory, such as Newton's laws of motion provide for classical mechanics or Schroedinger's wave equation provides for quantum physics. From among a plurality of contending laws to govern ecosystem behavior, the principle of increasing ascendency shows some early promise of being able to address the major questions asked of a theory of ecosystems, including, "How do organisms come to be distributed in time and space?, what accounts for the log-normal distribution of species numbers?, and how is the diversity of ecosystems related to their stability, resilience and persistence?" While some progress has been made in applying the concept of ascendency to the first issue, more work is needed to articulate exactly how it relates to the latter two. Accordingly, seven theoretical tasks are suggested that could help to establish these connections and to promote further consideration of the ascendency principle as the kernel of a theory of ecosystems.

  5. Are there signature limits in early theory of mind?

    PubMed

    Fizke, Ella; Butterfill, Stephen; van de Loo, Lea; Reindl, Eva; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2017-10-01

    Current theory-of-mind research faces the challenge of reconciling two sets of seemingly incompatible findings: Whereas children come to solve explicit verbal false belief (FB) tasks from around 4years of age, recent studies with various less explicit measures such as looking time, anticipatory looking, and spontaneous behavior suggest that even infants can succeed on some FB tasks. In response to this tension, two-systems theories propose to distinguish between an early-developing system, tracking simple forms of mental states, and a later-developing system, based on fully developed concepts of belief and other propositional attitudes. One prediction of such theories is that the early-developing system has signature limits concerning aspectuality. We tested this prediction in two experiments. The first experiment showed (in line with previous findings) that 2- and 3-year-olds take into account a protagonist's true or false belief about the location of an object in their active helping behavior. In contrast, toddlers' helping behavior did not differentiate between true and false belief conditions when the protagonist's belief essentially involved aspectuality. Experiment 2 replicated these findings with a more stringent method designed to rule out more parsimonious explanations. Taken together, the current findings are compatible with the possibility that early theory-of-mind reasoning is subject to signature limits as predicted by the two-systems account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Central Limit Theorem for Random Walks on the Dual of a Compact Grassmannian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösler, Margit; Voit, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We consider compact Grassmann manifolds G/K over the real, complex or quaternionic numbers whose spherical functions are Heckman-Opdam polynomials of type BC. From an explicit integral representation of these polynomials we deduce a sharp Mehler-Heine formula, that is an approximation of the Heckman-Opdam polynomials in terms of Bessel functions, with a precise estimate on the error term. This result is used to derive a central limit theorem for random walks on the semi-lattice parametrizing the dual of G/K, which are constructed by successive decompositions of tensor powers of spherical representations of G. The limit is the distribution of a Laguerre ensemble in random matrix theory. Most results of this paper are established for a larger continuous set of multiplicity parameters beyond the group cases.

  7. Bed-limited cracks in effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tod, S. R.

    2003-02-01

    An effective medium theory typically requires the description of a mean crack shape. In general, for simplicity, this is taken to be a flat, circular (`penny-shaped') crack. However, this places an unnecessary limitation on the theory, when it is perhaps more realistic to describe a crack in terms of having a bounded width and an otherwise ellipsoidal shape. The generalization of the method of smoothing, as proposed by Hudson (1994, Geophys. J. Int.,117, 555-561) , to extend his original model (Hudson, 1980. Math. proc. Camb. phil. Soc.,88, 371-384), has been used to study the role of the crack width and the ratio of the two larger dimensions in determining the properties of the effective medium. In general, this leads to a description of the medium as having orthorhombic symmetry, and provides a suitable description of a material where the crack dimensions are restricted in one direction owing to, for example, bed-limiting effects, while remaining unconfined in other directions. An elliptical flat crack limit is determined, analoguous to the circular crack description of the original Hudson model. In addition to the isolated crack description, the theory is extended to include the fluid flow mechanism of Tod (2001, Geophys. J. Int.,146, 249-263) that models the flow as being dominated by crack-to-crack flow and is valid for low matrix porosities and over a large range of frequencies, provided that the wavelength is much greater than the crack dimensions.

  8. On the limits of psychoanalytic theory: a cautionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Horner, Althea J

    2006-01-01

    Citing the complexities of the human mind with respect to early development and its functioning in later life, the author cautions against the reliance on any individual psychoanalytic theory in clinical work. Psychoanalytic theories, in general, do not take into account many factors such as the patient's constitutional givens, his or her inborn temperament, family system factors, the impact of the autonomous functions on development, the limits of the child in Piagetian terms, or post-oedipal learning. The analyst's favorite theory may become a belief system that shapes his or her understanding of the patient leading to an imposition of the theory on the data. The analyst's sense of certainty about his or her favorite theory may be based on a transference to the author of the theory or from its fit with his or her own psychological makeup. Cited is Greenson's position (1969/1978) that if he tries to imagine an analytic session with a "true believer" analyst repeating the catechism of his school, he would find it "hard to see this as a living creative experience for either the patient or the therapist" (p. 354). Ultimately, not accountable in terms of any psychoanalytic theory, there is something ineffable, which is the persistent and basically indestructible essence of the person that cannot be explained on the basis of good mothering or on the basis of a facilitating environment. Whether this is thought of as "soul" or "spirit," or even a Winnicottian "true self," it is not something the psychotherapist can omnipotently create. It can only be discovered - unearthed, unburied, cleared away of emotional clutter.

  9. Linking Theory of Mind and Central Coherence Bias in Autism and in the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrold, Christopher; Butler, David W.; Cottington, Emily M.; Jimenez, Flora

    2000-01-01

    Three experiments investigated whether theory-of-mind deficits and weak central coherence might be functionally related. Found that theory-of-mind performance was inversely related to a measure of central coherence bias in the general population. Poor theory-of-mind performance was linked to weak central coherence among children with typical…

  10. Weak Central Coherence and Its Relations to Theory of Mind and Anxiety in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Courtney P.; Mundy, Peter C.; Meyer, Jessica A.; Sutton, Steven K.; Vaughan, Amy E.; Charak, David

    2005-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggests that weak central coherence, a specific perceptual-cognitive style, underlies the central disturbance in autism. This study sought to provide a test of the weak central coherence hypothesis. In addition, this study explored the relations between the weak central coherence hypothesis, theory of mind skills, and…

  11. Weak Central Coherence and Its Relations to Theory of Mind and Anxiety in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnette, Courtney P.; Mundy, Peter C.; Meyer, Jessica A.; Sutton, Steven K.; Vaughan, Amy E.; Charak, David

    2005-01-01

    Recent theory and research suggests that weak central coherence, a specific perceptual-cognitive style, underlies the central disturbance in autism. This study sought to provide a test of the weak central coherence hypothesis. In addition, this study explored the relations between the weak central coherence hypothesis, theory of mind skills, and…

  12. THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    WONG,SK; CHAN,VS

    2002-11-01

    OAK B202 THE LARGE ASPECT RATIO LIMIT OF NEOCLASSICAL TRANSPORT THEORY. This article presents a comprehensive description of neoclassical transport theory in the banana regime for large aspect ratio flux surfaces of arbitrary shapes. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to obtain analytical solutions for plasma distribution functions and to compute transport coefficients. The method provides justification for retaining only the part of the Fokker-Planck operator that involves the second derivative with respect to the cosine of the pitch angle for the trapped and barely circulating particles. It leads to a simple equation for the freely circulating particles with boundary conditions that embody a discontinuity separating particles moving in opposite directions. Corrections to the transport coefficients are obtained by generalizing an existing boundary layer analysis. The system of moment and field equations is consistently taken in the cylinder limit, which facilitates discussion of the treatment of dynamical constraints. it is shown that the nonlocal nature of Ohm's law in neoclassical theory renders the mathematical problem of plasma transport with changing flux surfaces nonstandard.

  13. Tsunami generation: validity and limitations of conventional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    Most tools and theories for analysing tsunami records were originally developed for coastal sites located far from the tsunami source. As a result, we must take care in using these for records observed inside the focal area where seismic waves can exist together with tsunami. This study investigates the validity and limitations of theories used in past studies. We use 2-D elastic equation of motion as a reference, while most tsunami studies employed incompressible-fluid theory. We first examine a two-step method commonly used for setting the initial conditions in tsunami simulations. The method employs the two analytical solutions for the sea-bottom and sea-surface deformations. We found excellent agreement between the initial heights calculated by the two-step method and by the simulation including elastic crust and compressible sea water. We further investigated the change in the ocean-bottom pressure during tsunami generation. For high-frequency pressure records, although the pressure change was sometimes assumed to be proportional to sea-bottom velocity, this did not hold in general, but worked for the first motion. For low-frequency records, ocean-bottom pressure change was usually assumed to be proportional to sea-bottom acceleration. This works nicely when the deformation is smooth, but fails when the sea bottom deforms steeply. We found that a new analytical solution could reproduce the relation more precisely. The validity and limitations of the conventional theories need to be taken into account when analysing tsunami records inside the focal area.

  14. Theory and practice: Science for undergraduates of limited English proficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Judith W.

    1993-06-01

    Between 1980 and 1990, the total number of Asian, Hispanic, American Indian, and foreign undergraduates increased by more than 50% at public and private, four-year and two-year colleges. Many of these students may be of limited English proficiency, suggesting that the traditional science lecture/lab format may need modification to incorporate the theory of second language acquisition as it pertains to the practice of content instruction. Various methods exist to improve science instruction for limited English proficient undergraduates. These included the adjunct and tutorial models, sheltered or bridge science instruction, faculty development, and science instruction in the students' native language. Any plan for science education reform at the collegiate level or for increasing minority participation in science must address the needs of the growing population of undergraduates who speak English as a second language.

  15. Shear-Limited Diffusion and Viscosity: Experiments and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, C. Fred

    2001-10-01

    Experiments and theory on collisional diffusion and viscosity demonstrate enhanced transport in the 2D bounce-averaged regime, limited by shear in the plasma rotation. The experiments are performed on relatively quiescent pure-ion or pure electron plasma columns, where the shear in the drift rotation ωE (r) can be controlled accurately. For long plasma columns, we measure test particle diffusion(F. Anderegg, et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2128 (1997). and bulk viscosity(J.M. Kriesel and C.F. Driscoll, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2001).) coefficients which quantitatively agree with recent 3D theories(D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 5), 1688 (1998). of E × B drift collisions with impact parameters in the range rc < ρ < λ_D. In general, this transport is substantially greater than would be expected for velocity-scattering collisions with ρ < r_c. For finite plasma length L_p, thermal particles may bounce axially many times before rotational shear separates them in θ and this number of bounces Nb ≡ ( barv / 2L_p) / (r ; partial ωE / partial r) characterizes the approach to the 2D bounce-averaged regime. Experiments measuring electron viscosity coefficients and separate experiments measuring tagged ion diffusion coefficients each show transport enhancements up to 100×, scaling quantitatively as Nb over the range 1 < Nb < 10^2. In the zero-shear limit of Nb arrow ∞ , theory treats the particles as z-averaged rods of charge undergoing 2D E × B drift dynamics. For this case, Taylor and McNamara showed that Bohm-like diffusion results from large-scale thermally-excited ``Dawson-Okuda'' vortices. More recently, Dubin(D.H.E. Dubin and D.Z. Jin, Phys. Lett. A 284), 112 (2001). analyzed the 2D test-particle diffusion with applied background shear, showing that the particle diffusion decreases with increasing shear. Overall, this new theory gives fair quantitative agreement with the diffusion experiments from the 3D (or high shear) regime with Nb <= 1 to the 2D (or

  16. Flux limited Diffusion Theory of Microwave Background Radiation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.

    1995-08-01

    A physically satisfactory treatment of the radiative transfer during the recombination epoch is complicated by the fact that the Universe has a quite rapid (Dz~400 at z_dec~1200) transition into the optically thin regime. We show here that all previous approaches (e.g. Peebles and Yu,1968 [1],Bond and Efstathiou,1987 [2],up to the most recent by Holtzmann,1992 [3] and Stompor,1994 [4]) are based on analytic expansions in powers of the mean free path which run into physical inconsistencies (the predicted radiation flux is larger than the product of speed of light and radiation density). To remedy to this situation, we apply to this problem the Covariant Flux-Limited Diffusion (CFLD) theory recently formulated by Bonanno and Romano (1993)[4]. Flux-limited diffusion theories are currently adopted in plasma physics, and offer a physical description free of the above mentioned inconsistency. We calculate the spectrum of the resulting perturbations for a few CDM models. Our physical treatment improves consistently on small (<=50') scales over previous treatments: the resulting spectra for the corresponding high wavenumbers are then substantially different from those found by the previous authors.

  17. Quantitative confirmation of diffusion-limited oxidation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Clough, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Diffusion-limited (heterogeneous) oxidation effects are often important for studies of polymer degradation. Such effects are common in polymers subjected to ionizing radiation at relatively high dose rate. To better understand the underlying oxidation processes and to aid in the planning of accelerated aging studies, it would be desirable to be able to monitor and quantitatively understand these effects. In this paper, we briefly review a theoretical diffusion approach which derives model profiles for oxygen surrounded sheets of material by combining oxygen permeation rates with kinetically based oxygen consumption expressions. The theory leads to a simple governing expression involving the oxygen consumption and permeation rates together with two model parameters {alpha} and {beta}. To test the theory, gamma-initiated oxidation of a sheet of commercially formulated EPDM rubber was performed under conditions which led to diffusion-limited oxidation. Profile shapes from the theoretical treatments are shown to accurately fit experimentally derived oxidation profiles. In addition, direct measurements on the same EPDM material of the oxygen consumption and permeation rates, together with values of {alpha} and {beta} derived from the fitting procedure, allow us to quantitatively confirm for the first time the governing theoretical relationship. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Representational Realism, Closed Theories and the Quantum to Classical Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, Christian

    In this chapter, we discuss the representational realist stance as a pluralistontic approach to inter-theoretic relationships. Our stance stresses the fact that physical theories require the necessary consideration of a conceptual level of discourse which determines and configures the specific field of phenomena discussed by each particular theory. We will criticize the orthodox line of research which has grounded the analysis about QM in two (Bohrian) metaphysical presuppositions - accepted in the present as dogmas that all interpretations must follow. We will also examine how the orthodox project of "bridging the gap" between the quantum and the classical domains has constrained the possibilities of research, producing only a limited set of interpretational problems which only focus in the justification of "classical reality" and exclude the possibility of analyzing the possibilities of non-classical conceptual representations of QM. The representational realist stance introduces two new problems, namely, the superposition problem and the contextuality problem, which consider explicitly the conceptual representation of orthodox QM beyond the mere reference to mathematical structures and measurement outcomes. In the final part of the chapter, we revisit, from representational realist perspective, the quantum to classical limit and the orthodox claim that this inter-theoretic relation can be explained through the principle of decoherence.

  19. The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-08

    through which all vehicles large enough to carry items limited by the treaty (such as the first stage of a mobile ICBM) had to pass. The portal contained...little difficulty. The Foreign Affairs Committee of the Russian Duma had initially supported the treaty. However, in early November 2010, Konstantin

  20. The New START Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    through which all vehicles large enough to carry items limited by the treaty (such as the first stage of a mobile ICBM) had to pass. The portal contained...difficulty. The Foreign Affairs Committee of the Russian Duma had initially supported the treaty. However, in early November 2010, Konstantin

  1. CENTRAL LIMIT THEOREMS FOR CONDITIONALLY LINEAR RANDOM PROCESSES WITH APPLICATIONS TO MODELS OF RADAR CLUTTER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    models are called conditionally linear processes, and the description of the correlator output requires a central limit theorem for sums of dependent...random variables. The conditions for the central limit theorem are related to physically reasonable conditions on the model. The results of the study

  2. Scaling theory for the quasideterministic limit of continuous bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Kessler, David A; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2012-05-01

    Deterministic rate equations are widely used in the study of stochastic, interacting particles systems. This approach assumes that the inherent noise, associated with the discreteness of the elementary constituents, may be neglected when the number of particles N is large. Accordingly, it fails close to the extinction transition, when the amplitude of stochastic fluctuations is comparable with the size of the population. Here we present a general scaling theory of the transition regime for spatially extended systems. We demonstrate this through a detailed study of two fundamental models for out-of-equilibrium phase transitions: the Susceptible-Infected-Susceptible (SIS) that belongs to the directed percolation equivalence class and the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model belonging to the dynamic percolation class. Implementing the Ginzburg criteria we show that the width of the fluctuation-dominated region scales like N^{-κ}, where N is the number of individuals per site and κ=2/(d_{u}-d), d_{u} is the upper critical dimension. Other exponents that control the approach to the deterministic limit are shown to be calculable once κ is known. The theory is extended to include the corrections to the front velocity above the transition. It is supported by the results of extensive numerical simulations for systems of various dimensionalities.

  3. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  4. Resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force associating potential. Multi-patch models.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y V; Docherty, H; Cummings, P T

    2011-07-07

    A resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for associating fluids with multiply bondable central force associating potential is extended for the fluid with multiple number of multiply bondable associating sites. We consider a multi-patch hard-sphere model for associating fluids. The model is represented by the hard-sphere fluid system with several spherical attractive patches on the surface of each hard sphere. Resummation is carried out to account for blocking effects, i.e., when the bonding of a particle restricts (blocks) its ability to bond with other particles. Closed form analytical expressions for thermodynamical properties (Helmholtz free energy, pressure, internal energy, and chemical potential) of the models with arbitrary number of doubly bondable patches at all degrees of the blockage are presented. In the limiting case of total blockage, when the patches become only singly bondable, our theory reduces to Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) for polymerizing fluids. To validate the accuracy of the theory we compare to exact values, for the thermodynamical properties of the system, as determined by Monte Carlo computer simulations. In addition we compare the fraction of multiply bonded particles at different values of the density and temperature. In general, predictions of the present theory are in good agreement with values for the model calculated using Monte Carlo simulations, i.e., the accuracy of our theory in the case of the models with multiply bondable sites is similar to that of Wertheim's TPT in the case of the models with singly bondable sites.

  5. Critical Race Theory and the Limits of Relational Theory in Social Work with Women

    PubMed Central

    QUINN, CAMILLE R.; GRUMBACH, GIESELA

    2016-01-01

    The authors present a conceptual framework for expanding the use of relational theory with African-American women. Relational theory (RT) informs practice with women but is inadequate in addressing all aspects of culture and identity. RT presumes that all women desire or are able to make therapeutic connections, yet race, gender, and cultural experiences influence their ability to do so. Successful practice with minority women must address racism and its impact. Critical race theory (CRT) that incorporates a solution-focused (SF) approach is well-suited to address the limits of RT. This overview of a CRT/SF approach describes treatment for diverse women that extends RT and enhances effective social work practice to provide culturally sensitive treatment to women. PMID:28163661

  6. Critical Race Theory and the Limits of Relational Theory in Social Work with Women.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Camille R; Grumbach, Giesela

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a conceptual framework for expanding the use of relational theory with African-American women. Relational theory (RT) informs practice with women but is inadequate in addressing all aspects of culture and identity. RT presumes that all women desire or are able to make therapeutic connections, yet race, gender, and cultural experiences influence their ability to do so. Successful practice with minority women must address racism and its impact. Critical race theory (CRT) that incorporates a solution-focused (SF) approach is well-suited to address the limits of RT. This overview of a CRT/SF approach describes treatment for diverse women that extends RT and enhances effective social work practice to provide culturally sensitive treatment to women.

  7. Orbit Limited Theory in the Solar Wind - kappa Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinović, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    When a solid object is immersed into ionized gas it gets brought to a certain value of electrostatic potential and surrounded by a space charge region called `plasma sheath'. Through this region, particles are attracted or repelled from the surface of the charge collecting object. For collisionless plasma, this process is described by the so-called orbit limited theory, which explains how the collection of particles is determined by the collector geometry and plasma velocity distribution function (VDF). In this article, we provide explicit orbit-limited currents expressions for generalized Lorentzian (κ) distributions. This work is useful to describe the charging processes of objects in non-collisional plasmas like the solar wind, where the electrons VDF is often observed to exhibit quasi power-law populations of suprathermal particles. It is found that these 'suprathermals' considerably increase the charge collection. Since the surface charging process that determines the value of electrostatic potential is also affected by the plasma VDF, calculation of the collector potential in the solar wind is described along with some quantitative predictions.

  8. Central limit theorems and suppression of anomalous diffusion for systems with symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Melbourne, Ian

    2016-10-01

    We give general conditions for the central limit theorem and weak convergence to Brownian motion (the weak invariance principle/functional central limit theorem) to hold for observables of compact group extensions of nonuniformly expanding maps. In particular, our results include situations where the central limit theorem would fail, and anomalous behaviour would prevail, if the compact group were not present. This has important consequences for systems with noncompact Euclidean symmetry and provides the rigorous proof for a conjecture made in our paper: a Huygens principle for diffusion and anomalous diffusion in spatially extended systems. Gottwald and Melbourne (2013 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 110 8411-6).

  9. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  10. Theory of Space Charge Limited Current in Fractional Dimensional Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Muhammad; Ang, L. K.

    The concept of fractional dimensional space has been effectively applied in many areas of physics to describe the fractional effects on the physical systems. We will present some recent developments of space charge limited (SCL) current in free space and solid in the framework of fractional dimensional space which may account for the effect of imperfectness or roughness of the electrode surface. For SCL current in free space, the governing law is known as the Child-Langmuir (CL) law. Its analogy in a trap-free solid (or dielectric) is known as Mott-Gurney (MG) law. This work extends the one-dimensional CL Law and MG Law for the case of a D-dimensional fractional space with 0 < D <= 1 where parameter D defines the degree of roughness of the electrode surface. Such a fractional dimensional space generalization of SCL current theory can be used to characterize the charge injection by the imperfectness or roughness of the surface in applications related to high current cathode (CL law), and organic electronics (MG law). In terms of operating regime, the model has included the quantum effects when the spacing between the electrodes is small.

  11. Estimation of the limit of detection using information theory measures.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón; Marco, Santiago

    2014-01-31

    Definitions of the limit of detection (LOD) based on the probability of false positive and/or false negative errors have been proposed over the past years. Although such definitions are straightforward and valid for any kind of analytical system, proposed methodologies to estimate the LOD are usually simplified to signals with Gaussian noise. Additionally, there is a general misconception that two systems with the same LOD provide the same amount of information on the source regardless of the prior probability of presenting a blank/analyte sample. Based upon an analogy between an analytical system and a binary communication channel, in this paper we show that the amount of information that can be extracted from an analytical system depends on the probability of presenting the two different possible states. We propose a new definition of LOD utilizing information theory tools that deals with noise of any kind and allows the introduction of prior knowledge easily. Unlike most traditional LOD estimation approaches, the proposed definition is based on the amount of information that the chemical instrumentation system provides on the chemical information source. Our findings indicate that the benchmark of analytical systems based on the ability to provide information about the presence/absence of the analyte (our proposed approach) is a more general and proper framework, while converging to the usual values when dealing with Gaussian noise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Shielded attractive shell model again: resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reščič, J.; Kalyuzhnyi, Y. V.; Cummings, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    The approach developed earlier to describe the dimerizing shielded attractive shell (SAS) primitive model of chemical association due to Cummings and Stell is generalized and extended to include a description of a polymerizing SAS model. Our extension is based on the combination of the resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force (RTPT-CF) associating potential and self consistent scheme, which takes into account the changes in the system free volume due to association. Theoretical results for thermodynamical properties of the model at different bonding length, density and temperature are compared against newly generated computer simulation results. The theory gives very accurate predictions for the model with bonding length L * from the range 0  <  L *  <  0.6 at all values of the density and temperature studied, including the limit of infinitely large temperature.

  13. Hydrodynamic limit of Wigner-Poisson kinetic theory: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we revisit the hydrodynamic limit of the Langmuir wave dispersion relation based on the Wigner-Poisson model in connection with that obtained directly from the original Lindhard dielectric function based on the random-phase-approximation. It is observed that the (fourth-order) expansion of the exact Lindhard dielectric constant correctly reduces to the hydrodynamic dispersion relation with an additional term of fourth-order, beside that caused by the quantum diffraction effect. It is also revealed that the generalized Lindhard dielectric theory accounts for the recently discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive potential (SEAP). However, the expansion of the exact Lindhard static dielectric function leads to a k4 term of different magnitude than that obtained from the linearized quantum hydrodynamics model. It is shown that a correction factor of 1/9 should be included in the term arising from the quantum Bohm potential of the momentum balance equation in fluid model in order for a correct plasma dielectric response treatment. Finally, it is observed that the long-range oscillatory screening potential (Friedel oscillations) of type cos ( 2 k F r ) / r 3 , which is a consequence of the divergence of the dielectric function at point k = 2kF in a quantum plasma, arises due to the finiteness of the Fermi-wavenumber and is smeared out in the limit of very high electron number-densities, typical of white dwarfs and neutron stars. In the very low electron number-density regime, typical of semiconductors and metals, where the Friedel oscillation wavelength becomes much larger compared to the interparticle distances, the SEAP appears with a much deeper potential valley. It is remarked that the fourth-order approximate Lindhard dielectric constant approaches that of the linearized quantum hydrodynamic in the limit if very high electron number-density. By evaluation of the imaginary part of the Lindhard dielectric function, it is shown that the Landau

  14. Hydrodynamic limit of Wigner-Poisson kinetic theory: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we revisit the hydrodynamic limit of the Langmuir wave dispersion relation based on the Wigner-Poisson model in connection with that obtained directly from the original Lindhard dielectric function based on the random-phase-approximation. It is observed that the (fourth-order) expansion of the exact Lindhard dielectric constant correctly reduces to the hydrodynamic dispersion relation with an additional term of fourth-order, beside that caused by the quantum diffraction effect. It is also revealed that the generalized Lindhard dielectric theory accounts for the recently discovered Shukla-Eliasson attractive potential (SEAP). However, the expansion of the exact Lindhard static dielectric function leads to a k{sup 4} term of different magnitude than that obtained from the linearized quantum hydrodynamics model. It is shown that a correction factor of 1/9 should be included in the term arising from the quantum Bohm potential of the momentum balance equation in fluid model in order for a correct plasma dielectric response treatment. Finally, it is observed that the long-range oscillatory screening potential (Friedel oscillations) of type cos(2k{sub F}r)/r{sup 3}, which is a consequence of the divergence of the dielectric function at point k = 2k{sub F} in a quantum plasma, arises due to the finiteness of the Fermi-wavenumber and is smeared out in the limit of very high electron number-densities, typical of white dwarfs and neutron stars. In the very low electron number-density regime, typical of semiconductors and metals, where the Friedel oscillation wavelength becomes much larger compared to the interparticle distances, the SEAP appears with a much deeper potential valley. It is remarked that the fourth-order approximate Lindhard dielectric constant approaches that of the linearized quantum hydrodynamic in the limit if very high electron number-density. By evaluation of the imaginary part of the Lindhard dielectric function, it is shown that the

  15. Lateral and central presentation of words with limited exposure duration as remedial training for reading disabled children.

    PubMed

    Berends, Inez E; Reitsma, Pieter

    2005-10-01

    In two studies it is examined whether lateral presentation of words in remedial practice for reading disabled children has additional effects to central presentation. The effect of limited exposure duration (LED) is also studied as a possible factor in inducing higher level decoding processes or increased processing speed of words. Two groups of Dutch reading disabled children (n1 = 25, mean age = 9;8 years and n2 = 36, mean age = 7;1 years) repeatedly practiced reading words presented in the left, right or the central visual field. The results show that all children improved substantially both in reading speed and accuracy, which demonstrates the importance of repetitive practice in reading to attain fluency in reading disabled children. Further analysis demonstrated that neither site of presentation nor limited exposure duration added significantly to the training results. These findings do not corroborate neuropsychological theories suggesting a special role for lateral presentations.

  16. Pushing the Limits on Theories of Word Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Lois

    2000-01-01

    Describes the richness of Hollich et al.'s model of language acquisition. Presents concerns about focus on object words in word learning research, the phantom child in the model, and the missing affect in theories and research on word learning. Suggests that experimental work inspired by principles and constraints theory and observational work…

  17. A Central Capacity Limit to the Simultaneous Storage of Visual and Auditory Arrays in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saults, J. Scott; Cowan, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    If working memory is limited by central capacity (e.g., the focus of attention; N. Cowan, 2001), then storage limits for information in a single modality should apply also to the simultaneous storage of information from different modalities. The authors investigated this by combining a visual-array comparison task with a novel auditory-array…

  18. Central Limit Theorems for Linear Statistics of Heavy Tailed Random Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaych-Georges, Florent; Guionnet, Alice; Male, Camille

    2014-07-01

    We show central limit theorems (CLT) for the linear statistics of symmetric matrices with independent heavy tailed entries, including entries in the domain of attraction of α-stable laws and entries with moments exploding with the dimension, as in the adjacency matrices of Erdös-Rényi graphs. For the second model, we also prove a central limit theorem of the moments of its empirical eigenvalues distribution. The limit laws are Gaussian, but unlike the case of standard Wigner matrices, the normalization is the one of the classical CLT for independent random variables.

  19. Computational complexity of interacting electrons and fundamental limitations of density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuch, Norbert; Verstraete, Frank

    2009-10-01

    One of the central problems in quantum mechanics is to determine the ground-state properties of a system of electrons interacting through the Coulomb potential. Since its introduction, density functional theory has become the most widely used and successful method for simulating systems of interacting electrons. Here, we show that the field of computational complexity imposes fundamental limitations on density functional theory. In particular, if the associated `universal functional' could be found efficiently, this would imply that any problem in the computational complexity class Quantum Merlin Arthur could be solved efficiently. Quantum Merlin Arthur is the quantum version of the class NP and thus any problem in NP could be solved in polynomial time. This is considered highly unlikely. Our result follows from the fact that finding the ground-state energy of the Hubbard model in an external magnetic field is a hard problem even for a quantum computer, but, given the universal functional, it can be computed efficiently using density functional theory. This work illustrates how the field of quantum computing could be useful even if quantum computers were never built.

  20. Cognitive Adaptation Theory and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are There Limits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomich, Patricia L.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2006-01-01

    Relations of the components of cognitive adaptation theory (self-esteem, optimism, control) to quality of life and benefit finding were examined for 70 women (91% Caucasian) diagnosed with Stage I, II, or III breast cancer over 5 years ago. Half of these women experienced a recurrence within the 5 years; the other half remained disease free. Women…

  1. Cognitive Adaptation Theory and Breast Cancer Recurrence: Are There Limits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomich, Patricia L.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2006-01-01

    Relations of the components of cognitive adaptation theory (self-esteem, optimism, control) to quality of life and benefit finding were examined for 70 women (91% Caucasian) diagnosed with Stage I, II, or III breast cancer over 5 years ago. Half of these women experienced a recurrence within the 5 years; the other half remained disease free. Women…

  2. Central limit theorem and related results for the elephant random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, Cristian F.; Gava, Renato; Schütz, Gunter M.

    2017-05-01

    We study the so-called elephant random walk (ERW) which is a non-Markovian discrete-time random walk on ℤ with unbounded memory which exhibits a phase transition from a diffusive to superdiffusive behavior. We prove a law of large numbers and a central limit theorem. Remarkably the central limit theorem applies not only to the diffusive regime but also to the phase transition point which is superdiffusive. Inside the superdiffusive regime, the ERW converges to a non-degenerate random variable which is not normal. We also obtain explicit expressions for the correlations of increments of the ERW.

  3. Ice limit of Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzl, T.; Ilderton, A.; Langfeld, K.; Lavelle, M.; McMullan, D.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we describe gauge invariant multiquark states generalizing the path integral framework developed by Parrinello, Jona-Lasinio, and Zwanziger to amend the Faddeev-Popov approach. This allows us to produce states such that, in a limit which we call the ice limit, fermions are dressed with glue exclusively from the fundamental modular region associated with Coulomb gauge. The limit can be taken analytically without difficulties, avoiding the Gribov problem. This is illustrated by an unambiguous construction of gauge invariant mesonic states for which we simulate the static quark-antiquark potential.

  4. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit I: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    In an earlier work of the author the time evolution of Morse oscillator was studied analytically and exactly at low temperatures whereupon optical correlation functions were calculated using Morse oscillator coherent states were employed. Morse oscillator propagator in the high temperature limit is derived and a closed form of its corresponding canonical partition function is obtained. Both diagonal and off-diagonal forms of Morse oscillator propagator are derived in the high temperature limit. Partition functions of diatomic molecules are calculated.

  5. The Power of Doing: A Learning Exercise That Brings the Central Limit Theorem to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Barbara A.; Zhang, Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    This article demonstrates an active learning technique for teaching the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) in an introductory undergraduate business statistics class. Groups of students carry out one of two experiments in the lab, tossing a die in sets of 5 rolls or tossing a die in sets of 10 rolls. They are asked to calculate the sample average of each…

  6. Using Computers To Teach the Concepts of the Central Limit Theorem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    A pivotal theorem which is of critical importance to statistical inference in probability and statistics is the Central Limit Theorem (CLT). The theorem concerns the sampling distribution of random samples taken from a population, including population distributions that do not have to be normal distributions. This paper contains a brief history of…

  7. The Continuum Limit of Loop Quantum Gravity: A Framework for Solving the Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Bianca

    The following sections are included: * Solving the Dynamics of Loop Quantum Gravity * Continuum Limit in Canonical Loop Quantum Gravity * Continuum Limit for the Dynamics of the Theory * Renormalization Flow and Scale in Background Independent Theories * (Decorated) Tensor Network Renormalization for Spin Nets and Spin Foams * Diffeomorphism Symmetry in the Discrete, Constraints and Divergences * Summary and Outlook * Acknowledgements * References

  8. Theory of Mind and Central Coherence in Adults with High-Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Renae; Newcombe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated theory of mind and central coherence abilities in adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger syndrome (AS) using naturalistic tasks. Twenty adults with HFA/AS correctly answered significantly fewer theory of mind questions than 20 controls on a forced-choice response task. On a narrative task, there were no…

  9. Central charges of Liouville and Toda theories from M5-branes.

    PubMed

    Alday, Luis F; Tachikawa, Yuji; Benini, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    We show that the central charge of the Liouville and Toda theories of type A, D, and E can be reproduced by equivariantly integrating the anomaly eight-form of the corresponding six-dimensional N=(0,2) theories, which describe the low-energy dynamics of M5-branes.

  10. Central Charges of Liouville and Toda Theories from M5-Branes

    SciTech Connect

    Alday, Luis F.; Tachikawa, Yuji; Benini, Francesco

    2010-10-01

    We show that the central charge of the Liouville and Toda theories of type A, D, and E can be reproduced by equivariantly integrating the anomaly eight-form of the corresponding six-dimensional N=(0,2) theories, which describe the low-energy dynamics of M5-branes.

  11. Theory of Mind and Central Coherence in Adults with High-Functioning Autism or Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Renae; Newcombe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated theory of mind and central coherence abilities in adults with high-functioning autism (HFA) or Asperger syndrome (AS) using naturalistic tasks. Twenty adults with HFA/AS correctly answered significantly fewer theory of mind questions than 20 controls on a forced-choice response task. On a narrative task, there were no…

  12. A Central Limit Theorem for the Effective Conductance: Linear Boundary Data and Small Ellipticity Contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskup, M.; Salvi, M.; Wolff, T.

    2014-06-01

    Given a resistor network on with nearest-neighbor conductances, the effective conductance in a finite set with a given boundary condition is the minimum of the Dirichlet energy over functions with the prescribed boundary values. For shift-ergodic conductances, linear (Dirichlet) boundary conditions and square boxes, the effective conductance scaled by the volume of the box converges to a deterministic limit as the box-size tends to infinity. Here we prove that, for i.i.d. conductances with a small ellipticity contrast, also a (non-degenerate) central limit theorem holds. The proof is based on the corrector method and the Martingale Central Limit Theorem; a key integrability condition is furnished by the Meyers estimate. More general domains, boundary conditions and ellipticity contrasts will be addressed in a subsequent paper.

  13. Quantum theory of space charge limited current in solids

    SciTech Connect

    González, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    We present a quantum model of space charge limited current transport inside trap-free solids with planar geometry in the mean field approximation. We use a simple transformation which allows us to find the exact analytical solution for the steady state current case. We use our approach to find a Mott-Gurney like behavior and the mobility for single charge carriers in the quantum regime in solids.

  14. Vietnam and the American Theory of Limited War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-30

    there should not lead us to renounce those armed forces necessary to defend our inter- ests by means short of all out war . The study of limited...one reference to a survey of war through the ages, and that is all . Twenty years later, Osgood confirmed his studied distaste for military history in...to avoid a general nuclear war . Military success is unimportant: a stalemate is all that is necessary to get the combatants to the conference table

  15. Large Quantum Gravity Effects: Unforeseen Limitations of the Classical Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1996-12-01

    Three-dimensional gravity coupled to Maxwell (or Klein-Gordon) fields is exactly soluble under the assumption of axisymmetry. The solution is used to probe several quantum gravity issues. In particular, it is found that if there is an electromagnetic wave of Planckian frequency even with such low amplitude that the curvature of the classical solution is small, the uncertainty in the quantum metric can be very large. More generally, the quantum fluctuations in the geometry are large unless the number and frequency of photons satisfy the inequality N\\(ħGω\\)2<<1. Results hold also for a sector of the four-dimensional theory (consisting of Einstein-Rosen gravitational waves).

  16. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  17. Energy turnover in European hares is centrally limited during early, but not during peak lactation.

    PubMed

    Valencak, Teresa G; Ruf, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    We investigated metabolizable energy intake (MEI) and milk energy output in European hares throughout gestation and lactation in females raising three young, i.e., close to maximum litter size in this precocial species. We hypothesized that herbivorous hares may face a central limitation of energy turnover during lactation, imposed by maximum capacity of the gastrointestinal tract. Females were provided with low-energy or high-energy diets, either continually, or during lactation only. Unexpectedly, females on either diet reached identical peak MEIs (>6 times BMR) during late lactation, with females on low-energy diet increasing food intake proportionally. Thus, we reject our hypothesis that in lactating hares, peak MEI is centrally limited. During early lactation, MEI and milk transfer was, however, significantly impaired in females on the low-energy diet, indicating a temporal central limitation due to a time-lag caused by the readjustment of energy intake capacity. Importantly, irrespective of the diet, females significantly increased peak MEI late in the breeding season. Consequently, earlier in the season, when energy reserves are still high, energy throughput was not limited by physiological constraints at all. We conclude that extreme MEI may have fitness costs, and that females maximize lifetime reproductive success by actively down-regulating MEI whenever possible.

  18. Theory of cellwise optimization for solar central receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipps, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    Cost effective optimization of the solar central receiver system is primarily concerned with the distribution of heliostats in the collector field, including the boundaries of the field. The cellwise optimization procedure determines the optimum cell usage and heliostat spacing parameters for each cell in the collector field. Spacing parameters determine the heliostat density and neighborhood structure uniformly in each cell. Consequently, the cellwise approach ignores heliostat mismatch at cell boundaries. Ignoring the cell boundary problem permits an easy solution for the optimum in terms of appropriately defined annual average data. Insolation, receiver interception, shading and blocking, cosine effects, and the cost parameters combine to control the optimum. Many trade offs are represented. Outputs include the receiver flux density distribution for design time, coefficients for an actual layout, the optimum boundary and various performance and cost estimates for the optimum field. It is also possible to optimize receiver size and tower height by a repeated application of the field optimization procedure.

  19. Limits to northward drift of the Paleocene Cantwell Formation, central Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hillhouse, J.W.; Gromme, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Paleocene Cantwell Formation in central Alaska apparently originated at a paleolatitude of 83oN (alpha 95 = 9.7o), as indicated by paleomagnetic results. When compared with the Paleocene pole for the North American craton, the 95% confidence limits of the results suggest that terranes N of the Denali fault have moved no more than 550km northward relative to the North American craton since Paleocene time.-Authors

  20. CENTRIPETAL MOVEMENT OF THE CAPILLARIES IN THE CENTRAL MACULAR REGION AFTER INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Hangai, Masanori; Furukawa, Mariko; Suetsugu, Tetsuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2017-01-11

    To report a case that showed centripetal movements of the capillaries in the central macular region after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling. A 57-year-old pseudophakic woman underwent successful vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and air tamponade for a vitreomacular traction. Optical coherence tomography angiographic images of the 3 mm × 3 mm inner retinal vascular plexus were examined preoperatively and at 3 months postoperatively. The changes in 93 corresponding bifurcations of the capillaries were assessed. The majority of the bifurcations were displaced towards the fovea at 3 months after the vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling. Optical coherence tomography angiography was used to help visualize the centripetal movement of the inner retina around the fovea after the vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling.

  1. Possibilities and limitations of rod-beam theories. [nonlinear distortion tensor and nonlinear stress tensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, D.

    1979-01-01

    Rod-beam theories are founded on hypotheses such as Bernouilli's suggesting flat cross-sections under deformation. These assumptions, which make rod-beam theories possible, also limit the accuracy of their analysis. It is shown that from a certain order upward terms of geometrically nonlinear deformations contradict the rod-beam hypotheses. Consistent application of differential geometry calculus also reveals differences from existing rod theories of higher order. These differences are explained by simple examples.

  2. Physical Activity, Central Adiposity, and Functional Limitations in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Germain, Cassandra M; Vasquez, Elizabeth; Batsis, John A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and physical inactivity are independently associated with physical and functional limitations in older adults. The current study examines the impact of physical activity on odds of physical and functional limitations in older adults with central and general obesity. Data from 6279 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years or more from the Health and Retirement Study 2006 and 2008 waves were used to calculate prevalence and odds of physical and functional limitation among obese older adults with high waist circumference (waist circumference ≥88 cm in females and ≥102 cm in males) who were physically active versus inactive (engaging in moderate/vigorous activity less than once per week). Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, body mass index, and number of comorbidities. Physical activity was associated with lower odds of physical and functional limitations among older adults with high waist circumference (odds ratio [OR], 0.59; confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.68, for physical limitations; OR, 0.52; CI, 0.44-0.62, for activities of daily living; and OR, 0.44; CI, 0.39-0.50, for instrumental activities of daily living). Physical activity is associated with significantly lower odds of physical and functional limitations in obese older adults regardless of how obesity is classified. Additional research is needed to determine whether physical activity moderates long-term physical and functional limitations.

  3. Physical Activity, Central Adiposity and Functional Limitations in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; Batsis, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Obesity and physical inactivity are independently associated with declines in physical and functional limitations in older adults. The current study examines the impact of physical activity on odds of physical and functional limitations in older adults with central and general obesity. Methods Data from 6,279 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years from the Health and Retirement Study 2006 and 2008 waves were used to calculate prevalence and odds of physical and functional limitation among obese older adults with high waist circumference (WC) (WC ≥ 88cm in females and ≥ 102cm in males) who were physically active vs. inactive (engaging in moderate/vigorous activity less than once per week). Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking status, body mass index (BMI) and number of comorbidities. Results Physical activity was associated with lower odds of physical and functional limitations among older adults with high WC odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were OR 0.59 (CI: 0.52–0.68) for physical limitations, OR 0.52 (CI: .44–.62) for activities of daily living and OR 0.44 (CI: 0.39–0.50) for instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusion Physical activity is associated with significantly lower odds of physical and functional limitations in obese older adults regardless of how obesity is classified. Additional research is needed to determine whether physical activity moderates long-term physical and functional limitations. PMID:25794309

  4. A Central Capacity Limit to the Simultaneous Storage of Visual and Auditory Arrays in Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Saults, J. Scott; Cowan, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    If working memory is limited by central capacity (e.g., the focus of attention; Cowan, 2001) then storage limits for information in a single modality should also apply to the simultaneous storage of information from different modalities. We investigated this by combining a visual-array comparison task with a novel auditory-array comparison task in five experiments. Participants were to remember only the visual or only the auditory arrays (unimodal memory conditions) or both arrays (bimodal memory conditions). Experiments 1-2 showed significant dual-task tradeoffs for visual but not auditory capacity. In Experiments 3-5, modality-specific memory was eliminated using post-perceptual masks. Dual-task costs occurred for both modalities and the number of auditory and visual items remembered together was no more than the higher of the unimodal capacities (visual, 3-4 items). The findings suggest a central capacity supplemented by modality- or code-specific storage and point to avenues for further research on the role of processing in central storage. PMID:17999578

  5. Second-order resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central-force associating potential: multi-patch colloidal models.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y V; Marshall, B D; Chapman, W G; Cummings, P T

    2013-07-28

    We propose a second-order version of the resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for patchy colloidal models with arbitrary number of multiply bondable patches. The model is represented by the hard-sphere fluid system with several attractive patches on the surface and resummation is carried out to account for blocking effects, i.e., when the bonding of a particle restricts (blocks) its ability to bond with other particles. The theory represents an extension of the earlier proposed first order resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force associating potential and takes into account formation of the rings of the particles. In the limiting case of singly bondable patches (total blockage), the theory reduces to Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory for associating fluids. Closed-form expressions for the Helmholtz free energy, pressure, internal energy, and chemical potential of the model with an arbitrary number of equivalent doubly bondable patches are derived. Predictions of the theory for the model with two patches appears to be in a very good agreement with predictions of new NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, including the region of strong association.

  6. Second-order resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central-force associating potential: Multi-patch colloidal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Y. V.; Marshall, B. D.; Chapman, W. G.; Cummings, P. T.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a second-order version of the resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for patchy colloidal models with arbitrary number of multiply bondable patches. The model is represented by the hard-sphere fluid system with several attractive patches on the surface and resummation is carried out to account for blocking effects, i.e., when the bonding of a particle restricts (blocks) its ability to bond with other particles. The theory represents an extension of the earlier proposed first order resummed thermodynamic perturbation theory for central force associating potential and takes into account formation of the rings of the particles. In the limiting case of singly bondable patches (total blockage), the theory reduces to Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory for associating fluids. Closed-form expressions for the Helmholtz free energy, pressure, internal energy, and chemical potential of the model with an arbitrary number of equivalent doubly bondable patches are derived. Predictions of the theory for the model with two patches appears to be in a very good agreement with predictions of new NVT and NPT Monte Carlo simulations, including the region of strong association.

  7. On discrete field theory properties of the dimer and Ising models and their conformal field theory limits

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, Igor; Loebl, Martin; Somberg, Petr

    2013-05-15

    We study various mathematical aspects of discrete models on graphs, specifically the Dimer and the Ising models. We focus on proving gluing formulas for individual summands of the partition function. We also obtain partial results regarding conjectured limits realized by fermions in rational conformal field theories.

  8. Quantized Brans-Dicke theory: Phase transition, strong coupling limit, and general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sridip

    2016-10-01

    We show that Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry with a flat spatial section in quantized (Wheeler deWitt quantization) Brans-Dicke (BD) theory reveals a rich phase structure owing to anomalous breaking of a classical symmetry, which maps the scale factor a ↦λ a for some constant λ . In the weak coupling (ω ) limit, the theory goes from a symmetry preserving phase to a broken phase. The existence of a phase boundary is an obstruction to another classical symmetry [see V. Faraoni, Phys. Rev. D 59, 084021 (1999).] (which relates two BD theories with different couplings) admitted by BD theory with scale invariant matter content, i.e., Tμμ=0 . Classically, this prohibits the BD theory from reducing to general relativity (GR) for scale invariant matter content. We show that a strong coupling limit of both BD and GR preserves the symmetry involving the scale factor. We also show that with scale invariant matter content (radiation, i.e., P =1/3 ρ ), the quantized BD theory does reduce to GR as ω →∞ , which is in sharp contrast to classical behavior. This is a first known illustration of a scenario where quantized BD theory provides an example of anomalous symmetry breaking and resulting binary phase structure. We make a conjecture regarding the strong coupling limit of the BD theory in a generic scenario.

  9. Slaves, embryos, and nonhuman animals: moral status and the limitations of common morality theory.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ronald A

    2005-12-01

    Common morality theory must confront apparent counterexamples from the history of morality, such as the widespread acceptance of slavery in prior eras, that suggest core norms have changed over time. A recent defense of common morality theory addresses this problem by drawing a distinction between the content of the norms of the common morality and the range of individuals to whom these norms apply. This distinction is successful in reconciling common morality theory with practices such as slavery, but only at the cost of underscoring the limits of common morality theory, in particular its inability to resolve disputes about the moral status of entities. Given that many controversies in bioethics center on the disputed status of various entities, such as embryos and nonhuman animals, this is an important limitation. Nonetheless, common morality theory still can be a useful resource in diminishing moral conflict on issues that do not involve disputes over moral status.

  10. Ambiguity Detection in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome: Is Central Coherence or Theory of Mind Impaired?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Sourn-Bissaoui, Sandrine; Caillies, Stephanie; Gierski, Fabien; Motte, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of central coherence skills and theory of mind competences in ambiguity detection in adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS). We sought to pinpoint the level at which AS individuals experience difficulty detecting semantic ambiguity and identify the factors that account for their problems. We…

  11. Ambiguity Detection in Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome: Is Central Coherence or Theory of Mind Impaired?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Sourn-Bissaoui, Sandrine; Caillies, Stephanie; Gierski, Fabien; Motte, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of central coherence skills and theory of mind competences in ambiguity detection in adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS). We sought to pinpoint the level at which AS individuals experience difficulty detecting semantic ambiguity and identify the factors that account for their problems. We…

  12. Economic analysis of effluent limitation guidelines and standards for the centralized waste treatment industry

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, W.

    1998-12-01

    This report estimates the economic and financial effects and the benefits of compliance with the proposed effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the Centralized Waste Treatment (CWT) industry. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has measured these impacts in terms of changes in the profitability of waste treatment operations at CWT facilities, changes in market prices to CWT services, and changes in the quantities of waste management at CWT facilities in six geographic regions. EPA has also examined the impacts on companies owning CWT facilities (including impacts on small entities), on communities in which CWT facilities are located, and on environmental justice. EPA examined the benefits to society of the CWT effluent limitations guidelines and standards by examining cancer and non-cancer health effects of the regulation, recreational benefits, and cost savings to publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) to which indirect-discharging CWT facilities send their wastewater.

  13. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  14. MOND as the weak field limit of an extended metric theory of gravity with torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos, E.; Mendoza, S.

    2017-08-01

    In this article we construct a relativistic extended metric theory of gravity, for which its weak field limit reduces to the non-relativistic MOdified Newtonian Dynamics regime of gravity. The theory is fully covariant and local. The way to achieve this is by introducing torsion in the description of gravity as well as with the addition of a particular function of the matter Lagrangian into the gravitational action.

  15. Central Urocortin 3 Administration Decreases Limited Access Ethanol Intake in Non-Dependent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Amanda L.; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2010-01-01

    Stress and alcohol abuse are co-related. Acute alcohol is anxiolytic, and stress is cited as a factor in relapse to alcohol use. A primary mediator of the stress response is the neuropeptide corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF family of endogenous ligands includes urocortin 3 (Ucn 3), which binds selectively to the CRF2 receptor and has been implicated in ethanol consumption in dependent and withdrawing rats. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Ucn 3, delivered centrally to non-dependent mice, on limited-access ethanol consumption. Adult C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer 10% ethanol during daily, 2-hr limited access sessions using lickometers to assess drinking patterns for both ethanol and water. Sterile saline or 0.3, 1, or 3 nmol of Ucn 3 was microinjected into the lateral ventricle immediately before the limited-access session in a within-subjects design. There was a significant decrease in ethanol (both ml and g/kg), but not water, intake following Ucn 3 treatment, explained by a change in size of the largest lick run. Food intake at both 2- and 24-hours after injection was statistically unaffected by Ucn 3 administration. These results establish a role for CRF2R in a non-dependent, mouse model of ethanol self-administration. PMID:19581799

  16. Does the central limit theorem always apply to phase noise? Some implications for radar problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, John E.; Addison, Stephen R.

    2017-05-01

    The phase noise problem or Rayleigh problem occurs in all aspects of radar. It is an effect that a radar engineer or physicist always has to take into account as part of a design or in attempt to characterize the physics of a problem such as reverberation. Normally, the mathematical difficulties of phase noise characterization are avoided by assuming the phase noise probability distribution function (PDF) is uniformly distributed, and the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) is invoked to argue that the superposition of relatively few random components obey the CLT and hence the superposition can be treated as a normal distribution. By formalizing the characterization of phase noise (see Gray and Alouani) for an individual random variable, the summation of identically distributed random variables is the product of multiple characteristic functions (CF). The product of the CFs for phase noise has a CF that can be analyzed to understand the limitations CLT when applied to phase noise. We mirror Kolmogorov's original proof as discussed in Papoulis to show the CLT can break down for receivers that gather limited amounts of data as well as the circumstances under which it can fail for certain phase noise distributions. We then discuss the consequences of this for matched filter design as well the implications for some physics problems.

  17. Determination of the conformal-field-theory central charge by the Wang-Landau algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, P. A.; Nazarov, A. A.; Sorokin, A. O.

    2017-06-01

    We present a simple method to estimate the central charge of the conformal field theory corresponding to a critical point of a two-dimensional lattice model from Monte Carlo simulations. The main idea is to use the Wang-Landau flat-histogram algorithm, which allows us to obtain the free energy of a lattice model on a torus as a function of torus radii. The central charge is calculated with good precision from a free-energy scaling at the critical point. We apply the method to the Ising, tricritical Ising (Blume-Capel), Potts, and site-diluted Ising models, and we also discuss an estimation of the conformal weights.

  18. The limits of weak selection and large population size in evolutionary game theory.

    PubMed

    Sample, Christine; Allen, Benjamin

    2017-03-28

    Evolutionary game theory is a mathematical approach to studying how social behaviors evolve. In many recent works, evolutionary competition between strategies is modeled as a stochastic process in a finite population. In this context, two limits are both mathematically convenient and biologically relevant: weak selection and large population size. These limits can be combined in different ways, leading to potentially different results. We consider two orderings: the [Formula: see text] limit, in which weak selection is applied before the large population limit, and the [Formula: see text] limit, in which the order is reversed. Formal mathematical definitions of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] limits are provided. Applying these definitions to the Moran process of evolutionary game theory, we obtain asymptotic expressions for fixation probability and conditions for success in these limits. We find that the asymptotic expressions for fixation probability, and the conditions for a strategy to be favored over a neutral mutation, are different in the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] limits. However, the ordering of limits does not affect the conditions for one strategy to be favored over another.

  19. Life‐history variation of a neotropical thrush challenges food limitation theory

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Valentina; Llambías, Paulo E; Martin, Thomas E

    2005-01-01

    Since David Lack first proposed that birds rear as many young as they can nourish, food limitation has been accepted as the primary explanation for variation in clutch size and other life‐history traits in birds. The importance of food limitation in life-history variation, however, was recently questioned on theoretical grounds. Here, we show that clutch size differences between two populations of a neotropical thrush were contrary to expectations under Lack's food limitation hypothesis. Larger clutch sizes were found in a population with higher nestling starvation rate (i.e. greater food limitation). We experimentally equalized clutches between populations to verify this difference in food limitation. Our experiment confirmed greater food limitation in the population with larger mean clutch size. In addition, incubation bout length and nestling growth rate were also contrary to predictions of food limitation theory. Our results demonstrate the inability of food limitation to explain differences in several life-history traits: clutch size, incubation behaviour, parental feeding rate and nestling growth rate. These life-history traits were better explained by inter‐population differences in nest predation rates. Food limitation may be less important to life history evolution in birds than suggested by traditional theory. PMID:15870039

  20. Life-history variation of a neotropical thrush challenges food limitation theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferretti, V.; Llambias, P.E.; Martin, T.E.

    2005-01-01

    Since David Lack first proposed that birds rear as many young as they can nourish, food limitation has been accepted as the primary explanation for variation in clutch size and other life-history traits in birds. The importance of food limitation in life-history variation, however, was recently questioned on theoretical grounds. Here, we show that clutch size differences between two populations of a neotropical thrush were contrary to expectations under Lack's food limitation hypothesis. Larger clutch sizes were found in a population with higher nestling starvation rate (i.e. greater food limitation). We experimentally equalized clutches between populations to verify this difference in food limitation. Our experiment confirmed greater food limitation in the population with larger mean clutch size. In addition, incubation bout length and nestling growth rate were also contrary to predictions of food limitation theory. Our results demonstrate the inability of food limitation to explain differences in several life-history traits: clutch size, incubation behaviour, parental feeding rate and nestling growth rate. These life-history traits were better explained by inter-population differences in nest predation rates. Food limitation may be less important to life history evolution in birds than suggested by traditional theory. ?? 2005 The Royal Society.

  1. Practical issues in decoy-state quantum key distribution based on the central limit theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushechkin, A. S.; Kiktenko, E. O.; Fedorov, A. K.

    2017-08-01

    Decoy-state quantum key distribution (QKD) is a standard tool for long-distance quantum communications. An important issue in this field is processing the decoy-state statistics taking into account statistical fluctuations (or "finite-key effects"). In this work, we propose and analyze an option for decoy statistics processing, which is based on the central limit theorem. We discuss such practical issues as inclusion of the failure probability of the decoy-state statistical estimates in the total failure probability of a QKD protocol and also taking into account the deviations of the binomially distributed random variables used in the estimations from the Gaussian distribution. The results of numerical simulations show that the obtained estimations are quite tight. The proposed technique can be used as a part of post-processing procedures for industrial quantum key distribution systems.

  2. Upper limits to the magnetic field in central stars of planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Martínez González, M. J.; Manso Sainz, R.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Leone, F.

    2014-06-01

    More than about 20 central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNs) have been observed spectropolarimetrically, yet no clear, unambiguous signal of the presence of a magnetic field in these objects has been found. We perform a statistical (Bayesian) analysis of all the available spectropolarimetric observations of CSPN to constrain the magnetic fields in these objects. Assuming that the stellar field is dipolar and that the dipole axis of the objects is oriented randomly (isotropically), we find that the dipole magnetic field strength is smaller than 400 G with 95% probability using all available observations. The analysis introduced allows integration of future observations to further constrain the parameters of the distribution, and it is general, so that it can be easily applied to other classes of magnetic objects. We propose several ways to improve the upper limits found here.

  3. The Star Forming Main Sequence and its Scatter as Conequences of the Central Limit Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelson, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Star formation rates of disk galaxies strongly correlate with stellar mass, with a small dispersion in specific star formation rate at fixed mass. With such small scattter this main sequence of star formation has been interpreted as deterministic and fundamental. Here it is demonstrated that it is a simple consequence off he central limit theorem. Treating the star formation histories of galaxies as integrable, non-differentiable functions, where stochastic changes in star formation rate in a galaxy's history are not fully independent of each other, we derive the median specific star formation rate for the flat part of the main sequence from 0

  4. A Preferentially Segregated Recycling Vesicle Pool of Limited Size Supports Neurotransmission in Native Central Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Vincenzo; Burden, Jemima J.; Thorpe, Julian R.; Smith, Ikuko T.; Smith, Spencer L.; Häusser, Michael; Branco, Tiago; Staras, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Summary At small central synapses, efficient turnover of vesicles is crucial for stimulus-driven transmission, but how the structure of this recycling pool relates to its functional role remains unclear. Here we characterize the organizational principles of functional vesicles at native hippocampal synapses with nanoscale resolution using fluorescent dye labeling and electron microscopy. We show that the recycling pool broadly scales with the magnitude of the total vesicle pool, but its average size is small (∼45 vesicles), highly variable, and regulated by CDK5/calcineurin activity. Spatial analysis demonstrates that recycling vesicles are preferentially arranged near the active zone and this segregation is abolished by actin stabilization, slowing the rate of activity-driven exocytosis. Our approach reveals a similarly biased recycling pool distribution at synapses in visual cortex activated by sensory stimulation in vivo. We suggest that in small native central synapses, efficient release of a limited pool of vesicles relies on their favored spatial positioning within the terminal. PMID:23141069

  5. Connecting the Dots: Limited English Proficiency, Second Language Learning Theories, and Information Literacy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conteh-Morgan, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of barriers to effective learning when librarians teach students with limited English proficiency focuses on second language acquisition theories and teaching practices derived from them which can significantly impact outcomes of information literacy instruction. Includes a checklist for course preparation and instruction. (Author/LRW)

  6. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  7. Revising an Extension Education Website for Limited Resource Audiences Using Social Marketing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.; Martin, Peggy; Taylor, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Spend Smart Eat Smart (SSES), a unique website combining nutrition and food buying education for limited resource audiences (LRAs), was revised using social marketing theory to make it more appealing and relevant to LRAs (25-40 years). Focus groups and surveys identified the needs and preferences of LRAs. Needs were cooking, basic health, and…

  8. Revising an Extension Education Website for Limited Resource Audiences Using Social Marketing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.; Martin, Peggy; Taylor, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Spend Smart Eat Smart (SSES), a unique website combining nutrition and food buying education for limited resource audiences (LRAs), was revised using social marketing theory to make it more appealing and relevant to LRAs (25-40 years). Focus groups and surveys identified the needs and preferences of LRAs. Needs were cooking, basic health, and…

  9. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. V - Post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. L.; Ni, W.-T.; Caves, C. M.; Will, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    The post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory of gravity is evaluated and is shown to be identical to that of general relativity, except for the post-Newtonian parameter alpha sub 2 (which is related to the difference in propagation speeds for gravitational and electromagnetic waves). Both the value of alpha sub 2 and the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant depend on the present cosmological structure of the Universe. If the cosmological structure has a specific (but presumably special) form, the Newtonian gravitational constant assumes its current value, alpha sub 2 is zero, the post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory is identical to that of general relativity - and standard solar system experiments cannot distinguish between the two theories.

  10. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. 5: Post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. L.; Caves, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    The post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory of gravity is evaluated and is shown to be identical to that of general relativity, except for the PPN parameter alpha sub 2, which is related to the difference in propagation speeds for gravitational and electromagnetic waves. Both the value of alpha sub 2 and the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant depend on the present cosmological structure of the Universe. If the cosmological structure has a specific but presumably special form, the Newtonian gravitational constant assumes its current value, alpha sub 2 is zero, the post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory is identical to that of general relativity--and standard solar system experiments cannot distinguish between the two theories.

  11. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. V - Post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. L.; Ni, W.-T.; Caves, C. M.; Will, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    The post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory of gravity is evaluated and is shown to be identical to that of general relativity, except for the post-Newtonian parameter alpha sub 2 (which is related to the difference in propagation speeds for gravitational and electromagnetic waves). Both the value of alpha sub 2 and the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant depend on the present cosmological structure of the Universe. If the cosmological structure has a specific (but presumably special) form, the Newtonian gravitational constant assumes its current value, alpha sub 2 is zero, the post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory is identical to that of general relativity - and standard solar system experiments cannot distinguish between the two theories.

  12. Experimental and theoretical examples of the value and limitations of transition state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Value and limitations of transition-state theory (TST) are reviewed. TST analyses of the temperature dependence of the 'direct' reactions CH3 + CH3CHO yields CH4 + CH3CO(1) and O + CH4 yields OH + CH3(2) are presented in detail, and other examples of TST usefulness are recalled. Limitations are discussed for bimolecular processes in terms of 'complex' vs. 'direct' mechanisms. The reaction OH + CO yields CO2 + H is discussed in this context. Limitations for unimolecular processes seem to arise only for simple bond fission processes, and recent advances are noted.

  13. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S1↔S2. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-τ. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-τ performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-τ is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-τ method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  14. Dispersal limitation drives successional pathways in Central Siberian forests under current and intensified fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Tautenhahn, Susanne; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Jung, Martin; Kattge, Jens; Bohlman, Stephanie A; Heilmeier, Hermann; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kahl, Anja; Wirth, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Fire is a primary driver of boreal forest dynamics. Intensifying fire regimes due to climate change may cause a shift in boreal forest composition toward reduced dominance of conifers and greater abundance of deciduous hardwoods, with potential biogeochemical and biophysical feedbacks to regional and global climate. This shift has already been observed in some North American boreal forests and has been attributed to changes in site conditions. However, it is unknown if the mechanisms controlling fire-induced changes in deciduous hardwood cover are similar among different boreal forests, which differ in the ecological traits of the dominant tree species. To better understand the consequences of intensifying fire regimes in boreal forests, we studied postfire regeneration in five burns in the Central Siberian dark taiga, a vast but poorly studied boreal region. We combined field measurements, dendrochronological analysis, and seed-source maps derived from high-resolution satellite images to quantify the importance of site conditions (e.g., organic layer depth) vs. seed availability in shaping postfire regeneration. We show that dispersal limitation of evergreen conifers was the main factor determining postfire regeneration composition and density. Site conditions had significant but weaker effects. We used information on postfire regeneration to develop a classification scheme for successional pathways, representing the dominance of deciduous hardwoods vs. evergreen conifers at different successional stages. We estimated the spatial distribution of different successional pathways under alternative fire regime scenarios. Under intensified fire regimes, dispersal limitation of evergreen conifers is predicted to become more severe, primarily due to reduced abundance of surviving seed sources within burned areas. Increased dispersal limitation of evergreen conifers, in turn, is predicted to increase the prevalence of successional pathways dominated by deciduous hardwoods

  15. String Fields as Limit of Functions and Surface Terms in String Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordes, Josè; Lizzi, Fedele

    We consider the String Field Theory proposed by Witten in the discretized approach, where the string is considered as the limit N → ∞ of a collection of N points. In this picture the string functional is the limit of a succession of functions of an increasing number of variables; an object with some resemblances to distributions. Attention is drawn to the fact that the convergence is not of the uniform kind, and that therefore exchanges of limits, sums and integral signs can cause problems, and be ill defined. In this context we discuss some surface terms found by Woodard, which arise in integrations by parts, and argue that they depend crucially on the choice of the successions of function used to define the identity and vertices of the theory.

  16. Food limitation of sea lion pups and the decline of forage off central and southern California

    PubMed Central

    McClatchie, Sam; Field, John; Thompson, Andrew R.; Gerrodette, Tim; Lowry, Mark; Fiedler, Paul C.; Watson, William; Nieto, Karen M.; Vetter, Russell D.

    2016-01-01

    California sea lions increased from approximately 50 000 to 340 000 animals in the last 40 years, and their pups are starving and stranding on beaches in southern California, raising questions about the adequacy of their food supply. We investigated whether the declining sea lion pup weight at San Miguel rookery was associated with changes in abundance and quality of sardine, anchovy, rockfish and market squid forage. In the last decade off central California, where breeding female sea lions from San Miguel rookery feed, sardine and anchovy greatly decreased in biomass, whereas market squid and rockfish abundance increased. Pup weights fell as forage food quality declined associated with changes in the relative abundances of forage species. A model explained 67% of the variance in pup weights using forage from central and southern California and 81% of the variance in pup weights using forage from the female sea lion foraging range. A shift from high to poor quality forage for breeding females results in food limitation of the pups, ultimately flooding animal rescue centres with starving sea lion pups. Our study is unusual in using a long-term, fishery-independent dataset to directly address an important consequence of forage decline on the productivity of a large marine predator. Whether forage declines are environmentally driven, are due to a combination of environmental drivers and fishing removals, or are due to density-dependent interactions between forage and sea lions is uncertain. However, declining forage abundance and quality was coherent over a large area (32.5–38° N) for a decade, suggesting that trends in forage are environmentally driven. PMID:27069651

  17. Food limitation of sea lion pups and the decline of forage off central and southern California.

    PubMed

    McClatchie, Sam; Field, John; Thompson, Andrew R; Gerrodette, Tim; Lowry, Mark; Fiedler, Paul C; Watson, William; Nieto, Karen M; Vetter, Russell D

    2016-03-01

    California sea lions increased from approximately 50 000 to 340 000 animals in the last 40 years, and their pups are starving and stranding on beaches in southern California, raising questions about the adequacy of their food supply. We investigated whether the declining sea lion pup weight at San Miguel rookery was associated with changes in abundance and quality of sardine, anchovy, rockfish and market squid forage. In the last decade off central California, where breeding female sea lions from San Miguel rookery feed, sardine and anchovy greatly decreased in biomass, whereas market squid and rockfish abundance increased. Pup weights fell as forage food quality declined associated with changes in the relative abundances of forage species. A model explained 67% of the variance in pup weights using forage from central and southern California and 81% of the variance in pup weights using forage from the female sea lion foraging range. A shift from high to poor quality forage for breeding females results in food limitation of the pups, ultimately flooding animal rescue centres with starving sea lion pups. Our study is unusual in using a long-term, fishery-independent dataset to directly address an important consequence of forage decline on the productivity of a large marine predator. Whether forage declines are environmentally driven, are due to a combination of environmental drivers and fishing removals, or are due to density-dependent interactions between forage and sea lions is uncertain. However, declining forage abundance and quality was coherent over a large area (32.5-38° N) for a decade, suggesting that trends in forage are environmentally driven.

  18. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Luca Delzanno, Gian

    2014-12-15

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here, we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important application of dust particles in a tokamak plasma.

  19. Theory of mind and central coherence in eating disorders: two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Tapajóz P de Sampaio, Fernanda; Soneira, Sebastian; Aulicino, Alfredo; Martese, Graciela; Iturry, Monica; Allegri, Ricardo Francisco

    2013-12-30

    The aim of this study was to evaluate central coherence and theory of mind (ToM) and explore the relationships between these domains in patients with eating disorders (ED). ToM and central coherence were assessed in 72 women [24 with anorexia nervosa (AN), 24 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 24 healthy controls (HC)]. The Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) and the Faux Pas Test (FPT) to measure ToM, and the copy strategy of the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test to assess central coherence were used. It was observed that patients with ED had a decrease in central coherence skills compared with the control group; that patients with anorexia had a poor performance on RME ToM task compared with BN patients and HCs, and also that these measures were related in both clinical groups. The statistically significant correlation between them suggests that the central coherence and ToM measures might involve common cognitive processes. These results provide a better understanding of the nature of the socio-cognitive deficits observed in patients with eating disorders.

  20. Theory-based scaling of the SOL width in circular limited tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, F. D.; Ricci, P.; Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Arnoux, G.; Gunn, J. P.; Horacek, J.; Kočan, M.; LaBombard, B.; Silva, C.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-12-01

    A theory-based scaling for the characteristic length of a circular, limited tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) is obtained by considering the balance between parallel losses and non-linearly saturated resistive ballooning mode turbulence driving anomalous perpendicular transport. The SOL size increases with plasma size, resistivity, and safety factor q. The scaling is verified against flux-driven non-linear turbulence simulations, which reveal good agreement within a wide range of dimensionless parameters, including parameters closely matching the TCV tokamak. An initial comparison of the theory against experimental data from several tokamaks also yields good agreement.

  1. Setting limits on Effective Field Theories: the case of Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobbe, Federico; Wulzer, Andrea; Zanetti, Marco

    2017-08-01

    The usage of Effective Field Theories (EFT) for LHC new physics searches is receiving increasing attention. It is thus important to clarify all the aspects related with the applicability of the EFT formalism in the LHC environment, where the large available energy can produce reactions that overcome the maximal range of validity, i.e. the cutoff, of the theory. We show that this does not forbid to set rigorous limits on the EFT parameter space through a modified version of the ordinary binned likelihood hypothesis test, which we design and validate. Our limit-setting strategy can be carried on in its full-fledged form by the LHC experimental collaborations, or performed externally to the collaborations, through the Simplified Likelihood approach, by relying on certain approximations. We apply it to the recent CMS mono-jet analysis and derive limits on a Dark Matter (DM) EFT model. DM is selected as a case study because the limited reach on the DM production EFT Wilson coefficient and the structure of the theory suggests that the cutoff might be dangerously low, well within the LHC reach. However our strategy can also be applied, if needed, to EFT's parametrising the indirect effects of heavy new physics in the Electroweak and Higgs sectors.

  2. Limited preparation contextuality in quantum theory and its relation to the Cirel'son bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Manik; Bhattacharya, Some Sankar; Mukherjee, Amit; Roy, Arup; Ambainis, Andris; Rai, Ashutosh

    2015-09-01

    The Kochen-Specker (KS) theorem lies at the heart of the foundations of quantum mechanics. It establishes the impossibility of explaining predictions of quantum theory by any noncontextual ontological model. Spekkens generalized the notion of KS contextuality in [Phys. Rev. A 71, 052108 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.052108] for arbitrary experimental procedures (preparation, measurement, and transformation procedures). Interestingly, later on it was shown that preparation contextuality powers parity-oblivious multiplexing [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 010401 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.010401], a two-party information theoretic game. Thus, using resources of a given operational theory, the maximum success probability achievable in such a game suffices as a bona fide measure of preparation contextuality for the underlying theory. In this work we show that preparation contextuality in quantum theory is more restricted compared to a general operational theory known as box world. Moreover, we find that this limitation of quantum theory implies the quantitative bound on quantum nonlocality as depicted by the Cirel'son bound.

  3. A new VLA/e-MERLIN limit on central images in the gravitational lens system CLASS B1030+074

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Jonathan; Jackson, Neal; Tagore, Amitpal; Biggs, Andrew; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chapman, Scott; De Zotti, Gianfranco; McKean, John; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Scott, Douglas; Serjeant, Stephen

    2016-07-01

    We present the new Very Large Array 22 GHz and extended Multi-Element Remote-Linked Interferometer Network 5 GHz observations of CLASS B1030+074, a two-image strong gravitational lens system whose background source is a compact flat-spectrum radio quasar. In such systems we expect a third image of the background source to form close to the centre of the lensing galaxy. The existence and brightness of such images is important for investigation of the central mass distributions of lensing galaxies, but only one secure detection has been made so far in a galaxy-scale lens system. The noise levels achieved in our new B1030+074 images reach 3 μJy beam-1 and represent an improvement in central image constraints of nearly an order of magnitude over previous work, with correspondingly better resulting limits on the shape of the central mass profile of the lensing galaxy. Simple models with an isothermal outer power-law slope now require either the influence of a central supermassive black hole (SMBH), or an inner power-law slope very close to isothermal, in order to suppress the central image below our detection limit. Using the central mass profiles inferred from light distributions in Virgo galaxies, moved to z = 0.5, and matching to the observed Einstein radius, we now find that 45 per cent of such mass profiles should give observable central images, 10 per cent should give central images with a flux density still below our limit, and the remaining systems have extreme demagnification produced by the central SMBH. Further observations of similar objects will therefore allow proper statistical constraints to be placed on the central properties of elliptical galaxies at high redshift.

  4. [Regional land main-function division of Guangdong Province based on gravity center and central place theory].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiao-Qing; Ye, Da-Qing

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, the regional land main-function division of Guangdong Province was studied, based on the statistical indices of 21 cities in the Province in 2008 and the central place theory, and by the methods of spatial gravity center and fuzzy clustering. In 2008, cities Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Shantou, Foshan, Dongguan, and Chaozhou were the prior developed zones, lying in gravity center region and well exerted their radiating role in developed economy, being the central region for the development of economy in the Province. Cities Heyuan, Shanwei, Jiangmen, Yangjiang, Zhanjiang, Maoming, and Zhaoqing were the restrictively developed zones. These cities had lower centrality index and worse economic base, and thereby, their ecological restoration and protection should be strengthened to make these cities be established into an eco-benefit ensured region. Cities Zhuhai, Shaoguan, Meizhou, Huizhou, Zhongshan, Qingyuan, Jieyang and Yunfu were the key developed zones, which should undertake the transfer of the industries from prior developed zones of Guangdong and limit the transfer of population from restrictively developed zones of the Province, gradually becoming the main supporting region for the economic development and population agglomeration of Guangdong.

  5. Limits to physiological plasticity of the coral Pocillopora verrucosa from the central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Maren; Roder, Cornelia M.; Büchel, Claudia; Voolstra, Christian R.

    2014-12-01

    Many coral species display changing distribution patterns across coral reef depths. While changes in the underwater light field and the ability to associate with different photosynthetic symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium explain some of the variation, the limits to physiological plasticity are unknown for most corals. In the central Red Sea, colonies of the branching coral Pocillopora verrucosa are most abundant in shallow high light environments and become less abundant in water depths below 10 m. To further understand what determines this narrow distribution, we conducted a cross-depths transplant experiment looking at physiological plasticity and acclimation in regard to depth. Colonies from 5, 10, and 20 m were collected, transplanted to all depths, and re-investigated after 30 and 210 d. All coral colonies transplanted downward from shallow to deep water displayed an increase in photosynthetic light-harvesting pigments, which resulted in higher photosynthetic efficiency. Shallow-water specimens transplanted to deeper water showed a significant decrease in total protein content after 30 and 210 d under low light conditions compared to specimens transplanted to shallow and medium depths. Stable isotope data suggest that heterotrophic input of carbon was not increased under low light, and consequently, decreasing protein levels were symptomatic of decreasing photosynthetic rates that could not be compensated for through higher light-harvesting efficiency. Our results provide insights into the physiological plasticity of P. verrucosa in changing light regimes and explain the observed depth distribution pattern. Despite its high abundance in shallow reef waters, P. verrucosa possesses limited heterotrophic acclimation potential, i.e., the ability to support its mainly photoautotrophic diet through heterotrophic feeding. We conclude that P. verrucosa might be a species vulnerable to sudden changes in underwater light fields resulting from processes such as

  6. Can quantum transition state theory be defined as an exact t = 0+ limit?

    PubMed

    Jang, Seogjoo; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-02-28

    The definition of the classical transition state theory (TST) as a t → 0+ limit of the flux-side time correlation function relies on the assumption that simultaneous measurement of population and flux is a well defined physical process. However, the noncommutativity of the two measurements in quantum mechanics makes the extension of such a concept to the quantum regime impossible. For this reason, quantum TST (QTST) has been generally accepted as any kind of quantum rate theory reproducing the TST in the classical limit, and there has been a broad consensus that no unique QTST retaining all the properties of TST can be defined. Contrary to this widely held view, Hele and Althorpe (HA) [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084108 (2013)] recently suggested that a true QTST can be defined as the exact t → 0+ limit of a certain kind of quantum flux-side time correlation function and that it is equivalent to the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) TST. This work seeks to question and clarify certain assumptions underlying these suggestions and their implications. First, the time correlation function used by HA as a starting expression is not related to the kinetic rate constant by virtue of linear response theory, which is the first important step in relating a t = 0+ limit to a physically measurable rate. Second, a theoretical analysis calls into question a key step in HA's proof which appears not to rely on an exact quantum mechanical identity. The correction of this makes the true t = 0+ limit of HA's QTST different from the RPMD-TST rate expression, but rather equal to the well-known path integral quantum transition state theory rate expression for the case of centroid dividing surface. An alternative quantum rate expression is then formulated starting from the linear response theory and by applying a recently developed formalism of real time dynamics of imaginary time path integrals [S. Jang, A. V. Sinitskiy, and G. A. Voth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154103 (2014)]. It is shown

  7. Can quantum transition state theory be defined as an exact t = 0+ limit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-02-01

    The definition of the classical transition state theory (TST) as a t → 0+ limit of the flux-side time correlation function relies on the assumption that simultaneous measurement of population and flux is a well defined physical process. However, the noncommutativity of the two measurements in quantum mechanics makes the extension of such a concept to the quantum regime impossible. For this reason, quantum TST (QTST) has been generally accepted as any kind of quantum rate theory reproducing the TST in the classical limit, and there has been a broad consensus that no unique QTST retaining all the properties of TST can be defined. Contrary to this widely held view, Hele and Althorpe (HA) [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084108 (2013)] recently suggested that a true QTST can be defined as the exact t → 0+ limit of a certain kind of quantum flux-side time correlation function and that it is equivalent to the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) TST. This work seeks to question and clarify certain assumptions underlying these suggestions and their implications. First, the time correlation function used by HA as a starting expression is not related to the kinetic rate constant by virtue of linear response theory, which is the first important step in relating a t = 0+ limit to a physically measurable rate. Second, a theoretical analysis calls into question a key step in HA's proof which appears not to rely on an exact quantum mechanical identity. The correction of this makes the true t = 0+ limit of HA's QTST different from the RPMD-TST rate expression, but rather equal to the well-known path integral quantum transition state theory rate expression for the case of centroid dividing surface. An alternative quantum rate expression is then formulated starting from the linear response theory and by applying a recently developed formalism of real time dynamics of imaginary time path integrals [S. Jang, A. V. Sinitskiy, and G. A. Voth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154103 (2014)]. It is shown

  8. Sanov and central limit theorems for output statistics of quantum Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Horssen, Merlijn van; Guţă, Mădălin

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we consider the statistics of repeated measurements on the output of a quantum Markov chain. We establish a large deviations result analogous to Sanov’s theorem for the multi-site empirical measure associated to finite sequences of consecutive outcomes of a classical stochastic process. Our result relies on the construction of an extended quantum transition operator (which keeps track of previous outcomes) in terms of which we compute moment generating functions, and whose spectral radius is related to the large deviations rate function. As a corollary to this, we obtain a central limit theorem for the empirical measure. Such higher level statistics may be used to uncover critical behaviour such as dynamical phase transitions, which are not captured by lower level statistics such as the sample mean. As a step in this direction, we give an example of a finite system whose level-1 (empirical mean) rate function is independent of a model parameter while the level-2 (empirical measure) rate is not.

  9. A continuum limit of the chiral Jacobian in lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    1999-04-01

    We study the implications of the index theorem and chiral Jacobian in lattice gauge theory, which have been formulated by Hasenfratz, Laliena and Niedermayer and by Lüscher, on the continuum formulation of the chiral Jacobian and anomaly. We take a continuum limit of the lattice Jacobian factor without referring to the perturbative expansion and recover the result of continuum theory by using only the general properties of the lattice Dirac operator. This procedure is based on a set of well-defined rules and thus provides an alternative approach to the conventional analysis of the chiral Jacobian and related anomaly in continuum theory. By using an explicit form of the lattice Dirac operator introduced by Neuberger, which satisfies the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, we illustrate our calculation in some detail. We also briefly comment on the index theorem with a finite cut-off from the present viewpoint.

  10. Kinetic theory of a two-dimensional magnetized plasma. II - Balescu-Lenard limit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vahala, G.

    1972-01-01

    The kinetic theory of a two-dimensional one-species plasma in a uniform dc magnetic field is investigated in the small plasma parameter limit. The plasma consists of charged rods interacting through the logarithmic Coulomb potential. Vahala and Montgomery earlier (1971) derived a Fokker-Planck equation for this system, but it contained a divergent integral, which had to be cut off on physical grounds. This cutoff is compared to the standard cutoff introduced in the two-dimensional unmagnetized Fokker-Planck equation. In the small plasma parameter limit, it is shown that the Balescu-Lenard collision term is zero in the long time average limit if only two-body interactions are considered. The energy transfer from a test particle to an equilibrium plasma is discussed and is also shown to be zero in the long time average limit. This supports the unexpected result of zero Balescu-Lenard collision term.

  11. Upper limit of applicability of the local similarity theory in the stable atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, A. A.; Andreas, E. L.; Fairall, C. W.; Guest, P. S.; Persson, P. O. G.

    2012-04-01

    The applicability of the classical Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (1954) has been limited by constant flux assumption, which is valid in a narrow range z/L < 0.1 in the stable boundary layer (SBL). Nieuwstadt (1984) extended the range of applicability of the original theory using the local scaling (height-dependent) in place of the surface scaling, but the limits of applicability of the local similarity theory in the SBL have been blurred. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to clarify this issue. Based on spectral analysis of wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, it is shown that when both gradient Richardson number, Ri, and flux Richardson number, Rf, exceed a "critical value" about 0.2-0.25, inertial subrange associated with a Kolmogorov cascade dies out and vertical turbulent fluxes become small. Some small-scale turbulence survives even in the supercritical regime but this is non-Kolmogorov turbulence and it decays rapidly with further increasing stability. The similarity theory is based on the turbulent fluxes in the high frequency part of the spectra associated with energy-containing/flux-carrying eddies. Spectral densities in this high-frequency band collapse along with the Kolmogorov energy cascade. Therefore, applicability of the local Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in the SBL is limited by inequalities Ri < Ri_cr and Rf < Rf_cr (however, Rf_cr = 0.2-0.25 is a primary threshold). Application of this prerequisite shows that both the flux-profile and flux-variances relationships follow to the classical Monin-Obukhov local z-less predictions after the irrelevant cases have been filtered out.

  12. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  13. An exact limit of the Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco S.; Leoni, Matias

    2016-08-01

    We study planar Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena (ABJM) theory in a limit where one coupling is negligible compared to the other. We provide a recipe for exactly solving the expectation value of bosonic Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) Wilson loops on arbitrary smooth contours, or the leading divergence for cusped ones, using results from localization. As an application, we compute the exact (generalized) cusp anomalous dimension and Bremsstrahlung function and use it to determine the interpolating h -function. We finally prove a conjecture on the exact form of the dilatation operator in a closed sector, hinting at the integrability of this limit.

  14. Efficiency limits of rectenna solar cells: Theory of broadband photon-assisted tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Saumil; Moddel, Garret

    2013-02-01

    Because rectifiers can convert a wide range of frequencies to dc it was thought that rectenna solar cells-antennas coupled to ultra-high speed diodes-could efficiently harvest the entire solar spectrum and exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit. We show that there are efficiency limits to broadband optical conversion and provide a quantitative analysis using the theory of photon-assisted tunneling. This quantum-based approach differs from classical rectification in lower frequency rectennas. The conversion efficiency approaches 100% for monochromatic illumination. For broadband illumination at terrestrial solar intensities, the diode operating voltage plays the role that bandgap plays in conventional solar cells.

  15. Chiral Lagrangians from lattice gauge theories in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, Taro; Nishigaki, Shinsuke M.

    2001-07-01

    We derive nonlinear {sigma} models (chiral Lagrangians) over symmetric spaces U(n), U(2n)/Sp(2n), and U(2n)/O(2n) from U(N), O(N), and Sp(2N) lattice gauge theories coupled to n flavors of staggered fermions, in the large-N and g{sup 2}N limit. To this end, we employ Zirnbauer{close_quote}s color-flavor transformation. We prove the spatial homogeneity of the vacuum configurations of mesons by explicitly solving the large-N saddle point equations, and thus establish these patterns of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the above limit.

  16. Living With Limited Time: Socioemotional Selectivity Theory in the Context of Health Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan-Singh, Sarah J.; Stanton, Annette L.; Low, Carissa A.

    2016-01-01

    The current research was designed to test the applicability of socioemotional selectivity theory (SST; Carstensen, 2006), a life span theory that posits that perceived time remaining in life (time perspective) is a critical determinant of motivation, to individuals who face foreshortened futures (limited time perspective) due to life-limiting medical illness. In Study 1, we investigated whether life goals and biases in attention and memory for valenced emotional stimuli differed between women living with metastatic breast cancer (n = 113; theoretically living under greater limited time perspective than peers without cancer) and similarly aged women without a cancer diagnosis (n = 50; theoretically living under greater expansive time perspective than peers with cancer) in accordance with SST. As hypothesized, metastatic group goals reflected greater emphasis on limited versus expansive time perspective relative to comparison group goals. Hypotheses regarding biases in attention and memory were not supported. Study 2 followed metastatic group participants over 3 months and revealed that, consistent with hypotheses, whereas limited time perspective goals predicted decreased intrusive thoughts about cancer, expansive time perspective goals predicted decreased perceived cancer-related benefits. Together, these studies suggest that SST is a useful lens through which to view some components of motivation and psychological adjustment among individuals confronting medically foreshortened futures. PMID:25984789

  17. Model-independent limits and constraints on extended theories of gravity from cosmic reconstruction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-12-01

    The onset of dark energy domination depends on the particular gravitational theory driving the cosmic evolution. Model independent techniques are crucial to test the both the present ΛCDM cosmological paradigm and alternative theories, making the least possible number of assumptions about the Universe. In this paper we investigate whether cosmography is able to distinguish between different gravitational theories, by determining bounds on model parameters for three different extensions of General Relativity, namely quintessence, F(𝒯) and f(R) gravitational theories. We expand each class of theories in powers of redshift z around the present time, making no additional assumptions. This procedure is an extension of previous work and can be seen as the most general approach for testing extended theories of gravity through the use of cosmography. In the case of F(𝒯) and f(R) theories, we show that some assumptions on model parameters often made in previous works are superfluous or even unjustified. We use data from the Union 2.1 supernovae catalogue, baryonic acoustic oscillation data and H(z) differential age compilations, which probe cosmology on different scales of the cosmological evolution. We perform a Monte Carlo analysis using a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm with a Gelman-Rubin convergence criterion, reporting 1-σ and 2-σ confidence levels. To do so, we perform two distinct fits, assuming only data within z < 1 first and then without limitations in redshift. We obtain the corresponding numerical intervals in which coefficients span, and find that the data is compatible the ΛCDM limit of all three theories at the 1-σ level, while still compatible with quite a large portion of parameter space. We compare our results to the truncated ΛCDM paradigm, demonstrating that our bounds divert from the expectations of previous works, showing that the permitted regions of coefficients are significantly modified and in general widened with respect to

  18. Derivation of the upper limit of temperature from the field theory of thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, Ferenc; Gambar, Katalin

    2004-11-01

    In the present Rapid Communication we calculate the density matrix of heat conduction based on the field theory of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, which was worked out in the last 10 years. Applying these results we can discuss the existence of the maximal temperature and a possible upper limit for its value. We point out, proposing relevant physical assumptions, that this temperature could be the so-called Planck temperature [J. A. S. Lima and M. Trodden, Phys. Rev. D 53, 4280 (1996)].

  19. Origin of soft limits from nonlinear supersymmetry in Volkov-Akulov theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata; Karlsson, Anna; Murli, Divyanshu

    2017-03-01

    We apply the background field technique, recently developed for a general class of nonlinear symmetries, at tree level, to the Volkov-Akulov theory with spontaneously broken N=1 supersymmetry. We find that the background field expansion in terms of the free fields to the lowest order reproduces the nonlinear supersymmetry transformation rules. The double soft limit of the background field is, in agreement with the new general identities, defined by the algebra of the nonlinear symmetries.

  20. The Choice of Discount Rate Applicable to Government Resource Use: Theory and Limitations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    and later by others in the field of growth theory. See Gale (1967). Alternative objective functions such as the Cesaro mean or 13 criterion cannot be...some. Given P(t) is the payoff in period t, the Cesaro mean is T lir [1/T] 2 P(t), and Abel limit is lim (I - 6) 2;6- P(t) t -0 t-0 14 Before leaving

  1. Central depression in nucleonic densities: Trend analysis in the nuclear density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.; Reinhard, P.-G.

    2017-08-01

    Background: The central depression of nucleonic density, i.e., a reduction of density in the nuclear interior, has been attributed to many factors. For instance, bubble structures in superheavy nuclei are believed to be due to the electrostatic repulsion. In light nuclei, the mechanism behind the density reduction in the interior has been discussed in terms of shell effects associated with occupations of s orbits. Purpose: The main objective of this work is to reveal mechanisms behind the formation of central depression in nucleonic densities in light and heavy nuclei. To this end, we introduce several measures of the internal nucleonic density. Through the statistical analysis, we study the information content of these measures with respect to nuclear matter properties. Method: We apply nuclear density functional theory with Skyrme functionals. Using the statistical tools of linear least square regression, we inspect correlations between various measures of central depression and model parameters, including nuclear matter properties. We study bivariate correlations with selected quantities as well as multiple correlations with groups of parameters. Detailed correlation analysis is carried out for 34Si for which a bubble structure has been reported recently, 48Ca, and N =82 , 126, and 184 isotonic chains. Results: We show that the central depression in medium-mass nuclei is very sensitive to shell effects, whereas for superheavy systems it is firmly driven by the electrostatic repulsion. An appreciable semibubble structure in proton density is predicted for 294Og, which is currently the heaviest nucleus known experimentally. Conclusion: Our correlation analysis reveals that the central density indicators in nuclei below 208Pb carry little information on parameters of nuclear matter; they are predominantly driven by shell structure. On the other hand, in the superheavy nuclei there exists a clear relationship between the central nucleonic density and symmetry energy.

  2. Counterion condensation in short cationic peptides: limiting mobilities beyond the Onsager-Fuoss theory.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Erik; Heyda, Jan; Kubíčková, Anna; Křížek, Tomáš; Coufal, Pavel; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the effect of the background electrolyte (BGE) anions on the electrophoretic mobilities of the cationic amino acids arginine and lysine and the polycationic peptides tetraarginine, tetralysine, nonaarginine, and nonalysine. BGEs composed of sodium chloride, sodium propane-1,3-disulfonate, and sodium sulfate were used. For the amino acids, determination of the limiting mobility by extrapolation, using the Onsager-Fuoss (OF) theory expression, yielded consistent estimates. For the peptides, however, the estimates of the limiting mobilities were found to spuriously depend on the BGE salt. This paradox was resolved using molecular modeling. Simulations, on all-atom as well as coarse-grained levels, show that significant counterion condensation, an effect not accounted for in OF theory, occurs for the tetra- and nonapeptides, even for low BGE concentrations. Including this effect in the quantitative estimation of the BGE effect on mobility removed the discrepancy between the estimated limiting mobilities in different salts. The counterion condensation was found to be mainly due to electrostatic interactions, with specific ion effects playing a secondary role. Therefore, the conclusions are likely to be generalizable to other analytes with a similar density of charged groups and OF theory is expected to fail in a predictable way for such analytes.

  3. Understanding responses to feedback: the potential and limitations of regulatory focus theory.

    PubMed

    Watling, Christopher; Driessen, Erik; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Vanstone, Meredith; Lingard, Lorelei

    2012-06-01

    Regulatory focus theory posits the existence of two systems of self-regulation underlying human motivation: promotion focus, which is concerned with aspirations and accomplishments, and prevention focus, which is concerned with obligations and responsibilities. It has been proposed that regulatory focus theory may help to explain learners' variable responses to feedback, predicting that positive feedback is motivating under promotion focus, whereas negative feedback is motivating under prevention focus. We aimed to explore this link between regulatory focus theory and response to feedback using data collected in a naturalistic setting. In a constructivist grounded theory study, we interviewed 22 early-career academic doctors about experiences they perceived as influential in their learning. Although feedback emerged as important, responses to feedback were highly variable. To better understand how feedback becomes (or fails to become) influential, we used the theoretical framework of regulatory focus to re-examine all descriptions of experiences of receiving and responding to feedback. Feedback could be influential or non-influential, regardless of its sign (positive or negative). In circumstances in which the individual's regulatory focus was readily determined, such as in choosing a career (promotion) or preparing for a high-stakes examination (prevention), the apparent influence of feedback was consistent with the prediction of regulatory focus theory. However, we encountered many challenges in applying regulatory focus theory to real feedback scenarios, including the frequent presence of a mixed regulatory focus, the potential for regulatory focus to change over time, and the competing influences of other factors, such as the perceived credibility of the source or content of the feedback. Regulatory focus theory offers a useful, if limited, construct for exploring learners' responses to feedback in the clinical setting. The insights and predictions it offers

  4. Central nervous system granulomastous phlebitis with limited extracranial involvement of the heart and lungs: An autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Jernej; Zorman, Jerneja Videčnik; Matičič, Mojca; Vrabec, Matej; Alibegović, Armin; Popović, Mara

    2016-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system is a rare condition, usually with an insidious onset. There is a wide variety of histological types (granulomatous, lymphocytic or necrotizing vasculitis) and types of vessel involved (arteries, veins or both). Most cases are idiopathic. We describe a first case of idiopathic granulomatous central nervous system phlebitis with additional limited involvement of the heart and lung, exclusively affecting small and medium sized veins in a 22-year-old woman, presenting as a sub acute headache. The reasons for this peculiar limitation of inflammation to the veins and the involvement of the heart and lungs are unknown.

  5. Taylor's power law and fluctuation scaling explained by a central-limit-like convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Jørgensen, Bent

    2011-06-01

    A power function relationship observed between the variance and the mean of many types of biological and physical systems has generated much debate as to its origins. This Taylor's law (or fluctuation scaling) has been recently hypothesized to result from the second law of thermodynamics and the behavior of the density of states. This hypothesis is predicated on physical quantities like free energy and an external field; the correspondence of these quantities with biological systems, though, remains unproven. Questions can be posed as to the applicability of this hypothesis to the diversity of observed phenomena as well as the range of spatial and temporal scales observed with Taylor's law. We note that the cumulant generating functions derived from this thermodynamic model correspond to those derived over a quarter century earlier for a class of probabilistic models known as the Tweedie exponential dispersion models. These latter models are characterized by variance-to-mean power functions; their phenomenological basis rests with a central-limit-theorem-like property that causes many statistical systems to converge mathematically toward a Tweedie form. We review evaluations of the Tweedie Poisson-gamma model for Taylor's law and provide three further cases to test: the clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the horse chromosome 1, the clustering of genes within human chromosome 8, and the Mertens function. This latter case is a number theoretic function for which a thermodynamic model cannot explain Taylor's law, but where Tweedie convergence remains applicable. The Tweedie models are applicable to diverse biological, physical, and mathematical phenomena that express power variance functions over a wide range of measurement scales; they provide a probabilistic description for Taylor's law that allows mechanistic insight into complex systems without the assumption of a thermodynamic mechanism.

  6. Taylor's power law and fluctuation scaling explained by a central-limit-like convergence.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Wayne S; Jørgensen, Bent

    2011-06-01

    A power function relationship observed between the variance and the mean of many types of biological and physical systems has generated much debate as to its origins. This Taylor's law (or fluctuation scaling) has been recently hypothesized to result from the second law of thermodynamics and the behavior of the density of states. This hypothesis is predicated on physical quantities like free energy and an external field; the correspondence of these quantities with biological systems, though, remains unproven. Questions can be posed as to the applicability of this hypothesis to the diversity of observed phenomena as well as the range of spatial and temporal scales observed with Taylor's law. We note that the cumulant generating functions derived from this thermodynamic model correspond to those derived over a quarter century earlier for a class of probabilistic models known as the Tweedie exponential dispersion models. These latter models are characterized by variance-to-mean power functions; their phenomenological basis rests with a central-limit-theorem-like property that causes many statistical systems to converge mathematically toward a Tweedie form. We review evaluations of the Tweedie Poisson-gamma model for Taylor's law and provide three further cases to test: the clustering of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the horse chromosome 1, the clustering of genes within human chromosome 8, and the Mertens function. This latter case is a number theoretic function for which a thermodynamic model cannot explain Taylor's law, but where Tweedie convergence remains applicable. The Tweedie models are applicable to diverse biological, physical, and mathematical phenomena that express power variance functions over a wide range of measurement scales; they provide a probabilistic description for Taylor's law that allows mechanistic insight into complex systems without the assumption of a thermodynamic mechanism.

  7. Paternalism in nursing and healthcare: central issues and their relation to theory.

    PubMed

    Cody, William K

    2003-10-01

    Paternalistic practices, wherein providers confer a treatment or service upon a person or persons without their consent, ostensibly by reason of their limited autonomy or diminished capacity, are widespread in healthcare and in societies around the world. In the United States, paternalism in health and human services is widespread and probably increasing with newly emergent forms. Numerous issues surround paternalistic practices. In this column, the author examines these issues in relation to theory development in healthcare and nursing as well as theory as a guide to practice. It is suggested that scientific and ethical knowing are not separate but must be united in theoretical structures that include both in unity, along with an appreciation of the infinite complexity of life as it is humanly lived. It is also suggested that nursing's unique theory base of frameworks that honor human dignity and focus on human experience offers an opportunity for leadership in further developing theoretical frameworks that transcend paternalistic practices.

  8. Evaluation of Forming Limit by the 3 Dimensional Local Bifurcation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Ryuichi; Nakazawa, Yoshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Uemura, Gen; Mori, Naomichi

    2007-05-17

    A theoretical prediction and evaluation method for the sheet metal formability is developed on the basis of the three-dimensional local bifurcation theory previously proposed by authors. The forming limit diagram represented on the plane defined by the ratio of stress component to work-hardening rate is perfectly independent of plastic strain history. The upper and the lower limit of the sheet formability are indicated by the 3D critical line and the Stoeren-Rice's critical line on this plane, respectively. In order to verify the above mentioned behavior of the proposed forming limit diagram, the experimental research is also conducted. From the standpoint of the mechanical instability theory, a new concept called instability factor is introduced. It represents a degree of acceleration by current stress for developing the local bifurcation mode toward a fracture. The instability factor provides a method to evaluate a forming allowance which is useful to appropriate identification for a forming limit and to optimize the forming condition. The proposed criterion provides not only the moment to initiate the necking but also the local bifurcation mode vector and the direction of necking line.

  9. Electronic Zero-Point Oscillations in the Strong-Interaction Limit of Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Gori-Giorgi, Paola; Vignale, Giovanni; Seidl, Michael

    2009-04-14

    The exchange-correlation energy in Kohn-Sham density functional theory can be expressed exactly in terms of the change in the expectation of the electron-electron repulsion operator when, in the many-electron Hamiltonian, this same operator is multiplied by a real parameter λ varying between 0 (Kohn-Sham system) and 1 (physical system). In this process, usually called adiabatic connection, the one-electron density is kept fixed by a suitable local one-body potential. The strong-interaction limit of density functional theory, defined as the limit λ→∞, turns out to be like the opposite noninteracting Kohn-Sham limit (λ→0) mathematically simpler than the physical (λ = 1) case and can be used to build an approximate interpolation formula between λ→0 and λ→∞ for the exchange-correlation energy. Here we extend the systematic treatment of the λ→∞ limit [Phys. Rev. A 2007, 75, 042511] to the next leading term, describing zero-point oscillations of strictly correlated electrons, with numerical examples for small spherical atoms. We also propose an improved approximate functional for the zero-point term and a revised interpolation formula for the exchange-correlation energy satisfying more exact constraints.

  10. Toward a limited realism for psychiatric nosology based on the coherence theory of truth.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S

    2015-04-01

    A fundamental debate in the philosophy of science is whether our central concepts are true or only useful instruments to help predict and manipulate the world. The first position is termed 'realism' and the second 'instrumentalism'. Strong support for the instrumentalist position comes from the 'pessimistic induction' (PI) argument. Given that many key scientific concepts once considered true (e.g., humors, ether, epicycles, phlogiston) are now considered false, how, the argument goes, can we assert that our current concepts are true? The PI argument applies strongly to psychiatric diagnoses. Given our long history of abandoned diagnoses, arguments that we have finally 'gotten it right' and developed definitive psychiatric categories that correspond to observer-independent reality are difficult to defend. For our current diagnostic categories, we should settle for a less ambitious vision of truth. For this, the coherence theory, which postulates that something is true when it fits well with the other things we confidently know about the world, can serve us well. Using the coherence theory, a diagnosis is real to the extent that it is well integrated into our accumulating scientific data base. Furthermore, the coherence theory establishes a framework for us to evaluate our diagnostic categories and can provide a set of criteria, closely related to our concept of validators, for deciding when they are getting better. Finally, we need be much less skeptical about the truth status of the aggregate concept of psychiatric illness than we are regarding the specific categories in our current nosology.

  11. On the Continuous Limit of Integrable Lattices II. Volterra Systems and SP(N) Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosi, Carlo; Pizzocchero, Livio

    A connection is suggested between the zero-spacing limit of a generalized N-fields Volterra (VN) lattice and the KdV-type theory which is associated, in the Drinfeld-Sokolov classification, to the simple Lie algebra sp(N). As a preliminary step, the results of the previous paper [1] are suitably reformulated and identified as the realization for N=1 of the general scheme proposed here. Subsequently, the case N=2 is analyzed in full detail; the infinitely many commuting vector fields of the V2 system (with their Hamiltonian structure and Lax formulation) are shown to give in the continuous limit the homologous sp(2) KdV objects, through conveniently specified operations of field rescaling and recombination. Finally, the case of arbitrary N is attacked, showing how to obtain the sp(N) Lax operator from the continuous limit of the VN system.

  12. Chandrasekhar limit: an elementary approach based on classical physics and quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinochet, Jorge; Van Sint Jan, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In a brief article published in 1931, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar made public an important astronomical discovery. In his article, the then young Indian astrophysicist introduced what is now known as the Chandrasekhar limit. This limit establishes the maximum mass of a stellar remnant beyond which the repulsion force between electrons due to the exclusion principle can no longer stop the gravitational collapse. In the present article, we create an elemental approximation to the Chandrasekhar limit, accessible to non-graduate science and engineering students. The article focuses especially on clarifying the origins of Chandrasekhar’s discovery and the underlying physical concepts. Throughout the article, only basic algebra is used as well as some general notions of classical physics and quantum theory.

  13. Chaos, scaling and existence of a continuum limit in classical non-Abelian lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, H.B.; Rugh, H.H.; Rugh, S.E.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss space-time chaos and scaling properties for classical non-Abelian gauge fields discretized on a spatial lattice. We emphasize that there is a {open_quote}no go{close_quotes} for simulating the original continuum classical gauge fields over a long time span since there is a never ending dynamical cascading towards the ultraviolet. We note that the temporal chaotic properties of the original continuum gauge fields and the lattice gauge system have entirely different scaling properties thereby emphasizing that they are entirely different dynamical systems which have only very little in common. Considered as a statistical system in its own right the lattice gauge system in a situation where it has reached equilibrium comes closest to what could be termed a {open_quotes}continuum limit{close_quotes} in the limit of very small energies (weak non-linearities). We discuss the lattice system both in the limit for small energies and in the limit of high energies where we show that there is a saturation of the temporal chaos as a pure lattice artifact. Our discussion focuses not only on the temporal correlations but to a large extent also on the spatial correlations in the lattice system. We argue that various conclusions of physics have been based on monitoring the non-Abelian lattice system in regimes where the fields are correlated over few lattice units only. This is further evidenced by comparison with results for Abelian lattice gauge theory. How the real time simulations of the classical lattice gauge theory may reach contact with the real time evolution of (semi-classical aspects of) the quantum gauge theory (e.g. Q.C.D.) is left an important question to be further examined.

  14. Nonthermal fixed points in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jürgen; Wallisch, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    Quantum systems in extreme conditions can exhibit universal behavior far from equilibrium associated to nonthermal fixed points with a wide range of topical applications from early-Universe inflaton dynamics and heavy-ion collisions to strong quenches in ultracold quantum gases. So far, most studies have relied on a mapping of the quantum dynamics onto a classical-statistical theory that can be simulated on a computer. However, the mapping is based on a weak-coupling limit, while phenomenological applications often require moderate interaction strengths. We report on the observation of nonthermal fixed points directly in quantum field theory beyond the weak-coupling limit. For the example of a relativistic scalar O (N )-symmetric quantum field theory, we numerically solve the nonequilibrium dynamics employing a 1 /N expansion to next-to-leading order, which does not rely on a small coupling parameter. Starting from two different sets of overoccupied and of strong-field initial conditions, we find that nonthermal fixed points are not restricted to parameter ranges suitable for classical-statistical simulations but extend also to couplings of order 1. While the infrared behavior is found to be insensitive to the differences in the initial conditions, we demonstrate that transport phenomena to higher momenta depend on the presence or absence of a symmetry-breaking field expectation value.

  15. The many-nucleon theory of nuclear collective structure and its macroscopic limits: an algebraic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. J.; McCoy, A. E.; Caprio, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nuclear collective models introduced by Bohr, Mottelson and Rainwater, together with the Mayer-Jensen shell model, have provided the central framework for the development of nuclear physics. This paper reviews the microscopic evolution of the collective models and their underlying foundations. In particular, it is shown that the Bohr-Mottelson models have expressions as macroscopic limits of microscopic models that have precisely defined expressions in many-nucleon quantum mechanics. Understanding collective models in this way is especially useful because it enables the analysis of nuclear properties in terms of them to be revisited and reassessed in the light of their microscopic foundations.

  16. Identification of Misconceptions in the Central Limit Theorem and Related Concepts and Evaluation of Computer Media as a Remedial Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; And Others

    Central limit theorem (CLT) is considered an important topic in statistics, because it serves as the basis for subsequent learning in other crucial concepts such as hypothesis testing and power analysis. There is an increasing popularity in using dynamic computer software for illustrating CLT. Graphical displays do not necessarily clear up…

  17. Brain, mind and limitations of a scientific theory of human consciousness.

    PubMed

    Gierer, Alfred

    2008-05-01

    In biological terms, human consciousness appears as a feature associated with the functioning of the human brain. The corresponding activities of the neural network occur strictly in accord with physical laws; however, this fact does not necessarily imply that there can be a comprehensive scientific theory of consciousness, despite all the progress in neurobiology, neuropsychology and neurocomputation. Predictions of the extent to which such a theory may become possible vary widely in the scientific community. There are basic reasons-not only practical but also epistemological-why the brain-mind relation may never be fully "decodable" by general finite procedures. In particular self-referential features of consciousness, such as self-representations involved in strategic thought and dispositions, may not be resolvable in all their essential aspects by brain analysis. Assuming that such limitations exist, objective analysis by the methods of natural science cannot, in principle, fully encompass subjective, mental experience. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Ionic limiting molar conductivity calculation of Li-ion battery electrolyte based on mode coupling theory.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangming; Pu, Weihua; Han, Jingli; Chen, Jian; Lu, Jiufang; Jiang, Changyin; Wan, Chunrong

    2005-12-15

    A method is proposed based on mode coupling theory in which the ion transference number is introduced into the theory. The ionic limiting molar conductivities of LiPF6, LiClO4, LiBF4, LiCF3SO3, Li(CF3SO3)2N, LiC4F9SO3, and LiAsF6 in PC(propylene carbonate), GBL(gamma-butyrolactone), PC(propylene carbonate)/EMC(ethylmethyl carbonate), and PC(propylene carbonate)/DME(dimethoxyethane) are calculated based on this method, which does not involve any adjustable parameter. The results fit well to the literature data which are calculated by an empirically adjusted formula. This presents a potential way to calculate the conductivities of Li-ion battery electrolytes.

  19. Theory of cylindrical and spherical Langmuir probes in the limit of vanishing Debye number

    SciTech Connect

    Parrot, M.J.M.; Storey, L.R.O.; Parker, L.W.; Laframboise, J.G.

    1982-12-01

    A theory has been developed for cylindrical and spherical probes and other collectors in collisionless plasmas, in the limit where the ratio of Debye length to probe radius (the Debye number lambda/sub D/) vanishes. Results are presented for the case of equal electron and ion temperatures. On the scale of the probe radius, the distributions of potential and density in the presheath appear to have infinite slope at the probe surface. The dimensionless current--voltage characteristic is the same for the cylinder as for the sphere, within the limits of error of the numerical results, although no physical reason for this is evident. As the magnitude of probe potential (relative to space) increases, the current does not saturate abruptly but only asymptotically; its limiting value is about 45% larger than at space potential. Probe currents for small nonzero lambda/sub D/ approach those for zero lambda/sub D/ only very slowly, showing power-law behavior as function of lambda/sub D/ in the limit as lambda/sub D/ ..-->.. 0, with power-law exponents less than unity, resulting in infinite limiting derivatives with respect to lambda/sub D/.

  20. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory

    Treesearch

    Kimberly A. Novick; Chelcy F. Miniat; James M. Vose

    2016-01-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion–tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a ‘demand limitation’ driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) ‘hydraulic limitation’ of water movement from the roots to the leaves...

  1. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. IV - A compendium of metric theories of gravity and their post-Newtonian limits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1972-01-01

    Metric theories of gravity are compiled and classified according to the types of gravitational fields they contain, and the modes of interaction among those fields. The gravitation theories considered are classified as (1) general relativity, (2) scalar-tensor theories, (3) conformally flat theories, and (4) stratified theories with conformally flat space slices. The post-Newtonian limit of each theory is constructed and its Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) values are obtained by comparing it with Will's version of the formalism. Results obtained here, when combined with experimental data and with recent work by Nordtvedt and Will and by Ni, show that, of all theories thus far examined by our group, the only currently viable ones are general relativity, the Bergmann-Wagoner scalar-tensor theory and its special cases (Nordtvedt; Brans-Dicke-Jordan), and a recent, new vector-tensor theory by Nordtvedt, Hellings, and Will.

  2. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. IV - A compendium of metric theories of gravity and their post-Newtonian limits.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.-T.

    1972-01-01

    Metric theories of gravity are compiled and classified according to the types of gravitational fields they contain, and the modes of interaction among those fields. The gravitation theories considered are classified as (1) general relativity, (2) scalar-tensor theories, (3) conformally flat theories, and (4) stratified theories with conformally flat space slices. The post-Newtonian limit of each theory is constructed and its Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) values are obtained by comparing it with Will's version of the formalism. Results obtained here, when combined with experimental data and with recent work by Nordtvedt and Will and by Ni, show that, of all theories thus far examined by our group, the only currently viable ones are general relativity, the Bergmann-Wagoner scalar-tensor theory and its special cases (Nordtvedt; Brans-Dicke-Jordan), and a recent, new vector-tensor theory by Nordtvedt, Hellings, and Will.

  3. Mapping children's politics: the promise of articulation and the limits of nonrepresentational theory.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katharyne; Elwood, Sarah

    Reflecting wider debates in the discipline, recent scholarship in children's geographies has focused attention on the meanings of the political. While supportive of work that opens up new avenues for conceptualizing politics beyond the liberal rational subject, we provide a critique of research methods which delink politics from historical context and relations of power. Focusing on the use of nonrepresentational theory as a research methodology, the paper points to the limits of this approach for children's political formation as well as for sustained scholarly collaboration. We argue instead for a politics of articulation, in the double sense of communication and connection. An empirical case study is used as an illustrative example.

  4. Unique laminar-flow stability limit based shallow-water theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1993-01-01

    Two approaches are generally taken in deriving the stability limit for the Froude member (Fs) for laminar sheet flow. The first approach used the Orr-Sommerfeld equation, while the second uses the cross-section-averaged equations of continuity and motion. Because both approaches are based on shallow-water theory, the values of Fs obtained from both approaches should be identical, yet in the literature they are not. This suggests that a defect exists in at least one of the two approaches. After examining the governing equations used in both approaches, one finds that the existing cross-section -averaged equation of motion is dependent on the frame of reference.

  5. Semiclassical Theory of Inelastic Scattering of a Particle in the Near-Adiabatic Limit.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-06

    Theory of Inelastic Scattering of a Particle in the Near-Adiabatic Limit Lit-Deh Chang and Walter Koln Department of Physic. Univesity , of California... parallel to the x-axis at a distance which we denote by wi. The procedure of Ref.(4) for obtaining R is as follows. Starting with the right-going wave (4...that this restriction is not necesary. The general features of L, and L2 are: 1. LI extends to infinity and becomes parallel to the real axis at a

  6. A model for habitat selection and species distribution derived from central place foraging theory.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Ola; Bolin, Arvid

    2014-06-01

    We have developed a habitat selection model based on central place foraging theory. An individual's decision to include a patch in its habitat depends on the marginal fitness contribution of that patch, which is characterized by its quality and distance to the central place. The essence of the model we have developed is a fitness isocline which is a function of patch quality and travel time to the patch. It has two parameters: the maximum travel distance to a patch of infinite quality and a coefficient that appropriately scales quality by travel time. Patches falling below the isocline will have positive marginal fitness values and should be included in the habitat. The maximum travel distance depends on the availability and quality of patches, as well as on the forager's life history, whereas the scaling parameter mostly depends on life history properties. Using the model, we derived a landscape quality metric (which can be thought of as a connectivity measure) that sums the values of available habitat in the landscape around a central place. We then fitted the two parameters to foraging data on breeding white storks (Ciconia ciconia) and estimated landscape quality, which correlated strongly with reproductive success. Landscape quality was then calculated for a larger region where re-introduction of the species is currently going on in order to demonstrate how this model can also be regarded as a species distribution model. In conclusion, we have built a general habitat selection model for central place foragers and a novel way of estimating landscape quality based on a behaviorally scaled connectivity metric.

  7. Hardwood regeneration twenty years after three distinct diameter-limit cuts in upland central hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Randall B. Heiligmann; Jeffery S. Ward

    1993-01-01

    The effects of diameter-limit cutting on the future species composition and development of 60-80 year-old upland oak stands were studied in southern Ohio. Four treatments, 11-inch diameter-limit cut, 14-inch diameter-limit cut with selective thinning, 14-inch diameter-limit cut with low thinning, and uncut control were evaluated on medium oak sites (black oak site...

  8. Ecological optimality in water-limited natural soil-vegetation systems. I - Theory and hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleson, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    The solution space of an approximate statistical-dynamic model of the average annual water balance is explored with respect to the hydrologic parameters of both soil and vegetation. Within the accuracy of this model it is shown that water-limited natural vegetation systems are in stable equilibrium with their climatic and pedologic environments when the canopy density and species act to minimize average water demand stress. Theory shows a climatic limit to this equilibrium above which it is hypothesized that ecological pressure is toward maximization of biomass productivity. It is further hypothesized that natural soil-vegetation systems will develop gradually and synergistically, through vegetation-induced changes in soil structure, toward a set of hydraulic soil properties for which the minimum stress canopy density of a given species is maximum in a given climate. Using these hypotheses, only the soil effective porosity need be known to determine the optimum soil and vegetation parameters in a given climate.

  9. Aurora B suppresses microtubule dynamics and limits central spindle size by locally activating KIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Gandhi, Sapan R.; Baron, Ryan D.; Gruneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    Anaphase central spindle formation is controlled by the microtubule-stabilizing factor PRC1 and the kinesin KIF4A. We show that an MKlp2-dependent pool of Aurora B at the central spindle, rather than global Aurora B activity, regulates KIF4A accumulation at the central spindle. KIF4A phosphorylation by Aurora B stimulates the maximal microtubule-dependent ATPase activity of KIF4A and promotes its interaction with PRC1. In the presence of phosphorylated KIF4A, microtubules grew more slowly and showed long pauses in growth, resulting in the generation of shorter PRC1-stabilized microtubule overlaps in vitro. Cells expressing only mutant forms of KIF4A lacking the Aurora B phosphorylation site overextended the anaphase central spindle, demonstrating that this regulation is crucial for microtubule length control in vivo. Aurora B therefore ensures that suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by KIF4A is restricted to a specific subset of microtubules and thereby contributes to central spindle size control in anaphase. PMID:23940115

  10. Forecasting sales of new vehicle with limited data using Bass diffusion model and Grey theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Noratikah; Ismail, Zuhaimy

    2015-02-01

    New product forecasting is a process that determines a reasonable estimate of sales attainable under a given set of conditions. There are several new products forecasting method in practices and Bass Diffusion Model (BDM) is one of the most common new product diffusion model used in many industries to forecast new product and technology. Hence, this paper proposed a combining BDM with Grey theory to forecast sales of new vehicle in Malaysia that certainly have limited data to build a model on. The aims of this paper is to examine the accuracy of different new product forecasting models and thus identify which is the best among the basic BDM and combining BDM with Grey theory. The results show that combining BDM with Grey theory performs better than the basic BDM based on in-sample and out-sample mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). Results also reveals combining model forecast more effectively and accurately even with insufficient previous data on the new vehicle in Malaysia.

  11. Comparison of dust charging between orbital-motion-limited theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-11-15

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [X. Z. Tang and G. L. Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper, the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with particle-in-cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius r{sub d} relative to the plasma Debye length λ{sub D}, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered (r{sub d}/λ{sub D} ≤ 10, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within 20% accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within 15%–30%.

  12. Dynamical mean-field theory of strongly correlated fermion systems and the limit of infinite dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Georges, A.; Kotliar, G.; Krauth, W.; Rozenberg, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    We review the dynamical mean-field theory of strongly correlated electron systems which is based on a mapping of lattice models onto quantum impurity models subject to a self-consistency condition. This mapping is exact for models of correlated electrons in the limit of large lattice coordination (or infinite spatial dimensions). It extends the standard mean-field construction from classical statistical mechanics to quantum problems. We discuss the physical ideas underlying this theory and its mathematical derivation. Various analytic and numerical techniques that have been developed recently in order to analyze and solve the dynamical mean-field equations are reviewed and compared to each other. The method can be used for the determination of phase diagrams (by comparing the stability of various types of long-range order), and the calculation of thermodynamic properties, one-particle Green{close_quote}s functions, and response functions. We review in detail the recent progress in understanding the Hubbard model and the Mott metal-insulator transition within this approach, including some comparison to experiments on three-dimensional transition-metal oxides. We present an overview of the rapidly developing field of applications of this method to other systems. The present limitations of the approach, and possible extensions of the formalism are finally discussed. Computer programs for the numerical implementation of this method are also provided with this article. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Bloch Waves in Minimal Landau Gauge and the Infinite-Volume Limit of Lattice Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchieri, Attilio; Mendes, Tereza

    2017-05-01

    By exploiting the similarity between Bloch's theorem for electrons in crystalline solids and the problem of Landau gauge fixing in Yang-Mills theory on a "replicated" lattice, we show that large-volume results can be reproduced by simulations performed on much smaller lattices. This approach, proposed by Zwanziger [Nucl. Phys. B412, 657 (1994), 10.1016/0550-3213(94)90396-4], corresponds to taking the infinite-volume limit for Landau-gauge field configurations in two steps: first for the gauge transformation alone, while keeping the lattice volume finite, and second for the gauge-field configuration itself. The solutions to the gauge-fixing condition are then given in terms of Bloch waves. Applying the method to data from Monte Carlo simulations of pure SU(2) gauge theory in two and three space-time dimensions, we are able to evaluate the Landau-gauge gluon propagator for lattices of linear extent up to 16 times larger than that of the simulated lattice. This approach is reminiscent of the Fisher-Ruelle construction of the thermodynamic limit in classical statistical mechanics.

  14. Habitat-mediated population limitation in a colonial central-place forager: the sky is not the limit for the black-browed albatross.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Ewan D; Phillips, Richard A; Matthiopoulos, Jason

    2014-03-07

    Animal populations are frequently limited by the availability of food or of habitat. In central-place foragers, the cost of accessing these resources is distance-dependent rather than uniform in space. However, in seabirds, a widely studied exemplar of this paradigm, empirical population models have hitherto ignored this cost. In part, this is because non-independence among colonies makes it difficult to define population units. Here, we model the effects of both resource availability and accessibility on populations of a wide-ranging, pelagic seabird, the black-browed albatross Thalassarche melanophris. Adopting a multi-scale approach, we define regional populations objectively as spatial clusters of colonies. We consider two readily quantifiable proxies of resource availability: the extent of neritic waters (the preferred foraging habitat) and net primary production (NPP). We show that the size of regional albatross populations has a strong dependence, after weighting for accessibility, on habitat availability and to a lesser extent, NPP. Our results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that seabird populations are regulated from the bottom-up by food availability during the breeding season, and also suggest that the spatio-temporal predictability of food may be limiting. Moreover, we demonstrate a straightforward, widely applicable method for estimating resource limitation in populations of central-place foragers.

  15. Habitat-mediated population limitation in a colonial central-place forager: the sky is not the limit for the black-browed albatross

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Ewan D.; Phillips, Richard A.; Matthiopoulos, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Animal populations are frequently limited by the availability of food or of habitat. In central-place foragers, the cost of accessing these resources is distance-dependent rather than uniform in space. However, in seabirds, a widely studied exemplar of this paradigm, empirical population models have hitherto ignored this cost. In part, this is because non-independence among colonies makes it difficult to define population units. Here, we model the effects of both resource availability and accessibility on populations of a wide-ranging, pelagic seabird, the black-browed albatross Thalassarche melanophris. Adopting a multi-scale approach, we define regional populations objectively as spatial clusters of colonies. We consider two readily quantifiable proxies of resource availability: the extent of neritic waters (the preferred foraging habitat) and net primary production (NPP). We show that the size of regional albatross populations has a strong dependence, after weighting for accessibility, on habitat availability and to a lesser extent, NPP. Our results provide indirect support for the hypothesis that seabird populations are regulated from the bottom-up by food availability during the breeding season, and also suggest that the spatio-temporal predictability of food may be limiting. Moreover, we demonstrate a straightforward, widely applicable method for estimating resource limitation in populations of central-place foragers. PMID:24430849

  16. Nonrelativistic limit of quantum field theory in inertial and noninertial frames and the principle of equivalence

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Padmanabhan, T.

    2011-10-15

    We discuss the nonrelativistic limit of quantum field theory in an inertial frame, in the Rindler frame and in the presence of a weak gravitational field, and attempt to highlight and clarify several subtleties. In particular, we study the following issues: (a) While the action for a relativistic free particle is invariant under the Lorentz transformation, the corresponding action for a nonrelativistic free particle is not invariant under the Galilean transformation, but picks up extra contributions at the end points. This leads to an extra phase in the nonrelativistic wave function under a Galilean transformation, which can be related to the rest energy of the particle even in the nonrelativistic limit. We show that this is closely related to the peculiar fact that the relativistic action for a free particle remains invariant even if we restrict ourselves to O(1/c{sup 2}) in implementing the Lorentz transformation. (b) We provide a brief critique of the principle of equivalence in the quantum mechanical context. In particular, we show how solutions to the generally covariant Klein-Gordon equation in a noninertial frame, which has a time-dependent acceleration, reduce to the nonrelativistic wave function in the presence of an appropriate (time-dependent) gravitational field in the c{yields}{infinity} limit, and relate this fact to the validity of the principle of equivalence in a quantum mechanical context. We also show that the extra phase acquired by the nonrelativistic wave function in an accelerated frame, actually arises from the gravitational time dilation and survives in the nonrelativistic limit. (c) While the solution of the Schroedinger equation can be given an interpretation as being the probability amplitude for a single particle, such an interpretation fails in quantum field theory. We show how, in spite of this, one can explicitly evaluate the path integral using the (nonquadratic) action for a relativistic particle (involving a square root) and

  17. Poisson-Boltzmann theory of charged colloids: limits of the cell model for salty suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, A. R.

    2010-09-01

    Thermodynamic properties of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions and polyelectrolyte solutions are commonly modelled by implementing the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory within a cell model. This approach models a bulk system by a single macroion, together with counterions and salt ions, confined to a symmetrically shaped, electroneutral cell. While easing numerical solution of the nonlinear PB equation, the cell model neglects microion-induced interactions and correlations between macroions, precluding modelling of macroion ordering phenomena. An alternative approach, which avoids the artificial constraints of cell geometry, exploits the mapping of a macroion-microion mixture onto a one-component model of pseudo-macroions governed by effective interparticle interactions. In practice, effective-interaction models are usually based on linear-screening approximations, which can accurately describe strong nonlinear screening only by incorporating an effective (renormalized) macroion charge. Combining charge renormalization and linearized PB theories, in both the cell model and an effective-interaction (cell-free) model, we compute osmotic pressures of highly charged colloids and monovalent microions, in Donnan equilibrium with a salt reservoir, over a range of concentrations. By comparing predictions with primitive model simulation data for salt-free suspensions, and with predictions from nonlinear PB theory for salty suspensions, we chart the limits of both the cell model and linear-screening approximations in modelling bulk thermodynamic properties. Up to moderately strong electrostatic couplings, the cell model proves accurate for predicting osmotic pressures of deionized (counterion-dominated) suspensions. With increasing salt concentration, however, the relative contribution of macroion interactions to the osmotic pressure grows, leading predictions from the cell and effective-interaction models to deviate. No evidence is found for a liquid

  18. The periodic sℓ(2|1) alternating spin chain and its continuum limit as a bulk logarithmic conformal field theory at c = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, A. M.; Read, N.; Saleur, H.; Vasseur, R.

    2015-05-01

    The periodic sℓ(2|1) alternating spin chain encodes (some of) the properties of hulls of percolation clusters, and is described in the continuum limit by a logarithmic conformal field theory (LCFT) at central charge c = 0. This theory corresponds to the strong coupling regime of a sigma model on the complex projective superspace CP 1|1 = U(2|1) /(U(1) × U(1|1)), and the spectrum of critical exponents can be obtained exactly. In this paper we push the analysis further, and determine the main representation theoretic (logarithmic) features of this continuum limit by extending to the periodic case the approach of [1] [N. Read and H. Saleur, Nucl. Phys. B 777 (2007) 316]. We first focus on determining the representation theory of the finite size spin chain with respect to the algebra of local energy densities provided by a representation of the affine Temperley-Lieb algebra at fugacity one. We then analyze how these algebraic properties carry over to the continuum limit to deduce the structure of the space of states as a representation over the product of left and right Virasoro algebras. Our main result is the full structure of the vacuum module of the theory, which exhibits Jordan cells of arbitrary rank for the Hamiltonian.

  19. Socioeconomic circumstances, health behaviours and functional limitations in older persons in four Central and Eastern European populations.

    PubMed

    Doryńska, Agnieszka; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Malyutina, Sofia; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Peasey, Anne; Nikitin, Yuri; Marmot, Michael; Bobak, Martin

    2012-11-01

    to investigate functional limitations and their association with socioeconomic factors in four Central and Eastern European populations. a cross-sectional study of random population samples in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), Kaunas (Lithuania) and six Czech towns participating in the HAPIEE study. Functional limitations (classified into tertiles of the SF-36 physical functioning subscale), socioeconomic circumstances and health behaviours were available for 34,431 subjects aged 45-69 years. the proportion of subjects in the worst tertile of the functional limitations score (≤80% of the maximum score) ranged from 21% of the men in Kaunas to 48% in Krakow women. In multivariate ordered logistic regression, functional limitations were strongly inversely associated with education and positively with material deprivation and with being economically inactive. Functional limitations were more common in male smokers and less common in alcohol drinkers. Socioeconomic characteristics explained some of the differences in functional limitations between populations. Health behaviours explained some of the differences between social groups in both genders and between populations in women. unexpectedly, functional limitations were not most common in the sample from Russia, the country with the highest mortality rates. All socioeconomic measures were strongly associated with functional limitations and made some contribution towards explaining differences in limitations between populations.

  20. Long-term assessment of financial maturity, diameter-limit selection in the central Appalachians

    Treesearch

    Thomas M. Schuler; David W. McGill

    2007-01-01

    Financial maturity, diameter-limit (FMDL) selection was proposed more than three decades ago as a replacement for diameter-limit cutting. FMDL incorporates financial maturity guidelines for individual trees, high-priority removal of poorquality trees, and guidelines for residual basal area. We provide the first long-term assessment of this practice after more than...

  1. A low upper mass limit for the central black hole in the late-type galaxy NGC 4414

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thater, S.; Krajnović, D.; Bourne, M. A.; Cappellari, M.; de Zeeuw, T.; Emsellem, E.; Magorrian, J.; McDermid, R. M.; Sarzi, M.; van de Ven, G.

    2017-01-01

    We present our mass estimate of the central black hole in the isolated spiral galaxy NGC 4414. Using natural guide star adaptive optics assisted observations with the Gemini Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer (NIFS) and the natural seeing Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs-North (GMOS), we derived two-dimensional stellar kinematic maps of NGC 4414 covering the central 1.5 arcsec and 10 arcsec, respectively, at a NIFS spatial resolution of 0.13 arcsec. The kinematic maps reveal a regular rotation pattern and a central velocity dispersion dip down to around 105 km s-1. We constructed dynamical models using two different methods: Jeans anisotropic dynamical modeling and axisymmetric Schwarzschild modeling. Both modeling methods give consistent results, but we cannot constrain the lower mass limit and only measure an upper limit for the black hole mass of MBH = 1.56 × 106M⊙ (at 3σ level) which is at least 1σ below the recent MBH-σe relations. Further tests with dark matter, mass-to-light ratio variation and different light models confirm that our results are not dominated by uncertainties. The derived upper limit mass is not only below the MBH-σe relation, but is also five times lower than the lower limit black hole mass anticipated from the resolution limit of the sphere of influence. This proves that via high quality integral field data we are now able to push black hole measurements down to at least five times less than the resolution limit. The reduced data cubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/597/A18

  2. Pine (Pinus sylvestris L. ) tree-limit surveillance during recent decades, central Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Kullman, L. )

    1993-02-01

    The altitudinal tree-limit of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) has been surveyed at the population level since the early- and mid-1970s in the Swedish Scandes. Elevational tree-limit advance was recorded for the majority of sites, despite statistically stable, although highly fluctuating climate with clusters of exceptionally cold winters and many relatively cool summers. The new tree-limit derived from pines established in the late 1950s. Tree-limit rise was concurrent with net population decline for the period 1972 to 1991, mainly as a result of failing regeneration. The main factor of individual vitality depression and mortality was deduced to be winter desiccation. The progressive tree-limit has a tendency for slow upslope advance during periods of climatic stability, even if punctuated by shorter events of unfavorable climate. Pine tree-limit dynamics is suggested to be a complex of climate/age/disturbance interactions. The tree-limit may decline altitudinally mainly in response to secular climate cooling, which makes it best suited for surveying sustained climatic trends and analogous paleoclimatic reconstruction. 51 refs., 12 figs., 1 tabs.

  3. Carbon allocation in ectomycorrhizal plants at limited optimal N supply: an attempt aat unraveling conflicting theories.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Ana; Hampp, Rüdiger; Magel, Elisabeth; Martins-Loução, Maria-Amélia

    2011-01-01

    With regard to mycorrhiza, conflicting theories try to explain how the balance between fungal demand for carbohydrates and the plant’s needs for nutrients varies, resulting in conflicting predictions. In order to evaluate current concepts, we investigated some metabolic parameters, which are indicative for plant carbon allocation in response to mycorrhization at limited and optimal N supply. Pinus pinaster seedlings were inoculated with living or dead (control) cultures of Pisolithus tinctorius, supplied with ammonium at 4 (limiting) or 7% d−1 (non-limiting) N relative addition rate (RARN), and followed development for 29 days. Mycorrhizal colonization of roots was quantified by the determination of ergosterol. A series of enzymes (sucrose and trehalose metabolism, anaplerosis) and metabolites (soluble carbohydrate, including trehalose; fructose 2,6 bisphosphate, free amino acids) relevant in the C/N exchange between symbionts, and in the carbon allocation and sink strength within the plant were assayed for 2-day-intervals for up to 14 days, and at 5-day-intervals for the rest of the experiment. The first 10 days reflected the establishment of mycorrhizal interaction, and the carbon allocation to the root was higher in M plants independent of N supply. Following this period, carbon allocation became N-related, higher at low, and lower at high N supply. The belowground C investment of M plants was dependent on N availability, but not on N gain. Finally, increased belowground C allocation was accompanied by a shift from plant to fungal metabolism.

  4. Rational Choice Theory and the Politics of Education: Promise and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, William Lowe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Rational choice theory and its three branches (game theory, collective choice theory, and organizational economics) has altered the face of political science, sociology, and organizational theory. This chapter reviews rational choice theory, examines a small body of work that relies on the rational choice paradigm to study educational politics,…

  5. Tribal Minor NSR Synthetic Minor Limit Application Form in EPA's South Central Region

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Tribal Minor NSR application form should be used to notify the EPA Region 6 Tribal NSR Permitting Program of requested synthetic minor emission limits associated with a new source general application form.

  6. Demonstrating Compliance with Stringent Nitrogen Limits Using a Biological Nutrient Removal Process in California's Central Valley.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; Witzgall, Bob; Yu, William; Ohlinger, Kurt; Ramberg, Steve; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Parker, Denny

    2015-12-01

    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (District) must be compliant with stringent nitrogen limits by 2021 that the existing treatment facilities cannot meet. An 11-month pilot study was conducted to confirm that these limits could be met with an air activated sludge biological nutrient removal (BNR) process. The pilot BNR treated an average flow of 946 m(3)/d and demonstrated that it could reliably meet the ammonia limit, but that external carbon addition may be necessary to satisfy the nitrate limit. The BNR process performed well throughout the 11 months of operation with good settleability, minimal nocardioform content, and high quality secondary effluent. The BNR process was operated at a minimum pH of 6.4 with no noticeable impact to nitrification rates. Increased secondary sludge production was observed during rainfall events and is attributed to a change in wastewater influent characteristics.

  7. Normal-to-anomalous diffusion transition in disordered correlated potentials: from the central limit theorem to stable laws.

    PubMed

    Salgado-García, R; Maldonado, Cesar

    2013-12-01

    We study the diffusion of an ensemble of overdamped particles sliding over a tilted random potential (produced by the interaction of a particle with a random polymer) with long-range correlations. We found that the diffusion properties of such a system are closely related to the correlation function of the corresponding potential. We model the substrate as a symbolic trajectory of a shift space which enables us to obtain a general formula for the diffusion coefficient when normal diffusion occurs. The total time that the particle takes to travel through n monomers can be seen as an ergodic sum to which we can apply the central limit theorem. The latter can be implemented if the correlations decay fast enough in order for the central limit theorem to be valid. On the other hand, we presume that when the central limit theorem breaks down the system give rise to anomalous diffusion. We give two examples exhibiting a transition from normal to anomalous diffusion due to this mechanism. We also give analytical expressions for the diffusion exponents in both cases by assuming convergence to a stable law. Finally we test our predictions by means of numerical simulations.

  8. What are the ultimate limits to computational techniques: verifier theory and unverifiability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yampolskiy, Roman V.

    2017-09-01

    Despite significant developments in proof theory, surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the concept of proof verifiers. In particular, the mathematical community may be interested in studying different types of proof verifiers (people, programs, oracles, communities, superintelligences) as mathematical objects. Such an effort could reveal their properties, their powers and limitations (particularly in human mathematicians), minimum and maximum complexity, as well as self-verification and self-reference issues. We propose an initial classification system for verifiers and provide some rudimentary analysis of solved and open problems in this important domain. Our main contribution is a formal introduction of the notion of unverifiability, for which the paper could serve as a general citation in domains of theorem proving, as well as software and AI verification.

  9. Non-invasive flux measurements using microsensors: theory, limitations, and systems.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ian; Chen, Shao-Liang; Porterfield, D Marshall; Sun, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the fluxes of ions and neutral molecules across the outer membrane or boundary of living tissues and cells is an important strand of applied molecular biology. Such fluxes can be measured non-invasively with good resolution in time and space. Two systems (MIFE™ and SIET) have been developed and have become widely used to implement this technique, and they are commercially available. This Chapter is the first comparative description of these two systems. It gives the context, the basic underlying theory, practical limitations inherent in the technique, theoretical developments, guidance on the practicalities of the technique, and the functionality of the two systems. Although the technique is strongly relevant to plant salt tolerance and other plant stresses (drought, temperature, pollutants, waterlogging), it also has rich relevance throughout biomedical studies and the molecular genetics of transport proteins.

  10. Finite-representation approximation of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit with tensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyens, Boye; Montangero, Simone; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank; Van Acoleyen, Karel

    2017-05-01

    It has been established that matrix product states can be used to compute the ground state and single-particle excitations and their properties of lattice gauge theories at the continuum limit. However, by construction, in this formalism the Hilbert space of the gauge fields is truncated to a finite number of irreducible representations of the gauge group. We investigate quantitatively the influence of the truncation of the infinite number of representations in the Schwinger model, one-flavor QED2 , with a uniform electric background field. We compute the two-site reduced density matrix of the ground state and the weight of each of the representations. We find that this weight decays exponentially with the quadratic Casimir invariant of the representation which justifies the approach of truncating the Hilbert space of the gauge fields. Finally, we compute the single-particle spectrum of the model as a function of the electric background field.

  11. Drivers' compliance with speed limits: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark A; Armitage, Christopher J; Baughan, Christopher J

    2003-10-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB; I. Ajzen, 1985) was applied to drivers' compliance with speed limits. Questionnaire data were collected for 598 drivers at 2 time points separated by 3 months. TPB variables, demographic information, and self-reported prior behavior were measured at Time 1, and self-reported subsequent behavior was measured at Time 2. In line with the TPB, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived control were positively associated with behavioral intention, and intention and perceived control were positively associated with subsequent behavior. TPB variables mediated the effects of age and gender on behavior. Prior behavior was found to moderate the perceived control-intention and perceived control-subsequent behavior relationships. Practical implications of the findings for road safety and possible avenues for further research are discussed.

  12. Mapping children’s politics: the promise of articulation and the limits of nonrepresentational theory

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Katharyne; Elwood, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Reflecting wider debates in the discipline, recent scholarship in children’s geographies has focused attention on the meanings of the political. While supportive of work that opens up new avenues for conceptualizing politics beyond the liberal rational subject, we provide a critique of research methods which delink politics from historical context and relations of power. Focusing on the use of nonrepresentational theory as a research methodology, the paper points to the limits of this approach for children’s political formation as well as for sustained scholarly collaboration. We argue instead for a politics of articulation, in the double sense of communication and connection. An empirical case study is used as an illustrative example. PMID:25635154

  13. Floating Silicon Method single crystal ribbon - observations and proposed limit cycle theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Peter; Kernan, Brian; Helenbrook, Brian T.; Sun, Dawei; Sinclair, Frank; Carlson, Frederick

    2016-10-01

    In the Floating Silicon Method (FSM), a single-crystal Si ribbon is grown while floating on the surface of a Si melt. In this paper, we describe the phenomenology of FSM, including the observation of approximately regularly spaced "facet lines" on the ribbon surface whose orientation aligns with (111) crystal planes. Sb demarcation experiments sectioned through the thickness of the ribbon reveal that the solid/melt interface consists of dual (111) planes and that the leading edge facet growth is saccadic in nature, rather than steady-state. To explain this behavior, we propose a heuristic solidification limit cycle theory, using a continuum level of description with anisotropic kinetics as developed by others, and generalizing the interface kinetics to include a roughening transition as well as a re-faceting mechanism that involves curvature and the Gibbs-Thomson effect.

  14. Revisited comparison of thermal instability theory with MARFE density limit experiment in TEXTOR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Frederick

    2006-03-01

    Density limit shots in TEXTOR [Tokamak EXperiment for Technology Oriented Research] that ended in MARFE [Multifaceted Asymmetric Radiation From the Edge] are analyzed by several thermal instability theories^1-7 with convective effects included. ^1W. M. Stacey, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2673 (1996); Phys. Plasmas 3, 3032 (1996); Phys. Plasmas 4, 134 (1997); Phys. Plasmas 4, 242 (1997). ^2W. M. Stacey, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 39, 1245 (1997). ^3W. M. Stacey, Fusion Technol. 36, 38 (1999).^ ^4W. M. Stacey, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3464 (2000). ^5F. A. Kelly, W. M. Stacey, J. Rapp and M. Brix, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3382 (2001). ^6M. Z. Tokar and F. A. Kelly, Phys. Plasmas 10, 4378 (2003). ^7M. Z. Tokar, F. A. Kelly and X. Loozen, Phys. Plasmas 12, 052510 (2005).

  15. Deviations from Cooper Limit Theory in Disordered Arrays of Proximity Coupled Nanoscale Superconducting Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Taejoon; Valles, Zhenyi Long, Jr.

    2002-03-01

    Recently, novel superconductor to metal quantum phase transitions (SMQPT) have been predicted to occur in proximity coupled arrays of nanoscale superconducting islands. Quantum fluctuations, not considered in conventional proximity effect theories, drive these transitions^2. We have created 2d disordered arrays of Pb grains with radii and heights less than 10 nm and 4 nm, respectively, coupled by overlayers of Ag using the technique of quench condensation. We have measured the resistive transitions as a function of temperature, R(T), and Pb and Ag coverages, d_Pb and d_Ag, respectively. The R(T) follow the form expected for an array of mesoscopic SNS junctions. The transition temperature, T_co, of the highest d_Pb arrays decreases exponentially with d_Ag as expected from the Cooper Limit Theory of the proximity effect and faster than exponentially in arrays with smaller d_Pb. We discuss how the latter behavior is consistent with the arrays approaching a SMQPT. ^2See for example, B. Spivak, A. Zyuzin, and M. Hruska, Phys. Rev. B 6413, 2502 (2001).

  16. Credibility theory based dynamic control bound optimization for reservoir flood limited water level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Ping; Ji, Changming; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic control operation of reservoir flood limited water level (FLWL) can solve the contradictions between reservoir flood control and beneficial operation well, and it is an important measure to make sure the security of flood control and realize the flood utilization. The dynamic control bound of FLWL is a fundamental key element for implementing reservoir dynamic control operation. In order to optimize the dynamic control bound of FLWL by considering flood forecasting error, this paper took the forecasting error as a fuzzy variable, and described it with the emerging credibility theory in recent years. By combining the flood forecasting error quantitative model, a credibility-based fuzzy chance constrained model used to optimize the dynamic control bound was proposed in this paper, and fuzzy simulation technology was used to solve the model. The FENGTAN reservoir in China was selected as a case study, and the results show that, compared with the original operation water level, the initial operation water level (IOWL) of FENGTAN reservoir can be raised 4 m, 2 m and 5.5 m respectively in the three division stages of flood season, and without increasing flood control risk. In addition, the rationality and feasibility of the proposed forecasting error quantitative model and credibility-based dynamic control bound optimization model are verified by the calculation results of extreme risk theory.

  17. Central limit theorem for the solution to the heat equation with moving time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junfeng; Tudor, Ciprian A.

    2016-03-01

    We consider the solution to the stochastic heat equation driven by the time-space white noise and study the asymptotic behavior of its spatial quadratic variations with “moving time”, meaning that the time variable is not fixed and its values are allowed to be very big or very small. We investigate the limit distribution of these variations via Malliavin calculus.

  18. Limited irrigation of corn-based no-till crop rotations in West Central Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to numerous alternatives in crop sequence and changes in crop yield and price, finding the most profitable crop rotation for an area is a continuous research challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-yr limited irrigation corn (Zea mays L.)-based crop rotations for...

  19. Limited irrigation of corn-based no-till crop rotations in west central Great Plains.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identifying the most profitable crop rotation for an area is a continuous research challenge. The objective of this study was to evaluate 2, 3, and 4 yr. limited irrigation corn (Zea mays L.) based crop rotations for grain yield, available soil water, crop water productivity, and profitability in co...

  20. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollination in California's Central Valley is limited by native bee nest site location.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Hillary S; Tom, Kathleen; Ponisio, Lauren Catherine; Rominger, Andrew; Kremen, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The delivery of ecosystem services by mobile organisms depends on the distribution of those organisms, which is, in turn, affected by resources at local and landscape scales. Pollinator-dependent crops rely on mobile animals like bees for crop production, and the spatial relationship between floral resources and nest location for these central-place foragers influences the delivery of pollination services. Current models that map pollination coverage in agricultural regions utilize landscape-level estimates of floral availability and nesting incidence inferred from expert opinion, rather than direct assessments. Foraging distance is often derived from proxies of bee body size, rather than direct measurements of foraging that account for behavioral responses to floral resource type and distribution. The lack of direct measurements of nesting incidence and foraging distances may lead to inaccurate mapping of pollination services. We examined the role of local-scale floral resource presence from hedgerow plantings on nest incidence of ground-nesting bees in field margins and within monoculture, conventionally managed sunflower fields in California's Central Valley. We tracked bee movement into fields using fluorescent powder. We then used these data to simulate the distribution of pollination services within a crop field. Contrary to expert opinion, we found that ground-nesting native bees nested both in fields and edges, though nesting rates declined with distance into field. Further, we detected no effect of field-margin floral enhancements on nesting. We found evidence of an exponential decay rate of bee movement into fields, indicating that foraging predominantly occurred in less than 1% of medium-sized bees' predicted typical foraging range. Although we found native bees nesting within agricultural fields, their restricted foraging movements likely centralize pollination near nest sites. Our data thus predict a heterogeneous distribution of pollination services

  1. Band limited emission with central frequency around 2 Hz accompanying powerful cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troitskaia, V. A.; Shepetnov, K. S.; Dvobnia, B. D.

    1992-01-01

    It has been found that powerful cyclones are proceeded, accompanied and followed by narrow band electromagnetic emission with central frequency around 2 Hz. It is shown that the signal from this emission is unique and clearly distinguishable from known types of magnetic pulsations, spectra of local thunderstorms, and signals from industrial sources. This emission was first observed during an unusually powerful cyclone with tornadoes in the western European part of the Soviet Union, which passed by the observatory of Borok from south to north-east. The emission has been confirmed by analysis of similar events in Antarctica. The phenomenon described presents a new aspect of interactions of processes in the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere.

  2. Individual Differences in Executive Function and Central Coherence Predict Developmental Changes in Theory of Mind in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that individuals with autism show atypicalities in multiple cognitive domains, including theory of mind (ToM), executive function (EF), and central coherence (CC). In this study, the longitudinal relationships among these 3 aspects of cognition in autism were investigated. Thirty-seven cognitively able children…

  3. Individual Differences in Executive Function and Central Coherence Predict Developmental Changes in Theory of Mind in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that individuals with autism show atypicalities in multiple cognitive domains, including theory of mind (ToM), executive function (EF), and central coherence (CC). In this study, the longitudinal relationships among these 3 aspects of cognition in autism were investigated. Thirty-seven cognitively able children…

  4. Off-shell invariant D = N = 2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge without constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaka, Keisuke; Kato, Junji; Kawamoto, Noboru; Miyake, Akiko

    2013-11-01

    We formulate N=2 twisted super Yang-Mills theory with a gauged central charge by superconnection formalism in two dimensions. We obtain off-shell invariant supermultiplets and actions with and without constraints, which is in contrast with the off-shell invariant D=N=4 super Yang-Mills formulation with unavoidable constraints.

  5. Central diabetes insipidus as a very late relapse limited to the pituitary stalk in Langerhans cell histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Hazeki, Daisuke; Imamura, Mari; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-07-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and relapse are frequently seen in multifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). We present two females with multifocal LCH who developed CDI 9 and 5 years after the initial diagnosis, respectively, as a relapse limited to the pituitary stalk. Combination chemotherapy with cytarabine reduced the mass in the pituitary stalk. Although CDI did not improve, there has been no anterior pituitary hormone deficiency (APHD), neurodegenerative disease in the central nervous system (ND-CNS) or additional relapse for 2 years after therapy. It was difficult to predict the development of CDI in these cases. CDI might develop very late in patients with multifocal LCH, and therefore strict follow-up is necessary, especially with regard to symptoms of CDI such as polydipsia and polyuria. For new-onset CDI with LCH, chemotherapy with cytarabine might be useful for preventing APHD and ND-CNS.

  6. Momentum relation and classical limit in the future-not-included complex action theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Keiichi; Nielsen, Holger Bech

    2013-07-01

    Studying the time development of the expectation value in the future-not-included complex action theory, we point out that the momentum relation (the relation analogous to p=frac {partial L}{partial dot {q}}), which was derived via the Feynman path integral and was shown to be correct in the future-included theory in our previous papers, is not valid in the future-not-included theory. We provide the correct momentum relation in the future-not-included theory, and argue that the future-not-included classical theory is described by a certain real action. In addition, we provide another way to understand the time development of the future-not-included theory by utilizing the future-included theory. Furthermore, properly applying the method used in our previous paper to the future-not-included theory by introducing a formal Lagrangian, we derive the correct momentum relation in the future-not-included theory.

  7. Restriction limits and main drivers of fruit production in palm in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Cintia; Costa, Flávia R. C.; Barbosa, Carlos Eduardo; Cintra, Renato

    2016-11-01

    Adult plants incapable of producing viable offspring inflate our perception of the size of population distribution. We propose that species occurrence is limited to a subset of the environmental gradient and that it changes as ontogenetic development progresses. Moreover, fruit production is associated with site-specific environmental conditions. We sampled 2988 adult individuals from nine palm species in 30 plots (40 × 250 m) and used a larger data set including 42 other plots distributed along a continuous topo-edaphic gradient in a terra firme forest near Manaus, Brazil. Five out of nine palm species were more restricted to a sub-section of the topo-edaphic gradient in the adult-size phase. More specifically, reproductive individuals of species Attalea attaleoides and A. microcarpa had even more restricted distributions than adult-sized, non-reproductive plants. Successive environmental filtering and competition probably acting through selective mortality led to increasing habitat restriction, with reproductive adults being restricted to a smaller part of the region than juveniles and adults. Water availability and nutrients limited both the ability to produce fruits and the amount of fruit production. Previous studies have reported stronger habitat associations for older plants than for seedlings or juveniles, but we show here that some species are more restricted at their reproductive stage. Plant specializations to local conditions may be more common than currently acknowledged, and a significant portion of individuals in a population might represent sinks. Such strong environmental limitations of reproductive plants should also be considered in management of species with economic value and in conservation planning.

  8. Limited sufficiency of antigen presentation by dendritic cells in models of central nervous system autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gregory F; Shindler, Kenneth S; Allenspach, Eric J; Stephen, Tom L; Thomas, Hannah L; Mikesell, Robert J; Cross, Anne H; Laufer, Terri M

    2011-02-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis (MS), is dependent upon the activation and effector functions of autoreactive CD4 T cells. Multiple interactions between CD4 T cells and major histocompatibility class II (MHCII)+ antigen presenting cells (APCs) must occur in both the periphery and central nervous system (CNS) to elicit autoimmunity. The identity of the MHCII+ APCs involved throughout this process remains in question. We investigated which APC in the periphery and CNS mediates disease using transgenic mice with MHCII expression restricted to dendritic cells (DCs). MHCII expression restricted to DCs results in normal susceptibility to peptide-mediated EAE. Indeed, radiation-sensitive bone marrow-derived DCs were sufficient for all APC functions during peptide-induced disease. However, DCs alone were inefficient at promoting disease after immunization with the myelin protein myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), even in the presence of MHCII-deficient B cells. Consistent with a defect in disease induction following protein immunization, antigen presentation by DCs alone was incapable of mediating spontaneous optic neuritis. These results indicate that DCs are capable of perpetuating CNS-targeted autoimmunity when antigens are readily available, but other APCs are required to efficiently initiate pathogenic cognate CD4 T cell responses.

  9. Generalised Central Limit Theorems for Growth Rate Distribution of Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayasu, Misako; Watanabe, Hayafumi; Takayasu, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a solvable model of randomly growing systems consisting of many independent subunits. Scaling relations and growth rate distributions in the limit of infinite subunits are analysed theoretically. Various types of scaling properties and distributions reported for growth rates of complex systems in a variety of fields can be derived from this basic physical model. Statistical data of growth rates for about 1 million business firms are analysed as a real-world example of randomly growing systems. Not only are the scaling relations consistent with the theoretical solution, but the entire functional form of the growth rate distribution is fitted with a theoretical distribution that has a power-law tail.

  10. Evidence-based evaluation of information: the centrality and limitations of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Järvholm, Bengt; Bohlin, Ingemar

    2014-03-01

    This introductory paper considers the value and limitations of the methodology of systematic reviews especially according to the evidence-based movement. It explains some terms and organisations producing systematic reviews. It also discusses controversies. The first concerns the criteria by which the quality of individual studies is assessed, the second the possible effects of the affiliation of some reviewers, and the third the value of formalisation of procedure (i.e. the tensions between formal tools and professional judgments). The article contrasts the evidence-based formalism with other formalisms as those by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. It discusses systematic reviews in social science where interventions are complex, difficult to blind, and depend on context. Systematic reviews in working life research are often focusing on prevention. The formal evidence-based process may devaluate or disregard findings from mechanistic and observational studies. Hence such reviews may falsely conclude that existing knowledge about the risk of the factor is limited or nonexistent.

  11. IL-27 limits central nervous system viral clearance by promoting IL-10 and enhances demyelination.

    PubMed

    de Aquino, Maria Teresa P; Kapil, Parul; Hinton, David R; Phares, Timothy W; Puntambekar, Shweta S; Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2014-07-01

    IL-27 is a pleiotropic member of the IL-6 and IL-12 cytokine family composed of the IL-27p28 and the EBV-induced gene 3. IL-27 and its receptor mRNA are both upregulated in the CNS during acute encephalomyelitis induced by the JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) and sustained during viral persistence. Contributions of IL-27 to viral pathogenesis were evaluated by infection of IL-27Rα-chain-deficient (IL-27Rα(-/-)) mice. The absence of IL-27 signaling accelerated virus control within the CNS associated with increased IFN-γ secreting virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Abrogation of IL-27 signaling did not affect virus-specific CD8+ T cell-mediated IL-10 production or cytolytic activity or Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. However, IL-10 production by virus-specific CD4+ T cells was reduced significantly. Despite increased T cell-mediated antiviral function in IL-27Rα(-/-) mice, the virus persisted in the CNS at similar levels as in wild-type mice. Nevertheless, IL-27Rα(-/-) mice exhibited decreased clinical disease during persistence, coincident with less severe demyelination, the hallmark tissue damage associated with JHMV infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that in contrast to viral infections at other sites, IL-27 does not play a proinflammatory role during JHMV-induced encephalomyelitis. Rather, it limits CNS inflammation and impairs control of CNS virus replication via induction of IL-10 in virus-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, in contrast to its protective role in limiting CNS autoimmunity and preventing immunopathology, these data define a detrimental role of IL-27 in promoting demyelination by delaying viral control. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. IL-27 Limits Central Nervous System Viral Clearance by Promoting IL-10 and Enhances Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, Maria Teresa P.; Kapil, Parul; Hinton, David R.; Phares, Timothy W.; Puntambekar, Shweta S.; Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2014-01-01

    IL-27 is a pleiotropic member of the IL-6 and IL-12 cytokine family composed of the IL-27p28 and the EBV-induced gene 3. IL-27 and its receptor mRNA are both upregulated in the CNS during acute encephalomyelitis induced by the JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) and sustained during viral persistence. Contributions of IL-27 to viral pathogenesis were evaluated by infection of IL-27Rα-chain–deficient (IL-27Rα−/−) mice. The absence of IL-27 signaling accelerated virus control within the CNS associated with increased IFN-γ secreting virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Abrogation of IL-27 signaling did not affect virus-specific CD8+ T cell–mediated IL-10 production or cytolytic activity or Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. However, IL-10 production by virus-specific CD4+ T cells was reduced significantly. Despite increased T cell–mediated antiviral function in IL-27Rα−/− mice, the virus persisted in the CNS at similar levels as in wild-type mice. Nevertheless, IL-27Rα−/− mice exhibited decreased clinical disease during persistence, coincident with less severe demyelination, the hallmark tissue damage associated with JHMV infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that in contrast to viral infections at other sites, IL-27 does not play a proinflammatory role during JHMV-induced encephalomyelitis. Rather, it limits CNS inflammation and impairs control of CNS virus replication via induction of IL-10 in virus-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, in contrast to its protective role in limiting CNS autoimmunity and preventing immunopathology, these data define a detrimental role of IL-27 in promoting demyelination by delaying viral control. PMID:24890725

  13. An Upper Limit on the Mass of a Central Black Hole in the Large Magellanic Cloud from the Stellar Rotation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, H.; Lützgendorf, N.; van der Marel, R. P.; Baumgardt, H.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Neumayer, N.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2017-09-01

    We constrain the possible presence of a central black hole (BH) in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This requires spectroscopic measurements over an area of the order of a square degree, due to the poorly known position of the kinematic center. Such measurements are now possible with the impressive field of view of the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the ESO Very Large Telescope. We used the Calcium Triplet (∼850 nm) spectral lines in many short-exposure MUSE pointings to create a two-dimensional integrated-light line-of-sight velocity map from the ∼ {10}8 individual spectra, taking care to identify and remove Galactic foreground populations. The data reveal a clear velocity gradient at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 1 arcmin2. We fit kinematic models to arrive at a 3σ upper-mass limit of {10}7.1 {M}ȯ for any central BH—consistent with the known scaling relations for supermassive black holes and their host systems. This adds to the growing body of knowledge on the presence of BHs in low-mass and dwarf galaxies, and their scaling relations with host-galaxy properties, which can shed light on theories of BH growth and host system interaction.

  14. Principal shapes and squeezed limits in the effective field theory of large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Solon, Mikhail P.

    2016-11-01

    We apply an orthogonalization procedure on the effective field theory of large scale structure (EFT of LSS) shapes, relevant for the angle-averaged bispectrum and non-Gaussian covariance of the matter power spectrum at one loop. Assuming natural-sized EFT parameters, this identifies a linear combination of EFT shapes—referred to as the principal shape—that gives the dominant contribution for the whole kinematic plane, with subdominant combinations suppressed by a few orders of magnitude. For the covariance, our orthogonal transformation is in excellent agreement with a principal component analysis applied to available data. Additionally we find that, for both observables, the coefficients of the principal shapes are well approximated by the EFT coefficients appearing in the squeezed limit, and are thus measurable from power spectrum response functions. Employing data from N-body simulations for the growth-only response, we measure the single EFT coefficient describing the angle-averaged bispectrum with 𝒪(10%) precision. These methods of shape orthogonalization and measurement of coefficients from response functions are valuable tools for developing the EFT of LSS framework, and can be applied to more general observables.

  15. Development of the new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory

    SciTech Connect

    Veshchunov, M. S.

    2012-04-15

    The new approach to the diffusion-limited reaction rate theory, recently proposed by the author, is further developed on the base of a similar approach to Brownian coagulation. The traditional diffusion approach to calculation of the reaction rate is critically analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the traditional approach is applicable only in the special case of reactions with a large reaction radius and the mean inter-particle distances, and become inappropriate in calculating the reaction rate in the case of a relatively small reaction radius. In the latter case, most important for chemical reactions, particle collisions occur not in the diffusion regime but mainly in the kinetic regime characterized by homogeneous (random) spatial distribution of particles on the length scale of the mean inter-particle distance. The calculated reaction rate for a small reaction radius in three dimensions formally (and fortuitously) coincides with the expression derived in the traditional approach for reactions with a large reaction radius, but notably deviates at large times from the traditional result in the planar two-dimensional geometry. In application to reactions on discrete lattice sites, new relations for the reaction rate constants are derived for both three-dimensional and two-dimensional lattices.

  16. Al-Air Batteries: Fundamental Thermodynamic Limitations from First Principles Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leanne D.; Noerskov, Jens K.; Luntz, Alan C.

    2015-03-01

    The Al-air battery possesses high theoretical specific energy (4140 Wh/kg) and is therefore an attractive candidate for vehicle propulsion applications. However, the experimentally observed open-circuit potential is much lower than what thermodynamics predicts, and this potential loss is widely believed to be an effect of corrosion. We present a detailed study of the Al-air battery using density functional theory. The results suggest that the difference between bulk thermodynamic and surface potentials is due to both the effects of asymmetry in multi-electron transfer reactions that define the anodic dissolution of Al and, more importantly, a large chemical step inherent to the formation of bulk Al(OH)3 from surface intermediates. The former results in an energy loss of 3%, while the latter accounts for 14 -29% of the total thermodynamic energy depending on the surface site where dissolution occurs. Therefore, the maximum open-circuit potential of the Al anode is only -1.87 V vs. SHE in the absence of thermal excitations, contrary to -2.34 V predicted by bulk thermodynamics at pH 14.6. This is a fundamental limitation of the system and governs the maximum output potential, which cannot be improved even if corrosion effects were completely suppressed. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the ReLiable Project (#11-116792) funded by the Danish Council for Strategic Research.

  17. Determination of Detection Limits and Quantitation Limits for Compounds in a Database of GC/MS by FUMI Theory

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a stochastic method for estimating the detection limits (DLs) and quantitation limits (QLs) of compounds registered in a database of a GC/MS system and prove its validity with experiments. The approach described in ISO 11843 Part 7 is adopted here as an estimation means of DL and QL, and the decafluorotriphenylphosphine (DFTPP) tuning and retention time locking are carried out for adjusting the system. Coupled with the data obtained from the system adjustment experiments, the information (noise and signal of chromatograms and calibration curves) stored in the database is used for the stochastic estimation, dispensing with the repetition measurements. Of sixty-six pesticides, the DL values obtained by the ISO method were compared with those from the statistical approach and the correlation between them was observed to be excellent with the correlation coefficient of 0.865. The accuracy of the method proposed was also examined and concluded to be satisfactory as well. The samples used are commercial products of pesticides mixtures and the uncertainty from sample preparation processes is not taken into account. PMID:27162706

  18. Carbon balance indicates a time limit for cultivation of organic soils in central Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sonja; Ammann, Christof; Alewell, Christine; Leifeld, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands serve as important carbon sinks. Globally, more than 30% of the soil organic carbon is stored in organic soils, although they cover only 3% of the land surface. The agricultural use of organic soils usually requires drainage thereby transforming these soils from a net carbon sink into a net source. Currently, about 2 to 3 Gt CO2 are emitted world-wide from degrading organic soils (Joosten 2011; Parish et al. 2008) which is ca. 5% of the total anthropogenic emissions. Besides these CO2 emissions, the resulting subsidence of drained peat soils during agricultural use requires that drainage system are periodically renewed and finally to use pumping systems after progressive subsidence. In Switzerland, the Seeland region is characterised by fens which are intensively used for agriculture since 1900. The organic layer is degrading and subsequently getting shallower and the underlying mineral soil, as lake marl or loam, is approaching the surface. The questions arises for how long and under which land use practises and costs these soils can be cultivated in the near future. The study site was under crop rotation until 2009 when it was converted to extensively used grassland with the water regime still being regulated. The soil is characterised by a degraded organic horizon of 40 to 70 cm. Since December 2014 we are measuring the carbon exchange of this grassland using the Eddy-Covariance method. For 2015, the carbon balance indicates that the degraded fen is a strong carbon source, with approximately 500 g C m-2 a-1. The carbon balance is dominated by CO2 emissions and harvest. Methane emissions are negligible. With the gained emission factors different future scenarios are evaluated for the current cultivation practise of organic soils in central Switzerland. Joosten, H., 2011: Neues Geld aus alten Mooren: Über die Erzeugung von Kohlenstoffzertifikaten aus Moorwiedervernässungen. Telma Beiheft 4, 183-202. Parish, F., A. Sirin, D. Charman, H. Joosten, T

  19. Adjustment of growth and central metabolism to a mild but sustained nitrogen-limitation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tschoep, Hendrik; Gibon, Yves; Carillo, Petronia; Armengaud, Patrick; Szecowka, Marek; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R; Koehl, Karin; Stitt, Mark

    2009-03-01

    We have established a simple soil-based experimental system that allows a small and sustained restriction of growth of Arabidopsis by low nitrogen (N). Plants were grown in a large volume of a peat-vermiculite mix that contained very low levels of inorganic N. As a control, inorganic N was added in solid form to the peat-vermiculite mix, or plants were grown in conventional nutrient-rich solids. The low N growth regime led to a sustained 20% decrease of the relative growth rate over a period of 2 weeks, resulting in a two- to threefold decrease in biomass in 35- to 40-day-old plants. Plants in the low N regime contained lower levels of nitrate, lower nitrate reductase activity, lower levels of malate, fumarate and other organic acids and slightly higher levels of starch, as expected from published studies of N-limited plants. However, their rosette protein content was unaltered, and total and many individual amino acid levels increased compared with N-replete plants. This metabolic phenotype reveals that Arabidopsis responds adaptively to low N by decreasing the rate of growth, while maintaining the overall protein content, and maintaining or even increasing the levels of many amino acids.

  20. Limitations of selective deltamethrin application for triatomine control in central coastal Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This year-long study evaluated the effectiveness of a strategy involving selective deltamethrin spraying and community education for control of Chagas disease vectors in domestic units located in rural communities of coastal Ecuador. Results Surveys for triatomines revealed peridomestic infestation with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Panstrongylus howardi, with infestation indices remaining high during the study (13%, 17%, and 10%, at initial, 6-month, and 12-month visits, respectively), which indicates a limitation of this strategy for triatomine population control. Infestation was found 6 and 12 months after spraying with deltamethrin. In addition, a large number of previously vector-free domestic units also were found infested at the 6- and 12-month surveys, which indicates new infestations by sylvatic triatomines. The predominance of young nymphs and adults suggests new infestation events, likely from sylvatic foci. In addition, infection with Trypanosoma cruzi was found in 65%, 21% and 29% at initial, 6-month and 12-month visits, respectively. All parasites isolated (n = 20) were identified as TcI. Conclusion New vector control strategies need to be devised and evaluated for reduction of T. cruzi transmission in this region. PMID:21332985

  1. Cognitive Theories of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajendran, Gnanathusharan; Mitchell, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This article considers three theories of autism: The Theory of Mind Deficit, Executive Dysfunction and the Weak Central Coherence accounts. It outlines each along with studies relevant to their emergence, their expansion, their limitations and their possible integration. Furthermore, consideration is given to any implication from the theories in…

  2. Collection-limited theory interprets the extraordinary response of single semiconductor organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Biswajit; Baradwaj, Aditya G.; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Boudouris, Bryan W.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2015-01-01

    The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) architecture has dominated the literature due to its ability to be implemented in devices with relatively high efficiency values. However, a simpler device architecture based on a single organic semiconductor (SS-OPV) offers several advantages: it obviates the need to control the highly system-dependent nanoscale BHJ morphology, and therefore, would allow the use of broader range of organic semiconductors. Unfortunately, the photocurrent in standard SS-OPV devices is typically very low, which generally is attributed to inefficient charge separation of the photogenerated excitons. Here we show that the short-circuit current density from SS-OPV devices can be enhanced significantly (∼100-fold) through the use of inverted device configurations, relative to a standard OPV device architecture. This result suggests that charge generation may not be the performance bottleneck in OPV device operation. Instead, poor charge collection, caused by defect-induced electric field screening, is most likely the primary performance bottleneck in regular-geometry SS-OPV cells. We justify this hypothesis by: (i) detailed numerical simulations, (ii) electrical characterization experiments of functional SS-OPV devices using multiple polymers as active layer materials, and (iii) impedance spectroscopy measurements. Furthermore, we show that the collection-limited photocurrent theory consistently interprets typical characteristics of regular SS-OPV devices. These insights should encourage the design and OPV implementation of high-purity, high-mobility polymers, and other soft materials that have shown promise in organic field-effect transistor applications, but have not performed well in BHJ OPV devices, wherein they adopt less-than-ideal nanostructures when blended with electron-accepting materials. PMID:26290582

  3. Collection-limited theory interprets the extraordinary response of single semiconductor organic solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, Biswajit; Baradwaj, Aditya G.; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; ...

    2015-08-19

    The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) architecture has dominated the literature due to its ability to be implemented in devices with relatively high efficiency values. However, a simpler device architecture based on a single organic semiconductor (SS-OPV) offers several advantages: it obviates the need to control the highly system-dependent nanoscale BHJ morphology, and therefore, would allow the use of broader range of organic semiconductors. Unfortunately, the photocurrent in standard SS-OPV devices is typically very low, which generally is attributed to inefficient charge separation of the photogenerated excitons. In this paper, we show that the short-circuit current density from SS-OPVmore » devices can be enhanced significantly (~100-fold) through the use of inverted device configurations, relative to a standard OPV device architecture. This result suggests that charge generation may not be the performance bottleneck in OPV device operation. Instead, poor charge collection, caused by defect-induced electric field screening, is most likely the primary performance bottleneck in regular-geometry SS-OPV cells. We justify this hypothesis by: (i) detailed numerical simulations, (ii) electrical characterization experiments of functional SS-OPV devices using multiple polymers as active layer materials, and (iii) impedance spectroscopy measurements. Furthermore, we show that the collection-limited photocurrent theory consistently interprets typical characteristics of regular SS-OPV devices. Finally, these insights should encourage the design and OPV implementation of high-purity, high-mobility polymers, and other soft materials that have shown promise in organic field-effect transistor applications, but have not performed well in BHJ OPV devices, wherein they adopt less-than-ideal nanostructures when blended with electron-accepting materials.« less

  4. Collection-limited theory interprets the extraordinary response of single semiconductor organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ray, Biswajit; Baradwaj, Aditya G; Khan, Mohammad Ryyan; Boudouris, Bryan W; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2015-09-08

    The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) architecture has dominated the literature due to its ability to be implemented in devices with relatively high efficiency values. However, a simpler device architecture based on a single organic semiconductor (SS-OPV) offers several advantages: it obviates the need to control the highly system-dependent nanoscale BHJ morphology, and therefore, would allow the use of broader range of organic semiconductors. Unfortunately, the photocurrent in standard SS-OPV devices is typically very low, which generally is attributed to inefficient charge separation of the photogenerated excitons. Here we show that the short-circuit current density from SS-OPV devices can be enhanced significantly (∼100-fold) through the use of inverted device configurations, relative to a standard OPV device architecture. This result suggests that charge generation may not be the performance bottleneck in OPV device operation. Instead, poor charge collection, caused by defect-induced electric field screening, is most likely the primary performance bottleneck in regular-geometry SS-OPV cells. We justify this hypothesis by: (i) detailed numerical simulations, (ii) electrical characterization experiments of functional SS-OPV devices using multiple polymers as active layer materials, and (iii) impedance spectroscopy measurements. Furthermore, we show that the collection-limited photocurrent theory consistently interprets typical characteristics of regular SS-OPV devices. These insights should encourage the design and OPV implementation of high-purity, high-mobility polymers, and other soft materials that have shown promise in organic field-effect transistor applications, but have not performed well in BHJ OPV devices, wherein they adopt less-than-ideal nanostructures when blended with electron-accepting materials.

  5. On the continuous limit of integrable lattices I. The Kac-Moerbeke system and KdV theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosi, Carlo; Pizzocchero, Livio

    1996-10-01

    KdV theory is constructed systematically through the continuous limit of the Kac-Moerbeke system. The infinitely many commuting vector fields, the conserved functionals, the Lax pairs and the biHamiltonian structure are recovered as the limits of suitably defined linear combinations of homologous objects for the Kac-Moerbeke system. The combinatorial aspects of this recombination method are treated in detail.

  6. Central-line-associated bloodstream infections in a resource-limited South African neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, C; Dramowski, A; Jenkins, A; Bekker, A

    2017-08-25

    The rate of central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in South African (SA) public sector neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is unknown. Tygerberg Children's Hospital (TCH), Cape Town, introduced a neonatal CLABSI surveillance and prevention programme in August 2012. To describe CLABSI events and identify risk factors for development of CLABSI in a resource-limited NICU. A retrospective case-control study was conducted using prospectively collected NICU CLABSI events matched to four randomly selected controls, sampled from the NICU registry between 9 August 2012 and 31 July 2014. Clinical data and laboratory records were reviewed to identify possible risk factors, using stepwise forward logistic regression analysis. A total of 706 central lines were inserted in 530 neonates during the study period. Nineteen CLABSI events were identified, with a CLABSI rate of 5.9/1 000 line days. CLABSI patients were of lower gestational age (28 v. 34 weeks; p=0.003), lower median birth weight (1 170 g v. 1 975 g; p=0.014), had longer catheter dwell times (>4 days) (odds ratio (OR) 5.1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0 - 25.4); p=0.04) and were more likely to have had surgery during their NICU stay (OR 3.5 (95% CI 1.26 - 10); p=0.01). Significant risk factors for CLABSI were length of stay >30 days (OR 20.7 (95% CI 2.1 - 203.2); p=0.009) and central-line insertion in the operating theatre (OR 8.1 (95% CI 1.2 - 54.7); p=0.03). Gram-negative pathogens predominated (12/22; 54%), with most isolates (10/12; 83%) exhibiting multidrug resistance. The TCH NICU CLABSI rate is similar to that reported from resource-limited settings, but exceeds that of high-income countries. Prolonged NICU stay and central-line insertion in the operating theatre were important risk factors for CLABSI development. Intensified neonatal staff training regarding CLABSI maintenance bundle elements and hand hygiene are key to reducing CLABSI rates.

  7. In Vivo Analysis of NH4+ Transport and Central Nitrogen Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Aerobic Nitrogen-Limited Growth

    PubMed Central

    Maleki Seifar, R.; ten Pierick, A.; van Helmond, W.; Pieterse, M. M.; Heijnen, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ammonium is the most common N source for yeast fermentations. Although its transport and assimilation mechanisms are well documented, there have been only a few attempts to measure the in vivo intracellular concentration of ammonium and assess its impact on gene expression. Using an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-based method, we were able to measure the intracellular ammonium concentration in N-limited aerobic chemostat cultivations using three different N sources (ammonium, urea, and glutamate) at the same growth rate (0.05 h−1). The experimental results suggest that, at this growth rate, a similar concentration of intracellular (IC) ammonium, about 3.6 mmol NH4+/literIC, is required to supply the reactions in the central N metabolism, independent of the N source. Based on the experimental results and different assumptions, the vacuolar and cytosolic ammonium concentrations were estimated. Furthermore, we identified a futile cycle caused by NH3 leakage into the extracellular space, which can cost up to 30% of the ATP production of the cell under N-limited conditions, and a futile redox cycle between Gdh1 and Gdh2 reactions. Finally, using shotgun proteomics with protein expression determined relative to a labeled reference, differences between the various environmental conditions were identified and correlated with previously identified N compound-sensing mechanisms. IMPORTANCE In our work, we studied central N metabolism using quantitative approaches. First, intracellular ammonium was measured under different N sources. The results suggest that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells maintain a constant NH4+ concentration (around 3 mmol NH4+/literIC), independent of the applied nitrogen source. We hypothesize that this amount of intracellular ammonium is required to obtain sufficient thermodynamic driving force. Furthermore, our calculations based on thermodynamic analysis of the transport mechanisms of ammonium suggest that ammonium is not equally

  8. Three Decades of Implementation Research in Higher Education: Limitations and Prospects of Theory Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohoutek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article adopts a comparative approach to review three periods of theory development in research into higher education policy implementation. Given the conceptual affinity between Cerych and Sabatier's 1986 seminal study into higher education policy implementation and public policy implementation theory, the field of public policy is chosen for…

  9. Expansive Learning: Benefits and Limitations of Subject-Scientific Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotluschen, Anke

    2005-01-01

    One critical learning theory that has survived is once again being acclaimed. Subject-scientific theory requires learners to be taken seriously. Their reasons and resistance need to be brought into the open. This requirement was too radical for schools since it does not allow a fixed syllabus. It has borne fruit, however, in continuing education.…

  10. Three Decades of Implementation Research in Higher Education: Limitations and Prospects of Theory Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohoutek, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The article adopts a comparative approach to review three periods of theory development in research into higher education policy implementation. Given the conceptual affinity between Cerych and Sabatier's 1986 seminal study into higher education policy implementation and public policy implementation theory, the field of public policy is chosen for…

  11. Drought limitations to leaf-level gas exchange: results from a model linking stomatal optimization and cohesion-tension theory.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Miniat, Chelcy F; Vose, James M

    2016-03-01

    We merge concepts from stomatal optimization theory and cohesion-tension theory to examine the dynamics of three mechanisms that are potentially limiting to leaf-level gas exchange in trees during drought: (1) a 'demand limitation' driven by an assumption of optimal stomatal functioning; (2) 'hydraulic limitation' of water movement from the roots to the leaves; and (3) 'non-stomatal' limitations imposed by declining leaf water status within the leaf. Model results suggest that species-specific 'economics' of stomatal behaviour may play an important role in differentiating species along the continuum of isohydric to anisohydric behaviour; specifically, we show that non-stomatal and demand limitations may reduce stomatal conductance and increase leaf water potential, promoting wide safety margins characteristic of isohydric species. We used model results to develop a diagnostic framework to identify the most likely limiting mechanism to stomatal functioning during drought and showed that many of those features were commonly observed in field observations of tree water use dynamics. Direct comparisons of modelled and measured stomatal conductance further indicated that non-stomatal and demand limitations reproduced observed patterns of tree water use well for an isohydric species but that a hydraulic limitation likely applies in the case of an anisohydric species.

  12. A stochastic model and a functional central limit theorem for information processing in large systems of neurons.

    PubMed

    Höpfner, Reinhard; Brodda, Klaus

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with information transmission in large systems of neurons. We model the membrane potential in a single neuron belonging to a cell tissue by a non time-homogeneous Cox-Ingersoll-Ross type diffusion; in terms of its time-varying expectation, this stochastic process can convey deterministic signals. We model the spike train emitted by this neuron as a Poisson point process compensated by the occupation time of the membrane potential process beyond the excitation threshold. In a large system of neurons 1 < or = i < or = N processing independently the same deterministic signal, we prove a functional central limit theorem for the pooled spike train collected from the N neurons. This pooled spike train allows to recover the deterministic signal, up to some shape transformation which is explicit.

  13. A study of the limitations of linear theory methods as applied to sonic boom calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, Christine M.

    1990-01-01

    Current sonic boom minimization theories have been reviewed to emphasize the capabilities and flexibilities of the methods. Flexibility is important because it is necessary for the designer to meet optimized area constraints while reducing the impact on vehicle aerodynamic performance. Preliminary comparisons of sonic booms predicted for two Mach 3 concepts illustrate the benefits of shaping. Finally, for very simple bodies of revolution, sonic boom predictions were made using two methods - a modified linear theory method and a nonlinear method - for signature shapes which were both farfield N-waves and midfield waves. Preliminary analysis on these simple bodies verified that current modified linear theory prediction methods become inadequate for predicting midfield signatures for Mach numbers above 3. The importance of impulse is sonic boom disturbance and the importance of three-dimensional effects which could not be simulated with the bodies of revolution will determine the validity of current modified linear theory methods in predicting midfield signatures at lower Mach numbers.

  14. On the nonradiative and quasistatic conditions and the limitations of circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zozaya, Alfonso

    2007-06-01

    Field theory is used to analyze a simple circuit and to deduce the conditions for nonradiative and quasistatic fields. From the condition for quasistatic fields, which is the more stringent of the two, Kirchhoff's voltage equation and its range of validity are deduced. These conditions for the validity of circuit theory are not treated appropriately in the undergraduate curricula. A simple numerical problem is given to illustrate these ideas.

  15. Lower limit to the scale of an effective quantum theory of gravitation.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, R R; Grin, Daniel

    2008-01-25

    An effective quantum theory of gravitation in which gravity weakens at energies higher than approximately 10(-3) eV is one way to accommodate the apparent smallness of the cosmological constant. Such a theory predicts departures from the Newtonian inverse-square force law on distances below approximately 0.05 mm. However, it is shown that this modification also leads to changes in the long-range behavior of gravity and is inconsistent with observed gravitational lenses.

  16. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-07

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex.

  17. Dispersal limitation of Tillandsia species correlates with rain and host structure in a central Mexican tropical dry forest

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Seed dispersal permits the colonization of favorable habitats and generation of new populations, facilitating escape from habitats that are in decline. There is little experimental evidence of the factors that limit epiphyte dispersion towards their hosts. In a tropical dry forest in central Mexico, we monitored the phenology of dispersion of epiphyte species of the genus Tillandsia; we tested experimentally whether precipitation could cause failures in seed dispersal and whether seed capture differs among vertical strata and between host species with high (Bursera copallifera) and low (Conzattia multiflora) epiphyte loads. With the exception of one species that presents late dispersion and low abundance, all of the species disperse prior to the onset of the rainy season. However, early rains immobilize the seeds, affecting up to 24% of the fruits in species with late dispersion. We observed that Tillandsia seeds reach both Bursera and Conzattia hosts, but found that adherence to the host is 4–5 times higher in Bursera. Furthermore, seeds liberated from Bursera travel shorter distances and up to half may remain within the same crown, while the highest seed capture takes place in the upper strata of the trees. We conclude that dispersion of Tillandsia seeds is limited by early rains and by the capture of seeds within the trees where populations concentrate. This pattern of capture also helps to explain the high concentrations of epiphytes in certain hosts, while trees with few epiphytes can be simultaneously considered deficient receivers and efficient exporters of seeds. PMID:28158320

  18. Nonparametric Functional Central Limit Theorem for Time Series Regression with Application to Self-normalized Confidence Interval.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonjin; Zhao, Zhibiao; Shao, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the inference of nonparametric mean function in a time series context. The commonly used kernel smoothing estimate is asymptotically normal and the traditional inference procedure then consistently estimates the asymptotic variance function and relies upon normal approximation. Consistent estimation of the asymptotic variance function involves another level of nonparametric smoothing. In practice, the choice of the extra bandwidth parameter can be difficult, the inference results can be sensitive to bandwidth selection and the normal approximation can be quite unsatisfactory in small samples leading to poor coverage. To alleviate the problem, we propose to extend the recently developed self-normalized approach, which is a bandwidth free inference procedure developed for parametric inference, to construct point-wise confidence interval for nonparametric mean function. To justify asymptotic validity of the self-normalized approach, we establish a functional central limit theorem for recursive nonparametric mean regression function estimates under primitive conditions and show that the limiting process is a Gaussian process with non-stationary and dependent increments. The superior finite sample performance of the new approach is demonstrated through simulation studies.

  19. Dispersal limitation of Tillandsia species correlates with rain and host structure in a central Mexican tropical dry forest.

    PubMed

    Victoriano-Romero, Elizabeth; Valencia-Díaz, Susana; Toledo-Hernández, Víctor Hugo; Flores-Palacios, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Seed dispersal permits the colonization of favorable habitats and generation of new populations, facilitating escape from habitats that are in decline. There is little experimental evidence of the factors that limit epiphyte dispersion towards their hosts. In a tropical dry forest in central Mexico, we monitored the phenology of dispersion of epiphyte species of the genus Tillandsia; we tested experimentally whether precipitation could cause failures in seed dispersal and whether seed capture differs among vertical strata and between host species with high (Bursera copallifera) and low (Conzattia multiflora) epiphyte loads. With the exception of one species that presents late dispersion and low abundance, all of the species disperse prior to the onset of the rainy season. However, early rains immobilize the seeds, affecting up to 24% of the fruits in species with late dispersion. We observed that Tillandsia seeds reach both Bursera and Conzattia hosts, but found that adherence to the host is 4-5 times higher in Bursera. Furthermore, seeds liberated from Bursera travel shorter distances and up to half may remain within the same crown, while the highest seed capture takes place in the upper strata of the trees. We conclude that dispersion of Tillandsia seeds is limited by early rains and by the capture of seeds within the trees where populations concentrate. This pattern of capture also helps to explain the high concentrations of epiphytes in certain hosts, while trees with few epiphytes can be simultaneously considered deficient receivers and efficient exporters of seeds.

  20. The viability and limitations of percolation theory in modeling the electrical behavior of carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Rezvanian, O; Peters, K; Zikry, M A

    2013-04-19

    A new modeling method has been proposed to investigate how the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polymer composites are affected by tunneling distance, volume fraction, and tube aspect ratios. A search algorithm and an electrical junction identification method was developed with a percolation approach to determine conductive paths for three-dimensional (3D) carbon nanotube arrangements and to account for electron tunneling effects. The predicted results are used to understand the limitations of percolation theory and experimental measurements and observations, and why percolation theory breaks down for specific CNT arrangements.

  1. A Breath of Fresh Air in Foraging Theory: The Importance of Wind for Food Size Selection in a Central-Place Forager.

    PubMed

    Alma, Andrea Marina; Farji-Brener, Alejandro G; Elizalde, Luciana

    2017-09-01

    Empirical data about food size carried by central-place foragers do not often fit with the optimum predicted by classical foraging theory. Traditionally, biotic constraints such as predation risk and competition have been proposed to explain this inconsistency, leaving aside the possible role of abiotic factors. Here we documented how wind affects the load size of a central-place forager (leaf-cutting ants) through a mathematical model including the whole foraging process. The model showed that as wind speed at ground level increased from 0 to 2 km/h, load size decreased from 91 to 30 mm(2), a prediction that agreed with empirical data from windy zones, highlighting the relevance of considering abiotic factors to predict foraging behavior. Furthermore, wind reduced the range of load sizes that workers should select to maintain a similar rate of food intake and decreased the foraging rate by ∼70% when wind speed increased 1 km/h. These results suggest that wind could reduce the fitness of colonies and limit the geographic distribution of leaf-cutting ants. The developed model offers a complementary explanation for why load size in central-place foragers may not fit theoretical predictions and could serve as a basis to study the effects of other abiotic factors that influence foraging.

  2. Efficacy of PARP inhibitor rucaparib in orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts is limited by ineffective drug penetration into the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Karen E.; Cen, Ling; Murray, James; Calligaris, David; Kizilbash, Sani; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Carlson, Brett L.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Sludden, Julieann; Boddy, Alan V.; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Curtin, Nicola J.; Elmquist, William F.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition can enhance the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ) and prolong survival in orthotopic glioblastoma (GBM) xenografts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combination of the PARP inhibitor rucaparib with TMZ and to correlate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies with efficacy in patient-derived GBM xenograft models. The combination of rucaparib with TMZ was highly effective in vitro in short-term explant cultures derived from GBM12, and similarly, the combination of rucaparib and TMZ (dosed for 5 days every 28 days × 3 cycles) significantly prolonged the time to tumor regrowth by 40% in heterotopic xenografts. In contrast, the addition of rucaparib had no impact on the efficacy of TMZ in GBM12 or GBM39 orthotopic models. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells stably expressing murine BCRP1 or human MDR1, cell accumulation studies demonstrated that rucaparib is transported by both transporters. Consistent with the influence of these efflux pumps on central nervous system drug distribution, Mdr1a/b−/−Bcrp1−/− knockout mice had a significantly higher brain to plasma ratio for rucaparib (1.61 ± 0.25) than wild-type mice (0.11 ± 0.08). A pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation after a single dose confirmed limited accumulation of rucaparib in the brain associated with substantial residual PARP enzymatic activity. Similarly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging demonstrated significantly enhanced accumulation of drug in flank tumor compared to normal brain or orthotopic tumors. Collectively, these results suggest that limited drug delivery into brain tumors may significantly limit the efficacy of rucaparib combined with TMZ in GBM. PMID:26438157

  3. Models of the medical consultation: opportunities and limitations of a game theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, C; Stokes, T; Colman, A M

    2004-12-01

    The medical consultation is best understood as a two-way social interaction involving interactive decision making. Game theory--a theory based on assumptions of rational choice and focusing on interactive decision making--has the potential to provide models of the consultation that can be used to generate empirically testable predictions about the factors that promote quality of care. Three different game structures--the Prisoner's Dilemma game, the Assurance game, and the Centipede game--all provide insights into the possible underlying dynamics of the doctor-patient interaction. Further empirical work is needed to uncover the underlying game structures that occur most commonly in medical consultations. Game theory has the potential to provide a new conceptual and theoretical basis for future empirical work on the interaction between doctors and their patients.

  4. Limitations of Lifting-Line Theory for Estimation of Aileron Hinge-Moment Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Robert S.; Gillis, Clarence L.

    1943-01-01

    Hinge-moment parameters for several typical ailerons were calculated from section data with the aspect-ratio correction as usually determined from lifting-line theory. The calculations showed that the agreement between experimental and calculated results was unsatisfactory. An additional aspect-ratio correction, calculated by the method of lifting-surface theory, was applied to the slope of the curve of hinge-moment coefficient against angle of attack at small angles of attack. This so-called streamline-curvature correction brought the calculated and experimental results into satisfactory agreement.

  5. Chandrasekhar Limit: An Elementary Approach Based on Classical Physics and Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinochet, Jorge; Van Sint Jan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In a brief article published in 1931, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar made public an important astronomical discovery. In his article, the then young Indian astrophysicist introduced what is now known as the "Chandrasekhar limit." This limit establishes the maximum mass of a stellar remnant beyond which the repulsion force between electrons…

  6. Chandrasekhar Limit: An Elementary Approach Based on Classical Physics and Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinochet, Jorge; Van Sint Jan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In a brief article published in 1931, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar made public an important astronomical discovery. In his article, the then young Indian astrophysicist introduced what is now known as the "Chandrasekhar limit." This limit establishes the maximum mass of a stellar remnant beyond which the repulsion force between electrons…

  7. The structures of interstitial hydrogen centers in VO2 in the dilute limit from their vibrational properties and theory

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, W.; Qin, Ying; Fowler, W. B.; ...

    2016-07-28

    The introduction of a large concentration of H into VO2 is known to suppress the insulating phase of the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling below 340 K. We have used infrared spectroscopy and complementary theory to study the properties of interstitial H and D in VO2 in the dilute limit to determine the vibrational frequencies, thermal stabilities, and equilibrium positions of isolated interstitial H and D centers. The vibrational lines of several OH and OD centers were observed to have thermal stabilities similar to that of the hydrogen that suppresses the insulating phase. Theory associates two of the fourmore » possible OH configurations for Hi in the insulating VO2 monoclinic phase with OH lines seen by experiment. Furthermore, theory predicts the energies and vibrational frequencies for configurations with Hi trapped near a substitutional impurity and suggests such defects as candidates for additional OH centers that have been observed.« less

  8. The structures of interstitial hydrogen centers in VO2 in the dilute limit from their vibrational properties and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Weikai; Qin, Ying; Fowler, W. Beall; Stavola, Michael; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-10-01

    The introduction of a large concentration of H into VO2 is known to suppress the insulating phase of the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling below 340 K. We have used infrared spectroscopy and complementary theory to study the properties of interstitial H and D in VO2 in the dilute limit to determine the vibrational frequencies, thermal stabilities, and equilibrium positions of isolated interstitial H and D centers. The vibrational lines of several OH and OD centers were observed to have thermal stabilities similar to that of the hydrogen that suppresses the insulating phase. Theory associates two of the four possible OH configurations for Hi in the insulating VO2 monoclinic phase with OH lines seen by experiment. Furthermore, theory predicts the energies and vibrational frequencies for configurations with Hi trapped near a substitutional impurity and suggests such defects as candidates for additional OH centers that have been observed.

  9. The Limits of Co-Occurrence: Tools and Theories in Language Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfetti, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    Comments on several quantitative approaches to semantic knowledge representations (the focus of this special issue). Points out some of the ways in which Latent Semantic Analysis and Hyperspace Analog to Language fall short of being plausible theories about psychological reality. Examines in-principle failures and wrong-kind failures that arise in…

  10. Further analysis of clinical feasibility of OCT-based glaucoma diagnosis with Pigment epithelium central limit- Inner limit of the retina Minimal Distance (PIMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Malmberg, Filip; Sandberg-Melin, Camilla

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to elucidate if comparison of angular segments of Pigment epithelium central limit- Inner limit of the retina Minimal Distance, measured over 2π radians in the frontal plane (PIMD-2π) between visits of a patient, renders sufficient precision for detection of loss of nerve fibers in the optic nerve head. An optic nerve head raster scanned cube was captured with a TOPCON 3D OCT 2000 (Topcon, Japan) device in one early to moderate stage glaucoma eye of each of 13 patients. All eyes were recorded at two visits less than 1 month apart. At each visit, 3 volumes were captured. Each volume was extracted from the OCT device for analysis. Then, angular PIMD was segmented three times over 2π radians in the frontal plane, resolved with a semi-automatic algorithm in 500 equally separated steps, PIMD-2π. It was found that individual segmentations within volumes, within visits, within subjects can be phase adjusted to each other in the frontal plane using cross-correlation. Cross correlation was also used to phase adjust volumes within visits within subjects and visits to each other within subjects. Then, PIMD-2π for each subject was split into 250 bundles of 2 adjacent PIMDs. Finally, the sources of variation for estimates of segments of PIMD-2π were derived with analysis of variance assuming a mixed model. The variation among adjacent PIMDS was found very small in relation to the variation among segmentations. The variation among visits was found insignificant in relation to the variation among volumes and the variance for segmentations was found to be on the order of 20 % of that for volumes. The estimated variances imply that, if 3 segmentations are averaged within a volume and at least 10 volumes are averaged within a visit, it is possible to estimate around a 10 % reduction of a PIMD-2π segment from baseline to a subsequent visit as significant. Considering a loss rate for a PIMD-2π segment of 23 μm/yr., 4 visits per year, and averaging 3

  11. Optical absorption in the strong-coupling limit of Eliashberg theory

    SciTech Connect

    Combescot, R.; Dolgov, O.V.; Rainer, D.; Shulga, S.V.

    1996-02-01

    We calculate the optical conductivity of superconductors in the strong-coupling limit. In this anomalous limit the typical energy scale is set by the coupling energy, and other energy scales such as the energy of the bosons mediating the attraction are negligibly small. We find a universal frequency dependence of the optical absorption which is dominated by bound states and differs significantly from the weak-coupling results. A comparison with absorption spectra of superconductors with enhanced electron-phonon coupling shows that typical features of the strong-coupling limit are already present at intermediate coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Analysis and correlation with theory of rotor lift-limit test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, M.

    1979-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program to define the cruise performance and determine any limitations to lift and propulsive force of a conventional helicopter rotor is described. A 2.96 foot radius model rotor was used. The maximum lift and propulsive force obtainable from an articulated rotor for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67, and the blade load growth as the lift approaches the limit are determined. Cruise rotor performance for advance ratios of 0.4 to 0.67 and the sensitivity of the rotor forces and moments to rotor control inputs as the lift limit is approached are established.

  13. In the footsteps of Robert Marshall: Proposed research of white spruce growth and movement at the tree limit, central Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Droessler, T.D.

    1992-03-01

    The proposed research will quantify white spruce growth and document its latitudinal stability at the tree limit in the central Brooks Range over the life span of the living trees. The goal is to link tree growth and tree position to summer temperature and precipitation. Historical records from 1929 to 1938 from work by Robert Marshall have been used to identify tree limit sites and provide information to interpret the present location of the tree limit.

  14. Time perspective and the theory of planned behavior: moderate predictors of physical activity among central Appalachian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how well time perspective and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) predicted physical activity among adolescents residing in the central Appalachian region of the United States. A descriptive, correlational design was used. The setting was a rural high school in central Appalachia. The sample included 185 students in grades 9 through 12. Data were collected in school. Variables included components of the TPB, time perspective, and various levels of exercise. Data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis. The TPB was a moderate predictor of exercise frequency among central Appalachian adolescents, accounting for 42% of the variance. Time perspective did not add to the predictive ability of the TPB to predict exercise frequency in this sample. This study provides support for the TPB for predicting frequency of exercise among central Appalachian adolescents. By understanding the role of the TPB in predicting physical activity among adolescents, nurse practitioners will be able to adapt intervention strategies to improve the physical activity behaviors of this population. Copyright © 2014 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Postoperative Central Nervous System Infection After Neurosurgery in a Modernized, Resource-Limited Tertiary Neurosurgical Center in South Asia.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Swathi; Nair, M Nathan; Krishnan, Shyam Sundar; Cai, Ling; Gu, Weiling; Vasudevan, Madabushi Chakravarthy

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative central nervous system infections (PCNSIs) are rare but serious complications after neurosurgery. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and causative pathogens of PCNSIs at a modernized, resource-limited neurosurgical center in South Asia. A retrospective analysis was conducted of the medical records of all 363 neurosurgical cases performed between June 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, at a neurosurgical center in South Asia. Data from all operative neurosurgical cases during the 13-month period were included. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis indicated that 71 of the 363 surgical cases had low CSF glucose or CSF leukocytosis. These 71 cases were categorized as PCNSIs. The PCNSIs with positive CSF cultures (9.86%) all had gram-negative bacteria with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5), Escherichia coli (n = 1), or Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1). The data suggest a higher rate of death (P = 0.031), a higher rate of CSF leak (P < 0.001), and a higher rate of cranial procedures (P < 0.001) among the infected patients and a higher rate of CSF leak among the patients with culture-positive infections (P = 0.038). This study summarizes the prevalence, causative organism of PCNSI, and antibiotic usage for all of the neurosurgical cases over a 13-month period in a modernized yet resource-limited neurosurgical center located in South Asia. The results from this study highlight the PCNSI landscape in an area of the world that is often underreported in the neurosurgical literature because of the paucity of clinical neurosurgical research undertaken there. This study shows an increasing prevalence of gram-negative organisms in CSF cultures from PCNSIs, which supports a trend in the recent literature of increasing gram-negative bacillary meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The light asymptotic limit of conformal blocks in Toda field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Hasmik; Poghossian, Rubik; Sarkissian, Gor

    2016-05-01

    We compute the light asymptotic limit of A n-1 Toda conformal blocks by using the AGT correspondence. We show that for certain class of CFT blocks the corresponding Nekrasov partition functions in this limit are simplified drastically being represented as a sum of a restricted class of Young diagrams. In the particular case of A 2 Toda we also compute the corresponding conformal blocks using conventional CFT techniques finding a perfect agreement with the results obtained from the Nekrasov partition functions.

  17. Driven colloidal fluids: construction of dynamical density functional theories from exactly solvable limits.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, Alberto; Krüger, Matthias; Brader, Joseph M

    2016-06-22

    The classical dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) provides an approximate extension of equilibrium DFT to treat nonequilibrium systems subject to Brownian dynamics. However, the method fails when applied to driven systems, such as sheared colloidal dispersions. The breakdown of DDFT can be traced back to an inadequate treatment of the flow-induced distortion of the pair correlation functions. By considering the distortion of the pair correlations to second order in the flow-rate we show how to systematically correct the DDFT for driven systems. As an application of our approach we consider Poiseuille flow. The theory predicts that the particles will accumulate in spatial regions where the local shear rate is small, an effect known as shear-induced migration. We compare these predictions to Brownian dynamics simulations with generally good agreement.

  18. Driven colloidal fluids: construction of dynamical density functional theories from exactly solvable limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scacchi, Alberto; Krüger, Matthias; Brader, Joseph M.

    2016-06-01

    The classical dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) provides an approximate extension of equilibrium DFT to treat nonequilibrium systems subject to Brownian dynamics. However, the method fails when applied to driven systems, such as sheared colloidal dispersions. The breakdown of DDFT can be traced back to an inadequate treatment of the flow-induced distortion of the pair correlation functions. By considering the distortion of the pair correlations to second order in the flow-rate we show how to systematically correct the DDFT for driven systems. As an application of our approach we consider Poiseuille flow. The theory predicts that the particles will accumulate in spatial regions where the local shear rate is small, an effect known as shear-induced migration. We compare these predictions to Brownian dynamics simulations with generally good agreement.

  19. Intrinsic carrier mobility of Dirac cones: the limitations of deformation potential theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenzhu; Wang, Jinying; Liu, Zhirong

    2014-10-14

    An analytic formula for the intrinsic carrier mobility of Dirac cones under acoustic phonon scattering conditions was obtained for 2D systems such as graphene and graphyne. The influences of both the transverse acoustic (TA) and longitudinal acoustic phonon modes and that of the anisotropy were considered. Some extraordinary characteristics unlike those predicted by the deformation potential theory were revealed: the mobility at the neutrality point is proportional to 1/T(3), where T is the temperature; also, carrier scattering by the TA phonons dominates the mobility of graphene, which explains the overestimation of the measured deformation potential of graphene in previous experiments. The theory was combined with first-principles calculations to determine the mobility of graphene and five graphynes with Dirac cones. It was predicted that most graphynes will have much higher mobility than graphene because of the suppression of the scattering by the TA phonons.

  20. Demonstrating Energy Migration in Coupled Oscillators: A Central Concept in the Theory of Unimolecular Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcotte, Ronald E.

    2005-01-01

    This physical chemistry lecture demonstration is designed to aid the understanding of intramolecular energy transfer processes as part of the presentation of the theory of unimolecular reaction rates. Coupled pendulums are used to show the rate of migration of energy between oscillators under resonant and nonresonant conditions with varying…

  1. Event Schemas in Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Role of Theory of Mind and Weak Central Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loth, Eva; Gomez, Juan Carlos; Happe, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Event schemas (generalized knowledge of what happens at common real-life events, e.g., a birthday party) are an important cognitive tool for social understanding: They provide structure for social experiences while accounting for many variable aspects. Using an event narratives task, this study tested the hypotheses that theory of mind (ToM)…

  2. Demonstrating Energy Migration in Coupled Oscillators: A Central Concept in the Theory of Unimolecular Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcotte, Ronald E.

    2005-01-01

    This physical chemistry lecture demonstration is designed to aid the understanding of intramolecular energy transfer processes as part of the presentation of the theory of unimolecular reaction rates. Coupled pendulums are used to show the rate of migration of energy between oscillators under resonant and nonresonant conditions with varying…

  3. Kinetic limitations on the diffusional control theory of the ablation rate of carbon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the theoretical maximum oxidation rate is limited in many cases even at temperatures much higher than 1650 deg K, not by oxygen transport, but by the kinetics of the carbon-oxygen reaction itself. Mass-loss rates have been calculated at air pressures of 0.01 atm, 1 atm, and 100 atm. It is found that at high temperatures the rate of the oxidation reaction is much slower than has generally been assumed on the basis of a simple linear extrapolation of Scala's 'fast' and 'slow' rate expressions. Accordingly it cannot be assumed that a transport limitation inevitably must be reached at high temperatures.

  4. Kinetic limitations on the diffusional control theory of the ablation rate of carbon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1971-01-01

    It is shown that the theoretical maximum oxidation rate is limited in many cases even at temperatures much higher than 1650 deg K, not by oxygen transport, but by the kinetics of the carbon-oxygen reaction itself. Mass-loss rates have been calculated at air pressures of 0.01 atm, 1 atm, and 100 atm. It is found that at high temperatures the rate of the oxidation reaction is much slower than has generally been assumed on the basis of a simple linear extrapolation of Scala's 'fast' and 'slow' rate expressions. Accordingly it cannot be assumed that a transport limitation inevitably must be reached at high temperatures.

  5. Gauge field theory coherent states (GCS): IV. Infinite tensor product and thermodynamical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, T.; Winkler, O.

    2001-12-01

    In the canonical approach to Lorentzian quantum general relativity in four spacetime dimensions an important step forward has been made by Ashtekar, Isham and Lewandowski some eight years ago through the introduction of a Hilbert space structure, which was later proved to be a faithful representation of the canonical commutation and adjointness relations of the quantum field algebra of diffeomorphism invariant gauge field theories by Ashtekar, Lewandowski, Marolf, Mourão and Thiemann. This Hilbert space, together with its generalization due to Baez and Sawin, is appropriate for semi-classical quantum general relativity if the spacetime is spatially compact. In the spatially non-compact case, however, an extension of the Hilbert space is needed in order to approximate metrics that are macroscopically nowhere degenerate. For this purpose, in this paper we apply the theory of the infinite tensor product (ITP) of Hilbert Spaces, developed by von Neumann more than sixty years ago, to quantum general relativity. The cardinality of the number of tensor product factors can take the value of any possible Cantor aleph, making this mathematical theory well suited to our problem in which a Hilbert space is attached to each edge of an arbitrarily complicated, generally infinite graph. The new framework opens access to a new arsenal of techniques, appropriate to describe fascinating physics such as quantum topology change, semi-classical quantum gravity, effective low-energy physics etc from the universal point of view of the ITP. In particular, the study of photons and gravitons propagating on fluctuating quantum spacetimes should now be in reach.

  6. Spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas I: General theory and nonrelativistic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2012-02-01

    Using the system of the Klimontovich and Maxwell equations, general expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic field, charge and current densities) from uncorrelated plasma particles are derived, which are covariantly correct within the theory of special relativity. The general expressions hold for arbitrary momentum dependences of the plasma particle distribution functions and for collective and non-collective fluctuations. In this first paper of a series, the results are illustrated for the important special case of nonrelativistic isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution functions providing in particular the thermal fluctuations of weakly amplified modes and aperiodic modes.

  7. Case Report: Using Attribution Theory to Limit Need for Neuroleptic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriebel, Jr., George W.; Huckel, Lorraine H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of neuroleptic medicine in the treatment of schizophrenia is often predicated on the goal of eliminating psychotic symptoms. Use of neuroleptics, however, may produce unfortunate side effects. A case is presented which illustrates the time-limited use of neuroleptics. (JN)

  8. θ dependence of 4D S U (N ) gauge theories in the large-N limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonati, Claudio; D'Elia, Massimo; Rossi, Paolo; Vicari, Ettore

    2016-10-01

    We study the large-N scaling behavior of the θ dependence of the ground-state energy density E (θ ) of four-dimensional (4D) S U (N ) gauge theories and two-dimensional (2D) C PN -1 models, where θ is the parameter associated with the Lagrangian topological term. We consider its θ expansion around θ =0 , E (θ )-E (0 )=1/2 χ θ2(1 +b2θ2+b4θ4+…), where χ is the topological susceptibility and b2 n are dimensionless coefficients. We focus on the first few coefficients b2 n, which parametrize the deviation from a simple Gaussian distribution of the topological charge at θ =0 . We present a numerical analysis of Monte Carlo simulations of 4D S U (N ) lattice gauge theories for N =3 , 4, 6 in the presence of an imaginary θ term. The results provide a robust evidence of the large-N behavior predicted by standard large-N scaling arguments, i.e. b2 n=O (N-2 n). In particular, we obtain b2=b¯ 2/N2+O (1 /N4) with b¯2=-0.23 (3 ). We also show that the large-N scaling scenario applies to 2D C PN -1 models as well, by an analytical computation of the leading large-N θ dependence around θ =0 .

  9. Exploring the remarkable limits of continuum elastic theory to understand the nanomechanics of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Wouter; Gibbons, Melissa; Klug, William; Wuite, Gijs

    2009-03-01

    We report nanoindentation experiments by atomic force microscopy on capsids of the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). HBV is investigated because its capsids can form in either a smaller T=3 or a bigger T=4 configuration, making it an ideal system to test the predictive power of continuum elastic theory to describe nanometre-sized objects. It is shown that for small, consecutive indentations the particles behave reversibly linear and no material fatigue occurs. For larger indentations the particles start to deform non-linearly. The experimental force response fits very well with finite element simulations on coarse grained models of HBV capsids. Furthermore, this also fits with thin shell simulations guided by the F"oppl- von K'arm'an (FvK) number (the dimensionless ratio of stretching and bending stiffness of a thin shell). Both the T=3 and T=4 morphology are very well described by the simulations and the capsid material turns out to have the same Young's modulus, as expected. The presented results demonstrate the surprising strength of continuum elastic theory to describe indentation of viral capsids.

  10. The Critical Richardson Number and Limits of Applicability of Local Similarity Theory in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Andreas, Edgar L.; Fairall, Christopher W.; Guest, Peter S.; Persson, P. Ola G.

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of atmospheric turbulence made over the Arctic pack ice during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean experiment (SHEBA) are used to determine the limits of applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (in the local scaling formulation) in the stable atmospheric boundary layer. Based on the spectral analysis of wind velocity and air temperature fluctuations, it is shown that, when both the gradient Richardson number, Ri, and the flux Richardson number, Rf, exceed a `critical value' of about 0.20-0.25, the inertial subrange associated with the Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade dies out and vertical turbulent fluxes become small. Some small-scale turbulence survives even in this supercritical regime, but this is non-Kolmogorov turbulence, and it decays rapidly with further increasing stability. Similarity theory is based on the turbulent fluxes in the high-frequency part of the spectra that are associated with energy-containing/flux-carrying eddies. Spectral densities in this high-frequency band diminish as the Richardson-Kolmogorov energy cascade weakens; therefore, the applicability of local Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in stable conditions is limited by the inequalities Ri < Ri cr and Rf < Rf cr. However, it is found that Rf cr = 0.20-0.25 is a primary threshold for applicability. Applying this prerequisite shows that the data follow classical Monin-Obukhov local z-less predictions after the irrelevant cases (turbulence without the Richardson-Kolmogorov cascade) have been filtered out.

  11. Central kinematics of the globular cluster NGC 2808: upper limit on the mass of an intermediate-mass black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützgendorf, N.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Gebhardt, K.; Baumgardt, H.; Noyola, E.; Jalali, B.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Neumayer, N.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Globular clusters are an excellent laboratory for stellar population and dynamical research. Recent studies have shown that these stellar systems are not as simple as previously assumed. With multiple stellar populations as well as outer rotation and mass segregation they turn out to exhibit high complexity. This includes intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) which are proposed to sit at the centers of some massive globular clusters. Today's high angular resolution ground based spectrographs allow velocity-dispersion measurements at a spatial resolution comparable to the radius of influence for plausible IMBH masses, and to detect changes in the inner velocity-dispersion profile. Together with high quality photometric data from HST, it is possible to constrain black-hole masses by their kinematic signatures. Aims: We determine the central velocity-dispersion profile of the globular cluster NGC 2808 using VLT/FLAMES spectroscopy. In combination with HST/ACS data our goal is to probe whether this massive cluster hosts an IMBH at its center and constrain the cluster mass to light ratio as well as its total mass. Methods: We derive a velocity-dispersion profile from integral field spectroscopy in the center and Fabry Perot data for larger radii. High resolution HST data are used to obtain the surface brightness profile. Together, these data sets are compared to dynamical models with varying parameters such as mass to light ratio profiles and black-hole masses. Results: Using analytical Jeans models in combination with variable M/LV profiles from N-body simulations we find that the best fit model is a no black hole solution. After applying various Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the uncertainties, we derive an upper limit of the back hole mass of MBH < 1 × 104 M⊙ (with 95% confidence limits) and a global mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = (2.1 ± 0.2) M⊙/L⊙. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the

  12. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  13. Ring-polymer instanton theory of electron transfer in the nonadiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.

    2015-10-01

    We take the golden-rule instanton method derived in the previous paper [J. O. Richardson, R. Bauer, and M. Thoss, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134115 (2015)] and reformulate it using a ring-polymer instanton approach. This gives equations which can be used to compute the rates of electron-transfer reactions in the nonadiabatic (golden-rule) limit numerically within a semiclassical approximation. The multidimensional ring-polymer instanton trajectories are obtained efficiently by minimization of the action. In this form, comparison with Wolynes' quantum instanton method [P. G. Wolynes, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6559 (1987)] is possible and we show that our semiclassical approach is the steepest-descent limit of this method. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of both methods and give examples of where the new approach is more accurate.

  14. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  15. Monotonic convergent optimal control theory with strict limitations on the spectrum of optimized laser fields.

    PubMed

    Gollub, Caroline; Kowalewski, Markus; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2008-08-15

    We present a modified optimal control scheme based on the Krotov method, which allows for strict limitations on the spectrum of the optimized laser fields. A frequency constraint is introduced and derived mathematically correct, without losing monotonic convergence of the algorithm. The method guarantees a close link to learning loop control experiments and is demonstrated for the challenging control of nonresonant Raman transitions, which are used to implement a set of global quantum gates for molecular vibrational qubits.

  16. Theory of Molecular Cloud Formation through Colliding Flows: Successes and Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennebelle, P.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the recent efforts which have been made to understand the formation of molecular clouds through the accumulation of diffuse material, a scenario sometimes called “colliding flows”. We present a set of statistics which have been inferred from these simulations and which seem to agree reasonably with observations seemingly suggesting that this scenario could indeed be applied to understand molecular cloud formation. We also emphasize the limits of this highly idealized model.

  17. Limit Distribution Theory for Maximum Likelihood Estimation of a Log-Concave Density.

    PubMed

    Balabdaoui, Fadoua; Rufibach, Kaspar; Wellner, Jon A

    2009-06-01

    We find limiting distributions of the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a log-concave density, i.e. a density of the form f(0) = exp varphi(0) where varphi(0) is a concave function on R. Existence, form, characterizations and uniform rates of convergence of the MLE are given by Rufibach (2006) and Dümbgen and Rufibach (2007). The characterization of the log-concave MLE in terms of distribution functions is the same (up to sign) as the characterization of the least squares estimator of a convex density on [0, infinity) as studied by Groeneboom, Jongbloed and Wellner (2001b). We use this connection to show that the limiting distributions of the MLE and its derivative are, under comparable smoothness assumptions, the same (up to sign) as in the convex density estimation problem. In particular, changing the smoothness assumptions of Groeneboom, Jongbloed and Wellner (2001b) slightly by allowing some higher derivatives to vanish at the point of interest, we find that the pointwise limiting distributions depend on the second and third derivatives at 0 of H(k), the "lower invelope" of an integrated Brownian motion process minus a drift term depending on the number of vanishing derivatives of varphi(0) = log f(0) at the point of interest. We also establish the limiting distribution of the resulting estimator of the mode M(f(0)) and establish a new local asymptotic minimax lower bound which shows the optimality of our mode estimator in terms of both rate of convergence and dependence of constants on population values.

  18. Spin Chain in Magnetic Field: Limitations of the Large-N Mean-Field Theory

    DOE PAGES

    Wohlfeld, K.; Chen, Cheng-Chien; van Veenendaal, M.; ...

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent success in describing the spin and orbital spectrum of a spin-orbital chain using a large-N mean-field approximation [Phys. Rev. B 91, 165102 (2015)], we apply the same formalism to the case of a spin chain in the external magnetic field. It occurs that in this case, which corresponds to N=2 in the approximation, the large-N mean-field theory cannot qualitatively reproduce the spin excitation spectra at high magnetic fields, which polarize more than 50% of the spins in the magnetic ground state. This, rather counterintuitively, shows that the physics of a spin chain can under some circumstancesmore » be regarded as more complex than the physics of a spin-orbital chain.« less

  19. Spin Chain in Magnetic Field: Limitations of the Large-N Mean-Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfeld, K.; Chen, Cheng-Chien; van Veenendaal, M. ; Devereaux, T. P.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recent success in describing the spin and orbital spectrum of a spin-orbital chain using a large-N mean-field approximation [Phys. Rev. B 91, 165102 (2015)], we apply the same formalism to the case of a spin chain in the external magnetic field. It occurs that in this case, which corresponds to N=2 in the approximation, the large-N mean-field theory cannot qualitatively reproduce the spin excitation spectra at high magnetic fields, which polarize more than 50% of the spins in the magnetic ground state. This, rather counterintuitively, shows that the physics of a spin chain can under some circumstances be regarded as more complex than the physics of a spin-orbital chain.

  20. Limitations of effective medium theory in multilayer graphite/hBN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, René; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Gjerding, Morten Niklas; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-07-01

    We apply effective medium theory (EMT) to metamaterials consisting of a varying number of consecutive sheets of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, and compare this with a full calculation of the permittivity and the reflection based on the tight binding method and the transfer matrix method in order to study the convergence to EMT. We find that convergence is reached for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions already for five sheets but that for ≈30 sheets multiple reflection effects causes the reflection spectrum to differ from EMT. We show that modes that are evanescent in air are extremely sensitive to the electronic details of the sheets near the structure boundary and that EMT estimates poorly the reflection of these modes, causing an overestimation of the Purcell factor. Finally, we offer an improved EMT, which gives far better convergence in the low-energy regime.

  1. Thinking about a Limited Future Enhances the Positivity of Younger and Older Adults’ Recall: Support for Socioemotional Selectivity Theory

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sarah J.; Opitz, Philipp C.; Martins, Bruna; Sakaki, Michiko; Mather, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Compared with younger adults, older adults have a relative preference to attend to and remember positive over negative information. This is known as the “positivity effect,” and researchers have typically evoked socioemotional selectivity theory to explain it. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, as people get older they begin to perceive their time left in life as more limited. These reduced time horizons prompt older adults to prioritize achieving emotional gratification and thus exhibit increased positivity in attention and recall. Although this is the most commonly cited explanation of the positivity effect, there is currently a lack of clear experimental evidence demonstrating a link between time horizons and positivity. The goal of the current research was to address this issue. In two separate experiments, we asked participants to complete a writing activity, which directed them to think of time as being either limited or expansive (Experiments 1 and 2) or did not orient them to think about time in a particular manner (Experiment 2). Participants were then shown a series of emotional pictures, which they subsequently tried to recall. Results from both studies showed that regardless of chronological age, thinking about a limited future enhanced the relative positivity of participants’ recall. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 showed that this effect was not driven by changes in mood. Thus, the fact that older adults’ recall is typically more positive than younger adults’ recall may index naturally shifting time horizons and goals with age. PMID:27112461

  2. The heat dissipation limit theory and evolution of life histories in endotherms--time to dispose of the disposable soma theory?

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Król, Elzbieta

    2010-11-01

    A major factor influencing life-history strategies of endotherms is body size. Larger endotherms live longer, develop more slowly, breed later and less frequently, and have fewer offspring per attempt at breeding. The classical evolutionary explanation for this pattern is that smaller animals experience greater extrinsic mortality, which favors early reproduction at high intensity. This leads to a short lifespan and early senescence by three suggested mechanisms. First, detrimental late-acting mutations cannot be removed because of the low force of selection upon older animals (mutation accumulation). Second, genes that promote early reproduction will be favored in small animals, even if they have later detrimental effects (antagonistic pleiotropy). Third, small animals may be forced to reduce their investment in longevity assurance mechanisms (LAMs) in favor of investment in reproduction (the disposable soma theory, DST). The DST hinges on three premises: that LAMs exist, that such LAMs are energetically expensive and that the supply of energy is limited. By contrast, the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory provides a different conceptual perspective on the evolution of life histories in relation to body size. We suggest that rather than being limited, energy supplies in the environment are often unlimited, particularly when animals are breeding, and that animals are instead constrained by their maximum capacity to dissipate body heat, generated as a by-product of their metabolism. Because heat loss is fundamentally a surface-based phenomenon, the low surface-to-volume ratio of larger animals generates significant problems for dissipating the body heat associated with reproductive effort, which then limits their current reproductive investment. We suggest that this is the primary reason why fecundity declines as animal size increases. Because large animals are constrained by their capacity for heat dissipation, they have low reproductive rates. Consequently, only

  3. Accurate integral equation theory for the central force model of liquid water and ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiye, Toshiko; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1988-10-01

    The atom-atom pair correlation functions and thermodynamics of the central force model of water, introduced by Lemberg, Stillinger, and Rahman, have been calculated accurately by an integral equation method which incorporates two new developments. First, a rapid new scheme has been used to solve the Ornstein-Zernike equation. This scheme combines the renormalization methods of Allnatt, and Rossky and Friedman with an extension of the trigonometric basis-set solution of Labik and co-workers. Second, by adding approximate ``bridge'' functions to the hypernetted-chain (HNC) integral equation, we have obtained predictions for liquid water in which the hydrogen bond length and number are in good agreement with ``exact'' computer simulations of the same model force laws. In addition, for dilute ionic solutions, the ion-oxygen and ion-hydrogen coordination numbers display both the physically correct stoichiometry and good agreement with earlier simulations. These results represent a measurable improvement over both a previous HNC solution of the central force model and the ex-RISM integral equation solutions for the TIPS and other rigid molecule models of water.

  4. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2014-07-22

    This report consists of two parts. In the first part we describe a study of the heating of microprotrusions on surfaces of accelerating structures. This ;process is believed to lead to breakdown in these structures. Our study revealed that for current accelerator parameters melting should not occur due to space charge limitations of the current emitted by a protrusion. The second part describes a novel concept to develop THz range sources based on harmonic cyclotron masers for driving future colliders. This work was stimulated by a recent request of SLAC to develop high power, high-efficiency sources of sub-THz radiation for future high-gradient accelerators.

  5. Quantum limits on optical phase estimation accuracy from classical rate-distortion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Ranjith

    2014-12-04

    The classical information-theoretic lower bound on the distortion of a random variable upon transmission through a noisy channel is applied to quantum-optical phase estimation. An approach for obtaining Bayesian lower bounds on the phase estimation accuracy is described that employs estimates of the classical capacity of the relevant quantum-optical channels. The Heisenberg limit for lossless phase estimation is derived for arbitrary probe state and prior distributions of the phase, and shot-noise scaling of the phase accuracy is established in the presence of nonzero loss for a parallel entanglement-assisted strategy with a single probe mode.

  6. Coupled-cluster theory of a gas of strongly-interacting electrons in the dilute limit

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bodgan; Cardenas, Andres L

    2008-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a dilute gas of strongly-interacting fermions in the framework of the coupled-cluster expansion (CCE). We demonstrate that properties such as universality, opening of a gap in the excitation spectrum and applicability of s-wave approximations appear naturally in the CCE approach. In the zero-density limit, we show that the ground-state energy density depends on only one parameter which in turn may depend at most on the spatial dimensionality of the system.

  7. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Joanny, Fanny; Löhr, Sascha J Z; Engleitner, Thomas; Lell, Bertrand; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control.

  8. Limit of blank and limit of detection of Plasmodium falciparum thick blood smear microscopy in a routine setting in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper malaria diagnosis depends on the detection of asexual forms of Plasmodium spp. in the blood. Thick blood smear microscopy is the accepted gold standard of malaria diagnosis and is widely implemented. Surprisingly, diagnostic performance of this method is not well investigated and many clinicians in African routine settings base treatment decisions independent of microscopy results. This leads to overtreatment and poor management of other febrile diseases. Implementation of quality control programmes is recommended, but requires sustained funding, external logistic support and constant training and supervision of the staff. This study describes an easily applicable method to assess the performance of thick blood smear microscopy by determining the limit of blank and limit of detection. These two values are representative of the diagnostic quality and allow the correct discrimination between positive and negative samples. Methods Standard-conform methodology was applied and adapted to determine the limit of blank and the limit of detection of two thick blood smear microscopy methods (WHO and Lambaréné method) in a research centre in Lambaréné, Gabon. Duplicates of negative and low parasitaemia thick blood smears were read by several microscopists. The mean and standard deviation of the results were used to calculate the limit of blank and subsequently the limit of detection. Results The limit of blank was 0 parasites/μL for both methods. The limit of detection was 62 and 88 parasites/μL for the Lambaréné and WHO method, respectively. Conclusion With a simple, back-of-the-envelope calculation, the performance of two malaria microscopy methods can be measured. These results are specific for each diagnostic unit and cannot be generalized but implementation of a system to control microscopy performance can improve confidence in parasitological results and thereby strengthen malaria control. PMID:24929248

  9. Ising spin-glass transition in a magnetic field outside the limit of validity of mean-field theory.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, L; Parisi, G; Ricci-Tersenghi, F; Ruiz-Lorenzo, J J

    2009-12-31

    The spin-glass transition in a magnetic field is studied both in and out of the limit of validity of mean-field theory on a diluted one dimensional chain of Ising spins where exchange bonds occur with a probability decaying as the inverse power of the distance. Varying the power in this long-range model corresponds, in a one-to-one relationship, to changing the dimension in spin-glass short-range models. Evidence for a spin-glass transition in a magnetic field is found also for systems whose equivalent dimension is below the upper critical dimension in a zero magnetic field.

  10. Shot-Noise Limited Single-Molecule FRET Histograms: Comparison between Theory and Experiments†

    PubMed Central

    Nir, Eyal; Michalet, Xavier; Hamadani, Kambiz M.; Laurence, Ted A.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy; Weiss, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    We describe a simple approach and present a straightforward numerical algorithm to compute the best fit shot-noise limited proximity ratio histogram (PRH) in single-molecule fluorescence resonant energy transfer diffusion experiments. The key ingredient is the use of the experimental burst size distribution, as obtained after burst search through the photon data streams. We show how the use of an alternated laser excitation scheme and a correspondingly optimized burst search algorithm eliminates several potential artifacts affecting the calculation of the best fit shot-noise limited PRH. This algorithm is tested extensively on simulations and simple experimental systems. We find that dsDNA data exhibit a wider PRH than expected from shot noise only and hypothetically account for it by assuming a small Gaussian distribution of distances with an average standard deviation of 1.6 Å. Finally, we briefly mention the results of a future publication and illustrate them with a simple two-state model system (DNA hairpin), for which the kinetic transition rates between the open and closed conformations are extracted. PMID:17078646

  11. Rigorous dynamics and radiation theory for a Pauli-Fierz model in the ultraviolet limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bertini, Massimo; Noja, Diego; Posilicano, Andrea

    2005-10-01

    The present paper is devoted to the detailed study of quantization and evolution of the point limit of the Pauli-Fierz model for a charged oscillator interacting with the electromagnetic field in dipole approximation. In particular, a well defined dynamics is constructed for the classical model, which is subsequently quantized according to the Segal scheme. To this end, the classical model in the point limit, already obtained by Noja and Posilicano [Ann. I.H.P. Phys. Theor. 71, 425 (1999)], is reformulated as a second order abstract wave equation, and a consistent quantum evolution is given. This allows a study of the behavior of the survival and transition amplitudes for the process of decay of the excited states of the charged particle, and the emission of photons in the decay process. In particular, for the survival amplitude the exact time behavior is found. This is completely determined by the resonances of the systems plus a tail term prevailing in the asymptotic, long time regime. Moreover, the survival amplitude exhibits in a fairly clear way the Lamb shift correction to the unperturbed frequencies of the oscillator.

  12. Strong electrolyte continuum theory solution for equilibrium profiles, diffusion limitation, and conductance in charged ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, D G

    1985-01-01

    The solution for the ion flux through a membrane channel that incorporates the electrolyte nature of the aqueous solution is a difficult theoretical problem that, until now, has not been properly formulated. The difficulty arises from the complicated electrostatic problem presented by a high dielectric aqueous channel piercing a low dielectric lipid membrane. The problem is greatly simplified by assuming that the ratio of the dielectric constant of the water to that of the lipid is infinite. It is shown that this is a good approximation for most channels of biological interest. This assumption allows one to derive simple analytical expressions for the Born image potential and the potential from a fixed charge in the channel, and it leads to a differential equation for the potential from the background electrolyte. This leads to a rigorous solution for the ion flux or the equilibrium potential based on a combination of the Nernst-Planck equation and strong electrolyte theory (i.e., Gouy-Chapman or Debye-Huckel). This approach is illustrated by solving the system of equations for the specific case of a large channel containing fixed negative charges. The following characteristics of this channels are discussed: anion and mono- and divalent cation conductance, saturation of current with increasing concentration, current-voltage relationship, influence of location and valence of fixed charge, and interaction between ions. The qualitative behavior of this channel is similar to that of the acetylcholine receptor channel. PMID:2410048

  13. Turbulence Generation in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Limitations of the Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Lenschow, Donald; LeMone, Margaret; Mahrt, Larry

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent fluxes from the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) field experiment are further analyzed for both day- and nighttime as a follow-on to the investigation of the nighttime turbulence in Sun et al. (2012). The behavior of momentum and heat fluxes is investigated as functions of wind speed and the bulk temperature difference between observation heights and the surface. Vertical variations of momentum and heat flux at a given height z are correlated and are explained in terms of the energy and heat balance in a layer above the ground surface in which the surface heating/cooling and momentum sink need to be included. In addition, the surface also plays an important role in constraining the size of the dominant turbulent eddies, which is directly related to turbulence strength and the length scale of turbulence generation. The turbulence generation is not related to local vertical gradients especially under neutral condition as assumed in Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Based on the observed relationships between momentum and heat fluxes, a new bulk formula for turbulence parameterization is developed to mainly examine the above-mentioned surface effects on vertical variation of turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. The new understanding of the observed relationships between these turbulent variables and mean variables explains the observed nighttime turbulence regime change observed in Sun et al. (2012) as well as the daytime momentum and heat flux variations with height up to the maximum observation height of 55 m.

  14. A theory for the atmospheric energy spectrum: Depth-limited temperature anomalies at the tropopause

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, R.; Smith, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    The horizontal spectra of atmospheric wind and temperature at the tropopause have a steep −3 slope at synoptic scales, but transition to −5/3 at wavelengths of the order of 500–1,000 km [Nastrom, G. D. & Gage, K. S. (1985) J. Atmos. Sci. 42, 950–960]. Here we demonstrate that a model that assumes zero potential vorticity and constant stratification N over a finite-depth H in the troposphere exhibits the same type of spectra. In this model, temperature perturbations generated at the planetary scale excite a direct cascade of energy with a slope of −3 at large scales, −5/3 at small scales, and a transition near horizontal wavenumber kt = f/NH, where f is the Coriolis parameter. Ballpark atmospheric estimates for N, f, and H give a transition wavenumber near that observed, and numerical simulations of the previously undescribed model verify the expected behavior. Despite its simplicity, the model is consistent with a number of perplexing features in the observations and demonstrates that a complete theory for mesoscale dynamics must take temperature advection at boundaries into account. PMID:17001017

  15. Multiplication theory for dynamically biased avalanche photodiodes: new limits for gain bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Majeed M; Ramirez, David A

    2012-03-26

    Novel theory is developed for the avalanche multiplication process in avalanche photodiodes (APDs) under time-varying reverse-biasing conditions. Integral equations are derived characterizing the statistics of the multiplication factor and the impulse-response function of APDs, as well as their breakdown probability, all under the assumption that the electric field driving the avalanche process is time varying and spatially nonuniform. Numerical calculations generated by the model predict that by using a bit-synchronous sinusoidal biasing scheme to operate the APD in an optical receiver, the pulse-integrated gain-bandwidth product can be improved by a factor of 5 compared to the same APD operating under the conventional static biasing. The bit-synchronized periodic modulation of the electric field in the multiplication region serves to (1) produce large avalanche multiplication factors with suppressed avalanche durations for photons arriving in the early phase of each optical pulse; and (2) generate low avalanche gains and very short avalanche durations for photons arriving in the latter part of each optical pulse. These two factors can work together to reduce intersymbol interference in optical receivers without sacrificing sensitivity.

  16. Limitations on K-T mass extinction theories based upon the vertebrate record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archibald, J. David; Bryant, Laurie J.

    1988-01-01

    Theories of extinction are only as good as the patterns of extinction that they purport to explain. Often such patterns are ignored. For the terminal Cretaceous events, different groups of organisms in different environments show different patterns of extinction that to date cannot be explained by a single causal mechanism. Several patterns of extinction (and/or preservational bias) can be observed for the various groups of vertebrates from the uppermost Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation and lower Paleocene Tullock Formation in eastern Montana. The taxonomic level at which the percentage of survivals (or extinctions) is calculated will have an effect upon the perception of faunal turnover. In addition to the better known mammals and better publicized dinosaurs, there are almost 60 additional species of reptiles, birds, amphibians, and fish in the HELL Creek Formation. Simple arithmetic suggests only 33 percent survival of these vertebrates from the Hell Creek Fm. into the Tullock Fm. A more critical examination of the data shows that almost all Hell Creek species not found in the Tullock are represented in one of the following categories; extremely rare forms, elasmobranch fish that underwent rapid speciation taxa that although not known or rare in the Tullock, are found elsewhere. Each of the categories is largely the result of the following biases: taphonomy, ecological differences, taxonomic artifact paleogeography. The two most important factors appear to be the possible taphonomic biases and the taxonomic artifacts. The extinction patterns among the vertebrates do not appear to be attributable to any single cause, catastrophic or otherwise.

  17. A Microsoft® Excel Simulation Illustrating the Central Limit Theorem's Appropriateness for Comparing the Difference between the Means of Any Two Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, David H.; Powell, John E.

    2008-01-01

    Using Microsoft® Excel, several interactive, computerized learning modules are developed to illustrate the Central Limit Theorem's appropriateness for comparing the difference between the means of any two populations. These modules are used in the classroom to enhance the comprehension of this theorem as well as the concepts that provide the…

  18. Computer-Enriched Instruction (CEI) Is Better for Preview Material Instead of Review Material: An Example of a Biostatistics Chapter, the Central Limit Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, Lai-Chu; Huang, Yu-Hsun; Chang, Yi-Hu; Chiu, Yeo-Ju; Chen, Yi-Fen; Napper, Vicki S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the timing using computer-enriched instruction (CEI), before or after a traditional lecture to determine cross-over effect, period effect, and learning effect arising from sequencing of instruction. A 2 x 2 cross-over design was used with CEI to teach central limit theorem (CLT). Two sequences of graduate students in nursing…

  19. Classroom Research: Assessment of Student Understanding of Sampling Distributions of Means and the Central Limit Theorem in Post-Calculus Probability and Statistics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, M. Leigh; Rowell, Ginger Holmes; Goodson-Espy, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    We applied a classroom research model to investigate student understanding of sampling distributions of sample means and the Central Limit Theorem in post-calculus introductory probability and statistics courses. Using a quantitative assessment tool developed by previous researchers and a qualitative assessment tool developed by the authors, we…

  20. Limited role of spectra in dynamo theory: coherent versus random dynamos.

    PubMed

    Tobias, Steven M; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2008-09-19

    We discuss the importance of phase information and coherence times in determining the dynamo properties of turbulent flows. We compare the kinematic dynamo properties of three flows with the same energy spectrum. The first flow is dominated by coherent structures with nontrivial phase information and long eddy coherence times, the second has random phases and long-coherence time, the third has nontrivial phase information, but short coherence time. We demonstrate that the first flow is the most efficient kinematic dynamo, owing to the presence of sustained stretching and constructive folding. We argue that these results place limitations on the possible inferences of the dynamo properties of flows from the use of spectra alone, and that the role of coherent structures must always be accounted for.

  1. Theory of space-charge-limited ballistic currents in nanostructures of different dimensionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Beznogov, M. V. Suris, R. A.

    2013-04-15

    A new unified approach to the description of ballistic unipolar-injection currents is proposed for nanostructures of different dimensionalities. It is shown that in the case of three-dimensional (3D), two-dimensional (2D), and one-dimensional (1D) structures the problem can be reduced to a nonlinear integral equation with a dimensionless parameter determining the coefficient of the universal current-voltage characteristic. The existence of a maximum for this parameter, which is analogous to the Bursian limit for a vacuum diode, is proven for each dimensionality. The current-voltage characteristics and the potential and charge distributions are calculated for 3D, 2D, and 1D structures.

  2. Theory of remote entanglement via quantum-limited phase-preserving amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveri, Matti; Zalys-Geller, Evan; Hatridge, Michael; Leghtas, Zaki; Devoret, Michel H.; Girvin, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    We show that a quantum-limited phase-preserving amplifier can act as a which-path information eraser when followed by heterodyne detection. This "beam splitter with gain" implements a continuous joint measurement on the signal sources. As an application, we propose heralded concurrent remote entanglement generation between two qubits coupled dispersively to separate cavities. Dissimilar qubit-cavity pairs can be made indistinguishable by simple engineering of the cavity driving fields providing further experimental flexibility and the prospect for scalability. Additionally, we find an analytic solution for the stochastic master equation, a quantum filter, yielding a thorough physical understanding of the nonlinear measurement process leading to an entangled state of the qubits. We determine the concurrence of the entangled states and analyze its dependence on losses and measurement inefficiencies.

  3. A Broadband Quantum-Limited Josephson Parametric Amplifier. Part II: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutus, Josh; Barends, R.; Bochmann, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    The quantum-limited nature of the Josephson parametric amplifier (JPA) has enabled exquisite studies of single qubit dynamics. Scaling up to larger quantum systems and higher-power dynamics requires wider bandwidth and higher saturation power. We demonstrate that both bandwidth and saturation power can be increased by an order of magnitude through careful engineering of the frequency dependent impedance environment. We can understand and engineer the interaction between the JPA and this environment using the ``pumpistor'' model, in which the flux-pumped SQUID is treated as a linear circuit element. At extreme low Q this interaction, previously viewed as a parasitic effect, can be used to greatly enhance bandwidth while maintaining the robust noise performance of the JPA.

  4. Scaling theory for the anisotropic behavior of generalized diffusion-limited aggregation clusters in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Family, Fereydoon; Honda, Katsuya

    1987-10-01

    A scaling description of the crossover from isotropic to anisotropic cluster growth for ordinary diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in two dimensions developed recently by Family and Hentschel is extended to the generalized DLA or η model. The dependence of various exponents necessary to characterize the anisotropic growth of the local-growth probability exponent η of the generalized DLA is obtained explicitly. The η dependence of the exponent β describing the variation of the crossover mass Nc on the degree of symmetry m,Nc~mβ, is derived. The results indicate that the anisotropic star-shaped clusters can be easily observed for η>1, while their appearance is much more difficult for η<1. All our results are consistent with those of computer simulations reported so far.

  5. Muon flux limits for Majorana dark matter from strong coupling theories

    SciTech Connect

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Chris

    2009-04-15

    We analyze the effects of the capture of dark matter (DM) particles, with successive annihilations, predicted in the minimal walking technicolor model (MWT) by the Sun and the Earth. We show that the Super-Kamiokande upper limit on excessive muon flux disfavors the mass interval between 100 and 200 GeV for MWT DM with a suppressed standard model interaction (due to a mixing angle), and the mass interval between 0 and 1500 GeV for MWT DM without such suppression, upon making the standard assumption about the value of the local DM distribution. In the first case, the exclusion interval is found to be very sensitive to the DM distribution parameters and can vanish at the extreme of the acceptable values.

  6. Mori-Zwanzig theory for dissipative forces in coarse-grained dynamics in the Markov limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    We derive alternative Markov approximations for the projected (stochastic) force and memory function in the coarse-grained (CG) generalized Langevin equation, which describes the time evolution of the center-of-mass coordinates of clusters of particles in the microscopic ensemble. This is done with the aid of the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator method based on the recently introduced projection operator [S. Izvekov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134106 (2013), 10.1063/1.4795091]. The derivation exploits the "generalized additive fluctuating force" representation to which the projected force reduces in the adopted projection operator formalism. For the projected force, we present a first-order time expansion which correctly extends the static fluctuating force ansatz with the terms necessary to maintain the required orthogonality of the projected dynamics in the Markov limit to the space of CG phase variables. The approximant of the memory function correctly accounts for the momentum dependence in the lowest (second) order and indicates that such a dependence may be important in the CG dynamics approaching the Markov limit. In the case of CG dynamics with a weak dependence of the memory effects on the particle momenta, the expression for the memory function presented in this work is applicable to non-Markov systems. The approximations are formulated in a propagator-free form allowing their efficient evaluation from the microscopic data sampled by standard molecular dynamics simulations. A numerical application is presented for a molecular liquid (nitromethane). With our formalism we do not observe the "plateau-value problem" if the friction tensors for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) are computed using the Green-Kubo relation. Our formalism provides a consistent bottom-up route for hierarchical parametrization of DPD models from atomistic simulations.

  7. Mori-Zwanzig theory for dissipative forces in coarse-grained dynamics in the Markov limit.

    PubMed

    Izvekov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    We derive alternative Markov approximations for the projected (stochastic) force and memory function in the coarse-grained (CG) generalized Langevin equation, which describes the time evolution of the center-of-mass coordinates of clusters of particles in the microscopic ensemble. This is done with the aid of the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator method based on the recently introduced projection operator [S. Izvekov, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134106 (2013)10.1063/1.4795091]. The derivation exploits the "generalized additive fluctuating force" representation to which the projected force reduces in the adopted projection operator formalism. For the projected force, we present a first-order time expansion which correctly extends the static fluctuating force ansatz with the terms necessary to maintain the required orthogonality of the projected dynamics in the Markov limit to the space of CG phase variables. The approximant of the memory function correctly accounts for the momentum dependence in the lowest (second) order and indicates that such a dependence may be important in the CG dynamics approaching the Markov limit. In the case of CG dynamics with a weak dependence of the memory effects on the particle momenta, the expression for the memory function presented in this work is applicable to non-Markov systems. The approximations are formulated in a propagator-free form allowing their efficient evaluation from the microscopic data sampled by standard molecular dynamics simulations. A numerical application is presented for a molecular liquid (nitromethane). With our formalism we do not observe the "plateau-value problem" if the friction tensors for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) are computed using the Green-Kubo relation. Our formalism provides a consistent bottom-up route for hierarchical parametrization of DPD models from atomistic simulations.

  8. Refined Zigzag Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Plates: A Homogeneous Limit Methodology for Zigzag Function Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, marco

    2010-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT) for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich plates is presented from a multi-scale formalism starting with the inplane displacement field expressed as a superposition of coarse and fine contributions. The coarse kinematic field is that of first-order shear-deformation theory, whereas the fine kinematic field has a piecewise-linear zigzag distribution through the thickness. The condition of limiting homogeneity of transverse-shear properties is proposed and yields four distinct sets of zigzag functions. By examining elastostatic solutions for highly heterogeneous sandwich plates, the best-performing zigzag functions are identified. The RZT predictive capabilities to model homogeneous and highly heterogeneous sandwich plates are critically assessed, demonstrating its superior efficiency, accuracy ; and a wide range of applicability. The present theory, which is derived from the virtual work principle, is well-suited for developing computationally efficient CO-continuous finite elements, and is thus appropriate for the analysis and design of high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  9. A Theory for the RF Surface Field for Various Metals at the Destructive Breakdown Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Perry B.; /SLAC

    2007-03-06

    By destructive breakdown we mean a breakdown event that results in surface melting over a macroscopic area in a high E-field region of an accelerator structure. A plasma forms over the molten area, bombarding the surface with an intense ion current ({approx} 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2}), equivalent to a pressure of about a thousand Atmospheres. This pressure in turn causes molten copper to migrate away from the iris tip, resulting in measurable changes in the iris shape. The breakdown process can be roughly divided into four stages: (1) the formation of ''plasma spots'' at field emission sites, each spot leaving a crater-like footprint; (2) crater clustering, and the formation of areas with hundreds of overlapping craters; (3) surface melting in the region of a crater cluster; (4) the process after surface melting that leads to destructive breakdown. The physics underlying each of these stages is developed, and a comparison is made between the theory and experimental evidence whenever possible. The key to preventing breakdown lies in stage (3). A single plasma spot emits a current of several amperes, a portion of which returns to impact the surrounding area with a power density on the order 10{sup 7} Watt/cm{sup 2}. This power density is not quite adequate to melt the surrounding surface on a time scale short compared to the rf pulse length. In a crater field, however, the impact areas from multiple plasma spots overlap to provide sufficient power density for surface melting over an area on the order of 0.1 mm{sup 2} or more. The key to preventing breakdown is to choose an iris tip material that requires the highest power density (proportional to the square of the rf surface field) for surface melting, taking into account the penetration depth of the impacting electrons. The rf surface field required for surface melting (relative to copper) has been calculated for a large number elementary metals, plus stainless-steel and carbon.

  10. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  11. Examining the limits of time reweighting and Kramers' rate theory to obtain correct kinetics from accelerated molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yao; Doshi, Urmi; Hamelberg, Donald

    2010-06-14

    Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations are routinely being used to recover the correct canonical probability distributions corresponding to the original potential energy landscape of biomolecular systems. However, the limits of time reweighting, based on transition state theory, in obtaining true kinetic rates from accelerated molecular dynamics for biomolecular systems are less obvious. Here, we investigate this issue by studying the kinetics of cis-trans isomerization of peptidic omega bond by accelerated molecular dynamics. We find that time reweighting is valid for obtaining true kinetics when the original potential is not altered at the transition state regions, as expected. When the original potential landscape is modified such that the applied boost potential alters the transition state regions, time reweighting fails to reproduce correct kinetics and the reweighted rate is much slower than the true rate. By adopting the overdamped limit of Kramers' rate theory, we are successful in recovering correct kinetics irrespective of whether or not the transition state regions are modified. Furthermore, we tested the validity of the acceleration weight factor from the path integral formalism for obtaining the correct kinetics of cis-trans isomerization. It was found that this formulation of the weight factor is not suitable for long time scale processes such as cis-trans isomerization with high energy barriers.

  12. Theory of factors limiting high gradient operation of warm accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Antonsen, Thomas M.; Kishek, Rami

    2014-07-25

    This final report summarizes the research performed during the time period from 8/1/2010 to 7/31/2013. It consists of two parts describing our studies in two directions: (a) analysis of factors limiting operation of dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures where the main problem is the occurrence of multipactor on dielectric surfaces, and (b) studies of effects associated with either RF magnetic or RF electric fields which may cause the RF breakdown in high-gradient metallic accelerating structures. In the studies of DLA structures, at least, two accomplishments should be mentioned: the development of a 3D non-stationary, self-consistent code describing the multipactor phenomena and yielding very good agreement with some experimental data obtained in joint ANL/NRL experiments. In the metallic structures, such phenomena as the heating and melting of micro-particles (metallic dust) by RF electric and magnetic fields in single-shot and rep-rate regimes is analyzed. Also, such processes in micro-protrusions on the structure surfaces as heating and melting due to the field emitted current and the Nottingham effect are thoroughly investigated with the account for space charge of emitted current on the field emission from the tip.

  13. Good clinical practice in resource-limited settings: translating theory into practice.

    PubMed

    Tinto, Halidou; Noor, Ramadhani A; Wanga, Charles L; Valea, Innocent; Mbaye, Maimouna Ndour; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Ravinetto, Raffaella M

    2013-04-01

    A Good Clinical Practices (GCPs) course, based on the combination of theoretical modules with a practical training in real-life conditions, was held in 2010 in Burkina Faso. It was attended by 15 trainees from nine African, Asian, and Latin American countries. There were some discrepancies between the average good results at the end of the theoretical phase and the GCP application during the first days of the practical phase, underlying the difficulties of translating theoretical knowledge into good practices. Most of the findings were not unexpected and reflected the challenges commonly faced by clinical investigators in resource-poor contexts (i.e., the high workload at peripheral health facilities, the need to conciliate routine clinical activities with clinical research, and the risk of creating a double standard among patients attending the same health facility [free care for recruited patients versus user fees for non-recruited patients with the same medical condition]). Even if limited in number and time, these observations suggest that a theoretical training alone may not be sufficient to prepare trainees for the challenges of medical research in real-life settings. Conversely, when a practical phase immediately follows a theoretical one, trainees can immediately experience what the research methodology implicates in terms of work organization and relationship with recruited and non-recruited patients. This initial experience shows the complexity of translating GCP into practice and suggests the need to rethink the current conception of GCP training.

  14. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Ianoul, Anatoli; Albert, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the polarization analysis of the measured spectra allows for the identification of the principal states of polarization of the sensor system and consequentially for the calculation of the transmission spectrum for any incident polarization state. The stability of the orientation of the system principal axes is also investigated as a function of wavelength.

  15. Structure-factor extrapolation using the scalar approximation: theory, applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Genick, Ulrich K

    2007-10-01

    For many experiments in macromolecular crystallography, the overall structure of the protein/nucleic acid is already known and the aim of the experiment is to determine the effect a chemical or physical perturbation/activation has on the structure of the molecule. In a typical experiment, an experimenter will collect a data set from a crystal in the unperturbed state, perform the perturbation (i.e. soaking a ligand into the crystal or activating the sample with light) and finally collect a data set from the perturbed crystal. In many cases the perturbation fails to activate all molecules, so that the crystal contains a mix of molecules in the activated and native states. In these cases, it has become common practice to calculate a data set corresponding to a hypothetical fully activated crystal by linear extrapolation of structure-factor amplitudes. These extrapolated data sets often aid greatly in the interpretation of electron-density maps. However, the extrapolation of structure-factor amplitudes is based on a mathematical shortcut that treats structure factors as scalars, not vectors. Here, a full derivation is provided of the error introduced by this approximation and it is determined how this error scales with key experimental parameters. The perhaps surprising result of this analysis is that for most structural changes encountered in protein crystals, the error introduced by the scalar approximation is very small. As a result, the extrapolation procedure is largely limited by the propagation of experimental uncertainties of individual structure-factor amplitudes. Ultimately, propagation of these uncertainties leads to a reduction in the effective resolution of the extrapolated data set. The program XTRA, which implements SASFE (scalar approximation to structure-factor extrapolation), performs error-propagation calculations and determines the effective resolution of the extrapolated data set, is further introduced.

  16. A Detailed Look at a Pluto Central Flash Occultation: Limits on Pluto's Haze Opacity, Oblateness and Surface Frost Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Young, Leslie A.; Howell, Robert R.; French, Richard G.

    2014-11-01

    We report a new analysis of occultation lightcurves observed in 2007 (from Mt John Observatory) and 2011 (from San Pedro Martir Observatory). In both cases, lightcurves were observed simultaneously in two wavelengths, and in the 2007 case, a double-peaked central flash was observed. In contrast to the wavelength-dependent opacities reported by Elliot et al. (Nature 2003; 424:165) in 2002, we see no evidence for an opacity source in Pluto's atmosphere that has greater extinction at shorter wavelengths. From the separation of the peaks in the 2007 central flash lightcurves, we find the oblateness of Pluto's atmosphere (equatorial vs. polar radii of pressure contours near R = 1215 km) of 1.03 ± 0.002. If this oblateness were caused solely by zonal winds, the wind speed at the equator would have to be 206 km/s; an alternative explanation is that the equatorial bulge is caused by warmer temperatures above the equator than the poles. Finally, the amplitudes of the central flash peaks are very sensitive to the surface pressure. If that pressure is driven by the vapor pressure of nitrogen ice, then the ice temperature of 42 ± 2 K reported by Tryka et al. (Icarus 1994; 212:513) is too high and produces central flash amplitudes that are much too bright. We find that the observed central flash peak amplitudes are consistent with nitrogen ice temperatures near 37 K, closer to the alpha-beta transition temperature (35.6 K) of nitrogen ice.

  17. Associative neural network model for the generation of temporal patterns. Theory and application to central pattern generators.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfeld, D; Sompolinsky, H

    1988-01-01

    Cyclic patterns of motor neuron activity are involved in the production of many rhythmic movements, such as walking, swimming, and scratching. These movements are controlled by neural circuits referred to as central pattern generators (CPGs). Some of these circuits function in the absence of both internal pacemakers and external feedback. We describe an associative neural network model whose dynamic behavior is similar to that of CPGs. The theory predicts the strength of all possible connections between pairs of neurons on the basis of the outputs of the CPG. It also allows the mean operating levels of the neurons to be deduced from the measured synaptic strengths between the pairs of neurons. We apply our theory to the CPG controlling escape swimming in the mollusk Tritonia diomedea. The basic rhythmic behavior is shown to be consistent with a simplified model that approximates neurons as threshold units and slow synaptic responses as elementary time delays. The model we describe may have relevance to other fixed action behaviors, as well as to the learning, recall, and recognition of temporally ordered information. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:3233265

  18. Conformal Field Theory at Central Charge c = 0 and Two-Dimensional Critical Systems with Quenched Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurarie, V.; Ludwig, A. W. W.

    We examine two-dimensional conformal field theories (CFTs) at central charge c = 0. These arise typically in the description of critical systems with quenched disorder, but also in other contexts including dilute self-avoiding polymers and percolation. We show that such CFTs must in general possess, in addition to their stress energy tensor T(z), an extra field whose holomorphic part, t(z), has conformal weight two. The singular part of the Operator Product Expansion (OPE) between T(z) and t(z) is uniquely fixed up to a single number b, defining a new `anomaly' which is a characteristic of any c = 0 CFT, and which may be used to distinguish between different such CFTs. The extra field t(z) is not primary (unless b = 0), and is a so-called `logarithmic operator' except in special cases which include affine (Kač-Moody) Lie-super current algebras. The number b controls the question of whether Virasoro null-vectors arising at certain conformal weights contained in the c = 0 Kač table may be set to zero or not, in these nonunitary theories. This has, in the familiar manner, implications on the existence of differential equations satisfied by conformal blocks involving primary operators with Kač-table dimensions. It is shown that c = 0 theories where t(z) is logarithmic, contain, besides T and t, additional fields with conformal weight two. If the latter are a fermionic pair, the OPEs between the holomorphic parts of all these conformal weight-two operators are automatically covariant under a global U(1|1) supersymmetry. A full extension of the Virasoro algebra by the Laurent modes of these extra conformal weight-two fields, including t(z), remains an interesting question for future work.

  19. Between the Balkans and the Baltic: Phylogeography of a Common Vole Mitochondrial DNA Lineage Limited to Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Stojak, Joanna; McDevitt, Allan D; Herman, Jeremy S; Kryštufek, Boris; Uhlíková, Jitka; Purger, Jenő J; Lavrenchenko, Leonid A; Searle, Jeremy B; Wójcik, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    The common vole (Microtus arvalis) has been a model species of small mammal for studying end-glacial colonization history. In the present study we expanded the sampling from central and eastern Europe, analyzing contemporary genetic structure to identify the role of a potential 'northern glacial refugium', i.e. a refugium at a higher latitude than the traditional Mediterranean refugia. Altogether we analyzed 786 cytochrome b (cytb) sequences (representing mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA) from the whole of Europe, adding 177 new sequences from central and eastern Europe, and we conducted analyses on eight microsatellite loci for 499 individuals (representing nuclear DNA) from central and eastern Europe, adding data on 311 new specimens. Our new data fill gaps in the vicinity of the Carpathian Mountains, the potential northern refugium, such that there is now dense sampling from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea. Here we present evidence that the Eastern mtDNA lineage of the common vole was present in the vicinity of this Carpathian refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger Dryas. The Eastern lineage expanded from this refugium to the Baltic and shows low cytb nucleotide diversity in those most northerly parts of the distribution. Analyses of microsatellites revealed a similar pattern but also showed little differentiation between all of the populations sampled in central and eastern Europe.

  20. Between the Balkans and the Baltic: Phylogeography of a Common Vole Mitochondrial DNA Lineage Limited to Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Stojak, Joanna; McDevitt, Allan D.; Herman, Jeremy S.; Kryštufek, Boris; Uhlíková, Jitka; Purger, Jenő J.; Lavrenchenko, Leonid A.; Searle, Jeremy B.; Wójcik, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The common vole (Microtus arvalis) has been a model species of small mammal for studying end-glacial colonization history. In the present study we expanded the sampling from central and eastern Europe, analyzing contemporary genetic structure to identify the role of a potential ‘northern glacial refugium’, i.e. a refugium at a higher latitude than the traditional Mediterranean refugia. Altogether we analyzed 786 cytochrome b (cytb) sequences (representing mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA) from the whole of Europe, adding 177 new sequences from central and eastern Europe, and we conducted analyses on eight microsatellite loci for 499 individuals (representing nuclear DNA) from central and eastern Europe, adding data on 311 new specimens. Our new data fill gaps in the vicinity of the Carpathian Mountains, the potential northern refugium, such that there is now dense sampling from the Balkans to the Baltic Sea. Here we present evidence that the Eastern mtDNA lineage of the common vole was present in the vicinity of this Carpathian refugium during the Last Glacial Maximum and the Younger Dryas. The Eastern lineage expanded from this refugium to the Baltic and shows low cytb nucleotide diversity in those most northerly parts of the distribution. Analyses of microsatellites revealed a similar pattern but also showed little differentiation between all of the populations sampled in central and eastern Europe. PMID:27992546

  1. Irrigation Water Supply and Management in the Central High Plains: Can Agriculture Compete for a Limited Resource?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The era of expanding irrigated agriculture in the central high plains has come to an end, and we are likely entering a period of contraction. Contraction has begun in Colorado where the state estimates that current consumptive use exceeds sustainable supplies by about 10%. Groundwater pumping has ...

  2. Rocks: A Concrete Activity That Introduces Normal Distribution, Sampling Error, Central Limit Theorem and True Score Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This report introduces a short, hands-on activity that addresses a key challenge in teaching quantitative methods to students who lack confidence or experience with statistical analysis. Used near the beginning of the course, this activity helps students develop an intuitive insight regarding a number of abstract concepts which are key to…

  3. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  4. Interplay between theory and experiment for fission-fragment angular distributions from nuclei near the limits of stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freifelder, R.; Prakash, M.; Alexander, John M.

    1986-02-01

    We examine the application of transition-state theory for fission-fragment angular distributions to composite nuclei near the limits of stability. The possible roles of saddle-point and scission-point configurations are explored. For many heavy-ion reactions that involve large angular momenta, the observed anisotropies are between the predictions of the saddle-point and scisson-point models. Empirical correlations are shown between the effective moments of inertia and the spin and {Z 2}/{A} of the compound nucleus. These correlations provide evidence for a class of transition-state nuclei intermediate between saddle- and scission-point configurations. An important indication of these patterns is that the speed of collective deformation toward fission may well be slow enough to allow for statistical equilibrium in the tilting mode even for configurations well beyond the saddle point.

  5. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  6. Saturation and the limit of jet mixing enhancement by single frequency plane wave excitation: Experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1988-01-01

    The limitations of single frequency plane wave excitation in mixing enhancement are investigated for a circular jet. Measurements made in an 8.8 cm diameter jet are compared with a theoretical model. The measurements are made to quantify mixing at excitation amplitudes up to 2 percent of the jet exit velocity. The initial boundary layer state, the exit mean and fluctuating velocity profiles and spectra are documented for all cases considered. The amplitude of the fundamental wave is recorded along the jet axis for various levels of excitation. As the amplitude of excitation is increased the jet spreading rate is increased, but beyond a saturation amplitude further increases have no effect on the spreading. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimates. In the theory the flow is split into the mean flow, large scale motions, and fine scale turbulence. Shape assumptions for the mean flow, and fine scale turbulence along with the shape for the large scale motions obtained from a linear stability theory provide the closure. The experimental results compare reasonably well with predictions.

  7. Saturation and the limit of jet mixing enhancement by single frequency plane wave excitation - Experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1988-01-01

    The limitations of single frequency plane wave excitation in mixing enhancement are investigated for a circular jet. Measurements made in an 8.8 cm diameter jet are compared with a theoretical model. The measurements are made to quantify mixing at excitation amplitudes up to 2 percent of the jet exit velocity. The initial boundary layer state, the exit mean and fluctuating velocity profiles and spectra are documented for all cases considered. The amplitude of the fundamental wave is recorded along the jet axis for various levels of excitation. As the amplitude of excitation is increased the jet spreading rate is increased, but beyond a saturation amplitude further increases have no effect on the spreading. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimates. In the theory the flow is split into the mean flow, large scale motions, and fine scale turbulence. Shape assumptions for the mean flow, and fine scale turbulence along with the shape for the large scale motions obtained from a linear stability theory provide the closure. The experimental results compare reasonably well with predictions.

  8. On the limits of Köhler activation theory: how do collision and coalescence affect the activation of aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Fabian

    2017-07-01

    Activation is necessary to form a cloud droplet from an aerosol, and it is widely accepted that it occurs as soon as a wetted aerosol grows beyond its critical radius. Traditional Köhler theory assumes that this growth is driven by the diffusion of water vapor. However, if the wetted aerosols are large enough, the coalescence of two or more particles is an additional process for accumulating sufficient water for activation. This transition from diffusional to collectional growth marks the limit of traditional Köhler theory and it is studied using a Lagrangian cloud model in which aerosols and cloud droplets are represented by individually simulated particles within large-eddy simulations of shallow cumuli. It is shown that the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 1 µm in dry radius can be affected by collision and coalescence, and its contribution increases with a power-law relation toward larger radii and becomes the only process for the activation of aerosols larger than 0. 4-0. 8 µm depending on aerosol concentration. Due to the natural scarcity of the affected aerosols, the amount of aerosols that are activated by collection is small, with a maximum of 1 in 10 000 activations. The fraction increases as the aerosol concentration increases, but decreases again as the number of aerosols becomes too high and the particles too small to cause collections. Moreover, activation by collection is found to affect primarily aerosols that have been entrained above the cloud base.

  9. 75 FR 38452 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Central Gulf of Alaska License Limitation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... requirements of the LLP is intended to provide a limited opportunity for entry level vessel operators to... sufficient, amount of participation in the Pacific cod fishery to indicate some level of dependence on...

  10. A Comparison of Limited-Information and Full-Information Methods in M"plus" for Estimating Item Response Theory Parameters for Nonnormal Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    In structural equation modeling software, either limited-information (bivariate proportions) or full-information item parameter estimation routines could be used for the 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model. Limited-information methods assume the continuous variable underlying an item response is normally distributed. For skewed and…

  11. A Comparison of Limited-Information and Full-Information Methods in M"plus" for Estimating Item Response Theory Parameters for Nonnormal Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    In structural equation modeling software, either limited-information (bivariate proportions) or full-information item parameter estimation routines could be used for the 2-parameter item response theory (IRT) model. Limited-information methods assume the continuous variable underlying an item response is normally distributed. For skewed and…

  12. Improvement/Maintenance and Reorientation as Central Features of Coping with Major Life Change and Loss: Contributions of Three Life-Span Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Kathrin; Jopp, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the common and unique contributions of three major life-span theories in addressing improvement/maintenance and reorientation, which represent central processes of coping with major life change and loss. For this purpose, we review and compare the dual-process model of assimilative and accommodative coping, the model of…

  13. The Boundaries of the Cognitive Phenotype of Autism: Theory of Mind, Central Coherence and Ambiguous Figure Perception in Young People with Autistic Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Catherine S.; Moffat, Vivien J.; Power, Michael J.; Owens, David G. C.; Johnstone, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Theory of Mind, Weak Central Coherence and executive dysfunction, were investigated as a function of behavioural markers of autism. This was irrespective of the presence or absence of a diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disorder. Sixty young people completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), false belief tests, the block design test,…

  14. The Boundaries of the Cognitive Phenotype of Autism: Theory of Mind, Central Coherence and Ambiguous Figure Perception in Young People with Autistic Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Catherine S.; Moffat, Vivien J.; Power, Michael J.; Owens, David G. C.; Johnstone, Eve C.

    2008-01-01

    Theory of Mind, Weak Central Coherence and executive dysfunction, were investigated as a function of behavioural markers of autism. This was irrespective of the presence or absence of a diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disorder. Sixty young people completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), false belief tests, the block design test,…

  15. Estimating limiting age for Pleistocene erosional surfaces in central Montana by uranium-series dating of associated travertines.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, B. J.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of three travertine samples from the southeast side of The Park (central Montana) yield an average uranium-thorium age of 73 000 yr. Another sample from the west side of The Park is 320 000 yr old. These results indicate that travertine deposits may have formed at several intervals. The surface beneath The Park travertine is older than about 320 000 yr. Number 2 pediment gravels that contain travertine downslope from the oldest dated sample may be younger than about 320 000 yr. -Authors

  16. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer and Redox Pioneer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of “Pioneer” in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory. PMID:27095208

  17. Individual differences in executive function and central coherence predict developmental changes in theory of mind in autism.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2010-03-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that individuals with autism show atypicalities in multiple cognitive domains, including theory of mind (ToM), executive function (EF), and central coherence (CC). In this study, the longitudinal relationships among these 3 aspects of cognition in autism were investigated. Thirty-seven cognitively able children with an autism spectrum condition were assessed on tests targeting ToM (false-belief prediction), EF (planning ability, cognitive flexibility, and inhibitory control), and CC (local processing) at intake and again 3 years later. Time 1 EF and CC skills were longitudinally predictive of change in children's ToM test performance, independent of age, language, nonverbal intelligence, and early ToM skills. Predictive relations in the opposite direction were not significant, and there were no developmental links between EF and CC. Rather than showing problems in ToM, EF and CC as co-occurring and independent atypicalities in autism, these findings suggest that early domain-general skills play a critical role in shaping the developmental trajectory of children's ToM.

  18. Donor hyperfine Stark shift and the role of central-cell corrections in tight-binding theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Rahman, Rajib; Salfi, Joe; Bocquel, Juanita; Voisin, Benoit; Rogge, Sven; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hollenberg, Lloyd L. C.

    2015-04-01

    Atomistic tight-binding (TB) simulations are performed to calculate the Stark shift of the hyperfine coupling for a single arsenic (As) donor in silicon (Si). The role of the central-cell correction is studied by implementing both the static and the non-static dielectric screenings of the donor potential, and by including the effect of the lattice strain close to the donor site. The dielectric screening of the donor potential tunes the value of the quadratic Stark shift parameter (η2) from -1.3 × 10-3 µm2 V-2 for the static dielectric screening to -1.72 × 10-3 µm2 V-2 for the non-static dielectric screening. The effect of lattice strain, implemented by a 3.2% change in the As-Si nearest-neighbour bond length, further shifts the value of η2 to -1.87 × 10-3 µm2 V-2, resulting in an excellent agreement of theory with the experimentally measured value of -1.9 ± 0.2 × 10-3 µm2 V-2. Based on our direct comparison of the calculations with the experiment, we conclude that the previously ignored non-static dielectric screening of the donor potential and the lattice strain significantly influence the donor wave function charge density and thereby leads to a better agreement with the available experimental data sets.

  19. Rapid Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Eye Tracking Evidence for the Limits of Weak Central Coherence.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Noemi; Snedeker, Jesse; Rabagliati, Hugh

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have often been reported to have difficulty integrating information into its broader context, which has motivated the Weak Central Coherence theory of ASD. In the linguistic domain, evidence for this difficulty comes from reports of impaired use of linguistic context to resolve ambiguous words. However, recent work has suggested that impaired use of linguistic context may not be characteristic of ASD, and is instead better explained by co-occurring language impairments. Here, we provide a strong test of these claims, using the visual world eye tracking paradigm to examine the online mechanisms by which children with autism resolve linguistic ambiguity. To address concerns about both language impairments and compensatory strategies, we used a sample whose verbal skills were strong and whose average age (7; 6) was lower than previous work on lexical ambiguity resolution in ASD. Participants (40 with autism and 40 controls) heard sentences with ambiguous words in contexts that either strongly supported one reading or were consistent with both (John fed/saw the bat). We measured activation of the unintended meaning through implicit semantic priming of an associate (looks to a depicted baseball glove). Contrary to the predictions of weak central coherence, children with ASD, like controls, quickly used context to resolve ambiguity, selecting appropriate meanings within a second. We discuss how these results constrain the generality of weak central coherence.

  20. Parametric dependence of density limits in the Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR): Comparison of thermal instability theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, F. A.; Stacey, W. M.; Rapp, J.

    2001-11-01

    The observed dependence of the TEXTOR [Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research: E. Hintz, P. Bogen, H. A. Claassen et al., Contributions to High Temperature Plasma Physics, edited by K. H. Spatschek and J. Uhlenbusch (Akademie Verlag, Berlin, 1994), p. 373] density limit on global parameters (I, B, P, etc.) and wall conditioning is compared with the predicted density limit parametric scaling of thermal instability theory. It is necessary first to relate the edge parameters of the thermal instability theory to n¯ and the other global parameters. The observed parametric dependence of the density limit in TEXTOR is generally consistent with the predicted density limit scaling of thermal instability theory. The observed wall conditioning dependence of the density limit can be reconciled with the theory in terms of the radiative emissivity temperature dependence of different impurities in the plasma edge. The thermal instability theory also provides an explanation of why symmetric detachment precedes radiative collapse for most low power shots, while a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge MARFE precedes detachment for most high power shots.

  1. A Central Limit Theorem for Products of Random Matrices and GOE Statistics for the Anderson Model on Long Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadel, Christian; Virág, Bálint

    2016-05-01

    We consider products of random matrices that are small, independent identically distributed perturbations of a fixed matrix T_0. Focusing on the eigenvalues of T_0 of a particular size we obtain a limit to a SDE in a critical scaling. Previous results required T_0 to be a (conjugated) unitary matrix so it could not have eigenvalues of different modulus. From the result we can also obtain a limit SDE for the Markov process given by the action of the random products on the flag manifold. Applying the result to random Schrödinger operators we can improve some results by Valko and Virag showing GOE statistics for the rescaled eigenvalue process of a sequence of Anderson models on long boxes. In particular, we solve a problem posed in their work.

  2. The Sky is the Limit: Free Boundary Conditions in AdS3 Chern-Simons Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apolo, Luis; Sundborg, Bo

    We test the effects of new diffeomorphism invariant boundary terms in SL(2,R)×SL(2,R) Chern-Simons theory. The gravitational interpretation corresponds to free AdS3 boundary conditions, without restrictions on the boundary geometry. The boundary theory is the theory of a string in a target AdS3. Its Virasoro conditions can eliminate ghosts. Generalisations to SL(N,R)×SL(N,R) higher spin theories and many other questions are still unexplored.

  3. Nano bubble migration in a tapered conduit in the asymptotic limits of zero capillary and Bond Numbers - Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Ross, Frances; Bau, Haim

    2015-11-01

    Using a hermetically sealed liquid cell, we observed the growth and migration of bubbles (tens to hundreds of nanometers in diameter) in a tapered conduit and supersaturated solution with a transmission electron microscope. To better understand bubble shape and migration dynamics, we developed simple 2D and 3D models valid in the limit of zero capillary and Bond numbers. The 3D model is restricted to small taper slope, weakly non-circular contact line geometries and large bubble aspect ratio (high confinement), and was solved using a pseudo-spectral decomposition. Both models utilize the Blake-Haynes mechanism to relate dynamic contact angle to local contact line velocity The influence of pinning of a portion of the contact line on bubble geometry is also considered. Contact line dissipation controls curvature and regulates growth rate. Our 2D and 3D models predict growth rates in agreement with experimental observations, but several orders of magnitude lower than predicted by the classical Epstein - Plesset theory. The work was supported, in part, by NSF CBET grant 1066573.

  4. Acoustic magnons in the long-wavelength limit: Investigating the Goldstone violation in many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Mathias C. T. D.; Friedrich, Christoph; Blügel, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Collective spin excitations in magnetic materials arise from the correlated motion of electron-hole pairs with opposite spins. The pair propagation is described by the transverse magnetic susceptibility, which we calculate within many-body perturbation theory from first principles employing the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave formalism. Ferromagnetic materials exhibit a spontaneously broken global rotation symmetry in spin space leading to the appearance of acoustic magnons (zero gap) in the long-wavelength limit. However, due to approximations used in the numerical scheme, the acoustic magnon dispersion exhibits a small but finite gap at Γ . We analyze this violation of the Goldstone mode and present an approach that implements the magnetic susceptibility using a renormalized Green function instead of the Kohn-Sham one. This much more expensive approach shows substantial improvement of the Goldstone-mode condition. In addition, we discuss a possible correction scheme, which involves an adjustment of the Kohn-Sham exchange splitting, which is motivated by the spin-wave solution of the one-band Hubbard model. The new exchange splittings turn out to be closer to experiment. We present corrected magnon spectra for the elementary ferromagnets Fe, Co, and Ni.

  5. Mechanical conditions for the activation of the Main Himalayan Thrust: A view from the limit analysis theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leturmy, Pascale; Souloumiac, Pauline; Cubas, Nadaya; Mary, Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    In the Himalayan mountain range, great earthquakes with Mw >8 episodically rupture the upper part of the Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) and reach the surface along the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT). In this presentation, we propose a new approach based on the limit analysis theory (Cubas et al, 2008, Souloumiac et al, 2009) in order to quantify the mechanical parameters (primarily the effective friction along the MHT) necessary to allow the translation of the entire belt during those big events. We explore the mechanical parameters for three sections: the classic Kathmandu cross-section which ruptured during the Gorkha 2015 Mw 7.8 earthquake, and two adjacent cross-sections located at about 70 km along strike, where significant variations of the MHT geometry have been suggested (Hubbard et al, 2016). We first show how varying geometries of the décollement impact the frictional properties necessary to activate the MHT. In particular, we observe significant differences between the Gorkha cross-section and the western cross-section known as a seismic gap since 1505. We will also discuss the mechanical conditions necessary to reactivate possible out-of-sequence thrusts within the Himalayan wedge.

  6. Upper limit on the central density of dark matter in the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.; Filippov, Alexander I.; Ghosh, Mithun; Nandi, Kamal K.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the stability of circular material orbits in the analytic galactic metric recently derived by Harko et al., Mod. Phys. Lett. A29, 1450049 (2014). It turns out that stability depends more strongly on the dark matter central density ρ0 than on other parameters of the solution. This property then yields an upper limit on ρ0 for each individual galaxy, which we call here ρ 0 upper, such that stable circular orbits are possible only when the constraint ρ 0<= ρ 0 upper is satisfied. This is our new result. To approximately quantify the upper limit, we consider as a familiar example our Milky Way galaxy that has a projected dark matter radius RDM 180 kpc and find that ρ 0 upper ˜ 2.37× 1011 M⊙ kpc-3. This limit turns out to be about four orders of magnitude larger than the latest data on central density ρ0 arising from the fit to the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) and Burkert density profiles. Such consistency indicates that the Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld (EiBI) solution could qualify as yet another viable alternative model for dark matter.

  7. The interplay of central and peripheral factors in limiting maximal O2 consumption in man after prolonged bed rest.

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, G; Antonutto, G; Denis, C; Hoppeler, H; Minetti, A E; Narici, M V; Desplanches, D

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of bed rest on the cardiovascular and muscular parameters which affect maximal O2 consumption (VO2,max) were studied. The fractional limitation of VO2,max imposed by these parameters after bed rest was analysed. 2. The VO2,max, by standard procedure, and the maximal cardiac output (Qmax), by the pulse contour method, were measured during graded cyclo-ergometric exercise on seven subjects before and after a 42-day head-down tilt bed rest. Blood haemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and arterialized blood gas analysis were determined at the highest work load. 3. Muscle fibre types, oxidative enzyme activities, and capillary and mitochondrial densities were measured on biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis muscle before and at the end of bed rest. The measure of muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by NMR imaging at the level of biopsy site allowed computation of muscle oxidative capacity and capillary length. 4. The VO2,max was reduced after bed rest (-16.6%). The concomitant decreases in Qmax (-30.8%), essentially due to a change in stroke volume, and in [Hb] led to a huge decrease in O2 delivery (-39.7%). 5. Fibre type distribution was unaffected by bed rest. The decrease in fibre area corresponded to the significant reduction in muscle CSA (-17%). The volume density of mitochondria was reduced after bed rest (-16.6%), as were the oxidative enzyme activities (-11%). The total mitochondrial volume was reduced by 28.5%. Capillary density was unchanged. Total capillary length was 22.2% lower after bed rest, due to muscle atrophy. 6. The interaction between these muscular and cardiovascular changes led to a smaller reduction in VO2,max than in cardiovascular O2 transport. Yet the latter appears to play the greatest role in limiting VO2,max after bed rest (> 70% of overall limitation), the remaining fraction being shared between peripheral O2 diffusion and utilization. PMID:9218227

  8. Limited hybridization between Quercus lobata and Quercus douglasii (Fagaceae) in a mixed stand in central coastal California.

    PubMed

    Craft, Kathleen J; Ashley, Mary V; Koenig, Walter D

    2002-11-01

    Many oak species are interfertile, and morphological and genetic evidence for hybridization is widespread. Here we use DNA microsatellite markers to characterize hybridization between two closely related oak species in a mixed stand in central coastal California, Quercus lobata (valley oak) and Q. douglasii (blue oak) (Fagaceae). Genotypes from four microsatellite loci indicate that many alleles are shared between the two species. However, each species harbors unique alleles, and allele frequencies differ significantly. A Bayesian analysis of genetic structure in the stand identified two highly differentiated genetic clusters, essentially corresponding to species assignment based on morphology. Data from the four loci were sufficient to assign all 135 trees to one of the two species. In addition, five putative hybrid individuals having intermediate morphologies could be assigned genetically to one or the other species, and all but one had low probability of hybrid ancestry. Overally, only six (4.6%) trees showed >0.05 probability of hybrid ancestry, in all cases their probabilities for nonhybrid ancestry were substantially higher. We conclude that adult hybrids of Q. douglasii × Q. lobata are rare at this site and plasticity in morphological characters may lead to overestimates of hybridization among Quercus species.

  9. Pushing the limits – two new species of Pteromalus (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae) from Central Europe with remarkable morphology

    PubMed Central

    Baur, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species, Pteromalus briani sp. n. and Pteromalus janstai sp. n., with unusual characters are described from the Central Plateau and the Alps in Switzerland, respectively. Pteromalus briani sp. n. is remarkable in that it has the metatibia quite abruptly expanded before the middle. This type of modification of the hind tibia is unique within the Pteromalidae and probably also the entire Chalcidoidea. It is also very rare in other parasitic wasps, where it is suspected to be associated with pheromone glands. The species is a gregarious endoparasitoid of pupae of Vanessa atalanta (Linnaeus) and Aglais urticae (Linnaeus), two common butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Europe. It is furthermore a koinobiont parasitoid ovipositing in an early larval stage of the host. The other species, Pteromalus janstai sp. n., shows a flattened mesosoma. A dorsoventrally depressed body is a unique feature within the genus Pteromalus, but known from a number species in unrelated genera and subfamilies. The two records demonstrate that it is possible to discover entirely new species with extraordinary characters even in one of the taxonomically most thoroughly explored parts of the world. PMID:26261432

  10. Pushing the limits - two new species of Pteromalus (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Pteromalidae) from Central Europe with remarkable morphology.

    PubMed

    Baur, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Two new species, Pteromalusbriani sp. n. and Pteromalusjanstai sp. n., with unusual characters are described from the Central Plateau and the Alps in Switzerland, respectively. Pteromalusbriani sp. n. is remarkable in that it has the metatibia quite abruptly expanded before the middle. This type of modification of the hind tibia is unique within the Pteromalidae and probably also the entire Chalcidoidea. It is also very rare in other parasitic wasps, where it is suspected to be associated with pheromone glands. The species is a gregarious endoparasitoid of pupae of Vanessaatalanta (Linnaeus) and Aglaisurticae (Linnaeus), two common butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Europe. It is furthermore a koinobiont parasitoid ovipositing in an early larval stage of the host. The other species, Pteromalusjanstai sp. n., shows a flattened mesosoma. A dorsoventrally depressed body is a unique feature within the genus Pteromalus, but known from a number species in unrelated genera and subfamilies. The two records demonstrate that it is possible to discover entirely new species with extraordinary characters even in one of the taxonomically most thoroughly explored parts of the world.

  11. Astrocytic TGF-β signaling limits inflammation and reduces neuronal damage during central nervous system Toxoplasma infection.

    PubMed

    Cekanaviciute, Egle; Dietrich, Hans K; Axtell, Robert C; Williams, Aaron M; Egusquiza, Riann; Wai, Karen M; Koshy, Anita A; Buckwalter, Marion S

    2014-07-01

    The balance between controlling infection and limiting inflammation is particularly precarious in the brain because of its unique vulnerability to the toxic effects of inflammation. Astrocytes have been implicated as key regulators of neuroinflammation in CNS infections, including infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite that naturally establishes a chronic CNS infection in mice and humans. In CNS toxoplasmosis, astrocytes are critical to controlling parasite growth. They secrete proinflammatory cytokines and physically encircle parasites. However, the molecular mechanisms used by astrocytes to limit neuroinflammation during toxoplasmic encephalitis have not yet been identified. TGF-β signaling in astrocytes is of particular interest because TGF-β is universally upregulated during CNS infection and serves master regulatory and primarily anti-inflammatory functions. We report in this study that TGF-β signaling is activated in astrocytes during toxoplasmic encephalitis and that inhibition of astrocytic TGF-β signaling increases immune cell infiltration, uncouples proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production from CNS parasite burden, and increases neuronal injury. Remarkably, we show that the effects of inhibiting astrocytic TGF-β signaling are independent of parasite burden and the ability of GFAP(+) astrocytes to physically encircle parasites. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Potential and Limitations of Satellite Data to Identify Deaths of Individual Trees in a Central American Tropical Rain Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Kellner, J. R.; Peart, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Logistical constraints on sample size and spatial scale limit individual-based field research on tropical trees. With remote sensing data, we may escape these limitations if fates of individuals can be tracked rigorously. We assessed the potential of readily available, commercial satellite data (QuickBird, 0.7 m pixels) obtained in 2003, to track the fate of individual crowns (> 40 m height) in tropical rain forest at La Selva, Costa Rica. The positions and shapes of these crowns in 1997 had been established using small-footprint LiDAR data with field verification. We focused first on a subset (n=180) of trees monitored in the field over the period 1997-2003. For the 60% of those trees whose crown positions and shapes could be tracked with confidence in the satellite image, we correctly recorded all 3 actual deaths. But we also incorrectly assigned 4 additional deaths to living individuals, due to the abundance of dark pixels in their crown areas. For the 40% of field-monitored trees for which our tracking in the satellite data was less confident (due to lack of image clarity), we correctly identified the one real death event, but incorrectly assigned 6 additional deaths to living trees. Thus, for the field-monitored trees, we grossly overestimated mortality in the satellite image (by 350%). Although currently available high resolution satellite imagery was not adequate for reliable monitoring of individuals, even for the largest forest trees, time series satellite data, rather than time series LiDAR to satellite data, might provide unbiased estimates of overall tree mortality rates if errors compensate. Satellite data may be also be useful as a labor and time saving complement to fieldwork on individual forest trees.

  13. Limits for the central production of Theta+ and Xi(--)pentaquarks in 920-GeV pA collisions.

    PubMed

    Abt, I; Adams, M; Agari, M; Albrecht, H; Aleksandrov, A; Amaral, V; Amorim, A; Aplin, S J; Aushev, V; Bagaturia, Y; Balagura, V; Bargiotti, M; Barsukova, O; Bastos, J; Batista, J; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th S; Belkov, A; Belkov, Ar; Belotelov, I; Bertin, A; Bobchenko, B; Böcker, M; Bogatyrev, A; Bohm, G; Bräuer, M; Bruinsma, M; Bruschi, M; Buchholz, P; Buran, T; Carvalho, J; Conde, P; Cruse, C; Dam, M; Danielsen, K M; Danilov, M; Castro, S De; Deppe, H; Dong, X; Dreis, H B; Egorytchev, V; Ehret, K; Eisele, F; Emeliyanov, D; Essenov, S; Fabbri, L; Faccioli, P; Feuerstack-Raible, M; Flammer, J; Fominykh, B; Funcke, M; Garrido, Ll; Giacobbe, B; Gläss, J; Goloubkov, D; Golubkov, Y; Golutvin, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, I; Gorisek, A; Gouchtchine, O; Goulart, D C; Gradl, S; Gradl, W; Grimaldi, F; Groth-Jensen, J; Guilitsky, Yu; Hansen, J D; Hernández, J M; Hofmann, W; Hott, T; Hulsbergen, W; Husemann, U; Igonkina, O; Ispiryan, M; Jagla, T; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Karpenko, N; Keller, S; Kessler, J; Khasanov, F; Kiryushin, Yu; Klinkby, E; Knöpfle, K T; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krauss, C; Kreuzer, P; Krizan, P; Krücker, D; Kupper, S; Kvaratskheliia, T; Lanyov, A; Lau, K; Lewendel, B; Lohse, T; Lomonosov, B; Männer, R; Masciocchi, S; Massa, I; Matchikhilian, I; Medin, G; Medinnis, M; Mevius, M; Michetti, A; Mikhailov, Yu; Mizuk, R; Muresan, R; Zur Nedden, M; Negodaev, M; Nörenberg, M; Nowak, S; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M T; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Padilla, C; Peralta, D; Pernack, R; Pestotnik, R; Piccinini, M; Pleier, M A; Poli, M; Popov, V; Pose, A; Pose, D; Prystupa, S; Pugatch, V; Pylypchenko, Y; Pyrlik, J; Reeves, K; Ressing, D; Rick, H; Riu, I; Robmann, P; Rostovtseva, I; Rybnikov, V; Sánchez, F; Sbrizzi, A; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schreiner, A; Schröder, H; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, A S; Schwenninger, B; Schwingenheuer, B; Sciacca, F; Semprini-Cesari, N; Shuvalov, S; Silva, L; Smirnov, K; Sözüer, L; Solunin, S; Somov, A; Somov, S; Spengler, J; Spighi, R; Spiridonov, A; Stanovnik, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Subramania, H S; Symalla, M; Tikhomirov, I; Titov, M; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; van Eldik, C; Vassiliev, Yu; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Vukotic, I; Wahlberg, H; Walenta, A H; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wegener, D; Werthenbach, U; Wolters, H; Wurth, R; Wurz, A; Zaitsev, Yu; Zavertyaev, M; Zech, G; Zeuner, T; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Z; Zimmermann, R; Zivko, T; Zoccoli, A

    2004-11-19

    We have searched for Theta+(1540) and Xi(--)(1862) pentaquark candidates in proton-induced reactions on C, Ti, and W targets at midrapidity and square root of s = 41.6 GeV. In 2 x 10(8) inelastic events we find no evidence for narrow (sigma approximately 5 MeV) signals in the Theta+ --> pK0(S) and Xi(--) --> Xi- pi- channels; our 95% C.L. upper limits (UL) for the inclusive production cross section times branching fraction B dsigma/dy/(y approximately 0) are (4-16) mub/N for a Theta+ mass between 1521 and 1555 MeV, and 2.5 mub/N for the Xi(--). The UL of the yield ratio of Theta+/Lambda(1520) < (3-12)% is significantly lower than model predictions. Our UL of B Xi(--)/Xi(1530)0 < 4% is at variance with the results that have provided the first evidence for the Xi(--).

  14. The boundaries of the cognitive phenotype of autism: theory of mind, central coherence and ambiguous figure perception in young people with autistic traits.

    PubMed

    Best, Catherine S; Moffat, Vivien J; Power, Michael J; Owens, David G C; Johnstone, Eve C

    2008-05-01

    Theory of Mind, Weak Central Coherence and executive dysfunction, were investigated as a function of behavioural markers of autism. This was irrespective of the presence or absence of a diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disorder. Sixty young people completed the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), false belief tests, the block design test, viewed visual illusions and an ambiguous figure. A logistic regression was performed and it was found that Theory of Mind, central coherence and ambiguous figure variables significantly contributed to prediction of behavioural markers of autism. These findings provide support for the continuum hypothesis of autism. That is, mild autistic behavioural traits are distributed through the population and these behavioural traits may have the same underlying cognitive determinants as autistic disorder.

  15. Choreographing Theory: An Analysis of Edouard Lock's "Amelia" (2002) Questioning the Limits of Feminist and Poststructuralist Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Edouard Lock's dance film "Amelia" (2002) is the focus of this essay. Second-wave feminist and poststructuralist perspectives inform the analysis of this piece of contemporary dance. Laura Mulvey's male gaze theory and Julia Kristeva's theory of the semiotic and symbolic realms of representation are explored and critiqued, whilst Jacques Derrida's…

  16. Choreographing Theory: An Analysis of Edouard Lock's "Amelia" (2002) Questioning the Limits of Feminist and Poststructuralist Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireland, Ruby

    2009-01-01

    Edouard Lock's dance film "Amelia" (2002) is the focus of this essay. Second-wave feminist and poststructuralist perspectives inform the analysis of this piece of contemporary dance. Laura Mulvey's male gaze theory and Julia Kristeva's theory of the semiotic and symbolic realms of representation are explored and critiqued, whilst Jacques Derrida's…

  17. The Study of the Continuum Limit of the Supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi Identity for N = 1 Super Yang-Mills Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feo, A.

    2004-04-01

    The one-loop corrections to the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity (WTi) are investigated in the off-shell regime in the Wilson formulation of the discretized N = 1 Super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. The study of the continuum limit as well as the renormalization procedure for the supercurrent are presented.

  18. Generating functional and large N limit of nonlocal 2D generalized Yang-Mills theories (nlgYM 2's)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaidi, K.; Sajadi, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    Using the path integral method, we calculate the partition function and the generating functional (of the field strengths) on nonlocal generalized 2D Yang Mills theories (nlgYM_2's), which are nonlocal in the auxiliary field. This has been considered before by Saaidi and Khorrami. Our calculations are done for general surfaces. We find a general expression for the free energy of W(φ) =φ^{2k} in nlgYM_2 theories at the strong coupling phase (SCP) regime (A > A_c) for large groups. In the specific φ^4 model, we show that the theory has a third order phase transition.

  19. String Theory and Gauge Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Maldacena, Juan

    2009-02-20

    We will see how gauge theories, in the limit that the number of colors is large, give string theories. We will discuss some examples of particular gauge theories where the corresponding string theory is known precisely, starting with the case of the maximally supersymmetric theory in four dimensions which corresponds to ten dimensional string theory. We will discuss recent developments in this area.

  20. Chlorine-36 and 14C chronology support a limited last glacial maximum across central Chukotka, northeastern Siberia, and no Beringian ice sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Gualtieri, L.M.; Glushkova, O.Y.; Hamilton, T.D.; Mostoller, D.; Kotov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Pekulney Mountains and adjacent Tanyurer River valley are key regions for examining the nature of glaciation across much of northeast Russia. Twelve new cosmogenic isotope ages and 14 new radiocarbon ages in concert with morphometric analyses and terrace stratigraphy constrain the timing of glaciation in this region of central Chukotka. The Sartan Glaciation (Last Glacial Maximum) was limited in extent in the Pekulney Mountains and dates to ???20,000 yr ago. Cosmogenic isotope ages > 30,000 yr as well as non-finite radiocarbon ages imply an estimated age no younger than the Zyryan Glaciation (early Wisconsinan) for large sets of moraines found in the central Tanyurer Valley. Slope angles on these loess-mantled ridges are less than a few degrees and crest widths are an order of magnitude greater than those found on the younger Sartan moraines. The most extensive moraines in the lower Tanyurer Valley are most subdued implying an even older, probable middle Pleistocene age. This research provides direct field evidence against Grosswald's Beringian ice-sheet hypothesis. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical presentation and outcome of children with central diabetes insipidus associated with a self-limited or transient pituitary stalk thickening, diagnosed as infundibuloneurohypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Schaefers, J; Cools, M; De Waele, K; Gies, I; Beauloye, V; Lysy, P; Francois, I; Beckers, D; De Schepper, J

    2017-08-01

    Despite lymphocytic or autoimmune infundibuloneurohypophysitis (INH) is an increasingly recognized aetiology in children with central diabetes insipidus (CDI); clinical data on epidemiology (clinical evolution, predisposing factors, complications), diagnosis and management of this entity are limited and mostly based on published case reports. The aim of this study was to gain a broader insight in the natural history of this disease by analysing the clinical presentation, radiological pituitary stalk changes, associated autoimmunity and hormonal deficiencies in children with CDI and a self-limiting or transient stalk thickening (ST), diagnosed as autoimmune infundibuloneurohypophysitis, during the last 15 years in four Belgian university hospitals. The medical files of nine CDI patients with a ST at initial presentation and no signs of Langerhans cell histiocytosis or germinoma at presentation and/or during follow-up of more than 1.5 years were reviewed. Age at presentation ranged from 3 to 14 years. Two patients had a positive family history of autoimmunity. Three children presented with associated growth failure, two with nausea and one with long-standing headache. Median maximal diameter of the stalk was 4.6 mm (2.7-10 mm). Four patients had extra-pituitary brain anomalies, such as cysts. One patient had central hypothyroidism, and another had a partial growth hormone deficiency at diagnosis. Within a mean follow-up of 5.4 (1.5-15) years, stalk thickening remained unchanged in two patients, regressed in one and normalized in six children. CDI remained in all, while additional pituitary hormone deficiencies developed in only one patient. In this series of children INH with CDI as initial presentation, CDI was permanent and infrequently associated with anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, despite a frequent association with nonstalk cerebral lesions. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Endocrinology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Suitability assessment of construction land in the central and southern parts of Hebei Province, China based on potential-limitation model].

    PubMed

    Yin, Hai-wei; Kong, Fan-hua; Luo, Zhen-dong; Yan, Wei-jiao; Sun, Chang-feng; Xu, Feng

    2013-08-01

    The suitability assessment of regional construction land is one of the important prerequisites for the spatial arrangement in regional planning, and also, the important foundation for the reasonable utilization of regional land resources. With the support of GIS, and by using the regional comprehensive strength and spatial accessibility analysis and the eco-environmental sensitivity analysis, this paper quantitatively analyzed the development potential and its ecological limitation of the central and southern parts of Hebei Province. Besides, based on the cost-benefit analysis, the potential-limitation model was accordingly developed, and the three land suitability scenarios under different developmental concepts were captured through the interaction matrix. The results indicated that both the comprehensive strength and the development potential of the study area showed a primacy distribution pattern, and presented an obvious pole-axis spatial pattern. The areas with higher eco-environmental sensitivity were mainly distributed in the west regions, while those with lower eco-environmental sensitivity were in the east regions. Regional economic development concept had important effects on the regional ecological security pattern and urban growth. The newly developed principles and methods for the land suitability assessment in this paper could not only scientifically realize the spatial grid of regional development potential and capture the future land development trend and spatial distribution, but also provide scientific basis and effective ways for urban and regional planning to realize region 'smart growth' and 'smart conservation'.

  3. In vivo analysis of NH4+ transport and central N-metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic N-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Rojas, H F; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; van Helmond, W; Pieterse M, M; Heijnen, J J; Wahl, S A

    2016-09-16

    Ammonium is the most common N-source for yeast fermentations. Although, its transport and assimilation mechanisms are well documented, there have been only few attempts to measure the in vivo intracellular concentration of ammonium and assess its impact on gene expression. Using an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS)-based method we were able to measure the intracellular ammonium concentration in N-limited aerobic chemostat cultivations using three different N-sources (ammonium, urea and glutamate) at the same growth rate (0.05 h(-1)). The experimental results suggest that, at this growth rate, a similar concentration of intracellular ammonium, about 3.6 mmol NH4(+)/LIC, is required to supply the reactions in the central N-metabolism independent of the N-source. Based on the experimental results and different assumptions, the vacuolar and cytosolic ammonium concentrations were estimated. Furthermore, we identified a futile cycle caused by NH3 leakage to the extracellular space, which can cost up to 30% of the ATP production of the cell under N-limited conditions, and a futile redox cycle between reactions Gdh1 and Gdh2. Finally, using shotgun proteomics with labeled reference-relative protein expression, differences between the various environmental conditions were identified and correlated with previously identified N-compound sensing mechanisms.

  4. The structures of interstitial hydrogen centers in VO2 in the dilute limit from their vibrational properties and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, W.; Qin, Ying; Fowler, W. B.; Stavola, M.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-07-28

    The introduction of a large concentration of H into VO2 is known to suppress the insulating phase of the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling below 340 K. We have used infrared spectroscopy and complementary theory to study the properties of interstitial H and D in VO2 in the dilute limit to determine the vibrational frequencies, thermal stabilities, and equilibrium positions of isolated interstitial H and D centers. The vibrational lines of several OH and OD centers were observed to have thermal stabilities similar to that of the hydrogen that suppresses the insulating phase. Theory associates two of the four possible OH configurations for Hi in the insulating VO2 monoclinic phase with OH lines seen by experiment. Furthermore, theory predicts the energies and vibrational frequencies for configurations with Hi trapped near a substitutional impurity and suggests such defects as candidates for additional OH centers that have been observed.

  5. The structures of interstitial hydrogen centers in VO2 in the dilute limit from their vibrational properties and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, W.; Qin, Ying; Fowler, W. B.; Stavola, M.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2016-07-28

    The introduction of a large concentration of H into VO2 is known to suppress the insulating phase of the metal-insulator transition that occurs upon cooling below 340 K. We have used infrared spectroscopy and complementary theory to study the properties of interstitial H and D in VO2 in the dilute limit to determine the vibrational frequencies, thermal stabilities, and equilibrium positions of isolated interstitial H and D centers. The vibrational lines of several OH and OD centers were observed to have thermal stabilities similar to that of the hydrogen that suppresses the insulating phase. Theory associates two of the four possible OH configurations for Hi in the insulating VO2 monoclinic phase with OH lines seen by experiment. Furthermore, theory predicts the energies and vibrational frequencies for configurations with Hi trapped near a substitutional impurity and suggests such defects as candidates for additional OH centers that have been observed.

  6. Critical Realism and Realist Review: Analyzing Complexity in Educational Restructuring and the Limits of Generalizing Program Theories Across Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Souza, Denise E.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the design of a critical realist review that deployed Bhaskar's resolution, redescribing, retroduction, eliminating, identifying, and correcting schema and Pawson and Tilley's Context-Mechanism-Outcome configuration underpinned by realist social theory. Methodologically, the review examined the relationship between…

  7. From a Language to a Theory of Resistance: Critical Pedagogy, the Limits of "Framing," and Social Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlau, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Rebecca Tarlau attempts to build a more robust theory of the relationship between education and social change by drawing on the conceptual tools offered in the critical pedagogy and social movement literatures. Tarlau argues that while critical pedagogy has been largely disconnected from its roots in political organizing, social…

  8. Two-phase damage theory and crustal rock failure: the theoretical `void' limit, and the prediction of experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Yanick; Bercovici, David

    2003-12-01

    Using a classical averaging approach, we derive a two-phase theory to describe the deformation of a porous material made of a matrix containing voids. The presence and evolution of surface energy at the interface between the solid matrix and voids is taken into account with non-equilibrium thermodynamic considerations that allow storage of deformational work as surface energy on growing or newly created voids. This treatment leads to a simple description of isotropic damage that can be applied to low-cohesion media such as sandstone. In particular, the theory yields two possible solutions wherein samples can either `break' by shear localization with dilation (i.e. void creation), or undergo shear-enhanced compaction (void collapse facilitated by deviatoric stress). For a given deviatoric stress and confining pressure, the dominant solution is that with the largest absolute value of the dilation rate, |Γ|, which thus predicts that shear-localization and dilation occur at low effective pressures, while shear-enhanced compaction occurs at larger effective pressure. Stress trajectories of constant |Γ| represent potential failure envelopes that are ogive- (Gothic-arch-) shaped curves, wherein the ascending branch represents failure by dilation and shear-localization, and the descending branch denotes shear-enhanced compactive failure. The theory further predicts that the onset of dilation preceding shear-localization and failure necessarily occurs at the transition from compactive to dilational states and thus along a line connecting the peaks of constant-|Γ| ogives. Finally, the theory implies that while shear-enhanced compaction first occurs with increasing deviatoric stress (at large effective pressure), dilation will occur at higher deviatoric stresses. All of these predictions in fact compare very successfully with various experimental data. Indeed, the theory leads to a normalization where all the data of failure envelopes and dilation thresholds collapse to a

  9. Phase-only shaped laser pulses in optimal control theory: application to indirect photofragmentation dynamics in the weak-field limit.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels E

    2012-01-28

    We implement phase-only shaped laser pulses within quantum optimal control theory for laser-molecule interaction. This approach is applied to the indirect photofragmentation dynamics of NaI in the weak-field limit. It is shown that optimized phase-modulated pulses with a fixed frequency distribution can substantially modify transient dissociation probabilities as well as the momentum distribution associated with the relative motion of Na and I.

  10. Are systemizing and autistic traits related to talent and interest in mathematics and engineering? Testing some of the central claims of the empathizing-systemizing theory.

    PubMed

    Morsanyi, Kinga; Primi, Caterina; Handley, Simon J; Chiesi, Francesca; Galli, Silvia

    2012-11-01

    In two experiments, we tested some of the central claims of the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Experiment 1 showed that the systemizing quotient (SQ) was unrelated to performance on a mathematics test, although it was correlated with statistics-related attitudes, self-efficacy, and anxiety. In Experiment 2, systemizing skills, and gender differences in these skills, were more strongly related to spatial thinking styles than to SQ. In fact, when we partialled the effect of spatial thinking styles, SQ was no longer related to systemizing skills. Additionally, there was no relationship between the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) and the SQ, or skills and interest in mathematics and mechanical reasoning. We discuss the implications of our findings for the E-S theory, and for understanding the autistic cognitive profile. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Large-N Limit of Nonlocal 2d Generalized Yang-Mills Theories on Non-Orientable Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaidi, Kh.

    The large-group behavior of the nonlocal two-dimensional generalized Yang-Mills theories (nlgYM2's) on arbitrary closed non-orientable surfaces is investigated. It is shown that all order of ϕ2k model of these theories has third order phase transition only on the projective plane (RP2). Also the phase structure of φ 2 + (γ )/(4)φ 4 model of nlgYM2 is studied and it is found that for γ>0, this model has third order phase transition only on RP2. For γ<0, it has third order phase transition on any closed non-orientable surfaces except RP2 and Klein bottle.

  12. Scope and Limits of an anamnestic questionnaire in a control-induced low-endemicity helminthiasis setting in south-central Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Thomas; Ouattara, Mamadou; Silué, Kigbafori D; N'Goran, Dje N; Adiossan, Lukas G; Bogoch, Isaac I; N'Guessan, Yao; Koné, Siaka; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are two high-burden neglected tropical diseases. In highly endemic areas, control efforts emphasize preventive chemotherapy. However, as morbidity, infection, and transmission begin to decrease, more targeted treatment is likely to become more cost-effective, provided that comparatively cheap diagnostic methods with reasonable accuracy are available. Adults were administered an anamnestic questionnaire in mid-2010 during a cross-sectional epidemiological survey in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system in south-central Côte d'Ivoire. Questions pertaining to risk factors and signs and symptoms for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis were included. The individuals' helminth infection status and their belonging to three different anthelmintic treatment groups were compared with the questionnaire results (i) to inform the local health authorities about the epidemiological and clinical footprint of locally prevailing helminthiases, and (ii) to explore the scope and limits of an anamnestic questionnaire as monitoring tool, which eventually could help guiding the control of neglected tropical diseases in control-induced low-endemicity settings. Our study sample consisted of 195 adults (101 males, 94 females). We found prevalences of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mansoni of 39.0%, 2.7%, 2.1%, and 2.1%, respectively. No Ascaris lumbricoides infection was found. Helminth infection intensities were generally very low. Seven, 74 and 79 participants belonged to three different treatment groups. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed statistically significant (p<0.05) associations between some risk factors, signs, and symptoms, and the different helminth infections and treatment groups. However, the risk factors, signs, and symptoms showed weak diagnostic properties. The generally low prevalence and intensity of helminth infection in this part of

  13. Large- N limit of the non-local 2D Yang Mills and generalized Yang Mills theories on a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaidi, K.; Khorrami, M.

    2002-04-01

    The large-group behavior of the non-local YM_2's and gYM_2's on a cylinder or a disk is investigated. It is shown that this behavior is similar to that of the corresponding local theory, but with the area of the cylinder replaced by an effective area depending on the dominant representation. The critical areas for non-local YM_2's on a cylinder with some special boundary conditions are also obtained.

  14. Transcription Analysis of Central Metabolism Genes in Escherichia coli. Possible Roles of σ38 in Their Expression, as a Response to Carbon Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Noemí; Olvera, Maricela; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Gosset, Guillermo; Morett, Enrique; Bolívar, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate transferase system (PTS) transports glucose in Escherichia coli. Previous work demonstrated that strains lacking PTS, such as PB11, grow slow on glucose. PB11 has a reduced expression of glycolytic, and upregulates poxB and acs genes as compared to the parental strain JM101, when growing on glucose. The products of the latter genes are involved in the production of AcetylCoA. Inactivation of rpoS that codes for the RNA polymerase σ38 subunit, reduces further (50%) growth of PB11, indicating that σ38 plays a central role in the expression of central metabolism genes in slowly growing cells. In fact, transcription levels of glycolytic genes is reduced in strain PB11rpoS− as compared to PB11. In this report we studied the role of σ70 and σ38 in the expression of the complete glycolytic pathway and poxB and acs genes in certain PTS− strains and their rpoS− derivatives. We determined the transcription start sites (TSSs) and the corresponding promoters, in strains JM101, PB11, its derivative PB12 that recovered its growth capacity, and in their rpoS− derivatives, by 5′RACE and pyrosequencing. In all these genes the presence of sequences resembling σ38 recognition sites allowed the proposition that they could be transcribed by both sigma factors, from overlapping putative promoters that initiate transcription at the same site. Fourteen new TSSs were identified in seventeen genes. Besides, more than 30 putative promoters were proposed and we confirmed ten previously reported. In vitro transcription experiments support the functionality of putative dual promoters. Alternatives that could also explain lower transcription levels of the rpoS− derivatives are discussed. We propose that the presence if real, of both σ70 and σ38 dependent promoters in all glycolytic genes and operons could allow a differential transcription of these central metabolism genes by both sigma subunits as an adaptation response to carbon

  15. The central dynamics of M3, M13, and M92: stringent limits on the masses of intermediate-mass black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.; Gerssen, J.; Husser, T.-O.; Sandin, C.; Weilbacher, P.

    2014-06-01

    We used the PMAS integral field spectrograph to obtain large sets of radial velocities in the central regions of three northern Galactic globular clusters: M3, M13, and M92. By applying the novel technique of crowded field 3D spectroscopy, we measured radial velocities for about 80 stars within the central ~10″ of each cluster. These are by far the largest spectroscopic datasets obtained in the innermost parts of these clusters up to now. To obtain kinematical data across the whole extent of the clusters, we complement our data with measurements available in the literature. We combine our velocity measurements with surface brightness profiles to analyse the internal dynamics of each cluster using spherical Jeans models, and investigate whether our data provide evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole in any of the clusters. The surface brightness profiles reveal that all three clusters are consistent with a core profile, although shallow cusps cannot be excluded. We find that spherical Jeans models with a constant mass-to-light ratio provide a good overall representation of the kinematical data. A massive black hole is required in none of the three clusters to explain the observed kinematics. Our 1σ (3σ) upper limits are 5300 M⊙ (12 000 M⊙) for M3, 8600 M⊙ (13 000 M⊙) for M13, and 980 M⊙ (2700 M⊙) for M92. A puzzling circumstance is the existence of several potential high velocity stars in M3 and M13, as their presence can account for the majority of the discrepancies that we find in our mass limits compared to M92. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano-Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables D.1 to D.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  16. A psychophysiological re-evaluation of Eysenck's theory concerning cigarette smoking. Part I. The central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Roos, S S

    1977-07-30

    According to Eysenck, extraverts are characterized by inhibited cortical activity accompanied by prominent alpha brain rhythms. This prevents efficient cortical functioning. They have a 'stimulus hunger' in order to increase cortical efficiency. Assuming that nicotine is a stimulant drug, Eysenck puts forward his theory that extraverts will also have a 'stimulus hunger' for the nicotine in cigarettes and will therefore smoke more than introverts, to whom the reverse applies. Implicit in Eysenck's theory is a positive, causal relationship between the amount of alpha brain rhythms and the number of cigarettes smoked. Inspection of the literature, however, indicated that small doses of nicotine stimulate the nervous system, whereas large doses tend to inhibit it. Eysenck's theory was therefore challenged by the alternative hypothesis that light smokers are characterized by prominent alpha brain rhythms and smoke for stimulation. Heavy smokers are, however, characterized by a small amount of alpha activity (overactivated cortex which also prevents efficient functioning), and therefore smoke for inhibition to enhance their cortical efficiency and thus their alpha activity. The results were reconcilable with this hypothesis. The positive relationship implied by Eysenck's theory only held good for light and moderate smokers. Heavy smokers probably smoke for cortical inhibition.

  17. On the limitation of density functional theory (DFT) for the treatment of the anharmonicity in FCC metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifitokaldani, Ali; Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Dollé, Mickael

    2016-12-01

    It has been already shown that the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) overestimates the specific heat capacity (and in general the thermal properties) of fcc metals. DFT + QHA seemingly shows a large anharmonic contribution to the heat capacity. However, in this article we show that this anharmonicity has no physical origin and it is a consequence of the deviation of the QHA from the Maxwell relations. We show that one can simply avoid this overestimation by enforcing the QHA method to obey the Maxwell relations throughout the thermodynamically self-consistent (TSC) method, instead of considering non-real local anharmonic effects.

  18. Averaging theory at any order for computing limit cycles of discontinuous piecewise differential systems with many zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llibre, Jaume; Novaes, Douglas D.; Rodrigues, Camila A. B.

    2017-09-01

    This work is devoted to study the existence of periodic solutions for a class of ε-family of discontinuous differential systems with many zones. We show that the averaged functions at any order control the existence of crossing limit cycles for systems in this class. We also provide some examples dealing with nonsmooth perturbations of nonlinear centers.

  19. Application of the Central Limit Theorem in microbial risk assessment: high number of servings reduces the Coefficient of Variation of food-borne burden-of-illness.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Fernando; Zwietering, Marcel H

    2012-02-15

    The Central Limit Theorem (CLT) is proposed as a means of understanding microbial risk in foods from a Public Health perspective. One variant of the CLT states that as the number of random variables, each with a finite mean and variance, increases (→∞), the distribution of the sum (or mean) of those variables approximates a normal distribution. On the basis of the CLT, the hypothesis introduced by this paper states that the Coefficient of Variation (CV) of the annual number of food-borne illness cases decreases as a result of a larger number of exposures (or servings) (n). Second-order Monte-Carlo analysis and classical statistics were used to support the hypothesis, based on existing risk models on Listeria monocytogenes in deli meat products focused on elderly people in the United States. Likewise, the hypothesis was tested on epidemiological data of annual incidence of salmonellosis and listeriosis in different countries (i.e. different n). Although different sources of error affected the accuracy of the results, both the Monte-Carlo analysis (in silico) and epidemiological data (in vivo), especially for salmonellosis, demonstrated that the CV of the annual number of cases decreased as n increased as stated by the CLT. Furthermore, results from this work showed that classical statistical methods can be helpful to provide reliable risk estimates based on simple and well-established statistical principles.

  20. A theory that may explain the Hayflick limit--a means to delete one copy of a repeating sequence during each cell cycle in certain human cells such as fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Naveilhan, P; Baudet, C; Jabbour, W; Wion, D

    1994-09-01

    A model that may explain the limited division potential of certain cells such as human fibroblasts in culture is presented. The central postulate of this theory is that there exists, prior to certain key exons that code for materials needed for cell division, a unique sequence of specific repeating segments of DNA. One copy of such repeating segments is deleted during each cell cycle in cells that are not protected from such deletion through methylation of their cytosine residues. According to this theory, the means through which such repeated sequences are removed, one per cycle, is through the sequential action of enzymes that act much as bacterial restriction enzymes do--namely to produce scissions in both strands of DNA in areas that correspond to the DNA base sequence recognition specificities of such enzymes. After the first scission early in a replicative cycle, that enzyme becomes inhibited, but the cleavage of the first site exposes the closest site in the repetitive element to the action of a second restriction enzyme after which that enzyme also becomes inhibited. Then repair occurs, regenerating the original first site. Through this sequential activation and inhibition of two different restriction enzymes, only one copy of the repeating sequence is deleted during each cell cycle. In effect, the repeating sequence operates as a precise counter of the numbers of cell doubling that have occurred since the cells involved differentiated during development.

  1. Quasi BPS Wilson loops, localization of loop equation by homology and exact beta function in the large-N limit of SU(N) Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, M.

    2009-05-01

    We localize the loop equation of large-N YM theory in the anti-self-dual variables on a critical equation for an effective action by means of homological methods as opposed to the cohomological localization of equivariantly closed forms in local field theory. Our localization occurs for some special simple quasi BPS Wilson loops, that have no perimeter divergence and no cusp anomaly for backtracking cusps, in a partial Eguchi-Kawai reduction from four to two dimensions of the non-commutative theory in the limit of infinite non-commutativity and in a lattice regularization in which the anti-self-dual integration variables live at the points of the lattice, thus implying an embedding of parabolic Higgs bundles in the YM functional integral. We find that the beta function of the effective action is saturated by the non-commutative anti-self-dual vortices of the Eguchi-Kawai reduction. An exact canonical beta function of Novikov-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov type, that reproduces the universal first and second perturbative coefficients follows by the localization on vortices. Finally we argue that a scheme can be found in which the canonical coupling coincides with the physical charge between static quark sources in the large-N limit and we compare our theoretical calculation with some numerical lattice result.

  2. Exploring a type of central pattern generator based on Hindmarsh-Rose model: from theory to application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingguo; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes the idea that Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuronal model can be used to develop a new type of central pattern generator (CPG). Some key properties of HR model are studied and proved to meet the requirements of CPG. Pros and cons of HR model are provided. A CPG network based on HR model is developed and the related properties are investigated. We explore the bipedal primary gaits generated by the CPG network. The preliminary applications of HR model are tested on humanoid locomotion model and functional electrical stimulation (FES) walking system. The positive results of stimulation and experiment show the feasibility of HR model as a valid CPG.

  3. Ab initio and density functional theory evidence on the rate-limiting step in the Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2007-11-08

    The first ab initio and DFT studies on the mechanism of the MBH reaction show that the rate-limiting step involves an intramolecular proton transfer in the zwitterionic intermediate generated by the addition of enolate to electrophile. The activation barrier for the C-C bond-formation is found to be 20.2 kcal/mol lower than the proton-transfer step for the MBH reaction between methyl vinyl ketone and benzaldehyde catalyzed by DABCO.

  4. Graviton time delay and a speed limit for small black holes in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papallo, Giuseppe; Reall, Harvey S.

    2015-11-01

    Camanho, Edelstein, Maldacena and Zhiboedov have shown that gravitons can experience a negative Shapiro time delay, i.e. a time advance, in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory. They studied gravitons propagating in singular "shock-wave" geometries. We study this effect for gravitons propagating in smooth black hole spacetimes. For a small enough black hole, we find that gravitons of appropriate polarisation, and small impact parameter, can experience time advance. Such gravitons can also exhibit a deflection angle less than π, characteristic of a repulsive short-distance gravitational interaction. We discuss problems with the suggestion that the time advance can be used to build a "time machine". In particular, we argue that a small black hole cannot be boosted to a speed arbitrarily close to the speed of light, as would be required in such a construction.

  5. Quantum theory of optical temporal phase and instantaneous frequency. II. Continuous-time limit and state-variable approach to phase-locked loop design

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Mankei; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Lloyd, Seth

    2009-05-15

    We consider the continuous-time version of our recently proposed quantum theory of optical temporal phase and instantaneous frequency [M. Tsang et al., Phys. Rev. A 78, 053820 (2008)]. Using a state-variable approach to estimation, we design homodyne phase-locked loops that can measure the temporal phase with quantum-limited accuracy. We show that postprocessing can further improve the estimation performance if delay is allowed in the estimation. We also investigate the fundamental uncertainties in the simultaneous estimation of harmonic-oscillator position and momentum via continuous optical phase measurements from the classical estimation theory perspective. In the case of delayed estimation, we find that the inferred uncertainty product can drop below that allowed by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Although this result seems counterintuitive, we argue that it does not violate any basic principle of quantum mechanics.

  6. Scope and Limits of an Anamnestic Questionnaire in a Control-Induced Low-Endemicity Helminthiasis Setting in South-Central Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Thomas; Ouattara, Mamadou; Silué, Kigbafori D.; N’Goran, Dje N.; Adiossan, Lukas G.; Bogoch, Isaac I.; N’Guessan, Yao; Koné, Siaka; Utzinger, Jürg; N’Goran, Eliézer K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis are two high-burden neglected tropical diseases. In highly endemic areas, control efforts emphasize preventive chemotherapy. However, as morbidity, infection, and transmission begin to decrease, more targeted treatment is likely to become more cost-effective, provided that comparatively cheap diagnostic methods with reasonable accuracy are available. Methodology Adults were administered an anamnestic questionnaire in mid-2010 during a cross-sectional epidemiological survey in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system in south-central Côte d’Ivoire. Questions pertaining to risk factors and signs and symptoms for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis were included. The individuals’ helminth infection status and their belonging to three different anthelmintic treatment groups were compared with the questionnaire results (i) to inform the local health authorities about the epidemiological and clinical footprint of locally prevailing helminthiases, and (ii) to explore the scope and limits of an anamnestic questionnaire as monitoring tool, which eventually could help guiding the control of neglected tropical diseases in control-induced low-endemicity settings. Principal Findings Our study sample consisted of 195 adults (101 males, 94 females). We found prevalences of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mansoni of 39.0%, 2.7%, 2.1%, and 2.1%, respectively. No Ascaris lumbricoides infection was found. Helminth infection intensities were generally very low. Seven, 74 and 79 participants belonged to three different treatment groups. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed statistically significant (p<0.05) associations between some risk factors, signs, and symptoms, and the different helminth infections and treatment groups. However, the risk factors, signs, and symptoms showed weak diagnostic properties. Conclusions/Significance The generally

  7. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to explore hospital-based nurses' intention to use peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a survey study.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Laura; Carone, Maria; Caricati, Luca; Demaria, Serena; Fantuzzi, Silvia; Guarasci, Alessandro; Pirazzoli, Luca

    2016-11-22

    The peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have become an alternative to the traditional CVC. PICCs are usually inserted by trained nurses who decided to attend and complete a special training on PICC insertion and management. The present work aimed to investigate the intention of using PICC in a sample of hospital-based nurses using the theory of planned behavior as theoretical framework. A cross-sectional design was used in which a questionnaire was delivered to 199 nurses. According to the theory of planned behavior, the attitude toward the use of PICC, subjective norms and perceived self-efficacy predicted the intention to use PICC. Contrary to the expectations, the effect of subjective norms on intention to use PICC was mediated by attitude and self-efficacy. Finally, age of participants was negatively related to the intention to use the PICC. The theory of planned behavior offers a useful framework to explain nurses' intention to use PICC. Shared norms favoring the use of PICC seem to increase both nurse's positive attitudes and self-efficacy whit respect to the use of these devices. Thus, it appears that to train professionals individually does not necessarily results in an increased use of PICC.

  8. Transfer Entropy and Transient Limits of Computation

    PubMed Central

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Lizier, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Transfer entropy is a recently introduced information-theoretic measure quantifying directed statistical coherence between spatiotemporal processes, and is widely used in diverse fields ranging from finance to neuroscience. However, its relationships to fundamental limits of computation, such as Landauer's limit, remain unknown. Here we show that in order to increase transfer entropy (predictability) by one bit, heat flow must match or exceed Landauer's limit. Importantly, we generalise Landauer's limit to bi-directional information dynamics for non-equilibrium processes, revealing that the limit applies to prediction, in addition to retrodiction (information erasure). Furthermore, the results are related to negentropy, and to Bremermann's limit and the Bekenstein bound, producing, perhaps surprisingly, lower bounds on the computational deceleration and information loss incurred during an increase in predictability about the process. The identified relationships set new computational limits in terms of fundamental physical quantities, and establish transfer entropy as a central measure connecting information theory, thermodynamics and theory of computation. PMID:24953547

  9. Theory and Implementation of Nuclear Safety System Codes - Part II: System Code Closure Relations, Validation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A Roth; Fatih Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    This is Part II of two articles describing the details of thermal-hydraulic sys- tem codes. In this second part of the article series, the system code closure relationships (used to model thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium and the coupling of the phases) for the governing equations are discussed and evaluated. These include several thermal and hydraulic models, such as heat transfer coefficients for various flow regimes, two phase pressure correlations, two phase friction correlations, drag coefficients and interfacial models be- tween the fields. These models are often developed from experimental data. The experiment conditions should be understood to evaluate the efficacy of the closure models. Code verification and validation, including Separate Effects Tests (SETs) and Integral effects tests (IETs) is also assessed. It can be shown from the assessments that the test cases cover a significant section of the system code capabilities, but some of the more advanced reactor designs will push the limits of validation for the codes. Lastly, the limitations of the codes are discussed by considering next generation power plants, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), analyz- ing not only existing nuclear power plants, but also next generation nuclear power plants. The nuclear industry is developing new, innovative reactor designs, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) and others. Sub-types of these reactor designs utilize pebbles, prismatic graphite moderators, helical steam generators, in- novative fuel types, and many other design features that may not be fully analyzed by current system codes. This second part completes the series on the comparison and evaluation of the selected reactor system codes by discussing the closure relations, val- idation and limitations. These two articles indicate areas where the models can be improved to adequately address issues with new reactor design and development.

  10. Central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference and the effect of venous hyperoxia: A limiting factor, or an additional marker of severity in shock?

    PubMed

    Saludes, P; Proença, L; Gruartmoner, G; Enseñat, L; Pérez-Madrigal, A; Espinal, C; Mesquida, J

    2016-11-10

    Central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide difference (PcvaCO2) has demonstrated its prognostic value in critically ill patients suffering from shock, and current expert recommendations advocate for further resuscitation interventions when PcvaCO2 is elevated. PcvaCO2 combination with arterial-venous oxygen content difference (PcvaCO2/CavO2) seems to enhance its performance when assessing anaerobic metabolism. However, the fact that PCO2 values might be altered by changes in blood O2 content (the Haldane effect), has been presented as a limitation of PCO2-derived variables. The present study aimed at exploring the impact of hyperoxia on PcvaCO2 and PcvaCO2/CavO2 during the early phase of shock. Prospective interventional study. Ventilated patients suffering from shock within the first 24 h of ICU admission. Patients requiring FiO2 ≥ 0.5 were excluded. At inclusion, simultaneous arterial and central venous blood samples were collected. Patients underwent a hyperoxygenation test (5 min of FiO2 100%), and arterial and central venous blood samples were repeated. Oxygenation and CO2 variables were calculated at both time points. Twenty patients were studied. The main cause of shock was septic shock (70%). The hyperoxygenation trial increased oxygenation parameters in arterial and venous blood, whereas PCO2 only changed at the venous site. Resulting PcvaCO2 and PcvaCO2/CavO2 significantly increased [6.8 (4.9, 8.1) vs. 7.6 (6.7, 8.5) mmHg, p 0.001; and 1.9 (1.4, 2.2) vs. 2.3 (1.8, 3), p < 0.001, respectively]. Baseline PcvaCO2, PcvaCO2/CavO2 and ScvO2 correlated with the magnitude of PO2 augmentation at the venous site within the trial (ρ -0.46, p 0.04; ρ 0.6, p < 0.01; and ρ 0.7, p < 0.001, respectively). Increased PcvaCO2/CavO2 values were associated with higher mortality in our sample [1.46 (1.21, 1.89) survivors vs. 2.23 (1.86, 2.8) non-survivors, p < 0.01]. PcvaCO2 and PcvaCO2/CavO2 are influenced by oxygenation changes not related to flow. Elevated

  11. Accuracy and limitations of second-order many-body perturbation theory for predicting vertical detachment energies of solvated-electron clusters.

    PubMed

    Herbert, John M; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-01-07

    Vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) are calculated for a variety of (H(2)O)(n)(-) and (HF)(n)(-) isomers, using different electronic structure methodologies but focusing in particular on a comparison between second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled-cluster theory with noniterative triples, CCSD(T). For the surface-bound electrons that characterize small (H(2)O)(n)(-) clusters (n< or = 7), the correlation energy associated with the unpaired electron grows linearly as a function of the VDE but is unrelated to the number of monomers, n. In every example considered here, including strongly-bound "cavity" isomers of (H(2)O)(24)(-), the correlation energy associated with the unpaired electron is significantly smaller than that associated with typical valence electrons. As a result, the error in the MP2 detachment energy, as a fraction of the CCSD(T) value, approaches a limit of about -7% for (H(2)O)(n)(-) clusters with VDEs larger than about 0.4 eV. CCSD(T) detachment energies are bounded from below by MP2 values and from above by VDEs calculated using second-order many-body perturbation theory with molecular orbitals obtained from density functional theory. For a variety of both strongly- and weakly-bound isomers of (H(2)O)(20)(-) and (H(2)O)(24)(-), including both surface states and cavity states, these bounds afford typical error bars of +/-0.1 eV. We have found only one case where the Hartree-Fock and density functional orbitals differ qualitatively; in this case the aforementioned bounds lie 0.4 eV apart, and second-order perturbation theory may not be reliable.

  12. Self-limiting outbreak of crayfish plague in an Austropotamobius pallipes population of a river basin in the Abruzzi region (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Caprioli, Riccardo; Cargini, Daniele; Marcacci, Maurilia; Cammà, Cesare; Giansante, Carla; Ferri, Nicola

    2013-03-26

    Crayfish plague, caused by the oomycete Aphanomyces astaci, is a serious disease of European freshwater crayfish and has eliminated entire populations in several European countries. In September 2011, mortality was observed among the Austropotamobius pallipes population of a river basin in the Abruzzi region (central Italy), and A. astaci DNA was detected by PCR in dead crayfish. A systematic survey was carried out to evaluate the spread and the effects of the plague in the river basin. The source of the outbreak remained unknown since North American crayfish species, which frequently act as subclinical carriers of the infection, were not detected in the area. The A. pallipes population disappeared from a river stretch of ~1 km, where A. astaci infection was detected in dead crayfish. However, apparently unaffected crayfish were still present upstream of that area as well as in a tributary that joined the brook in the apparently depopulated stretch. A. astaci infection was not detected in dead individuals collected in the upstream area and tributary. A follow-up visit conducted in the following season showed the presence of A. pallipes in the river stretch hit by the plague. In this outbreak, the spread of the infection could have been limited by a low density of the crayfish population and by the geographic conformation of the river basin, which includes a dense network of small tributaries, characterized by high flow velocity and low water temperature. In this particular setting, crayfish plague outbreaks can remain undetected. This underlines the importance of active monitoring programs aimed at the prompt recognition of both episodes of mortality and the presence of non-indigenous crayfish species.

  13. Rapid Water Uptake and Limited Storage Capacity at Height of Growing Season in Four Temperate Tree Species in a Central Pennsylvania Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaines, K.; Meinzer, F. C.; Duffy, C.; Thomas, E.; Eissenstat, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Water uptake and retention by trees affects their ability to cope with drought, as well as influences ground water recharge and stream flow. Historically, water has not often been limiting in Eastern U.S. forests. As a result, very little work has been done to understand the basics of timing of water use by vegetation in these systems. As droughts are projected to increase in length and severity in future decades, this focus is increasingly important, particularly for informing hydrologic models. We used deuterium tracer and sap flux techniques to study tree water transport on a forested ridge top with shallow soil in central Pennsylvania. Three trees of each of the species, Acer saccharum, Carya tomentosa, Quercus prinus, and Quercus rubrum were accessed by tree climbing and scaffolding towers. We hypothesized that contrasting vessel size of the tree species would affect the efficiency of water transport (tracer velocity) and contrasting tree size would affect tracer storage as estimated by tracer residence times. Trees were injected with deuterated water in July 2012. Leaves were sampled 15 times over 35 days, initially daily for the first week, then at regular intervals afterwards. The tracer arrived in the canopy of the study trees between 1 and 7 days after injection, traveling at a velocity of 2 to 19 m d-1. The tracer residence time was between 7 and 33 days. Although there was variation in tracer velocity and residence time in individual trees, there were no significant differences among wood types or species (P>0.05). The general patterns in timing of water use were similar to other studies on angiosperm trees in tropical and arid ecosystems. There was no evidence of longer residence times in the larger trees. Sap flux-based estimates of sap velocity were much lower than tracer estimates, which was consistent with other studies. Levels of sap flux and midday water potential measurements suggested that the trees were water-stressed. We observed relatively

  14. Does the lattice zero-momentum gluon propagator for pure-gauge SU(3) Yang-Mills theory vanish in the infinite-volume limit?

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, O.; Silva, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The Cucchieri-Mendes bounds for the gluon propagator are discussed for the four dimensional pure-gauge SU(3) theory. Assuming a pure power law dependence on the inverse of the lattice volume, the lattice data gives a vanishing zero-momentum gluon propagator in the infinite-volume limit in agreement with the Gribov-Zwanziger horizon condition but contradicting the SU(2) analysis. The results are robust against variations of the lattice volumes and corrections to the power law. Our analysis considers also more general ansatze that, although not conclusive, open the possibility of having D(0){ne}0 in the infinite-volume limit. A solution to this puzzle requires further investigations.

  15. Photoresponsive Liquid Crystal Elastomers as Feedback Controlled Light-driven Actuators - Theory, Real-time Behaviour, Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippenberger, Michael; Dengler, Philipp; Wandinger, Andreas; Schmidt, Michael

    Liquid Crystal Elastomers constitute a class of intelligent materials and actuators. External stimulation induces an internal phase-change that results in a mechanical motion of the Liquid Crystal Elastomer. External stimuli can be humidity, thermal energy but also radiation with an appropriate wavelength. In this paper we use the photomechanic response of Liquid Crystal Elastomers as a driving force for a controlled actuator, operating in feedback constellation with a tuned cascade-compensator. To accomplish this, we go the methodical route of dynamic system investigation consisting of an analysis of the phenomenological system-properties, the identification of the dynamic behaviour and the overall synthesis of the feedback-control loop. Since we also take practical considerations into account, we present a coordinated hard- and software concept to realize the application of the Liquid Crystal Elastomer as a controlled actuator. An application guide complements the paper and discusses the limits of this class of actuators.

  16. Density functional theory calculation on many-cores hybrid central processing unit-graphic processing unit architectures.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luigi; Ospici, Matthieu; Deutsch, Thierry; Méhaut, Jean-François; Neelov, Alexey; Goedecker, Stefan

    2009-07-21

    We present the implementation of a full electronic structure calculation code on a hybrid parallel architecture with graphic processing units (GPUs). This implementation is performed on a free software code based on Daubechies wavelets. Such code shows very good performances, systematic convergence properties, and an excellent efficiency on parallel computers. Our GPU-based acceleration fully preserves all these properties. In particular, the code is able to run on many cores which may or may not have a GPU associated, and thus on parallel and massive parallel hybrid machines. With double precision calculations, we may achieve considerable speedup, between a factor of 20 for some operations and a factor of 6 for the whole density functional theory code.

  17. The limits of ray theory when measuring shear wave splitting in the lowermost mantle with ScS waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Andy; Wookey, James

    2016-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting provide unambiguous evidence of the presence of anisotropy in the Earth's lowermost mantle, a region known as D″. Much recent work has attempted to use these observations to place constraints on strain above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), as this may help map flow throughout the mantle. Previously, this interpretation has relied on the assumption that waves can be modelled as infinite-frequency rays, or that the Earth is radially symmetric. Due to computational constraints it has not been possible to test these approximations until now. We use fully 3-D, generally anisotropic simulations of ScS waves at the frequencies of the observations to show that ray methods are sometimes inadequate to interpret the signals seen. We test simple, uniform models, and for a D″ layer as thin as 50 km, significant splitting may be produced, and we find that recovered fast orientations usually reflect the imposed fast orientation above the CMB. Ray theory in these cases provides useful results, though there are occasional, notable differences between forward methods. Isotropic models do not generate apparent splitting. We also test more complex models, including ones based on our current understanding of mineral plasticity and elasticity in D″. The results show that variations of anisotropy over even several hundred kilometres cause the ray-theoretical and finite-frequency calculations to differ greatly. Importantly, models with extreme mineral alignment in D″ yield splitting times not dissimilar to observations (δt ≤ 3 s), suggesting that anisotropy in the lowermost mantle is probably much stronger than previously thought-potentially ˜10 per cent shear wave anisotropy or more. We show that if the base of the mantle is as complicated as we believe, future studies of lowermost mantle anisotropy will have to incorporate finite-frequency effects to fully interpret observations of shear wave splitting.

  18. Study the Linkage of Allometric Scaling and Resource Limitation Model of Vegetation Structure with Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Myneni, R.; Knyazikhin, Y.

    2012-12-01

    ) by exploiting synergistically the information content of lidar, multiangle and hyperspectral remote sensing data; (c) the extension of pair correlation function in forms of allometric scaling to represent dispersion in vegetation canopies, and therefore imbuing retrievals with explanatory power and building direct linkages to dynamics of resource allocation within canopy; (d) calculation of biomass information from knowledge of frequency distribution of individual size in a canopy from allometric relationships and linking structural variables to biomass; (e) inversion of the allometric scaling and resource limitations model with knowledge of vegetation structure retrievals to predict environmental limiting factors for vegetation growth and identifying potential changes due to natural or anthropogenic disturbances.

  19. Regularity properties and pathologies of position-space renormalization-group transformations: Scope and limitations of Gibbsian theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Enter, Aernout C. D.; Fernández, Roberto; Sokal, Alan D.

    1993-09-01

    We reconsider the conceptual foundations of the renormalization-group (RG) formalism, and prove some rigorous theorems on the regularity properties and possible pathologies of the RG map. Our main results apply to local (in position space) RG maps acting on systems of bounded spins (compact single-spin space). Regarding regularity, we show that the RG map, defined on a suitable space of interactions (=formal Hamiltonians), is always single-valued and Lipschitz continuous on its domain of definition. This rules out a recently proposed scenario for the RG description of first-order phase transitions. On the pathological side, we make rigorous some arguments of Griffiths, Pearce, and Israel, and prove in several cases that the renormalized measure is not a Gibbs measure for any reasonable interaction. This means that the RG map is ill-defined, and that the conventional RG description of first-order phase transitions is not universally valid. For decimation or Kadanoff transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension d⩾3, these pathologies occur in a full neighborhood { β> β 0, ¦h¦< ɛ( β)} of the low-temperature part of the first-order phase-transition surface. For block-averaging transformations applied to the Ising model in dimension d⩾2, the pathologies occur at low temperatures for arbitrary magnetic field strength. Pathologies may also occur in the critical region for Ising models in dimension d⩾4. We discuss the heuristic and numerical evidence on RG pathologies in the light of our rigorous theorems. In addition, we discuss critically the concept of Gibbs measure, which is at the heart of present-day classical statistical mechanics. We provide a careful, and, we hope, pedagogical, overview of the theory of Gibbsian measures as well as (the less familiar) non-Gibbsian measures, emphasizing the distinction between these two objects and the possible occurrence of the latter in different physical situations. We give a rather complete catalogue of

  20. Introduction: Ecological knowledge, theory and information in space and time [Chapter 1

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Falk Huettmann

    2010-01-01

    A central theme of this book is that there is a strong mutual dependence between explanatory theory, available data and analytical method in determining the lurching progress of ecological knowledge (Fig. 1.1). The two central arguments are first that limits in each of theory, data and method have continuously constrained advances in understanding ecological systems...

  1. Monsoon Season Moisture Deficit Limits Growth in Co-Occurring Alpine Shrub (Cassiope fastigata) and Tree (Abies spectabilis) Species in the Central Himalayas, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayback, S. A.; Shrestha, K. B.; Hofgaard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates changing climatological conditions in the Nepalese Himalayas including decreasing precipitation, a weakening Indian monsoon and rising temperatures. Trees and shrubs found at treeline are considered to be highly sensitive to climate, but the climatic effects on these ecotone species in the Himalayas are not well understood. Dendrochronological techniques applied to co-occurring shrubs and trees up-and down-slope of treeline extend our understanding of vegetation response at range margins and into tree-less environments. We developed tree-ring width and annual height increment chronologies for Abies spectabilis (Himalayan fir) and the first annual growth increment and annual production of leaves chronologies for Cassiope fastigata (Himalayan heather) at a high elevation site in central Nepal. C. fastigata chronologies showed moisture availability in late pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons of the previous year are critical to stem elongation and leaf production (AGI and previous May-August SPEI-12, r = 0.790; LEAF and previous June-September SPEI-12, r = 0.708) A. spectabilis chronologies were significantly and negatively correlated with monsoon season temperature during the current year (tree-ring width and June mean temperature, r = -0.677; height-increment and Sept maximum temperature, r = -0.605). In addition to both long-term and recent declines in moisture in the Himalayas, moisture deficit may be further exacerbated at high elevation sites via run-off and higher levels of evapotranspiration resulting in growth reductions, dieback and even death of these species. These results highlight that not all mid-latitude, high elevation treelines are limited by temperature as previously thought and that severe drought stress may initiate downslope treeline retraction. Understanding the response of co-occurring tree and shrub species to climate, now and in the future, may help to elucidate the physiological mechanisms controlling local and

  2. Smooth and sharp creation of a Dirichlet wall in 1+1 quantum field theory: how singular is the sharp creation limit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric G.; Louko, Jorma

    2015-08-01

    We present and utilize a simple formalism for the smooth creation of boundary conditions within relativistic quantum field theory. We consider a massless scalar field in (1 + 1)-dimensional flat spacetime and imagine smoothly transitioning from there being no boundary condition to there being a two-sided Dirichlet mirror. The act of doing this, expectantly, generates a flux of real quanta that emanates from the mirror as it is being created. We show that the local stress-energy tensor of the flux is finite only if an infrared cutoff is introduced, no matter how slowly the mirror is created, in agreement with the perturbative results of Obadia and Parentani. In the limit of instaneous mirror creation the total energy injected into the field becomes ultraviolet divergent, but the response of an Unruh-DeWitt particle detector passing through the infinite burst of energy nevertheless remains finite. Implications for vacuum entanglement extraction and for black hole firewalls are discussed.

  3. Exact Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation of the Dirac-Pauli Hamiltonian in the weak-field limit by the method of direct perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei; Chen, Tsung-Wei

    2016-11-01

    We apply the method of direct perturbation theory for the Foldy-Wouthuysen (FW) transformation upon the Dirac-Pauli Hamiltonian subject to external electromagnetic fields. The exact FW transformations exist and agree with those obtained by Eriksen's method for two special cases. In the weak-field limit of static and homogeneous electromagnetic fields, by mathematical induction on the orders of 1 /c in the power series, we rigorously prove the long-held speculation: the FW transformed Dirac-Pauli Hamiltonian is in full agreement with the classical counterpart, which is the sum of the orbital Hamiltonian for the Lorentz force equation and the spin Hamiltonian for the Thomas-Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation.

  4. Self-Consistent Field Theory for the Convective Turbulence in a Rayleigh-Benard System in the Infinite Prandtl Number Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-09-01

    The kinetic energy spectrum for three dimensional convective turbulence in a Rayleigh-Benard system,where k is the wave vector, was shown to scale as on heuristic grounds in the recent work of Pandey, Verma and Mishra in the infinite Prandtl number limit. They also presented clear numerical evidence of this scaling. This limit is very similar to the spherical model of critical phenomena and hence amenable to exact treatment in a self-consistent field theory. We find that self-consistency gives is the Rayleigh number) but the inevitable presence of sweeping adds a part which is proportional to . This can account for the slight k-dependence of the compensated spectrum of Pandey et al. We also estimate the anisotropy in the spectrum and find that the second order Legendre function has a strength of 15 % relative to the isotropic part. In two spatial dimensions the scaling exponent of the energy spectrum is still 13/3 but the anisotropy is larger.

  5. Eleventh-order calculation of Ising-limit Green's functions for scalar quantum field theory in arbitrary space-time dimension [ital D

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, C.M. ); Boettcher, S. )

    1995-02-15

    This paper extends an earlier high-temperature lattice calculation of the renormalized Green's function of a [ital D]-dimensional Euclidean scalar quantum field theory in the Ising limit. The previous calculation included all graphs through sixth order. Here, we present the results of an eleventh-order calculation. The extrapolation to the continuum limit in the previous calculation was rather clumsy and did not appear to converge when [ital D][gt]2. Here, we present an improved extrapolation which gives uniformly good results for all real values of the dimension between [ital D]=0 and [ital D]=4. We find that the four-point Green's function has the value 0.620[plus minus]0.007 when [ital D]=2 and 0.98[plus minus]0.01 when [ital D]=3 and that the six-point Green's function has the value 0.96[plus minus]0.03 when [ital D]=2 and 1.2[plus minus]0.2 when [ital D]=3.

  6. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-06-01

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360°) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200° with a fixed angle step of 1.2° and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  7. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  8. Large spin limit of AdS5× S5 string theory and low energy expansion of ferromagnetic spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczenski, M.; Ryzhov, A. V.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2004-08-01

    By considering AdS5× S5 string states with large S5 angular momenta one can provide non-trivial quantitative checks of the AdS/CFT duality. A string rotating in S5 with two angular momenta J1, J2 is dual to an operator in N=4 SYM theory whose conformal dimension can be computed by diagonalizing a (generalization of) spin 1/2 Heisenberg chain Hamiltonian. It was recently argued and verified to lowest order in a large J= J1+ J2 expansion, that the Heisenberg chain can be described using a non-relativistic low energy effective 2d action for a unit vector field ni which exactly matches the corresponding large J limit of the classical AdS5× S5 string action. In this paper we show that this agreement extends to the next order and develop a systematic procedure for computing higher orders in such large angular momentum expansion. This involves several non-trivial steps. On the string side, we need to choose a special gauge with a non-diagonal world-sheet metric which insures that the angular momentum is uniformly distributed along the string, as indeed is the case on the spin chain side. We need also to implement an order by order redefinition of the field ni to get an action linear in the time derivative. On the spin chain side, it turns out to be crucial to include the effects of integrating out short wave-length modes. In this way we gain a better understanding of how (a subsector of) the string sigma model emerges from the dual gauge theory, allowing us to demonstrate the duality beyond comparing particular examples of states with large J.

  9. The limited impact of indeterminacy for healthcare rationing: how indeterminacy problems show the need for a hybrid theory, but nothing more.

    PubMed

    Herlitz, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A notorious debate in the ethics of healthcare rationing concerns whether to address rationing decisions with substantial principles or with a procedural approach. One major argument in favour of procedural approaches is that substantial principles are indeterminate so that we can reasonably disagree about how to apply them. To deal with indeterminacy, we need a just decision process. In this paper I argue that it is a mistake to abandon substantial principles just because they are indeterminate. It is true that reasonable substantial principles designed to deal with healthcare rationing can be expected to be indeterminate. Yet, the indeterminacy is only partial. In some situations we can fully determine what to do in light of the principles, in some situations we cannot. The conclusion to draw from this fact is not that we need to develop procedural approaches to healthcare rationing, but rather that we need a more complex theory in which both substantial principles and procedural approaches are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. A Teaching Experiment in Constructing the Limit of a Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Pham Sy; Stephens, Max

    2014-01-01

    "Limit" is a difficult mathematical concept, even for good students. It is also a key foundational idea for the study of advanced mathematics. It holds a central position as a foundation of the theory of approximation, of continuity, and of differential and integral calculus. However, the difficulty for teachers is how to organise…

  11. Physiologic upper limits of pore size of different blood capillary types and another perspective on the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Much of our current understanding of microvascular permeability is based on the findings of classic experimental studies of blood capillary permeability to various-sized lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules. According to the classic small pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the transcapillary flow rates of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused endogenous macromolecules, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall takes place through a single population of small pores that are approximately 6 nm in diameter; whereas, according to the dual pore theory of microvascular permeability, which was formulated on the basis of the findings of studies on the accumulation of various-sized systemically or regionally perfused non-endogenous macromolecules in the locoregional tissue lymphatic drainages, transcapillary exchange across the capillary wall also takes place through a separate population of large pores, or capillary leaks, that are between 24 and 60 nm in diameter. The classification of blood capillary types on the basis of differences in the physiologic upper limits of pore size to transvascular flow highlights the differences in the transcapillary exchange routes for the transvascular transport of endogenous and non-endogenous macromolecules across the capillary walls of different blood capillary types. Methods The findings and published data of studies on capillary wall ultrastructure and capillary microvascular permeability to lipid-insoluble endogenous and non-endogenous molecules from the 1950s to date were reviewed. In this study, the blood capillary types in different tissues and organs were classified on the basis of the physiologic upper limits of pore size to the transvascular flow of lipid-insoluble molecules. Blood capillaries were classified as non-sinusoidal or sinusoidal on the basis of capillary wall basement membrane layer

  12. Probability Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaynes, E. T.; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2003-04-01

    Foreword; Preface; Part I. Principles and Elementary Applications: 1. Plausible reasoning; 2. The quantitative rules; 3. Elementary sampling theory; 4. Elementary hypothesis testing; 5. Queer uses for probability theory; 6. Elementary parameter estimation; 7. The central, Gaussian or normal distribution; 8. Sufficiency, ancillarity, and all that; 9. Repetitive experiments, probability and frequency; 10. Physics of 'random experiments'; Part II. Advanced Applications: 11. Discrete prior probabilities, the entropy principle; 12. Ignorance priors and transformation groups; 13. Decision theory: historical background; 14. Simple applications of decision theory; 15. Paradoxes of probability theory; 16. Orthodox methods: historical background; 17. Principles and pathology of orthodox statistics; 18. The Ap distribution and rule of succession; 19. Physical measurements; 20. Model comparison; 21. Outliers and robustness; 22. Introduction to communication theory; References; Appendix A. Other approaches to probability theory; Appendix B. Mathematical formalities and style; Appendix C. Convolutions and cumulants.

  13. Theory of multiple-stage interband photovoltaic devices and ultimate performance limit comparison of multiple-stage and single-stage interband infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkey, Robert T.; Yang, Rui Q.

    2013-09-01

    A theoretical framework for studying signal and noise in multiple-stage interband infrared photovoltaic devices is presented. The theory flows from a general picture of electrons transitioning between thermalized reservoirs. Making the assumption of bulk-like absorbers, we show how the standard semiconductor transport and recombination equations can be extended to the case of multiple-stage devices. The electronic noise arising from thermal fluctuations in the transition rates between reservoirs is derived using the Shockley-Ramo and Wiener-Khinchin theorems. This provides a unified noise treatment accounting for both the Johnson and shot noise. Using a Green's function formalism, we derive consistent analytic expressions for the quantum efficiency and thermal noise in terms of the design parameters and macroscopic material properties of the absorber. The theory is then used to quantify the potential performance improvement from the use of multiple stages. We show that multiple-stage detectors can achieve higher sensitivities for applications requiring a fast temporal response. This is shown by deriving an expression for the optimal number of stages in terms of the absorption coefficient and absorber thicknesses for a multiple-stage detector with short absorbers. The multiple-stage architecture may also be useful for improving the sensitivity of high operating temperature detectors in situations where the quantum efficiency is limited by a short diffusion length. The potential sensitivity improvement offered by a multiple-stage architecture can be judged from the product of the absorption coefficient, α, and diffusion length, Ln, of the absorber material. For detector designs where the absorber lengths in each of the stages are equal, the multiple-stage architecture offers the potential for significant detectivity improvement when αLn ≤ 0.2. We also explore the potential of multiple-stage detectors with photocurrent-matched absorbers. In this architecture, the

  14. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels: Limitations of the Membrane Theory in the Analysis of the Hydraulic Bulge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Iancu, A.; Ferron, G.

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, an accurate determination of the true stress-strain curve is a key-element for all finite element (FE) forming predictions. Since the introduction of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) for the automotive market, the standard uniaxial tension test suffers the drawback of relatively low uniform elongations. The extrapolation of the uniaxial stress-strain curve up to large strains is not without consequence in forming predictions—especially formability and springback. One of the means to solve this problem is to use experimental tests where large plastic strain levels can be reached. The hydraulic bulge test is one of these tests. The effective plastic strain levels reached in the bulge test are of about 0.7. From an experimental standpoint, the biaxial flow stress is estimated using measurement of fluid pressure, and calculation of thickness and curvature at the pole, via appropriate measurements and assumptions. The biaxial stress at the pole is determined using the membrane equilibrium equation. The analysis proposed in this paper consists of performing "virtual experiments" where the results obtained by means of FE calculations are used as input data for determining the biaxial stress-strain law in agreement with the experimental procedure. In this way, a critical discussion of the experimental procedure can be made, by comparing the "experimental" stress-strain curve (Membrane theory curve) with the "reference" one introduced in the simulations. In particular, the influences of the "(die diameter)/thickness" ratio and of the plastic anisotropy are studied, and limitations of the hydraulic bulge test analysis are discussed.

  15. Language limits the experience of emotions. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Adrienne; Niedenthal, Paula

    2015-06-01

    Emotions are phylogenetically ancient and involve complex interactions of neural, behavioral, and physiological processes. A complete theory of emotions must incorporate, or at least be informed by, current knowledge from neurobiology and comparative psychology [1]. The Quartet Theory of Human Emotions by Koelsch and colleagues [2] is therefore a welcome step towards a more integrative affective science.

  16. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  17. Laser-Plasma Instabilities by Avoiding the Strong Ion Landau Damping Limit: The Central Role of Statistical, Ultrafast, Nonlinear Optical Laser Techniques (SUNOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan; Montgomery, David; Moody, John; Froula, Dustin; Hammer, James; Jones, Oggie; Amendt, Peter

    2014-10-01

    In mid-Z and high-Z plasmas, it is possible to control crossed bean energy transfer (CBET) and subsequently occurring single or multiple beam instabilities such as Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) by novel means. These new techniques are inoperative when the ion acoustic waves are in their strong damping limit, such as occurs in low Z plasmas with comparable electron and ion temperatures. For mid-Z plasmas, such as Z = 10, and near the Mach 1 surface, the strong coupling regime (SCR) can be exploited for LPI mitigation. While at higher Z values, it is thermal filamentation in conjunction with nonlocal heat transport that are useful to exploit. In both these settings, the strategy is to induce laser hot spot intensity dependent, and thus spatially dependent, frequency shifts to the ion acoustic waves in the transient response of wave-wave interactions. The latter is achieved by the on-off nature of spike trains of uneven duration and delay, STUD pulses. The least taxing use of STUD pulses is to modulate the beams at the 10 ps time scale and to choose which crossing beams are overlapping in time and which are not. Work supported by a grant from the DOE NNSA-OFES joint program on HEDP

  18. More stereotypes, please! The limits of 'theory of mind' and the need for further studies on the complexity of real world social interactions.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    I suggest that the Stereotype Rationality Hypothesis (Jussim 2012) is only partially right. I agree it is rational to rely on stereotypes, but in the complexity of real world social interactions, most of our individuating information invokes additional stereotypes. Despite assumptions to the contrary, there is reason to think theory of mind is not accurate, and social psychology's denial of stereotype accuracy led us toward mindreading/theory of mind - a less accurate account of how we understand other people.

  19. Stabilizing bottomless action theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, J.; Halpern, M. B.

    1984-08-01

    We show how to construct the euclidean quantum theory corresponding to classical actions which are unbounded from below. Our method preserves the classical limit, the large- N limit, and the perturbative expansion of the unstabilized theories.

  20. Interval Graph Limits

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2015-01-01

    We work out a graph limit theory for dense interval graphs. The theory developed departs from the usual description of a graph limit as a symmetric function W (x, y) on the unit square, with x and y uniform on the interval (0, 1). Instead, we fix a W and change the underlying distribution of the coordinates x and y. We find choices such that our limits are continuous. Connections to random interval graphs are given, including some examples. We also show a continuity result for the chromatic number and clique number of interval graphs. Some results on uniqueness of the limit description are given for general graph limits. PMID:26405368

  1. Efficiently Assessing Negative Cognition in Depression: An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Strong, David R.; Meyer, Bjorn; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Miller, Ivan R.

    2007-01-01

    Despite a central role for dysfunctional attitudes in cognitive theories of depression and the widespread use of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, form A (DAS-A; A. Weissman, 1979), the psychometric development of the DAS-A has been relatively limited. The authors used nonparametric item response theory methods to examine the DAS-A items and…

  2. Efficiently Assessing Negative Cognition in Depression: An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Strong, David R.; Meyer, Bjorn; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Miller, Ivan R.

    2007-01-01

    Despite a central role for dysfunctional attitudes in cognitive theories of depression and the widespread use of the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, form A (DAS-A; A. Weissman, 1979), the psychometric development of the DAS-A has been relatively limited. The authors used nonparametric item response theory methods to examine the DAS-A items and…

  3. Limitations in Social Anticipation Are Independent of Imaginative and Theory of Mind Abilities in Children with Autism but Not in Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Douglas Jozef; de Rosnay, Marc; Lunenburg, Patty; Meerum Terwogt, Mark; Begeer, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Anticipating future interactions is characteristic of our everyday social experiences, yet has received limited empirical attention. Little is known about how children with autism spectrum disorder, known for their limitations in social interactive skills, engage in "social anticipation." We asked children with autism spectrum disorder…

  4. Limitations in Social Anticipation Are Independent of Imaginative and Theory of Mind Abilities in Children with Autism but Not in Typically Developing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Douglas Jozef; de Rosnay, Marc; Lunenburg, Patty; Meerum Terwogt, Mark; Begeer, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Anticipating future interactions is characteristic of our everyday social experiences, yet has received limited empirical attention. Little is known about how children with autism spectrum disorder, known for their limitations in social interactive skills, engage in "social anticipation." We asked children with autism spectrum disorder…

  5. Southwestern limits of Indian Ocean Ridge mantle and the origin of low Pb-206/Pb-204 mid-ocean ridge basalt - Isotope systematics of the central Southwest Indian Ridge (17 deg - 50 deg E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, J.; Le Roex, A. P.; Peng, Z.; Fisher, R. L.; Natland, J. H.

    1992-12-01

    The isotopic characteristics of the Indian Ocean Ridge midocean ridge basalts (MORBs) and of the Atlantic and the Pacific MORBs (north of 25 deg S) were determined in order to estimate the southwestern limits of the Indian Ocean Ridge mantle and the origin of low Pb-206/Pb-204 MORB. In view of the possible importance of a Marion-type mantle along portions of the ridge, lavas from several Marion Island, Prince Edward Island, and Funk Seamount were also analyzed isotopically. The isotopic results include analyses of fields for the Indian Ocean triple junction area, the entire Central Indian and southern Carlsberg ridges, for several oceanic islands, and Pacific and/or North Atlantic MORBs.

  6. The Possibilities and Limitations of Assessment for Learning: Exploring the Theory of Formative Assessment and the Notion of "Closing the Learning Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ninomiya, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    Black and Wiliam (1998a, 1998b) demonstrate that formative assessment is one of the most effective strategies for promoting student learning. Since the publication of their reviews, formative assessment has gained increasing international prominence in both policy and practice. However, despite this early innovation, the theory and practice of…

  7. Limits to growth reconsidered.

    PubMed

    Hagen, E E

    1972-01-01

    In their book, ''The Limits of Growth,'' the authors conclude that through pollution, exhaustion of natural resources, and limits to the food supply, the world faces a catastrophic fall in population and in living standards by the middle of the 21st century. The authors fail to state, however, 1 centrally important assumption underlying their results, but which is present through their omission of the contrary assumption. In their model the continuing technical progress that has been a primary feature of the material world for the past 200 years suddenly ceases. The assumptions of the model presented in ''Limits of Growth'' are not the assumptions other analysts make - these are strangely unrealistic. These assumptions require closer examination. The assumption concerning population assumes that the sole determinants of birthrates are the level of industrialization and the food supply. This is not good demography, for demographers have long recognized that it may have been the decrease in death rates, not industrialization or the rise in income, that caused the decrease in birthrates. Furthermore, their theory that many of the natural resources are irreplacable is like the belief that the sun revolves around the earth. It is obvious and false. It neglects that part of technical process which includes invention of new natural resources. Technical advance is needed and the following are some of the problems that technical advance must overcome: 1) a need to discover how to increase food production progressively while preventing the runoff of chemical fertilizers from the soil into waterways, 2) the ''natural'' minerals on which until recently all have depended are ''biodegradable,'' 3) there is a similar problem with radioactive nuclear wastes; 4) energy must dissipate into heat; and 5) there is a need to hasten the decline in birthrates throughout the world. In conclusion, indefinitely continuing growth is not regarded as desirable only as possible.

  8. Limiting Central Government Budget Deficits: International Experiences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-11

    discretionary fiscal policy actions, and by other actions, including extraordinary measures, that were taken to shore up the financial sector. In comparison... policy in response to the 1993 recession left France with a large fiscal deficit and a medium-level but rapidly rising public debt, falling short...services. However, the September 2005 elections did not lead to any significant relaxation of fiscal policy and the incumbent party was re-elected

  9. Orbital topography and other astrophysical consequences of Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity. [black holes hypothesis and neutron star upper mass limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Since Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity provides at present a worthy devil's advocate for the black hole hypothesis, it is important for eventual observational work to elaborate the astrophysical consequences and possibilities peculiar to it. This work is begun by deriving the orbital topography of the spherically symmetric solution to Rosen's field equations - which is relevant to the behavior of relativistic axisymmetric accretion flows - and calculating predicted accretion disk efficiencies, which can be as much as 2.5 times higher than for a disk in Schwarzschild. Thereafter, a brief treatment of the shortest kinematic time scale and the time dilations for in-falling material is given. Finally it is shown that Birkhoff's theorem does not hold in Rosen's theory, and, therefore, that genuine gravitational monopole radiation is possible. The energy it carries, however, is not positive definite.

  10. Orbital topography and other astrophysical consequences of Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity. [black holes hypothesis and neutron star upper mass limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Since Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity provides at present a worthy devil's advocate for the black hole hypothesis, it is important for eventual observational work to elaborate the astrophysical consequences and possibilities peculiar to it. This work is begun by deriving the orbital topography of the spherically symmetric solution to Rosen's field equations - which is relevant to the behavior of relativistic axisymmetric accretion flows - and calculating predicted accretion disk efficiencies, which can be as much as 2.5 times higher than for a disk in Schwarzschild. Thereafter, a brief treatment of the shortest kinematic time scale and the time dilations for in-falling material is given. Finally it is shown that Birkhoff's theorem does not hold in Rosen's theory, and, therefore, that genuine gravitational monopole radiation is possible. The energy it carries, however, is not positive definite.

  11. Decidability of formal theories and hyperincursivity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grappone, Arturo G.

    2000-05-01

    This paper shows the limits of the Proof Standard Theory (briefly, PST) and gives some ideas of how to build a proof anticipatory theory (briefly, PAT) that has no such limits. Also, this paper considers that Gödel's proof of the undecidability of Principia Mathematica formal theory is not valid for axiomatic theories that use a PAT to build their proofs because the (hyper)incursive functions are self-representable.

  12. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  13. The identification, assessment, and amelioration of perceived and actual barriers to teachers' incorporation of evolutionary theory as a central theme in life science classes through a two-week institute and follow-up studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firenze, Richard F.

    In an effort to incorporate the near universal suggestions of teaching life science thematically and using evolution as its central theme a two week institute entitled EVOLUTION AND THE NATURE OF SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY: Using Evolution as a Central Theme in the Life Sciences was developed and offered to fourteen 7th and 10th grade life science teachers. Pre-institute questionnaires and interviews attempted to determine the barriers to the infusion of an evolutionary theme and much of the institute was designed to overcome these perceived barriers. This research also attempted to follow all fourteen participants for the academic year '96-'97 with continued participant feedback and networking. Using a combination of both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies it was hoped the researcher could gain a better understanding of: (1) What are the perceived barriers to the incorporation of evolutionary theory as a central theme? (2) Can these barriers be partially and/or completely overcome as a result of participation? (3) Will additional classroom time (as compared to the previous year) be spent on the topic of evolution? (4) How influential will the institute be in making determinations of classroom content? (5) Will the perceived barriers actually be encountered? (6) What barriers, if any, will be encountered in the infusion of evolution? It was concluded that participants generally reported a reduction in their perception of barriers to the incorporation of evolutionary theory, both on post-institute surveys and post-delay (final) surveys at the end of the academic year. Six of ten "perceived barrier categories" showed a statistically significant decrease when subjected to a paired t-Test analysis. "Lack of time," "personal inertia," and the "controversial nature of the topic" were identified as the most persistent barriers. Few (4) participants actually chose to incorporate either evolution or the nature of science as central themes, however, most

  14. Limitations in social anticipation are independent of imaginative and Theory of Mind abilities in children with autism but not in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Angus, Douglas Jozef; de Rosnay, Marc; Lunenburg, Patty; Meerum Terwogt, Mark; Begeer, Sander

    2015-07-01

    Anticipating future interactions is characteristic of our everyday social experiences, yet has received limited empirical attention. Little is known about how children with autism spectrum disorder, known for their limitations in social interactive skills, engage in social anticipation. We asked children with autism spectrum disorder and their typically developing counterparts to consider an interaction with another person in the near future. Our results suggest that children with autism spectrum disorder and typically developing children performed similarly when anticipating the age, gender, and possible questions of another person, but children with autism spectrum disorder struggled more to anticipate what they would say in response to an anticipated interaction. Furthermore, such responses were robustly associated with imaginative capacities in typically developing children but not children with autism spectrum disorder. Our findings suggest that the cognitive mechanisms of social anticipation may differ between these groups.

  15. Applying learning theories to develop teaching strategies for the critical care nurse. Don't limit yourself to the formal classroom lecture.

    PubMed

    Dobbin, K R

    2001-03-01

    Learning, as defined by Alspach, is "a change in cognitive, psychomotor, and/or affective behaviors." The teaching strategies reviewed in this article have focused on ones that can affect all three learner behaviors if carefully planned and executed by the instructor. It is also key to provide the content in a manner that will appeal to the autonomy and self-direction of the adult learner, keeping in mind the importance of relating new information to previously learned material. Realizing that learners have different learning styles, the instructor also should assess learning styles and vary teaching methods accordingly. Incorporating some of the learner assessments and teaching strategies discussed here can be a change for both the learner and instructor, but it is consistent with modern learning theory where the focus is on the learner.

  16. Approaching the basis set limit for DFT calculations using an environment-adapted minimal basis with perturbation theory: Formulation, proof of concept, and a pilot implementation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R; Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-07-28

    Recently developed density functionals have good accuracy for both thermochemistry (TC) and non-covalent interactions (NC) if very large atomic orbital basis sets are used. To approach the basis set limit with potentially lower computational cost, a new self-consistent field (SCF) scheme is presented that employs minimal adaptive basis (MAB) functions. The MAB functions are optimized on each atomic site by minimizing a surrogate function. High accuracy is obtained by applying a perturbative correction (PC) to the MAB calculation, similar to dual basis approaches. Compared to exact SCF results, using this MAB-SCF (PC) approach with the same large target basis set produces <0.15 kcal/mol root-mean-square deviations for most of the tested TC datasets, and <0.1 kcal/mol for most of the NC datasets. The performance of density functionals near the basis set limit can be even better reproduced. With further improvement to its implementation, MAB-SCF (PC) is a promising lower-cost substitute for conventional large-basis calculations as a method to approach the basis set limit of modern density functionals.

  17. Approaching the basis set limit for DFT calculations using an environment-adapted minimal basis with perturbation theory: Formulation, proof of concept, and a pilot implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yuezhi; Horn, Paul R.; Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Recently developed density functionals have good accuracy for both thermochemistry (TC) and non-covalent interactions (NC) if very large atomic orbital basis sets are used. To approach the basis set limit with potentially lower computational cost, a new self-consistent field (SCF) scheme is presented that employs minimal adaptive basis (MAB) functions. The MAB functions are optimized on each atomic site by minimizing a surrogate function. High accuracy is obtained by applying a perturbative correction (PC) to the MAB calculation, similar to dual basis approaches. Compared to exact SCF results, using this MAB-SCF (PC) approach with the same large target basis set produces <0.15 kcal/mol root-mean-square deviations for most of the tested TC datasets, and <0.1 kcal/mol for most of the NC datasets. The performance of density functionals near the basis set limit can be even better reproduced. With further improvement to its implementation, MAB-SCF (PC) is a promising lower-cost substitute for conventional large-basis calculations as a method to approach the basis set limit of modern density functionals.

  18. Enhanced central serotonin release from slices of rat hypothalamus following repeated nialamide administration: evidence supporting the overactive serotonin receptor theory of depression

    SciTech Connect

    Offord, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Researchers are suggesting unipolar affective disorders may be related to an abnormality in biogenic amine receptor-sensitivity. This abnormality may be a result of a dysfunction in central serotonin (5-HT) release mechanisms. 5-HT neurotransmission is modulated by presynaptic autoreceptors, which are members of the 5-HT/sub 1/ receptor subtype. The autoreceptor is thought to play an important role in the homeostasis of the central 5-HT synapse and could be a site at which some antidepressants mediate their therapeutic effect. The number of 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptor binding sites are reduced and behavior mediated by this receptor is abolished following repeated injections of monoamine oxidase inhibitor type antidepressants. These changes did not occur following a single injection. It was hypothesized that repeated treatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor would reduce the sensitivity of 5-HT autoreceptors and enhance 5-HT release. Rats were pretreated with single or repeated (twice daily for 7 days) intraperitoneal injections of nialamide (40 mg/kg) or chlorimipramine (10 mg/kg) and the ability of the autoreceptor agonist to inhibit potassium-induced /sup 3/H-5-HT release was evaluated using an in vitro superfusion system. These changes in 5-HT autoreceptor activity are consistent with other reports evaluating monoamine oxidase inhibitors on 5-HT/sub 1/ type receptors. It is hypothesized that the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission are related to the antidepressant mechanism of monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

  19. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  20. Understanding the barriers to setting up a healthcare quality improvement process in resource-limited settings: a situational analysis at the Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Agyeman-Duah, Josephine Nana Afrakoma; Theurer, Antje; Munthali, Charles; Alide, Noor; Neuhann, Florian

    2014-01-02

    Knowledge regarding the best approaches to improving the quality of healthcare and their implementation is lacking in many resource-limited settings. The Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi set out to improve the quality of care provided to its patients and establish itself as a recognized centre in teaching, operations research and supervision of district hospitals. Efforts in the past to achieve these objectives were short-lived, and largely unsuccessful. Against this background, a situational analysis was performed to aid the Medical Department to define and prioritize its quality improvement activities. A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was applied using checklists for observed practice, review of registers, key informant interviews and structured patient interviews. The mixed methods comprised triangulation by including the perspectives of the clients, healthcare providers from within and outside the department, and the field researcher's perspectives by means of document review and participatory observation. Human resource shortages, staff attitudes and shortage of equipment were identified as major constraints to patient care, and the running of the Medical Department. Processes, including documentation in registers and files and communication within and across cadres of staff were also found to be insufficient and thus undermining the effort of staff and management in establishing a sustained high quality culture. Depending on their past experience and knowledge, the stakeholder interviewees revealed different perspectives and expectations of quality healthcare and the intended quality improvement process. Establishing a quality improvement process in resource-limited settings is an enormous task, considering the host of challenges that these facilities face. The steps towards changing the status quo for improved quality care require critical self-assessment, the willingness to change as well as determined commitment and

  1. Understanding the barriers to setting up a healthcare quality improvement process in resource-limited settings: a situational analysis at the Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge regarding the best approaches to improving the quality of healthcare and their implementation is lacking in many resource-limited settings. The Medical Department of Kamuzu Central Hospital in Malawi set out to improve the quality of care provided to its patients and establish itself as a recognized centre in teaching, operations research and supervision of district hospitals. Efforts in the past to achieve these objectives were short-lived, and largely unsuccessful. Against this background, a situational analysis was performed to aid the Medical Department to define and prioritize its quality improvement activities. Methods A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods was applied using checklists for observed practice, review of registers, key informant interviews and structured patient interviews. The mixed methods comprised triangulation by including the perspectives of the clients, healthcare providers from within and outside the department, and the field researcher’s perspectives by means of document review and participatory observation. Results Human resource shortages, staff attitudes and shortage of equipment were identified as major constraints to patient care, and the running of the Medical Department. Processes, including documentation in registers and files and communication within and across cadres of staff were also found to be insufficient and thus undermining the effort of staff and management in establishing a sustained high quality culture. Depending on their past experience and knowledge, the stakeholder interviewees revealed different perspectives and expectations of quality healthcare and the intended quality improvement process. Conclusions Establishing a quality improvement process in resource-limited settings is an enormous task, considering the host of challenges that these facilities face. The steps towards changing the status quo for improved quality care require critical self-assessment, the willingness to change

  2. Pars Plana Vitrectomy Combined with Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling to Treat Persistent Macular Edema after Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treatment in Cases of Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Shirakata, Yukari; Fujita, Tomoyoshi; Nakano, Yuki; Shiraga, Fumio; Tsujikawa, Akitaka

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) combined with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in cases of ischemic central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) where macular edema (ME) persisted after anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment. Fifteen eyes with ischemic CRVO-related ME were included in the study. Nine were treated with panretinal photocoagulation after initial examination. Anti-VEGF agents were injected intravitreally. Persistent ME was treated with PPV combined with ILM peeling. During surgery, laser photocoagulation was further applied to the non-perfused area. Mean retinal thickness gradually decreased after surgery (p = 0.024 at 6 months), although visual acuity did not improve significantly during the follow-up period (14.7 ± 11.6 months). Neovascular glaucoma subsequently developed in three cases and a trabeculectomy was performed in one case. In eyes with ischemic CRVO, PPV combined with ILM peeling contributed to a reduction in persistent ME. However, there was no significant improvement in visual acuity.

  3. A force-level theory of the rheology of entangled rod and chain polymer liquids. I. Tube deformation, microscopic yielding, and the nonlinear elastic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Sussman, Daniel M.

    2016-12-01

    We employ a first-principles-based, force-level approach to construct the anharmonic tube confinement field for entangled fluids of rigid needles, and also for chains described at the primitive-path (PP) level in two limiting situations where chain stretch is assumed to either be completely equilibrated or unrelaxed. The influence of shear and extensional deformation and polymer orientation is determined in a nonlinear elastic limit where dissipative relaxation processes are intentionally neglected. For needles and PP-level chains, a self-consistent analysis of transverse polymer harmonic dynamical fluctuations predicts that deformation-induced orientation leads to tube weakening or widening. In contrast, for deformed polymers in which chain stretch does not relax, we find tube strengthening or compression. For all three systems, a finite maximum transverse entanglement force localizing the polymers in effective tubes is predicted. The conditions when this entanglement force can be overcome by an externally applied force associated with macroscopic deformation can be crisply defined in the nonlinear elastic limit, and the possibility of a "microscopic absolute yielding" event destroying the tube confinement can be analyzed. For needles and contour-relaxed PP chains, this force imbalance occurs at a stress of order the equilibrium shear modulus and a strain of order unity, corresponding to a mechanically fragile entanglement tube field. However, for unrelaxed stretched chains, tube compression stabilizes transverse polymer confinement, and there appears to be no force imbalance. These results collectively suggest that the crossover from elastic to irreversible viscous response requires chain retraction to initiate disentanglement. We qualitatively discuss comparisons with existing phenomenological models for nonlinear startup shear, step strain, and creep rheology experiments.

  4. Optimal Low-Thrust Limited-Power Transfers between Arbitrary Elliptic Coplanar Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilvaFernandes, Sandro; dasChagasCarvalho, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    In this work, a complete first order analytical solution, which includes the short periodic terms, for the problem of optimal low-thrust limited-power transfers between arbitrary elliptic coplanar orbits in a Newtonian central gravity field is obtained through Hamilton-Jacobi theory and a perturbation method based on Lie series.

  5. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  6. Limits of imagination: the 150th Anniversary of Mendel's Laws, and why Mendel failed to see the importance of his discovery for Darwin's theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rama S

    2015-09-01

    Mendel is credited for discovering Laws of Heredity, but his work has come under criticism on three grounds: for possible falsification of data to fit his expectations, for getting undue credit for the laws of heredity without having ideas of segregation and independent assortment, and for being interested in the development of hybrids rather than in the laws of heredity. I present a brief review of these criticisms and conclude that Mendel deserved to be called the father of genetics even if he may not, and most likely did not, have clear ideas of segregation and particulate determiners as we know them now. I argue that neither Mendel understood the evolutionary significance of his findings for the problem of genetic variation, nor would Darwin have understood their significance had he read Mendel's paper. I argue that the limits to imagination, in both cases, came from their mental framework being shaped by existing paradigms-blending inheritance in the case of Darwin, hybrid development in the case of Mendel. Like Einstein, Darwin's natural selection was deterministic; like Niels Bohr, Mendel's Laws were probabilistic-based on random segregation of trait-determining "factors". Unlike Einstein who understood quantum mechanics, Darwin would have been at a loss with Mendel's paper with no guide to turn to. Geniuses in their imaginations are like heat-seeking missiles locked-in with their targets of deep interests and they generally see things in one dimension only. Imagination has limits; unaided imagination is like a bird without wings--it goes nowhere.

  7. Piagetian Theory and Biology Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.; Renner, John W.

    1975-01-01

    Introduces biology teachers to the central ideas of Piaget's theory of intellectual development. Also presents a scheme of biology instruction and classroom procedures based on a Piaget-related theory of learning. (PEB)

  8. "Reinforcement" in behavior theory.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, W N

    1978-01-01

    In its Pavlovian context, "reinforcement" was actually a descriptive term for the functional relation between an unconditional and a conditional stimulus. When it was adopted into operant conditioning, "reinforcement" became the central concept and the key operation, but with new qualifications, new referents, and new expectations. Some behavior theorists believed that "reinforcers" comprise a special and limited class of stimuli or events, and they speculated about what the essential "nature of reinforcement" might be. It is now known that any stimulus can serve a reinforcing function, with due recognition of such parameters as subject species characteristics, stimulus intensity, sensory modality, and schedule of application. This paper comments on these developments from the standpoint of reflex behavior theory.

  9. Push it to the limit: Characterizing the convergence of common sequences of basis sets for intermolecular interactions as described by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Witte, Jonathon; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-05-21

    With the aim of systematically characterizing the convergence of common families of basis sets such that general recommendations for basis sets can be made, we have tested a wide variety of basis sets against complete-basis binding energies across the S22 set of intermolecular interactions-noncovalent interactions of small and medium-sized molecules consisting of first- and second-row atoms-with three distinct density functional approximations: SPW92, a form of local-density approximation; B3LYP, a global hybrid generalized gradient approximation; and B97M-V, a meta-generalized gradient approximation with nonlocal correlation. We have found that it is remarkably difficult to reach the basis set limit; for the methods and systems examined, the most complete basis is Jensen's pc-4. The Dunning correlation-consistent sequence of basis sets converges slowly relative to the Jensen sequence. The Karlsruhe basis sets are quite cost effective, particularly when a correction for basis set superposition error is applied: counterpoise-corrected def2-SVPD binding energies are better than corresponding energies computed in comparably sized Dunning and Jensen bases, and on par with uncorrected results in basis sets 3-4 times larger. These trends are exhibited regardless of the level of density functional approximation employed. A sense of the magnitude of the intrinsic incompleteness error of each basis set not only provides a foundation for guiding basis set choice in future studies but also facilitates quantitative comparison of existing studies on similar types of systems.

  10. Play: The Reversal Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, J. H.

    The intention of this theoretical paper is to present a reversal theory interpretation of play phenomena. Reversal theory, a developing theory in psychology, concerns the complex relationship between experience and motivation. One of the central charactieristics of the theory is that it attempts to understand why so much of human behavior is…

  11. Small-scale spatial genetic structure in the Central African rainforest tree species Aucoumea klaineana: a stepwise approach to infer the impact of limited gene dispersal, population history and habitat fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Born, Céline; Hardy, Olivier J; Chevallier, Marie-Hélène; Ossari, Simon; Attéké, Christiane; Wickings, E Jean; Hossaert-McKey, Martine

    2008-04-01

    Under the isolation-by-distance model, the strength of spatial genetic structure (SGS) depends on seed and pollen dispersal and genetic drift, which in turn depends on local demographic structure. SGS can also be influenced by historical events such as admixture of differentiated gene pools. We analysed the fine-scale SGS in six populations of a pioneer tree species endemic to Central Africa, Aucoumea klaineana. To infer the impacts of limited gene dispersal, population history and habitat fragmentation on isolation by distance, we followed a stepwise approach consisting of a Bayesian clustering method to detect differentiated gene pools followed by the analysis of kinship-distance curves. Interestingly, despite considerable variation in density, the five populations situated under continuous forest cover displayed very similar extent of SGS. This is likely due to an increase in dispersal distance with decreased tree density. Admixture between two gene pools was detected in one of these five populations creating a distinctive pattern of SGS. In the last population sampled in open habitat, the genetic diversity was in the same range as in the other populations despite a recent habitat fragmentation. This result may due to the increase of gene dispersal compensating the effect of the disturbance as suggested by the reduced extent of SGS estimated in this population. Thus, in A. klaineana, the balance between drift and dispersal may facilitate the maintenance of genetic diversity. Finally, from the strength of the SGS and population density, an indirect estimate of gene dispersal distances was obtained for one site: the quadratic mean parent-offspring distance, sigma(g), ranged between 210 m and 570 m.

  12. Rider control of a motorcycle near to its cornering limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, R. S.

    2012-08-01

    Optimal linear quadratic control theory is applied to longitudinal and lateral control of a high-performance motorcycle. Central to the story is the use of sufficient preview of the road to obtain the full benefit available from it. The focus is on effective control near to the cornering limits of the machine, and gain scheduling according to speed and lateral acceleration is employed to ensure that the linear controller used at any time is the most appropriate to the running conditions. The motorcycle model employed and the control theory background are described briefly. Selected optimal controls and closed-loop system frequency responses are illustrated. Path-tracking simulations are discussed and results are shown. Excellent machine control near to the feasible cornering limit is demonstrated. Further work is needed to provide similarly excellent control under limit braking.

  13. {N}=2 gauge theories on toric singularities, blow-up formulae and W-algebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Maruyoshi, Kazunobu; Tanzini, Alessandro; Yagi, Futoshi

    2013-01-01

    We compute the Nekrasov partition function of gauge theories on the (resolved) toric singularities {{{{{{C}}^2}}} / {\\varGamma } .} in terms of blow-up formulae. We discuss the expansion of the partition function in the ɛ 1, ɛ 2 → 0 limit along with its modular properties and how to derive them from the M-theory perspective. On the two-dimensional conformal field theory side, our results can be interpreted in terms of representations of the direct sum of Heisenberg plus W N -algebrae with suitable central charges, which can be computed from the fan of the resolved toric variety. We provide a check of this correspondence by computing the central charge of the two-dimensional theory from the anomaly polynomial of M5-brane theory. Upon using the AGT correspondence our results provide a candidate for the conformal blocks and three-point functions of a class of the two-dimensional CFTs which includes parafermionic theories.

  14. Factorization of tree QCD amplitudes in the high-energy limit and in the collinear limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Duca, Vittorio; Frizzo, Alberto; Maltoni, Fabio

    2000-03-01

    In the high-energy limit, we compute the gauge-invariant three-parton forward clusters, which in the BFKL theory constitute the tree parts of the NNLO impact factors. In the triple collinear limit, we obtain the polarized double-splitting functions. For the unpolarized and the spin-correlated double-splitting functions, our results agree with the ones obtained by Campbell-Glover and Catani-Grazzini, respectively. In addition, we compute the four-gluon forward cluster, which in the BFKL theory forms the tree part of the NNNLO gluonic impact factor. In the quadruple collinear limit we obtain the unpolarized triple-splitting functions, while in the limit of a three-parton central cluster we derive the Lipatov vertex for the production of three gluons, relevant for the calculation of a BFKL ladder at NNLL accuracy. Finally, motivated by the reorganization of the color in the high-energy limit, we introduce a color decomposition of the purely gluonic tree amplitudes in terms of the linearly independent subamplitudes only.

  15. Optical Limiting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-22

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave EPO RT D A TE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Optical Limiting 6. AUTHOR(S) , 1 oS...to nanoseconds and find that, since the excited state absorption is cummulative, that the dyes can limit well for nanosecond pulses but not for...over which the device limits . In addition, we find that the dynamic range of limiting devices can be substantially increased using two elements without

  16. Balanced Centrality of Networks.

    PubMed

    Debono, Mark; Lauri, Josef; Sciriha, Irene

    2014-01-01

    There is an age-old question in all branches of network analysis. What makes an actor in a network important, courted, or sought? Both Crossley and Bonacich contend that rather than its intrinsic wealth or value, an actor's status lies in the structures of its interactions with other actors. Since pairwise relation data in a network can be stored in a two-dimensional array or matrix, graph theory and linear algebra lend themselves as great tools to gauge the centrality (interpreted as importance, power, or popularity, depending on the purpose of the network) of each actor. We express known and new centralities in terms of only two matrices associated with the network. We show that derivations of these expressions can be handled exclusively through the main eigenvectors (not orthogonal to the all-one vector) associated with the adjacency matrix. We also propose a centrality vector (SWIPD) which is a linear combination of the square, walk, power, and degree centrality vectors with weightings of the various centralities depending on the purpose of the network. By comparing actors' scores for various weightings, a clear understanding of which actors are most central is obtained. Moreover, for threshold networks, the (SWIPD) measure turns out to be independent of the weightings.

  17. Current limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Loescher, D.H.; Noren, K.

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  18. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  19. Regeneration of a Tooth in a Tissue-Engineered Mandible After Resection of a Central Giant Cell Tumor. Demonstrating Evidence of Functional Matrix Theory and Ectodermal Origin of Teeth in a Human Model-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Melville, James C; Couey, Marcus A; Tong, Matthew S; Marx, Robert E

    2016-09-29

    Central giant cell tumors (CGCTs) are uncommon lesions occurring in the jaw. They are benign but locally destructive osteolytic lesions. They usually occur in pediatric patients 5 to 15 years of age. Multiple noninvasive modalities of treatment (intralesional steroids, interferon, calcitonin, and denosumab) have been described for those lesions, but for those that are refractory to treatment, enucleation and curettage or resection is a curative surgery. This case report describes a pediatric patient who was diagnosed with an aggressive CGCT of the left mandible encompassing the right angle to the condyle. The lesion became refractory to noninvasive treatments and immediate resection and reconstruction was performed using principles of tissue engineering. After 5 years of close observation, the patient showed normal morphology and growth of his mandible, but surprisingly developed a left mandibular third molar (tooth 17) in the site of the mandibular resection and reconstruction. This is the first case report in the literature to show the spontaneous development of teeth in a human reconstructed mandible, contributing evidence toward the functional matrix theory of mandibular growth and ectodermal origin of teeth.

  20. The 'sensory tolerance limit': A hypothetical construct determining exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Hureau, Thomas J; Romer, Lee M; Amann, Markus

    2016-11-07

    Neuromuscular fatigue compromises exercise performance and is determined by central and peripheral mechanisms. Interactions between the two components of fatigue can occur via neural pathways, including feedback and feedforward processes. This brief review discusses the influence of feedback and feedforward mechanisms on exercise limitation. In terms of feedback mechanisms, particular attention is given to group III/IV sensory neurons which link limb muscle with the central nervous system. Central corollary discharge, a copy of the neural drive from the brain to the working muscles, provides a signal from the motor system to sensory systems and is considered a feedforward mechanism that might influence fatigue and consequently exercise performance. We highlight findings from studies supporting the existence of a 'critical threshold of peripheral fatigue', a previously proposed hypothesis based on the idea that a negative feedback loop operates to protect the exercising limb muscle from severe threats to homeostasis during whole-body exercise. While the threshold theory remains to be disproven within a given task, it is not generalisable across different exercise modalities. The 'sensory tolerance limit', a more theoretical concept, may address this issue and explain exercise tolerance in more global terms and across exercise modalities. The 'sensory tolerance limit' can be viewed as a negative feedback loop which accounts for the sum of all feedback (locomotor muscles, respiratory muscles, organs, and muscles not directly involved in exercise) and feedforward signals processed within the central nervous system with the purpose of regulating the intensity of exercise to ensure that voluntary activity remains tolerable.

  1. Master equation theory applied to the redistribution of polarized radiation in the weak radiation field limit. IV. Application to the second solar spectrum of the Na i D1 and D2 lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, Véronique

    2016-06-01

    Context. The spectrum of the linear polarization, which is formed by scattering and observed on the solar disk close to the limb, is very different from the intensity spectrum and thus able to provide new information, in particular about anisotropies in the solar surface plasma and magnetic fields. In addition, a large number of lines show far wing polarization structures assigned to partial redistribution (PRD), which we prefer to denote as Rayleigh/Raman scattering. The two-level or two-term atom approximation without any lower level polarization is insufficient for many lines. Aims: In the previous paper of this series, we presented our theory generalized to the multilevel and multiline atom and comprised of statistical equilibrium equations for the atomic density matrix elements and radiative transfer equation for the polarized radiation. The present paper is devoted to applying this theory to model the second solar spectrum of the Na i D1 and D2 lines. Methods: The solution method is iterative, of the lambda-iteration type. The usual acceleration techniques were considered or even applied, but we found these to be unsuccessful, in particular because of nonlinearity or large number of quantities determining the radiation at each depth. Results: The observed spectrum is qualitatively reproduced in line center, but the convergence is yet to be reached in the far wings and the observed spectrum is not totally reproduced there. Conclusions: We need to investigate noniterative resolution methods. The other limitation lies in the one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere model, which is unable to reproduce the intermittent matter structure formed of small loops or spicules in the chromosphere. This modeling is rough, but the computing time in the presence of hyperfine structure and PRD prevents us from envisaging a three-dimensional (3D) model at this instant.

  2. Cognitive Load Theory, Educational Research, and Instructional Design: Some Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Ton

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive load is a theoretical notion with an increasingly central role in the educational research literature. The basic idea of cognitive load theory is that cognitive capacity in working memory is limited, so that if a learning task requires too much capacity, learning will be hampered. The recommended remedy is to design instructional systems…

  3. Delving into Limits of Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cory, Beth; Smith, Ken W.

    2011-01-01

    Limits are foundational to the central concepts of calculus. However, the authors' experiences with students and educational research abound with examples of students' misconceptions about limits and infinity. The authors wanted calculus students to understand, appreciate, and enjoy their first introduction to advanced mathematical thought. Thus,…

  4. Limits of detection and decision. Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigtman, E.

    2008-02-01

    It has been shown that the MARLAP (Multi-Agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols) for estimating the Currie detection limit, which is based on 'critical values of the non-centrality parameter of the non-central t distribution', is intrinsically biased, even if no calibration curve or regression is used. This completed the refutation of the method, begun in Part 2. With the field cleared of obstructions, the true theory underlying Currie's limits of decision, detection and quantification, as they apply in a simple linear chemical measurement system (CMS) having heteroscedastic, Gaussian measurement noise and using weighted least squares (WLS) processing, was then derived. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations were performed, on 900 million independent calibration curves, for linear, "hockey stick" and quadratic noise precision models (NPMs). With errorless NPM parameters, all the simulation results were found to be in excellent agreement with the derived theoretical expressions. Even with as much as 30% noise on all of the relevant NPM parameters, the worst absolute errors in rates of false positives and false negatives, was only 0.3%.

  5. On Limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the last 3 decades or so, the size of systems we have been able to verify formally with automated tools has increased dramatically. At each point in this development, we encountered a different set of limits -- many of which we were eventually able to overcome. Today, we may have reached some limits that may be much harder to conquer. The problem I will discuss is the following: given a hypothetical machine with infinite memory that is seamlessly shared among infinitely many CPUs (or CPU cores), what is the largest problem size that we could solve?

  6. A new theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, W.

    1972-01-01

    A new relativistic theory of gravity is presented. This theory agrees with all experiments to date. It is a metric theory, it is Lagrangian-based, and it possesses a preferred frame with conformally-flat space slices. With an appropriate choice of certain adjustable functions and parameters, this theory possesses precisely the same post-Newtonian limit as general relativity.

  7. [Centralization versus decentralization. Hematology].

    PubMed

    Borregaard, Niels

    2006-04-10

    Clinical haematology is the result of teamwork among dedicated specialists in pathology, molecular diagnostics, imaging, radiotherapy and the haematologist, who in turn can focus on only a limited fraction of the various and highly complex diseases that together constitute clinical haematology. The treatment of patients should be centralized in departments large enough to permit internal subspecialization and to provide expert service focused on haematology. No more than three such hematology centers are needed in Denmark.

  8. Central Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Clouds and haze cover most of the Italian peninsula in this view of central Italy (41.5N, 14.0E) but the Bay of Naples region with Mt. Vesuvius and the island of Capri are clear. The Adriatic Sea in the background separates Italy from the cloud covered Balkans of eastern Europe and the Tyrrhenian Sea in the foreground lies between the Italian mainland and the off scene islands of Corsica and Sardinia. Several aircraft contrails can also be seen.

  9. Estimating the central charge from the Rényi entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Meurice, Y.; Tsai, S.-W.; Unmuth-Yockey, J.; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    We calculate the von Neumann and Rényi bipartite entanglement entropy of the O (2 ) model with a chemical potential on a 1 +1 -dimensional Euclidean lattice with open and periodic boundary conditions. We show that the Calabrese-Cardy conformal field theory predictions for the leading logarithmic scaling of these entropies are consistent with a central charge c =1 . This scaling survives the time-continuum limit and truncations of the microscopic degrees of freedom, modifications which allow us to connect the Lagrangian formulation to quantum Hamiltonians. At half-filling, the forms of the subleading corrections imposed by conformal field theory allow the determination of the central charge with an accuracy better than 2% for moderately sized lattices. We briefly discuss the possibility of estimating the central charge using quantum simulators.

  10. Children's theories of motivation.

    PubMed

    Gurland, Suzanne T; Glowacky, Victoria C

    2011-09-01

    To investigate children's theories of motivation, we asked 166 children (8-12 years of age) to rate the effect of various motivational strategies on task interest, over the short and long terms, in activities described as appealing or unappealing. Children viewed the rewards strategy as resulting in greatest interest except when implemented over the long term for appealing activities. Individual difference analyses revealed that some children held operant theories of motivation, in which rewards were central, and others held hybrid theories, in which rewards were key, but some allowance was made for interest to be self-sustaining in the absence of inducements. Children's theories predicted their academic self-regulation. Their theories are discussed relative to an expert theory of motivation.

  11. Detection limit

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.S.; Ward, R.C.; Bell, H.F.

    1988-08-01

    Water quality monitoring data are plagued with levels of chemicals that are too low to be measured precisely. This discussion will focus on the information needs of water quality management and how these needs are best met for monitoring systems that require many trace-level measurements. We propose that the limit of detection (LOD) or the limit of quantitation (LOQ) not be used to censor data. Although LOD and LOQ aid in the interpretation of individual measurements, they hinder statistical analysis of water quality data. More information is gained when a numerical result and an estimate of measurement precision are reported for every measurement, as opposed to reporting not detected or less than. This article is not intended to be a review of the issues pertaining to the LOD and related concepts.

  12. [From the cell theory to the neuron theory].

    PubMed

    Tixier-Vidal, Andrée

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the cell theory formulated by Schwann (1839) and by Virchow (1855) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, the neuron theory, as formulated by Waldeyer (1891) and by Cajal (1906), are discussed from a historical point of view. Both of them are the result of technical and conceptuel progress. Both of them had to fight against the dominant dogma before being accepted. The cell theory opposed the school of Bichat, the vitalist philosophy and the positivist philosophy of Auguste Comte. The neuron theory, which is clearly based on the cell theory, was mostly concerned with the mode of interneuronal communication; it opposed the concept of contiguity to Golgi's concept of continuity. At present, the cell theory remains central in every field of Biology. By contrast, the neuron theory, which until the middle of the XXth century opened the study of the nervous system to a necessary reductionnist approach, is no longer central to recent developments of neurosciences.

  13. Computer simulation and mode coupling theory study of the effects of specific solute-solvent interactions on diffusion: Crossover from a sub-slip to a super-stick limit of diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Groundla; Bhattacharyya, Sarika; Bagchi, Biman

    1999-03-01

    In many experimental situations, the interaction potential between the tagged solute and the solvent molecules is often different from that between the two solvent molecules. In such cases, the Stokes-Einstein relation attempts to describe the self-diffusion of the solute in terms of an effective hydrodynamic radius which, along with the hydrodynamic boundary condition (slip or stick), are varied to fit the experimental results. Extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to obtain the diffusion coefficient by varying interaction between the solute and the solvent. It is found that when this interaction is more repulsive than that between solvent-solvent, the diffusion can be significantly faster, leading to a complete breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. In the limit of strong attractive interaction, we recover a dynamic version of the solvent-berg picture. The diffusion coefficient of the solute is found to depend strongly and nonlinearly on the magnitude of this specific interaction. The velocity correlation function also shows an interesting dependence on the sign and magnitude of the specific interaction. Another potentially important observation is that the specific solute-solvent interaction can induce a crossover from a sliplike to a stick-like diffusion, if one still uses the hydrodynamic language. Mode coupling theory analysis of the friction shows that the change in it originates largely from the modification of the binary component of the total friction. This is because the cage structure around the solute is modified due to the specific solute-solvent interaction, which directly affects the binary dynamics.

  14. Central Campus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-17

    A long exposure photograph of the new headquarters building, part of the Central Campus in the industrial area at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The nearly-complete seven-story, 200,000-square-foot facility will house about 500 NASA civil service and contractor employees. The building will be more energy efficient than the current Headquarters building and will feature the latest in office and administrative building technology to fulfill Kennedy's role as the premiere spaceport for NASA and, increasingly, commercial entities.

  15. Central pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is central pain, a neuropathic pain syndrome caused by a lesion in the brain or spinal cord that sensitizes one's perception of pain. It is a debilitating condition caused by various diseases such as multiple sclerosis, strokes, spinal cord injuries, or brain tumors. Varied symptoms and the use of pharmacological medicines and nonpharmacological therapies will be addressed.

  16. Relevance theory: pragmatics and cognition.

    PubMed

    Wearing, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Relevance Theory is a cognitively oriented theory of pragmatics, i.e., a theory of language use. It builds on the seminal work of H.P. Grice(1) to develop a pragmatic theory which is at once philosophically sensitive and empirically plausible (in both psychological and evolutionary terms). This entry reviews the central commitments and chief contributions of Relevance Theory, including its Gricean commitment to the centrality of intention-reading and inference in communication; the cognitively grounded notion of relevance which provides the mechanism for explaining pragmatic interpretation as an intention-driven, inferential process; and several key applications of the theory (lexical pragmatics, metaphor and irony, procedural meaning). Relevance Theory is an important contribution to our understanding of the pragmatics of communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Non-Gaussian limit fluctuations in active swimmer suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Takashi; Aridome, Msato; Ayade, Heev; Zaid, Irwin; Mizuno, Daisuke

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic fluctuations in suspensions of swimming microorganisms (Chlamydomonas) by observing the probe particles dispersed in the media. Short-term fluctuations of probe particles were superdiffusive and displayed heavily tailed non-Gaussian distributions. The analytical theory that explains the observed distribution was derived by summing the power-law-decaying hydrodynamic interactions from spatially distributed field sources (here, swimming microorganisms). The summing procedure, which we refer to as the physical limit operation, is applicable to a variety of physical fluctuations to which the classical central limiting theory does not apply. Extending the analytical formula to compare to experiments in active swimmer suspensions, we show that the non-Gaussian shape of the observed distribution obeys the analytic theory concomitantly with independently determined parameters such as the strength of force generations and the concentration of Chlamydomonas. Time evolution of the distributions collapsed to a single master curve, except for their extreme tails, for which our theory presents a qualitative explanation. Investigations thereof and the complete agreement with theoretical predictions revealed broad applicability of the formula to dispersions of active sources of fluctuations.

  18. Conflicting perspectives on neurobehavioral theories of the depressive disorders and drug actions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Martin M

    2016-12-01

    A prominent theory of depression focusses on neural plasticity and stress as central issues in seeking to develop a pattern of identifiable biological markers for the depressive disorders. Relative neglect, however, of clinical factors in that theory limits the uncovering of markers and opens to question their methodological approach. A conflicting theory, the 'opposed neurobehavioral states', based on dimensional analysis of monoamine neurotransmitter systems and behavioural factors is presented. This perspectives paper contrasts the two approaches viewing the biomarkers theory as premature at this point in the progress of depression research. Studies developed to support the biomarkers theory and the opposed neurobehavioral states theory are examined for their strengths and limitations in explaining the nature of the disorder and the actions of therapeutic drugs. Reference is made to reviews of the many studies on biomarkers and the recent work that supports the opposed neurobehavioral states theory. Discussion Main issue: the biomarkers theory sets important goals, but despite the many advances in the neural investigations of factors underlying depression, is still not successful in specifying markers. Thus, it is believed to be applying the wrong methodologic approach and premature in its claims. the 'opposed neurobehavioral' theory is limited in its breadth of research. It applies, however, the dimensional approach to the clinical side of the problem, a methodological approach more likely to be effective in selecting the best clinical treatment and open to a more productive path to understanding of the nature of the disorder in future research.

  19. Neurological theory of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eggers, A E

    2003-06-01

    Review of the older literature on the relationship between migraine and hypertension, written in the era before either condition could be treated, discloses a high rate of co-morbidity. A neurological theory of essential hypertension is proposed in which the two diseases are brought together into one entity. It is hypothesized that abnormally functioning serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus, as part of a chronic stress response, inappropriately activate and inhibit parts of the central and autonomic nervous systems, so as to cause the two conditions. This theory builds on a previously published neural theory of migraine.

  20. Rate theories for biologists

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Some of the rate theories that are most useful for modeling biological processes are reviewed. By delving into some of the details and subtleties in the development of the theories, the review will hopefully help the reader gain a more than superficial perspective. Examples are presented to illustrate how rate theories can be used to generate insight at the microscopic level into biomolecular behaviors. Attempt is made to clear up a number of misconceptions in the literature regarding popular rate theories, including the appearance of Planck’s constant in the transition-state theory and the Smoluchowski result as an upper limit for protein-protein and protein-DNA association rate constants. Future work in combining the implementation of rate theories through computer simulations with experimental probes of rate processes, and in modeling effects of intracellular environments so theories can be used for generating rate constants for systems biology studies is particularly exciting. PMID:20691138