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Sample records for central memory cd4

  1. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  2. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Stevenson, Freda K; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines.

  3. Effector and Central Memory Poly-Functional CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells are Boosted upon ZOSTAVAX® Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Janet J.; Cox, Kara S.; Dubey, Sheri A.; Antonello, Joseph M.; Krah, David L.; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Vora, Kalpit A.

    2015-01-01

    ZOSTAVAX® is a live attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine that is licensed for the protection of individuals ≥50 years against shingles and its most common complication, postherpetic neuralgia. While IFNγ responses increase upon vaccination, the quality of the T cell response has not been elucidated. By using polychromatic flow cytometry, we characterized the breadth, magnitude, and quality of ex vivo CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses induced 3–4 weeks after ZOSTAVAX vaccination of healthy adults. We show, for the first time that the highest frequencies of VZV-specific CD4+ T cells were poly-functional CD154+IFNγ+IL-2+TNFα+ cells, which were boosted upon vaccination. The CD4+ T cells were broadly reactive to several VZV proteins, with immediate early (IE) 63 ranking the highest among them in the fold rise of poly-functional cells, followed by IE62, gB, open reading frame (ORF) 9, and gE. We identified a novel poly-functional ORF9-specific CD8+ T cell population in 62% of the subjects, and these were boosted upon vaccination. Poly-functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells produced significantly higher levels of IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα compared to mono-functional cells. After vaccination, a boost in the expression of IFNγ by poly-functional IE63- and ORF9-specific CD4+ T cells and IFNγ, IL-2, and TNFα by ORF9-specific poly-functional CD8+ T cells was observed. Responding poly-functional T cells exhibited both effector (CCR7−CD45RA−CD45RO+), and central (CCR7+CD45RA−CD45RO+) memory phenotypes, which expressed comparable levels of cytokines. Altogether, our studies demonstrate that a boost in memory poly-functional CD4+ T cells and ORF9-specific CD8+ T cells may contribute toward ZOSTAVAX efficacy. PMID:26579128

  4. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4+T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. Mycobacterium ...

  5. Polyfunctional cytokine responses by central memory CD4*T cells in response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB. Mycobacterium bovis in...

  6. ICOS is required for the generation of both central and effector CD4(+) memory T-cell populations following acute bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Clare L; Carlesso, Gianluca; Herbst, Ronald; Withers, David R

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between ICOS and ICOS ligand (ICOSL) are essential for the development of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and thus the formation and maintenance of GC reactions. Given the conflicting reports on the requirement of other CD4(+) T-cell populations for ICOS signals, we have employed a range of in vivo approaches to dissect requirements for ICOS signals in mice during an endogenous CD4(+) T-cell response and contrasted this with CD28 signals. Genetic absence of ICOSL only modestly reduced the total number of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at the peak of the primary response, but resulted in a severely diminished number of both T central memory and T effector memory cells. Treatment with blocking anti-ICOS mAb during the primary response recapitulated these effects and caused a more substantial reduction than blocking CD28 signals with CTLA4Ig. During the memory phase of the response further signals through ICOS or CD28 were not required for survival. However, upon secondary challenge only Tfh cell expansion remained heavily ICOS-dependent, while CD28 signals were required for optimal expansion of all subsets. These data demonstrate the importance of ICOS signals specifically for memory CD4(+) T-cell formation, while highlighting the potential of therapeutically targeting this pathway.

  7. ICOS is required for the generation of both central and effector CD4+ memory T‐cell populations following acute bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Clare L.; Carlesso, Gianluca; Herbst, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between ICOS and ICOS ligand (ICOSL) are essential for the development of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and thus the formation and maintenance of GC reactions. Given the conflicting reports on the requirement of other CD4+ T‐cell populations for ICOS signals, we have employed a range of in vivo approaches to dissect requirements for ICOS signals in mice during an endogenous CD4+ T‐cell response and contrasted this with CD28 signals. Genetic absence of ICOSL only modestly reduced the total number of antigen‐specific CD4+ T cells at the peak of the primary response, but resulted in a severely diminished number of both T central memory and T effector memory cells. Treatment with blocking anti‐ICOS mAb during the primary response recapitulated these effects and caused a more substantial reduction than blocking CD28 signals with CTLA4Ig. During the memory phase of the response further signals through ICOS or CD28 were not required for survival. However, upon secondary challenge only Tfh cell expansion remained heavily ICOS‐dependent, while CD28 signals were required for optimal expansion of all subsets. These data demonstrate the importance of ICOS signals specifically for memory CD4+ T‐cell formation, while highlighting the potential of therapeutically targeting this pathway. PMID:25754933

  8. Reduction in CD4 Central Memory T-Cell Subset in Costimulation Modulator Abatacept-Treated Patients With Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated With Slower C-Peptide Decline

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Craig A.; Xu, Ping; Moore, Keith; Jiang, Qi; Deng, Jun; Muller, Sarah; Gottlieb, Peter; Spain, Lisa; Peakman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that continuous 24-month costimulation blockade by abatacept significantly slows the decline of β-cell function after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. In a mechanistic extension of that study, we evaluated peripheral blood immune cell subsets (CD4, CD8-naive, memory and activated subsets, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, monocytes, B lymphocytes, CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, and invariant NK T cells) by flow cytometry at baseline and 3, 6, 12, 24, and 30 months after treatment initiation to discover biomarkers of therapeutic effect. Using multivariable analysis and lagging of longitudinally measured variables, we made the novel observation in the placebo group that an increase in central memory (CM) CD4 T cells (CD4+CD45R0+CD62L+) during a preceding visit was significantly associated with C-peptide decline at the subsequent visit. These changes were significantly affected by abatacept treatment, which drove the peripheral contraction of CM CD4 T cells and the expansion of naive (CD45R0−CD62L+) CD4 T cells in association with a significantly slower rate of C-peptide decline. The findings show that the quantification of CM CD4 T cells can provide a surrogate immune marker for C-peptide decline after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and that costimulation blockade may exert its beneficial therapeutic effect via modulation of this subset. PMID:24834977

  9. IL-21-Induced MHC Class II+ NK Cells Promote the Expansion of Human Uncommitted CD4+ Central Memory T Cells in a Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Loyon, Romain; Picard, Emilie; Mauvais, Olivier; Queiroz, Lise; Mougey, Virginie; Pallandre, Jean-René; Galaine, Jeanne; Mercier-Letondal, Patricia; Kellerman, Guillaume; Chaput, Nathalie; Wijdenes, John; Adotévi, Olivier; Ferrand, Christophe; Romero, Pedro; Godet, Yann; Borg, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    NK cells are critical for innate immunity-mediated protection. The main roles of NK cells rely on their cytotoxic functions or depend on the tuning of Th1 adaptive immunity by IFN-γ. However, the precise influence of inflammatory cytokines on NK cell and CD4 T lymphocyte interactions was never investigated. In this study, we provide evidence that IL-21, a cytokine produced during chronic inflammation or infectious diseases, promotes the differentiation of a specific subset of NK cells coexpressing CD86 and HLA-DR and lacking NKp44. More importantly, IL-21-propagated HLA-DR(+) NK cells produce macrophage migration inhibitory factor and provide costimulatory signaling during naive CD4(+) T cell priming inducing the differentiation of uncommitted central memory T cells. Central memory T cells expanded in the presence of HLA-DR(+) NK cells are CXCR3(+)CCR6(-)CCR4(-)CXCR5(-) and produce IL-2, as well as low levels of TNF-α. Costimulation of CD4(+) T cells by HLA-DR(+) NK cells prevents the acquisition of effector memory phenotype induced by IL-2. Moreover, we identified this population of NK HLA-DR(+) macrophage migration inhibitory factor(+) cells in inflammatory human appendix. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel function for IL-21 in tuning NK and CD4(+) T cell interactions promoting a specific expansion of central memory lymphocytes. PMID:27233967

  10. CD4 T-cell memory generation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gasper, David J; Tejera, Melba Marie; Suresh, M

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic memory is the adaptive immune system's powerful ability to remember a previous antigen encounter and react with accelerated vigor upon antigen re-exposure. It provides durable protection against reinfection with pathogens and is the foundation for vaccine-induced immunity. Unlike the relatively restricted immunologic purview of memory B cells and CD8 T cells, the field of CD4 T-cell memory must account for multiple distinct lineages with diverse effector functions, the issue of lineage commitment and plasticity, and the variable distribution of memory cells within each lineage. Here, we discuss the evidence for lineage-specific CD4 T-cell memory and summarize the known factors contributing to memory-cell generation, plasticity, and long-term maintenance.

  11. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  12. Study of Marine Natural Products Including Resorcyclic Acid Lactones from Humicola fuscoatra That Reactivate Latent HIV-1 Expression in an in Vitro Model of Central Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An extract of Humicola fuscoatra (UCSC strain no. 108111A) was shown to reactivate latent HIV-1 expression in an in vitro model of central memory CD4+ T cells. We report the bioassay-guided isolation and structure determination of several resorcyclic acid lactones, including four known compounds, radicicol (1, aka. monorden) and pochonins B (2), C (3), and N (4), and three new analogues, radicicols B–D (5–7). Compounds 1–3 and 5 showed moderate activities in the memory T cell model of HIV-1 latency. Radicicol (1) displayed lower potency in reactivating latent HIV-1 (EC50 = 9.1 μM) relative to the HDAC inhibitors apicidin (EC50 = 0.3 μM), romidepsin (EC50 = 0.003 μM), and SAHA (EC50 = 0.6 μM); however, it achieved equivalent maximum efficacy relative to the positive control compounds (98% of SAHA and romidepsin). PMID:24495105

  13. CD4⁺ effector and memory cell populations protect against Cryptosporidium parvum infection.

    PubMed

    McNair, Nina N; Mead, Jan R

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the epithelial cells of the small intestine causing diarrheal illness in humans. While T cells are known to be important in resistance and recovery from infection, little has been characterized as to the phenotypic expression of surface effector and memory markers after infection. We used an acute model of infection (C57BL/6 interleukin-12p40), which develops long-standing resistance to re-infection, to characterize expression of different effector and memory cells. Using flow cytometry, we found that heterogeneous populations were generated after infection, consisting of both CD62L(high) central memory T cells (T(CM)) and CD62L(low) effector memory T cells (T(EM)) that were competent to produce the Th type 1 effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Both CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T(CM) and T(EM) populations persisted in the absence of infection (up to 60 days post-infection). Additionally, transfer of either CD62L(low)CD4⁺ T(EM) or CD62L(high)CD4⁺ T(CM) into naive recipients resulted in a protective response. Taken together, these studies show that distinct subsets of effector and memory CD4⁺ T cells develop after infection with C. parvum, and mediate protective immunity to re-challenge.

  14. Quantifying susceptibility of CD4+ stem memory T-cells to infection by laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-02-10

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs.

  15. Quantifying Susceptibility of CD4+ Stem Memory T-Cells to Infection by Laboratory Adapted and Clinical HIV-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jacqueline K.; Paukovics, Geza; Cashin, Kieran; Borm, Katharina; Ellett, Anne; Roche, Michael; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Churchill, Melissa J.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are principal targets for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD4+ T cell subsets are heterogeneous cell populations, divided by functional and phenotypic differences into naïve and memory T cells. The memory CD4+ T cells are further segregated into central, effector and transitional memory cell subsets by functional, phenotypic and homeostatic characteristics. Defining the distribution of HIV-1 infection in different T cell subsets is important, as this can play a role in determining the size and composition of the viral reservoir. Both central memory and transitional memory CD4+ T cells have been described as long-lived viral reservoirs for HIV. Recently, the newly described stem memory T cell subset has also been implicated as a long-lived HIV reservoir. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strains of HIV-1 and multi parameter flow cytometry, we developed an assay to simultaneously quantify the susceptibility of stem memory (TSCM), central memory, effector memory, transitional memory and naïve CD4+ T cell subsets, to HIV-1 infection in vitro. We show that TSCM are susceptible to infection with laboratory adapted and clinical HIV-1 strains. Our system facilitates the quantitation of HIV-1 infection in alternative T cell subsets by CCR5- and CXCR4-using viruses across different HIV-1 subtypes, and will be useful for studies of HIV-1 pathogenesis and viral reservoirs. PMID:24517971

  16. IL-15 induces CD4+ effector memory T cell production and tissue emigration in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.; Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward F.; Hagen, Shoko I.; Edgar, John B.; Hansen, Scott G.; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Maino, Vernon C.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Villinger, Francois

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection selectively targets CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, resulting in dramatic depletion of CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector sites in early infection. Regeneration of the TEM cell compartment is slow and incomplete, even when viral replication is controlled by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, we demonstrate that IL-15 dramatically increases in vivo proliferation of rhesus macaque (RM) CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells with little effect on the naive or central memory T (TCM) cell subsets, a response pattern that is quite distinct from that of either IL-2 or IL-7. TEM cells produced in response to IL-15 did not accumulate in blood. Rather, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling studies suggest that many of these cells rapidly disperse to extralymphoid effector sites, where they manifest (slow) decay kinetics indistinguishable from that of untreated controls. In RMs with uncontrolled SIV infection and highly activated immune systems, IL-15 did not significantly increase CD4+ TEM cell proliferation, but with virologic control and concomitant reduction in immune activation by ART, IL-15 responsiveness was again observed. These data suggest that therapeutic use of IL-15 in the setting of ART might facilitate specific restoration of the CD4+ T cell compartment that is the primary target of HIV with less risk of exhausting precursor T cell compartments or generating potentially deleterious regulatory subsets. PMID:16691294

  17. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C; Regev, Aviv; Williams, Matthew A; Tantin, Dean

    2015-11-16

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4(+) memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4(+) T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4(+) T cell memory.

  18. Oct1 and OCA-B are selectively required for CD4 memory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Arvind; Goren, Alon; Shalek, Alex; German, Cody N.; Snook, Jeremy; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Yosef, Nir; Chan, Raymond C.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes are crucial for the generation of immunological memory. Failure to generate or maintain these changes will result in poor memory responses. Similarly, augmenting or stabilizing the correct epigenetic states offers a potential method of enhancing memory. Yet the transcription factors that regulate these processes are poorly defined. We find that the transcription factor Oct1 and its cofactor OCA-B are selectively required for the in vivo generation of CD4+ memory T cells. More importantly, the memory cells that are formed do not respond properly to antigen reencounter. In vitro, both proteins are required to maintain a poised state at the Il2 target locus in resting but previously stimulated CD4+ T cells. OCA-B is also required for the robust reexpression of multiple other genes including Ifng. ChIPseq identifies ∼50 differentially expressed direct Oct1 and OCA-B targets. We identify an underlying mechanism involving OCA-B recruitment of the histone lysine demethylase Jmjd1a to targets such as Il2, Ifng, and Zbtb32. The findings pinpoint Oct1 and OCA-B as central mediators of CD4+ T cell memory. PMID:26481684

  19. Progressive CD4+ central–memory T cell decline results in CD4+ effector–memory insufficiency and overt disease in chronic SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Okoye, Afam; Meier-Schellersheim, Martin; Brenchley, Jason M.; Hagen, Shoko I.; Walker, Joshua M.; Rohankhedkar, Mukta; Lum, Richard; Edgar, John B.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Maino, Vernon C.; Sodora, Donald L.; Douek, Daniel C.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Grossman, Zvi; Picker, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections of rhesus macaques result in the dramatic depletion of CD4+ CCR5+ effector–memory T (TEM) cells from extra-lymphoid effector sites, but in most infections, an increased rate of CD4+ memory T cell proliferation appears to prevent collapse of effector site CD4+ TEM cell populations and acute-phase AIDS. Eventually, persistent SIV replication results in chronic-phase AIDS, but the responsible mechanisms remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate that in the chronic phase of progressive SIV infection, effector site CD4+ TEM cell populations manifest a slow, continuous decline, and that the degree of this depletion remains a highly significant correlate of late-onset AIDS. We further show that due to persistent immune activation, effector site CD4+ TEM cells are predominantly short-lived, and that their homeostasis is strikingly dependent on the production of new CD4+ TEM cells from central–memory T (TCM) cell precursors. The instability of effector site CD4+ TEM cell populations over time was not explained by increasing destruction of these cells, but rather was attributable to progressive reduction in their production, secondary to decreasing numbers of CCR5− CD4+ TCM cells. These data suggest that although CD4+ TEM cell depletion is a proximate mechanism of immunodeficiency, the tempo of this depletion and the timing of disease onset are largely determined by destruction, failing production, and gradual decline of CD4+ TCM cells. PMID:17724130

  20. Dendritic Cells Enhance HIV Infection of Memory CD4(+) T Cells in Human Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Rodriguez, Angel L; Reuter, Morgan A; McDonald, David

    2016-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in controlling infections by coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses to invading pathogens. Paradoxically, DCs can increase HIV-1 dissemination in vitro by binding and transferring infectious virions to CD4(+) T cells, a process called transinfection. Transinfection has been well characterized in cultured cell lines and circulating primary T cells, but it is unknown whether DCs enhance infection of CD4(+) T cells in vivo. In untreated HIV infection, massive CD4(+) T-cell infection and depletion occur in secondary lymphoid tissues long before decline is evident in the peripheral circulation. To study the role of DCs in HIV infection of lymphoid tissues, we utilized human tonsil tissues, cultured either as tissue blocks or as aggregate suspension cultures, in single-round infection experiments. In these experiments, addition of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) to the cultures increased T-cell infection, particularly in CD4(+) T cells expressing lower levels of HLA-DR. Subset analysis demonstrated that MDDCs increased HIV-1 infection of central and effector memory T-cell populations. Depletion of endogenous myeloid DCs (myDCs) from the cultures decreased memory T-cell infection, and readdition of MDDCs restored infection to predepletion levels. Using an HIV-1 fusion assay, we found that MDDCs equally increased HIV delivery into naïve, central, and effector memory T cells in the cultures, whereas predepletion of myDCs reduced fusion into memory T cells. Together, these data suggest that resident myDCs facilitate memory T-cell infection in lymphoid tissues, implicating DC-mediated transinfection in driving HIV dissemination within these tissues in untreated HIV/AIDS.

  1. Increased competition for antigen during priming negatively impacts the generation of memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blair, David A.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The factors involved in the differentiation of memory CD4 T cells from naïve precursors are poorly understood. We developed a system to examine the effect of increased competition for antigen by CD4 T cells on the generation of memory in response to infection with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus. Competition was initially regulated by increasing the precursor frequency of adoptively transferred naïve T cell antigen receptor transgenic CD4 T cells. Despite robust proliferation at high precursor frequencies, memory CD4 T cells did not develop, whereas decreasing the input number of naïve CD4 T cells promoted memory development after infection. The lack of memory development was linked to reduced blastogenesis and poor effector cell induction, but not to initial recruitment or proliferation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells. To prove that availability of antigen alone could regulate memory CD4 T cell development, we used treatment with an mAb specific for the epitope recognized by the transferred CD4 T cells. At high doses, this mAb effectively inhibited the antigen-specific CD4 T cell response. However, at a very low dose of mAb, primary CD4 T cell expansion was unaffected, although memory development was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the induction of effector function was concomitantly inhibited. Thus, competition for antigen during CD4 T cell priming is a major contributing factor to the development of the memory CD4 T cell pool. PMID:17827281

  2. Defective CD8 T Cell Memory Following Acute Infection Without CD4 T Cell Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Joseph C.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    The CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response to pathogens is thought to be CD4+ helper T cell independent because infectious agents provide their own inflammatory signals. Mice that lack CD4+ T cells mount a primary CD8 response to Listeria monocytogenes equal to that of wild-type mice and rapidly clear the infection. However, protective memory to a challenge is gradually lost in the former animals. Memory CD8+ T cells from normal mice can respond rapidly, but memory CD8+ T cells that are generated without CD4 help are defective in their ability to respond to secondary encounters with antigen. The results highlight a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in promoting protective CD8 memory development.

  3. Memory CD4+ T cells do not induce graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britt E; McNiff, Jennifer; Yan, Jun; Doyle, Hester; Mamula, Mark; Shlomchik, Mark J; Shlomchik, Warren D

    2003-07-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). Donor T cells that accompany stem cell grafts cause GVHD by attacking recipient tissues; therefore, all patients receive GVHD prophylaxis by depletion of T cells from the allograft or through immunosuppressant drugs. In addition to providing a graft-versus-leukemia effect, donor T cells are critical for reconstituting T cell-mediated immunity. Ideally, immunity to infectious agents would be transferred from donor to host without GVHD. Most donors have been exposed to common pathogens and have an increased precursor frequency of memory T cells against pathogenic antigens. We therefore asked whether memory CD62L-CD44+ CD4+ T cells would induce less GVHD than unfractionated or naive CD4+ T cells. Strikingly, we found that memory CD4 cells induced neither clinical nor histologic GVHD. This effect was not due to the increased number of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells found in the CD62L-CD44+ fraction because memory T cells depletion of these cells did not cause GVHD. Memory CD4 cells engrafted and responded to antigen both in vivo and in vitro. If these murine results are applicable to human alloSCT, selective administration of memory T cells could greatly improve post-transplant immune reconstitution.

  4. New Insights into the Generation of CD4 Memory May Shape Future Vaccine Strategies for Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Bautista, Bianca; Vong, Allen M.; McKinstry, Karl Kai; Strutt, Tara M.; Swain, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viral evolution presents a formidable challenge to vaccination due to the virus’ ability to rapidly mutate to evade immune responses. Live influenza infections generate large and diverse CD4 effector T cell responses that yield highly protective, long-lasting CD4 T cell memory that can target conserved viral epitopes. We review advances in our understanding of mechanisms involved in generating CD4 T cell responses against the influenza A virus (IAV), focusing on specialized follicular helper (TFH) and CD4 cytotoxic (ThCTL) effector subsets and on CD4 T cell memory. We also discuss two recent findings in context of enhancing vaccine responses. First, helper T cells require priming with APC secreting high levels of IL-6. Second, the transition of IAV-generated effectors to memory depends on IL-2, costimulation and antigen signals, just before effectors reach peak numbers, defined as the “memory checkpoint.” The need for these signals during the checkpoint could explain why many current influenza vaccines are poorly effective and elicit poor cellular immunity. We suggest that CD4 memory generation can be enhanced by re-vaccinating at this time. Our best hope lies in a universal vaccine that will not need to be formulated yearly against seasonal antigenically novel influenza strains and will also be protective against a pandemic strain. We suggest a vaccine approach that elicits a powerful T cell response, by initially inducing high levels of APC activation and later providing antigen at the memory checkpoint, may take us a step closer to such a universal influenza vaccine. PMID:27148257

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated RBPJ polymorphism alters memory CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Orent, William; Mchenry, Allison R; Rao, Deepak A; White, Charles; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Bassil, Ribal; Srivastava, Gyan; Replogle, Joseph M; Raj, Towfique; Frangieh, Michael; Cimpean, Maria; Cuerdon, Nicole; Chibnik, Lori; Khoury, Samia J; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Brenner, Michael B; De Jager, Philip; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M; Elyaman, Wassim

    2016-01-15

    Notch signaling has recently emerged as an important regulator of immune responses in autoimmune diseases. The recombination signal-binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) is a transcriptional repressor, but converts into a transcriptional activator upon activation of the canonical Notch pathway. Genome-wide association studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) identified a susceptibility locus, rs874040(CC), which implicated the RBPJ gene. Here, chromatin state mapping generated using the chromHMM algorithm reveals strong enhancer regions containing DNase I hypersensitive sites overlapping the rs874040 linkage disequilibrium block in human memory, but not in naïve CD4(+) T cells. The rs874040 overlapping this chromatin state was associated with increased RBPJ expression in stimulated memory CD4(+) T cells from healthy subjects homozygous for the risk allele (CC) compared with memory CD4(+) T cells bearing the protective allele (GG). Transcriptomic analysis of rs874040(CC) memory T cells showed a repression of canonical Notch target genes IL (interleukin)-9, IL-17 and interferon (IFN)γ in the basal state. Interestingly, activation of the Notch pathway using soluble Notch ligand, Jagged2-Fc, induced IL-9 and IL-17A while delta-like 4Fc, another Notch ligand, induced higher IFNγ expression in the rs874040(CC) memory CD4(+) T cells compared with their rs874040(GG) counterparts. In RA, RBPJ expression is elevated in memory T cells from RA patients compared with control subjects, and this was associated with induced inflammatory cytokines IL-9, IL-17A and IFNγ in response to Notch ligation in vitro. These findings demonstrate that the rs874040(CC) allele skews memory T cells toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype involving Notch signaling, thus increasing the susceptibility to develop RA. PMID:26604133

  6. Impaired CD4 T Cell Memory Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae Precedes CD4 T Cell Depletion in HIV-Infected Malawian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mzinza, David; Harawa, Visopo; Miles, David J. C.; Jambo, Kondwani C.; Gordon, Stephen B.; Williams, Neil A.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected African adults. CD4 T cell depletion may partially explain this high disease burden but those with relatively preserved T cell numbers are still at increased risk of IPD. This study evaluated the extent of pneumococcal-specific T cell memory dysfunction in asymptomatic HIV infection early on in the evolution of the disease. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from asymptomatic HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected Malawian adults and stained to characterize the underlying degree of CD4 T cell immune activation, senescence and regulation. Pneumococcal-specific T cell proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-17 production and CD154 expression was assessed using flow cytometry and ELISpot. Results We find that in asymptomatic HIV-infected Malawian adults, there is considerable immune disruption with an increase in activated and senescent CD4+CD38+PD-1+ and CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ Treg cells. In the context of high pneumococcal exposure and therefore immune stimulation, show a failure in pneumococcal-specific memory T cell proliferation, skewing of T cell cytokine production with preservation of interleukin-17 but decreased interferon-gamma responses, and failure of activated T cells to express the co-stimulatory molecule CD154. Conclusion Asymptomatic HIV-infected Malawian adults show early signs of pneumococcal- specific immune dysregulation with a shift in the balance of CD4 memory, T helper 17 cells and Treg. Together these data offer a mechanistic understanding of how antigen-specific T cell dysfunction occurs prior to T cell depletion and may explain the early susceptibility to IPD in those with relatively preserved CD4 T cell numbers. PMID:21980502

  7. Defining CD4 T cell memory by the epigenetic landscape of CpG DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Komori, H Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A; Chew, Pamela V; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-02-15

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to Ag; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpGs) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Four hundred sixty-six CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naive and memory cells. Twenty-one genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, whereas 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. Eighty-four genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naive cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared with naive cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared with naive cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression.

  8. Defining CD4 T cell memory by the epigenetic landscape of CpG DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Komori, H Kiyomi; Hart, Traver; LaMere, Sarah A; Chew, Pamela V; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-02-15

    Memory T cells are primed for rapid responses to Ag; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for priming remain incompletely defined. CpG methylation in promoters is an epigenetic modification, which regulates gene transcription. Using targeted bisulfite sequencing, we examined methylation of 2100 genes (56,000 CpGs) mapped by deep sequencing of T cell activation in human naive and memory CD4 T cells. Four hundred sixty-six CpGs (132 genes) displayed differential methylation between naive and memory cells. Twenty-one genes exhibited both differential methylation and gene expression before activation, linking promoter DNA methylation states to gene regulation; 6 of 21 genes encode proteins closely studied in T cells, whereas 15 genes represent novel targets for further study. Eighty-four genes demonstrated differential methylation between memory and naive cells that correlated to differential gene expression following activation, of which 39 exhibited reduced methylation in memory cells coupled with increased gene expression upon activation compared with naive cells. These reveal a class of primed genes more rapidly expressed in memory compared with naive cells and putatively regulated by DNA methylation. These findings define a DNA methylation signature unique to memory CD4 T cells that correlates with activation-induced gene expression. PMID:25576597

  9. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  10. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  11. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E.; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated CD4+T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). To assess the dynamics of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial -infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial (BmA) or with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific Ag CFP10. Our data demonstrated that the Inf group not only had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4+IL-4+ cells (Median net frequency compared to baseline (Fo)=0.09% vs. 0.01%, p=0.038) but also to CFP10 (Fo =0.16% vs. 0.007%, p=0.04) and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (Fo =0.49% vs. 0.26%, p=0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4+CD45RO+IL-4+ producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO+CCR7+CD27+) (Fo =1.1% vs. 0.5%, p=0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM CD45RO+CCR7-CD27-) (Fo =1.5% vs. 0.2%, p=0.03) with a similar but non-significant response to CFP10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4+ IL-4+ CD45RA+ CCR7+CD27+ (naïve-like) in Inf individuals compared to Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis , there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4 producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared to the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces antigen-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to Mtb-specific antigens, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to Mtb. PMID:25667413

  12. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-03-15

    Exaggerated CD4(+) T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper 1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To assess the dynamics of Ag-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection, we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial-infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial Ag (BmA) or with the M. tuberculosis-specific Ag culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10). Our data demonstrated that the Inf group had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4(+)IL-4(+) cells (median net frequency compared with baseline [Fo] = 0.09% versus 0.01%; p = 0.038) but also to CFP-10 (Fo = 0.16% versus 0.007%; p = 0.04) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (Fo = 0.49% versus 0.26%; p = 0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4(+)CD45RO(+)IL-4(+) producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+); Fo = 1.1% versus 0.5%; p = 0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM, CD45RO(+)CCR7(-)CD27(-); Fo = 1.5% versus 0.2%; p = 0.03) with a similar but nonsignificant response to CFP-10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4(+)IL-4(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)CD27(+) (naive-like) in Inf individuals compared with Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis, there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4-producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared with the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces Ag-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to M. tuberculosis-specific Ags, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to M. tuberculosis. PMID:25667413

  13. Analysis of HIV-1- and CMV-specific memory CD4 T-cell responses during primary and chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Harari, Alexandre; Rizzardi, G Paolo; Ellefsen, Kim; Ciuffreda, Donatella; Champagne, Patrick; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Kaufmann, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Sahli, Roland; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Kaiser, Laurent; Lazzarin, Adriano; Perrin, Luc; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2002-08-15

    CD4 T-cell-specific memory antiviral responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) were investigated in 16 patients with documented primary HIV-1 infection (4 of the 16 subjects also had primary CMV infection) and compared with those observed in patients with chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection. Virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were characterized on the basis of the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR7. HIV-1- and CMV-specific interferon-gamma-secreting CD4 T cells were detected in patients with primary and chronic HIV-1 and CMV coinfection and were mostly contained in the cell population lacking expression of CCR7. The magnitude of the primary CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response was significantly greater than that of chronic CMV infection, whereas there were no differences between primary and chronic HIV-1-specific CD4 T-cell responses. A substantial proportion of CD4(+)CCR7(-) T cells were infected with HIV-1. These results advance the characterization of antiviral memory CD4 T-cell response and the delineation of the potential mechanisms that likely prevent the generation of a robust CD4 T-cell immune response during primary infection.

  14. Skin-resident memory CD4+ T cells enhance protection against Leishmania major infection

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Nelson D.; Yeramilli, Venkata A.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Volk, Susan W.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis causes a significant disease burden worldwide. Although Leishmania-infected patients become refractory to reinfection after disease resolution, effective immune protection has not yet been achieved by human vaccines. Although circulating Leishmania-specific T cells are known to play a critical role in immunity, the role of memory T cells present in peripheral tissues has not been explored. Here, we identify a population of skin-resident Leishmania-specific memory CD4+ T cells. These cells produce IFN-γ and remain resident in the skin when transplanted by skin graft onto naive mice. They function to recruit circulating T cells to the skin in a CXCR3-dependent manner, resulting in better control of the parasites. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD4+ TRM cells form in response to a parasitic infection, and indicate that optimal protective immunity to Leishmania, and thus the success of a vaccine, may depend on generating both circulating and skin-resident memory T cells. PMID:26216123

  15. Virus-specific CD4+ memory phenotype T cells are abundant in unexposed adults

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; Kidd, Brian A.; Han, Arnold; Kotzin, Jonathan J.; Davis, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    While T cell memory is generally thought to require direct antigen exposure, we find an abundance of memory phenotype cells (20–90%, averaging over 50%) of CD4+ T cells specific for viral antigens in adults that have never been infected. These cells express the appropriate memory markers and genes, rapidly produce cytokines, and have clonally expanded. This contrasts with newborns where the same T cell receptor (TCR) specificities are almost entirely naïve, which may explain the vulnerability of young children to infections. One mechanism for this phenomenon is TCR cross-reactivity to environmental antigens and in support of this we find extensive cross-recognition by HIV-1 and influenza-reactive T lymphocytes to other microbial peptides and the expansion of one of these following influenza vaccination. Thus the presence of these memory phenotype T cells has significant implications for immunity to novel pathogens, child and adult health, and the influence of pathogen-rich versus hygienic environments. PMID:23395677

  16. Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Fife, Brian T; Pagan, Antonio J; Kotov, Dmitri I; Goldberg, Michael F; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-01-29

    Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells.

  17. Oral vaccination with lipid-formulated BCG induces a long-lived, multifunctional CD4(+) T cell memory immune response.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay R; Aldwell, Frank E; Rich, Fenella J; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-01-01

    Oral delivery of BCG in a lipid formulation (Liporale™-BCG) targets delivery of viable bacilli to the mesenteric lymph nodes and confers protection against an aerosol Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. The magnitude, quality and duration of the effector and memory immune response induced by Liporale™-BCG vaccination is unknown. Therefore, we compared the effector and memory CD4(+) T cell response in the spleen and lungs of mice vaccinated with Liporale™-BCG to the response induced by subcutaneous BCG vaccination. Liporale™-BCG vaccination induced a long-lived CD4(+) T cell response, evident by the detection of effector CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and a significant increase in the number of Ag85B tetramer-specific CD4(+) T cells in the spleen up to 30 weeks post vaccination. Moreover, following polyclonal stimulation, Liporale™-BCG vaccination, but not s.c. BCG vaccination, induced a significant increase in both the percentage of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs capable of producing IFNγ and the number of multifunctional CD4(+) T cells in the lungs at 30 weeks post vaccination. These results demonstrate that orally delivered Liporale™-BCG vaccine induces a long-lived multifunctional immune response, and could therefore represent a practical and effective means of delivering novel BCG-based TB vaccines. PMID:23049885

  18. Treatment with targeted Vesicular Stomatitis Virus generates therapeutic multifunctional anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanhua; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Griffin, Judith A.; Bergman, Ira

    2011-01-01

    A generally applicable, easy-to-use method of focusing a patient's immune system to eradicate or prevent cancer has been elusive. We are attempting to develop a targeted virus to accomplish these aims. We previously created a recombinant replicating Vesicular Stomatitis Virus that preferentially infected Her2/neu expressing breast cancer cells and showed therapeutic efficacy in an implanted Balb/c mouse tumor model. The current work shows that this therapy generated therapeutic anti-tumor CD4 T-cells against multiple tumor antigens. CD4 T-cells transferred directly from cured donor mice could eradicate established tumors in host mice. T-cells were transferred directly from donor mice and were not stimulated ex vivo. Both tumors that expressed Her2/neu and those that did not were cured by transferred T-cells. Analysis of cytokines secreted by anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells displayed a multifunctional pattern with high levels of IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-17. Anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells traveled to the mesenteric lymph nodes and were activated there. Treatment with targeted rrVSV is a potent immune adjuvant that generates therapeutic, multifunctional anti-tumor memory CD4 T-cells that recognize multiple tumor antigens. Immunity elicited by viral therapy is independent of host major histocompatibility complex (MHC) or knowledge of tumor antigens. Virus-induced tumor immunity could have great benefit in the prevention and treatment of tumor metastases. PMID:22240921

  19. Skin CD4+ memory T cells exhibit combined cluster-mediated retention and equilibration with the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicholas; Jiang, Xiaodong; Zaid, Ali; Macleod, Bethany L.; Li, Jane; Park, Chang Ook; Haque, Ashraful; Bedoui, Sammy; Heath, William R.; Mueller, Scott N.; Kupper, Thomas S.; Gebhardt, Thomas; Carbone, Francis R.

    2016-01-01

    Although memory T cells within barrier tissues can persist as permanent residents, at least some exchange with blood. The extent to which this occurs is unclear. Here we show that memory CD4+ T cells in mouse skin are in equilibrium with the circulation at steady state. These cells are dispersed throughout the inter-follicular regions of the dermis and form clusters with antigen presenting cells around hair follicles. After infection or administration of a contact sensitizing agent, there is a sustained increase in skin CD4+ T-cell content, which is confined to the clusters, with a concomitant CCL5-dependent increase in CD4+ T-cell recruitment. Skin CCL5 is derived from CD11b+ cells and CD8+ T cells, with the elimination of the latter decreasing CD4+ T-cell numbers. These results reveal a complex pattern of tissue-retention and equilibration for CD4+ memory T cells in skin, which is altered by infection and inflammation history. PMID:27160938

  20. The frequency of α4β7high memory CD4+ T cells correlates with susceptibility to rectal SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Elena; Veglia, Filippo; Goode, Diana; Guerra-Perez, Natalia; Aravantinou, Meropi; Arthos, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background Integrin α4β7 (α4β7) mediates the homing of CD4+ T cells to gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), which constitute a highly favorable environment for HIV expansion and dissemination. HIV and SIV envelope proteins bind to and signal through α4β7 and during acute infection SIV preferentially infects α4β7high CD4+ T cells. We postulated that the availability of these cells at the time of challenge could influence mucosal SIV transmission and acute viral load (VL). Methods We challenged 17 rhesus macaques with 3000 TCID50 of SIVmac239 rectally and followed the subsets of α4β7+ T and dendritic cells (DCs) by flow cytometry in blood and tissues, before and after challenge. Results We found that the frequency of memory CD4+ T cells that expressed high levels of α4β7 (α4β7high memory CD4+ T cells) in blood before challenge correlated strongly with susceptibility to infection and acute VL. Notably, not only at the time of challenge, but also their frequency 3 weeks before challenge correlated with infection. This association extended to the rectal tissue as we observed a strong direct correlation between the frequency of α4β7high memory CD4+ T cells in blood and rectum before and after challenge. The frequency of α4β7+ myeloid DCs and α4β7high CD80+ DCs also correlated with infection and acute VL, while blood CCR5+ and CD69+ CD4+ T cells could not be associated with infection. Conclusions Our results suggest that animals with higher frequency of α4β7high CD4+ T cells in circulation and in rectal tissue could be more susceptible to SIV rectal transmission. PMID:23797688

  1. CD4(+) T cells confer anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects, but enhance fear memory processes in Rag2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah M; Soroka, Jennifer A; Song, Chang; Li, Xin; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role of T cells in behavioral stress responsiveness. Our laboratory previously reported that lymphocyte deficient Rag2(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background display resilience to maladaptive stress responses when compared with immune competent mice in the predator odor exposure (POE) paradigm, while exhibiting similar behavior in a cued fear-conditioning (FC) paradigm. In the present study, Rag2(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background were assessed in the same behavioral paradigms, as well as additional tests of anxiety and depressive-like behavior. Furthermore, the effects of naïve CD4(+ ) T cells were evaluated by adoptive transfer of functional cells from nonstressed, wild-type donors to Rag2(-/-) mice. Consistent with our prior results, Rag2(-/-) mice displayed an attenuated startle response after POE. Nevertheless, reconstitution of Rag2(-/-) mice with CD4(+ ) T cells did not modify startle reactivity. Additionally, in contrast with our previous findings, Rag2(-/-) mice showed attenuated fear responses in the FC paradigm compared to wild-type mice and reconstitution with CD4(+ ) T cells promoted fear learning and memory. Notably, reconstitution with CD4(+ ) T cells had anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects in Rag2(-/-) mice that had not been previously stressed, but had no effect after POE. Taken together, our results support a role of CD4(+ ) T cells in emotionality, but also indicate that they may promote fear responses by enhancing learning and memory processes.

  2. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  3. Ex vivo analysis of human memory CD4 T cells specific for hepatitis C virus using MHC class II tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Day, Cheryl L.; Seth, Nilufer P.; Lucas, Michaela; Appel, Heiner; Gauthier, Laurent; Lauer, Georg M.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M.; Casson, Deborah R.; Chung, Raymond T.; Bell, Shannon; Harcourt, Gillian; Walker, Bruce D.; Klenerman, Paul; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2003-01-01

    Containment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and other chronic human viral infections is associated with persistence of virus-specific CD4 T cells, but ex vivo characterization of circulating CD4 T cells has not been achieved. To further define the phenotype and function of these cells, we developed a novel approach for the generation of tetrameric forms of MHC class II/peptide complexes that is based on the cellular peptide-exchange mechanism. HLA-DR molecules were expressed as precursors with a covalently linked CLIP peptide, which could be efficiently exchanged with viral peptides following linker cleavage. In subjects who spontaneously resolved HCV viremia, but not in those with chronic progressive infection, HCV tetramer–labeled cells could be isolated by magnetic bead capture despite very low frequencies (1:1,200 to 1:111,000) among circulating CD4 T cells. These T cells expressed a set of surface receptors (CCR7+CD45RA–CD27+) indicative of a surveillance function for secondary lymphoid structures and had undergone significant in vivo selection since they utilized a restricted Vβ repertoire. These studies demonstrate a relationship between clinical outcome and the presence of circulating CD4 T cells directed against this virus. Moreover, they show that rare populations of memory CD4 T cells can be studied ex vivo in human diseases. PMID:12975468

  4. Peripheral and central neuronal ATF3 precedes CD4+ T-cell infiltration in EAE.

    PubMed

    Frezel, Noémie; Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard; Basbaum, Allan I; Braz, Joao M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis produced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and adjuvants, results from profound T-cell mediated CNS demyelination. EAE is characterized by progressive, ascending motor dysfunction and symptoms of ongoing pain and hypersensitivity, in some cases preceding or concomitant with the motor deficits. In this regard, the EAE model mimics major features of multiple sclerosis, where a central neuropathic pain state is common. Although the latter condition is presumed to arise from a CNS loss of inhibitory controls secondary to the demyelination, dysfunction of sensory neurons may also contribute. Based on our previous studies that demonstrated the utility of monitoring expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a sensitive marker of injured sensory neurons, here we followed both ATF3 and CD4+ T cells invasion of sensory ganglia (as well as the CNS) at different stages of the EAE model. We found that ATF3 is induced in peripheral sensory ganglia and brainstem well before the appearance of motor deficits. Unexpectedly, the ATF3 induction always preceded T cell infiltration, typically in adjacent, but non-overlapping regions. Surprisingly, control administration of the pertussis toxin and/or Complete Freund's adjuvants, without MOG, induced ATF3 in sensory neurons. In contrast, T cell infiltration only occurred with MOG. Taken together, our results suggest that the clinical manifestations in the EAE result not only from central demyelination but also from neuronal stress and subsequent pathophysiology of sensory neurons. PMID:27343802

  5. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) Induces Memory CD4 T Cell Anergy in vivo and Impairs Recall Immunity to Unrelated Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Janik, David K; Lee, William T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Naïve and memory T cells can utilize unique regulatory pathways to promote protection but prevent self-reactivity. A bacterial superantigen SEB exploits unique TCR proximal signaling processes in memory CD4 T cells to induce clonal anergy. The aim of this study was to determine if SEB could antagonize memory CD4 T cells in vivo and whether there would be consequences on recall immune responses. We evaluated Ab responses to a T-dependent antigen as a measurement of memory T cell helper function. Method BALB/c mice were primed with TNP-RGG to elicit memory B cells and also immunized with an ovalbumin peptide to elicit memory helper T cells. Another group of TNP-RGG immunized mice were used as adoptive transfer recipients of exogenous DO11.10 memory T cells. Mice were challenged with TNP-OVA with or without prior administration of SEB. B cells secreting IgM or IgG TNP-specific Ab were enumerated by ELISPOT as indicators of primary versus secondary humoral immunity. Results Comparing the SEB and non-SEB-treated groups, the SEB-treated group failed to produce TNP-specific IgG in response to challenge with TNP-OVA, even if they were previously immunized with OVA. All groups produced IgM, indicating that the primary Ab responses and naïve helper T cells were not impacted by SEB. SEB had no negative impact when DO11.10 × Fyn−/− memory T cells were used as donor cells. Conclusion The present study indicated that SEB selectively targeted memory CD4 T cells in vivo and prevented helper function. Consequently, recall humoral immunity was lost. The data are most consistent with in vivo T cell anergy as opposed to indirect suppression as elimination of Fyn kinase restored helper function. These data suggest that bacterial superantigens can impair post-vaccination memory cell responses to unrelated antigens via their ability to target Vb families and antagonize memory cell activation. PMID:26807307

  6. Depletion of CD4 T cells enhances immunotherapy for neuroblastoma after syngeneic HSCT but compromises development of antitumor immune memory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Gershan, Jill A; Johnson, Bryon D

    2009-04-30

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains a clinically challenging disease. Here, we report that a multifaceted immunotherapeutic approach including syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), adoptive transfer of sensitized T cells (from syngeneic donors vaccinated to tumor antigens), and early posttransplantation tumor vaccination can effectively treat mice with established neuroblastoma. Vaccination was an important component of this immunotherapy, as it resulted in enhanced and prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T-cell activity and improved antitumor efficacy. Surprisingly, CD4 cell depletion of mice given sensitized T cells resulted in better tumor-free survival, which was associated with an early increased expansion of CD8 T cells with an effector phenotype, increased numbers of tumor-reactive CD8 T cells, and increased tumor infiltration by CD8 T cells. However, in the absence of CD4 T cells, development of long-term tumor immunity (memory) was severely compromised as reflected by diminished CD8 T-cell recall responses and an inability to resist tumor rechallenge in vivo. Based on these results, a major challenge with this immunotherapeutic approach is how to obtain the ideal initial antitumor response but still preserve antitumor immune memory. These data suggest that identification and selective depletion of immune inhibitory CD4 T cells may be a strategy to enhance early antitumor immunity and induce a long-lasting tumor response after HSCT.

  7. Restoration of CD4+ Responses to Copathogens in HIV-Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Is Dependent on T Cell Memory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Tanko, Ramla F; Soares, Andreia P; Masson, Lindi; Werner, Lise; Garrett, Nigel J; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Burgers, Wendy A

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) induces rapid suppression of viral replication and a progressive replenishment of CD4(+) T cells in HIV-infected individuals. However, the effect of ART on restoring pre-existing memory CD4(+) T cells specific for common copathogens is still unclear. To better understand the dynamics of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells during ART, we assessed the frequency, functional capacity, and memory profile of CD4(+) T cells specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and CMV in 15 HIV-infected individuals before and 1 y after ART initiation. After ART initiation, the frequency of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T cells showed little change, whereas CMV-specific CD4(+) T cells were significantly lower (p = 0.003). There was no difference in the polyfunctional or memory profile of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells before and after ART. The replenishment of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells correlated with the memory differentiation profile of these cells prior to ART. Pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibiting a late differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(-)) had a lower capacity to replenish (p = 0.019; r = -0.5) compared with cells with an early differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(+); p = 0.04; r = 0.45). In conclusion, restoration of copathogen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells during treated HIV infection is related to their memory phenotype, in which early differentiated cells (such as most M. tuberculosis-specific cells) have a higher replenishment capacity compared with late differentiated cells (such as most CMV-specific cells). These data identify an important, hitherto unrecognized, factor that may limit restoration of copathogen immunity in HIV-infected individuals on ART.

  8. Immunophenotyping of rheumatoid arthritis reveals a linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype, CXCR4 expression on memory CD4+ T cells, and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, Yasuo; Shoda, Hirofumi; Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Kato, Rika; Tsuchida, Yumi; Tsuchiya, Haruka; Sakurai, Keiichi; Hanata, Norio; Tateishi, Shoko; Kanda, Hiroko; Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Kochi, Yuta; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease that leads to destructive arthritis. Although the HLA class II locus is the strongest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, the relationship between HLA class II alleles and lymphocyte activation remains unclear. We performed immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on 91 HLA-DRB1-genotyped RA patients and 110 healthy donors. The frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells, and not Th1 and Th17 cells, was significantly associated with disease severity by multiple linear regression analysis. RA patients with one or more susceptible HLA-DR haplotypes (shared epitope: SE) displayed a significantly higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Moreover, the frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells significantly correlated with the expression level of HLA-DR on B cells, which was elevated in RA patients with SE. In vitro analysis and transcriptomic pathway analysis suggested that the interaction between HLA-DR and T cell receptors is an important regulator of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells. Clinically, a higher frequency of memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells predicted a better response to CTLA4-Ig. Memory CXCR4+CD4+ T cells may serve as a powerful biomarker for unraveling the linkage between HLA-DRB1 genotype and disease activity in RA. PMID:27385284

  9. HIV replication in conjunction with granzyme B production by CCR5+ memory CD4 T cells: Implications for bystander cell and tissue pathologies.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Jacob; Hutchison, Alexander T; Medina, Miguel A; Gingaras, Cosmina; Urvil, Petri; Yu, Xiaoying; Nguyen, Chi; Mahale, Parag; Lin, Lin; Kozinetz, Claudia A; Schmitz, Joern E; Kimata, Jason T; Savidge, Tor C; Lewis, Dorothy E

    2014-08-01

    Granzyme B (GrzB) is expressed by activated T cells and mediates cellular apoptosis. GrzB also acts as an extracellular protease involved in tissue degradation. We hypothesized that GrzB production from activated memory CD4 T cells may be associated with HIV pathogenesis. We found that stimulated memory CD4 T cells (via costimulation, cytokines, and TLR ligands) concomitantly produced GrzB and HIV. Both GrzB and HIV expression were mainly restricted to CCR5-expressing memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells, including Th1 and Th17 subsets. Activated memory CD4 T cells also mediated tissue damage, such as disruption of intestinal epithelial monolayers. In non-human primates, CD4 T cells of rhesus macaques (pathogenic SIV hosts) expressed higher GrzB compared to African green monkeys (non-pathogenic SIV hosts). These results suggest that GrzB from CCR5+ memory CD4 T cells may have a role in cellular and tissue pathologies during HIV infection. PMID:24999042

  10. Requirement for CD4+ T Lymphocytes in Host Resistance against Cryptococcus neoformans in the Central Nervous System of Immunized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Kent L.; Doyle, Hester A.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and CD4+ T lymphocytes in host resistance against Cryptococcus neoformans is well documented and is exemplified by the high susceptibility to progressive infection with this pathogen of AIDS patients with reduced CD4+ T-cell numbers. Although much has been learned about the role of CMI in the clearance of C. neoformans from the lungs and other internal organs, less is known about the protective mechanisms in the brain, the organ most frequently involved with a fatal outcome of cryptococcosis. We hypothesized that host resistance mechanisms against C. neoformans in the central nervous system (CNS) were similar to those outside the CNS (i.e., gamma interferon [IFN-γ], CD4+ T cells, and others). To test this hypothesis, we used a murine model of cryptococcal meningitis whereby cryptococci are introduced directly into the CNS. In experiments where mice were immunized to mount an anticryptococcal CMI response, our results indicate that immunization induced protective mechanisms that could be detected in the CNS by inhibition of the growth of viable yeast cells. Flow cytometric analyses of leukocytes in brain and spinal cord homogenates revealed that T lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils accumulated in C. neoformans-infected brains of immune mice. In vivo depletion of CD4+ T cells, but not CD8+ T cells, resulted in significantly reduced leukocyte accumulation in the brains of immune mice. Furthermore, depletion of CD4+ T cells or neutralization of IFN-γ exacerbated CNS infection in immune mice, suggesting a critical role for CMI mechanisms in acquired protection in the CNS. PMID:10639404

  11. TCR stimulation without co-stimulatory signals induces expression of "tolerogenic" genes in memory CD4 T cells but does not compromise cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Aini; Zheng, Xiong; Khattar, Mithun; Schroder, Paul; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Xia, Jiahong; Chen, Wenhao

    2015-02-01

    Memory T cells resist co-stimulatory blockade and present a unique therapeutic challenge in transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Herein, we determined whether memory T cells express less "tolerogenic" genes than naïve T cells to reinforce a proliferative response under the deprivation of co-stimulatory signals. The expression of ∼40 tolerogenic genes in memory and naïve CD4(+) T cells was thus assessed during an in vitro TCR stimulation without co-stimulation. Briefly, upon TCR stimulation with an anti-CD3 mAb alone, memory CD4(+) T cells exhibited more proliferation than naïve CD4(+) T cells. To our surprise, at 24h upon anti-CD3 mAb stimulation, memory CD4(+) T cells expressed more than a 5-fold higher level of the transcription factor Egr2 and a 20-fold higher level of the transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase GRAIL than those in naïve T cells. Hence, the high-level expression of tolerogenic genes, Egr2 and GRAIL, in memory CD4(+) T cells does not prevent cell proliferation. Importantly, anti-CD3 mAb-stimulated memory CD4(+) T cells expressed high protein/gene levels of phosphorylated STAT5, Nedd4, Bcl-2, and Bcl-XL. Therefore, co-stimulation-independent proliferation of memory CD4(+) T cells may be due to elevated expression of molecules that support cell proliferation and survival, but not lack of tolerogenic molecules.

  12. Gut environment-induced intraepithelial autoreactive CD4+ T cells suppress central nervous system autoimmunity via LAG-3

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Atsushi; Miyake, Sachiko; Saga, Ryoko; Chiba, Asako; Mochizuki, Hideki; Yamamura, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The gut environment has been found to significantly influence autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis; however, immune cell mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that the gut epithelium of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein(35-55)-specific T-cell receptor transgenic mice contains environmental stimuli-induced intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis on transfer. These cells express surface markers phenotypical of ‘induced' IELs, have a TH17-like profile and infiltrate the central nervous system (CNS). They constitutively express Ctla4 and Tgfb1 and markedly upregulate Lag3 expression in the CNS, thereby inhibiting inflammation. We also demonstrate the suppressive capability of CD4+ IELs with alternative antigen specificities, their proliferation in response to gut-derived antigens and contribution of the microbiota and dietary aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands to their induction. Thus, the gut environment favours the generation of autoreactive CD4+ T cells with unique regulatory functions, potentially important for preventing CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27198196

  13. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity.

  14. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A-Modulated Dendritic Cells Promote Antigen-Specific Tolerogenic Properties on Naive and Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Jaxaira; Schinnerling, Katina; Pesce, Bárbara; Hilkens, Catharien M.; Catalán, Diego; Aguillón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising tool to control T cell-mediated autoimmunity. Here, we evaluate the ability of dexamethasone-modulated and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA)-activated DCs [MPLA-tolerogenic DCs (tDCs)] to exert immunomodulatory effects on naive and memory CD4+ T cells in an antigen-specific manner. For this purpose, MPLA-tDCs were loaded with purified protein derivative (PPD) as antigen and co-cultured with autologous naive or memory CD4+ T cells. Lymphocytes were re-challenged with autologous PPD-pulsed mature DCs (mDCs), evaluating proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. On primed-naive CD4+ T cells, the expression of regulatory T cell markers was evaluated and their suppressive ability was assessed in autologous co-cultures with CD4+ effector T cells and PPD-pulsed mDCs. We detected that memory CD4+ T cells primed by MPLA-tDCs presented reduced proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in response to PPD and were refractory to subsequent stimulation. Naive CD4+ T cells were instructed by MPLA-tDCs to be hyporesponsive to antigen-specific restimulation and to suppress the induction of T helper cell type 1 and 17 responses. In conclusion, MPLA-tDCs are able to modulate antigen-specific responses of both naive and memory CD4+ T cells and might be a promising strategy to “turn off” self-reactive CD4+ effector T cells in autoimmunity. PMID:27698654

  15. Polarized granzyme release is required for antigen-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Thomas D.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2014-01-01

    Human effector memory (EM) CD4 T cells may transmigrate across endothelial cell (EC) monolayers either in response to inflammatory chemokines or in response to TCR recognition of antigen presented on the surface of the EC. The kinetics, morphologic manifestations, and molecular requirements of chemokine- and TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM) differ significantly. Here we report that while the MTOC and cytosolic granules follow the nucleus across the endothelium in a uropod during chemokine-driven TEM, MTOC reorientation to the contact region between the T cell and the EC, accompanied by dynein-driven transport of granzyme-containing granules to and exocytosis at the contact region, are early events in TCR-driven but not chemokine-driven TEM. Inhibitors of either granule function or of granzyme proteolytic activity can arrest TCR-driven TEM, implying a requirement for granule discharge in the process. In the final stages of TCR-driven TEM, the MTOC precedes, rather than follows, the nucleus across the endothelium. Thus TCR-driven TEM of EM CD4 T cells appears to be a novel process that more closely resembles immune synapse formation than it does conventional chemotaxis. PMID:25367116

  16. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects.

    PubMed

    Sylwester, Andrew W; Mitchell, Bridget L; Edgar, John B; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Hosken, Nancy A; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A; Picker, Louis J

    2005-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average approximately 10% of both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8(+) T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  17. Broadly targeted human cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominate the memory compartments of exposed subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sylwester, Andrew W.; Mitchell, Bridget L.; Edgar, John B.; Taormina, Cara; Pelte, Christian; Ruchti, Franziska; Sleath, Paul R.; Grabstein, Kenneth H.; Hosken, Nancy A.; Kern, Florian; Nelson, Jay A.; Picker, Louis J.

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of immunocompetent hosts are characterized by a dynamic, life-long interaction in which host immune responses, particularly of T cells, restrain viral replication and prevent disease but do not eliminate the virus or preclude transmission. Because HCMV is among the largest and most complex of known viruses, the T cell resources committed to maintaining this balance have never been characterized completely. Here, using cytokine flow cytometry and 13,687 overlapping 15mer peptides comprising 213 HCMV open reading frames (ORFs), we found that 151 HCMV ORFs were immunogenic for CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells, and that ORF immunogenicity was influenced only modestly by ORF expression kinetics and function. We further documented that total HCMV-specific T cell responses in seropositive subjects were enormous, comprising on average ∼10% of both the CD4+ and CD8+ memory compartments in blood, whereas cross-reactive recognition of HCMV proteins in seronegative individuals was limited to CD8+ T cells and was rare. These data provide the first glimpse of the total human T cell response to a complex infectious agent and will provide insight into the rules governing immunodominance and cross-reactivity in complex viral infections of humans. PMID:16147978

  18. Replicative fitness of transmitted HIV-1 drives acute immune activation, proviral load in memory CD4+ T cells, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Scully, Eileen; Macharia, Gladys; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Deymier, Martin J; Vanderford, Thomas H; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Ende, Zachary; Brooks, Kelsie; Tang, Jianming; Yu, Tianwei; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Silvestri, Guido; Douek, Daniel; Goepfert, Paul A; Price, Matthew A; Allen, Susan A; Paiardini, Mirko; Altfeld, Marcus; Gilmour, Jill; Hunter, Eric

    2015-03-24

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by varying degrees of chronic immune activation and disruption of T-cell homeostasis, which impact the rate of disease progression. A deeper understanding of the factors that influence HIV-1-induced immunopathology and subsequent CD4(+) T-cell decline is critical to strategies aimed at controlling or eliminating the virus. In an analysis of 127 acutely infected Zambians, we demonstrate a dramatic and early impact of viral replicative capacity (vRC) on HIV-1 immunopathogenesis that is independent of viral load (VL). Individuals infected with high-RC viruses exhibit a distinct inflammatory cytokine profile as well as significantly elevated T-cell activation, proliferation, and CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion, during the earliest months of infection. Moreover, the vRC of the transmitted virus is positively correlated with the magnitude of viral burden in naive and central memory CD4(+) T-cell populations, raising the possibility that transmitted viral phenotypes may influence the size of the initial latent viral reservoir. Taken together, these findings support an unprecedented role for the replicative fitness of the founder virus, independent of host protective genes and VL, in influencing multiple facets of HIV-1-related immunopathology, and that a greater focus on this parameter could provide novel approaches to clinical interventions.

  19. Impaired CD4+ and T-helper 17 cell memory response to Streptococcus pneumoniae is associated with elevated glucose and percent glycated hemoglobin A1c in Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Perla J; Mathews, Christine; Actor, Jeffrey K; Hwang, Shen-An; Brown, Eric L; De Santiago, Heather K; Fisher Hoch, Susan P; McCormick, Joseph B; Mirza, Shaper

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes are significantly more susceptible to pneumococcal infections than healthy individuals of the same age. Increased susceptibility is the result of impairments in both innate and adaptive immune systems. Given the central role of T-helper 17 (Th17) and T-regulatory (Treg) cells in pneumococcal infection and their altered phenotype in diabetes, this study was designed to analyze the Th17 and Treg cell responses to a whole heat-killed capsular type 2 strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Patients with diabetes demonstrated a lower frequency of total CD+T-cells, which showed a significant inverse association with elevated fasting blood glucose. Measurement of specific subsets indicated that those with diabetes had, low intracellular levels of interleukin (IL)-17, and lower pathogen-specific memory CD4+ and IL-17+ cell numbers. No significant difference was observed in the frequency of CD4+ and Th17 cells between those with and without diabetes. However, stratification of data by obesity indicated a significant increase in frequency of CD4+ and Th17 cells in obese individuals with diabetes compared with nonobese individual with diabetes. The memory CD+T-cell response was associated inversely with both fasting blood glucose and percent glycated hemoglobin A1c. This study demonstrated that those with type 2 diabetes have a diminished pathogen-specific memory CD4+ and Th17 response, and low percentages of CD+T-cells in response to S. pneumoniae stimulation.

  20. Central Muscarinic Cholinergic Activation Alters Interaction between Splenic Dendritic Cell and CD4+CD25- T Cells in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Khafipour, Ehsan; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is based on vagus nerve (VN) activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and sequential CD4+/CD25−T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. Methods The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP)-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25−T cell co-culture were determined. Results McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25−T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. Conclusions Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD. PMID:25295619

  1. Dopaminergic Receptors on CD4+ T Naive and Memory Lymphocytes Correlate with Motor Impairment in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kustrimovic, Natasa; Rasini, Emanuela; Legnaro, Massimiliano; Bombelli, Raffaella; Aleksic, Iva; Blandini, Fabio; Comi, Cristoforo; Mauri, Marco; Minafra, Brigida; Riboldazzi, Giulio; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta, α-synuclein (α-syn)-rich intraneuronal inclusions (Lewy bodies), and microglial activation. Emerging evidence suggests that CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to neuroinflammation in PD. Since the mainstay of PD treatment is dopaminergic substitution therapy and dopamine is an established transmitter connecting nervous and immune systems, we examined CD4+ T naive and memory lymphocytes in PD patients and in healthy subjects (HS), with specific regard to dopaminergic receptor (DR) expression. In addition, the in vitro effects of α-syn were assessed on CD4+ T naive and memory cells. Results showed extensive association between DR expression in T lymphocytes and motor dysfunction, as assessed by UPDRS Part III score. In total and CD4+ T naive cells expression of D1-like DR decrease, while in T memory cells D2-like DR increase with increasing score. In vitro, α-syn increased CD4+ T memory cells, possibly to a different extent in PD patients and in HS, and affected DR expression with cell subset-specific patterns. The present results support the involvement of peripheral adaptive immunity in PD, and may contribute to develop novel immunotherapies for PD, as well as to better use of current dopaminergic antiparkinson drugs. PMID:27652978

  2. CD40L+ CD4+ memory T cells migrate in a CD62P-dependent fashion into reactive lymph nodes and license dendritic cells for T cell priming

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fontecha, Alfonso; Baumjohann, Dirk; Guarda, Greta; Reboldi, Andrea; Hons, Miroslav; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica

    2008-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the maturation state of dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical parameter determining the balance between tolerance and immunity. We report that mouse CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, but not naive or central memory T cells, constitutively expressed CD40L at levels sufficient to induce DC maturation in vitro and in vivo in the absence of antigenic stimulation. CD4+ TEM cells were excluded from resting lymph nodes but migrated in a CD62P-dependent fashion into reactive lymph nodes that were induced to express CD62P, in a transient or sustained fashion, on high endothelial venules. Trafficking of CD4+ TEM cells into chronic reactive lymph nodes maintained resident DCs in a mature state and promoted naive T cell responses and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) to antigens administered in the absence of adjuvants. Antibodies to CD62P, which blocked CD4+ TEM cell migration into reactive lymph nodes, inhibited DC maturation, T cell priming, and induction of EAE. These results show that TEM cells can behave as endogenous adjuvants and suggest a mechanistic link between lymphocyte traffic in lymph nodes and induction of autoimmunity. PMID:18838544

  3. Increasing the CD4+ T Cell Precursor Frequency Leads to Competition for IFN-γ Thereby Degrading Memory Cell Quantity and Quality1

    PubMed Central

    Whitmire, Jason K.; Benning, Nicola; Eam, Boreth; Whitton, J. Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The precursor frequency of naive CD4+ T cells shows an inverse relationship with the number of memory cells generated after exposure to cognate Ag. Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model, we show here that only when the initial number of naive virus-specific CD4+ T cell precursors is low (≤104 per spleen) do they give rise to abundant and homogeneous memory cells that are CD62Llow, IL-7Rhigh, and imbued with an enhanced capacity to produce cytokine, proliferate, and survive over time. Furthermore, memory cells derived from a high naive precursor number show functional deficits upon secondary exposure to virus. The negative effect of higher naive precursor frequency was not attributable to competition for limiting amounts of Ag, because LCMV-naive CD4+ TCR-transgenic CD4 T cells were recruited into the LCMV-induced response even when their initial number was high. Instead, the T cells appear to compete for direct IFN-γ signals as they differentiate into memory cells. These results are consistent with a model of T cell development in which the most fit effector T cells that receive sufficient direct IFN-γ signals are selected to differentiate further into memory cells. PMID:18453598

  4. Long-term exposure to superantigen induces p27Kip1 and Bcl-2 expression in effector memory CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Madoka; Fukada, Kenji; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Yagi, Junji; Arimura, Yutaka

    2007-08-01

    The long-term exposure of mice to superantigen SEA using a mini-osmotic pump (SEA pump) induced a long-lasting expansion of Vbeta3+ CD4+ T cells with T helper (Th) 2 cell-type properties. Removal of the SEA pump 10 days after pump implantation did not significantly alter the level of Vbeta3+ CD4+ T cell expansion/maintenance. Furthermore, CFSE-labeled CD4+ T cells failed to divide when transferred to post-implantation day 15 mice. Thus, CD4+ T cells appeared to survive for at least 30 days in the absence of a sufficient amount of antigen to trigger cell division. STAT6 deficient mice, in which Th2 cell development is largely impaired, also exhibited a protracted cell expansion, similar to that observed in normal mice, suggesting that the Th2 cell property is dispensable for the maintenance of Vbeta3+ CD4+ T cell expansion. The expanded CD4+ T cells on post-implantation day 26 were arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and showed a lower level of cell division upon restimulation. The Cdk inhibitor p27(Kip1) was highly expressed, and Cdk2 was downregulated. Moreover, the CD4+ T cells were resistant to in vitro apoptosis induction in parallel with their level of Bcl-2 expression. Collectively, the Vbeta3+ CD4+ T cells appeared to develop into long-lived memory T cells with cell cycle arrest upon long-term exposure to SEA.

  5. Analysis of the functional WT1-specific T-cell repertoire in healthy donors reveals a discrepancy between CD4+ and CD8+ memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Sabine; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Abken, Hinrich; Assenmacher, Mario; Richter, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The Wilms’ tumour-1 (WT1) protein is considered a prime target for cancer immunotherapy based on its presumptive immunogenicity and widespread expression across a variety of malignancies. However, little is known about the naturally occurring WT1-specific T-cell repertoire because self-derived antigens typically elicit low frequency responses that challenge the sensitivity limits of current detection techniques. In this study, we used highly efficient cell enrichment procedures based on CD137, CD154, and pHLA class I tetramer staining to conduct a detailed analysis of WT1-specific T cells from the peripheral blood. Remarkably, we detected WT1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations in the vast majority of healthy individuals. Memory responses specific for WT1 were commonly present in the CD4+ T-cell compartment, whereas WT1-specific CD8+ T cells almost universally displayed a naive phenotype. Moreover, memory CD4+ and naive CD8+ T cells with specificity for WT1 were found to coexist in some individuals. Collectively, these findings suggest a natural discrepancy between the CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell lineages with respect to memory formation in response to a self-derived antigen. Nonetheless, WT1-specific T cells from both lineages were readily activated ex vivo and expanded in vitro, supporting the use of strategies designed to exploit this expansive reservoir of self-reactive T cells for immunotherapeutic purposes. PMID:25882672

  6. Abundance and specificity of influenza reactive circulating memory follicular helper and non-follicular helper CD4 T cells in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Leddon, Scott A; Richards, Katherine A; Treanor, John J; Sant, Andrea J

    2015-09-01

    CD4 T-cell responses are functionally complex and regulate many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. Follicular helper (Tfh) cells are CD4 T cells specialized to support B-cell production of isotype-switched, high-affinity antibody. So far, studies of Tfh cells in humans have focused on their differentiation requirements, with little research devoted to their antigen specificity. Here, after separating circulating human memory CD4 T cells based on expression of CXCR5, a signature marker of Tfh, we have quantified and assayed the influenza protein antigen specificity of blood Tfh cells and CD4 T cells lacking this marker. Through the use of peptide pools derived from nucleoprotein (NP) or haemagglutinin (HA) and a panel of human donors, we have discovered that circulating Tfh cells preferentially recognize peptide epitopes from HA while cells lacking CXCR5 are enriched for specificity toward NP. These studies suggest that reactive CD4 T cells specific for distinct viral antigens may have generalized differences in their functional potential due to their previous stimulation history. PMID:26094691

  7. Nuclear PKC-θ facilitates rapid transcriptional responses in human memory CD4+ T cells through p65 and H2B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jasmine; Hardy, Kristine; Phetsouphanh, Chan; Tu, Wen Juan; Sutcliffe, Elissa L.; McCuaig, Robert; Sutton, Christopher R.; Zafar, Anjum; Munier, C. Mee Ling; Zaunders, John J.; Xu, Yin; Theodoratos, Angelo; Tan, Abel; Lim, Pek Siew; Knaute, Tobias; Masch, Antonia; Zerweck, Johannes; Brezar, Vedran; Milburn, Peter J.; Dunn, Jenny; Casarotto, Marco G.; Turner, Stephen J.; Seddiki, Nabila; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Memory T cells are characterized by their rapid transcriptional programs upon re-stimulation. This transcriptional memory response is facilitated by permissive chromatin, but exactly how the permissive epigenetic landscape in memory T cells integrates incoming stimulatory signals remains poorly understood. By genome-wide ChIP-sequencing ex vivo human CD4+ T cells, here, we show that the signaling enzyme, protein kinase C theta (PKC-θ) directly relays stimulatory signals to chromatin by binding to transcriptional-memory-responsive genes to induce transcriptional activation. Flanked by permissive histone modifications, these PKC-enriched regions are significantly enriched with NF-κB motifs in ex vivo bulk and vaccinia-responsive human memory CD4+ T cells. Within the nucleus, PKC-θ catalytic activity maintains the Ser536 phosphorylation on the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RelA) and can directly influence chromatin accessibility at transcriptional memory genes by regulating H2B deposition through Ser32 phosphorylation. Furthermore, using a cytoplasm-restricted PKC-θ mutant, we highlight that chromatin-anchored PKC-θ integrates activating signals at the chromatin template to elicit transcriptional memory responses in human memory T cells. PMID:27149922

  8. Nuclear PKC-θ facilitates rapid transcriptional responses in human memory CD4+ T cells through p65 and H2B phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine; Hardy, Kristine; Phetsouphanh, Chan; Tu, Wen Juan; Sutcliffe, Elissa L; McCuaig, Robert; Sutton, Christopher R; Zafar, Anjum; Munier, C Mee Ling; Zaunders, John J; Xu, Yin; Theodoratos, Angelo; Tan, Abel; Lim, Pek Siew; Knaute, Tobias; Masch, Antonia; Zerweck, Johannes; Brezar, Vedran; Milburn, Peter J; Dunn, Jenny; Casarotto, Marco G; Turner, Stephen J; Seddiki, Nabila; Kelleher, Anthony D; Rao, Sudha

    2016-06-15

    Memory T cells are characterized by their rapid transcriptional programs upon re-stimulation. This transcriptional memory response is facilitated by permissive chromatin, but exactly how the permissive epigenetic landscape in memory T cells integrates incoming stimulatory signals remains poorly understood. By genome-wide ChIP-sequencing ex vivo human CD4(+) T cells, here, we show that the signaling enzyme, protein kinase C theta (PKC-θ) directly relays stimulatory signals to chromatin by binding to transcriptional-memory-responsive genes to induce transcriptional activation. Flanked by permissive histone modifications, these PKC-enriched regions are significantly enriched with NF-κB motifs in ex vivo bulk and vaccinia-responsive human memory CD4(+) T cells. Within the nucleus, PKC-θ catalytic activity maintains the Ser536 phosphorylation on the p65 subunit of NF-κB (also known as RelA) and can directly influence chromatin accessibility at transcriptional memory genes by regulating H2B deposition through Ser32 phosphorylation. Furthermore, using a cytoplasm-restricted PKC-θ mutant, we highlight that chromatin-anchored PKC-θ integrates activating signals at the chromatin template to elicit transcriptional memory responses in human memory T cells. PMID:27149922

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PstS1 amplifies IFN-γ and induces IL-17/IL-22 responses by unrelated memory CD4+ T cells via dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Carla; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Abalsamo, Laura; Mattei, Fabrizio; Piccaro, Giovanni; Sanchez, Massimo; Fernandez, Carmen; Singh, Mahavir; Gabriele, Lucia

    2013-09-01

    The immunological mechanisms that modulate protection during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection or vaccination are not fully understood. Secretion of IFN-γ and, to a lesser extent, of IL-17 by CD4(+) T cells plays a major role both in protection and immunopathology. Few Mtb Ags interacting with DCs affect priming, activation, and regulation of Ag-unrelated CD4(+) T-cell responses. Here we demonstrate that PstS1, a 38 kDa-lipoprotein of Mtb, promotes Ag-independent activation of memory T lymphocytes specific for Ag85B or Ag85A, two immunodominant protective Ags of Mtb. PstS1 expands CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells, amplifies secretion of IFN-γ and IL-22 and induces IL-17 production by effector memory cells in an Ag-unrelated manner in vitro and in vivo. These effects were mediated through the stimulation of DCs, particularly of the CD8α(-) subtype, which respond to PstS1 by undergoing phenotypic maturation and by secreting IL-6, IL-1β and, to a lower extent, IL-23. IL-6 secretion by PstS1-stimulated DCs was required for IFN-γ, and to a lesser extent for IL-22 responses by Ag85B-specific memory T cells. These results may open new perspectives for immunotherapeutic strategies to control Th1/Th17 immune responses in Mtb infections and in vaccinations against tuberculosis. PMID:23719937

  10. Exclusive Transduction of Human CD4+ T Cells upon Systemic Delivery of CD4-Targeted Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi; Uhlig, Katharina M; Muth, Anke; Kimpel, Janine; Lévy, Camille; Münch, Robert C; Seifried, Janna; Pfeiffer, Anett; Trkola, Alexandra; Coulibaly, Cheick; von Laer, Dorothee; Wels, Winfried S; Hartwig, Udo F; Verhoeyen, Els; Buchholz, Christian J

    2015-09-01

    Playing a central role in both innate and adaptive immunity, CD4(+) T cells are a key target for genetic modifications in basic research and immunotherapy. In this article, we describe novel lentiviral vectors (CD4-LV) that have been rendered selective for human or simian CD4(+) cells by surface engineering. When applied to PBMCs, CD4-LV transduced CD4(+) but not CD4(-) cells. Notably, also unstimulated T cells were stably genetically modified. Upon systemic or intrasplenic administration into mice reconstituted with human PBMCs or hematopoietic stem cells, reporter gene expression was predominantly detected in lymphoid organs. Evaluation of GFP expression in organ-derived cells and blood by flow cytometry demonstrated exclusive gene transfer into CD4(+) human lymphocytes. In bone marrow and spleen, memory T cells were preferentially hit. Toward therapeutic applications, we also show that CD4-LV can be used for HIV gene therapy, as well as for tumor therapy, by delivering chimeric Ag receptors. The potential for in vivo delivery of the FOXP3 gene was also demonstrated, making CD4-LV a powerful tool for inducible regulatory T cell generation. In summary, our work demonstrates the exclusive gene transfer into a T cell subset upon systemic vector administration opening an avenue toward novel strategies in immunotherapy.

  11. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing HLA class II molecules as an effective tool for amplifying human specific memory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anthony; Hamieh, Mohamad; Drouet, Aurélie; Leprince, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis; Frébourg, Thierry; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Toutirais, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Owing to their multiple immune functions, CD4(+) T cells are of major interest for immunotherapy in chronic viral infections and cancer, as well as for severe autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Therefore, standardized methods allowing rapid generation of a large number of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy are still awaited. We constructed stable artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) derived from mouse fibroblasts. They were genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules and the human accessory molecules B7.1, Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-3 (LFA-3). AAPCs expressing HLA-DR1, HLA-DR15 or HLA-DR51 molecules and loaded with peptides derived from influenza hemagglutinin (HA), myelin basic protein (MBP) or factor VIII, respectively, activated specific CD4(+) T-cell clones more effectively than Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells. We also showed that AAPCs were able to take up and process whole Ag proteins, and present epitopes to specific T cells. In primary cultures, AAPCs loaded with HA peptide allowed generation of specific Th1 lymphocytes from healthy donors as demonstrated by tetramer and intracellular cytokine staining. Although AAPCs were less effective than autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to stimulate CD4(+) T cells in primary culture, AAPCs were more potent to reactivate and expand memory Th1 cells in a strictly Ag-dependent manner. As the availability of autologous APCs is limited, the AAPC system represents a stable and reliable tool to achieve clinically relevant numbers of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. For fundamental research in immunology, AAPCs are also useful to decipher mechanisms involved in the development of human CD4 T-cell responses. PMID:26924643

  12. CD27 stimulation promotes the frequency of IL-7R expressing memory precursors and prevents IL-12 mediated loss of CD8+ T cell memory in the absence of CD4+ T cell help

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Han; Franklin, Nathan. A.; Roberts, Drew J.; Yagita, Hideo; Glennie, Martin J.; Bullock, Timothy N.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fully functional CD8+ T cell memory is highly dependent upon CD4+ T cell support. CD4+ T cells play a critical role in inducing the expression of CD70, the ligand for CD27, on dendritic cells. Here we demonstrate that CD27 stimulation during primary CD8+ T cell responses regulates the ability to mount secondary CD8+ T cell responses. CD27 stimulation during vaccinia and dendritic cell immunization controls the expression of the IL-7 receptor (CD127), which has been shown to be necessary for memory CD8+ T cell survival. Further, CD27 stimulation during primary CD8+ T cell responses to vaccinia virus restrained the late expression on memory precursor cells of cytokine receptors that support terminal differentiation. The formation of CD8+ T cell memory precursors and secondary CD8+ T cell responses were restored in the absence of CD27 costimulation when endogenous IL-12 was not available. Similarly, the lesion in CD8+ T cell memory that occurs in the absence ofCD4+ T cells did not occur in mice lacking IL-12. These data indicate that CD4+ T cell help and, by extension, CD27 stimulation supports CD8+ T cell memory by modulating the expression of cytokine receptors that influence the differentiation and survival of memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:22422886

  13. Circulating CXCR5⁺CD4⁺ T Follicular-Like Helper Cell and Memory B Cell Responses to Human Papillomavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Ken; Adelsberger, Joseph W; Kemp, Troy J; Baseler, Michael W; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Pinto, Ligia A

    2015-01-01

    Through the interaction of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and B cells, efficacious vaccines can generate high-affinity, pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and memory B cells. Using CXCR5, CXCR3, CCR6, CCR7, PD1, and ICOS as markers, Tfh-like cells can be identified in the circulation and be classified into three functionally distinct subsets that are PD1+ICOS+, PD1+ ICOS-, or PD1-ICOS-. We used these markers to identify different subsets of CXCR5+CD4+ Tfh-like cells in response to highly immunogenic and efficacious vaccines for human papillomaviruses (HPV): Cervarix and Gardasil. In this small study, we used PBMC samples from 11 Gardasil recipients, and 8 Cervarix recipients from the Vaccine Research Center 902 Study to examine the induction of circulating Tfh-like cells and IgD-CD38HiCD27+ memory B cells by flow cytometry. PD1+ICOS+ CXCR3+CCR6-CXCR5+CD4+ (Tfh1-like) cells were induced and peaked on Day (D) 7 post-first vaccination, but not as much on D7 post-third vaccination. We also observed a trend toward increase in PD1+ICOS+ CXCR3-CCR6-CXCR5+CD4+ (Tfh2-like) cells for both vaccines, and PD1+ICOS+ CXCR3-CCR6+CXCR5+CD4+ (Tfh17-like) subset was induced by Cervarix post-first vaccination. There were also minimal changes in the other cellular subsets. In addition, Cervarix recipients had more memory B cells post-first vaccination than did Gardasil recipients at D14 and D30. We found frequencies of memory B cells at D30 correlated with anti-HPV16 and 18 antibody titers from D30, and the induction levels of memory B cells at D30 and PD1+ICOS+Tfh1-like cells at D7 post-first vaccination correlated for Cervarix. Our study showed that induction of circulating CXCR5+CD4+ Tfh-like subsets can be detected following immunization with HPV vaccines, and potentially be useful as a marker of immunogenicity of vaccines. However, further investigations should be extended to different cohorts with larger sample size to better understand the functions of these T cells, as well as

  14. Production of IL-10 by CD4+ regulatory T cells during the resolution of infection promotes the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J; Cui, Weiguo; Amezquita, Robert A; Gray, Simon M; Guan, Tianxia; Lu, Yisi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Flavell, Richard A; Kleinstein, Steven H; Craft, Joe; Kaech, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are critical for host defense upon reexposure to intracellular pathogens. We found that interleukin 10 (IL-10) derived from CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) was necessary for the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells following acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Treg cell–derived IL-10 was most important during the resolution phase, calming inflammation and the activation state of dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of IL-10-sufficient Treg cells during the resolution phase ‘restored’ the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells in IL-10-deficient mice. Our data indicate that Treg cell–derived IL-10 is needed to insulate CD8+ T cells from inflammatory signals, and reveal that the resolution phase of infection is a critical period that influences the quality and function of developing memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26147684

  15. CC Chemokine Receptor 7 Expression by Effector/Memory CD4+ T Cells Depends on Antigen Specificity and Tissue Localization during Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Debes, Gudrun F.; Bonhagen, Kerstin; Wolff, Thorsten; Kretschmer, Ute; Krautwald, Stefan; Kamradt, Thomas; Hamann, Alf

    2004-01-01

    The lung is an important entry site for respiratory pathogens such as influenza A virus. In order to combat such invading infectious agents, effector/memory T cells home to the lung and other peripheral tissues as well as lymphoid organs. In this process, chemokines and their receptors fulfill important roles in the guidance of T cells into such organs and specialized microenvironments within tissues. In this study, we determined if CD4+ T cells residing in different lung compartments and draining lymph nodes of influenza A virus-infected and naïve mice express receptors allowing their recirculation into secondary lymphoid tissues. We found high levels of l-selectin and CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression in lung-derived CD4+ T cells, similar to that detected on T cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Upon influenza A virus infection, the bulk of gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) and IFN-γ− CD4+ T cells recovered from lung parenchyma retained functional CCR7, whereas virus-specific IFN-γ-producing T cells were CCR7−. In contrast, a majority of virus-specific IFN-γ+ T cells in the lung draining lymph node were CCR7+. Independent of infection, CD4+ T cells obtained from the lung airways exhibited the lowest expression level of l-selectin and CCR7, indicating that T cells at this anatomical site represent the most differentiated effector cell type, lacking the ability to recirculate. Our results suggest that effector/memory T cells that enter inflammatory sites retain functional CCR7 expression, which is lost only upon response to viral antigen and after localization to the final effector site. PMID:15220427

  16. CC chemokine receptor 7 expression by effector/memory CD4+ T cells depends on antigen specificity and tissue localization during influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Debes, Gudrun F; Bonhagen, Kerstin; Wolff, Thorsten; Kretschmer, Ute; Krautwald, Stefan; Kamradt, Thomas; Hamann, Alf

    2004-07-01

    The lung is an important entry site for respiratory pathogens such as influenza A virus. In order to combat such invading infectious agents, effector/memory T cells home to the lung and other peripheral tissues as well as lymphoid organs. In this process, chemokines and their receptors fulfill important roles in the guidance of T cells into such organs and specialized microenvironments within tissues. In this study, we determined if CD4(+) T cells residing in different lung compartments and draining lymph nodes of influenza A virus-infected and naïve mice express receptors allowing their recirculation into secondary lymphoid tissues. We found high levels of l-selectin and CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression in lung-derived CD4(+) T cells, similar to that detected on T cells in secondary lymphoid organs. Upon influenza A virus infection, the bulk of gamma interferon-positive (IFN-gamma(+)) and IFN-gamma(-) CD4(+) T cells recovered from lung parenchyma retained functional CCR7, whereas virus-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells were CCR7(-). In contrast, a majority of virus-specific IFN-gamma(+) T cells in the lung draining lymph node were CCR7(+). Independent of infection, CD4(+) T cells obtained from the lung airways exhibited the lowest expression level of l-selectin and CCR7, indicating that T cells at this anatomical site represent the most differentiated effector cell type, lacking the ability to recirculate. Our results suggest that effector/memory T cells that enter inflammatory sites retain functional CCR7 expression, which is lost only upon response to viral antigen and after localization to the final effector site. PMID:15220427

  17. Regulation of gene expression in autoimmune disease loci and the genetic basis of proliferation in CD4+ effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinli; Kim, Hyun; Raj, Towfique; Brennan, Patrick J; Trynka, Gosia; Teslovich, Nikola; Slowikowski, Kamil; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut, Suna; Baecher-Allan, Clare; De Jager, Philip L; Rich, Stephen S; Stranger, Barbara E; Brenner, Michael B; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent dense-genotyping of associated loci identified over a hundred single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes (T1D), and celiac disease (CeD). Immunological and genetic studies suggest a role for CD4-positive effector memory T (CD+ TEM) cells in the pathogenesis of these diseases. To elucidate mechanisms of autoimmune disease alleles, we investigated molecular phenotypes in CD4+ effector memory T cells potentially affected by these variants. In a cohort of genotyped healthy individuals, we isolated high purity CD4+ TEM cells from peripheral blood, then assayed relative abundance, proliferation upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, and the transcription of 215 genes within disease loci before and after stimulation. We identified 46 genes regulated by cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the majority of which we detected in stimulated cells. Eleven of the 46 genes with eQTLs were previously undetected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of 96 risk alleles of RA, T1D, and/or CeD in densely genotyped loci, eleven overlapped cis-eQTLs, of which five alleles completely explained the respective signals. A non-coding variant, rs389862A, increased proliferative response (p=4.75 × 10-8). In addition, baseline expression of seventeen genes in resting cells reliably predicted proliferative response after TCR stimulation. Strikingly, however, there was no evidence that risk alleles modulated CD4+ TEM abundance or proliferation. Our study underscores the power of examining molecular phenotypes in relevant cells and conditions for understanding pathogenic mechanisms of disease variants. PMID:24968232

  18. Intracellular expression of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ by a Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subpopulation with memory phenotype in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Martínez, Maria C; Linares, Marisela; Báez, Renata; Montaño, Luis F; Martínez-Cairo, Salvador; Gorocica, Patricia; Chávez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    In some chronic pathological conditions, antigen persistence activates and expands the CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subset. The host immune response against tuberculosis infection is maintained through the continuous presence of antigen-stimulated effector/memory helper T cells. To determine whether CD4+ CD57+ T cells were also expanded in human tuberculosis, we analysed (by flow cytometry) the phenotype of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells from 30 tuberculosis patients and 30 healthy controls. We observed a significant increase in the CD4+ CD57+ T-cell subset in tuberculosis patients in comparison to healthy controls (P < 0.001). Most CD4+ CD57+ T cells exhibited a CD28− CD45RO+ CD62L− phenotype, which is associated with memory cells. In vitro, a higher number of antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57+ T cells produced intracellular interferon-γ and interleukin-4 compared with antigen-stimulated CD4+ CD57− T cells (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the majority of CD4+ CD57+ T cells correspond to a phenotype of activated memory T cells. PMID:14678204

  19. Central tolerance spares the private high-avidity CD4(+) T-cell repertoire specific for an islet antigen in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Serre, Laurent; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Guerder, Sylvie

    2015-07-01

    Although central tolerance induces the deletion of most autoreactive T cells, some autoreactive T cells escape thymic censorship. Whether potentially harmful autoreactive T cells present distinct TCRαβ features remains unclear. Here, we analyzed the TCRαβ repertoire of CD4(+) T cells specific for the S100β protein, an islet antigen associated with type 1 diabetes. We found that diabetes-resistant NOD mice deficient for thymus specific serine protease (TSSP), a protease that impairs class II antigen presentation by thymic stromal cells, were hyporesponsive to the immunodominant S100β1-15 epitope, as compared to wild-type NOD mice, due to intrathymic negative selection. In both TSSP-deficient and wild-type NOD mice, the TCRαβ repertoire of S100β-specific CD4(+) T cells though diverse showed a specific bias for dominant TCRα rearrangements with limited CDR3α diversity. These dominant TCRα chains were public since they were found in all mice. They were of intermediate- to low-avidity. In contrast, high-avidity T cells expressed unique TCRs specific to each individual (private TCRs) and were only found in wild-type NOD mice. Hence, in NOD mice, the autoreactive CD4(+) T-cell compartment has two major components, a dominant and public low-avidity TCRα repertoire and a private high-avidity CD4(+) T-cell repertoire; the latter is deleted by re-enforced negative selection. PMID:25884569

  20. ERβ in CD4+ T Cells Is Crucial for Ligand-Mediated Suppression of Central Nervous System Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Aggelakopoulou, Maria; Kourepini, Evangelia; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Panoutsakopoulou, Vily

    2016-06-15

    The development of therapies for multiple sclerosis targeting pathogenic T cell responses remains imperative. Previous studies have shown that estrogen receptor (ER) β ligands could inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. However, the effects of ERβ-specific ligands on human or murine pathogenic immune cells, such as Th17, were not investigated. In this article, we show that the synthetic ERβ-specific ligand 4-(2-phenyl-5,7-bis[trifluoromethyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)phenol (PHTPP) reversed established paralysis and CNS inflammation, characterized by a dramatic suppression of pathogenic Th responses as well as induction of IL-10-producing regulatory CD4(+) T cell subsets in vivo. Moreover, administration of PHTPP in symptomatic mice induced regulatory CD4(+) T cells that were suppressive in vivo. PHTPP-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis amelioration was canceled in mice with ERβ-deficient CD4(+) T cells only, indicating that expression of ERβ by these cells is crucial for the observed therapeutic effect. Importantly, synthetic ERβ-specific ligands acting directly on CD4(+) T cells suppressed human and mouse Th17 cells, downregulating Th17 cell signature gene expression and expanding IL-10-producing T cells among them. TGF-β1 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation enhanced the ERβ ligand-mediated expansion of IL-10-producing T cells among Th17 cells. In addition, these ERβ-specific ligands promoted the induction and maintenance of Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells, as well as their in vitro suppressive function. Thus, ERβ-specific ligands targeting pathogenic Th17 cells and inducing functional regulatory cells represent a promising subset of therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:27183630

  1. Phenotypic and functional alteration of CD4+ T cells after antigen stimulation. Resolution of two populations of memory T cells that both secrete interleukin 4

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Phenotypic and functional alteration of murine CD4+ T cells after antigenic stimulation was studied using two anti-T cell mAbs recently described that define four distinct T cell subsets. Activation of T cells resulted in the permanent loss of 3G11 expression. However, two phenotypically distinct memory T cell populations were established depending on the system used; whereas those for anti-KLH antibody response were enriched in the fraction expression 6C10 (Fr. III), memory T cells for the allogeneic MLR lacked such expression (Fr. IV). Furthermore, successive stimulation with antigen in vitro resulted in secretion of IL-4 without detectable IL-2. This alteration of phenotype and interleukin secretion was also demonstrable when starting with 3G11+6C10- cells (Fr. I), the fraction that secretes IL-2 exclusively upon activation. PMID:2525174

  2. Cellular and molecular requirements for the recall of IL-4-producing memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(-) T cells during protection induced by attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Dupeh R; Krzych, Urszula

    2002-03-01

    The requirements for maintenance of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cells in protection to malaria is poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated a recall of IL-4-producing memory CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells with parasitized red blood cells (pRBC) in persons protected by radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (gamma-spz). Using the CD27 marker, we have now identified two subsets of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) T cells: CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(+) T cells representing an early memory and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27() T cells representing a terminally differentiated memory cells. A small subset of CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD27(-) T cells also expressed CD70, the CD27 ligand. The addition of anti-CD70 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to pRBC-stimulated cultures significantly inhibited the conversion of CD27(+) to CD27(-) subset without profoundly affecting IL-4 production. In contrast, the inclusion of anti-CD27 mAb in parallel cultures abrogated IL-4 production without interfering with conscription of T cells into the CD27(-) T cell set. We propose that the persistence of memory CD4(+) T cells depends on Ag-driven conscription of a mature memory phenotype through co-ligation of CD27 and CD70 expressed, respectively, on CD27(+) and CD27(-) T cells. Hence, protracted protection in malaria depends in part on memory CD4(+) T cells that require specific Ag presumably from the repositories of liver-and blood-stage antigens and the delivery of a second signal from the CD27:CD70 interaction.

  3. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4+ T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139–151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4+ T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4+ T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met5]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3+ T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4+ T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4+ Th effector cell responses in the CNS of

  4. Opioid growth factor and low-dose naltrexone impair central nervous system infiltration by CD4 + T lymphocytes in established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Leslie A; Waldner, Hanspeter; Zagon, Ian S; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by infiltrating myelin-reactive T lymphocytes and demyelinating lesions. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model widely utilized to study MS. EAE is mediated by CD4(+) T cells and can be induced in EAE-susceptible mice through immunization with a myelin antigen, such as proteolipid protein 139-151 (PLP139-151) in SJL mice. In this PLP-induced EAE model, autoreactive CD4(+) T cells migrate from peripheral tissues into the CNS where they are reactivated resulting in CNS damage. Th1 and Th17 cells produce the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and IL-17, respectively, that have been shown to have pathogenic roles in EAE and MS. Anti-inflammatory Th2, IL-4 secreting cells, have been indicated to inhibit EAE exacerbation. However, given the inflammatory environment of EAE, Th2 effector cells are outnumbered by Th1/Th17 cells. Regulatory CD4(+) T cells suppress immune reactions and have been demonstrated to be dysfunctional in MS patients. Opioid growth factor (OGF), chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is a negative growth factor that interacts with the OGF receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis can be activated through exogenous administration of OGF or a low dosage of naltrexone (LDN), an opioid antagonist. We have previously demonstrated that modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis results in alleviation from relapse-remitting EAE, and that CNS-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells are diminished with exogenous OGF or intermittent blockade with LDN administration. In this paper, we aimed to determine whether OGF or LDN alter the Th effector responses of CD4(+) T lymphocytes within the CNS in established EAE. We report in these studies that the numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the CNS of EAE mice are decreased following treatment with OGF for five days but not LDN. However, modulation of the OGF-OGFr axis did not result in changes to CD4(+) Th effector cell responses

  5. A pilot study showing associations between frequency of CD4(+) memory cell subsets at diagnosis and duration of partial remission in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Rosita; Robertson, Hannah Kathryn; Payne, Dawson; Narsale, Aditi; Koziol, Jim; Davies, Joanna Davida

    2016-05-01

    In some patients with type 1 diabetes the dose of insulin required to achieve euglycemia is substantially reduced soon after diagnosis. This partial remission is associated with β-cell function and good glucose control. The purpose of this study was to assess whether frequencies of CD4(+) T cell subsets in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are associated with length of partial remission. We found that the frequency of CD4(+) memory cells, activated Treg cells and CD25(+) cells that express a high density of the IL-7 receptor, CD127 (CD127(hi)) are strongly associated with length of partial remission. Prediction of length of remission via Cox regression is significantly enhanced when CD25(+) CD127(hi) cell frequency is combined with either Insulin Dependent Adjusted A1c (IDAA1c), or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), or C-peptide levels at diagnosis. CD25(+) CD127(hi) cells do not express Foxp3, LAG-3 and CD49b, indicating that they are neither Treg nor Tr1 cells. PMID:27114212

  6. A pilot study showing associations between frequency of CD4(+) memory cell subsets at diagnosis and duration of partial remission in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moya, Rosita; Robertson, Hannah Kathryn; Payne, Dawson; Narsale, Aditi; Koziol, Jim; Davies, Joanna Davida

    2016-05-01

    In some patients with type 1 diabetes the dose of insulin required to achieve euglycemia is substantially reduced soon after diagnosis. This partial remission is associated with β-cell function and good glucose control. The purpose of this study was to assess whether frequencies of CD4(+) T cell subsets in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes are associated with length of partial remission. We found that the frequency of CD4(+) memory cells, activated Treg cells and CD25(+) cells that express a high density of the IL-7 receptor, CD127 (CD127(hi)) are strongly associated with length of partial remission. Prediction of length of remission via Cox regression is significantly enhanced when CD25(+) CD127(hi) cell frequency is combined with either Insulin Dependent Adjusted A1c (IDAA1c), or glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), or C-peptide levels at diagnosis. CD25(+) CD127(hi) cells do not express Foxp3, LAG-3 and CD49b, indicating that they are neither Treg nor Tr1 cells.

  7. Impaired selective cytokine production by CD4(+) T cells in Common Variable Immunodeficiency associated with the absence of memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Berrón-Ruiz, Laura; López-Herrera, Gabriela; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; López-Macías, Constantino; Isibasi, Armando; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda; Bonifaz, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by B cell dysfunction and decreased serum immunoglobulin. CVID patients are classified by the absence or presence of memory B cells. In addition, T cell defects have been demonstrated in only a proportion of CVID patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of CD4(+) T cells from CVID patients and its association with memory B cells. Patients were classified according to their Freiburg groups: group Ia and Ib, with decreased switched memory B cells (<0.4 of PBL), and group II, with normal B cell subsets. Their T cell function was evaluated after stimulation. We observed normal and even increased CD4(+) T cell proliferation in group Ia (p=0.0277). The proliferation positively correlated with the clinical severity score (r=0.4796). We observed lower levels of IL-17A and IL-10 in group Ia (p=0.0177, 0.0109) and Ib (p=0.0009, 0.0084) patients. Group Ib patients also had low levels of IL-13 and IL-9 (p=0.0169, 0.010). Group II patients had similar cytokine production to that of the controls. BAFFR expression was reduced in groups Ia (p=0.0001) and Ib (p=0.0002) and showed an inverse correlation with the severity score (p=0.0262; r=0.5371). ICOS expression was reduced in group Ia (p=0.0364), and PD-1 was increased in group Ib (p=0.0432) patients. This study shows a selective impairment in cytokine production in group Ia patients, which was more extensive than in group Ib patients. The impairment was associated with BAFFR expression in B cells, with ICOS and PD-1 in T cells and, remarkably, with the absence of memory B cells and with the disease severity. Our results suggest that the evaluation of cytokine expression by T cells in combination with the study of B cell memory could be important for understand the pathogenesis of CVID patients.

  8. Differential Regulation of Self-reactive CD4+ T Cells in Cervical Lymph Nodes and Central Nervous System during Viral Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, Carine; Bergmann, Cornelia C.; Hinton, David R.; Stohlman, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections have long been implicated as triggers of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS), a central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory demyelinating disorder. Epitope spreading, molecular mimicry, cryptic antigen, and bystander activation have been implicated as mechanisms responsible for activating self-reactive (SR) immune cells, ultimately leading to organ-specific autoimmune disease. Taking advantage of coronavirus JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV)-induced demyelination, this study demonstrates that the host also mounts counteractive measures to specifically limit expansion of endogenous SR T cells. In this model, immune-mediated demyelination is associated with induction of SR T cells after viral control. However, their decline during persisting infection, despite ongoing demyelination, suggests an active control mechanism. Antigen-specific IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells (Tr1) and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), both known to control autoimmunity and induced following JHMV infection, were assessed for their relative in vivo suppressive function of SR T cells. Ablation of Foxp3+ Tregs in chronically infected DEREG mice significantly increased SR CD4+ T cells within cervical lymph nodes (CLN), albeit without affecting their numbers or activation within the CNS compared to controls. In contrast, infected IL-27 receptor deficient (IL-27R−/−) mice, characterized by a drastic reduction of Tr1 cells, revealed that SR CD4+ T cells in CLN remained unchanged but were specifically increased within the CNS. These results suggest that distinct Treg subsets limit SR T cells in the draining lymph nodes and CNS to maximize suppression of SR T-cell-mediated autoimmune pathology. The JHMV model is thus valuable to decipher tissue-specific mechanisms preventing autoimmunity. PMID:27708643

  9. Long-lasting changes in the T-cell receptor V beta repertoires of CD4 memory T-cell populations in the peripheral blood of radiation-exposed people.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Yamaoka, Mika; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Tomonori; MacPhee, Donald G; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2003-09-01

    To study the long-term effects of radiation-induced T-cell depletion on the T-cell receptor (TCR) Vbeta repertoires of human peripheral CD4 T-cell populations, we measured the percentages of CD4 T cells representing each of the full range of possible TCR Vbeta families in a cohort of atomic bomb survivors. We then estimated the extent to which the expression levels for individual TCR Vbeta families differed from the average expression level for that particular TCR Vbeta family across the entire cohort. We found no evidence of a systematic change in the TCR Vbeta repertoires of the naïve CD4 T-cell populations, but memory CD4 T-cell TCR Vbeta family expression levels diverged significantly from the population average for counterpart families, especially in individuals who had been exposed to higher doses and were at least 20 years of age at the time of the bombing. Comparisons of the TCR Vbeta family expression profiles in the naïve and memory CD4 T-cell pools of the same group of adult survivors revealed that differences in the TCR Vbeta repertoires of these two types of CD4 T-cell pool were larger in more heavily exposed survivors than in unexposed controls. These findings suggest that the memory CD4 T-cell pools of individuals who received significant radiation doses in adulthood may well have become (and could still be) dependent upon a much less diverse complement of TCR Vbeta families than would otherwise have been the case.

  10. Stress-activated Dendritic Cells (DC) Induce Dual Interleukin (IL)-15- and IL1β-mediated Pathways, Which May Elicit CD4+ Memory T Cells and Interferon (IFN)-stimulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Lavender, Paul; Watson, Julie; Arno, Matthew; Lehner, Thomas

    2015-06-19

    The prevailing evidence suggests that immunological memory does not require antigenic re-stimulation but is maintained by low level tonic stimulation. We examined the hypothesis that stress agents contribute to tonic cellular activation and maintain immunological memory. Stimulation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) with stress agents elicits reactive oxygen species and HSP70. NFκB is activated, which up-regulates membrane-associated (ma) IL-15, caspase-1 and IL-1β. Co-culture of stress-treated DC with mononuclear cells activates IL-15 and IL-1β receptors on CD4(+) T cells, eliciting CD40L, proliferation, and up-regulation of CD45RO(+) memory T cells. The transcription factors Tbet(high) and RORγt are up-regulated, whereas FoxP3 is down-regulated, resulting in enhanced Th1 and Th17 expression and the corresponding cytokines. The interaction between maIL-15 expressed by DC and IL-15R on CD4(+) T cells results in one pathway and the corresponding cells expressing IL-1β and IL1βR as a second pathway. Importantly, inhibition studies with IL-15 antibodies and IL-1βR inhibitor suggest that both pathways may be required for optimum CD4(+) CD45RO(+) memory T cell expression. Type 1 IFN expression in splenic CD11c DC of stress-treated mice demonstrated a significant increase of IFN-α in CD11c CD317(+) and CD8α(+) DC. Analysis of RNA in human CD4(+) memory T cells showed up-regulation of type 1 IFN-stimulated genes and inhibition with histone methyltransferase inhibitor. We suggest the paradigm that stress-induced tonic stimulation might be responsible for the robust persistence of the immune response in vaccination and that epigenetic changes are involved in maintaining CD4(+) T cell memory.

  11. Stress-activated Dendritic Cells (DC) Induce Dual Interleukin (IL)-15- and IL1β-mediated Pathways, Which May Elicit CD4+ Memory T Cells and Interferon (IFN)-stimulated Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; Lavender, Paul; Watson, Julie; Arno, Matthew; Lehner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The prevailing evidence suggests that immunological memory does not require antigenic re-stimulation but is maintained by low level tonic stimulation. We examined the hypothesis that stress agents contribute to tonic cellular activation and maintain immunological memory. Stimulation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) with stress agents elicits reactive oxygen species and HSP70. NFκB is activated, which up-regulates membrane-associated (ma) IL-15, caspase-1 and IL-1β. Co-culture of stress-treated DC with mononuclear cells activates IL-15 and IL-1β receptors on CD4+ T cells, eliciting CD40L, proliferation, and up-regulation of CD45RO+ memory T cells. The transcription factors Tbethigh and RORγt are up-regulated, whereas FoxP3 is down-regulated, resulting in enhanced Th1 and Th17 expression and the corresponding cytokines. The interaction between maIL-15 expressed by DC and IL-15R on CD4+ T cells results in one pathway and the corresponding cells expressing IL-1β and IL1βR as a second pathway. Importantly, inhibition studies with IL-15 antibodies and IL-1βR inhibitor suggest that both pathways may be required for optimum CD4+ CD45RO+ memory T cell expression. Type 1 IFN expression in splenic CD11c DC of stress-treated mice demonstrated a significant increase of IFN-α in CD11c CD317+ and CD8α+ DC. Analysis of RNA in human CD4+ memory T cells showed up-regulation of type 1 IFN-stimulated genes and inhibition with histone methyltransferase inhibitor. We suggest the paradigm that stress-induced tonic stimulation might be responsible for the robust persistence of the immune response in vaccination and that epigenetic changes are involved in maintaining CD4+ T cell memory. PMID:25907558

  12. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  13. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  14. reChIP-seq reveals widespread bivalency of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in CD4(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kinkley, Sarah; Helmuth, Johannes; Polansky, Julia K; Dunkel, Ilona; Gasparoni, Gilles; Fröhler, Sebastian; Chen, Wei; Walter, Jörn; Hamann, Alf; Chung, Ho-Ryun

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial action of co-localizing chromatin modifications and regulators determines chromatin structure and function. However, identifying co-localizing chromatin features in a high-throughput manner remains a technical challenge. Here we describe a novel reChIP-seq approach and tailored bioinformatic analysis tool, normR that allows for the sequential enrichment and detection of co-localizing DNA-associated proteins in an unbiased and genome-wide manner. We illustrate the utility of the reChIP-seq method and normR by identifying H3K4me3 or H3K27me3 bivalently modified nucleosomes in primary human CD4(+) memory T cells. We unravel widespread bivalency at hypomethylated CpG-islands coinciding with inactive promoters of developmental regulators. reChIP-seq additionally uncovered heterogeneous bivalency in the population, which was undetectable by intersecting H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 ChIP-seq tracks. Finally, we provide evidence that bivalency is established and stabilized by an interplay between the genome and epigenome. Our reChIP-seq approach augments conventional ChIP-seq and is broadly applicable to unravel combinatorial modes of action. PMID:27530917

  15. reChIP-seq reveals widespread bivalency of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 in CD4+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinkley, Sarah; Helmuth, Johannes; Polansky, Julia K.; Dunkel, Ilona; Gasparoni, Gilles; Fröhler, Sebastian; Chen, Wei; Walter, Jörn; Hamann, Alf; Chung, Ho-Ryun

    2016-01-01

    The combinatorial action of co-localizing chromatin modifications and regulators determines chromatin structure and function. However, identifying co-localizing chromatin features in a high-throughput manner remains a technical challenge. Here we describe a novel reChIP-seq approach and tailored bioinformatic analysis tool, normR that allows for the sequential enrichment and detection of co-localizing DNA-associated proteins in an unbiased and genome-wide manner. We illustrate the utility of the reChIP-seq method and normR by identifying H3K4me3 or H3K27me3 bivalently modified nucleosomes in primary human CD4+ memory T cells. We unravel widespread bivalency at hypomethylated CpG-islands coinciding with inactive promoters of developmental regulators. reChIP-seq additionally uncovered heterogeneous bivalency in the population, which was undetectable by intersecting H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 ChIP-seq tracks. Finally, we provide evidence that bivalency is established and stabilized by an interplay between the genome and epigenome. Our reChIP-seq approach augments conventional ChIP-seq and is broadly applicable to unravel combinatorial modes of action. PMID:27530917

  16. Decreases in percentages of naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells and increases in percentages of memory CD8 T-cell subsets in the peripheral blood lymphocyte populations of A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mika; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2004-03-01

    Our previous studies have revealed a clear dose-dependent decrease in the percentage of naïve CD4 T cells that are phenotypically CD45RA+ in PBL among A-bomb survivors. However, whether there is a similar radiation effect on CD8 T cells has remained undetermined because of the unreliability of CD45 isoforms as markers of naïve and memory subsets among the CD8 T-cell population. In the present study, we used double labeling with CD45RO and CD62L for reliable identification of naïve and memory cell subsets in both CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations among 533 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. Statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in the percentages of CD45RO-/CD62L+ naïve cells were found in the CD8 T-cell population as well as in the CD4 T-cell population. Furthermore, the percentages of CD45RO+/CD62L+ and CD45RO+/CD62L- memory T cells were found to increase significantly with increasing radiation dose in the CD8 T-cell population but not in the CD4 T-cell population. These results suggest that the prior A-bomb exposure has induced long-lasting deficits in both naïve CD4 and CD8 T- cell populations along with increased proportions of these particular subsets of the memory CD8 T-cell population.

  17. A diametric role for OX40 in the response of effector/memory CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells to alloantigen

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, Gillian; Wood, Kathryn J.; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Jones, Nick D.

    2013-01-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNFR superfamily that has potent costimulatory properties. Although the impact of blockade of the OX40-OX40L pathway has been well documented in models of autoimmune disease, its effect on the rejection of allografts is less well defined. Here we show that the alloantigen-mediated activation of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells results in the induction of OX40 expression and that blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions prevents skin allograft rejection mediated by either subset of T cells. Moreover, a blocking anti-OX40 was found to have no effect on the activation and proliferation of T cells, but rather effector T cells failed to accumulate in peripheral lymph nodes and subsequently migrate to skin allografts. This was found to be the result of an enhanced degree of cell death amongst proliferating effector cells. In clear contrast, blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions at the time of exposure to alloantigen enhanced the ability of regulatory T cells to suppress T cell responses to alloantigen by supporting rather than diminishing regulatory T cell survival. These data show that OX40-OX40L signalling contributes to the evolution of the adaptive immune response to an allograft via the differential control of alloreactive effector and regulatory T cell survival. Moreover, these data serve to further highlight OX40 and OX40L as therapeutic targets to assist the induction of tolerance to allografts and self-antigens. PMID:23817421

  18. Loss of memory CD4+ T-cells in semi-wild mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) naturally infected with species-specific simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmnd-1.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Edward J D; Schmidt, Fabian; Liégeois, Florian; Kondova, Ivanela; Herbert, Anaïs; Ngoubangoye, Barthelemy; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is found in a number of African primate species and is thought to be generally non-pathogenic. However, studies of wild primates are limited to two species, with SIV infection appearing to have a considerably different outcome in each. Further examination of SIV-infected primates exposed to their natural environment is therefore warranted. We performed a large cross-sectional study of a cohort of semi-wild mandrills with naturally occurring SIV infection, including 39 SIV-negative and 33 species-specific SIVmnd-1-infected animals. This study was distinguished from previous reports by considerably greater sample size, examination of exclusively naturally infected animals in semi-wild conditions and consideration of simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) status in addition to SIVmnd-1 infection. We found that SIVmnd-1 infection was associated with a significant and progressive loss of memory CD4(+) T-cells. Limited but significant increases in markers of immune activation in the T-cell populations, significant increases in plasma neopterin and changes to B-cell subsets were also observed in SIV-infected animals. However, no increase in plasma soluble CD14 was observed. Histological examination of peripheral lymph nodes suggested that SIVmnd-1 infection was not associated with a significant disruption of the lymph node architecture. Whilst this species has evolved numerous strategies to resist the development of AIDS, significant effects of SIV infection could be observed when examined in a natural environment. STLVmnd-1 infection also had significant effects on some markers relevant to understanding SIV infection and thus should be considered in studies of SIV infection of African primates where present.

  19. Loss of memory CD4+ T-cells in semi-wild mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) naturally infected with species-specific simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmnd-1.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Edward J D; Schmidt, Fabian; Liégeois, Florian; Kondova, Ivanela; Herbert, Anaïs; Ngoubangoye, Barthelemy; Rouet, François; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is found in a number of African primate species and is thought to be generally non-pathogenic. However, studies of wild primates are limited to two species, with SIV infection appearing to have a considerably different outcome in each. Further examination of SIV-infected primates exposed to their natural environment is therefore warranted. We performed a large cross-sectional study of a cohort of semi-wild mandrills with naturally occurring SIV infection, including 39 SIV-negative and 33 species-specific SIVmnd-1-infected animals. This study was distinguished from previous reports by considerably greater sample size, examination of exclusively naturally infected animals in semi-wild conditions and consideration of simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) status in addition to SIVmnd-1 infection. We found that SIVmnd-1 infection was associated with a significant and progressive loss of memory CD4(+) T-cells. Limited but significant increases in markers of immune activation in the T-cell populations, significant increases in plasma neopterin and changes to B-cell subsets were also observed in SIV-infected animals. However, no increase in plasma soluble CD14 was observed. Histological examination of peripheral lymph nodes suggested that SIVmnd-1 infection was not associated with a significant disruption of the lymph node architecture. Whilst this species has evolved numerous strategies to resist the development of AIDS, significant effects of SIV infection could be observed when examined in a natural environment. STLVmnd-1 infection also had significant effects on some markers relevant to understanding SIV infection and thus should be considered in studies of SIV infection of African primates where present. PMID:24214347

  20. High quality long-term CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory populations stimulated by DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK regimen in Leishmania major BALB/c model of infection.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S; Esteban, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous vaccination based on priming with a plasmid DNA vector and boosting with an attenuated vaccinia virus MVA recombinant, with both vectors expressing the Leishmania infantum LACK antigen (DNA-LACK and MVA-LACK), has shown efficacy conferring protection in murine and canine models against cutaneus and visceral leishmaniasis, but the immune parameters of protection remain ill defined. Here we performed by flow cytometry an in depth analysis of the T cell populations induced in BALB/c mice during the vaccination protocol DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK, as well as after challenge with L. major parasites. In the adaptive response, there is a polyfunctional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation against LACK antigen. At the memory phase the heterologous vaccination induces high quality LACK-specific long-term CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector memory cells. After parasite challenge, there is a moderate boosting of LACK-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Anti-vector responses were largely CD8(+)-mediated. The immune parameters induced against LACK and triggered by the combined vaccination DNA/MVA protocol, like polyfunctionality of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with an effector phenotype, could be relevant in protection against leishmaniasis. PMID:22715418

  1. Preferential effects of leptin on CD4 T cells in central and peripheral immune system are critically linked to the expression of leptin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Yong; Lim, Ju Hyun; Choi, Sung Won; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Seong-Tae; Kim, Min-Seon; Cho, You Sook; Chun, Eunyoung; Lee, Ki-Young

    2010-04-09

    Leptin can enhance thymopoiesis and modulate the T-cell immune response. However, it remains controversial whether these effects correlate with the expression of leptin receptor, ObR. We herein addressed this issue by using in vivo animal models and in vitro culture systems. Leptin treatment in both ob/ob mice and normal young mice induced increases of CD4 SP thymocytes in thymus and CD4 T cells in the periphery. Interestingly, expression of the long form ObR was significantly restricted to DN, DP and CD4 SP, but not CD8 SP thymocytes. Moreover, in the reaggregated DP thymocyte cultures with leptin plus TSCs, leptin profoundly induced differentiation of CD4 SP but not CD8 SP thymocytes, suggesting that the effects of leptin on thymocyte differentiation might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor in developing thymocytes. Surprisingly, ObR expression was markedly higher in peripheral CD4 T cells than that in CD8 T cells. Furthermore, leptin treatment with or without IL-2 and PHA had preferential effects on cell proliferation of CD4 T cells compared to that of CD8 T cells. Collectively, these data provide evidence that the effects of leptin on differentiation and proliferation of CD4 T cells might be closely related to the expression of leptin receptor.

  2. The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP-1 and adaptors Dok-1 and 2 play central roles in CD4-mediated inhibitory signaling

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, Paul M.; Marschner, Susanne; Brandl, Erin; Cambier, John C.

    2012-01-01

    CD4 functions to enhance the sensitivity of T cells to antigenic peptide/MHC class II. However, if aggregated in isolation, e.g. in the absence of T cell receptor (TCR), CD4 can transduce yet undefined signals that lead to T cell unresponsiveness to antigen and apoptosis. In Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) disease, CD4+ T cell loss can result from gp120-induced CD4 signaling in uninfected cells. We show here that CD4 aggregation leads to Lck-dependent phosphorylation of the RasGAP adaptors Downstream of kinase-1/2 (Dok-1/2) and the inositol 5-phosphatase-1 (SHIP-1) and association of the two molecules. Studies using SHIP-1 shRNA, knockout mice and decoy inhibitors further indicate that CD4-mediated inhibition of TCR-mediated T cell activation is SHIP-1 and Dok-1/2 dependent, and involves SHIP-1 hydrolysis of Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosophate (PI(3,4,5)P3) needed for TCR signaling. Our studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism by which ill-timed CD4-mediated signals activated by ligands such as HIV-1 gp120 lead to disarmament of the immune system. PMID:22370159

  3. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOEpatents

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  4. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

    2013-10-22

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  5. HIV-1 tropism for the central nervous system: Brain-derived envelope glycoproteins with lower CD4 dependence and reduced sensitivity to a fusion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Garcia, Julio . E-mail: julio.martin-garcia@drexelmed.edu; Cao, Wei; Varela-Rohena, Angel; Plassmeyer, Matthew L.; Gonzalez-Scarano, Francisco

    2006-03-01

    We previously described envelope glycoproteins of an HIV-1 isolate adapted in vitro for growth in microglia that acquired a highly fusogenic phenotype and lower CD4 dependence, as well as resistance to inhibition by anti-CD4 antibodies. Here, we investigated whether similar phenotypic changes are present in vivo. Envelope clones from the brain and spleen of an HIV-1-infected individual with neurological disease were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated clustering of sequences according to the tissue of origin, as expected. Functional clones were then used in cell-to-cell fusion assays to test for CD4 and co-receptor utilization and for sensitivity to various antibodies and inhibitors. Both brain- and spleen-derived envelope clones mediated fusion in cells expressing both CD4 and CCR5 and brain envelopes also used CCR3 as co-receptor. We found that the brain envelopes had a lower CD4 dependence, since they efficiently mediated fusion in the presence of low levels of CD4 on the target cell membrane, and they were significantly more resistant to blocking by anti-CD4 antibodies than the spleen-derived envelopes. In contrast, we observed no difference in sensitivity to the CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. However, brain-derived envelopes were significantly more resistant than those from spleen to the fusion inhibitor T-1249 and concurrently showed slightly greater fusogenicity. Our results suggest an increased affinity for CD4 of brain-derived envelopes that may have originated from in vivo adaptation to replication in microglial cells. Interestingly, we note the presence of envelopes more resistant to a fusion inhibitor in the brain of an untreated, HIV-1-infected individual.

  6. Blimp-1-mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, SuJin; Cobb, Dustin A; Bhadra, Rajarshi; Youngblood, Ben; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2016-08-22

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)-susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  7. Recovery of CD4+ T Cells in HIV patients with a stable virologic response to antiretroviral therapy is associated with polymorphisms of interleukin-6 and central major histocompatibility complex genes.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Rosenow, Ann A; James, Ian R; Roberts, Steven G; Nolan, Richard C; French, Martyn A; Price, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether polymorphisms in genes associated with HIV disease progression and/or immune activation affect CD4+ T-cell recovery in HIV patients who began combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) with advanced immunodeficiency and achieved stable control of plasma viremia. Patients with CD4 T-cell counts <300 cells/microL (n = 33) and >400 cells/microL (n = 37) on ART were compared. A multiple case-control logistic regression associated carriage of BAT1(1,2) or interleukin (IL)6-174(2,2) with low CD4 T-cell counts (P = 0.012). BAT1*2 uniquely marks the central major histocompatibility complex region of a conserved haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,BAT1*2,TNFA-308*2,DR3,DQ2). There was no association between alleles carried at CCR5Delta32, CCR5 59029, CCR5 59353, CCR2+190 (V64I), SDF1 3'UTR, IL1A+4845, IL1B+3953, IL4-589, IL10-592, IL10-R1+536, IL10-R1+1112, IL12B 3'UTR, TNFA-308, or TNFA-1031 and CD4 T-cell counts. We suggest that immune activation and/or CD4 T-cell apoptosis in HIV patients on effective ART is influenced by genetic factors.

  8. Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Régent, Alexis; Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Cheynier, Rémi; Terrier, Benjamin; Charmeteau-De Muylder, Bénédicte; Krivitzky, Alain; Oksenhendler, Eric; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hubert, Pascale; Lortholary, Olivier; Dupin, Nicolas; Debré, Patrice; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic CD4 T lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare and severe condition with limited available data. We conducted a French multicenter study to analyze the clinical and immunologic characteristics of a cohort of patients with ICL according to the Centers for Disease Control criteria. We recruited 40 patients (24 female) of mean age 44.2 ± 12.2 (19–70) years. Patients underwent T-lymphocyte phenotyping and lymphoproliferation assay at diagnosis, and experiments related to thymic function and interferon (IFN)-γ release by natural killer (NK) cell were performed. Mean follow-up was 6.9 ± 6.7 (0.14–24.3) years. Infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic events were recorded, as were outcomes of interleukin 2 therapy. In all, 25 patients had opportunistic infections (12 with human papillomavirus infection), 14 had autoimmune symptoms, 5 had malignancies, and 8 had mild or no symptoms. At the time of diagnosis, the mean cell counts were as follows: mean CD4 cell count: 127/mm3 (range, 4–294); mean CD8: 236/mm3 (range, 1–1293); mean CD19: 113/mm3 (range, 3–547); and mean NK cell count: 122/mm3 (range, 5–416). Most patients had deficiency in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Cytotoxic function of NK cells was normal, and patients with infections had a significantly lower NK cell count than those without (p = 0.01). Patients with autoimmune manifestations had increased CD8 T-cell count. Proliferation of thymic precursors, as assessed by T-cell rearrangement excision circles, was increased. Six patients died (15%). CD4 T-cell count <150/mm3 and NK cell count <100/mm3 were predictors of death. In conclusion, ICL is a heterogeneous disorder often associated with deficiencies in CD8, CD19, and/or NK cells. Long-term prognosis may be related to initial CD4 and NK cell deficiency. PMID:24646462

  9. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M.; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2’-bromo-5’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  10. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexandra M; Carnathan, Diane G; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Davenport, Miles P; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2'-bromo-5'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  11. Memory CD4(+) T cells are the earliest detectable human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells in the female genital mucosal tissue during HIV-1 transmission in an organ culture system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Phalguni; Collins, Kelly B; Ratner, Deena; Watkins, Simon; Naus, Gregory J; Landers, Daniel V; Patterson, Bruce K

    2002-10-01

    The virologic and cellular factors that are involved in transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) across the female genital tissue are poorly understood. We have recently developed a human cervical tissue-derived organ culture model to study heterosexual transmission of HIV-1 that mimics the in vivo situation. Using this model we investigated the role of phenotypic characteristics of HIV-1 and identified the cell types that are first infected during transmission. Our data indicate that the cell-free R5 HIV-1 was more efficiently transmitted than cell-free X4 HIV-1. Cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1 had comparable transmission efficiency regardless of whether the virus was of R5 or X4 type. We have demonstrated that memory CD4(+) T cells and not Langerhans cells were the first HIV-1 RNA-positive cells detected at the epithelial-submucosal junction 6 h after virus exposure. Multicolor laser confocal microscopy demonstrated a globular distribution of HIV-1 gag-pol mRNA in the cytoplasm, and the distribution of CD4 and the CD45RO isoform was irregular on the cellular membrane. At 96 h postinoculation, in addition to memory CD4(+) T cells, HIV-1 RNA-positive Langerhans cells and macrophages were also detected. The identification of CD4(+) T cells in the tissue at 6 h was confirmed by flow cytometric simultaneous immunophenotyping and ultrasensitive fluorescence in situ hybridization assay on immune cells isolated from disaggregated tissue. Furthermore, PMPA [9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl] adenine], an antiretroviral compound, and UC781, a microbicide, inhibited HIV-1 transmission across the mucosa, indicating the utility of the organ culture to screen topical microbicides for their ability to block sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate protein 10-specific effector/memory CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells in tubercular pleural fluid, with biased usage of T cell receptor Vβ chains.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dan; Li, Li; Guo, Jian; Lao, Suihua; Zhang, Xianlan; Zhang, Jianping; Wu, Changyou

    2011-08-01

    T cell-mediated immunity is critical for the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Identifying the precise immune mechanisms that lead to control of initial M. tuberculosis infection and preventing reactivation of latent infection are crucial for combating tuberculosis. However, a detailed understanding of the role of T cells in the immune response to infection has been hindered. In addition, there are few flow cytometry studies characterizing the Vβ repertoires of T cell receptors (TCRs) at local sites of M. tuberculosis infection in adult tuberculosis. In this study, we used culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) from M. tuberculosis to characterize T cells at local sites of infection. We simultaneously analyzed the correlation of the production of cytokines with TCR Vβ repertoires in CFP-10-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets. For the first time, we demonstrate that CFP-10-specific CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells from tubercular pleural fluid can produce high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and upregulate the expression of CD107a/b on the cell surface. The CFP-10-specific cells were effector/memory cells with a CD45RO(+) CD62L(-) CCR7(-) CD27(-) expression profile. In addition, we found CFP-10-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in tubercular pleural fluid, with biased usage of TCR Vβ9, Vβ12, or Vβ7.2. Our findings of CFP-10-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in tubercular pleural fluid are critical for understanding the mechanisms of the local cellular immune response and developing more effective therapeutic interventions in cases of M. tuberculosis infection.

  13. Bystander stimulation of activated CD4+ T cells of unrelated specificity following a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Gianfranco; Savelyeva, Natalia; Suchacki, Amy; Thirdborough, Stephen M; Stevenson, Freda K

    2010-04-01

    Antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are central to natural and vaccine-induced immunity. An ongoing antigen-specific T-cell response can, however, influence surrounding T cells with unrelated antigen specificities. We previously observed this bystander effect in healthy human subjects following recall vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT). Since this interplay could be important for maintenance of memory, we have moved to a mouse model for further analysis. We investigated whether boosting memory CD4(+) T cells against TT in vivo would influence injected CD4(+) TCR transgenic T cells (OT-II) specific for an unrelated OVA peptide. If OT-II cells were pre-activated with OVA peptide in vitro, these cells showed a bystander proliferative response during the ongoing parallel TT-specific response. Bystander proliferation was dependent on boosting of the TT-specific memory response in the recipients, with no effect in naive mice. Bystander stimulation was also proportional to the strength of the TT-specific memory T-cell response. T cells activated in vitro displayed functional receptors for IL-2 and IL-7, suggesting these as potential mediators. This crosstalk between a stimulated CD4(+) memory T-cell response and CD4(+) T cells activated by an unrelated antigen could be important in human subjects continually buffeted by environmental antigens.

  14. Anaplasma marginale infection with persistent high-load bacteremia induces a dysfunctional memory CD4+ T lymphocyte response but sustained high IgG titers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of blood-borne infections is dependent on antigen-specific effector and memory T cells and high-affinity IgG responses. In chronic infections characterized by a high antigen load, it has been shown that antigen-specific T and B cells are vulnerable to downregulation and apoptosis. Anaplasma ...

  15. Bystander Activation and Anti-Tumor Effects of CD8+ T Cells Following Interleukin-2 Based Immunotherapy Is Independent of CD4+ T Cell Help

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Zamora, Anthony E.; Mirsoian, Annie; Koehn, Brent; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immunotherapy combining agonistic anti-CD40 and IL-2 (IT) results in synergistic anti-tumor effects. IT induces expansion of highly cytolytic, antigen-independent “bystander-activated” (CD8+CD44high) T cells displaying a CD25−NKG2D+ phenotype in a cytokine dependent manner, which were responsible for the anti-tumor effects. While much attention has focused on CD4+ T cell help for antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, little is known regarding the role of CD4+ T cells in antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cell expansion. Utilizing CD4 deficient mouse models, we observed a significant expansion of bystander-memory T cells following IT which was similar to the non-CD4 depleted mice. Expanded bystander-memory CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1 in the absence of CD4+ T cells which has been published as a hallmark of exhaustion and dysfunction in helpless CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, compared to CD8+ T cells from CD4 replete hosts, these bystander expanded cells displayed comparable (or enhanced) cytokine production, lytic ability, and in vivo anti-tumor effects suggesting no functional impairment or exhaustion and were enriched in an effector phenotype. There was no acceleration of the post-IT contraction phase of the bystander memory CD8+ response in CD4-depleted mice. The response was independent of IL-21 signaling. These results suggest that, in contrast to antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, CD4+ T cell help is not necessary for expansion and activation of antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cells following IT, but may play a role in regulating conversion of these cells from a central memory to effector phenotype. Additionally, the expression of PD-1 in this model appears to be a marker of effector function and not exhaustion. PMID:25119341

  16. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells.

  17. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells. PMID:27233960

  18. Identification of PGAM5 as a Mammalian Protein Histidine Phosphatase that Plays a Central Role to Negatively Regulate CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Panda, Saswati; Srivastava, Shekhar; Li, Zhai; Vaeth, Martin; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-08-01

    Whereas phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine is exceedingly well characterized, the role of histidine phosphorylation in mammalian signaling is largely unexplored. Here we show that phosphoglycerate mutase family 5 (PGAM5) functions as a phosphohistidine phosphatase that specifically associates with and dephosphorylates the catalytic histidine on nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B). By dephosphorylating NDPK-B, PGAM5 negatively regulates CD4(+) T cells by inhibiting NDPK-B-mediated histidine phosphorylation and activation of the K(+) channel KCa3.1, which is required for TCR-stimulated Ca(2+) influx and cytokine production. Using recently developed monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize phosphorylation of nitrogens at the N1 (1-pHis) or N3 (3-pHis) positions of the imidazole ring, we detect for the first time phosphoisoform-specific regulation of histidine-phosphorylated proteins in vivo, and we link these modifications to TCR signaling. These results represent an important step forward in studying the role of histidine phosphorylation in mammalian biology and disease. PMID:27453048

  19. Treatment with Interleukin-7 Restores Host Defense against Pneumocystis in CD4+ T-Lymphocyte-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, D. R.; Assouline, B.; Morre, M.; Shellito, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. CD4+ T lymphocytes are critical for host defense against this infection, but in the absence of CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes may provide limited host defense. The cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7) functions to enhance lymphocyte proliferation, survival, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection. However, there is little known about the role of IL-7 in PCP or its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent. We hypothesized that treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) would augment host defense against Pneumocystis and accelerate pathogen clearance in CD4-depleted mice. Control and CD4-depleted mice were infected with Pneumocystis, and rhIL-7 was administered via intraperitoneal injection. Our studies indicate that endogenous murine IL-7 is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis murina and that administration of rhIL-7 markedly enhanced clearance of Pneumocystis in CD4-depleted mice. Additionally, we observed increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes to the lungs and decreased apoptosis of pulmonary CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhIL-7-treated animals compared to those in untreated mice. The antiapoptotic effect of rhIL-7 was associated with increased levels of Bcl-2 protein in T lymphocytes. rhIL-7 immunotherapy in CD4-depleted mice also increased the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive CD8+ central memory T lymphocytes in the lungs. We conclude that rhIL-7 has a potent therapeutic effect in the treatment of murine Pneumocystis pneumonia in CD4-depleted mice. This therapeutic effect is mediated through enhanced recruitment of CD8+ T cells and decreased apoptosis of lung T lymphocytes, with a preferential action on central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:26483405

  20. Normal adult ramified microglia separated from other central nervous system macrophages by flow cytometric sorting: Phenotypic differences defined and direct ex vivo antigen presentation to myelin basic protein-reactive CD4{sup +} T cells compared

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, A.L.; Goodsall, A.L.; Sedgwick, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    Ramified microglia in the adult central nervous system (CNS) are the principal glial element up-regulating MHC class I and II expression in response to inflammatory events or neuronal damage. A proportion of these cells also express MHC class II constitutively in the normal CNS. The role of microglia as APCs for CD4{sup +} cells extravasating into the CNS remains undefined. In this study, using irradiation bone marrow chimeras in CD45-congenic rats, the phenotype CD45{sup low}CD11b/c{sup +} is shown to identify microglial cells specifically within the CNS. Highly purified populations of microglia and nonmicroglial but CNS-associated macrophages (CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +}) have been obtained directly from the adult CNS, by using flow cytometric sorting. Morphologically, freshly isolated microglia vs other CNS macrophages are quite distinct. Of the two populations recovered from the normal CNS, it is the minority CD45{sup high}CD11 b/c{sup +} transitional macrophage population, and not microglia, that is the effective APC for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-inducing CD4{sup +} myelin basic protein (MBP)-reactive T cells. CD45{sup high}CD11b/c{sup +} CNS macrophages also stimulate MBP-reactive T cells without addition of MBP to culture suggesting presentation of endogenous Ag. This is the first study in which microglia vs other CNS macrophages have been analyzed for APC ability directly from the CNS, with substantial cross-contamination between the two populations eliminated. The heterogeneity of these populations in terms of APC function is clearly demonstrated. Evidence is still lacking that adult CNS microglia have the capacity to interact with and stimulate CD4{sup +} T cells to proliferate or secrete IL-2. 60 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Characterization of CD4 and CD8 T cells producing IFN-γ in human latent and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Marín, Nancy D; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-11-01

    Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) frequently have reduced IFN-γ production in response to mycobacterial antigens, compared to individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBi). However, it is not clear whether this reduced responsiveness is restricted to a particular T cell subset. Herein, PBMCs from 26 PTB patients, 30 household contacts (HHCs) of PTB, and 30 tuberculin positive (TST+) healthy subjects not recently exposed to PTB, were stained with CFSE and stimulated non-specific (PPD) for 120 h, and specific (CFP-10/ESAT-6) and latency (HSpX) mycobacterial antigens for 144 h and the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells responding determined by flow cytometry, in addition to their memory phenotype by the CD45RO and CD27 expression. PTB had decreased frequency of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursor cells, as well as decreased number of CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) cells in response to all antigens, whereas CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells were decreased in response to PPD and ESAT-6, but not to CFP-10 and HSpX. HHCs exhibited the highest precursor frequencies and IFN-γ responses, irrespective of the antigen employed. The CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratios showed that in response to PPD CD4(+) precursor and IFN-γ-producer cells are more frequent than their CD8(+) counterparts, and that PTB have a decreased CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)/CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) ratio in response to PPD, CFP-10, and ESAT-6. CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells exhibited a central memory phenotype (CD45RO(+)CD27(+)), irrespective of the group of subjects and the antigen used for stimulation. In conclusion, PTB patients had a decreased percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursor cells and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+). HHCs exhibited the highest frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) precursors and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+)-producing cells.

  2. Uneven distributions of naïve and memory T cells in the CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations derived from a single stem cell in an atomic bomb survivor: implications for the origins of the memory T-cell pools in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hirai, Yuko; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi

    2002-05-01

    The processes that lead to the establishment and maintenance of memory T-cell pools in humans are not well understood. In this study, we examined the emergence of naïve and memory T cells in an adult male who was exposed to an atomic bomb radiation dose of approximately 2 Gy in 1945 at the age of 17. The analysis presented here was made possible by our earlier observation that this particular individual carries a hematopoietic stem cell mutation at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus that is almost certainly a result of his exposure to A-bomb radiation. Our key finding is that we detected a very much higher HPRT mutant frequency in the naive (CD45RA(+)) cell component of this individual's CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations than in the memory (CD45RA(-)) cell component of his CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations. This stands in marked contrast to our finding that HPRT mutant frequencies are fairly similar in the naïve CD45RA(+) and memory CD45RA(-) components of the CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations of three unexposed individuals examined concurrently. In addition we found that the HPRT mutant frequencies were about 30-fold higher in the naïve (CD45RA(+)) CD4 T cells of the exposed individual than in his memory (CD45RA(-)) cell populations, but that the effect was a little less striking in his CD8 cell populations, where the HPRT mutant frequencies were only about 15-fold higher in his naïve T-cell pools than in his memory T-cell pools. We further found that 100% of the HPRT mutant cells in both his CD4 and CD8 naïve cell subsets appeared to have originated from repeated divisions of the initial HPRT mutant stem cell, whereas only 4 of 24 and 5 of 6 mutant cells in his CD4 and CD8 memory cell subsets appeared to have originated from that same stem cell. The most straightforward conclusion may be that the great majority of the T cells produced by this individual since he was 17 years old have remained as naïve-type T cells, rather than having become

  3. Increased TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma/IL-2 and decreased TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma production by central memory T cells are associated with protective responses against bovine tuberculosis following BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Central memory T cells (Tcm’s) and polyfunctional CD4 T responses contribute to vaccine-elicited protection with both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB); however, their combined role in protective immunity to TB is unclear. To address this question, we evaluated polyfunctional cytokine responses by ...

  4. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  5. Increased CD4+ T cell levels during IL-7 administration of antiretroviral therapy-treated simian immunodeficiency virus-positive macaques are not dependent on strong proliferative responses.

    PubMed

    Leone, Amanda; Rohankhedkar, Mukta; Okoye, Afam; Legasse, Alfred; Axthelm, Michael K; Villinger, Francois; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Assouline, Brigitte; Morre, Michel; Picker, Louis J; Sodora, Donald L

    2010-08-01

    CD4(+) T cell depletion is a fundamental component of HIV infection and AIDS pathogenesis and is not always reversed following antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this study, the SIV-infected rhesus macaque model was used to assess recombinant simian IL-7 in its glycosylated form (rsIL-7gly) to enhance regeneration of CD4(+) T cells, particularly the crucial central memory compartment, after ART. We assessed the impact of rsIL-7gly administration as single injections and as a cluster of three doses. Irrespective of the dosing strategy used, the rsIL-7gly administration transiently increased proliferation of both central memory and naive cells, in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets, without increasing SIV levels in the blood. Administration of rsIL-7gly at intervals of 4-6 wk maximized the proliferative response to therapy but resulted in only transient increases in peripheral blood T cell counts. Although more frequent rsIL-7gly "clustered" dosing (three times weekly with 2 wk of rest and then repeat) induced only an initial proliferative burst by CD4(+) T cells, this dosing strategy resulted in sustained increases in peripheral blood CD4(+) T cell counts. The clustered rsIL-7gly treatment regimen was shown to increase the half-life of a BrdU label among memory T cells in the blood when compared with that of macaques treated with ART alone, which is consistent with enhanced cell survival. These results indicate that dosing intervals have a major impact on the response to rsIL-7gly in SIV-positive ART-treated rhesus macaques and that optimum dosing strategies may be ones that induce CD4(+) T cell proliferation initially and provide increased CD4(+) T cell survival.

  6. A rationally designed CD4 analogue inhibits experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Bradford A.; McDonnell, James M.; Marini, Joseph C.; Korngold, Robert

    1994-04-01

    EXPERIMENTAL allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an acute inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that can be elicited in rodents and is the major animal model for the study of multiple sclerosis (MS)1,2. The pathogenesis of both EAE and MS directly involves the CD4+ helper T-cell subset3-5. Anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies inhibit the development of EAE in rodents6-9, and are currently being used in human clinical trials for MS. We report here that similar therapeutic effects can be achieved in mice using a small (rationally designed) synthetic analogue of the CD4 protein surface. It greatly inhibits both clinical incidence and severity of EAE with a single injection, but does so without depletion of the CD4+ subset and without the inherent immunogenicity of an antibody. Furthermore, this analogue is capable of exerting its effects on disease even after the onset of symptoms.

  7. Expression of CCR7 and CD45RA in CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in cerebrospinal fluid of 134 patients with inflammatory and non-inflammatory neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Katherine M.; Gocke, Anne R.; Allie, Rameeza; Ntranos, Achilles; Grishkan, Inna V.; Pardo, Carlos; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated CD45RA and CCR7 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ subsets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes, both immediately ex vivo and after stimulation, from 134 patients with a variety of inflammatory and non-inflammatory neurological diseases. Most inflammatory diseases had a higher CD4+: CD8+ ratio and higher percentage of effector memory T cells (TEM) than non-inflammatory controls, excluding active infection. Moreover, we found that patients with highly elevated cell counts in the CSF tended to have a lower percentage of central memory T cells (TCM) than patients with low or absent pleiocytosis, with a concomitant increase in TEM. We also found that samples with elevated IgG index or presence of oligoclonal bands had a significantly higher CD4+:CD8+ ratio than normal samples, consistent with increased CD4+ help for intrathecal IgG synthesis by B cells. PMID:22633193

  8. Mucosal vaccination with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces strong central memory responses and protects against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Deepak; Foreman, Taylor W.; Gautam, Uma S.; Alvarez, Xavier; Adekambi, Toidi; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Golden, Nadia A.; Johnson, Ann-Marie F.; Phillips, Bonnie L.; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Doyle, Lara A.; Roy, Chad J.; Didier, Peter J.; Blanchard, James L.; Rengarajan, Jyothi; Lackner, Andrew A.; Khader, Shabaana A.; Mehra, Smriti

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global pandaemic, partially due to the failure of vaccination approaches. Novel anti-TB vaccines are therefore urgently required. Here we show that aerosol immunization of macaques with the Mtb mutant in SigH (MtbΔsigH) results in significant recruitment of inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing activation and proliferation markers to the lungs. Further, the findings indicate that pulmonary vaccination with MtbΔsigH elicited strong central memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in the lung. Vaccination with MtbΔsigH results in significant protection against a lethal TB challenge, as evidenced by an approximately three log reduction in bacterial burdens, significantly diminished clinical manifestations and granulomatous pathology and characterized by the presence of profound iBALT. This highly protective response is virtually absent in unvaccinated and BCG-vaccinated animals after challenge. These results suggest that future TB vaccine candidates can be developed on the basis of MtbΔsigH. PMID:26460802

  9. Chemokine Transfer by Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Contributes to the Recruitment of CD4+ T Cells into the Murine Liver.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katrin; Erben, Ulrike; Kruse, Nils; Wechsung, Katja; Schumann, Michael; Klugewitz, Katja; Scheffold, Alexander; Kühl, Anja A

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion and transmigration are central features governing immune surveillance and inflammatory reactions in body tissues. Within the liver sinusoids, chemokines initiate the first crucial step of T-cell migration into the hepatic tissue. We studied molecular mechanisms involved in endothelial chemokine supply during hepatic immune surveillance and liver inflammation and their impact on the recruitment of CD4(+) T cells into the liver. In the murine model of Concanavalin A-induced T cell-mediated hepatitis, we showed that hepatic expression of the inflammatory CXC chemokine ligands (CXCL)9 and CXCL10 strongly increased whereas homeostatic CXCL12 significantly decreased. Consistently, CD4(+) T cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 accumulated within the inflamed liver tissue. In histology, CXCL9 was associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) which represent the first contact site for T-cell immigration into the liver. LSEC actively transferred basolaterally internalized CXCL12, CXCL9 and CXCL10 via clathrin-coated vesicles to CD4(+) T cells leading to enhanced transmigration of CXCR4(+) total CD4(+) T cells and CXCR3(+) effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, respectively in vitro. LSEC-expressed CXCR4 mediated CXCL12 transport and blockage of endothelial CXCR4 inhibited CXCL12-dependent CD4(+) T-cell transmigration. In contrast, CXCR3 was not involved in the endothelial transport of its ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10. The clathrin-specific inhibitor chlorpromazine blocked endothelial chemokine internalization and CD4(+) T-cell transmigration in vitro as well as migration of CD4(+) T cells into the inflamed liver in vivo. Moreover, hepatic accumulation of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells during T cell-mediated hepatitis was strongly reduced after administration of chlorpromazine. These data demonstrate that LSEC actively provide perivascularly expressed homeostatic and inflammatory chemokines by CXCR4- and clathrin-dependent intracellular transport

  10. Prime, Shock, and Kill: Priming CD4 T Cells from HIV Patients with a BCL-2 Antagonist before HIV Reactivation Reduces HIV Reservoir Size

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Nathan W.; Sainski, Amy M.; Dai, Haiming; Natesampillai, Sekar; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Bren, Gary D.; de Araujo Correia, Maria Cristina Miranda; Sampath, Rahul; Rizza, Stacey A.; O'Brien, Daniel; Yao, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding how some HIV-infected cells resist the cytotoxicity of HIV replication is crucial to enabling HIV cure efforts. HIV killing of CD4 T cells that replicate HIV can involve HIV protease-mediated cleavage of procaspase 8 to generate a fragment (Casp8p41) that directly binds and activates the mitochondrial proapoptotic protein BAK. Here, we demonstrate that Casp8p41 also binds with nanomolar affinity to the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, which sequesters Casp8p41 and prevents apoptosis. Further, we show that central memory CD4 T cells (TCM) from HIV-infected individuals have heightened expression of BCL-2 relative to procaspase 8, possibly explaining the persistence of HIV-infected TCM despite generation of Casp8p41. Consistent with this hypothesis, the selective BCL-2 antagonist venetoclax induced minimal killing of uninfected CD4 T cells but markedly increased the death of CD4 T cells and diminished cell-associated HIV DNA when CD4 T cells from antiretroviral therapy (ART)-suppressed HIV patients were induced with αCD3/αCD28 to reactivate HIV ex vivo. Thus, priming CD4 T cells from ART suppressed HIV patients with a BCL-2 antagonist, followed by HIV reactivation, achieves reductions in cell-associated HIV DNA, whereas HIV reactivation alone does not. IMPORTANCE HIV infection is incurable due to a long-lived reservoir of HIV+ memory CD4 T cells, and no clinically relevant interventions have been identified that reduce the number of these HIV DNA-containing cells. Since postintegration HIV replication can result in HIV protease generation of Casp8p41, which activates BAK, causing infected CD4 T cell death, we sought to determine whether this occurs in memory CD4 T cells. Here, we demonstrate that memory CD4 T cells can generate Casp8p41 and yet are intrinsically resistant to death induced by diverse stimuli, including Casp8p41. Furthermore, BCL-2 expression is relatively increased in these cells and directly binds and inhibits Casp8p41's

  11. ROSTRUM IN MEMORIAL SECTION ALONG CENTRAL DRIVE, WITH BIVOUAC OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ROSTRUM IN MEMORIAL SECTION ALONG CENTRAL DRIVE, WITH BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD MONUMENT AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Baton Rouge National Cemetery, 220 North 19th Street, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA

  12. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection.

  13. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection. PMID:25911759

  14. A single HIV-1 cluster and a skewed immune homeostasis drive the early spread of HIV among resting CD4+ cell subsets within one month post-infection.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, Charline; Cheret, Antoine; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Nembot, Georges; Mélard, Adeline; Blanc, Catherine; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Slama, Laurence; Allegre, Thierry; Allavena, Clotilde; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Duvivier, Claudine; Katlama, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Seksik, Bao Chau Phung; Leplatois, Anne; Molina, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Laurence; Autran, Brigitte; Rouzioux, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing therapeutic strategies for an HIV cure requires better understanding the characteristics of early HIV-1 spread among resting CD4+ cells within the first month of primary HIV-1 infection (PHI). We studied the immune distribution, diversity, and inducibility of total HIV-DNA among the following cell subsets: monocytes, peripheral blood activated and resting CD4 T cells, long-lived (naive [TN] and central-memory [TCM]) and short-lived (transitional-memory [TTM] and effector-memory cells [TEM]) resting CD4+T cells from 12 acutely-infected individuals recruited at a median 36 days from infection. Cells were sorted for total HIV-DNA quantification, phylogenetic analysis and inducibility, all studied in relation to activation status and cell signaling. One month post-infection, a single CCR5-restricted viral cluster was massively distributed in all resting CD4+ subsets from 88% subjects, while one subject showed a slight diversity. High levels of total HIV-DNA were measured among TN (median 3.4 log copies/million cells), although 10-fold less (p = 0.0005) than in equally infected TCM (4.5), TTM (4.7) and TEM (4.6) cells. CD3-CD4+ monocytes harbored a low viral burden (median 2.3 log copies/million cells), unlike equally infected resting and activated CD4+ T cells (4.5 log copies/million cells). The skewed repartition of resting CD4 subsets influenced their contribution to the pool of resting infected CD4+T cells, two thirds of which consisted of short-lived TTM and TEM subsets, whereas long-lived TN and TCM subsets contributed the balance. Each resting CD4 subset produced HIV in vitro after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28+IL-2 with kinetics and magnitude varying according to subset differentiation, while IL-7 preferentially induced virus production from long-lived resting TN cells. In conclusion, within a month of infection, a clonal HIV-1 cluster is massively distributed among resting CD4 T-cell subsets with a flexible inducibility, suggesting that

  15. CD4-Specific Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins Are Novel Potent HIV Entry Inhibitors with Unique Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Andreas; Rusert, Peter; Berlinger, Livia; Ruprecht, Claudia R.; Mann, Axel; Corthésy, Stéphanie; Turville, Stuart G.; Aravantinou, Meropi; Fischer, Marek; Robbiani, Melissa; Amstutz, Patrick; Trkola, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation of a novel type of HIV entry inhibitor using the recently developed Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology. DARPin proteins specific for human CD4 were selected from a DARPin DNA library using ribosome display. Selected pool members interacted specifically with CD4 and competed with gp120 for binding to CD4. DARPin proteins derived in the initial selection series inhibited HIV in a dose-dependent manner, but showed a relatively high variability in their capacity to block replication of patient isolates on primary CD4 T cells. In consequence, a second series of CD4-specific DARPins with improved affinity for CD4 was generated. These 2nd series DARPins potently inhibit infection of genetically divergent (subtype B and C) HIV isolates in the low nanomolar range, independent of coreceptor usage. Importantly, the actions of the CD4 binding DARPins were highly specific: no effect on cell viability or activation, CD4 memory cell function, or interference with CD4-independent virus entry was observed. These novel CD4 targeting molecules described here combine the unique characteristics of DARPins—high physical stability, specificity and low production costs—with the capacity to potently block HIV entry, rendering them promising candidates for microbicide development. PMID:18654624

  16. Analysis of subsets of B cells, Breg, CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells in adult patients with primary selective IgM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Primary selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD) is a rare and recently IUIS-recognized primary immunodeficiency disease with increased susceptibility to infections, allergy, and autoimmune diseases. The pathogenesis of selective IgM remains unclear. The objective of the study was to understand the pathogenesis of selective IgM deficiency via a comprehensive analysis of subsets of B cells, naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and Breg, CD4Treg, and CD8Treg cells. Twenty adult patients with SIGMD (serum IgM 4 mg/dl-32 mg/dl) and age-and gender-matched healthy controls were studied. Naïve B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cells, IgM memory B cells, switched memory B cells, plasmablasts, CD21low B cells, B1 cells, CXCR3+ naive and memory B cells; naïve, central memory, and effector memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CD4Treg, CD8Treg and Breg were phenotypically analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry. A significant increase in CD21low, IgM memory B cells, Breg and CD8Treg, and a significant decreased in germinal center B cells, and CXCR3+ naïve and memory B cells were observed in SIGMD. These alterations in subsets of B cells, and Breg and CD8Treg cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD. PMID:27168952

  17. Magnitude and kinetics of multifunctional CD4+ and CD8β+ T cells in pigs infected with swine influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Talker, Stephanie C; Koinig, Hanna C; Stadler, Maria; Graage, Robert; Klingler, Eva; Ladinig, Andrea; Mair, Kerstin H; Hammer, Sabine E; Weissenböck, Herbert; Dürrwald, Ralf; Ritzmann, Mathias; Saalmüller, Armin; Gerner, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Although swine are natural hosts for influenza A viruses, the porcine T-cell response to swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) infection has been poorly characterized so far. We have studied Ki-67 expression and FLUAVsw-specific production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in CD4(+) and CD8β(+) T cells isolated from piglets that had been intratracheally infected with a H1N2 FLUAVsw isolate. IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) multifunctional CD4(+) T cells were present in the blood of all infected animals at one or two weeks after primary infection and their frequency increased in four out of six animals after homologous secondary infection. These cells produced higher amounts of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 than did CD4(+) T cells that only produced a single cytokine. The vast majority of cytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells expressed CD8α, a marker associated with activation and memory formation in porcine CD4(+) T cells. Analysis of CD27 expression suggested that FLUAVsw-specific CD4(+) T cells included both central memory and effector memory populations. Three out of six animals showed a strong increase of Ki-67(+)perforin(+) CD8β(+) T cells in blood one week post infection. Blood-derived FLUAVsw-specific CD8β(+) T cells could be identified after an in vitro expansion phase and were multifunctional in terms of CD107a expression and co-production of IFN-γ and TNF-α. These data show that multifunctional T cells are generated in response to FLUAVsw infection of pigs, supporting the idea that T cells contribute to the efficient control of infection. PMID:25971313

  18. Magnitude and kinetics of multifunctional CD4+ and CD8β+ T cells in pigs infected with swine influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Talker, Stephanie C; Koinig, Hanna C; Stadler, Maria; Graage, Robert; Klingler, Eva; Ladinig, Andrea; Mair, Kerstin H; Hammer, Sabine E; Weissenböck, Herbert; Dürrwald, Ralf; Ritzmann, Mathias; Saalmüller, Armin; Gerner, Wilhelm

    2015-05-14

    Although swine are natural hosts for influenza A viruses, the porcine T-cell response to swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) infection has been poorly characterized so far. We have studied Ki-67 expression and FLUAVsw-specific production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in CD4(+) and CD8β(+) T cells isolated from piglets that had been intratracheally infected with a H1N2 FLUAVsw isolate. IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) multifunctional CD4(+) T cells were present in the blood of all infected animals at one or two weeks after primary infection and their frequency increased in four out of six animals after homologous secondary infection. These cells produced higher amounts of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 than did CD4(+) T cells that only produced a single cytokine. The vast majority of cytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells expressed CD8α, a marker associated with activation and memory formation in porcine CD4(+) T cells. Analysis of CD27 expression suggested that FLUAVsw-specific CD4(+) T cells included both central memory and effector memory populations. Three out of six animals showed a strong increase of Ki-67(+)perforin(+) CD8β(+) T cells in blood one week post infection. Blood-derived FLUAVsw-specific CD8β(+) T cells could be identified after an in vitro expansion phase and were multifunctional in terms of CD107a expression and co-production of IFN-γ and TNF-α. These data show that multifunctional T cells are generated in response to FLUAVsw infection of pigs, supporting the idea that T cells contribute to the efficient control of infection.

  19. Expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain is down regulated on the surface of CD4 T-cells by the HIV-1 Tat protein.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Denny; Faller, Elliott; Sugden, Scott; MacPherson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection elicits defects in CD4 T-cell homeostasis in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is essential to T-cell homeostasis and several groups have shown reduced levels of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127) on both CD4 and CD8 T-cells in viremic HIV+ patients. We have shown previously that soluble HIV Tat protein specifically down regulates cell surface expression of CD127 on human CD8 T-cells in a paracrine fashion. The effects of Tat on CD127 expression in CD4 T-cells has yet to be described. To explore this effect, CD4 T-cells were isolated from healthy individuals and expression levels of CD127 were examined on cells incubated in media alone or treated with Tat protein. We show here that, similar to CD8 T-cells, the HIV-1 Tat protein specifically down regulates CD127 on primary human CD4 T-cells and directs the receptor to the proteasome for degradation. Down regulation of CD127 in response to Tat was seen on both memory and naive CD4 T-cell subsets and was blocked using either heparin or anti-Tat antibodies. Tat did not induce apoptosis in cultured primary CD4 T-cells over 72 hours as determined by Annexin V and PI staining. Pre-incubation of CD4 T-cells with HIV-1 Tat protein did however reduce the ability of IL-7 to up regulate Bcl-2 expression. Similar to exogenous Tat, endogenously expressed HIV Tat protein also suppressed CD127 expression on primary CD4 T-cells. In view of the important role IL-7 plays in lymphocyte proliferation, homeostasis and survival, down regulation of CD127 by Tat likely plays a central role in immune dysregulation and CD4 T-cell decline. Understanding this effect could lead to new approaches to mitigate the CD4 T-cell loss evident in HIV infection. PMID:25333710

  20. Circulating subsets and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cell function in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sanvito, Lara; Makowska, Anna; Gregson, Norman; Nemni, Raffaello; Hughes, Richard A C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system that is probably autoimmune in origin. Different components of the adaptive and innate immunity may be responsible for the aberrant response towards nerve antigens. To investigate this, we examined lymphocyte subsets and regulatory T cell (Treg) function in the blood of CIDP patients, healthy controls (HC) and subjects with non-immune mediated neuropathies (other neuropathies, ON). We used flow cytometry to determine the frequency of monocytes, B cells, natural killer (NK) and NK-T cells, total and activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, effector memory and central memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treg function was studied after polyclonal stimulation and antigen specific stimulation with myelin protein peptides in CIDP and HC. There was an increased frequency of monocytes (p = 0.02) and decreased frequency of NK cells (p = 0.02) in CIDP compared with HC but not ON. There were no significant differences in other populations. Treg function was impaired in CIDP compared to HC (p = 0.02), whilst T cell proliferation to myelin protein peptides before and after depletion of Tregs was not different between patients and controls. This study shows increased circulating monocytes and reduced NK cells in CIDP. Although Treg frequency was not altered, we confirm that Tregs display a defect of suppressive function. Myelin protein peptides were not the target of the altered peripheral regulation of the immune response. The mechanisms of peripheral immune tolerance in CIDP and their relevance to the pathogenesis deserve further exploration.

  1. A subset of CD4+ memory T cells contains preformed CD40 ligand that is rapidly but transiently expressed on their surface after activation through the T cell receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Signaling through surface CD40 is essential for selecting B cells that have mutated their immunoglobulin variable region genes in germinal centers and is an important signal in the early stages of antibody responses to T cell-dependent antigens. It is shown that a subset of CD45RO+, CD4+ T cells isolated from human tonsil contains preformed 30- 35-kD ligand for CD40. This is expressed on their surfaces within 5 min of their antigen-receptor complexes interacting with CD3 epsilon antibodies bound to ox erythrocytes. This surface expression does not require de novo protein synthesis and lasts for only 1-2 h. Preformed CD40 ligand (CD40L) was not detected in any CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells, but > 90% of all CD4+ T cells from the tonsil can be induced to express large amounts of CD40L on culture with phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. This expression of CD40L starts between 1 and 2 h, peaks at 6 h, and remains at a high level for > 20 h. It is totally prevented by adding a concentration of cycloheximide that inhibits CD25 synthesis by these activated cells. While CD3 epsilon antibody bound to ox red cells is a good inducer of surface expression of CD40L, it is a much less potent inducer of CD40L synthesis than phorbol myristate acetate with ionomycin. Immunohistological analysis of tonsil sections shows that cells containing CD40L are located mainly in the outer zone of germinal centers and the margins of the T zones that are rich in dendritic cells (interdigitating cells). The distribution of these cells is consistent with: (a) their interaction in T zones with B cells that have taken up and processed antigen and (b) their involvement in B cell selection in germinal centers. PMID:7699321

  2. Sublingual therapeutic immunization with a polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with recurrent respiratory infections: immunomodulatory effect on antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells and impact on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alecsandru, D; Valor, L; Sánchez-Ramón, S; Gil, J; Carbone, J; Navarro, J; Rodríguez, J J; Rodríguez-Sainz, C; Fernández-Cruz, E

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are common clinical conditions in individuals with alterations of the immune function. A prospective open pilot study in a cohort of patients with RRTIs has been performed to assess whether sublingual immunization with a polyvalent bacterial vaccine could exert an immunomodulatory effect on the antigen-specific immunological responses and have an impact on the clinical outcome. Seventeen patients with RRTIs were recruited. An oral polyvalent bacterial preparation (Bactek®) was administered to all patients daily for 6 months. Immunological assessment was performed at baseline and at the end of immunization. Immunological measurements included: T cell-specific proliferations of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ to Bactek® antigens, total immunoglobulin levels, antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharide and tetanus toxoid and B, T and natural killer (NK) cell subsets. There was a significant increase in the proliferative capacity of CD3+CD4+ T cells specific to Bactek® antigens at month 6 in comparison to baseline (P < 0·0001). A significant increase in total CD3+ T cells was also observed (P < 0·05). No significant differences were observed between baseline and month 6 in levels of total immunoglobulins, specific antibodies and B, T or NK cell subsets. A significant reduction in the patient's rate of RRTIs was observed compared with 1 year prior to initiation of therapy (P < 0·0001). The results demonstrate that long-term administration of a sublingual polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with RRTIs exerts an immune stimulating effect on CD4+ T helper cell responses to bacterial antigens which could be associated with clinical benefit. PMID:21391984

  3. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  4. CD4 (T-Cell) Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 to 6 months when starting antiretroviral therapy (ART, see fact sheet 403 ). Once treatment has increased ... Fact Sheet 514 ) Monitoring treatment success: With successful ART, CD4 counts rise. Sometimes they rise quickly. Other ...

  5. Predicting AIDS-related events using CD4 percentage or CD4 absolute counts

    PubMed Central

    Pirzada, Yasmin; Khuder, Sadik; Donabedian, Haig

    2006-01-01

    Background The extent of immunosuppression and the probability of developing an AIDS-related complication in HIV-infected people is usually measured by the absolute number of CD4 positive T-cells. The percentage of CD4 positive cells is a more easily measured and less variable number. We analyzed sequential CD4 and CD8 numbers, percentages and ratios in 218 of our HIV infected patients to determine the most reliable predictor of an AIDS-related event. Results The CD4 percentage was an unsurpassed predictor of the occurrence of AIDS-related events when all subsets of patients are considered. The CD4 absolute count was the next most reliable, followed by the ratio of CD4/CD8 percentages. The value of CD4 percentage over the CD4 absolute count was seen even after the introduction of highly effective HIV therapy. Conclusion The CD4 percentage is unsurpassed as a parameter for predicting the onset of HIV-related diseases. The extra time and expense of measuring the CD4 absolute count may be unnecessary. PMID:16916461

  6. Central and Peripheral Components of Working Memory Storage

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Nelson; Saults, J. Scott; Blume, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    This study re-examines the issue of how much of working memory storage is central, or shared across sensory modalities and verbal and nonverbal codes, and how much is peripheral, or specific to a modality or code. In addition to the exploration of many parameters in 9 new dual-task experiments and re-analysis of some prior evidence, the innovations of the present work compared to previous studies of memory for two stimulus sets include (1) use of a principled set of formulas to estimate the number of items in working memory, and (2) a model to dissociate central components, which are allocated to very different stimulus sets depending on the instructions, from peripheral components, which are used for only one kind of material. We consistently find that the central contribution is smaller than was suggested by Saults and Cowan (2007), and that the peripheral contribution is often much larger when the task does not require the binding of features within an object. Previous capacity estimates are consistent with the sum of central plus peripheral components observed here. We consider the implications of the data as constraints on theories of working memory storage and maintenance. PMID:24867488

  7. Peripheral canine CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells - unique amongst others.

    PubMed

    von Buttlar, Heiner; Bismarck, Doris; Alber, Gottfried

    2015-12-15

    T lymphocytes co-expressing CD4 and CD8 ("double-positive T cells") are commonly associated with a thymic developmental stage of T cells. Their first description in humans and pigs as extrathymic T cells with a memory phenotype almost 30 years ago came as a surprise. Meanwhile peripheral double-positive T cells have been described in a growing number of different species. In this review we highlight novel data from our very recent studies on canine peripheral double-positive T cells which point to unique features of double-positive T cells in the dog. In contrast to porcine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells forming a homogenous cellular population based on their expression of CD4 and CD8α, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can be divided into three different cellular subsets with distinct expression levels of CD4 and CD8α. Double-positive T cells expressing CD8β are present in humans and dogs but absent in swine. Moreover, canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells can not only develop from CD4(+) single-positive T cells but also from CD8(+) single-positive T cells. Together, this places canine CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells closer to their human than porcine counterparts since human double-positive T cells also appear to be heterogeneous in their CD4 and CD8α expression and have both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as progenitor cells. However, CD4(+) single-positive T cells are the more potent progenitors for canine double-positive T cells, whereas CD8(+) single-positive T cells are more potent progenitors for human double-positive T cells. Canine double-positive T cells have an activated phenotype and may have as yet unrecognized roles in vivo in immunity to infection or in inflammatory diseases such as chronic infection, autoimmunity, allergy, or cancer.

  8. Immune reconstitution but persistent activation after 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy in youth with pre-therapy CD4 >350 in ATN 061

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Squires, Kathleen; Bethel, James; Li, Su; Wilson, Craig M.; Agwu, Allison; Emmanuel, Patricia; Price, Georgine; Hudey, Stephanie; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Sleasman, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of immune outcomes in youth who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) early in HIV infection are limited. Design Adolescent Trials Network 061 examined changes over 48 weeks of cART in T cell subsets and markers of T cell and macrophage activation in subjects with pre-therapy CD4>350. All subjects had optimal viral suppression from weeks 24 through 48. Methods Subjects (n=48) initiated cART with tenofovir/emtricitabine plus ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data were collected at baseline and weeks 12, 24, and 48. Trends were compared to uninfected controls. Results Significant increases over 48 weeks were noted in all CD4 populations including total, naïve, central memory (CM), and effector memory RO (EM RO) and effector memory RA (EM RA) while numbers of CM and EMRO CD8 cells declined significantly. By week 48, CD4 naïve cells were similar to controls while CM CD4 cells remained significantly lower and EM RO and EM RA subsets were significantly higher. CD38 and HLA DR expression, both individually and when co-expressed, decreased over 48 weeks of cART on CD8 cells but remained significantly higher than controls at week 48. In contrast, markers of macrophage activation measured by sCD14 and sCD163 in plasma did not change with cART and were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion In youth initiating early cART, CD4 cell reconstitution is robust with decreases in CD8 cells. However CD8 T cell and macrophage activation persists at higher levels than uninfected controls. PMID:25942459

  9. Enhanced Monocyte Response and Decreased Central Memory T Cells in Children with Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Monica I.; Banchereau, Romain; Mejias, Asuncion; Di Pucchio, Tiziana; Glaser, Casey; Allantaz, Florence; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a significant pathogen causing severe invasive disease in otherwise healthy people. Despite considerable advances in understanding the epidemiology, resistance mechanisms, and virulence factors produced by the bacteria, there is limited knowledge of the in vivo host immune response to acute, invasive S. aureus infections. Herein, we report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with severe S. aureus infections demonstrate a distinctive and robust gene expression profile which is validated in a distinct group of patients and on a different microarray platform. Application of a systems-wide modular analysis framework reveals significant over-expression of innate immunity genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. Simultaneous flow cytometry analyses demonstrated marked alterations in immune cell numbers, with decreased central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of monocytes. CD14+ monocyte numbers significantly correlated with the gene expression levels of genes related to the innate immune response. These results demonstrate the value of applying a systems biology approach that reveals the significant alterations in the components of circulating blood lymphocytes and monocytes in invasive S. aureus infections. PMID:19424507

  10. Chronic parasitic infection maintains high frequencies of short-lived Ly6C+CD4+ effector T cells that are required for protection against re-infection.

    PubMed

    Peters, Nathan C; Pagán, Antonio J; Lawyer, Phillip G; Hand, Timothy W; Henrique Roma, Eric; Stamper, Lisa W; Romano, Audrey; Sacks, David L

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to the ability of long-lived CD8(+) memory T cells to mediate protection against systemic viral infections, the relationship between CD4(+) T cell memory and acquired resistance against infectious pathogens remains poorly defined. This is especially true for T helper 1 (Th1) concomitant immunity, in which protection against reinfection coincides with a persisting primary infection. In these situations, pre-existing effector CD4 T cells generated by ongoing chronic infection, not memory cells, may be essential for protection against reinfection. We present a systematic study of the tissue homing properties, functionality, and life span of subsets of memory and effector CD4 T cells activated in the setting of chronic Leishmania major infection in resistant C57Bl/6 mice. We found that pre-existing, CD44(+)CD62L(-)T-bet(+)Ly6C+ effector (T(EFF)) cells that are short-lived in the absence of infection and are not derived from memory cells reactivated by secondary challenge, mediate concomitant immunity. Upon adoptive transfer and challenge, non-dividing Ly6C(+) T(EFF) cells preferentially homed to the skin, released IFN-γ, and conferred protection as compared to CD44(+)CD62L(-)Ly6C(-) effector memory or CD44(+)CD62L(+)Ly6C(-) central memory cells. During chronic infection, Ly6C(+) T(EFF) cells were maintained at high frequencies via reactivation of T(CM) and the T(EFF) themselves. The lack of effective vaccines for many chronic diseases may be because protection against infectious challenge requires the maintenance of pre-existing T(EFF) cells, and is therefore not amenable to conventional, memory inducing, vaccination strategies.

  11. CD4 immunophenotyping in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, David; Walker, Brooke; Landay, Alan; Denny, Thomas N.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to rapidly identify immune cell subsets such as CD4 cells, which became possible around the same time as the onset of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, was one of the greatest advances in clinical and diagnostic immunology. The evolution of this global pandemic and the subsequent development of treatment strategies to prolong the life of infected individuals mean that it is now more crucial than ever that we develop affordable, reliable and accurate methods for the enumeration of CD4 cells. Here, we provide an overview of the historical developments in CD4 enumeration technologies that are related to HIV infection, and summarize the current technological challenges that must be overcome to meet the needs of those living with HIV infection. PMID:18923413

  12. Cd4As2Br3

    PubMed Central

    Kars, Mohammed; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Rebbah, Allaoua; Otero-Diáz, L. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Single crystals of Cd4As2Br3 (tetra­cadmium biarsenide tri­bromide) were grown by a chemical transport reaction. The structure is isotypic with the members of the cadmium and mercury pnictidohalides family with general formula M 4 A 2 X 3 (M = Cd, Hg; A = P, As, Sb; X = Cl, Br, I) and contains two independent As atoms on special positions with site symmetry -3 and two independent Cd atoms, of which one is on a special position with site symmetry -3. The Cd4As2Br3 structure consists of AsCd4 tetra­hedra sharing vertices with isolated As2Cd6 octa­hedra that contain As–As dumbbells in the centre of the octahedron. The Br atoms are located in the voids of this three-dimensional arrangement and bridge the different polyhedra through Cd⋯Br contacts. PMID:24764933

  13. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia with sensorimotor polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Vinod; Duggal, Ashish Kumar; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    A, 21-years-old, male, presented with acute onset, gradually progressive, predominantly distal, symmetrical weakness of both upper and lower limbs with arreflexia. He had impaired sensations in glove and stocking distribution with distal gradient. He was found to have absolute CD4 + cell count of 188 cells/μL, absolute CD8 cell count, 532 cells/μL and CD4: CD8 ratio of 0.35. Electrophysiology revealed reduced to absent CMAP amplitude as well as SNAPs in various nerves of upper and lower limbs, along with normal conduction velocity and normal F wave latencies. Pattern evoked visual potentials were prolonged, on both sides, P100 being 130 ms, on right and 108 ms, on left side. In the follow up of 2 years, he showed spontaneous but gradual clinical improvement but his electrophysiological parameters as well as CD 4+ cells count did not show any significant improvement. PMID:27570393

  14. Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia with sensorimotor polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Vinod; Duggal, Ashish Kumar; Chaudhry, Neera

    2016-01-01

    A, 21-years-old, male, presented with acute onset, gradually progressive, predominantly distal, symmetrical weakness of both upper and lower limbs with arreflexia. He had impaired sensations in glove and stocking distribution with distal gradient. He was found to have absolute CD4 + cell count of 188 cells/μL, absolute CD8 cell count, 532 cells/μL and CD4: CD8 ratio of 0.35. Electrophysiology revealed reduced to absent CMAP amplitude as well as SNAPs in various nerves of upper and lower limbs, along with normal conduction velocity and normal F wave latencies. Pattern evoked visual potentials were prolonged, on both sides, P100 being 130 ms, on right and 108 ms, on left side. In the follow up of 2 years, he showed spontaneous but gradual clinical improvement but his electrophysiological parameters as well as CD 4+ cells count did not show any significant improvement. PMID:27570393

  15. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Deborah M.; Lampe, Anna T.; Workman, Aspen M.

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  16. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deborah M; Lampe, Anna T; Workman, Aspen M

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection. PMID:27014272

  17. The Differentiation and Protective Function of Cytolytic CD4 T Cells in Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Deborah M; Lampe, Anna T; Workman, Aspen M

    2016-01-01

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity (CD4 CTL) play a role in chronic as well as acute infections, such as influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In the last couple of decades, techniques to measure the frequency and activity of these cytolytic cells has demonstrated their abundance in infections, such as human immunodeficiency virus, mouse pox, murine gamma herpes virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza among others. We now appreciate a greater role for CD4 CTL as direct effectors in viral infections and antitumor immunity through their ability to acquire perforin-mediated cytolytic activity and contribution to lysis of virally infected targets or tumors. As early as the 1980s, CD4 T cell clones with cytolytic potential were identified after influenza virus infection, yet much of this early work was dependent on in vitro culture and little was known about the physiological relevance of CD4 CTL. Here, we discuss the direct role CD4 CTL play in protection against lethal IAV infection and the factors that drive the generation of perforin-mediated lytic activity in CD4 cells in vivo during IAV infection. While focusing on CD4 CTL generated during IAV infection, we pull comparisons from the literature in other antiviral and antitumor systems. Further, we highlight what is currently known about CD4 CTL secondary and memory responses, as well as vaccination strategies to induce these potent killer cells that provide an extra layer of cell-mediated immune protection against heterosubtypic IAV infection.

  18. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells derived from defined CD8+ and CD4+ subsets confer superior antitumor reactivity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Kosasih, Paula L.; Gogishvili, Tea; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy with gene-modified T-cells expressing a tumor-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a rapidly growing field of translational medicine and has shown success in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors. In all reported trials, patients have received T-cell products comprised of random compositions of CD4+ and CD8+ naïve and memory T-cells, meaning that each patient received a different therapeutic agent. This variation might have influenced the efficacy of T-cell therapy, and complicates comparison of outcomes between different patients and across trials. We analyzed CD19 CAR-expressing effector T-cells derived from different subsets (CD4+/CD8+ naïve, central memory, effector memory). T-cells derived from each of the subsets were efficiently transduced and expanded, but showed clear differences in effector function and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Combining the most potent CD4+ and CD8+ CAR-expressing subsets resulted in synergistic antitumor effects in vivo. We show that CAR-T-cell products generated from defined T-cell subsets can provide uniform potency compared with products derived from unselected T-cells that vary in phenotypic composition. These findings have important implications for the formulation of T-cell products for adoptive therapies. PMID:26369987

  20. Identification of a CD4 variant in Microminipigs not detectable with available anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Tatsuya; Nishii, Naohito; Takashima, Satoshi; Takasu, Masaki; Imaeda, Noriaki; Aiki-Oshimo, Kayo; Yamazoe, Kazuaki; Kametani, Yoshie; Ando, Asako; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2015-12-15

    The Microminipig is an extra-small sized novel miniature pig developed in Japan. In the process of peripheral blood mononuclear cells analysis by flow cytometry, CD4+ cells could not be detected in some pigs with an anti-pig CD4 antibody (clone 74-12-4), or in some pigs with two other antibodies from different clones (MIL17 and PT90A). In a herd of 178 Microminipigs, 87 pigs (48.9%) were reactive with the anti-CD4 antibody (designated as CD4.A), and 91 pigs (51.1%) were non-reactive (designated as CD4.B). The CD4 types of piglets delivered from parents with CD4.A were CD4.A or CD4.B, and piglets delivered from parents with CD4.B were only CD4.B. This implies that the CD4.A pigs were homozygous for CD4.A or heterozygous for CD4.A and CD4.B, and the CD4.B pigs were homozygous for CD4.B. The CD4.B trait might be recessive. Significant differences could not be found in the percentage of CD3+ and CD8+ cells in whole lymphocytes between CD4.A and CD4.B animals. In the profile of CD4.B pigs, CD4+CD8+ T cells appeared to be detected in the CD4-CD8+ T cell region because the CD8 dull T cell population was observed. Thus, we considered that the CD4 molecules may be expressed on helper T cells, but the CD4 expressing cells could not be detected with the three anti-pig CD4 antibodies. Clinical abnormalities have not been observed in CD4.B pigs. Significant differences were not observed in immunoglobulin concentrations between CD4.A and CD4.B, though lower tendency was observed in plasma IgM concentrations from CD4.B pigs >36-months-old. These results imply that the CD4.B does not affect basic humoral immunity in vivo.

  1. Myeloid dendritic cells induce HIV-1 latency in non-proliferating CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Vanessa A; Kumar, Nitasha; Filali, Ali; Procopio, Francesco A; Yegorov, Oleg; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Saleh, Suha; Haddad, Elias K; da Fonseca Pereira, Candida; Ellenberg, Paula C; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Cameron, Paul U; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Latently infected resting CD4(+) T cells are a major barrier to HIV cure. Understanding how latency is established, maintained and reversed is critical to identifying novel strategies to eliminate latently infected cells. We demonstrate here that co-culture of resting CD4(+) T cells and syngeneic myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) can dramatically increase the frequency of HIV DNA integration and latent HIV infection in non-proliferating memory, but not naïve, CD4(+) T cells. Latency was eliminated when cell-to-cell contact was prevented in the mDC-T cell co-cultures and reduced when clustering was minimised in the mDC-T cell co-cultures. Supernatants from infected mDC-T cell co-cultures did not facilitate the establishment of latency, consistent with cell-cell contact and not a soluble factor being critical for mediating latent infection of resting CD4(+) T cells. Gene expression in non-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, enriched for latent infection, showed significant changes in the expression of genes involved in cellular activation and interferon regulated pathways, including the down-regulation of genes controlling both NF-κB and cell cycle. We conclude that mDC play a key role in the establishment of HIV latency in resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which is predominantly mediated through signalling during DC-T cell contact.

  2. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  3. IL-7 signaling imparts polyfunctionality and stemness potential to CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Chufeng; Cao, Yang; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Kuczma, Michal; Pi, Wenhu; Kong, Heng; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F; Cui, Yan; Blazar, Bruce R; Munn, David H; Zhou, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The functional status of CD4(+) T cells is a critical determinant of antitumor immunity. Polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells possess the ability to concomitantly produce multiple Th1-type cytokines, exhibiting a functional attribute desirable for cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms by which these cells are induced are neither defined nor it is clear if these cells can be used therapeutically to treat cancer. Here, we report that CD4(+) T cells exposed to exogenous IL-7 during antigenic stimulation can acquire a polyfunctional phenotype, characterized by their ability to simultaneously express IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα and granzyme B. This IL-7-driven polyfunctional phenotype was associated with increased histone acetylation in the promoters of the effector genes, indicative of increased chromatin accessibility. Moreover, forced expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of STAT5 recapitulated IL-7 in inducing CD4(+) T-cell polyfunctionality. Conversely, the expression of a dominant negative (DN) form of STAT5 abolished the ability of IL-7 to induce polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells. These in-vitro-generated polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells can traffic to tumor and expand intratumorally in response to immunization. Importantly, adoptive transfer of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells following lymphodepletive chemotherapy was able to eradicate large established tumors. This beneficial outcome was associated with the occurrence of antigen epitope spreading, activation of the endogenous CD8(+) T cells and persistence of donor CD4(+) T cells exhibiting memory stem cell attributes. These findings indicate that IL-7 signaling can impart polyfunctionality and stemness potential to CD4(+) T cells, revealing a previously unknown property of IL-7 that can be exploited in adoptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  4. Tuberculosis Therapy Modifies the Cytokine Profile, Maturation State, and Expression of Inhibitory Molecules on Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific CD4+ T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saharia, Kapil K.; Petrovas, Constantinos; Ferrando-Martinez, Sara; Leal, Manuel; Luque, Rafael; Ive, Prudence; Luetkemeyer, Anne; Havlir, Diane; Koup, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the expression of inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed-death-1 (PD-1) on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific CD4 T-cells and how their expression is impacted by TB treatment. Methods Cryopreserved PBMCs from HIV-TB co-infected and TB mono-infected patients with untreated and treated tuberculosis (TB) disease were stimulated for six hours with PPD and stained. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we characterized the differentiation state, cytokine profile, and inhibitory molecule expression on PPD-specific CD4 T-cells. Results In our HIV-TB co-infected cohort, TB treatment increased the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+IL-2+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+IL-2+ (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0002, respectively) while decreasing the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells co-producing IFN-γ+MIP1-β+TNF-α+ and IFN-γ+MIP1-β+. The proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing an effector memory phenotype decreased (63.6% vs 51.6%, p = 0.0015) while the proportion expressing a central memory phenotype increased (7.8% vs. 21.7%, p = 0.001) following TB treatment. TB treatment reduced the proportion of PPD-specific CD4 T-cells expressing CTLA-4 (72.4% vs. 44.3%, p = 0.0005) and PD-1 (34.5% vs. 29.2%, p = 0.03). Similar trends were noted in our TB mono-infected cohort. Conclusion TB treatment alters the functional profile of Mtb-specific CD4 T-cells reflecting shifts towards a less differentiated maturational profile and decreases PD-1 and CTLA-4 expression. These could serve as markers of reduced mycobacterial burden. Further study is warranted. PMID:27367521

  5. Long-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+ T Cells rather than Short-Lived CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T Cells Initiate Rapid IL-10 Production To Suppress Anamnestic T Cell Responses during Secondary Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Villegas-Mendez, Ana; Inkson, Colette A.; Shaw, Tovah N.; Strangward, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells that produce IFN-γ are the source of host-protective IL-10 during primary infection with a number of different pathogens, including Plasmodium spp. The fate of these CD4+IFN-γ+IL-10+ T cells following clearance of primary infection and their subsequent influence on the course of repeated infections is, however, presently unknown. In this study, utilizing IFN-γ–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and IL-10–GFP dual reporter mice, we show that primary malaria infection–induced CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells have limited memory potential, do not stably express IL-10, and are disproportionately lost from the Ag-experienced CD4+ T cell memory population during the maintenance phase postinfection. CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cells generally exhibited a short-lived effector rather than effector memory T cell phenotype postinfection and expressed high levels of PD-1, Lag-3, and TIGIT, indicative of cellular exhaustion. Consistently, the surviving CD4+YFP+GFP+ T cell–derived cells were unresponsive and failed to proliferate during the early phase of secondary infection. In contrast, CD4+YFP+GFP− T cell–derived cells expanded rapidly and upregulated IL-10 expression during secondary infection. Correspondingly, CD4+ T cells were the major producers within an accelerated and amplified IL-10 response during the early stage of secondary malaria infection. Notably, IL-10 exerted quantitatively stronger regulatory effects on innate and CD4+ T cell responses during primary and secondary infections, respectively. The results in this study significantly improve our understanding of the durability of IL-10–producing CD4+ T cells postinfection and provide information on how IL-10 may contribute to optimized parasite control and prevention of immune-mediated pathology during repeated malaria infections. PMID:27630165

  6. CD4 T cells in murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: polyclonal progression to anergy

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the kinetics of changes that occur in the helper T cell subset during murine acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which occurs after infection with the mix of viruses known as BM5. We find that there is expansion of the CD4 T cells by 2 wk, 50% of the CD4 T cells become large as the disease progresses, and the CD4 T cell population is increasingly comprised of cells with a memory/activated phenotype. These effects are apparent by 2 wk postinfection, and the change is nearly complete by 6-8 wk. The phenotypic shift is paralleled by the loss of the ability of the CD4 T cells to proliferate or to produce interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-3, IL-4, and interferon gamma in response to stimulation with mitogens, superantigen, or anti-CD3. There is no obvious expansion or deletion of CD4 T cells expressing particular V beta genes, as might be expected if a conventional superantigen were driving the changes. The results suggest, however, that the total CD4 population has been driven to anergy by some potent polyclonal stimulus directly associated with viral infection. PMID:1588283

  7. CD4+ follicular helper T cell infiltration predicts breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Gu-Trantien, Chunyan; Loi, Sherene; Garaud, Soizic; Equeter, Carole; Libin, Myriam; de Wind, Alexandre; Ravoet, Marie; Le Buanec, Hélène; Sibille, Catherine; Manfouo-Foutsop, Germain; Veys, Isabelle; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Singhal, Sandeep K.; Michiels, Stefan; Rothé, Françoise; Salgado, Roberto; Duvillier, Hugues; Ignatiadis, Michail; Desmedt, Christine; Bron, Dominique; Larsimont, Denis; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos; Willard-Gallo, Karen

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are critical regulators of immune responses, but their functional role in human breast cancer is relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to produce an image of CD4+ T cells infiltrating breast tumors using limited ex vivo manipulation to better understand the in vivo differences associated with patient prognosis. We performed comprehensive molecular profiling of infiltrating CD4+ T cells isolated from untreated invasive primary tumors and found that the infiltrating T cell subpopulations included follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which have not previously been found in solid tumors, as well as Th1, Th2, and Th17 effector memory cells and Tregs. T cell signaling pathway alterations included a mixture of activation and suppression characterized by restricted cytokine/chemokine production, which inversely paralleled lymphoid infiltration levels and could be reproduced in activated donor CD4+ T cells treated with primary tumor supernatant. A comparison of extensively versus minimally infiltrated tumors showed that CXCL13-producing CD4+ Tfh cells distinguish extensive immune infiltrates, principally located in tertiary lymphoid structure germinal centers. An 8-gene Tfh signature, signifying organized antitumor immunity, robustly predicted survival or preoperative response to chemotherapy. Our identification of CD4+ Tfh cells in breast cancer suggests that they are an important immune element whose presence in the tumor is a prognostic factor. PMID:23778140

  8. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

  9. The story of CD4+ CD28- T cells revisited: solved or still ongoing?

    PubMed

    Maly, Kathrin; Schirmer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells are a unique type of proinflammatory T cells characterised by blockade of costimulatory CD28 receptor expression at the transcriptional level, which is still reversible by IL-12. In healthy individuals older than 65 years, these cells may accumulate to up to 50% of total CD4(+) T lymphocytes as in many immune-mediated diseases, immunodeficiency, and specific infectious diseases. Here we focus on CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells in chronic immune-mediated diseases, summarizing various phenotypic and functional characteristics, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disease activity, and concurrent treatment. CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells present as effector/memory cells with increased replicative history and oligoclonality but reduced apoptosis. As an alternative costimulatory signal instead of CD28, not only natural killer cell receptors and Toll-like receptors, but also CD47, CTLA-4, OX40, and 4-1BB have to be considered. The proinflammatory and cytotoxic capacities of these cells indicate an involvement in progression and maintenance of chronic immune-mediated disease. So far it has been shown that treatment with TNF-α blockers, abatacept, statins, and polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG) mediates reduction of the CD4(+)CD28(-) T cell level. The clinical relevance of targeting CD4(+)CD28(-) T cells as a therapeutic option has not been examined so far. PMID:25834833

  10. Infection of brain microglial cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is CD4 dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, C A; Watkins, B A; Kufta, C; Dubois-Dalcq, M

    1991-01-01

    In the central nervous system of AIDS patients, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects primarily microglia, a cell type of bone marrow origin. Moreover, microglial cells isolated from adult human brain support the replication of macrophage-adapted strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) (B.A. Watkins, H.H. Dorn, W.B. Kelly, R.C. Armstrong, B. Potts, F. Michaels, C.V. Kufta, and M. Dubois-Dalcq, Science 249:549-553, 1990). To determine whether the CD4 receptor, which is expressed in brain, mediates the entry of HIV-1 in microglial cells, we analyzed CD4 transcript expression in cultured microglia using highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction detection of cDNAs synthesized from RNA. With this method, CD4 transcripts could be detected in cultured microglia--as well as in various human brain regions and cultured macrophages used as positive controls--along with transcripts for the LDL and Fc receptors which are characteristic of cells of the macrophage lineage. We then attempted to block viral entry into microglial cells using anti-CD4 antibodies or soluble CD4 (sCD4), which recognize binding sites on CD4 and HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120, respectively. Cultures were pretreated with blocking antibodies (Leu-3a, OKT4A) or virus was preincubated with sCD4 prior to infection with HIV-1 strain AD87(M) or BaL. With either viral strain, these treatments resulted in the prevention of infection or significant and dose-dependent reduction in the number of infected cells and in the levels of reverse transcriptase or p24 antigen released in the medium. Thus, brain-derived microglial cells, which are the primary target of HIV-1 infection in the brain, express the CD4 receptor and this receptor is effectively used for viral entry in vitro. Images PMID:1702842

  11. Bronchoalveolar CD4+ T cell responses to respiratory antigens are impaired in HIV-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Sepako, Enoch; Fullerton, Duncan G; Mzinza, David; Glennie, Sarah; Wright, Adam K; Heyderman, Robert S; Gordon, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    Rationale HIV-infected adults are at an increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections. HIV infection impairs systemic acquired immunity, but there is limited information in humans on HIV-related cell-mediated immune defects in the lung. Objective To investigate antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses to influenza virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood between HIV-infected individuals and HIV-uninfected Malawian adults. Methods We obtained BAL fluid and blood from HIV-infected individuals (n=21) and HIV-uninfected adults (n=24). We determined the proportion of T cell subsets including naive, memory and regulatory T cells using flow cytometry, and used intracellular cytokine staining to identify CD4+ T cells recognising influenza virus-, S pneumoniae- and M tuberculosis-antigens. Main results CD4+ T cells in BAL were predominantly of effector memory phenotype compared to blood, irrespective of HIV status (p<0.001). There was immune compartmentalisation with a higher frequency of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells against influenza virus, S pneumoniae and M tuberculosis retained in BAL compared to blood in HIV-uninfected adults (p<0.001 in each case). Influenza virus- and M tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cell responses in BAL were impaired in HIV-infected individuals: proportions of total antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and of polyfunctional IFN-γ and TNF-α-secreting cells were lower in HIV-infected individuals than in HIV-uninfected adults (p<0.05 in each case). Conclusions BAL antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses against important viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens are impaired in HIV-infected adults. This might contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected adults to lower respiratory tract infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. PMID:21357587

  12. Tapping CD4 T cells for cancer immunotherapy: the choice of personalized genomics.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Cellular immune responses that protect against tumors typically have been attributed to CD8 T cells. However, CD4 T cells also play a central role. It was shown recently that, in a patient with metastatic cholangiocarcinoma, CD4 T cells specific for a peptide from a mutated region of ERBB2IP could arrest tumor progression. This and other recent findings highlight new opportunities for CD4 T cells in cancer immunotherapy. In this article, I discuss the role and regulation of CD4 T cells in response to tumor Ags. Emphasis is placed on the types of Ags and mechanisms that elicit tumor-protective responses. I discuss the advantages and drawbacks of cancer immunotherapy through personalized genomics. These considerations should help to guide the design of next-generation therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  13. Quantification of Cells with Specific Phenotypes I: Determination of CD4+ Cell Count Per Microliter in Reconstituted Lyophilized Human PBMC Prelabeled with Anti-CD4 FITC Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Paola Sassi, Maria; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 ± 4.9) μL−1 CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within ±15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25655255

  14. Quantification of cells with specific phenotypes I: determination of CD4+ cell count per microliter in reconstituted lyophilized human PBMC prelabeled with anti-CD4 FITC antibody.

    PubMed

    Stebbings, Richard; Wang, Lili; Sutherland, Janet; Kammel, Martin; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; John, Manuela; Roemer, Bodo; Kuhne, Maren; Schneider, Rudolf J; Braun, Michael; Engel, Andrea; Dikshit, Dinesh K; Abbasi, Fatima; Marti, Gerald E; Sassi, Maria Paola; Revel, Laura; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Baradez, Marc-Olivier; Lekishvili, Tamara; Marshall, Damian; Whitby, Liam; Jing, Wang; Ost, Volker; Vonsky, Maxim; Neukammer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    A surface-labeled lyophilized lymphocyte (sLL) preparation has been developed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells prelabeled with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. The sLL preparation is intended to be used as a reference material for CD4+ cell counting including the development of higher order reference measurement procedures and has been evaluated in the pilot study CCQM-P102. This study was conducted across 16 laboratories from eight countries to assess the ability of participants to quantify the CD4+ cell count of this reference material and to document cross-laboratory variability plus associated measurement uncertainties. Twelve different flow cytometer platforms were evaluated using a standard protocol that included calibration beads used to obtain quantitative measurements of CD4+ T cell counts. There was good overall cross-platform and counting method agreement with a grand mean of the laboratory calculated means of (301.7 ± 4.9) μL(-1) CD4+ cells. Excluding outliers, greater than 90% of participant data agreed within ±15%. A major contribution to variation of sLL CD4+ cell counts was tube to tube variation of the calibration beads, amounting to an uncertainty of 3.6%. Variation due to preparative steps equated to an uncertainty of 2.6%. There was no reduction in variability when data files were centrally reanalyzed. Remaining variation was attributed to instrument specific differences. CD4+ cell counts obtained in CCQM-P102 are in excellent agreement and show the robustness of both the measurements and the data analysis and hence the suitability of sLL as a reference material for interlaboratory comparisons and external quality assessment. PMID:25655255

  15. Regulation of DNA methylation dictates Cd4 expression during the development of helper and cytotoxic T cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Sellars, MacLean; Huh, Jun R; Day, Kenneth; Issuree, Priya D; Galan, Carolina; Gobeil, Stephane; Absher, Devin; Green, Michael R; Littman, Dan R

    2015-07-01

    During development, progenitor cells with binary potential give rise to daughter cells that have distinct functions. Heritable epigenetic mechanisms then lock in gene-expression programs that define lineage identity. Regulation of the gene encoding the T cell-specific coreceptor CD4 in helper and cytotoxic T cells exemplifies this process, with enhancer- and silencer-regulated establishment of epigenetic memory for stable gene expression and repression, respectively. Using a genetic screen, we identified the DNA-methylation machinery as essential for maintaining silencing of Cd4 in the cytotoxic lineage. Furthermore, we found a requirement for the proximal enhancer in mediating the removal of DNA-methylation marks from Cd4, which allowed stable expression of Cd4 in helper T cells. Our findings suggest that stage-specific methylation and demethylation events in Cd4 regulate its heritable expression in response to the distinct signals that dictate lineage 'choice' during T cell development. PMID:26030024

  16. Epigenetic repression of interleukin 2 expression in senescent CD4+ T cells during chronic HIV type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Nakayama-Hosoya, Kaori; Ishida, Takaomi; Youngblood, Ben; Nakamura, Hitomi; Hosoya, Noriaki; Koga, Michiko; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for IL2 gene-specific dysregulation during chronic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are unknown. Here, we investigated the role of DNA methylation in suppressing interleukin 2 (IL-2) expression in memory CD4(+) T cells during chronic HIV-1 infection. We observed that CpG sites in the IL2 promoter of CD4(+) T cells were fully methylated in naive CD4(+) T cells and significantly demethylated in the memory populations. Interestingly, we found that the memory cells that had a terminally differentiated phenotype and expressed CD57 had increased IL2 promoter methylation relative to less differentiated memory cells in healthy individuals. Importantly, early effector memory subsets from HIV-1-infected subjects expressed high levels of CD57 and were highly methylated at the IL2 locus. Furthermore, the increased CD57 expression on memory CD4(+) T cells was inversely correlated with IL-2 production. These data suggest that DNA methylation at the IL2 locus in CD4(+) T cells is coupled to immunosenescence and plays a critical role in the broad dysfunction that occurs in polyclonal T cells during HIV-1 infection.

  17. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  18. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) downregulates the cell surface expression of the CD4 molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanyou; Zeng, Yaoying; Liang, Peiyan; Zhou, Congrong; Zhao, Shuyun; Huang, Xiuyan; Wu, Lingfei; He, Xianhui

    2012-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been implicated in preventing the fetus from undergoing maternal T cell-mediated immune responses, yet the mechanism underlying these kinds of IDO-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. Since the CD4 molecule plays a central role in the onset and regulation of antigen-specific immune responses, and T cell is sensitive in the absence of tryptophan, we hypothesize that IDO may reduce cell surface CD4 expression. To test this hypothesis, an adenoviral vector-based construct IDO-EGFP was generated and the effect of IDO-EGFP on CD4 expression was determined on recombinant adenoviral infected C8166 and MT-2 cells, by flow cytometry and/or Western blot analysis. The results revealed a significant downregulation of cell membrane CD4 in pAd-IDOEGFP infected cells when compared to that of mock-infected cells or infection with empty vector pAd-EGFP. Further experiments disclosed that either an addition of tryptophan or IDO inhibitor could partly restore CD4 expression in pAd-IDOEGFP infected C8166 cells. Our findings suggest that downregulation of CD4 by IDO might be one of the mechanisms through which IDO regulates T cell-mediated immune responses.

  19. Suppression of Foxo1 Activity and Down-Modulation of CD62L (L-Selectin) in HIV-1 Infected Resting CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trinité, Benjamin; Chan, Chi N.; Lee, Caroline S.; Mahajan, Saurabh; Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A.; Folkvord, Joy M.; Pham, Michael; Connick, Elizabeth; Levy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin), a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1), CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo. PMID:25330112

  20. CD1-restricted CD4+ T cells in major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Rather unexpectedly, major histocompatibility complex class II- deficient mice have a significant population of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes. We have investigated these cells at the population and clonal levels. CD4+ T lymphocytes from class II-deficient animals are thymically derived, appear early in ontogeny, exhibit the phenotype of resting memory cells, are potentially functional by several criteria, and have a diverse T cell receptor repertoire. They do not include substantially elevated numbers of NK1.1+ cells. Hybridomas derived after polyclonal stimulation of the CD4+ lymphocytes from class II- deficient animals include a subset with an unusual reactivity pattern, responding to splenocytes from many mouse strains including the strain of origin. Most members of this subset recognize the major histocompatibility complex class Ib molecule CD1; their heterogeneous reactivities and T cell receptor usage further suggest the involvement of peptides and/or highly variable posttranslational modifications. PMID:7561702

  1. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients. PMID:27622033

  2. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients.

  3. Casp8p41: The Protean Mediator of Death in CD4 T-cells that Replicate HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Rahul; Cummins, Nathan W.; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV cure is now the focus of intense research after Timothy Ray Brown (the Berlin patient) set the precedent of being the first and only person cured. A major barrier to achieving this goal on a meaningful scale is an elimination of the latent reservoir, which is thought to comprise CD4-positive cells that harbor integrated, replication-competent HIV provirus. These cells do not express viral proteins, are indistinguishable from uninfected CD4 cells, and are thought to be responsible for HIV viral rebound—that occurs within weeks of combination anti retroviral therapy (cART) interruption. Modalities to engineer transcriptional stimulation (reactivation) of this dormant integrated HIV provirus, leading to expression of cytotoxic viral proteins, are thought to be a specific way to eradicate the latently infected CD4 pool and are becoming increasingly relevant in the era of HIV cure. HIV protease is one such protein produced after HIV reactivation that cleaves procaspase-8 to generate a novel protein Casp8p41. Casp8p41 then binds to the BH3 domain of BAK, leading to BAK oligomerization, mitochondrial depolarization, and apoptosis. In central memory T cells (TCMs) from HIV-infected patients, an elevated Bcl-2/procaspase-8 ratio was observed, and Casp8p41 binding to Bcl-2 was associated with a lack of reactivation-induced cell death. This was reversed by priming cells with a specific Bcl-2 antagonist prior to reactivation, resulting in increased cell death and decreased HIV DNA in a Casp8p41-dependent pathway. This review describes the biology, clinical relevance, and implications of Casp8p41 for a potential cure. PMID:27721655

  4. Pathogenic memory type Th2 cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yusuke; Hirahara, Kiyoshi; Yagi, Ryoji; Tumes, Damon J; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2014-02-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity. Memory CD4 T helper (Th) cells are central to acquired immunity, and vaccines for infectious diseases are developed based on this concept. However, memory Th cells also play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various chronic inflammatory diseases, including asthma. We refer to these populations as 'pathogenic memory Th cells.' Here, we review recent developments highlighting the functions and characteristics of several pathogenic memory type Th2 cell subsets in allergic inflammation. Also discussed are the similarities and differences between pathogenic memory Th2 cells and recently identified type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2), focusing on cytokine production and phenotypic profiles.

  5. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  6. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread.

  7. CD4-binding site alterations in CCR5-using HIV-1 envelopes influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Churchill, Melissa J.; Roche, Michael; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-02-20

    CD4-binding site (CD4bs) alterations in gp120 contribute to different pathophysiological phenotypes of CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains, but the potential structural basis is unknown. Here, we characterized functionally diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones (n = 16) to elucidate potential structural alterations within the gp120 CD4bs that influence Env function. Initially, we showed that the magnitude of gp120-CD4-binding correlates with increased fusogenicity and reduced CD4 dependence. Analysis of three-dimensional gp120 structural models revealed two CD4bs variants, D279 and N362, that were associated with reduced CD4 dependence. Further structural analysis showed that a wider aperture of the predicted CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop, was associated with amino acid alterations within V5 and correlated with increased gp120-CD4 binding and increased fusogenicity. Our results provide evidence that the gp120 V5 loop may alter CD4bs conformation and contribute to increased gp120-CD4 interactions and Env fusogenicity.

  8. Long-Term Central and Effector SHIV-Specific Memory T Cell Responses Elicited after a Single Immunization with a Novel Lentivector DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Moussa, Maha; Baccard-Longere, Monique; Villinger, François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2014-01-01

    Prevention of HIV acquisition and replication requires long lasting and effective immunity. Given the state of HIV vaccine development, innovative vectors and immunization strategies are urgently needed to generate safe and efficacious HIV vaccines. Here, we developed a novel lentivirus-based DNA vector that does not integrate in the host genome and undergoes a single-cycle of replication. Viral proteins are constitutively expressed under the control of Tat-independent LTR promoter from goat lentivirus. We immunized six macaques once only with CAL-SHIV-IN− DNA using combined intramuscular and intradermal injections plus electroporation. Antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored for 47 weeks post-immunization (PI). PBMCs were assessed directly ex vivo or after 6 and 12 days of in vitro culture using antigenic and/or homeostatic proliferation. IFN-γ ELISPOT was used to measure immediate cytokine secretion from antigen specific effector cells and from memory precursors with high proliferative capacity (PHPC). The memory phenotype and functions (proliferation, cytokine expression, lytic content) of specific T cells were tested using multiparametric FACS-based assays. All immunized macaques developed lasting peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses mainly against Gag and Nef antigens. During the primary expansion phase, immediate effector cells as well as increasing numbers of proliferating cells with limited effector functions were detected which expressed markers of effector (EM) and central (CM) memory phenotypes. These responses contracted but then reemerged later in absence of antigen boost. Strong PHPC responses comprising vaccine-specific CM and EM T cells that readily expanded and acquired immediate effector functions were detected at 40/47 weeks PI. Altogether, our study demonstrated that a single immunization with a replication-limited DNA vaccine elicited persistent vaccine-specific CM and EM CD8+ and CD4+ T cells with immediate and readily

  9. CRTAM determines the CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte lineage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Arata; Badr, Mohamed El Sherif Gadelhaq; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Ishihara, Chitose; Onishi, Reiko; Guo, Zijin; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Ike, Hiroshi; Takumi, Akiko; Tsuji, Noriko M; Murakami, Yoshinori; Katakai, Tomoya; Kubo, Masato; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-11

    Naive T cells differentiate into various effector T cells, including CD4(+) helper T cell subsets and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Although cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells (CD4 +: CTL) also develop from naive T cells, the mechanism of development is elusive. We found that a small fraction of CD4(+) T cells that express class I-restricted T cell-associated molecule (CRTAM) upon activation possesses the characteristics of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. CRTAM(+) CD4(+) T cells secrete IFN-γ, express CTL-related genes, such as eomesodermin (Eomes), Granzyme B, and perforin, after cultivation, and exhibit cytotoxic function, suggesting that CRTAM(+) T cells are the precursor of CD4(+)CTL. Indeed, ectopic expression of CRTAM in T cells induced the production of IFN-γ, expression of CTL-related genes, and cytotoxic activity. The induction of CD4(+)CTL and IFN-γ production requires CRTAM-mediated intracellular signaling. CRTAM(+) T cells traffic to mucosal tissues and inflammatory sites and developed into CD4(+)CTL, which are involved in mediating protection against infection as well as inducing inflammatory response, depending on the circumstances, through IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxic activity. These results reveal that CRTAM is critical to instruct the differentiation of CD4(+)CTL through the induction of Eomes and CTL-related gene.

  10. CRTAM determines the CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Arata; Badr, Mohamed El Sherif Gadelhaq; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Ishihara, Chitose; Onishi, Reiko; Guo, Zijin; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Ike, Hiroshi; Takumi, Akiko; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Murakami, Yoshinori; Katakai, Tomoya; Kubo, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Naive T cells differentiate into various effector T cells, including CD4+ helper T cell subsets and CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Although cytotoxic CD4+ T cells (CD4+CTL) also develop from naive T cells, the mechanism of development is elusive. We found that a small fraction of CD4+ T cells that express class I–restricted T cell–associated molecule (CRTAM) upon activation possesses the characteristics of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CRTAM+ CD4+ T cells secrete IFN-γ, express CTL-related genes, such as eomesodermin (Eomes), Granzyme B, and perforin, after cultivation, and exhibit cytotoxic function, suggesting that CRTAM+ T cells are the precursor of CD4+CTL. Indeed, ectopic expression of CRTAM in T cells induced the production of IFN-γ, expression of CTL-related genes, and cytotoxic activity. The induction of CD4+CTL and IFN-γ production requires CRTAM-mediated intracellular signaling. CRTAM+ T cells traffic to mucosal tissues and inflammatory sites and developed into CD4+CTL, which are involved in mediating protection against infection as well as inducing inflammatory response, depending on the circumstances, through IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxic activity. These results reveal that CRTAM is critical to instruct the differentiation of CD4+CTL through the induction of Eomes and CTL-related gene. PMID:26694968

  11. Differential endocytosis of CD4 in lymphocytic and nonlymphocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The endocytosis of the T cell differentiation antigen CD4 has been investigated in CD4-transfected HeLa cells, the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line, and in a number of leukemia- or lymphoma-derived T cell lines. CD4 internalization was followed using radioiodinated antibodies in an acid-elution endocytosis assay, or by covalently modifying cell surface proteins with biotin and analyzing CD4 distributions by immunoprecipitation; both approaches gave equivalent results. The assays demonstrated that in transfected HeLa cells and in HL-60 cells CD4 was constitutively internalized and recycled in the absence of ligand. Immunogold labeling and electron microscopy demonstrated that CD4 enters cells through coated pits. In contrast to the nonlymphocytic cells, T cell lines showed very little endocytosis of CD4. Measurements of fluid phase endocytosis and morphometric analysis of the endosome compartment indicated that the endocytic capacities of HeLa and lymphoid cells are equivalent and suggested that the low level of CD4 uptake in lymphocytic cells is due to exclusion of CD4 from coated pits. This conclusion was supported by experiments using truncated CD4 molecules, lacking the bulk of the cytoplasmic domain, which were internalized equally efficiently in both transfected lymphocytes and HeLa cells. Together, these results indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 mediates the different interactions with the endocytic apparatus in lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells. We suggest that the CD4- associated lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase p56lck may be involved in preventing CD4 endocytosis in T cells. PMID:1900077

  12. Virions of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to soluble CD4 (sCD4) neutralization differ in sCD4 binding and glycoprotein gp120 retention from sCD4-sensitive isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; McKeating, J A; Huang, Y X; Ashkenazi, A; Ho, D D

    1992-01-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are much less sensitive to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and sCD4-immunoglobulin (Ig) chimeras (CD4-IgG) than are HIV-1 strains adapted to growth in cell culture. We demonstrated that there are significant reductions (10- to 30-fold) in the binding of sCD4 and CD4-IgG to intact virions of five primary isolates compared with sCD4-sensitive, cell culture-adapted isolates RF and IIIB. However, soluble envelope glycoproteins (gp120) derived from the primary isolate virions, directly by detergent solubilization or indirectly by recombinant DNA technology, differed in affinity from RF and IIIB gp120 by only one- to threefold. The reduced binding of sCD4 to these primary isolate virions must therefore be a consequence of the tertiary or quaternary structure of the envelope glycoproteins in their native, oligomeric form on the viral surface. In addition, the rate and extent of sCD4-induced gp120 shedding from these primary isolates was lower than that from RF. We suggest that reduced sCD4 binding and increased gp120 retention together account for the relative resistance of these primary isolates to neutralization by sCD4 and CD4-IgG and that virions of different HIV-1 isolates vary both in the mechanism of sCD4 binding and in subsequent conformational changes in their envelope glycoproteins. PMID:1727487

  13. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product.

  14. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product. PMID:23903715

  15. TGF‐β induces the differentiation of human CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shio; Watanabe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Ryo; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Ito, Juichi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    In the ectopic lymphoid‐like structures present in chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, a subset of human effector memory CD4+ T cells that lacks features of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells produces CXCL13. Here, we report that TGF‐β induces the differentiation of human CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells from naïve CD4+ T cells. The TGF‐β‐induced CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells do not express CXCR5, B‐cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6), and other Tfh‐cell markers. Furthermore, expression levels of CD25 (IL‐2Rα) in CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells are significantly lower than those in FoxP3+ in vitro induced Treg cells. Consistent with this, neutralization of IL‐2 and knockdown of STAT5 clearly upregulate CXCL13 production by CD4+ T cells, while downregulating the expression of FoxP3. Furthermore, overexpression of FoxP3 in naïve CD4+ T cells downregulates CXCL13 production, and knockdown of FoxP3 fails to inhibit the differentiation of CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells. As reported in rheumatoid arthritis, proinflammatory cytokines enhance secondary CXCL13 production from reactivated CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells. Our findings demonstrate that CXCL13‐producing CD4+ T cells lacking Tfh‐cell features differentiate via TGF‐β signaling but not via FoxP3, and exert their function in IL‐2‐limited but TGF‐β‐rich and proinflammatory cytokine‐rich inflammatory conditions. PMID:26541894

  16. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  17. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  18. Correlation between Central Memory T Cell Expression and Proinflammatory Cytokine Production with Clinical Presentation of Multibacillary Leprosy Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Esquenazi, Danuza; Alvim, Iris Maria Peixoto; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; de Oliveira, Eliane Barbosa; Moreira, Lilian de Oliveira; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Nery, Jose Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the efficacy of multidrug therapy, surviving Mycobacterium leprae causes relapse in some leprosy patients, and these patients present signs and symptoms of disease after healing. This study focused on the cellular immune response in relapsed multibacillary patients but also included non-relapsed multibacillary cured individuals, newly diagnosed and untreated multibacillary patients, paucibacillary patients just before the beginning of treatment, and voluntary healthy individuals for comparative analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Inhibition of CD86 expression in the blood-derived monocytes and dendritic cells of relapsed multibacillary patients, either ex vivo or after M. leprae antigen stimulation was observed by flow cytometry. In addition, no significant changes in Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) expression were observed in 5-day culture supernatants of relapsed patients in response to M. leprae, neither before nor after treatment, as measured by ELISA. However, these patients demonstrated a significant increase in central memory CD4+ and CD8+ M. leprae-specific T cells, as assessed by multiparametric flow cytometry. The increase in frequency of central memory T cells in relapsed patients strongly correlated with the bacillary index and the number of skin lesions observed in these subjects. Moreover, cytokine multiplex analysis demonstrated significant antigen-specific production of Interlukin-1beta (IL-1b), IL-6, and Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) in the relapsed group with extremely low IL-10 production, which resulted in a high TNF/IL-10 ratio. Conclusions/Significance Inhibition of CD86 expression may function to reduce effector T cell responses against the M. leprae antigen. Furthermore, the predominance of central memory T cells in association with the high TNF/IL-10 ratio and no observed IFN-γ production may be related to the pathogenesis of relapse in multibacillary leprosy. Therefore, our findings may be a direct result of the clinical

  19. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  20. Quantification of cells with specific phenotypes II: determination of CD4 expression level on reconstituted lyophilized human PBMC labelled with anti-CD4 FITC antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Stebbings, R; Gaigalas, A K; Sutherland, J; Kammel, M; John, M; Roemer, B; Kuhne, M; Schneider, R J; Braun, M; Engel, A; Dikshit, D; Abbasi, F; Marti, G E; Sassi, M; Revel, L; Kim, S K; Baradez, M; Lekishvili, T; Marshall, D; Whitby, L; Jing, W; Ost, V; Vonsky, M; Neukammer, J

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the characterization of CD4 expression level in terms of equivalent number of reference fluorophores (ERF). Twelve different flow cytometer platforms across sixteen laboratories were utilized in this study. As a first step the participants were asked to calibrate the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) channel of each flow cytometer using commercially available calibration standard consisting of five populations of microspheres. Each population had an assigned value of equivalent fluorescein fluorophores (EFF denotes a special case of the generic term ERF with FITC as the reference fluorophore). The EFF values were assigned at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A surface-labelled lyophilized cell preparation was provided by the National Institute of Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) pre-labeled with a FITC conjugated anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. Three PBMC sample vials, provided to each participant, were used for the CD4 expression analysis. The PBMC are purported to have a fixed number of surface CD4 receptors. On the basis of the microsphere calibration, the EFF value of the PBMC samples was measured to characterize the population average CD4 expression level of the PBMC preparations. Both the results of data analysis performed by each participant and the results of centralized analysis of all participants' raw data are reported. Centralized analysis gave a mean EFF value of 22,300 and an uncertainty of 750, corresponding to 3.3% (level of confidence 68%) of the mean EFF value. The next step will entail the measurement of the ERF values of the lyophilized PBMC stained with labels for other fluorescence channels. The ultimate goal is to show that lyophilized PBMC is a suitable biological reference cell material for multicolor flow cytometry and that it can be used to present multicolor flow cytometry measurements in terms of ABC (antibodies bound per cell

  1. In Vivo Identification and Characterization of CD4+ Cytotoxic T Cells Induced by Virulent Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Anna; Von Bargen, Kristine; Arce Gorvel, Vilma; Zhao, Weidong; Hanniffy, Sean; Bonnardel, Johnny; Méresse, Stéphane; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells display a variety of helper functions necessary for an efficient adaptive immune response against bacterial invaders. This work reports the in vivo identification and characterization of murine cytotoxic CD4+ T cells (CD4+ CTL) during Brucella abortus infection. These CD4+ CTLs express granzyme B and exhibit immunophenotypic features consistent with fully differentiated T cells. They express CD25, CD44, CD62L ,CD43 molecules at their surface and produce IFN-γ. Moreover, these cells express neither the co-stimulatory molecule CD27 nor the memory T cell marker CD127. We show here that CD4+ CTLs are capable of cytolytic action against Brucella-infected antigen presenting cells (APC) but not against Mycobacterium-infected APC. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cell population appears at early stages of the infection concomitantly with high levels of IFN-γ and granzyme B expression. CD4+ CTLs represent a so far uncharacterized immune cell sub-type triggered by early immune responses upon Brucella abortus infection. PMID:24367519

  2. Range of CD4-Bound Conformations of HIV-1 gp120, as Defined Using Conditional CD4-Induced Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Gilad; Roitburd-Berman, Anna; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV envelope binds cellular CD4 and undergoes a range of conformational changes that lead to membrane fusion and delivery of the viral nucleocapsid into the cellular cytoplasm. This binding to CD4 reveals cryptic and highly conserved epitopes, the molecular nature of which is still not fully understood. The atomic structures of CD4 complexed with gp120 core molecules (a form of gp120 in which the V1, V2, and V3 loops and N and C termini have been truncated) have indicated that a hallmark feature of the CD4-bound conformation is the bridging sheet minidomain. Variations in the orientation of the bridging sheet hairpins have been revealed when CD4-liganded gp120 was compared to CD4-unliganded trimeric envelope structures. Hence, there appears to be a number of conformational transitions possible in HIV-1 monomeric gp120 that are affected by CD4 binding. The spectrum of CD4-bound conformations has been interrogated in this study by using a well-characterized panel of conditional, CD4-induced (CD4i) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that bind HIV-1 gp120 and its mutations under various conditions. Two distinct CD4i epitopes of the outer domain were studied: the first comprises the bridging sheet, while the second contains elements of the V2 loop. Furthermore, we show that the unliganded extended monomeric core of gp120 (coree) assumes an intermediate CD4i conformation in solution that further undergoes detectable rearrangements upon association with CD4. These discoveries impact both accepted paradigms concerning gp120 structure and the field of HIV immunogen design. IMPORTANCE Elucidation of the conformational transitions that the HIV-1 envelope protein undergoes during the course of entry into CD4+ cells is fundamental to our understanding of HIV biology. The binding of CD4 triggers a range of gp120 structural rearrangements that could present targets for future drug design and development of preventive vaccines. Here we have systematically interrogated and

  3. Probing the Effect of Force on HIV-1 Receptor CD4

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell-surface proteins are central for the interaction of cells with their surroundings and are also associated with numerous diseases. These molecules are exposed to mechanical forces, but the exact relation between force and the functions and pathologies associated with cell-surface proteins is unclear. An important cell-surface protein is CD4, the primary receptor of HIV-1. Here we show that mechanical force activates conformational and chemical changes on CD4 that may be important during viral attachment. We have used single-molecule force spectroscopy and analysis on HIV-1 infectivity to demonstrate that the mechanical extension of CD4 occurs in a time-dependent manner and correlates with HIV-1 infectivity. We show that Ibalizumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks HIV-1, prevents the mechanical extension of CD4 domains 1 and 2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thiol/disulfide exchange in CD4 requires force for exposure of cryptic disulfide bonds. This mechanical perspective provides unprecedented information that can change our understanding on how viruses interact with their hosts. PMID:25299596

  4. Computational modeling of heterogeneity and function of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Carbo, Adria; Hontecillas, Raquel; Andrew, Tricity; Eden, Kristin; Mei, Yongguo; Hoops, Stefan; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is composed of many different cell types and hundreds of intersecting molecular pathways and signals. This large biological complexity requires coordination between distinct pro-inflammatory and regulatory cell subsets to respond to infection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. CD4+ T cells play a central role in orchestrating immune responses and in maintaining a balance between pro- and anti- inflammatory responses. This tight balance between regulatory and effector reactions depends on the ability of CD4+ T cells to modulate distinct pathways within large molecular networks, since dysregulated CD4+ T cell responses may result in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The CD4+ T cell differentiation process comprises an intricate interplay between cytokines, their receptors, adaptor molecules, signaling cascades and transcription factors that help delineate cell fate and function. Computational modeling can help to describe, simulate, analyze, and predict some of the behaviors in this complicated differentiation network. This review provides a comprehensive overview of existing computational immunology methods as well as novel strategies used to model immune responses with a particular focus on CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:25364738

  5. Immunologic memory in cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Phillip

    2005-12-01

    Leishmania major infections induce solid immunity to reinfection. Experimental studies in mice indicate that the CD4+ T cells responsible for this immunity include two populations: parasite-dependent T effector cells and parasite-independent central memory T (Tcm) cells. While there currently is no vaccine for leishmaniasis, the existence of a long-lived population of Tcm cells that does not require the continued presence of live parasites suggests that a vaccine that expands these cells might be efficacious.

  6. Differential contributions of central and effector memory T cells to recall responses

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alan D.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Woodland, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Although the absolute number of memory CD8+ T cells established in the spleen following antigen encounter remains stable for many years, the relative capacity of these cells to mediate recall responses is not known. Here we used a dual adoptive transfer approach to demonstrate a progressive increase in the quality of memory T cell pools in terms of their ability to proliferate and accumulate at effector sites in response to secondary pathogen challenge. This temporal increase in efficacy occurred in CD62Llo (effector memory) and CD62Lhi (central memory) subpopulations, but was most prominent in the CD62Lhi subpopulation. These data indicate that the contribution of effector memory and central memory T cells to the recall response changes substantially over time. PMID:15983064

  7. Rate of CD4 Decline and Factors Associated with Rapid CD4 Decline in Asymptomatic HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Chaiyasin, Natdanai; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-01-01

    The accurate marker to assess the risk of disease progression in HIV disease is CD4 count. CD4 decline to <200 cells/mm3 prompts the patients to have risk of opportunistic infections. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients who had CD4 count>200 cell/mm3, were antiretroviral naive, and had ≥1-year follow-up. Eighty patients, with mean age of 36.4 (standard deviation [SD]=9.1) years and 58.8% females, were analyzed. The mean (SD) baseline CD4 count was 423 (119) cells/mm3. During the median (IQR) time of 29.0 (14.1-49.6) months, 26.3% had CD4 declined to <200 cells/mm3. From Cox proportional hazard model, only baseline CD4 count<350 cells/mm3 was significantly associated with rapid decline in CD4 count (HR 4.208; 95%CI, 1.428-12.397; P=.009). Age, gender, comorbid disease, risk of HIV infection, duration of HIV diagnosis, and body weight were not associated with rapid CD4 decline. This indicates that asymptomatic patients with CD4 count<350 cells/mm3 are at priority for antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

  8. CD4+ T Cells Promote Antibody Production but Not Sustained Affinity Maturation during Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial for enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, supporting the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibody responses, long-lived plasma cells, and memory B cells. Previous studies showed that the immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi appears to lack robust T-dependent B cell responses, as neither long-lived plasma cells nor memory B cells form for months after infection, and nonswitched IgM antibodies are produced continuously during this chronic disease. These data prompted us to evaluate the induction and functionality of B. burgdorferi infection-induced CD4 TFH cells. We report that CD4 T cells were effectively primed and TFH cells induced after B. burgdorferi infection. These CD4 T cells contributed to the control of B. burgdorferi burden and supported the induction of B. burgdorferi-specific IgG responses. However, while affinity maturation of antibodies against a prototypic T-dependent B. burgdorferi protein, Arthritis-related protein (Arp), were initiated, these increases were reversed later, coinciding with the previously observed involution of germinal centers. The cessation of affinity maturation was not due to the appearance of inhibitory or exhausted CD4 T cells or a strong induction of regulatory T cells. In vitro T-B cocultures demonstrated that T cells isolated from B. burgdorferi-infected but not B. burgdorferi-immunized mice supported the rapid differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells rather than continued proliferation, mirroring the induction of rapid short-lived instead of long-lived T-dependent antibody responses in vivo. The data further suggest that B. burgdorferi infection drives the humoral response away from protective, high-affinity, and long-lived antibody responses and toward the rapid induction of strongly induced, short-lived antibodies of limited efficacy. PMID:25312948

  9. Quantitative and qualitative characterization of expanded CD4+ T cell clones in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ishigaki, Kazuyoshi; Shoda, Hirofumi; Kochi, Yuta; Yasui, Tetsuro; Kadono, Yuho; Tanaka, Sakae; Fujio, Keishi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune destructive arthritis associated with CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity. Although expanded CD4+ T cell clones (ECs) has already been confirmed, the detailed characteristics of ECs have not been elucidated in RA. Using combination of a single-cell analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in TCR repertoire analysis, we here revealed the detailed nature of ECs by examining peripheral blood (PB) from 5 RA patients and synovium from 1 RA patient. When we intensively investigated the single-cell transcriptome of the most expanded clones in memory CD4+ T cells (memory-mECs) in RA-PB, senescence-related transcripts were up-regulated, indicating circulating ECs were constantly stimulated. Tracking of the transcriptome shift within the same memory-mECs between PB and the synovium revealed the augmentations in senescence-related gene expression and the up-regulation of synovium-homing chemokine receptors in the synovium. Our in-depth characterization of ECs in RA successfully demonstrated the presence of the specific immunological selection pressure, which determines the phenotype of ECs. Moreover, transcriptome tracking added novel aspects to the underlying sequential immune processes. Our approach may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:26245356

  10. HIV-specific regulatory T cells are associated with higher CD4 cell counts in primary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kared, Hassen; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Aouba, Albertine; Melica, Giovanna; Balbo, Michèle; Weiss, Laurence; Lévy, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Objective Expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells has been described in chronically HIV-infected subjects. We investigated whether HIV-suppressive Treg could be detected during primary HIV infection (PHI). Methods Seventeen patients diagnosed early after PHI (median: 13 days; 1–55) were studied. Median CD4 cell count was 480 cells/μl (33–1306) and plasma HIV RNA levels ranged between 3.3 to 5.7 log10 cp/mL. Suppressive capacity of blood purified CD4+CD25+ was evaluated in a co-culture assay. Fox-p3, IL-2 and IL-10 were quantified by RT-PCR and intra-cellular staining of ex vivo and activated CD4+CD25high T cells. Results The frequency of CD4+CD127lowCD25high T cells among CD4 T cells was lower in PHI compared to chronic patients (n=19). They exhibited a phenotype of memory T cells and expressed constitutively FoxP3. Similarly to chronic patients, Treg from PHI patients inhibited the proliferation of PPD and HIV p24 activated CD4+CD25− T cells. CD4+CD25high T cells from PHI patients responded specifically to p24 stimulation by expressing IL-10. In untreated PHI patients, the frequency, as well as HIV-specific activity of Treg decreased during a 24-month follow up. A positive correlation between percentages of Treg and both CD4 cell counts and the magnitude of p24-specific suppressive activity at diagnosis of PHI was found. Conclusions Our data showed that HIV drives Treg since PHI and that these cells persist throughout the course of the infection. A correlation between the frequency of Treg and CD4 T cell counts suggest that these cells may impact on the immune activation set point at PHI diagnosis. PMID:19005268

  11. Sialylation regulates peripheral tolerance in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patrick J; Saouaf, Sandra J; Van Dyken, Steve; Marth, Jamey D; Li, Bin; Bhandoola, Avinash; Greene, Mark I

    2006-05-01

    Decreased binding by the 6C10 auto-antibody serves as a unique marker for CD4+ T cell unresponsiveness after the induction of T cell tolerance in Vbeta8.1 TCR transgenic mice. We further define the nature of the epitope recognized by the 6C10 antibody to be a subset of Thy-1 bearing incompletely sialylated N-linked glycans, and furthermore, we demonstrate that tolerant CD4+ T cells have an increased degree of cell-surface sialylation. To test the significance of the altered glycosylation state identified by the 6C10 auto-antibody in the tolerant CD4+ T cell population, surface sialic acid was cleaved enzymatically. Treatment of purified peripheral CD4+ T cells with Vibrio cholerae sialidase (VCS) leads to increased 6C10 binding, significantly enhances proliferation in the tolerant CD4+ population and corrects defects in phosphotyrosine signaling observed in the tolerant CD4+ T cell. Furthermore, in vivo administration of VCS enhances proliferation in both tolerant and naive CD4+ T cell subsets. These studies suggest that sialylation of glycoproteins on the surface of the CD4+ T cell contributes to the regulation of T cell responsiveness in the tolerant state. PMID:16291658

  12. CEMETERY CENTRAL PLAZA, SHOWING ROSTRUM AT RIGHT BACK¬GROUND AND MEMORIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CEMETERY CENTRAL PLAZA, SHOWING ROSTRUM AT RIGHT BACK¬GROUND AND MEMORIAL TO PURSUERS OF LINCOLN’S ASSASSIN AT LEFT FORE¬GROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Alexandria National Cemetery, 1450 Wilkes Street, Alexandria, Independent City, VA

  13. Neuropharmacology of memory consolidation and reconsolidation: Insights on central cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Krawczyk, M C; Baratti, C M; Boccia, M M

    2014-01-01

    Central cholinergic system is critically involved in all known memory processes. Endogenous acetylcholine release by cholinergic neurons is necessary for modulation of acquisition, encoding, consolidation, reconsolidation, extinction, retrieval and expression. Experiments from our laboratory are mainly focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which acetylcholine modulates memory processes. Blockade of hippocampal alpha-7-nicotinic receptors (α7-nAChRs) with the antagonist methyllycaconitine impairs memory reconsolidation. However, the administration of a α7-nAChR agonist (choline) produce a paradoxical modulation, causing memory enhancement in mice trained with a weak footshock, but memory impairment in animals trained with a strong footshock. All these effects are long-lasting, and depend on the age of the memory trace. This review summarizes and discusses some of our recent findings, particularly regarding the involvement of α7-nAChRs on memory reconsolidation.

  14. CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio increase during rituximab maintenance in granulomatosis with polyangiitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Johannes C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rituximab (RTX) is a B cell-depleting agent approved for the treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). RTX reduces antibody producing precursor plasma cells and inhibits B and T cells interaction. Infections related to T cell immunodeficiency are not infrequent during RTX treatment. Our study investigated CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio in GPA patients during the first two years of long-term RTX treatment. Methods A single centre cohort study of 35 patients who received median total cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide (CYC) of 15 g and were treated with RTX 2 g followed by retreatment with either 2 g once annually or 1 g biannually. Serum levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) and lymphocytes subsets were recorded at RTX initiation and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Low CD4 count and inverted CD4/CD8 ratio were defined as CD4 < 0.3 × 109/l and ratio < 1. Results The CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio decreased slightly following the initial RTX treatment and then increased gradually during maintenance treatment. While the proportion of patients with low CD4 cell count decreased from 43% at baseline to 18% at 24 months, the ratio remained inverted in 40%. Oral daily prednisolone dose at baseline, CYC exposure and the maintenance regimen did not influence the CD4 cell count and ratio. Being older (p = 0.012) and having a higher CRP (p = 0.044) and ESR (p = 0.024) at baseline significantly increased the risk of inverted CD4/CD8 ratio at 24 months. Inverted ratio at baseline associated with lower total Ig levels during the study. Conclusions Overall, the CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio increased during maintenance RTX therapy in GPA with no discernible impact of other immunosuppressive therapy. However the increase in CD4 was not followed by an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio, especially in older patients. Inverted CD4/CD8 ratio associated with lower Ig levels, suggesting a more profound B cell depleting effect of RTX with a relative increase in CD8

  15. CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio increase during rituximab maintenance in granulomatosis with polyangiitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Johannes C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rituximab (RTX) is a B cell-depleting agent approved for the treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). RTX reduces antibody producing precursor plasma cells and inhibits B and T cells interaction. Infections related to T cell immunodeficiency are not infrequent during RTX treatment. Our study investigated CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio in GPA patients during the first two years of long-term RTX treatment. Methods A single centre cohort study of 35 patients who received median total cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide (CYC) of 15 g and were treated with RTX 2 g followed by retreatment with either 2 g once annually or 1 g biannually. Serum levels of total immunoglobulin (Ig) and lymphocytes subsets were recorded at RTX initiation and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Low CD4 count and inverted CD4/CD8 ratio were defined as CD4 < 0.3 × 109/l and ratio < 1. Results The CD4 cell count and CD4/CD8 ratio decreased slightly following the initial RTX treatment and then increased gradually during maintenance treatment. While the proportion of patients with low CD4 cell count decreased from 43% at baseline to 18% at 24 months, the ratio remained inverted in 40%. Oral daily prednisolone dose at baseline, CYC exposure and the maintenance regimen did not influence the CD4 cell count and ratio. Being older (p = 0.012) and having a higher CRP (p = 0.044) and ESR (p = 0.024) at baseline significantly increased the risk of inverted CD4/CD8 ratio at 24 months. Inverted ratio at baseline associated with lower total Ig levels during the study. Conclusions Overall, the CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio increased during maintenance RTX therapy in GPA with no discernible impact of other immunosuppressive therapy. However the increase in CD4 was not followed by an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio, especially in older patients. Inverted CD4/CD8 ratio associated with lower Ig levels, suggesting a more profound B cell depleting effect of RTX with a relative increase in CD8

  16. Impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis remains the primary cause of death from infection in hospital patients, despite improvements in antibiotics and intensive-care practices. Patients who survive severe sepsis can display suppressed immune function, often manifested as an increased susceptibility to (and mortality from) nosocomial infections. Not only is there a significant reduction in the number of various immune cell populations during sepsis, but there is also decreased function in the remaining lymphocytes. Within the immune system, CD4 T cells are important players in the proper development of numerous cellular and humoral immune responses. Despite sufficient clinical evidence of CD4 T cell loss in septic patients of all ages, the impact of sepsis on CD4 T cell responses is not well understood. Recent findings suggest that CD4 T cell impairment is a multipronged problem that results from initial sepsis-induced cell loss. However, the subsequent lymphopenia-induced numerical recovery of the CD4 T cell compartment leads to intrinsic alterations in phenotype and effector function, reduced repertoire diversity, changes in the composition of naive antigen-specific CD4 T cell pools, and changes in the representation of different CD4 T cell subpopulations (e.g., increases in Treg frequency). This review focuses on sepsis-induced alterations within the CD4 T cell compartment that influence the ability of the immune system to control secondary heterologous infections. The understanding of how sepsis affects CD4 T cells through their numerical loss and recovery, as well as function, is important in the development of future treatments designed to restore CD4 T cells to their presepsis state. PMID:24791959

  17. Out-of-Sequence Signal 3 Paralyzes Primary CD4(+) T-Cell-Dependent Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sckisel, Gail D; Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Monjazeb, Arta M; Crittenden, Marka; Curti, Brendan D; Wilkins, Danice E C; Alderson, Kory A; Sungur, Can M; Ames, Erik; Mirsoian, Annie; Reddy, Abhinav; Alexander, Warren; Soulika, Athena; Blazar, Bruce R; Longo, Dan L; Wiltrout, Robert H; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-18

    Primary T cell activation involves the integration of three distinct signals delivered in sequence: (1) antigen recognition, (2) costimulation, and (3) cytokine-mediated differentiation and expansion. Strong immunostimulatory events such as immunotherapy or infection induce profound cytokine release causing "bystander" T cell activation, thereby increasing the potential for autoreactivity and need for control. We show that during strong stimulation, a profound suppression of primary CD4(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses ensued and was observed across preclinical models and patients undergoing high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy. This suppression targeted naive CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells and was mediated through transient suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) inhibition of the STAT5b transcription factor signaling pathway. These events resulted in complete paralysis of primary CD4(+) T cell activation, affecting memory generation and induction of autoimmunity as well as impaired viral clearance. These data highlight the critical regulation of naive CD4(+) T cells during inflammatory conditions.

  18. Out-of-Sequence Signal 3 Paralyzes Primary CD4(+) T-Cell-Dependent Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sckisel, Gail D; Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Monjazeb, Arta M; Crittenden, Marka; Curti, Brendan D; Wilkins, Danice E C; Alderson, Kory A; Sungur, Can M; Ames, Erik; Mirsoian, Annie; Reddy, Abhinav; Alexander, Warren; Soulika, Athena; Blazar, Bruce R; Longo, Dan L; Wiltrout, Robert H; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-18

    Primary T cell activation involves the integration of three distinct signals delivered in sequence: (1) antigen recognition, (2) costimulation, and (3) cytokine-mediated differentiation and expansion. Strong immunostimulatory events such as immunotherapy or infection induce profound cytokine release causing "bystander" T cell activation, thereby increasing the potential for autoreactivity and need for control. We show that during strong stimulation, a profound suppression of primary CD4(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses ensued and was observed across preclinical models and patients undergoing high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy. This suppression targeted naive CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T cells and was mediated through transient suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) inhibition of the STAT5b transcription factor signaling pathway. These events resulted in complete paralysis of primary CD4(+) T cell activation, affecting memory generation and induction of autoimmunity as well as impaired viral clearance. These data highlight the critical regulation of naive CD4(+) T cells during inflammatory conditions. PMID:26231116

  19. Regulated expression of human CD4 rescues helper T cell development in mice lacking expression of endogenous CD4.

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, N; Sawada, S; Littman, D R

    1993-01-01

    During T cell development, precursor thymocytes that co-express the CD4 and CD8 glycoproteins give rise to mature progeny expressing one of these molecules to the exclusion of the other. Continued expression of only CD4 is the hallmark of mature helper T cells, whereas cytotoxic T cells express CD8 and extinguish CD4. The differentiation program that generates the two T cell subsets is likely to be intimately tied to regulation of expression of these cell surface molecules. We now describe the use of a murine CD4 enhancer in the generation of transgenic mice expressing physiologic levels of human CD4. The transgene is appropriately regulated during T cell development and includes the necessary cis-acting sequences for extinguishing expression in the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, in mice whose endogenous CD4 gene is inactivated, the transgenic human CD4 mediates rescue of the CD4 lineage and restoration of normal helper cell functions. The generation of these mice exemplifies a general approach for developing reliable animal models for the human immune system. Images PMID:8467804

  20. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C; Beilman, Greg J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Schacker, Timothy W; Silvestri, Guido; Haase, Ashley T

    2012-08-30

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1-infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution.

  1. Critical role of CD4 T cells in maintaining lymphoid tissue structure for immune cell homeostasis and reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Paiardini, Mirko; Engram, Jessica C.; Beilman, Greg J.; Chipman, Jeffrey G.; Schacker, Timothy W.; Silvestri, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the fibroblastic reticular cell (FRC) network in lymphoid tissues during HIV-1 infection has been shown to impair the survival of naive T cells and limit immune reconstitution after antiretroviral therapy. What causes this FRC loss is unknown. Because FRC loss correlates with loss of both naive CD4 and CD8 T-cell subsets and decreased lymphotoxin-β, a key factor for maintenance of FRC network, we hypothesized that loss of naive T cells is responsible for loss of the FRC network. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the consequences of antibody-mediated depletion of CD4 and CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques and sooty mangabeys. We found that only CD4 T-cell depletion resulted in FRC loss in both species and that this loss was caused by decreased lymphotoxin-β mainly produced by the CD4 T cells. We further found the same dependence of the FRC network on CD4 T cells in HIV-1–infected patients before and after antiretroviral therapy and in other immunodeficiency conditions, such as CD4 depletion in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy and irradiation. CD4 T cells thus play a central role in the maintenance of lymphoid tissue structure necessary for their own homeostasis and reconstitution. PMID:22613799

  2. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS. PMID:3492511

  3. CD4 T Cell Help via B Cells Is Required for Lymphopenia-Induced CD8 T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Ab-mediated lymphoablation is commonly used in solid organ and hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, these strategies fail to control pathogenic memory T cells efficiently and to improve long-term transplant outcomes significantly. Understanding the mechanisms of T cell reconstitution is critical for enhancing the efficacy of Ab-mediated depletion in sensitized recipients. Using a murine analog of anti-thymocyte globulin (mATG) in a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, we previously showed that peritransplant lymphocyte depletion induces rapid memory T cell proliferation and only modestly prolongs allograft survival. We now report that T cell repertoire following depletion is dominated by memory CD4 T cells. Additional depletion of these residual CD4 T cells severely impairs the recovery of memory CD8 T cells after mATG treatment. The CD4 T cell help during CD8 T cell recovery depends on the presence of B cells expressing CD40 and intact CD40/CD154 interactions. The requirement for CD4 T cell help is not limited to the use of mATG in heart allograft recipients, and it is observed in nontransplanted mice and after CD8 T cell depletion with mAb instead of mATG. Most importantly, limiting helper signals increases the efficacy of mATG in controlling memory T cell expansion and significantly extends heart allograft survival in sensitized recipients. Our findings uncover the novel role for helper memory CD4 T cells during homeostatic CD8 T cell proliferation and open new avenues for optimizing lymphoablative therapies in allosensitized patients.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Salmonid CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Montero, Ruth; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Sandino, Ana María; Zou, Jun; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Imarai, Mónica

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the isolation and functional characterization of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CD4-1(+) T cells and the establishment of an IL-15-dependent CD4-1(+) T cell line. By using Abs specific for CD4-1 and CD3ε it was possible to isolate the double-positive T cells in spleen and head kidney. The morphology and the presence of transcripts for T cell markers in the sorted CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) cells were studied next. Cells were found to express TCRα, TCRβ, CD152 (CTLA-4), CD154 (CD40L), T-bet, GATA-3, and STAT-1. The sorted CD4-1(+) T cells also had a distinctive functional attribute of mammalian T lymphocytes, namely they could undergo Ag-specific proliferation, using OVA as a model Ag. The OVA-stimulated cells showed increased expression of several cytokines, including IFN-γ1, IL-4/13A, IL-15, IL-17D, IL-10, and TGF-β1, perhaps indicating that T cell proliferation led to differentiation into distinct effector phenotypes. Using IL-15 as a growth factor, we have selected a lymphoid cell line derived from rainbow trout head kidney cells. The morphology, cell surface expression of CD4-1, and the presence of transcripts of T cell cytokines and transcription factors indicated that this is a CD4-1(+) T cell line. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of CD4-1(+)CD3ε(+) T cells in salmonids. As in mammals, CD4-1(+) T cells may be the master regulators of immune responses in fish, and therefore these findings and the new model T cell line developed will contribute to a greater understanding of T cell function and immune responses in teleost fish. PMID:27053758

  5. HIV-1 Nef mutations abrogating downregulation of CD4 affect other Nef functions and show reduced pathogenicity in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Zaher . E-mail: Zaher.Hanna@ircm.qc.ca; Priceputu, Elena; Hu, Chunyan; Vincent, Patrick; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2006-03-01

    HIV-1 Nef has the ability to downmodulate CD4 cell surface expression. Several studies have shown that CD4 downregulation is required for efficient virus replication and high infectivity. However, the pathophysiological relevance of this phenomenon in vivo, independently of its role in sustaining high virus loads, remains unclear. We studied the impact of the CD4 downregulation function of Nef on its pathogenesis in vivo, in the absence of viral replication, in the CD4C/HIV transgenic (Tg) mouse model. Two independent Nef mutants (RD35/36AA and D174K), known to abrogate CD4 downregulation, were tested in Tg mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed that downregulation of murine CD4 was severely decreased or abrogated on Tg T cells expressing respectively Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and Nef{sup D174K}. Similarly, the severe depletion of double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} and of single-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup -} thymocytes, usually observed with Nef{sup Wt}, was not detected in Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and Nef{sup D174K} Tg mice. However, both mutant Tg mice showed a partial depletion of peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells. This was accompanied, as previously reported for Net{sup Wt} Tg mice, by the presence of an activated/memory-like phenotype (CD69{sup +}, CD25{sup +}, CD44{sup +}, CD45RB{sup Low}, CD62{sup Low}) of CD4{sup +} T cells expressing Nef{sup RD35/36AA} and to a lesser extent Nef{sup D174K}. In addition, both mutants retained the ability to block CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation in vitro after anti-CD3 stimulation, but not to enhance apoptosis/death of CD4{sup +} T cells. Therefore, it appears that Nef-mediated CD4 downregulation is associated with thymic defects, but segregates independently of the activated/memory-like phenotype, of the partial depletion and of the impaired in vitro proliferation of peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells. Histopathological assessment revealed the total absence of or decrease severity and frequency of organ AIDS-like diseases (lung, heart and kidney

  6. Increased TNF-α/IFN-γ/IL-2 and Decreased TNF-α/IFN-γ Production by Central Memory T Cells Are Associated with Protective Responses against Bovine Tuberculosis Following BCG Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Vordermeier, Hans Martin; McGill, Jodi L.; Whelan, Adam O.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Waters, W. Ray

    2016-01-01

    Central memory T cell (Tcm) and polyfunctional CD4 T cell responses contribute to vaccine-elicited protection with both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB); however, their combined role in protective immunity to TB is unclear. To address this question, we evaluated polyfunctional cytokine responses by CD4 T cell effector/memory populations from bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG) vaccinated and non-vaccinated calves by flow cytometry prior to and after aerosol challenge with virulent Mycobacterium bovis. Polyfunctional cytokine expression patterns in the response by Tcm, effector memory, and effector T cell subsets were similar between BCG-vaccinated and M. bovis-infected calves, only differing in magnitude (i.e., infected > vaccinated). BCG vaccination, however, did alter the kinetics of the ensuing response to virulent M. bovis infection. Early after challenge (3 weeks post-infection), non-vaccinates had greater antigen-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ)/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and lesser IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 responses by Tcm cells than did vaccinated animals. Importantly, these differences were also associated with mycobacterial burden upon necropsy. Polyfunctional responses to ESAT-6:CFP10 (antigens not synthesized by BCG strains) were detected in memory subsets, as well as in effector cells, as early as 3 weeks after challenge. These findings suggest that cell fate divergence may occur early after antigen priming in the response to bovine TB and that memory and effector T cells may expand concurrently during the initial phase of the immune response. In summary, robust IFN-γ/TNF-α response by Tcm cells is associated with greater mycobacterial burden, while IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 response by Tcm cells are indicative of a protective response to bovine TB. PMID:27799930

  7. Extensive CD4 and CD8 T Cell Cross-Reactivity between Alphaherpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lichen; Laing, Kerry J; Dong, Lichun; Russell, Ronnie M; Barlow, Russell S; Haas, Juergen G; Ramchandani, Meena S; Johnston, Christine; Buus, Soren; Redwood, Alec J; White, Katie D; Mallal, Simon A; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Posavad, Christine M; Wald, Anna; Koelle, David M

    2016-03-01

    The Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily includes HSV types 1 and 2 and the sequence-divergent pathogen varicella zoster virus (VZV). T cells, controlled by TCR and HLA molecules that tolerate limited epitope amino acid variation, might cross-react between these microbes. We show that memory PBMC expansion with either HSV or VZV enriches for CD4 T cell lines that recognize the other agent at the whole-virus, protein, and peptide levels, consistent with bidirectional cross-reactivity. HSV-specific CD4 T cells recovered from HSV-seronegative persons can be explained, in part, by such VZV cross-reactivity. HSV-1-reactive CD8 T cells also cross-react with VZV-infected cells, full-length VZV proteins, and VZV peptides, as well as kill VZV-infected dermal fibroblasts. Mono- and cross-reactive CD8 T cells use distinct TCRB CDR3 sequences. Cross-reactivity to VZV is reconstituted by cloning and expressing TCRA/TCRB receptors from T cells that are initially isolated using HSV reagents. Overall, we define 13 novel CD4 and CD8 HSV-VZV cross-reactive epitopes and strongly imply additional cross-reactive peptide sets. Viral proteins can harbor both CD4 and CD8 HSV/VZV cross-reactive epitopes. Quantitative estimates of HSV/VZV cross-reactivity for both CD4 and CD8 T cells vary from 10 to 50%. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that host herpesvirus immune history may influence the pathogenesis and clinical outcome of subsequent infections or vaccinations for related pathogens and that cross-reactive epitopes and TCRs may be useful for multi-alphaherpesvirus vaccine design and adoptive cellular therapy. PMID:26810224

  8. POC CD4 Testing Improves Linkage to HIV Care and Timeliness of ART Initiation in a Public Health Approach: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vojnov, Lara; Markby, Jessica; Boeke, Caroline; Harris, Lindsay; Ford, Nathan; Peter, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Background CD4 cell count is an important test in HIV programs for baseline risk assessment, monitoring of ART where viral load is not available, and, in many settings, antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation decisions. However, access to CD4 testing is limited, in part due to the centralized conventional laboratory network. Point of care (POC) CD4 testing has the potential to address some of the challenges of centralized CD4 testing and delays in delivery of timely testing and ART initiation. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the extent to which POC improves linkages to HIV care and timeliness of ART initiation. Methods We searched two databases and four conference sites between January 2005 and April 2015 for studies reporting test turnaround times, proportion of results returned, and retention associated with the use of point-of-care CD4. Random effects models were used to estimate pooled risk ratios, pooled proportions, and 95% confidence intervals. Results We identified 30 eligible studies, most of which were completed in Africa. Test turnaround times were reduced with the use of POC CD4. The time from HIV diagnosis to CD4 test was reduced from 10.5 days with conventional laboratory-based testing to 0.1 days with POC CD4 testing. Retention along several steps of the treatment initiation cascade was significantly higher with POC CD4 testing, notably from HIV testing to CD4 testing, receipt of results, and pre-CD4 test retention (all p<0.001). Furthermore, retention between CD4 testing and ART initiation increased with POC CD4 testing compared to conventional laboratory-based testing (p = 0.01). We also carried out a non-systematic review of the literature observing that POC CD4 increased the projected life expectancy, was cost-effective, and acceptable. Conclusions POC CD4 technologies reduce the time and increase patient retention along the testing and treatment cascade compared to conventional laboratory-based testing. POC CD4 is

  9. Central Nervous Insulin Signaling in Sleep-Associated Memory Formation and Neuroendocrine Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Gordon B; Wilhem, Ines; Benedict, Christian; Rüdel, Benjamin; Klameth, Corinna; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The neurochemical underpinnings of sleep's contribution to the establishment and maintenance of memory traces are largely unexplored. Considering that intranasal insulin administration to the CNS improves memory functions in healthy and memory-impaired humans, we tested whether brain insulin signaling and sleep interact to enhance memory consolidation in healthy participants. We investigated the effect of intranasal insulin on sleep-associated neurophysiological and neuroendocrine parameters and memory consolidation in 16 men and 16 women (aged 18–30 years), who learned a declarative word-pair task and a procedural finger sequence tapping task in the evening before intranasal insulin (160 IU) or placebo administration and 8 h of nocturnal sleep. On the subsequent evening, they learned interfering word-pairs and a new finger sequence before retrieving the original memories. Insulin increased growth hormone concentrations in the first night-half and EEG delta power during the second 90 min of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Insulin treatment impaired the acquisition of new contents in both the declarative and procedural memory systems on the next day, whereas retrieval of original memories was unchanged. Results indicate that sleep-associated memory consolidation is not a primary mediator of insulin's acute memory-improving effect, but that the peptide acts on mechanisms that diminish the subsequent encoding of novel information. Thus, by inhibiting processes of active forgetting during sleep, central nervous insulin might reduce the interfering influence of encoding new information. PMID:26448203

  10. Peripheral and central CB1 cannabinoid receptors control stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Cutando, Laura; Ortega-Alvaro, Antonio; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floortje; Bindila, Laura; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-08-30

    Stressful events can generate emotional memories linked to the traumatic incident, but they also can impair the formation of nonemotional memories. Although the impact of stress on emotional memories is well studied, much less is known about the influence of the emotional state on the formation of nonemotional memories. We used the novel object-recognition task as a model of nonemotional memory in mice to investigate the underlying mechanism of the deleterious effect of stress on memory consolidation. Systemic, hippocampal, and peripheral blockade of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors abolished the stress-induced memory impairment. Genetic deletion and rescue of CB1 receptors in specific cell types revealed that the CB1 receptor population specifically in dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH)-expressing cells is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation, but CB1 receptors present in other neuronal populations are not involved. Strikingly, pharmacological manipulations in mice expressing CB1 receptors exclusively in DBH(+) cells revealed that both hippocampal and peripheral receptors mediate the impact of stress on memory consolidation. Thus, CB1 receptors on adrenergic and noradrenergic cells provide previously unrecognized cross-talk between central and peripheral mechanisms in the stress-dependent regulation of nonemotional memory consolidation, suggesting new potential avenues for the treatment of cognitive aspects on stress-related disorders. PMID:27528659

  11. Peripheral and central CB1 cannabinoid receptors control stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Cutando, Laura; Ortega-Alvaro, Antonio; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floortje; Bindila, Laura; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-08-30

    Stressful events can generate emotional memories linked to the traumatic incident, but they also can impair the formation of nonemotional memories. Although the impact of stress on emotional memories is well studied, much less is known about the influence of the emotional state on the formation of nonemotional memories. We used the novel object-recognition task as a model of nonemotional memory in mice to investigate the underlying mechanism of the deleterious effect of stress on memory consolidation. Systemic, hippocampal, and peripheral blockade of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors abolished the stress-induced memory impairment. Genetic deletion and rescue of CB1 receptors in specific cell types revealed that the CB1 receptor population specifically in dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH)-expressing cells is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation, but CB1 receptors present in other neuronal populations are not involved. Strikingly, pharmacological manipulations in mice expressing CB1 receptors exclusively in DBH(+) cells revealed that both hippocampal and peripheral receptors mediate the impact of stress on memory consolidation. Thus, CB1 receptors on adrenergic and noradrenergic cells provide previously unrecognized cross-talk between central and peripheral mechanisms in the stress-dependent regulation of nonemotional memory consolidation, suggesting new potential avenues for the treatment of cognitive aspects on stress-related disorders.

  12. Innate PLZF+ CD4+ αβ T cells develop and expand in the absence of Itk1

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Amanda L.; Watkin, Levi B.; Yin, Catherine C.; Selin, Liisa K.; Kang, Joonsoo; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2014-01-01

    T cell development in the thymus produces multiple lineages of cells, including innate T cells. Studies in mice harboring alterations in TCR signaling proteins or transcriptional regulators have revealed an expanded population of CD4+ innate T cells in the thymus that produce IL-4 and express the transcription factor PLZF. In these mice, IL-4 produced by the CD4+ PLZF+ T cell population leads to the conversion of conventional CD8+ thymocytes into innate CD8+ T cells resembling memory T cells expressing Eomesodermin. The expression of PLZF, the signature iNKT cell transcription factor, in these innate CD4+ T cells suggests that they might be a subset of αβ or γδ TCR+ NKT cells or MAIT cells. To address these possibilities, we characterized the CD4+ PLZF+ innate T cells in itk-/- mice. We show that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells are not CD1d-dependent NKT cells, MR1-dependent MAIT cells, nor γδ T cells. Further, although the itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells express αβ TCRs, neither β2m-dependent MHC class I nor any MHC class II molecules are required for their development. In contrast to iNKT cells and MAIT cells, this population has a highly diverse TCRα chain repertoire. Analysis of peripheral tissues indicates that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells preferentially home to spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes due to increased expression of gut-homing receptors, and that their expansion is regulated by commensal gut flora. These data support the conclusion that itk-/- innate PLZF+ CD4+ T cells are a novel subset of innate T cells. PMID:24928994

  13. CD4+ T Cell Priming as Biomarker to Study Immune Response to Preventive Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Medaglini, Donata

    2013-01-01

    T cell priming is a critical event in the initiation of the immune response to vaccination since it deeply influences both the magnitude and the quality of the immune response induced. CD4+ T cell priming, required for the induction of high-affinity antibodies and immune memory, represents a key target for improving and modulating vaccine immunogenicity. A major challenge in the study of in vivo T cell priming is due to the low frequency of antigen-specific T cells. This review discusses the current knowledge on antigen-specific CD4+ T cell priming in the context of vaccination, as well as the most advanced tools for the characterization of the in vivo T cell priming and the opportunities offered by the application of systems biology. PMID:24363656

  14. Decentralization of CD4 testing in resource-limited settings: 7 years of experience in six African countries.

    PubMed

    Marinucci, F; Medina-Moreno, S; Paterniti, A D; Wattleworth, M; Redfield, R R

    2011-05-01

    Improving access to CD4 testing in resource-limited settings can be achieved through both centralized and decentralized testing networks. Decentralized testing models are more suitable for countries where the HIV epidemic affects a large portion of rural populations. Timely access to accurate CD4 results is crucial at the primary level of the health system. For the past 7 years, the Institute of Human Virology of the University of Maryland School of Medicine has implemented a flexible and sustainable three-phase model: (1) site assessment and improvement, (2) appropriate technology selection with capacity building through practical training and laboratory mentoring, and (3) quality management system strengthening and monitoring, to support accessibility to reliable CD4 counting at the point of service. CD4 testing capacity was established in 122 of 229 (53%) laboratories supported in Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Zambia, Tanzania, and Rwanda. Among those in rural settings, 46% (69/151) had CD4 testing available at site level, with a functioning flow cytometer installed at 28% (8/29) and 50% (61/122) of level 1 and level 2 sites, respectively. To strengthen local capacity, a total of 1,152 laboratory technicians were trained through 188 training sessions provided both on-site and at central locations. The overall quality of CD4 total testing procedure was assessed at 76% (92/121) of the laboratories, with 25% (23/92), 34% (31/92), and 33% (30/92) of them reporting excellent, good, and satisfactory performance. Balancing country-specific factors with the location of the clinic, number of patients, and the expected workload, was crucial in adapting this flexible model for decentralizing CD4 testing. The close collaboration with local governments and private vendors was key to successfully expanding access to CD4 testing within the framework of HIV care and treatment programs and for the sustainability of medical laboratories in resource-limited settings. PMID:21495181

  15. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  16. High frequency of central memory regulatory T cells allows detection of liver recipients at risk of early acute rejection within the first month after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boix-Giner, Francisco; Millan, Olga; San Segundo, David; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Mancebo, Esther; Llorente, Santiago; Rafael-Valdivia, Lourdes; Rimola, Antoni; Fábrega, Emilio; Mrowiec, Anna; Allende, Luis; Minguela, Alfredo; Bolarín, Jose M; Paz-Artal, Estela; López-Hoyos, Marcos; Brunet, Mercé; Muro, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have analyzed the potential of T regulatory cells (Treg cells) as biomarkers of acute rejection (AR). The aim of the present multicenter study was to correlate the percentage of peripheral Treg cells in liver graft recipients drawn at baseline up to 12 months after transplantation with the presence of AR. The percentage of central memory (cm) Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RO(+)CD62L(+)) was monitored at pre-transplant and at 1 and 2 weeks, and 1, 2, 3 and 6 months and 1 year post-transplantation. The same validation standard operating procedures were used in all participating centers. Fifteen patients developed AR (23.4%). Hepatitis C virus recurrence was observed in 16 recipients, who displayed low peripheral blood cmTreg levels compared with patients who did not. A steady increase of cmTregs was observed during the first month after transplantation with statistically significant differences between AR and non-AR patients. The high frequency of memory Treg cells allowed us to monitor rejection episodes during the first month post-transplantation. On the basis of these data, we developed a prediction model for assessing risk of AR that can provide clinicians with useful information for managing patients individually and customizing immunosuppressive therapies.

  17. Establishment of HIV-1 latency in resting CD4+ T cells depends on chemokine-induced changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Paul U; Saleh, Suha; Sallmann, Georgina; Solomon, Ajantha; Wightman, Fiona; Evans, Vanessa A; Boucher, Genevieve; Haddad, Elias K; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Harman, Andrew N; Anderson, Jenny L; Jones, Kate L; Mak, Johnson; Cunningham, Anthony L; Jaworowski, Anthony; Lewin, Sharon R

    2010-09-28

    Eradication of HIV-1 with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is not possible due to the persistence of long-lived, latently infected resting memory CD4(+) T cells. We now show that HIV-1 latency can be established in resting CD4(+) T cells infected with HIV-1 after exposure to ligands for CCR7 (CCL19), CXCR3 (CXCL9 and CXCL10), and CCR6 (CCL20) but not in unactivated CD4(+) T cells. The mechanism did not involve cell activation or significant changes in gene expression, but was associated with rapid dephosphorylation of cofilin and changes in filamentous actin. Incubation with chemokine before infection led to efficient HIV-1 nuclear localization and integration and this was inhibited by the actin stabilizer jasplakinolide. We propose a unique pathway for establishment of latency by direct HIV-1 infection of resting CD4(+) T cells during normal chemokine-directed recirculation of CD4(+) T cells between blood and tissue.

  18. Cyclotriazadisulfonamides: promising new CD4-targeted anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Kurt; Schols, Dominique

    2005-08-01

    It is imperative to continue efforts to identify novel effective therapies that can assist in containing the spread of HIV. Recently acquired knowledge about the HIV entry process points to new strategies to block viral entry. For most HIV strains, the successful infection of their target cells is mainly dependent on the presence of the CD4 surface molecule, which serves as the primary virus receptor. The attachment of the viral envelope to this cellular CD4 receptor can be considered as an ideal target with multiple windows of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, drugs that interfere with the CD4 receptor, and thus inhibit viral entry, may be promising agents for the treatment of AIDS. The CD4-targeted HIV entry inhibitors cyclotriazadisulfonamides represent a novel class of small molecule antiviral agents with a unique mode of action. The lead compound, CADA, specifically interacts with the cellular CD4 receptor and is active against a wide variety of HIV strains at submicromolar levels when evaluated in different cell-types such as T cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Moreover, a strict correlation has been demonstrated between anti-HIV activity and CD4 interaction of about 20 different CADA analogues. In addition, CADA acted synergistically in combination with all other FDA-approved anti-HIV drugs as well as with compounds that target the main HIV co-receptors. In this article, the characteristics of cyclotriazadisulfonamide compounds are presented and the possible application of CADA as a microbicide is also discussed. PMID:15980096

  19. HIV exceptionalism, CD4+ cell testing, and conscientious subversion

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, L

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, many states in the United States have passed legislation requiring laboratories to report the names of patients with low CD4 cell counts to their state Departments of Health. This name reporting is an integral part of the growing number of "HIV Reporting and Partner Notification Laws" which have emerged in response to recently revised guidelines suggested by the National Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Name reporting for patients with low CD4 cell counts allows for a more accurate tracking of the natural history of HIV disease. However, given that this test is now considered to be an "indicator" of HIV, should it be subject to the same strict consent required for HIV testing? While the CDC has recommended that each state develop its own consent requirements for CD4 cell testing, most states have continued to rely on the presumed consent standards for CD4 cell testing that were in place before the passage of name reporting statutes. This allows physicians who treat patients who refuse HIV testing to order a CD4 cell blood analysis to gather information that is indicative of their patient's HIV status. This paper examines the ethical and legal issues associated with the practice of "conscientious subversion" as it arises when clinicians use CD4 cell counts as a surrogate for HIV testing. PMID:15923478

  20. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  1. OX40 controls effector CD4+ T-cell expansion, not follicular T helper cell generation in acute Listeria infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Clare L; Mackley, Emma C; Ferreira, Cristina; Veldhoen, Marc; Yagita, Hideo; Withers, David R

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the importance of OX40 signals for physiological CD4+ T-cell responses, an endogenous antigen-specific population of CD4+ T cells that recognise the 2W1S peptide was assessed and temporal control of OX40 signals was achieved using blocking or agonistic antibodies (Abs) in vivo. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes expressing 2W1S peptide, OX40 was briefly expressed by the responding 2W1S-specific CD4+ T cells, but only on a subset that co-expressed effector cell markers. This population was specifically expanded by Ab-ligation of OX40 during priming, which also caused skewing of the memory response towards effector memory cells. Strikingly, this greatly enhanced effector response was accompanied by the loss of T follicular helper (TFH) cells and germinal centres. Mice deficient in OX40 and CD30 showed normal generation of TFH cells but impaired numbers of 2W1S-specific effector cells. OX40 was not expressed by 2W1S-specific memory cells, although it was rapidly up-regulated upon challenge whereupon Ab-ligation of OX40 specifically affected the effector subset. In summary, these data indicate that for CD4+ T cells, OX40 signals are important for generation of effector T cells rather than TFH cells in this response to acute bacterial infection. PMID:24771127

  2. Differences in expression of gut-homing receptors on CD4+ T cells in black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Colleen F; Lai, Lilin; Ibegbu, Chris; Rosenberg, Eli S; Kaur, Surinder; Patel, Kalpana; Mulligan, Mark J; Marconi, Vincent C; Sullivan, Patrick S; Amara, Rama R

    2016-05-15

    HIV incidence rates are higher among black men who have sex with men (BMSM) as compared with MSM of other race/ethnicities in the USA. We found that blood memory CD4 cells from BMSM express higher levels of α4β7, the gut-homing integrin, compared with white MSM. Higher expression of α4β7 on blood CD4 cells correlated with higher percentage of proliferating CD4α4β7 cells in rectal tissue suggesting increased trafficking of potential HIV target cells to rectal mucosa could increase HIV susceptibility among BMSM. PMID:26891038

  3. Idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia: natural history and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Falloon, Judith; Bennett, John E.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Chaitt, Doreen; Baseler, Michael W.; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Metcalf, Julia A.; Polis, Michael A.; Kovacs, Stephen J.; Kovacs, Joseph A.; Davey, Richard T.; Lane, H. Clifford; Masur, Henry

    2008-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4+ lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare non–HIV-related syndrome with unclear natural history and prognosis. This prospective natural history cohort study describes the clinical course, CD4 T lymphocyte kinetics, outcome, and prognostic factors of ICL. Thirty-nine patients (17 men, 22 women) 25 to 85 years old with ICL were evaluated between 1992 and 2006, and 36 were followed for a median of 49.5 months. Cryptococcal and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections were the major presenting opportunistic infections. Seven patients presented with no infection. In 32, CD4 T-cell counts remained less than 300/mm3 throughout the study period and in 7 normalized after an average of 31 months. Overall, 15 (41.6%) developed an opportunistic infection in follow-up, 5 (13.8%) of which were “AIDS-defining clinical conditions,” and 4 (11.1%) developed autoimmune diseases. Seven patients died, 4 from ICL-related opportunistic infections, within 42 months after diagnosis. Immunologic analyses revealed increased activation and turnover in CD4 but not CD8 T lymphocytes. CD8 T lymphocytopenia (< 180/mm3) and the degree of CD4 T cell activation (measured by HLA-DR expression) at presentation were associated with adverse outcome (opportunistic infection-related death; P = .003 and .02, respectively). This trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00001319. PMID:18456875

  4. Functional and Phenotypic Plasticity of CD4+ T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Tiffany; Landas, Steve

    2015-01-01

    The remarkable plasticity of CD4+ T cells allows individuals to respond to environmental stimuli in a context-dependent manner. A balance of CD4+ T cell subsets is critical to mount responses against pathogen challenges to prevent inappropriate activation, to maintain tolerance, and to participate in antitumor immune responses. Specification of subsets is a process beginning in intrathymic development and continuing within the circulation. It is highly flexible to adapt to differences in nutrient availability and the tissue microenvironment. CD4+ T cell subsets have significant cross talk, with the ability to “dedifferentiate” given appropriate environmental signals. This ability is dependent on the metabolic status of the cell, with mTOR acting as the rheostat. Autoimmune and antitumor immune responses are regulated by the balance between regulatory T cells and Th17 cells. When a homeostatic balance of subsets is not maintained, immunopathology can result. CD4+ T cells carry complex roles within tumor microenvironments, with context-dependent immune responses influenced by oncogenic drivers and the presence of inflammation. Here, we examine the signals involved in CD4+ T cell specification towards each subset, interconnectedness of cytokine networks, impact of mTOR signaling, and cellular metabolism in lineage specification and provide a supplement describing techniques to study these processes. PMID:26583116

  5. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Remodeling Precedes Lineage Specification during Differentiation of Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Colm E; Lentini, Antonio; Hägg Nilsson, Cathrine; Gawel, Danuta R; Gustafsson, Mika; Mattson, Lina; Wang, Hui; Rundquist, Olof; Meehan, Richard R; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Hauck, Stefanie M; Laumen, Helmut; Zhang, Huan; Benson, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    5-methylcytosine (5mC) is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the TET family of enzymes as part of a recently discovered active DNA de-methylation pathway. 5hmC plays important roles in regulation of gene expression and differentiation and has been implicated in T cell malignancies and autoimmunity. Here, we report early and widespread 5mC/5hmC remodeling during human CD4(+) T cell differentiation ex vivo at genes and cell-specific enhancers with known T cell function. We observe similar DNA de-methylation in CD4(+) memory T cells in vivo, indicating that early remodeling events persist long term in differentiated cells. Underscoring their important function, 5hmC loci were highly enriched for genetic variants associated with T cell diseases and T-cell-specific chromosomal interactions. Extensive functional validation of 22 risk variants revealed potentially pathogenic mechanisms in diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Our results support 5hmC-mediated DNA de-methylation as a key component of CD4(+) T cell biology in humans, with important implications for gene regulation and lineage commitment.

  6. 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine Remodeling Precedes Lineage Specification during Differentiation of Human CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Colm E; Lentini, Antonio; Hägg Nilsson, Cathrine; Gawel, Danuta R; Gustafsson, Mika; Mattson, Lina; Wang, Hui; Rundquist, Olof; Meehan, Richard R; Klocke, Bernward; Seifert, Martin; Hauck, Stefanie M; Laumen, Helmut; Zhang, Huan; Benson, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    5-methylcytosine (5mC) is converted to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) by the TET family of enzymes as part of a recently discovered active DNA de-methylation pathway. 5hmC plays important roles in regulation of gene expression and differentiation and has been implicated in T cell malignancies and autoimmunity. Here, we report early and widespread 5mC/5hmC remodeling during human CD4(+) T cell differentiation ex vivo at genes and cell-specific enhancers with known T cell function. We observe similar DNA de-methylation in CD4(+) memory T cells in vivo, indicating that early remodeling events persist long term in differentiated cells. Underscoring their important function, 5hmC loci were highly enriched for genetic variants associated with T cell diseases and T-cell-specific chromosomal interactions. Extensive functional validation of 22 risk variants revealed potentially pathogenic mechanisms in diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Our results support 5hmC-mediated DNA de-methylation as a key component of CD4(+) T cell biology in humans, with important implications for gene regulation and lineage commitment. PMID:27346350

  7. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD4 T-cell antigens via high throughput proteome screening

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kaustuv; Jing, Lichen; Russell, Ronnie M.; Davies, D. Huw; Hermanson, Gary; Molina, Douglas M.; Liang, Xiaowu; Sherman, David R.; Kwok, William W.; Yang, Junbao; Kenneth, John; Ahamed, Syed F.; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of CD4 IFN-gamma T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a rational vaccine strategy to prevent clinical tuberculosis. Diagnosis of MTB infection is based on T-cell immune memory to MTB antigens. The MTB proteome contains over four thousand open reading frames (ORFs). We conducted a pilot antigen identification study using 164 MTB proteins and MTB-specific T-cells expanded in vitro from 12 persons with latent MTB infection. Enrichment of MTB-reactive T-cells from PBMC used cell sorting or an alternate system compatible with limited resources. MTB proteins were used as single antigens or combinatorial matrices in proliferation and cytokine secretion readouts. Overall, our study found that 44 MTB proteins were antigenic, including 27 not previously characterized as CD4 T-cell antigens. Antigen truncation, peptide, NTM homology, and HLA class II tetramer studies confirmed malate synthase G (encoded by gene Rv1837) as a CD4 T-cell antigen. This simple, scalable system has potential utility for the identification of candidate MTB vaccine and biomarker antigens. PMID:25857935

  8. Central Auditory Dysfunction in Older People with Memory Impairment or Alzheimer's Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gates, George A.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Feeney, M. Patrick; McCurry, Susan M.; Larson, Eric B.

    2009-01-01

    Central auditory function is commonly compromised in people with a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may precede the onset of clinical dementia by several years. Given that screening for AD in its earliest stages might someday be useful for emerging therapies aimed at limiting progression, we inquired whether central auditory testing might be suitable for identifying people at risk for dementia. To address this question, we performed a battery of behavioral central auditory tests in a cohort of 313 older people enrolled in a dementia surveillance research program. The cohort consisted of three groups: controls without memory loss (N=232), targets with mild memory impairment but without dementia (N=64), and targets with a dementia diagnosis (N=17). The auditory tests were the Synthetic Sentence Identification with Ipsilateral Competing Message (SSI), the Dichotic Sentence Identification test (DSI), the Dichotic Digits Test (DDT), and the Pitch Pattern Sequence (PPS) test. Additional control was provided by electrophysiologic testing to assess the integrity of the primary auditory pathways. The mean score on each central auditory test worsened significantly across the three memory groups even after adjusting for age and peripheral hearing status, being poorest in the pAD group and moderately reduced in the memory-impaired group compared to the mean scores in the control group. Heterogeneity of results was noted in all three groups. The electrophysiologic tests did not differ across the three groups. Central auditory function was affected by mild memory impairment. The Dichotic Sentence Identification in the free report mode appears to be the central auditory test most sensitive to the presence of memory impairment. Although central auditory testing requires specialized equipment and training, the objectivity of these tests is appealing. We recommend that comprehensive auditory testing be considered and further evaluated for its potential value as a baseline

  9. CD4-mediated and CD8-mediated cytotoxic and proliferative immune responses to Toxoplasma gondii in seropositive humans.

    PubMed Central

    Purner, M B; Berens, R L; Nash, P B; van Linden, A; Ross, E; Kruse, C; Krug, E C; Curiel, T J

    1996-01-01

    Both CD4+ and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are part of the human immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection. To further our understanding of Toxoplasma immunity, we investigated factors influencing stimulation of CD4+ or CD8+ human T. gondii-specific immune cells. Both antigen-pulsed and Toxoplasma-infected antigen-presenting cells (APC) induced cell proliferation. Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited strong proliferation of CD4+ cells, but little or no proliferation of CD8+ cells, unless high antigen loads were used. Toxoplasma-infected APC stimulated specific cytotoxicity poorly or not at all, owing to death of stimulated cultures, whereas antigen-pulsed APC strongly elicited specific cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity elicited by either type of APC resided exclusively in CD4+ T cells in polyclonal cultures. Thus, Toxoplasma-infected APC elicited stronger CD4-mediated than CD8-mediated cell proliferation and generated CD4+ CTL more readily than CD8+ CTL. Nonetheless, specific CD8+ memory cells were demonstrated, and rare CD8+ Toxoplasma-specific CTL were subcloned. Fixed Toxoplasma-infected APC (which induce CD8+ CTL) also elicited cell proliferation, but polyclonal cultures stimulated with these infected APC did not die. Unfixed Toxoplasma-infected APC strongly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-induced cell proliferation, whereas fixed APC did not. These data suggested that infected APC were inhibitory or lethal to some immune cells. Further investigations into interactions between immune cells and Toxoplasma-infected cells likely will help elucidate factors involved in the immunopathogenesis of Toxoplasma infection. As other intracellular parasites, including Plasmodium spp. and Leishmania spp., also elicit CD4+ CTL, such work may help establish paradigms governing immunity to intracellular parasites. PMID:8926107

  10. CD4+ T Cells Expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 Contribute to HIV Persistence during ART

    PubMed Central

    Fromentin, Rémi; Bakeman, Wendy; Lawani, Mariam B.; Khoury, Gabriela; Hartogensis, Wendy; DaFonseca, Sandrina; Killian, Marisela; Epling, Lorrie; Hoh, Rebecca; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M.; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Chomont, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    HIV persists in a small pool of latently infected cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART). Identifying cellular markers expressed at the surface of these cells may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to reduce the size of the HIV reservoir. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells expressing immune checkpoint molecules would be enriched in HIV-infected cells in individuals receiving suppressive ART. Expression levels of 7 immune checkpoint molecules (PD-1, CTLA-4, LAG-3, TIGIT, TIM-3, CD160 and 2B4) as well as 4 markers of HIV persistence (integrated and total HIV DNA, 2-LTR circles and cell-associated unspliced HIV RNA) were measured in PBMCs from 48 virally suppressed individuals. Using negative binomial regression models, we identified PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 as immune checkpoint molecules positively associated with the frequency of CD4+ T cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. The frequency of CD4+ T cells co-expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 independently predicted the frequency of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA. Quantification of HIV genomes in highly purified cell subsets from blood further revealed that expressions of PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 were associated with HIV-infected cells in distinct memory CD4+ T cell subsets. CD4+ T cells co-expressing the three markers were highly enriched for integrated viral genomes (median of 8.2 fold compared to total CD4+ T cells). Importantly, most cells carrying inducible HIV genomes expressed at least one of these markers (median contribution of cells expressing LAG-3, PD-1 or TIGIT to the inducible reservoir = 76%). Our data provide evidence that CD4+ T cells expressing PD-1, TIGIT and LAG-3 alone or in combination are enriched for persistent HIV during ART and suggest that immune checkpoint blockers directed against these receptors may represent valuable tools to target latently infected cells in virally suppressed individuals. PMID:27415008

  11. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  12. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  13. Immediate Dysfunction of Vaccine-Elicited CD8+ T Cells Primed in the Absence of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Aid, Malika; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Borducchi, Erica N.; Yates, Kathleen B.; Abbink, Peter; Kirilova, Marinela; Ng’ang’a, David; Bramson, Jonathan; Haining, W. Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cell help is critical for optimal CD8+ T cell memory differentiation and maintenance in many experimental systems. In addition, many reports have identified reduced primary CD8+ T cell responses in the absence of CD4+ T cell help, which often coincides with reduced Ag or pathogen clearance. In this study, we demonstrate that absence of CD4+ T cells at the time of adenovirus vector immunization of mice led to immediate impairments in early CD8+ T cell functionality and differentiation. Unhelped CD8+ T cells exhibited a reduced effector phenotype, decreased ex vivo cytotoxicity, and decreased capacity to produce cytokines. This dysfunctional state was imprinted within 3 d of immunization. Unhelped CD8+ T cells expressed elevated levels of inhibitory receptors and exhibited transcriptomic exhaustion and anergy profiles by gene set enrichment analysis. Dysfunctional, impaired effector differentiation also occurred following immunization of CD4+ T cell–deficient mice with a poxvirus vector. This study demonstrates that following priming with viral vectors, CD4+ T cell help is required to promote both the expansion and acquisition of effector functions by CD8+ T cells, which is accomplished by preventing immediate dysfunction. PMID:27448585

  14. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  15. Analysis of CD4-positive T cell subpopulation in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gerli, R; Darwish, S; Broccucci, L; Minotti, V; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Bertotto, A; Rambotti, P

    1988-01-01

    Double-labelling immunofluorescence analysis within the CD4+ cell subset was carried out in 27 bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and 11 peripheral blood samples of sarcoidosis patients with anti-TQ1, anti-2H4 and anti-4B4 monoclonal antibodies. Helper/inducer CD4+TQ1-/4B4+ cells were strongly increased in the lung and slightly, but significantly, decreased in the blood of sarcoidosis patients with respect to normal controls. No differences were found in the number of both lung and blood CD4+2H4+ cells between sarcoidosis patients and controls. The findings are further evidence for a compartmentalization of T cell subsets in sarcoidosis. PMID:3263230

  16. Above and beyond emotional valence: the unique contribution of central and traumatic shame memories to psychopathology vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marcela; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Duarte, Cristiana

    2012-07-01

    This paper explores whether shame memories have a distinct impact on emotional difficulties and psychopathology that goes beyond their negative emotional valence. Study 1 (N=292) investigates the contribution of centrality of shame memory, in comparison to the centrality of fear and sadness memories, to explain the memory's traumatic impact, shame, depression, anxiety, stress, paranoid, and dissociative symptoms. Study 2 (N=192) explores the impact of shame traumatic memory on shame and depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, in comparison to fear and sadness traumatic memories. Both studies used undergraduate student samples. Results show that shame memories' centrality and traumatic features made an independent contribution to current external and internal shame and distinct psychopathological symptoms, after controlling for the effect of fear and sadness, centrality, and traumatic qualities. Moreover, shame memories' centrality and traumatic features were the best global predictors of external and internal shame and depressive symptoms. Centrality of shame memories was also the only significant predictor of paranoid ideation and dissociation. These results offer novel perspectives on the nature of shame and its relation to psychopathology, emphasising the distinct role of shame memories in human functioning and suffering, which goes above and beyond its negative emotional valence.

  17. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4+ T cells to CD4− T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4+ T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4−CD8−NK1.1− double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4+ rather than CD8+ T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4+ T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  18. The effect of low versus high approach-motivated positive affect on memory for peripherally versus centrally presented information.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2010-08-01

    Emotions influence attention and processes involved in memory. Although some research has suggested that positive affect categorically influences these processes differently than neutral affect, recent research suggests that motivational intensity of positive affective states influences these processes. The present experiments examined memory for centrally or peripherally presented information after the evocation of approach-motivated positive affect. Experiment 1 found that, relative to neutral conditions, pregoal, approach-motivated positive affect (caused by a monetary incentives task) enhanced memory for centrally presented information, whereas postgoal, low approach-motivated positive affect enhanced memory for peripherally presented information. Experiment 2 found that, relative to a neutral condition, high approach-motivated positive affect (caused by appetitive pictures) enhanced memory for centrally presented information but hindered memory for peripheral information. These results suggest a more complex relationship between positive affect and memory processes and highlight the importance of considering the motivational intensity of positive affects in cognitive processes.

  19. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are a correlate of protection. Recent...

  20. A Central Capacity Limit to the Simultaneous Storage of Visual and Auditory Arrays in Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saults, J. Scott; Cowan, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    If working memory is limited by central capacity (e.g., the focus of attention; N. Cowan, 2001), then storage limits for information in a single modality should apply also to the simultaneous storage of information from different modalities. The authors investigated this by combining a visual-array comparison task with a novel auditory-array…

  1. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection. In other species, Tcm’s pose low activation threshold and a...

  2. Working Memory and Mental Arithmetic: A Case for Dual Central Executive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelsen, Kirk; Welsh, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine the possible existence of two limited-capacity pools of central executive resources: one each for verbal and visuospatial processing. Ninety-one college students (M age = 19.0, SD = 2.2) were administered a verbal working memory task that involved updating numbers in 2-, 3-, and 4-load conditions. The task…

  3. CD4 immunodiagnostics for HIV in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Redd, Andrew D; Quinn, Thomas C

    2008-11-01

    This supplement on evaluating CD4 diagnostics for HIV is the fourth in a series of user-friendly operational guides explaining how to conduct evaluations of diagnostic tests for infectious diseases that are of public health importance in the developing world. Here, Andrew Redd and Thomas Quinn introduce the supplement.

  4. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  5. Detection of central circuits implicated in the formation of novel pain memories

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Granitzka, Julia; Bauermann, Thomas; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Breimhorst, Markus; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Birklein, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Being able to remember physically and emotionally painful events in one’s own past may shape behavior, and can create an aversion to a variety of situations. Pain imagination is a related process that may include recall of past experiences, in addition to production of sensory and emotional percepts without external stimuli. This study aimed to understand 1) the central nervous system processes that underlie pain imagination, 2) the retrieval of pain memories, and 3) to compare the latter with visual object memory. These goals were achieved by longitudinally investigating brain function with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a unique group of healthy volunteers who had never experienced tooth pain. In these subjects, we compared brain responses elicited during three experimental conditions in the following order: imagination of tooth pain (pain imagination), remembering one’s own house (object memory), and remembrance of tooth pain following an episode of induced acute tooth pain (pain memory). Key observations stemming from group-level conjunction analyses revealed common activation in the posterior parietal cortex for both pain imagination and pain memory, while object and pain memory each had strong activation predominantly within the middle frontal gyrus. When contrasting pain imagination and memory, significant activation differences were observed in subcortical structures (ie, parahippocampus − pain imagination > pain memory; midbrain − pain memory > pain imagination). Importantly, these findings were observed in the presence of consistent and reproducible psychophysical and behavioral measures that informed on the subjects’ ability to imagine novel and familiar thoughts, as well as the subjects’ pain perception. PMID:27695361

  6. Detection of central circuits implicated in the formation of novel pain memories

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Granitzka, Julia; Bauermann, Thomas; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Breimhorst, Markus; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Birklein, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Being able to remember physically and emotionally painful events in one’s own past may shape behavior, and can create an aversion to a variety of situations. Pain imagination is a related process that may include recall of past experiences, in addition to production of sensory and emotional percepts without external stimuli. This study aimed to understand 1) the central nervous system processes that underlie pain imagination, 2) the retrieval of pain memories, and 3) to compare the latter with visual object memory. These goals were achieved by longitudinally investigating brain function with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a unique group of healthy volunteers who had never experienced tooth pain. In these subjects, we compared brain responses elicited during three experimental conditions in the following order: imagination of tooth pain (pain imagination), remembering one’s own house (object memory), and remembrance of tooth pain following an episode of induced acute tooth pain (pain memory). Key observations stemming from group-level conjunction analyses revealed common activation in the posterior parietal cortex for both pain imagination and pain memory, while object and pain memory each had strong activation predominantly within the middle frontal gyrus. When contrasting pain imagination and memory, significant activation differences were observed in subcortical structures (ie, parahippocampus − pain imagination > pain memory; midbrain − pain memory > pain imagination). Importantly, these findings were observed in the presence of consistent and reproducible psychophysical and behavioral measures that informed on the subjects’ ability to imagine novel and familiar thoughts, as well as the subjects’ pain perception.

  7. High numbers of differentiated effector CD4 T cells are found in patients with cancer and correlate with clinical response after neoadjuvant therapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Péguillet, Isabelle; Milder, Maud; Louis, Delphine; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Dorval, Thierry; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Scholl, Suzy M; Lantz, Olivier

    2014-04-15

    CD4(+) T cells influence tumor immunity in complex ways that are not fully understood. In this study, we characterized a population of human differentiated effector CD4(+) T cells that is defined by low levels of the interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-7 receptors (CD25(-)CD127(-)). We found that this cell population expands in patients with various types of cancer, including breast cancer, to represent 2% to 20% of total CD4(+) blood T lymphocytes as compared with only 0.2% to 2% in healthy individuals. Notably, these CD25(-)CD127(-)CD4 T cells expressed effector markers such as CD244 and CD11b with low levels of CD27, contrasting with the memory phenotype dominating this population in healthy individuals. These cells did not cycle in patients, nor did they secrete IL-10 or IL-17, but instead displayed cytotoxic features. Moreover, they encompassed oligoclonal expansions paralleling an expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells that included tumor antigen-specific T cells. During neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer, we found that the increase in CD25(-)CD127(-) CD4(+) T cells correlated with tumor regression. This observation suggested that CD4(+) T cells included tumor antigen-specific cells, which may be generated by or participate in tumor regressions during chemotherapy. In summary, our results lend support to the hypothesis that CD4(+) T cells are involved in human antitumor responses.

  8. Mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 localization in CD4-negative thymocytes: differentiation from a CD4-positive precursor allows productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, S G; Uittenbogaart, C H; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the thymus could have profound effects on development of the immune response, particularly in children. We and others have established that in addition to infecting and depleting CD4-bearing thymocytes, functional HIV proviruses are found in thymocytes lacking surface CD4 expression. Using in vitro thymocyte cultures, we show that neither HIV-mediated down regulation of CD4 nor CD4-independent infection contributes to the localization of HIV in cells lacking the primary virus receptor. Rather, infection of a CD4-positive precursor cell (CD4 positive/CD8 positive) with subsequent differentiation into a mature CD4-negative phenotype results in productively infected CD4-negative cells. This novel mechanism may contribute to pathogenesis by distributing viral sequences into functional subsets of T cells typically refractory to HIV infection and could account for the presence of viral DNA in CD8-positive lymphocytes recently observed in patients. PMID:9223457

  9. [The Analysis for Probable Reasons of Cd4+ T-Cell Activation Non-Linear Dependence on Extra Cellular Calcium Ion Concentration in Human Peripheral Blood in vitro].

    PubMed

    Litvinov, I S

    2015-01-01

    The analysis for probable reasons of CD4+ T-cell activation non-linear dependence on [Ca2+]o in HPB in vitro is the general aim of current work. At the beginning we pursued the analysis of receptor-dependent (the mixture of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to CD3 and CD28 molecules) and receptor-independent (phorbol-myristate-acetate and ionomycin mixture) means to activate T cells in vitro with different [Ca2+]o in HPB. The key role of intracellular T-cell signaling systems in activated T cells in their non-similar sensitivity to calcium ions in the blood was shown. The analysis of differentiation next stages of CD4+ T-cell activation in vitro relatively [Ca2+]o in PHB demonstrates the key role of the earliest induction stages in non-similar sensitivity to calcium ions in CD4+ T-cell activation in vitro. According to the pursued analysis; the non-similar sensitivity of CD4+ T-cell in vitro to activation is in no-way connected with pace differences on the primary stages of activation process. The comparison of CD4+ memory T cells with their naive T-cell precursors in the cell activation process in hypocalcemia conditions was made in the separate experimental series. The 1st maximum consists in average of 85% CD4+CD45R0high CD69+ memory T cells. Naive CD4+CD45RAlowCD69+ T cells constitute the remainder 15%. The 2nd maximum almost completely consists of CD4+CD45R0+CD69+ memory T cells. The ratio between CD4+CD69+ T cell maximums depends on donor ages and represents linear dependence with R = -0.981. The most probable candidate on the role of CD4+ T cell, being capable of activation in hypocalcemia conditions, are memory T lymphocytes, being resistant to ionomycin action (I R) subset. To check this assumption the mononuclear cells and their IR-fraction were prepared from donor PB. Then the mononuclear cells and their IR-fraction were activated by mAbs mixture at different [EGTA] values. For IR-fraction, enriched with CD4+CD45RA-CD45R0+ memory T cells, slightly seen 1st

  10. Evolution of the CD4 family: teleost fish possess two divergent forms of CD4 in addition to lymphocyte activation gene-3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laing, K.J.; Zou, J.J.; Purcell, M.K.; Phillips, R.; Secombes, C.J.; Hansen, J.D.

    2006-01-01

    The T cell coreceptor CD4 is a transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the Ig superfamily and is essential for cell-mediated immunity. Two different genes were identified in rainbow trout that resemble mammalian CD4. One (trout CD4) encodes four extracellular Ig domains reminiscent off mammalian CD4, whereas the other (CD4REL) codes for two Ig domains. Structural motifs within the amino acid sequences suggest that the two Ig domains of CD4REL duplicated to generate the four-domain molecule of CD4 and the related gene, lymphocyte activation gene-3. Here we present evidence that both of these molecules in trout are homologous to mammalian CD4 and that teleosts encode an additional CD4 family member, lymphocyte activation gene-3, which is a marker for activated T cells. The syntenic relationships of similar genes in other teleost and non-fish genomes provide evidence for the likely evolution of CD4-related molecules in vertebrates, with CD4REL likely representing the primordial form in fish. Expression of both CD4 genes is highest in the thymus and spleen, and mRNA expression of these genes is limited to surface IgM- lymphocytes, consistent with a role for T cell functionality. Finally, the intracellular regions of both CD4 and CD4REL possess the canonical CXC motif involved in the interaction off CD4 with p56LCK, implying that similar mechanisms for CD4 + T cell activation are present in all vertebrates. Our results therefore raise new questions about T cell development and functionality in lower vertebrates that cannot be answered by current mammalian models and, thus, is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolution of cell-mediated immunity in gnathosomes. Copyright ?? 2006 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) activity decreases raltegravir disposition in primary CD4+P-gphigh cells and correlates with HIV-1 viral load

    PubMed Central

    Minuesa, Gerard; Arimany-Nardi, Cristina; Erkizia, Itziar; Cedeño, Samandhy; Moltó, José; Clotet, Bonaventura; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug-resistant-protein 1 (MRP1) on raltegravir intracellular drug disposition in CD4+ T cells, investigate the effect of HIV-1 infection on P-gp expression and correlate HIV-1 viraemia with P-gp activity in primary CD4+ T cell subsets. Methods The cellular accumulation ratio of [3H]raltegravir was quantified in CD4+ T cell lines overexpressing either P-gp (CEM-P-gp) or MRP1 (CEM-MRP1) and in primary CD3+CD4+ T cells with high (P-gphigh) and low P-gp activity (P-gplow); inhibition of efflux transporters was confirmed by the intracellular retention of calcein-AM. The correlation of P-gp activity with HIV-1 viraemia was assessed in naive and memory T cell subsets from 21 HIV-1-infected treatment-naive subjects. Results [3H]Raltegravir cellular accumulation ratio decreased in CEM-P-gp cells (P < 0.0001). XR9051 (a P-gp inhibitor) and HIV-1 PIs reversed this phenomenon. Primary CD4+P-gphigh cells accumulated less raltegravir (38.4% ± 9.6%) than P-gplow cells, whereas XR9051 also reversed this effect. In vitro HIV-1 infection of PBMCs and stimulation of CD4+ T cells increased P-gp mRNA and P-gp activity, respectively, while primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells sustained a higher HIV-1 replication than P-gplow cells. A significant correlation between HIV-1 viraemia and P-gp activity was found in different CD4+ T cell subsets, particularly memory CD4+ T cells (r = 0.792, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Raltegravir is a substrate of P-gp in CD4+ T cells. Primary CD4+P-gphigh T cells eliminate intracellular raltegravir more readily than P-gplow cells and HIV-1 viraemia correlates with P-gp overall activity. Specific CD4+P-gphigh T cell subsets could facilitate the persistence of viral replication in vivo and ultimately promote the appearance of drug resistance. PMID:27334660

  12. Protective CD4 T cells targeting cryptic epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resist infection-driven terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Joshua S; Aagaard, Claus Sindbjerg; Hansen, Paul R; Cassidy, Joseph P; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter

    2014-04-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial to the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and are a key component of current vaccine strategies. Conversely, immune-mediated pathology drives disease, and recent evidence suggests that adaptive and innate responses are evolutionarily beneficial to M. tuberculosis. We compare the functionality of CD4 T cell responses mounted against dominant and cryptic epitopes of the M. tuberculosis 6-kDa early secreted Ag (ESAT-6) before and postinfection. Protective T cells against cryptic epitopes not targeted during natural infection were induced by vaccinating mice with a truncated ESAT-6 protein, lacking the dominant epitope. The ability to generate T cells that recognize multiple cryptic epitopes was MHC-haplotype dependent, including increased potential via heterologous MHC class II dimers. Before infection, cryptic epitope-specific T cells displayed enhanced proliferative capacity and delayed cytokine kinetics. After aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge, vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells expanded and recruited to the lung. In chronic infection, dominant epitope-specific T cells developed a terminal differentiated KLRG1(+)/PD-1(lo) surface phenotype that was significantly reduced in the cryptic epitope-specific T cell populations. Dominant epitope-specific T cells in vaccinated animals developed into IFN-γ- and IFN-γ,TNF-α-coproducing effector cells, characteristic of the endogenous response. In contrast, cryptic epitope-specific CD4 T cells maintained significantly greater IFN-γ(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) and TNF-α(+)IL-2(+) memory-associated polyfunctionality and enhanced proliferative capacity. Vaccine-associated IL-17A production by cryptic CD4 T cells was also enhanced, but without increased neutrophilia/pathology. Direct comparison of dominant/cryptic epitope-specific CD4 T cells within covaccinated mice confirmed the superior ability of protective cryptic epitope-specific T cells to resist M. tuberculosis infection-driven T cell

  13. Role of Therapeutic Plasma Exchange in Treatment of Tumefactive Multiple Sclerosis-Associated Low CD4 and CD8 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Kristen; Mewada, Nishith; Ramanujam, Sahana; Hassanzadeh, Bahareh; Donahue, John E.; Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Moser, Robert; Kososky, Charles; Grewal, Raji P.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old healthy male who developed central nervous system inflammatory demyelinating disease consistent with tumefactive multiple sclerosis. About 2 weeks after onset of symptoms and prior to initiation of therapy, the patient had lymphopenia and low CD4 and CD8 levels. His lymphocyte count was 400 cells/µl (850–3,900 cells/µl), CD4 was 193 cells/µl (490–1,740 cells/µl) and CD8 was 103 cells/µl (180–1,170 cells/µl). He was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone followed by therapeutic plasma exchange, the levels of CD4 and CD8 normalized, and ultimately, he recovered completely. PMID:27721782

  14. CD4+ and CD8+ TCRβ repertoires possess different potentials to generate extraordinarily high-avidity T cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Rahman, Muhammed A.; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Wnuk, Piotr; Tanaka, Shinya; Chamoto, Kenji; Kagoya, Yuki; Saso, Kayoko; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Butler, Marcus O.; Hirano, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Recent high throughput sequencing analysis has revealed that the TCRβ repertoire is largely different between CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Here, we show that the transduction of SIG35α, the public chain-centric HLA-A*02:01(A2)/MART127–35 TCRα hemichain, conferred A2/MART127–35 reactivity to a substantial subset of both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells regardless of their HLA–A2 positivity. T cells individually reconstituted with SIG35α and different A2/MART127–35 TCRβ genes isolated from CD4+ or CD8+ T cells exhibited a wide range of avidity. Surprisingly, approximately half of the A2/MART127–35 TCRs derived from CD4+ T cells, but none from CD8+ T cells, were stained by A2/MART127–35 monomer and possessed broader cross-reactivity. Our results suggest that the differences in the primary structure of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ TCRβ repertoire indeed result in the differences in their ability to form extraordinarily high avidity T cells which would otherwise have been deleted by central tolerance. PMID:27030642

  15. Stabilization of HIV-1 envelope in the CD4-bound conformation through specific cross-linking of a CD4 mimetic.

    PubMed

    Martin, Grégoire; Burke, Brian; Thaï, Robert; Dey, Antu K; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar H P; Heyd, Bernadette; Geonnotti, Anthony R; Montefiori, David C; Kan, Elaine; Lian, Ying; Sun, Yide; Abache, Toufik; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Madaoui, Hocine; Guérois, Raphaël; Barnett, Susan W; Srivastava, Indresh K; Kessler, Pascal; Martin, Loïc

    2011-06-17

    CD4 binding on gp120 leads to the exposure of highly conserved regions recognized by the HIV co-receptor CCR5 and by CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies. A covalent gp120-CD4 complex was shown to elicit CD4i antibody responses in monkeys, which was correlated with control of the HIV virus infection (DeVico, A., Fouts, T., Lewis, G. K., Gallo, R. C., Godfrey, K., Charurat, M., Harris, I., Galmin, L., and Pal, R. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 17477-17482). Because the inclusion of CD4 in a vaccine formulation should be avoided, due to potential autoimmune reactions, we engineered small sized CD4 mimetics (miniCD4s) that are poorly immunogenic and do not induce anti-CD4 antibodies. We made covalent complexes between such an engineered miniCD4 and gp120 or gp140, through a site-directed coupling reaction. These complexes were recognized by CD4i antibodies as well as by the HIV co-receptor CCR5. In addition, they elicit CD4i antibody responses in rabbits and therefore represent potential vaccine candidates that mimic an important HIV fusion intermediate, without autoimmune hazard.

  16. Generation of memory CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+ and CD16- lymphocytes activated with IL-2, INF-gamma, and TNF-alpha with specific cytotoxicity against autologous cervical cancer cells in a mixed leukocyte-tumour cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rangel, R; Rocha, L; Ramirez, J L; Ibarra, M J; Solorza, G; Monroy, A; Ramirez, M A; Herrera, A; Weiss-Steider, B

    1995-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific against autologous human cervical cancer cells were generated in vitro from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from four patients with non-keratinized epidermoid carcinoma. For this purpose, these patients' PBL were co-cultured for 28 days either with IL-2 or a mixture of IL-2, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in the presence of autologous tumour cells (ATC). Our results showed that these CTL were highly cytotoxic for ATC, weakly cytotoxic for heterologous cervical cancer tumour cells, and not cytotoxic for carcinoma cell lines, normal cervix cells nor autologous PBL. Proliferation and cytotoxicity against ATC were greater when the PBL were activated with the three cytokines. These CTL had a CD4:CD8 ratio of 1:1, were CD16- and CD45RO+ and their killing activity was inhibited by antibodies against CD3, CD8 and MHC-class I but not by antibodies against CD4, CD16 or HLA-class II. The possibility of generating specific CTL in long term cultures for cervical cancer therapy is also discussed.

  17. HIV-1 transgenic rat CD4+ T cells develop decreased CD28 responsiveness and suboptimal Lck tyrosine dephosphorylation following activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Anjana; Pati, Shibani; Nyugen, Anhthu; Barabitskaja, Oxana; Mondal, Prosanta; Anderson, Michael; Gallo, Robert C.; Huso, David L.; Reid, William . E-mail: reid@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-09-30

    Impaired CD4+ T cell responses, resulting in dysregulated T-helper 1 (Th1) effector and memory responses, are a common result of HIV-1 infection. These defects are often preceded by decreased expression and function of the {alpha}/{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex and of co-stimulatory molecules including CD28, resulting in altered T cell proliferation, cytokine secretion and cell survival. We have previously shown that HIV Tg rats have defective development of T cell effector function and generation of specific effector/memory T cell subsets. Here we identify abnormalities in activated HIV-1 Tg rat CD4+ T cells that include decreased pY505 dephosphorylation of Lck (required for Lck activation), decreased CD28 function, reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-xL, decreased secretion of the mitogenic lympokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) and increased activation induced apoptosis. These events likely lead to defects in antigen-specific signaling and may help explain the disruption of Th1 responses and the generation of specific effector/memory subsets in transgenic CD4+ T cells.

  18. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A.; Laurance, John D.; Favila, Michelle A.; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  19. Optimizing Immunization Strategies for the Induction of Antigen-Specific CD4 and CD8 T Cell Responses for Protection against Intracellular Parasites.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Duthie, Malcolm S; Laurance, John D; Favila, Michelle A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Coler, Rhea N; Reed, Steven G

    2016-09-01

    Immunization strategies that generate either CD4 or CD8 T cell responses are relatively well described, but less is known with regard to optimizing regimens to induce both CD4 and CD8 memory T cells. Considering the importance of both CD4 and CD8 T cells in the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania donovani, we wanted to identify vaccines that could raise both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses and determine how to configure immunization strategies to generate the best combined protective T cell response. We examined responses generated against the Leishmania vaccine antigen F3 following its administration in either recombinant form with the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist-containing adjuvant formulation GLA-SE (F3+GLA-SE) or as a gene product delivered in an adenoviral vector (Ad5-F3). Homologous immunization strategies using only F3+GLA-SE or Ad5-F3 preferentially generated either CD4 or CD8 T cells, respectively. In contrast, heterologous strategies generated both antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Administration of F3+GLA-SE before Ad5-F3 generated the greatest combined CD4 and CD8 responses. Cytotoxic CD8 T cell responses were highest when Th1 cells were generated prior to their induction by Ad5-F3. Finally, a single immunization with a combination of F3+GLA-SE mixed with Ad5-F3 was found to be sufficient to provide protection against experimental L. donovani infection. Taken together, our data delineate immunization regimens that induce antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell memory responses, and identify a single immunization strategy that could be used to rapidly provide protection against intracellular pathogens in regions where access to health care is limited or sporadic. PMID:27466350

  20. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Attachment to HeLa CD4 Cells Is CD4 Independent and gp120 Dependent and Requires Cell Surface Heparans

    PubMed Central

    Mondor, Isabelle; Ugolini, Sophie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    1998-01-01

    The binding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Hx10) virions to two different cell lines was analyzed by using a novel assay based on the detection, by anti-HLA-DR-specific antibodies, of HLA-DR+ virus binding to HLA-DR− cells. Virion attachment to the CD4+-T-cell line A3.01 was highly CD4 dependent in that it was potently inhibited by CD4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), and little virus binding to the CD4− sister A2.01 line was observed. By contrast, virion binding to HeLa cells expressing moderate or high levels of CD4 was equivalent to, or lower than, binding to wild-type CD4− HeLa cells. Moreover, several CD4 MAbs did not reduce, but enhanced, HIV-1 attachment to HeLa-CD4 cells. CD4 was required for infection of HeLa cells, however, demonstrating a postattachment role for this receptor. MAbs specific for the V2 and V3 loops and the CD4i epitope of gp120 strongly inhibited virion binding to HeLa-CD4 cells, whereas MAbs specific for the CD4bs and the 2G12 epitopes enhanced attachment. Despite this, all gp120- and gp41-specific MAbs tested neutralized infectivity on HeLa-CD4 cells. HIV-1 attachment to HeLa cells was only partially inhibited by MAbs specific for adhesion molecules present on the virus or target cells but was completely blocked by polyanions such as heparin, dextran sulfate, and pentosan sulfate. Treatment of HeLa-CD4 cells with heparinases completely eliminated HIV attachment and infection, strongly implicating cell surface heparans in the attachment process. CD4 dependence for HIV-1 attachment to target cells is thus highly cell line specific and may be replaced by other ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:9557643

  1. Impairment of visual memory for objects in natural scenes by simulated central scotomata.

    PubMed

    Geringswald, Franziska; Porracin, Eleonora; Pollmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Because of the close link between foveal vision and the spatial deployment of attention, typically only objects that have been foveated during scene exploration may form detailed and persistent memory representations. In a recent study on patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration, however, we found surprisingly accurate visual long-term memory for objects in scenes. Normal exploration patterns that the patients had learned to rereference saccade targets to an extrafoveal retinal location. This rereferencing may allow use of an extrafoveal location as a focus of attention for efficient object encoding into long-term memory. Here, we tested this hypothesis in normal-sighted observers with gaze-contingent central scotoma simulations. As these observers were inexperienced in scene exploration with central vision loss and had not developed saccadic rereferencing, we expected deficits in long-term memory for objects. We used the same change detection task as in our patient study, probing sensitivity to object changes after a period of free scene exploration. Change detection performance was significantly reduced for two types of scotoma simulation diminishing foveal and parafoveal vision--a visible gray disc and a more subtle image warping--compared with unimpaired controls, confirming our hypothesis. The impact of a smaller scotoma covering specifically foveal vision was less distinct, leading to a marginally significant decrease of long-term memory performance compared with controls. We conclude that attentive encoding of objects is deficient when central vision is lost as long as successful saccadic rereferencing has not yet developed. PMID:27002551

  2. Energetics of the HIV gp120-CD4 binding reaction.

    PubMed

    Myszka, D G; Sweet, R W; Hensley, P; Brigham-Burke, M; Kwong, P D; Hendrickson, W A; Wyatt, R; Sodroski, J; Doyle, M L

    2000-08-01

    HIV infection is initiated by the selective interaction between the cellular receptor CD4 and gp120, the external envelope glycoprotein of the virus. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance biosensor analysis to characterize the assembly state, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the CD4-gp120 interaction. The binding thermodynamics were of unexpected magnitude; changes in enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity greatly exceeded those described for typical protein-protein interactions. These unusual thermodynamic properties were observed with both intact gp120 and a deglycosylated and truncated form of gp120 protein that lacked hypervariable loops V1, V2, and V3 and segments of its N and C termini. Together with previous crystallographic studies, the large changes in heat capacity and entropy reveal that extensive structural rearrangements occur within the core of gp120 upon CD4 binding. CD spectral studies and slow kinetics of binding support this conclusion. These results indicate considerable conformational flexibility within gp120, which may relate to viral mechanisms for triggering infection and disguising conserved receptor-binding sites from the immune system.

  3. Jacalin: a lectin mitogenic for human CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, N; Aucouturier, P; Brugier, J C; Preud'homme, J L

    1990-01-01

    The major protein component of seeds from jackfruit is the lectin jacalin. Jackfruit crude extracts are known to stimulate human lymphocytes, but the mitogenic properties of purified jacalin have not been studied in detail so far. Study of the proliferative response of cell populations from normal human peripheral blood to purified jacalin showed it to be mitogenic through an interaction with lymphocytes by its lectin-binding site, as shown by inhibition by IgA. Jacalin failed to stimulate B cells to proliferate and to undergo plasma cell maturation. It induced a proliferation of CD4 (and not CD8) lymphocytes, as shown by phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after culture and by studies of the response of isolated T cell subpopulations. The proliferative response to jacalin was autologous monocyte-dependent. The kinetics of jacalin-induced DNA synthesis, expression of CD25 and interleukin-2 secretion was shifted by comparison with that induced by phytohaemagglutinin. The reason for the restricted responsiveness of CD4 T cells is presently unclear; jacalin bound to all blood cells and did not significantly co-cap with CD1, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD38, and jacalin response was neither enhanced nor inhibited by antibodies to these surface antigens. PMID:2372991

  4. The central role of heat shock factor 1 in synaptic fidelity and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Philip L; Durham, Heather D; Török, Zsolt; Hooper, Paul L; Crul, Tim; Vígh, László

    2016-09-01

    Networks of neuronal synapses are the fundamental basis for making and retaining memory. Reduced synapse number and quality correlates with loss of memory in dementia. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the major transcription factor regulating expression of heat shock genes, plays a central role in proteostasis, in establishing and sustaining synaptic fidelity and function, and in memory consolidation. Support for this thesis is based on these observations: (1) heat shock induces improvements in synapse integrity and memory consolidation; (2) synaptic depolarization activates HSF1; (3) activation of HSF1 alone (independent of the canonical heat shock response) augments formation of essential synaptic elements-neuroligands, vesicle transport, synaptic scaffolding proteins, lipid rafts, synaptic spines, and axodendritic synapses; (4) HSF1 coalesces and activates memory receptors in the post-synaptic dendritic spine; (5) huntingtin or α-synuclein accumulation lowers HSF1 while HSF1 lowers huntingtin and α-synuclein aggregation-a potential vicious cycle; and (6) HSF1 agonists (including physical activity) can improve cognitive function in dementia models. Thus, via direct gene expression of synaptic elements, production of HSPs that assure high protein fidelity, and activation of other neuroprotective signaling pathways, HSF1 agonists could provide breakthrough therapy for dementia-associated disease.

  5. The central role of heat shock factor 1 in synaptic fidelity and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Philip L; Durham, Heather D; Török, Zsolt; Hooper, Paul L; Crul, Tim; Vígh, László

    2016-09-01

    Networks of neuronal synapses are the fundamental basis for making and retaining memory. Reduced synapse number and quality correlates with loss of memory in dementia. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), the major transcription factor regulating expression of heat shock genes, plays a central role in proteostasis, in establishing and sustaining synaptic fidelity and function, and in memory consolidation. Support for this thesis is based on these observations: (1) heat shock induces improvements in synapse integrity and memory consolidation; (2) synaptic depolarization activates HSF1; (3) activation of HSF1 alone (independent of the canonical heat shock response) augments formation of essential synaptic elements-neuroligands, vesicle transport, synaptic scaffolding proteins, lipid rafts, synaptic spines, and axodendritic synapses; (4) HSF1 coalesces and activates memory receptors in the post-synaptic dendritic spine; (5) huntingtin or α-synuclein accumulation lowers HSF1 while HSF1 lowers huntingtin and α-synuclein aggregation-a potential vicious cycle; and (6) HSF1 agonists (including physical activity) can improve cognitive function in dementia models. Thus, via direct gene expression of synaptic elements, production of HSPs that assure high protein fidelity, and activation of other neuroprotective signaling pathways, HSF1 agonists could provide breakthrough therapy for dementia-associated disease. PMID:27283588

  6. Tyrosine kinase activity of CD4-associated p56lck may not be required for CD4-dependent T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, T L; Burakoff, S J

    1993-01-01

    The lymphoid-specific tyrosine kinase p56lck (Lck) is critical for the development and activation of T lymphocytes, and Lck kinase activity has been implicated in both T-cell antigen receptor/CD3- and CD4-mediated signaling. CD4-dependent T-cell activation has been demonstrated to be dependent upon the association of CD4 with Lck. To examine the role of the kinase activity of Lck in CD4-dependent T-cell activation, we have generated several kinase-deficient mutants of Lck. When transfected into CD4+ murine T-cell hybridoma cells, these mutants cause approximately 90% diminution in CD4-associated Lck kinase activity. Specifically, upon CD4 crosslinking there is decreased Lck autophosphorylation and decreased phosphorylation of an exogenous substrate. When CD4 is crosslinked to the T-cell antigen receptor-CD3 complex, decreased phosphorylation of associated substrates is also observed. In spite of this striking inhibition of Lck kinase function, cells expressing the kinase-deficient mutants demonstrate normal or enhanced CD4-dependent antigen responsiveness. These data demonstrate that the level of Lck kinase activity does not correlate with its CD4-associated function and suggest that the kinase activity of Lck may not be required for CD4-mediated signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7505449

  7. Quantification of entry phenotypes of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 across a wide range of CD4 densities.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Arrildt, Kathryn T; Swanstrom, Adrienne E; Schnell, Gretja; Lee, Benhur; Hoxie, James A; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    Defining a macrophage-tropic phenotype for HIV-1 to assess a role in pathogenesis is complicated by the fact that HIV-1 isolates vary continuously in their ability to enter monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) in vitro, and MDMs vary in their ability to support HIV-1 entry. To overcome these limitations, we identified consistent differences in entry phenotypes between five paired blood-derived, T cell-tropic HIV-1 env genes, four of which are CCR5-using (R5) and one of which is CXCR4-using (X4), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-derived, R5 macrophage-tropic env genes. We performed entry assays using the CD4- and CCR5-inducible Affinofile cell line, expressing a range of CD4 levels that approximates the range from MDMs to CD4(+) T cells. The macrophage-tropic viruses were significantly better at infecting cells expressing low levels of CD4 than the T cell-tropic viruses from the same subjects, with the titration of CD4 providing a distinctive and quantitative phenotype. This difference in CD4 utilization was not due to macrophage-tropic viruses being CD4 independent. Furthermore, macrophage-tropic viruses did not differ from paired T cell-tropic viruses in their ability to use low levels of CCR5 (tpaired = -1.39; P = 0.24) or their use of an alternative conformation of CCR5. We also infected MDMs with a panel of viruses and observed that infectivity of each virus differed across four donors and between three preparations from a single donor. We concluded that the evolutionary transition from replication in T cells to that in macrophages involves a phenotypic transition to acquire the ability to infect cells expressing low levels of CD4 and that this phenotype is more reliably measured in Affinofile cells than in macrophages. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 typically infects memory T cells by using CD4 and CCR5 to enter cells. The virus evolves to infect new cell types by changing the coreceptor from CCR5 to CXCR4 to infect naive T cells or adapting to the use of low levels of CD4 to

  8. Human CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells do not constitutively express IL-35.

    PubMed

    Bardel, Emilie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Charlot-Rabiega, Pascaline; Coulomb-L'Herminé, Aurore; Devergne, Odile

    2008-11-15

    EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) can associate with p28 to form the heterodimeric cytokine IL-27, or with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, recently named IL-35. In mice, IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. In this study, we investigated whether human Treg cells express IL-35. Double-staining analysis of human thymuses showed that neither Foxp3(+) nor CD25(+) cells coexpressed EBI3. Similarly, Foxp3(+) cells present in human lymph nodes, tonsils, spleens, and intestines did not express EBI3. Consistent with these in situ observations, Treg cells purified from blood or tonsils were negative for EBI3 by immunoblotting. Other human T cell subsets, including effector T cells, naive and memory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells also did not constitutively express EBI3, which contrasts with IL-35 expression observed in murine CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells. Furthermore, although CD3/CD28 stimulation consistently induced low levels of EBI3 in various CD4(+) T cell subsets, no EBI3 could be detected in CD3/CD28-stimulated Treg cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that, whereas p35 transcripts were detected in both Teff and Treg cells, EBI3 transcripts were detected only in activated Teff cells, but not in resting or activated Treg cells. Thus, in contrast to their murine counterpart, human Treg cells do not express detectable amounts of IL-35.

  9. CD4 Variability in Malawi: Implications for Use of a CD4 Threshold of 500 Cells/mm3 Versus Universal Eligibility for Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schooley, Alan L.; Kamudumuli, Pocha Samuel; Vangala, Sitaram; Tseng, Chi-hong; Soko, Chifundo; Parent, Julie; Phiri, Khumbo; Jahn, Andreas; Namarika, Dan; Hoffman, Risa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given the uncertainty about the ability of a single CD4 count to accurately classify a patient as antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligible, we sought to understand the extent to which CD4 variability results in misclassification at a CD4 threshold of 500 cells/mm3. Methods. We performed a prospective study of CD4 variability in Malawian human immunodeficiency virus-infected, ART-naive, World Health Organization (WHO) stage 1 or 2, nonpregnant adults. CD4 counts were performed daily for 8 days. We fit a Bayesian linear mixed-effects model of log-transformed CD4 cell counts to the data. We used Monte Carlo approximations to estimate misclassification rates for different observed values of CD4. The misclassification rate was calculated based on the conditional probability of true CD4 given the geometric mean of observed CD4 measurements. Results. Fifty patients were enrolled from 2 sites. The median age was 33.5 years (interquartile range, 27.5–40.0) and 34 (68%) were female. Misclassification rates were <1% when the observed CD4 counts were ≤250 or ≥750 cells/mm3. Rates of misclassification were high at observed CD4 counts between 350 and 650 cells/mm3, particularly when a single measurement was used (up to 46.7%). Conclusions. Our data show that ART eligibility based on a single CD4 count results in highest risk of misclassification when observed CD4 counts are in the range of 350–650 cells/mm3. Given the benefits of early ART, countries should weigh the costs and complexity of CD4 testing using a 500 cell/mm3 threshold against the cost savings and public health benefits of universal eligibility. PMID:27704028

  10. Transporters for Antiretroviral Drugs in Colorectal CD4+ T Cells and Circulating α4β7 Integrin CD4+ T Cells: Implications for HIV Microbicides.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhya, Indrani; Murray, Graeme I; Duncan, Linda; Yuecel, Raif; Shattock, Robin; Kelly, Charles; Iannelli, Francesco; Pozzi, Gianni; El-Omar, Emad M; Hold, Georgina L; Hijazi, Karolin

    2016-09-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes in the colorectal mucosa are key in HIV-1 transmission and dissemination. As such they are also the primary target for antiretroviral (ARV)-based rectal microbicides for pre-exposure prophylaxis. Drug transporters expressed in mucosal CD4+ T cells determine ARV distribution across the cell membrane and, most likely, efficacy of microbicides. We describe transporters for antiretroviral drugs in colorectal mucosal CD4+ T lymphocytes and compare gene expression with circulating α4β7+CD4+ T cells, which traffic to the intestine and have been shown to be preferentially infected by HIV-1. Purified total CD4+ T cells were obtained from colorectal tissue and blood samples by magnetic separation. CD4+ T cells expressing α4β7 integrin were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers. Expressions of 15 efflux and uptake drug transporter genes were quantified using Taqman qPCR assays. Expression of efflux transporters MRP3, MRP5, and BCRP and uptake transporter CNT2 were significantly higher in colorectal CD4+ T cells compared to circulating CD4+ T cells (p = 0.01-0.03). Conversely, circulating α4β7+CD4+ T cells demonstrated significantly higher expression of OATPD compared to colorectal CD4+ T cells (p = 0.001). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of drug transporter gene expression in colorectal CD4+ and peripheral α4β7+CD4+ T cells. The qualitative and quantitative differences in drug transporter gene expression profiles between α4β7+CD4+ T cells and total mucosal CD4+ T cells may have significant implications for the efficacy of rectally delivered ARV-microbicides. Most notably, we have identified efflux drug transporters that could be targeted by selective inhibitors or beneficial drug-drug interactions to enhance intracellular accumulation of antiretroviral drugs.

  11. HIVgp120 activates autoreactive CD4-specific T cell responses by unveiling of hidden CD4 peptides during processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    T cells are made tolerant only to those self-peptides that are presented in sufficient amounts by antigen-presenting cells. They ignore cryptic self-determinants, such as either those not generated by processing machinery or generated in insufficient amounts. It is anticipated that mechanisms that either change antigen processing or increase the yield of previously "invisible" peptides may be capable of inducing T cell priming and, if they are self-maintained, may sustain autoimmune diseases. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time a mechanism by which the gp120 human immunodeficiency virus-I, by downregulating plasma membrane CD4 and increasing its processing, unveils hidden CD4 epitopes, inducing an autoimmune-specific T cell response. PMID:7760011

  12. Cell-intrinsic gp130 Signaling on CD4+ T cells Shapes Long-lasting Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Harker, James A.; Wong, Kurt A.; Dolgoter, Aleksandr; Zuniga, Elina I.

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family utilizes the common signal transduction molecule gp130, which can mediate a diverse range of outcomes. To clarify the role of gp130 signaling in vivo during acute viral infection we infected Cd4-cre Il6stfl/fl mice, in which gp130 is conditionally ablated in T cells, with acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). We found that by day 12, but not at day 8, post infection the number of virus specific CD4+ T cells was reduced in the absence of gp130, and this was sustained for up to 2 months post infection. Additionally gp130 deficient TFH had lower expression of Maf, IL-21 and ICOS and this was accompanied by a reduction in the proportion of germinal center B cells and plasmablasts. Remarkably, two months post-infection the proportion of IgG2a/c+ memory B cells and the systemic levels of LCMV-specific IgG2 Abs were dramatically decreased, while there was a corresponding increase in IgG1+ memory B cells and virus-specific IgG1 Abs. In the same animals Gp130 deficient virus specific CD8+ T cells showed a reduced proportion of memory cells, which expressed lower levels of Tcf7, and displayed diminished recall responses on secondary infection. Mixed bone marrow chimeras revealed that the aforementioned gp130 effects on CD4+ T cells were cell-intrinsic. Overall our data show that gp130 signaling in T cells influences the quantity and quality of long lasting CD4+ T cell responses as well as CD8+ T cell and antibody mediated immunity after acute viral infection. PMID:26085685

  13. Manufacture of Gene-Modified Human T-Cells with a Memory Stem/Central Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; Nuijen, Bastiaan; Heemskerk, Bianca; van Rooij, Nienke; van den Berg, Joost H.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Uckert, Wolfgang; Kvistborg, Pia; Schumacher, Ton N.; Jorritsma, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Advances in genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cell products that carry desired functionalities, such as the ability to recognize cancer cells. The currently used strategies for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products lead to highly differentiated cells within the infusion product, and on the basis of data obtained in preclinical models, this is likely to impact the efficacy of these products. We set out to develop a good manufacturing practice (GMP) protocol that yields T-cell receptor (TCR) gene-modified T-cells with more favorable properties for clinical application. Here, we show the robust clinical-scale production of human peripheral blood T-cells with an early memory phenotype that express a MART-1-specific TCR. By combining selection and stimulation using anti-CD3/CD28 beads for retroviral transduction, followed by expansion in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15, production of a well-defined clinical-scale TCR gene-modified T-cell product could be achieved. A major fraction of the T-cells generated in this fashion were shown to coexpress CD62L and CD45RA, and express CD27 and CD28, indicating a central memory or memory stemlike phenotype. Furthermore, these cells produced IFNγ, TNFα, and IL-2 and displayed cytolytic activity against target cells expressing the relevant antigen. The T-cell products manufactured by this robust and validated GMP production process are now undergoing testing in a phase I/IIa clinical trial in HLA-A*02:01 MART-1-positive advanced stage melanoma patients. To our knowledge, this is the first clinical trial protocol in which the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 has been applied for the generation of gene-modified T-cell products. PMID:25143008

  14. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  15. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  16. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation.

  17. Concomitant augmentation of CD4+ CD29+ helper inducer and diminution of CD4+ CD45RA+ suppressor inducer subset in patients infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus types I or II.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, R B; Rudolph, D L; Schmid, D S; Lairmore, M D

    1992-01-01

    To examine the immunomodulatory effects of HTLV infection, lymphocyte subset analysis was performed on patients infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I, n = 6) or -II (HTLV-II, n = 12) and on normal blood donors (n = 16). The percentages of total B lymphocytes (CD19), natural killer (NK) cells (CD16), T lymphocytes and their subsets (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8), and IL-2R (CD25) were found to be within the range found in normal donors. However, the expression of CD8+ HLA-DR+ increased significantly in patients with HTLV-I or HTLV-II infection (14.1 +/- 3.9% and 9.7 +/- 2.4% respectively; P less than 0.01) when compared with controls (3.2 +/- 1.1%). In addition, there was a significantly greater proportion of CD4+CD29+ T lymphocytes (29.3 +/- 6.1% and 31.1 +/- 9.0%; P less than 0.05) with concomitant diminution of CD4+CD45RA+ T lymphocytes (8.3 +/- 3.3% and 11.4 +/- 1.5%; P less than 0.01) in patients infected with HTLV-I or HTLV-II respectively, when compared with controls. The increased percentage of CD4+CD29+ subpopulations showed a direct correlation (rs = 0.86; P less than 0.001) with HTLV-specific antibody production. No difference in the CD8 population coexpressing CD29 and S6F1 (an epitope of LFA-1) were observed in the HTLV-infected group when compared with normal donors and functional analysis exhibited minimal cytotoxicity against lectin labelled heterologous target cells. Thus, the shift in the suppressor/cytotoxic to helper/inducer 'memory' CD4+ may be associated with immunoregulatory abnormalities often found in persons infected with HTLV-I or HTLV-II. PMID:1370929

  18. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    2016-04-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bursts of γ-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries “memory” of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, and suggest a common physical mechanism behind GRBs and SGRs, which points toward a magnetar central engine of GRBs.

  19. Cytomegalovirus-Associated CD4(+) CD28(null) Cells in NKG2D-Dependent Glomerular Endothelial Injury and Kidney Allograft Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shabir, S; Smith, H; Kaul, B; Pachnio, A; Jham, S; Kuravi, S; Ball, S; Chand, S; Moss, P; Harper, L; Borrows, R

    2016-04-01

    Emerging data suggest that expansion of a circulating population of atypical, cytotoxic CD4(+) T cells lacking costimulatory CD28 (CD4(+) CD28(null) cells) is associated with latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. The purpose of the current study was to increase the understanding of the relevance of these cells in 100 unselected kidney transplant recipients followed prospectively for a median of 54 months. Multicolor flow cytometry of peripheral blood mononuclear cells before transplantation and serially posttransplantation was undertaken. CD4(+) CD28(null) cells were found predominantly in CMV-seropositive patients and expanded in the posttransplantation period. These cells were predominantly effector-memory phenotype and expressed markers of endothelial homing (CX3CR1) and cytotoxicity (NKG2D and perforin). Isolated CD4(+) CD27(-) CD28(null) cells proliferated in response to peripheral blood mononuclear cells previously exposed to CMV-derived (but not HLA-derived) antigens and following such priming incubation with glomerular endothelium resulted in signs of endothelial damage and apoptosis (release of fractalkine and von Willebrand factor; increased caspase 3 expression). This effect was mitigated by NKG2D-blocking antibody. Increased CD4(+) CD28(null) cell frequencies were associated with delayed graft function and lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at end follow-up. This study suggests an important role for this atypical cytotoxic CD4(+) CD28(null) cell subset in kidney transplantation and points to strategies that may minimize the impact on clinical outcomes.

  20. New candidates for CD4 T cell pathogenicity in experimental neuroinflammation and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Nicola; Graetz, Christiane; Paterka, Magdalena; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Larochelle, Catherine; Hasan, Maruf; Lill, Christina M; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is thought to be triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals leading to activation of autoreactive T lymphocytes. Large multi-centre genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic risk loci in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated T cell transcriptomic changes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model for multiple sclerosis. We correlated these findings with the multiple sclerosis risk genes postulated by the most recent Immunochip analysis and found that multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes were significantly regulated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data indicate that nine distinct genes associated with multiple sclerosis risk, Bach2, Il2ra, Irf8, Mertk, Odf3b, Plek, Rgs1, Slc30a7 and Thada, can be confirmed to be differentially regulated in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. During the effector phase within the inflamed CNS, CD4(+) T cells undergo comprehensive transformation and we identified key transcription factors and signalling networks involved in this process. The transformation was linked to metabolic changes with the involvement of liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor signalling and cholesterol biosynthesis, which might control the T cell effector function in the central nervous system. Thus, our study confirms the involvement of multiple sclerosis risk genes in the pathophysiology of the animal model and sheds light on additional disease-relevant inflammatory networks.

  1. A Subset of Circulating Blood Mycobacteria-Specific CD4 T Cells Can Predict the Time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sputum Culture Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P.; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+IL2+TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  2. A subset of circulating blood mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells can predict the time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sputum culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive M; Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+ Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+ HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+ HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+ IL2+ TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+ HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment.

  3. A subset of circulating blood mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells can predict the time to Mycobacterium tuberculosis sputum culture conversion.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive M; Lugongolo, Masixole; Gwala, Thabisile; Kiravu, Agano; Deniso, Pamela; Stewart-Isherwood, Lynsey; Omar, Shaheed Vally; Grobusch, Martin P; Coetzee, Gerrit; Conradie, Francesca; Ismail, Nazir; Kaplan, Gilla; Fallows, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    We investigated 18 HIV-negative patients with MDR-TB for M. tuberculosis (Mtb)- and PPD-specific CD4 T cell responses and followed them over 6 months of drug therapy. Twelve of these patients were sputum culture (SC) positive and six patients were SC negative upon enrollment. Our aim was to identify a subset of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells that would predict time to culture conversion. The total frequency of mycobacteria-specific CD4 T cells at baseline could not distinguish patients showing positive or negative SC. However, a greater proportion of late-differentiated (LD) Mtb- and PPD-specific memory CD4 T cells was found in SC positive patients than in those who were SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0012, respectively). Similarly, a higher co-expression of HLA-DR+ Ki67+ on Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells could also discriminate between sputum SC positive versus SC negative (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed that baseline levels of Ki67+ HLA-DR+ Mtb- and PPD-specific CD4 T cells were predictive of the time to sputum culture conversion, with area-under-the-curve of 0.8 (p = 0.027). Upon treatment, there was a significant decline of these Ki67+ HLA-DR+ T cell populations in the first 2 months, with a progressive increase in mycobacteria-specific polyfunctional IFNγ+ IL2+ TNFα+ CD4 T cells over 6 months. Thus, a subset of activated and proliferating mycobacterial-specific CD4 T cells (Ki67+ HLA-DR+) may provide a valuable marker in peripheral blood that predicts time to sputum culture conversion in TB patients at the start of treatment. PMID:25048802

  4. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  5. AP-2 Is the Crucial Clathrin Adaptor Protein for CD4 Downmodulation by HIV-1 Nef in Infected Primary CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Marcos Vinicius; Wiltzer-Bach, Linda; Maurer, Brigitte; Banning, Carina; Arganaraz, Enrique; Schindler, Michael

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation involves various host factors. We investigated the importance of AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, V1H-ATPase, β-COP, and ACOT8 for CD4 downmodulation in HIV-1-infected short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing CD4(+) T cells and characterized direct interaction with Nef by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Binding of lentiviral Nefs to CD4 and AP-2 was conserved, and only AP-2 knockdown impaired Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation from primary T cells. Altogether, among the factors tested, AP-2 is the most important player for Nef-mediated CD4 downmodulation.

  6. Chimpanzees Immunized with Recombinant Soluble CD4 Develop Anti-Self CD4 Antibody Responses with Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Lord, Carol I.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1992-06-01

    In view of the efficiency with which human immunodeficiency virus replication can be blocked in vitro with anti-CD4 antibodies, the elicitation of an anti-CD4 antibody response through active immunization might represent a useful therapeutic strategy for AIDS. Here we demonstrate that immunization of chimpanzees with recombinant soluble human CD4 elicited an anti-CD4 antibody response. The elicited antibody bound self CD4 on digitonin-treated but not freshly isolated lymphocytes. Nevertheless, this antibody blocked human immunodeficiency virus replication in chimpanzee and human lymphocytes. These observations suggest that immunization with recombinant soluble CD4 from human immunodeficiency virus-infected humans may be feasible and therapeutically beneficial.

  7. Influence of clitoria ternatea extracts on memory and central cholinergic activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Taranalli, A D; Cheeramkuzhy, T C

    2000-01-01

    Clitoria ternatea , commonly known as Shankpushpi, is widely used in the traditional Indian system of medicine as a brain tonic and is believed to promote memory and intelligence. We examined the effectiveness of alcoholic extracts of aerial and root parts of C. ternatea at 300 and 500 mg/kg doses orally in rats in attenuating electroshock-induced amnesia. Extracts at 300 mg/kg dose produced significant memory retention, and the root parts were found to be more effective. In order to delineate the possible mechanism through which C. ternatea elicits the anti-amnesic effects, we studied its influence on central cholinergic activity by estimating the acetylcholine content of the whole brain and acetylcholinesterase activity at different regions of the rat brain, viz., cerebral cortex, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebellum. Our results suggest that C. ternatea extracts increase rat brain acetylcholine content and acetyl cholinesterase a ctivity in a similar fashion to the standard cerebro protective drug Pyritinol. PMID:21214440

  8. Emergence of CD4 Independence Envelopes and Astrocyte Infection in R5 Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Model of Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ke; Leda, Ana Rachel; Tsai, Lily; Knight, Heather; Harbison, Carole; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Westmoreland, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the central nervous system (CNS) is characterized by replication in macrophages or brain microglia that express low levels of the CD4 receptor and is the cause of HIV-associated dementia and related cognitive and motor disorders that affect 20 to 30% of treatment-naive patients with AIDS. Independent viral envelope evolution in the brain has been reported, with the need for robust replication in resident CD4low cells, as well as CD4-negative cells, such as astrocytes, proposed as a major selective pressure. We previously reported giant-cell encephalitis in subtype B and C R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected macaques (SHIV-induced encephalitis [SHIVE]) that experienced very high chronic viral loads and progressed rapidly to AIDS, with varying degrees of macrophage or microglia infection and activation of these immune cells, as well as astrocytes, in the CNS. In this study, we characterized envelopes (Env) amplified from the brains of subtype B and C R5 SHIVE macaques. We obtained data in support of an association between severe neuropathological changes, robust macrophage and microglia infection, and evolution to CD4 independence. Moreover, the degree of Env CD4 independence appeared to correlate with the extent of astrocyte infection in vivo. These findings further our knowledge of the CNS viral population phenotypes that are associated with the severity of HIV/SHIV-induced neurological injury and improve our understanding of the mechanism of HIV-1 cellular tropism and persistence in the brain. IMPORTANCE Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of astrocytes in the brain has been suggested to be important in HIV persistence and neuropathogenesis but has not been definitively demonstrated in an animal model of HIV-induced encephalitis (HIVE). Here, we describe a new nonhuman primate (NHP) model of R5 simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-induced encephalitis

  9. Prion protein-deficient mice exhibit decreased CD4 T and LTi cell numbers and impaired spleen structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soochan; Han, Sinsuk; Lee, Ye Eun; Jung, Woong-Jae; Lee, Hyung Soo; Kim, Yong-Sun; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein is expressed in almost all tissues, including the central nervous system and lymphoid tissues. To investigate the effects of the prion protein in lymphoid cells and spleen structure formation, we used prion protein-deficient (Prnp(0/0)) Zürich I mice generated by inactivation of the Prnp gene. Prnp(0/0) mice had decreased lymphocytes, in particular, CD4 T cells and lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Decreased CD4 T cells resulted from impaired expression of CCL19 and CCL21 in the spleen rather than altered chemokine receptor CCR7 expression. Importantly, some of the white pulp regions in spleens from Prnp(0/0) mice displayed impaired T zone structure as a result of decreased LTi cell numbers and altered expression of the lymphoid tissue-organizing genes lymphotoxin-α and CXCR5, although expression of the lymphatic marker podoplanin and CXCL13 by stromal cells was not affected. In addition, CD3(-)CD4(+)IL-7Rα(+) LTi cells were rarely detected in impaired white pulp in spleens of these mice. These data suggest that the prion protein is required to form the splenic white pulp structure and for development of normal levels of CD4 T and LTi cells.

  10. Depletion of the surface CD4 molecule by the envelope protein of human immunodeficiency virus expressed in a human CD4 sup + monocytoid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Ikuo; Koga, Yasuhiro; Oh-Hori, Nobuhira; Kimura, Genki; Nomoto, Kikuo ); Onodera, Kazukiyo )

    1989-09-01

    A CD4{sup +} human monocytoid cell line, U937, was transfected with a constructed plasmid which has the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus under the transcriptional control of the human metallothionein IIA promoter and was cloned thereafter. These cloned cell lines (EH and EL cells) expressed the viral gp160 in the cytoplasm. The expression of surface CD4 antigen examined by Leu3a and OKT4 monoclonal antibodies, however, disappeared completely in EH cells, which produce a larger amount of gp160, while diminishing only partly in EL cells, which produce a smaller amount of gp160. These results indicate that the level of expression of surface CD4 antigen correlates inversely with the amount of intracellular gp160. Moreover, immunoprecipitation studies using lysate from EH cells showed that OKT4 monoclonal antibody precipitated a significant number of CD4 molecules even after surface CD4 disappeared. However, Leu3a monoclonal antibody, which recognizes the binding site for envelope protein, could not precipitate any CD4 molecules in the same cell lysate. Taken together, these results suggested that CD4 molecules are still synthesized normally after the augmented production of gp160 in the cells but form a complex with the envelope protein in the cytoplasm and become unable to be transported to the cell surface, resulting in the observed depletion of surface CD4 antigen. This mechanism may explain the decrease or absence of surface CD4 antigens in human lymphocytes infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

  11. CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Latent Antigen EBNA-1 and Lytic Antigen BZLF-1 during Persistent Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Leskowitz, R. M.; Zhou, X. Y.; Villinger, F.; Fogg, M. H.; Kaur, A.; Lieberman, P. M.; Wang, F.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4+ and/or CD8+ T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8+ T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  12. Impact of Distinct Poxvirus Infections on the Specificities and Functionalities of CD4+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Nicholas A.; Hersperger, Adam R.; Lacuanan, Aimee M.; Xu, Ren-Huan; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Sigal, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The factors that determine CD4+ T cell (TCD4+) specificities, functional capacity, and memory persistence in response to complex pathogens remain unclear. We explored these parameters in the C57BL/6 mouse through comparison of two highly related (>92% homology) poxviruses: ectromelia virus (ECTV), a natural mouse pathogen, and vaccinia virus (VACV), a heterologous virus that nevertheless elicits potent immune responses. In addition to elucidating several previously unidentified major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-restricted epitopes, we observed many qualitative and quantitative differences between the TCD4+ repertoires, including responses not elicited by VACV despite complete sequence conservation. In addition, we observed functional heterogeneity between ECTV- and VACV-specific TCD4+ at both a global and individual epitope level, particularly greater expression of the cytolytic marker CD107a from TCD4+ following ECTV infection. Most striking were differences during the late memory phase where, in contrast to ECTV, VACV infection failed to elicit measurable epitope-specific TCD4+ as determined by intracellular cytokine staining. These findings illustrate the strong influence of epitope-extrinsic factors on TCD4+ responses and memory. IMPORTANCE Much of our understanding concerning host-pathogen relationships in the context of poxvirus infections stems from studies of VACV in mice. However, VACV is not a natural mouse pathogen, and therefore, the relevance of results obtained using this model may be limited. Here, we explored the MHC class II-restricted TCD4+ repertoire induced by mousepox (ECTV) infection and the functional profile of the responding epitope-specific TCD4+, comparing these results to those induced by VACV infection under matched conditions. Despite a high degree of homology between the two viruses, we observed distinct specificity and functional profiles of TCD4+ responses at both acute and memory time points, with VACV

  13. How word decoding skill impacts text memory: The centrality deficit and how domain knowledge can compensate.

    PubMed

    Miller, Amanda C; Keenan, Janice M

    2009-12-01

    We examined text memory in children with word reading deficits to determine how these difficulties impact representations of text meaning. We show that even though children with poor word decoding recall more central than peripheral information, they show a significantly bigger deficit relative to controls on central than on peripheral information. We call this the centrality deficit and argue that it is the consequence of insufficient cognitive resources for connecting ideas together due to these children's resources being diverted from comprehension to word decoding. We investigated a possible compensatory mechanism for making these connections. Because a text representation is a synthesis of text information and a reader's prior knowledge, we hypothesized that having knowledge of the passage topic might reduce or eliminate the centrality deficit. Our results support this knowledge compensation hypothesis: The centrality deficit was evident when poor readers did not have prior knowledge, but was eliminated when they did. This presents an exciting avenue to pursue for possible remediation of reading comprehension in children with word identification difficulties.

  14. How Word Reading Skill Impacts Text Memory: The Centrality Deficit and How Domain Knowledge Can Compensate

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Amanda C.; Keenan, Janice M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined text memory in children with word reading deficits to determine how these difficulties impact representations of text meaning. We show that even though children with poor word decoding recall more central than peripheral information, they show a significantly bigger deficit relative to controls on central than on peripheral information. We call this the centrality deficit and argue that it is the consequence of insufficient cognitive resources for connecting ideas together due to these children's resources being diverted from comprehension to word decoding. We investigated a possible compensatory mechanism for making these connections. Because a text representation is a synthesis of text information and a reader's prior knowledge, we hypothesized that having knowledge of the passage topic might reduce or eliminate the centrality deficit. Our results support this knowledge compensation hypothesis: the centrality deficit was evident when poor readers did not have prior knowledge, but was eliminated when they did. This presents an exciting avenue to pursue for possible remediation of reading comprehension in children with word identification difficulties. PMID:19475514

  15. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  16. Induction of CD4 suppressor T cells with anti-Leu-8 antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kanof, M.E.; Strober, W.; James, S.P.

    1987-07-01

    To characterize the conditions under which CD4 T cells suppress polyclonal immunoglobulin synthesis, we investigated the capacity of CD4 T cells that coexpress the surface antigen recognized by the monoclonal antibody anti-Leu-8 to mediate suppression. In an in vitro system devoid of CD8 T cells, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells suppressed pokeweed mitogen-induced immunoglobulin synthesis. Similarly, suppressor function was induced in unfractionated CD4 T cell populations after incubation with anti-Leu-8 antibody under cross-linking conditions. This induction of suppressor function by anti-Leu-8 antibody was not due to expansion of the CD4, Leu-8+ T cell population because CD4 T cells did not proliferate in response to anti-Leu-8 antibody. However, CD4, Leu-8+ T cell-mediated suppression was radiosensitive. Finally, CD4, Leu-8+ T cells do not inhibit immunoglobulin synthesis when T cell lymphokines were used in place of helper CD4 T cells (CD4, Leu-8- T cells), suggesting that CD4 T cell-mediated suppression occurs at the T cell level. We conclude that CD4 T cells can be induced to suppress immunoglobulin synthesis by modulation of the membrane antigen recognized by anti-Leu-8 antibody.

  17. The role of CD4 on mechanical properties of live cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Chien; Nguyen, Thi-Huong

    2016-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the characterization and identification of CD4 functions, its role in mechanical properties of cell membrane remains largely unknown. Here an atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the roles of CD4 in the elasticity of the leukemic human Jurkat (clone E6-1) cell membranes. Analysis of the approach force curves with Hertz model for a completely elastic soft sample measured on the selected CD4+ and CD4- cells showed that CD4+ cell membrane was softer than CD4- one. To confirm that CD4 plays a role in altering cell elasticity, human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (wt) CD4 plasmid before being used in AFM nanoindentation experiments. The results also demonstrated CD4- membrane was stiffer than CD4+ one suggesting that CD4 integrated into plasma membrane and altered its mechanical properties. The study gives insights into the role of CD4 on cell membrane mechanical characteristics and might be helpful for development of cell biology and medicine. PMID:26362701

  18. The role of CD4 on mechanical properties of live cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Chien; Nguyen, Thi-Huong

    2016-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in the characterization and identification of CD4 functions, its role in mechanical properties of cell membrane remains largely unknown. Here an atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the roles of CD4 in the elasticity of the leukemic human Jurkat (clone E6-1) cell membranes. Analysis of the approach force curves with Hertz model for a completely elastic soft sample measured on the selected CD4+ and CD4- cells showed that CD4+ cell membrane was softer than CD4- one. To confirm that CD4 plays a role in altering cell elasticity, human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (wt) CD4 plasmid before being used in AFM nanoindentation experiments. The results also demonstrated CD4- membrane was stiffer than CD4+ one suggesting that CD4 integrated into plasma membrane and altered its mechanical properties. The study gives insights into the role of CD4 on cell membrane mechanical characteristics and might be helpful for development of cell biology and medicine.

  19. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  20. Two systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) global disease activity indexes--the SLE Disease Activity Index and the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure--demonstrate different correlations with activation of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Daca, Agnieszka; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Smoleńska, Zaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Jacek M; Bryl, Ewa

    2011-12-01

    Global disease activity measurement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is important for the clinical estimation and adjustment of therapy. By contrast, immune system activation plays a significant role in disease pathogenesis, with CD4+ lymphocytes acting as central cells in the immune response. We investigated which scale better correlates with immunologic changes in the blood of SLE patients, the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) or the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) scale. Samples of peripheral blood were obtained from 45 SLE patients with different disease activity as assessed by the SLEDAI and the SLAM scales on the same day. We assessed the percentage of CD4+ T cells with activation-associated receptors: CD69, CD25int, CD95, HLA-DR, and CD4+ T cells with killing properties containing perforin and granzyme B. Our results indicated that the percentage of CD4+CD69+ and CD4+CD25(int) cells did not correlate with either the SLEDAI or the SLAM scale. Significant and positive correlations were observed between percentages of CD4+CD95+ and CD4+HLA-DR+ lymphocytes and SLE activity, but only when activity was measured using the SLAM scale, not with the SLEDAI scale. The percentage of CD4+perforin+ and CD4+granzyme B+ cells also strongly correlated with disease activity measured only with the SLAM scale. We conclude that the SLAM scale better reflects changes of immune system activity in SLE patients compared with the SLEDAI scale.

  1. Beta-catenin signaling mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Jason M; Zloza, Andrew; Li, Wei; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2010-08-15

    Upon activation, a subset of mature human CD8(+) T cells re-expresses CD4 dimly. This CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cell population is genuine and enriched in antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses. The signaling pathway that leads to CD4 re-expression on mature CD8(+) T cells is not clear. Given that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a critical role in the transition of CD4(-)CD8(-) to CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, we determined whether beta-catenin mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells. We demonstrate that active beta-catenin expression is 20-fold higher on CD4(dim)CD8(bright) than CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Activation of beta-catenin signaling, through LiCl or transfection with a constitutively active construct of beta-catenin, induced CD4 on CD8(+) T cells by approximately 10-fold. Conversely, inhibition of beta-catenin signaling through transfection with a dominant-negative construct for T cell factor-4, a downstream effector of beta-catenin signaling, diminished CD4 expression on CD8(+) T cells by 50% in response to T cell activation. Beta-catenin-mediated induction of CD4 on CD8(+) T cells is transcriptionally regulated, as it induced CD4 mRNA, and T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor sites were identified within the human CD4 promoter. Further, beta-catenin expression induced the antiapoptotic factor BcL-xL, suggesting that beta-catenin may mediate protection against activation-induced cell death. Collectively, these data demonstrate that beta-catenin is critical in inducing CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells, suggesting that it is a common pathway for CD4 upregulation among thymocytes and mature CD8(+) T cells. PMID:20631314

  2. Modulation of CD4 lateral mobility in intact cells by an intracellularly applied antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Grebenkämper, K; Tosi, P F; Lazarte, J E; Sneed, L; Brüggemann, U; Kubitscheck, U; Nicolau, C; Peters, R

    1995-01-01

    This study shows that the lateral mobility of CD4, an important plasma-membrane immune receptor, can be modulated by intracellular application of an anti-CD4 antibody. For this purpose, (i) full-length CD4 and a truncated CD4 mutant, lacking a 32-residue-long C-terminal intracellularly exposed domain, were expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells, (ii) a monoclonal antibody, C6, with specificity for the C-terminal domain was generated, and (iii) a versatile apparatus for fluorescence microphotolysis (FM) studies was constructed. By these means it was found that the commercial anti-CD4 antibody Leu3a-PE, in contrast with several other anti-CD4 antibodies, could be used as a fluorescent label of CD4 without interfering greatly with CD4 mobility. Labelled by Leu3a-PE, full-length CD4 had a lateral diffusion coefficient of D = (4.7 +/- 1.9) x 10(-10) cm2/s and a mobile fraction of fm = 80 +/- 16% (room temperature). Within experimental accuracy the truncated CD4 had the same mobility as full-length CD4. Introduction of the C6 antibody into Sf9 cells by microinjection or by fusion with C6-loaded liposomes decreased the mobility of full-length CD4 (fm = 40%) but not of truncated CD4 (fm = 80%). Treatment of Sf9 cells with phorbol ester also reduced the mobility of full-length CD4 (fm = 50%) but not truncated CD4 (fm = 90%). A calmodulin inhibitor but not a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor abolished the phorbol ester effect. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7492321

  3. Macrophage entry mediated by HIV Envs from brain and lymphoid tissues is determined by the capacity to use low CD4 levels and overall efficiency of fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Elaine R.; Dunfee, Rebecca L.; Stanton, Jennifer; Bogdan, Derek; Taylor, Joann; Kunstman, Kevin; Bell, Jeanne E.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana . E-mail: dana_gabuzda@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-03-30

    HIV infects macrophages and microglia in the central nervous system (CNS), which express lower levels of CD4 than CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood. To investigate mechanisms of HIV neurotropism, full-length env genes were cloned from autopsy brain and lymphoid tissues from 4 AIDS patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD). Characterization of 55 functional Env clones demonstrated that Envs with reduced dependence on CD4 for fusion and viral entry are more frequent in brain compared to lymphoid tissue. Envs that mediated efficient entry into macrophages were frequent in brain but were also present in lymphoid tissue. For most Envs, entry into macrophages correlated with overall fusion activity at all levels of CD4 and CCR5. gp160 nucleotide sequences were compartmentalized in brain versus lymphoid tissue within each patient. Proline at position 308 in the V3 loop of gp120 was associated with brain compartmentalization in 3 patients, but mutagenesis studies suggested that P308 alone does not contribute to reduced CD4 dependence or macrophage-tropism. These results suggest that HIV adaptation to replicate in the CNS selects for Envs with reduced CD4 dependence and increased fusion activity. Macrophage-tropic Envs are frequent in brain but are also present in lymphoid tissues of AIDS patients with HAD, and entry into macrophages in the CNS and other tissues is dependent on the ability to use low receptor levels and overall efficiency of fusion.

  4. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage. PMID:7857246

  5. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage.

  6. Structural Basis for Species Selectivity in the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Interaction: Restoring Affinity to gp120 in Murine CD4 Mimetic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kassler, Kristin; Meier, Julia; Eichler, Jutta; Sticht, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    The first step of HIV-1 infection involves interaction between the viral glycoprotein gp120 and the human cellular receptor CD4. Inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction represents an attractive strategy to block HIV-1 infection. In an attempt to explore the known lack of affinity of murine CD4 to gp120, we have investigated peptides presenting the putative gp120-binding site of murine CD4 (mCD4). Molecular modeling indicates that mCD4 protein cannot bind gp120 due to steric clashes, while the larger conformational flexibility of mCD4 peptides allows an interaction. This finding is confirmed by experimental binding assays, which also evidenced specificity of the peptide-gp120 interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the mCD4-peptide stably interacts with gp120 via an intermolecular β-sheet, while an important salt-bridge formed by a C-terminal lysine is lost. Fixation of the C-terminus by introducing a disulfide bridge between the N- and C-termini of the peptide significantly enhanced the affinity to gp120. PMID:22312332

  7. CD4+ T-cell deficiency in HIV patients responding to antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased expression of interferon-stimulated genes in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Sonia; Tanaskovic, Sara; Helbig, Karla; Rajasuriar, Reena; Kramski, Marit; Murray, John M; Beard, Michael; Purcell, Damian; Lewin, Sharon R; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A

    2011-12-15

    Most patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who remain CD4(+) T-cell deficient on antiretroviral therapy (ART) exhibit marked immune activation. As CD4(+) T-cell activation may be mediated by microbial translocation or interferon-alpha (IFN-α), we examined these factors in HIV patients with good or poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery on long-term ART. Messenger RNA levels for 3 interferon-stimulated genes were increased in CD4(+) T cells of patients with poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery, whereas levels in patients with good recovery did not differ from those in healthy controls. Poor CD4(+) T-cell recovery was also associated with CD4(+) T-cell expression of markers of activation, senescence, and apoptosis, and with increased serum levels of the lipopolysaccharide receptor and soluble CD14, but these were not significantly correlated with expression of the interferon-stimulated genes. Therefore, CD4(+) T-cell recovery may be adversely affected by the effects of IFN-α, which may be amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  8. CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ Cells in Cord Blood of Neonates Born from Filaria Infected Mother Are Negatively Associated with CD4+Tbet+ and CD4+RORγt+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zettlmeissl, Eva; van der Vlugt, Luciën E. P. M.; de Jong, Sanne; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Adegnika, Ayola Akim

    2014-01-01

    Background Children who have been exposed in utero to maternal filarial infection are immunologically less responsive to filarial antigens, have less pathology, and are more susceptible to acquire infection than offspring of uninfected mothers. Moreover children from filaria infected mothers have been shown to be less responsive to vaccination as a consequence of an impairment of their immune response. However, it is not well known how in utero exposure to parasite antigens affects cellular immune responses. Methodology Here, 30 pregnant women were examined for the presence of microfilaria of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in peripheral blood. At delivery, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) were obtained and the CD4+T cells were phenotyped by expression of the transcription factors Tbet, RORγt, and FOXP3. Results No significant difference was observed between newborns from infected versus uninfected mothers in the frequencies of total CD4+T cells and CD4+T cells subsets including CD4+Tbet+, CD4+RORγt+ T and CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ T cells. However, there was a negative association between CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+T cells and CD4+Tbet+ as well as CD4+RORγt+ T cells in the infected group only (B = −0.242, P = 0.002; B = −0.178, P = 0.013 respectively). Conclusion Our results suggest that filarial infection during pregnancy leads to an expansion of functionally active regulatory T cells that keep TH1 and TH17 in check. PMID:25531674

  9. Myd88 Initiates Early Innate Immune Responses and Promotes CD4 T Cells during Coronavirus Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Butchi, Niranjan; Kapil, Parul; Puntambekar, Shweta; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myd88 signaling is critical to the control of numerous central nervous system (CNS) infections by promoting both innate and adaptive immune responses. Nevertheless, the extent to which Myd88 regulates type I interferon (IFN) versus proinflammatory factors and T cell function, as well as the anatomical site of action, varies extensively with the pathogen. CNS infection by neurotropic coronavirus with replication confined to the brain and spinal cord induces protective IFN-α/β via Myd88-independent activation of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). However, a contribution of Myd88-dependent signals to CNS pathogenesis has not been assessed. Infected Myd88−/− mice failed to control virus, exhibited enhanced clinical disease coincident with increased demyelination, and succumbed to infection within 3 weeks. The induction of IFN-α/β, as well as of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, was impaired early during infection. However, defects in both IFN-α/β and select proinflammatory factors were rapidly overcome prior to T cell recruitment. Myd88 deficiency also specifically blunted myeloid and CD4 T cell recruitment into the CNS without affecting CD8 T cells. Moreover, CD4 T cells but not CD8 T cells were impaired in IFN-γ production. Ineffective virus control indeed correlated most prominently with reduced antiviral IFN-γ in the CNS of Myd88−/− mice. The results demonstrate a crucial role for Myd88 both in early induction of innate immune responses during coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis and in specifically promoting protective CD4 T cell activation. In the absence of these responses, functional CD8 T cells are insufficient to control viral spread within the CNS, resulting in severe demyelination. IMPORTANCE During central nervous system (CNS) infections, signaling through the adaptor protein Myd88 promotes both innate and adaptive immune responses. The extent to which Myd88 regulates antiviral type I IFN, proinflammatory

  10. CD4 T-Cell Enumeration in a Field Setting: Evaluation of CyFlow Counter Using the CD4 Easy Count Kit-Dry and Pima CD4 Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Djibril; Diaw, Papa Alassane; Daneau, Géraldine; Camara, Makhtar; Dieye, Tandakha Ndiaye; Mboup, Souleymane; Kestens, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Flow Cytometry (FCM) is still considered to be the method of choice for accurate CD4 enumeration. However, the use of FCM in developing countries is problematic due to their cost and complexity. Lower-cost technologies have been introduced. We evaluated CyFlow Counter together with its lyophilized reagents, and Pima CD4 in high-temperature area, using FACSCount as reference. Materials and Methods Whole blood samples were consecutively collected by venipuncture from 111 HIV+ patients and 17 HIV-negative donors. CD4 T-cell enumeration was performed on CyFlow Counter, Pima CD4 and FACSCount. Results CyFlow Counter and Pima CD4 systems showed good correlation with FACSCount (slope of 0.82 and 0.90, and concordance ρc of 0.94 and 0.98, respectively). CyFlow Counter showed absolute or relative biases (LOA) of −63 cells/mm3 (−245 to 120) or −9.8% (−38.1 to 18.4) respectively, and Pima CD4 showed biases (LOA) of −30 cells/mm3 (−160 to 101) or −3.5% (−41.0 to 33.9%). CyFlow Counter and Pima CD4 showed respectively 106.7% and 105.9% of similarity with FACSCount. According to WHO-2010 ART initiation threshold of 350 cells/mm3, CyFlow Counter and Pima CD4 showed respectively sensibility of 100% and 97%, and specificity of 91% and 93%. CyFlow Counter and Pima CD4 were strongly correlated (slope of 1.09 and ρc of 0.95). These alternative systems showed good agreement with bias of 33 cells/mm3 (−132 to 203) or 6.3% (−31.2 to 43.8), and similarity of 104.3%. Conclusion CyFlow Counter using CD4 easy count kit-dry and Pima CD4 systems can accurately provide CD4 T-cell counts with acceptable agreement to those of FACSCount. PMID:24066184

  11. In vivo dendritic cell targeting cellular vaccine induces CD4+ Tfh cell-dependent antibody against influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Satoru; Shimizu, Kanako; Kometani, Kohei; Sakurai, Maki; Kawamura, Masami; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    An induction of long-term cellular and humoral immunity is for the goal of vaccines, but the combination of antigens and adjuvant remain unclear. Here, we show, using a cellular vaccine carrying foreign protein antigen plus iNKT cell glycolipid antigen, designated as artificial adjuvant vector cells (aAVCs), that mature XCR1− DCs in situ elicit not only ordinal antigen-specific CD4+T cells, but also CD4+ Tfh and germinal center, resulted in inducing long-term antibody production. As a mechanism for leading the long-term antibody production by aAVC, memory CD4+ Tfh cells but not iNKTfh cells played an important role in a Bcl6 dependent manner. To develop it for influenza infection, we established influenza hemagglutinin-carrying aAVC (aAVC-HA) and found that all the mice vaccinated with aAVC-HA were protected from life-threatening influenza infection. Thus, the in vivo DC targeting therapy by aAVC would be useful for protection against viral infection. PMID:27739478

  12. CD4+ T-cell-independent mechanisms suppress reactivation of latent tuberculosis in a macaque model of HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Taylor W; Mehra, Smriti; LoBato, Denae N; Malek, Adel; Alvarez, Xavier; Golden, Nadia A; Bucşan, Allison N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Roy, Chad J; Blanchard, James; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Lackner, Andrew A; Chan, John; Khader, Shabaana A; Jacobs, William R; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-09-20

    The synergy between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and HIV in coinfected patients has profoundly impacted global mortality because of tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS. HIV significantly increases rates of reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease, with the decline in CD4(+) T cells believed to be the major causality. In this study, nonhuman primates were coinfected with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), recapitulating human coinfection. A majority of animals exhibited rapid reactivation of Mtb replication, progressing to disseminated TB and increased SIV-associated pathology. Although a severe loss of pulmonary CD4(+) T cells was observed in all coinfected macaques, a subpopulation of the animals was still able to prevent reactivation and maintain LTBI. Investigation of pulmonary immune responses and pathology in this cohort demonstrated that increased CD8(+) memory T-cell proliferation, higher granzyme B production, and expanded B-cell follicles correlated with protection from reactivation. Our findings reveal mechanisms that control SIV- and TB-associated pathology. These CD4-independent protective immune responses warrant further studies in HIV coinfected humans able to control their TB infection. Moreover, these findings will provide insight into natural immunity to Mtb and will guide development of novel vaccine strategies and immunotherapies. PMID:27601645

  13. Risk factors, CD4 long-term evolution and mortality of HIV-infected patients who persistently maintain low CD4 counts, despite virological response to HAART.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Yolanda M; Jarrín, Inmaculada; Del Amo, Julia; Moreno, Santiago; Iribarren, José A; Viciana, Pompeyo; Parra, Jorge; Gomez-Sirvent, Juan L; Gutierrez, Félix; Blanco, José R; Vidal, Francesc; Leal, Manuel

    2009-11-01

    A proportion of HIV-patients does not normally restore their CD4 counts despite virological response to HAART. Those whose CD4 counts persistently remain closed to the critical threshold for opportunistic infections deserve special interest. To study the risk factors, the long-term CD4 counts evolution, and the risk of death of patients who persistently maintain low CD4 counts, despite virological response to HAART, within a multicenter, hospital-based cohort study. A total of 147 patients were selected from CoRIS-MD and classified into a "Low-Group" or a "High-Group", depending on their CD4 counts after two-years of effective HAART (threshold 250 cells/microL). Associated risk factors were analysed by logistic regression, the CD4 dynamics were evaluated over a total period of 7.70 years (IQR, 6.70-9.00), and mortality was estimated by Cox proportional hazard. A total of 40 patients (27%) were classified into the "Low-Group". The odds ratio for this group increased with age, being 4.56 (2.23-9.33) for over 40, and was also higher among IDU, 3.63 (1.04-12.68). Six years thereafter, among these patients, only a 30% exceeded 350 CD4 cells/microL and a 12% exceeded 500 CD4 cells/microL. Furthermore, the "Low-Group" had a death rate of 2.42 per 100 persons/year (95%CI, 1.01-5.81), although once adjusted by age the estimates were no longer significant [4.14 (0.87-19.72)]. Our results suggest that those HIV patients who have not overcome the critical threshold of 250 CD4 cells/microL after a two years period of virologically effective HAART do persist with the aforementioned failure of CD4 restoration for a much longer time.

  14. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pachnio, Annette; Ciaurriz, Miriam; Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01-24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  15. Membrane expression of NK receptors CD160 and CD158k contributes to delineate a unique CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset in normal and mycosis fungoides skin.

    PubMed

    Sako, Nouhoum; Schiavon, Valérie; Bounfour, Touda; Dessirier, Valérie; Ortonne, Nicolas; Olive, Daniel; Ram-Wolff, Caroline; Michel, Laurence; Sicard, Hélène; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Schmitt, Christian

    2014-10-01

    CD160 is a GPI-anchored Ig-like receptor identified by the BY55 mAb on human circulating CD56dim+ NK cells and TCRγδ lymphocytes. In addition, while most intestinal T lymphocytes express it, only a minor circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte subset is CD160+. Here we describe a population of CD4+ CD160+ human blood T lymphocytes of circulating cutaneous T cells. These rare T lymphocytes represent 2.1 ± 1.9% of the circulating CD3+ CD4+ T cells, coexpress CD8αα, CD244, and perforin but lack CD28 expression, a phenotype corresponding to effector memory cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Functional studies further confirmed their cytotoxic potential. These cells lack αEβ7 integrin and CCR7 expression but do express skin-addressing molecules CLA, and CCR4. In normal human skin, CD4+ CD160+ cells represent 34.6 ± 14.7% of the CD4+ T lymphocytes extracted by collagenase treatment. These T cells coexpress CLA (81 ± 13.6%), CCR4 (62.3 ± 15.9%), and some CD8αα (19.6 ± 13%) or CCR7 (24.4 ± 11.7%) expression. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells express the natural killer receptor KIR3DL2 (CD158k) used as a tumor marker. Not only we confirmed the expression of this marker in the blood and/or skin of mycosis fungoides patients but we also show for the first time CD158k expression (often associated with CD160) on cutaneous CD4+ T cells from healthy individuals (25.3 ± 15%). Therefore, CD4+ CD160+ T cells expressing CD158k might represent specialized cutaneous lymphocytes devoted to immune surveillance, from which could originate cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as mycosis fungoides.

  16. Cytomegalovirus Infection Leads to Development of High Frequencies of Cytotoxic Virus-Specific CD4+ T Cells Targeted to Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Jusnara; Lal, Neeraj; Zuo, Jianmin; Beggs, Andrew; Moss, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection elicits a very strong and sustained intravascular T cell immune response which may contribute towards development of accelerated immune senescence and vascular disease in older people. Virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses have been investigated extensively through the use of HLA-peptide tetramers but much less is known regarding CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We used a range of HLA class II-peptide tetramers to investigate the phenotypic and transcriptional profile of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells within healthy donors. We show that such cells comprise an average of 0.45% of the CD4+ T cell pool and can reach up to 24% in some individuals (range 0.01–24%). CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display a highly differentiated effector memory phenotype and express a range of cytokines, dominated by dual TNF-α and IFN-γ expression, although substantial populations which express IL-4 were seen in some donors. Microarray analysis and phenotypic expression revealed a profile of unique features. These include the expression of CX3CR1, which would direct cells towards fractalkine on activated endothelium, and the β2-adrenergic receptor, which could permit rapid response to stress. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells display an intense cytotoxic profile with high level expression of granzyme B and perforin, a pattern which increases further during aging. In addition CMV-specific CD4+ T cells demonstrate strong cytotoxic activity against antigen-loaded target cells when isolated directly ex vivo. PD-1 expression is present on 47% of cells but both the intensity and distribution of the inhibitory receptor is reduced in older people. These findings reveal the marked accumulation and unique phenotype of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells and indicate how such T cells may contribute to the vascular complications associated with CMV in older people. PMID:27606804

  17. Burn-injury affects gut-associated lymphoid tissues derived CD4+ T cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Nadeem; Shelip, Alla; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.

    2013-01-01

    After scald burn-injury, the intestinal immune system responds to maintain immune balance. In this regard CD4+T cells in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues (GALT), like mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) respond to avoid immune suppression following major injury such as burn. Therefore, we hypothesized that the gut CD4+T cells become dysfunctional and turn the immune homeostasis towards depression of CD4+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. In the current study we show down regulation of mucosal CD4+ T cell proliferation, IL-2 production and cell surface marker expression of mucosal CD4+ T cells moving towards suppressive-type. Acute burn-injury lead to up-regulation of regulatory marker (CD25+), down regulation of adhesion (CD62L, CD11a) and homing receptor (CD49d) expression, and up-regulation of negative co-stimulatory (CTLA-4) molecule. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ T cells of intestinal origin showed resistance to spontaneous as well as induced apoptosis that may contribute to suppression of effector CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, gut CD4+CD25+ T cells obtained from burn-injured animals were able to down-regulate naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation following adoptive transfer of burn-injured CD4+CD25+ T cells into sham control animals, without any significant effect on cell surface activation markers. Together, these data demonstrate that the intestinal CD4+ T cells evolve a strategy to promote suppressive CD4+ T cell effector responses, as evidenced by enhanced CD4+CD25+ T cells, up-regulated CTLA-4 expression, reduced IL-2 production, tendency towards diminished apoptosis of suppressive CD4+ T cells, and thus lose their natural ability to regulate immune homeostasis following acute burn-injury and prevent immune paralysis. PMID:24600563

  18. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Kimberly A; Jiang, Xiaowen; Stephensen, Charles B

    2013-04-30

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10(+) cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vaccination. Blood was drawn before, 3, 7, 14, and 28days after vaccination and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured for 7days with TT, negative control (diluent), and a positive control (Staphylococcus enterotoxin B [SEB]). Activation markers (CD25 and CD69) were measured after 44h (n=8), cytokines in supernatant after 3 and 7days, and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) of proliferated cells (identified by dye dilution) after 7days (n=6). Vaccination increased TT-specific expression of CD25 and CD69 on CD3(+)CD4(+) lymphocytes, and TT-specific proliferation at 7, 14 and 28days post vaccination. Vaccination induced TT-specific Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2) Th2 (IL-13, IL-5, and IL-4), Th17 (IL-17A) and IL-10(+) cells as measured by ICS. TT-specific Th1 cells were the most abundant (12-15% of all TT-specific CD4(+) T-cells) while IL10(+) (1.8%) Th17 (1.1%) and Th2 cells (0.2-0.6%) were less abundant. TT-specific cytokine concentrations in PBMC supernatants followed the same pattern where a TT-specific IL-9 response was also seen. In conclusion, TT booster vaccination induced a broad T-helper cell response. This method of evaluating cytokine phenotypes may be useful in examining the impact of nutrition and environmental conditions on the plasticity of T-helper cell memory responses.

  19. Switching HIV Treatment in Adults Based on CD4 Count Versus Viral Load Monitoring: A Randomized, Non-Inferiority Trial in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Gonzague; Le Cœur, Sophie; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Traisathit, Patrinee; Cressey, Tim R.; Fregonese, Federica; Leurent, Baptiste; Collins, Intira J.; Techapornroong, Malee; Banchongkit, Sukit; Buranabanjasatean, Sudanee; Halue, Guttiga; Nilmanat, Ampaipith; Luekamlung, Nuananong; Klinbuayaem, Virat; Chutanunta, Apichat; Kantipong, Pacharee; Bowonwatanuwong, Chureeratana; Lertkoonalak, Rittha; Leenasirimakul, Prattana; Tansuphasawasdikul, Somboon; Sang-a-gad, Pensiriwan; Pathipvanich, Panita; Thongbuaban, Srisuda; Wittayapraparat, Pakorn; Eiamsirikit, Naree; Buranawanitchakorn, Yuwadee; Yutthakasemsunt, Naruepon; Winiyakul, Narong; Decker, Luc; Barbier, Sylvaine; Koetsawang, Suporn; Sirirungsi, Wasna; McIntosh, Kenneth; Thanprasertsuk, Sombat; Lallemant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral load (VL) is recommended for monitoring the response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) but is not routinely available in most low- and middle-income countries. The purpose of the study was to determine whether a CD4-based monitoring and switching strategy would provide a similar clinical outcome compared to the standard VL-based strategy in Thailand. Methods and Findings The Programs for HIV Prevention and Treatment (PHPT-3) non-inferiority randomized clinical trial compared a treatment switching strategy based on CD4-only (CD4) monitoring versus viral-load (VL). Consenting participants were antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected adults (CD4 count 50–250/mm3) initiating non-nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based therapy. Randomization, stratified by site (21 public hospitals), was performed centrally after enrollment. Clinicians were unaware of the VL values of patients randomized to the CD4 arm. Participants switched to second-line combination with confirmed CD4 decline >30% from peak (within 200 cells from baseline) in the CD4 arm, or confirmed VL >400 copies/ml in the VL arm. Primary endpoint was clinical failure at 3 years, defined as death, new AIDS-defining event, or CD4 <50 cells/mm3. The 3-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative risks of clinical failure were compared for non-inferiority with a margin of 7.4%. In the intent to treat analysis, data were censored at the date of death or at last visit. The secondary endpoints were difference in future-drug-option (FDO) score, a measure of resistance profiles, virologic and immunologic responses, and the safety and tolerance of HAART. 716 participants were randomized, 356 to VL monitoring and 360 to CD4 monitoring. At 3 years, 319 participants (90%) in VL and 326 (91%) in CD4 were alive and on follow-up. The cumulative risk of clinical failure was 8.0% (95% CI 5.6–11.4) in VL versus 7.4% (5.1–10.7) in CD4, and the upper-limit of the one-sided 95% CI of the difference was

  20. MHC II tetramers visualize human CD4+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus infection and demonstrate atypical kinetics of the nuclear antigen EBNA1 response.

    PubMed

    Long, Heather M; Chagoury, Odette L; Leese, Alison M; Ryan, Gordon B; James, Eddie; Morton, Laura T; Abbott, Rachel J M; Sabbah, Shereen; Kwok, William; Rickinson, Alan B

    2013-05-01

    Virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are key orchestrators of host responses to viral infection yet, compared with their CD8(+) T cell counterparts, remain poorly characterized at the single cell level. Here we use nine MHC II-epitope peptide tetramers to visualize human CD4(+) T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis (IM), a disease associated with large virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. We find that, while not approaching virus-specific CD8(+) T cell expansions in magnitude, activated CD4(+) T cells specific for epitopes in the latent antigen EBNA2 and four lytic cycle antigens are detected at high frequencies in acute IM blood. They then fall rapidly to values typical of life-long virus carriage where most tetramer-positive cells display conventional memory markers but some, unexpectedly, revert to a naive-like phenotype. In contrast CD4(+) T cell responses to EBNA1 epitopes are greatly delayed in IM patients, in line with the well-known but hitherto unexplained delay in EBNA1 IgG antibody responses. We present evidence from an in vitro system that may explain these unusual kinetics. Unlike other EBNAs and lytic cycle proteins, EBNA1 is not naturally released from EBV-infected cells as a source of antigen for CD4(+) T cell priming. PMID:23569328

  1. Targeting self- and foreign antigens to dendritic cells via DC-ASGPR generates IL-10-producing suppressive CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dapeng; Romain, Gabrielle; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Duluc, Dorothée; Dullaers, Melissa; Li, Xiao-Hua; Zurawski, Sandra; Bosquet, Nathalie; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Le Grand, Roger; O'Garra, Anne; Zurawski, Gerard; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, Sangkon

    2012-01-16

    Dendritic cells (DCs) can initiate and shape host immune responses toward either immunity or tolerance by their effects on antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. DC-asialoglycoprotein receptor (DC-ASGPR), a lectinlike receptor, is a known scavenger receptor. Here, we report that targeting antigens to human DCs via DC-ASGPR, but not lectin-like oxidized-LDL receptor, Dectin-1, or DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin favors the generation of antigen-specific suppressive CD4(+) T cells that produce interleukin 10 (IL-10). These findings apply to both self- and foreign antigens, as well as memory and naive CD4(+) T cells. The generation of such IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells requires p38/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and IL-10 induction in DCs. We further demonstrate that immunization of nonhuman primates with antigens fused to anti-DC-ASGPR monoclonal antibody generates antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that produce IL-10 in vivo. This study provides a new strategy for the establishment of antigen-specific IL-10-producing suppressive T cells in vivo by targeting whole protein antigens to DCs via DC-ASGPR.

  2. MiniCD4 protein resistance mutations affect binding to the HIV-1 gp120 CD4 binding site and decrease entry efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Binding of the viral envelope protein (Env), and particularly of its gp120 subunit, to the cellular CD4 receptor is the first essential step of the HIV-1 entry process. The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp120, and especially a recessed cavity occupied by the CD4 Phe43 residue, are known to be highly conserved among the different circulating subtypes and therefore constitute particularly interesting targets for vaccine and drug design. The miniCD4 proteins are a promising class of CD4bs inhibitors. Studying virus evolution under pressure of CD4bs inhibitors could provide insight on the gp120-CD4 interaction and viral entry. Results The present study reports on the resistance induction of two subtype B HIV-1 against the most active miniCD4, M48U1, and its ancestor, M48, and how these mutated positions affect CD4bs recognition, entry efficiency, and sensitivity to other CD4bs inhibitors. Resistance against M48U1 was always associated with S375R/N substitution in both BaL and SF162; M48 resistance was associated with D474N substitution in SF162 and with H105Y substitution in BaL. In addition, some other mutations at position V255 and G471 were of importance for SF162 resistant viruses. Except for 474, all of these mutated positions are conserved, and introducing them into an SF162 Env expressing infectious molecular clone (pBRNL4.3 SF162) resulted in decreased entry efficiency. Furthermore, resistant mutants showed at least some cross-resistance towards other CD4bs inhibitors, the V3 monoclonal antibody 447-52D and some even against the monoclonal antibody 17b, of which the epitope overlaps the co-receptor binding site. Conclusions The mutations H105Y, V255M, S375R/N, G471R/E, and D474N are found to be involved in resistance towards M48 and M48U1. All mutated positions are part of, or in close proximity to, the CD4bs; most are highly conserved, and all have an impact on the entry efficiency, suggesting their importance for optimal virus infectivity. PMID

  3. The effects of an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody, keliximab, on peripheral blood CD4+ T-cells in asthma.

    PubMed

    Kon, O M; Sihra, B S; Loh, L C; Barkans, J; Compton, C H; Barnes, N C; Larché, M; Kay, A B

    2001-07-01

    CD4+ T-cells are likely to be involved as a source of pro-inflammatory cytokines in asthma. This study assessed the effects of an infusion of keliximab (IDEC CE9.1), an anti-CD4+ monoclonal antibody, on peripheral blood CD4+ T-cells in corticosteroid-dependent asthmatics. Three cohorts of patients (termed C0.5: n=6, C1.5: n=5, and C3.0: n=5) received a single infusion of 0.5, 1.5 or 3.0 mg x kg(-1), respectively, with a fourth receiving placebo (Cpl: n=6), and were followed-up for 4 weeks. By flow cytometry in peripheral blood, pre- and postinfusion assessment was made of: a) CD4 and CD8 counts and mean fluorescence; b) CD25, human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR), CD45RO and CD45RA expression on CD4+ T-cells; and c) interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 expression in CD4+ T-cells. Keliximab's in vitro effects on allergen-specific peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation in atopic asthmatics were also evaluated. There was a significant increase in lung function (peak expiratory flow rate) in the C3.0 group. Following infusion in C0.5, C1.5 and C3.0 but not Cpl: 1) the CD4, but not CD8 count was significantly decreased; 2) there was total loss of Leu3a staining; 3) there were significant reductions in the mean fluorescence of OKT4 binding; and 4) there were significant reductions in the numbers of CD25, HLA-DR, CD45RO and CD45RA/CD4+ cells. There were no changes in CD4+ cell expression of IFN-gamma, IL-4 or IL-5. Keliximab caused a significant reduction in T-cell proliferation as compared to a control monoclonal antibody. Keliximab, as an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody, leads to a transient reduction in the number of CD4+ T-cells and modulation of CD4+ receptor expression in severe asthmatics. The effects of keliximab may be mediated through a decrease in CD4+ surface expression and T-lymphocyte numbers, in addition to a reduction in allergen-induced proliferation.

  4. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation. PMID:11578817

  5. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation.

  6. Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Primary Receptor CD4 i Complex with a Potent Antiviral Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.M.; Hong, X.; Seaman, M.S.; Rits-Vollock, S.p Kao, C.Y.; Ho, D.D.; Chen, B.

    2010-06-18

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of human CD4 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, F P; Doros, L; Vitale, J; Blackwell, C; Gosselin, J; Snyder, B W; Wadsworth, S C

    1993-05-01

    The gene for the human CD4 glycoprotein, which serves as the receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1, along with approximately 23 kb of sequence upstream of the translational start site, was cloned. The ability of 5' flanking sequences to direct tissue-specific expression was tested in cell culture and in transgenic mice. A 5' flanking region of 6 kb was able to direct transcription of the CD4 gene in NIH 3T3 cells but did not result in detectable expression in the murine T-cell line EL4 or in four lines of transgenic mice. A larger 5' flanking region of approximately 23 kb directed high-level CD4 transcription in the murine T-cell line EL4 and in three independent lines of transgenic mice. Human CD4 expression in all tissues analyzed was tightly correlated with murine CD4 expression; the highest levels of human CD4 RNA expression were found in the thymus and spleen, with relatively low levels detected in other tissues. Expression of human CD4 protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was examined by flow cytometry in these transgenic animals and found to be restricted to the murine CD4+ subset of lymphocytes. Human CD4 protein, detected with an anti-human CD4 monoclonal antibody, was present on the surface of 45 to 50% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all transgenic lines. PMID:8474453

  8. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  9. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells.

  10. Conformational Rearrangement Within the Soluble Domains of the CD4 Receptor is Ligand-Specific

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Juncadella, I.; Garg, R.; Boone, C.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ligand binding induces shape changes within the four modular ectodomains (D1-D4) of the CD4 receptor, an important receptor in immune signaling. Small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) on both a two-domain and a four-domain construct of the soluble CD4 (sCD4) is consistent with known crystal structures demonstrating a bilobal and a semi-extended tetralobal Z conformation in solution, respectively. Detection of conformational changes within sCD4 as a result of ligand binding was followed by SAXS on sCD4 bound to two different glycoprotein ligands: the tick saliva immunosuppressor Salp15 and the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120. Ab initio modeling of these data showed that both Salp15 and gp120 bind to the D1 domain of sCD4 and yet induce drastically different structural rearrangements. Upon binding, Salp15 primarily distorts the characteristic lobal architecture of the sCD4 without significantly altering the semi-extended shape of the sCD4 receptor. In sharp contrast, the interaction of gp120 with sCD4 induces a shape change within sCD4 that can be described as a Z-to-U bi-fold closure of the four domains across its flexible D2-D3 linker. Placement of known crystal structures within the boundaries of the SAXS-derived models suggests that the ligand-induced shape changes could be a result of conformational changes within this D2-D3 linker. Functionally, the observed shape changes in CD4 receptor causes dissociation of lymphocyte kinase from the cytoplasmic domain of Salp15-bound CD4 and facilitates an interaction between the exposed V3 loops of CD4-bound gp120 molecule to the extracellular loops of its co-receptor, a step essential for HIV-1 viral entry.

  11. Mice Transgenic for CD4-Specific Human CD4, CCR5 and Cyclin T1 Expression: A New Model for Investigating HIV-1 Transmission and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ken; Dutta, Monica; Deneroff, Kathryn; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Littman, Dan R.; Goldstein, Harris

    2013-01-01

    Mice cannot be used to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics and vaccines because they are not infectible by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 entry and replication including CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1. We overcame this limitation by constructing mice with CD4 enhancer/promoter-regulated human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes integrated as tightly linked transgenes (hCD4/R5/cT1 mice) promoting their efficient co-transmission and enabling the murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry and Tat-mediated LTR transcription. All of the hCD4/R5/cT1 mice developed disseminated infection of tissues that included the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with an HIV-1 infectious molecular clone (HIV-IMC) expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (LucR). Furthermore, localized infection of cervical-vaginal mucosal leukocytes developed after intravaginal inoculation of hCD4/R5/cT1 mice with the LucR-expressing HIV-IMC. hCD4/R5/cT1 mice reproducibly developed in vivo infection after inoculation with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC which could be bioluminescently quantified and visualized with a high sensitivity and specificity which enabled them to be used to evaluate the efficacy of HIV-1 therapeutics. Treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy or one dose of VRC01, a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody, almost completed inhibited acute systemic HIV-1 infection of the hCD4/R5/cT1 mice. hCD4/R5/cT1 mice could also be used to evaluate the capacity of therapies delivered by gene therapy to inhibit in vivo HIV infection. VRC01 secreted in vivo by primary B cells transduced with a VRC01-encoding lentivirus transplanted into hCD4/R5/cT1 mice markedly inhibited infection after intravenous challenge with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC. The reproducible infection of CD4/R5/cT1 mice with LucR-expressing HIV-IMC after intravenous or mucosal inoculation combined with the availability of Luc

  12. Estrogen control of central neurotransmission: effect on mood, mental state, and memory.

    PubMed

    Fink, G; Sumner, B E; Rosie, R; Grace, O; Quinn, J P

    1996-06-01

    1. Estrogen exerts profound effects on mood, mental state and memory by acting on both "classical" monoamine and neuropeptide transmitter mechanisms in brain. Here we review an example of each type of action. 2. With respect to the effect of estrogen on central monoamine neurotransmission, low levels of estrogen in women are associated with the premenstrual syndrome, postnatal depression and post-menopausal depression. Sex differences in schizophrenia have also been attributed to estrogen. Previous studies have shown that estrogen stimulates a significant increase in dopamine2 (D2) receptors in the striatum. Here we show for the first time that estrogen also stimulates a significant increase in the density of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) binding sites in anterior frontal, cingulate and primary olfactory cortex and in the nucleus accumbens, areas of the brain concerned with the control of mood, mental state, cognition, emotion and behavior. These findings explain, for example, the efficacy of estrogen therapy or 5-HT uptake blockers such as fluoxetine in treating the depressive symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome. and suggest that the sex differences in schizophrenia may also be due to an action of estrogen mediated by way of 5-HT2A receptors. 3. With respect to the effect of estrogen on central neuropeptide transmission, estrogen stimulates the expression of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in rodents. This results in a 100-fold increase in AVP mRNA in the BNST and a massive increase in AVP peptide in the BNST and its projections to the lateral septum and lateral habenula. The BNST-AVP system enhances and/or maintains "social" or "olfactory" memory, and thus provides a powerful model for correlating transcriptional control of neuropeptide gene expression with behavior. Whether similar mechanisms operate in the human remain to be determined. 4. These two examples of the action of estrogen on central

  13. Interleukin-2-Dependent Allergen-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory Cells Drive Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; An, Dowon; Schenkel, Jason M; Kim, Karen S; Steach, Holly R; Krishnamurty, Akshay T; Keitany, Gladys J; Garza, Esteban N; Fraser, Kathryn A; Moon, James J; Altemeier, William A; Masopust, David; Pepper, Marion

    2016-01-19

    Exposure to inhaled allergens generates T helper 2 (Th2) CD4(+) T cells that contribute to episodes of inflammation associated with asthma. Little is known about allergen-specific Th2 memory cells and their contribution to airway inflammation. We generated reagents to understand how endogenous CD4(+) T cells specific for a house dust mite (HDM) allergen form and function. After allergen exposure, HDM-specific memory cells persisted as central memory cells in the lymphoid organs and tissue-resident memory cells in the lung. Experimental blockade of lymphocyte migration demonstrated that lung-resident cells were sufficient to induce airway hyper-responsiveness, which depended upon CD4(+) T cells. Investigation into the differentiation of pathogenic Trm cells revealed that interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling was required for residency and directed a program of tissue homing migrational cues. These studies thus identify IL-2-dependent resident Th2 memory cells as drivers of lung allergic responses.

  14. Lack of permissivity of human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes to HIV.

    PubMed

    Chapel, A; Bourges, J F; Bensussan, A; d'Auriol, L; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1990-01-01

    Although knowledge has accumulated about GP110-CD4 interaction, viral penetration into human CD4+ lymphocytes remains unclear, in spite of the fact that all studies on HIV infection were performed on cell-transformed lineages, or on human polyclonal CD4+ cells. In order to investigate this viral entrance into susceptible cells, we studied the permissivity of 13 human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes by means of reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and immunocapture. We demonstrated a differential susceptibility to HIV of these CD4+ clones. In a second experiment, HIV infection was studied: (1) sequentially by RT assay and P24 immunocapture on several clones; (2) by cocultivation of infected clones with umbilical cord lymphocytes. These experiments suggested existence of permissive and "nonpermissive" CD4+ monoclonal lymphocytes. Slot blot, then PCR, revealed that proviral DNA sequences were detectable in all clones, but were present at lower levels in nonpermissive clones.

  15. Blocking of HIV-1 Infectivity by a Soluble, Secreted Form of the CD4 Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Douglas H.; Byrn, Randal A.; Marsters, Scot A.; Gregory, Timothy; Groopman, Jerome E.; Capon, Daniel J.

    1987-12-01

    The initial event in the infection of human T lymphocytes, macrophages, and other cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is the attachment of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to its cellular receptor, CD4. As a step toward designing antagonists of this binding event, soluble, secreted forms of CD4 were produced by transfection of mammalian cells with vectors encoding versions of CD4 lacking its transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. The soluble CD4 so produced binds gp120 with an affinity and specificity comparable to intact CD4 and is capable of neutralizing the infectivity of HIV-1. These studies reveal that the high-affinity CD4-gp120 interaction does not require other cell or viral components and may establish a novel basis for therapeutic intervention in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  16. Bystander CD4+ T lymphocytes survive in HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angelique; Ito, Yoshinori; Lima, Rosangela G.; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with depletion of CD4(+) T cells. The mechanisms of this phenomenon remain to be understood. In particular, it remains controversial whether and to what extent uninfected ("bystander") CD4(+) T cells die in HIV-infected individuals. We address this question using a system of human lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Tissue blocks were inoculated with HIV-1. After productive infection was established, they were treated with the reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine to protect from infection those CD4(+) T cells that had not yet been infected. These CD4(+) T cells residing in HIV-infected tissue are by definition bystanders. Our results demonstrate that after nevirapine application the number of bystander CD4(+) T cells is conserved. Thus, in the context of HIV-infected human lymphoid tissue, productive HIV infection kills infected cells but is not sufficient to cause the death of a significant number of uninfected CD4(+) T cells.

  17. Antibodies to CD4 in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, M; Ardman, B; Basiripour, L; Lu, Y C; Blohm, D; Haseltine, W; Sodroski, J

    1989-01-01

    The attachment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to target cells is mediated by a specific interaction between the viral envelope glycoprotein (gp120) and the CD4 receptor. Here we report that approximately 10% of HIV-1-infected individuals produce antibodies that recognize the extracellular portion of the CD4 molecule. Carboxyl-terminal deletions of CD4 that do not affect HIV-1 gp120 binding eliminate recognition of CD4 by patient antisera. In contrast, mutations in the amino-terminal domain of CD4 that attenuate HIV-1 gp120 binding do not diminish CD4 recognition by patient antisera. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection can generate antibodies directed against a region of the viral receptor distinct from the virus-binding domain. Images PMID:2541442

  18. Basal Gene Expression by Lung CD4+ T Cells in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Identifies Independent Molecular Correlates of Airflow Obstruction and Emphysema Extent

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Christine M.; McCubbrey, Alexandra L.; Crudgington, Sean; Nelson, Joshua; Martinez, Fernando J.; Han, MeiLan K.; Washko, George R.; Chensue, Stephen W.; Arenberg, Douglas A.; Meldrum, Catherine A.; McCloskey, Lisa; Curtis, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Lung CD4+ T cells accumulate as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) progresses, but their role in pathogenesis remains controversial. To address this controversy, we studied lung tissue from 53 subjects undergoing clinically-indicated resections, lung volume reduction, or transplant. Viable single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry or underwent CD4+ T cell isolation, followed either by stimulation with anti-CD3 and cytokine/chemokine measurement, or by real-time PCR analysis. In lung CD4+ T cells of most COPD subjects, relative to lung CD4+ T cells in smokers with normal spirometry: (a) stimulation induced minimal IFN-γ or other inflammatory mediators, but many subjects produced more CCL2; (b) the T effector memory subset was less uniformly predominant, without correlation with decreased IFN-γ production. Analysis of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cells of all subjects identified a molecular phenotype, mainly in COPD, characterized by markedly reduced mRNA transcripts for the transcription factors controlling TH1, TH2, TH17 and FOXP3+ T regulatory subsets and their signature cytokines. This mRNA-defined CD4+ T cell phenotype did not result from global inability to elaborate mRNA; increased transcripts for inhibitory CD28 family members or markers of anergy; or reduced telomerase length. As a group, these subjects had significantly worse spirometry, but not DLCO, relative to subjects whose lung CD4+ T cells expressed a variety of transcripts. Analysis of mRNA transcripts of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cell among all subjects identified two distinct molecular correlates of classical COPD clinical phenotypes: basal IL-10 transcripts correlated independently and inversely with emphysema extent (but not spirometry); by contrast, unstimulated IFN-γ transcripts correlated independently and inversely with reduced spirometry (but not reduced DLCO or emphysema extent). Aberrant lung CD4+ T cells polarization appears to be common in advanced COPD, but also

  19. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED CD4+ T-CELL ACTIVATION AMONG HIV-NEGATIVE HIGH-RISK WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kaur, Surinder P.; Amara, Rama R.; Kelley, Mary E.; del Rio, Carlos; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Biological pathways mediating the link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and increased HIV risk remain unexplored. We hypothesized that IPV-induced stress negatively affects HIV systemic immune defenses and aimed to evaluate whether IPV was associated with immune profiles linked to HIV susceptibility: CD4 activation and diminished regulatory T-cell (Treg) frequency. Methods Seventy-five HIV-negative high-risk women were surveyed regarding their IPV experience. They provided blood, urine, and (if present) genital ulcer samples for cortisol, immune assays, and STI testing. Using flow cytometry, we assessed activated CD4+ T-cell (%HLA-DR+/CD38+) and Treg (%CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) frequencies and phenotyping. Nonparametric tests evaluated the association between IPV and immune outcomes. Multivariate regression explored confounding and moderation of the IPV-CD4 activation pathway. Results Lifetime IPV was associated with increased CD4+ activation (r = 0.331, P = 0.004), a shift in CD4+ phenotype from naïve to effector memory (r = 0.343, P = 0.003), and a decrease in naive (%HLA-DR+/CD45RA−) Treg frequency (r = −0.337, P = 0.003). Experiencing IPV over the past year had similar trends. After controlling for sexual IPV, lifetime physical and psychological abuse remained significantly associated with CD4+ activation (P = 0.004 and P = 0.033, respectively). After controlling for race (the only covariate linked to activation), the lifetime IPV-CD4 activation association remained significant (P = 0.012). Alcohol use and depression were identified as potential pathway moderators. Conclusion Our data is the first to suggest an immune link between IPV and HIV, and may help explain differences at the individual level in HIV susceptibility and response to biological HIV prevention strategies. The association of psychological and physical abuse with CD4 activation independent of sexual abuse further supports the existence of a stress-induced immune pathway. PMID

  20. INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED CD4+ T-CELL ACTIVATION AMONG HIV-NEGATIVE HIGH-RISK WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kaur, Surinder P.; Amara, Rama R.; Kelley, Mary E.; del Rio, Carlos; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Biological pathways mediating the link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and increased HIV risk remain unexplored. We hypothesized that IPV-induced stress negatively affects HIV systemic immune defenses and aimed to evaluate whether IPV was associated with immune profiles linked to HIV susceptibility: CD4 activation and diminished regulatory T-cell (Treg) frequency. Methods Seventy-five HIV-negative high-risk women were surveyed regarding their IPV experience. They provided blood, urine, and (if present) genital ulcer samples for cortisol, immune assays, and STI testing. Using flow cytometry, we assessed activated CD4+ T-cell (%HLA-DR+/CD38+) and Treg (%CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) frequencies and phenotyping. Nonparametric tests evaluated the association between IPV and immune outcomes. Multivariate regression explored confounding and moderation of the IPV-CD4 activation pathway. Results Lifetime IPV was associated with increased CD4+ activation (r = 0.331, P = 0.004), a shift in CD4+ phenotype from naïve to effector memory (r = 0.343, P = 0.003), and a decrease in naive (%HLA-DR+/CD45RA−) Treg frequency (r = −0.337, P = 0.003). Experiencing IPV over the past year had similar trends. After controlling for sexual IPV, lifetime physical and psychological abuse remained significantly associated with CD4+ activation (P = 0.004 and P = 0.033, respectively). After controlling for race (the only covariate linked to activation), the lifetime IPV-CD4 activation association remained significant (P = 0.012). Alcohol use and depression were identified as potential pathway moderators. Conclusion Our data is the first to suggest an immune link between IPV and HIV, and may help explain differences at the individual level in HIV susceptibility and response to biological HIV prevention strategies. The association of psychological and physical abuse with CD4 activation independent of sexual abuse further supports the existence of a stress-induced immune pathway.

  1. CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality through expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Pan, Yuqiong; Baker, Jeanette; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H; Meyer, Everett H; Negrin, Robert S

    2014-11-20

    Dysregulated donor T cells lead to destruction of host tissues resulting in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We investigated the impact of highly purified (>95%) donor CD4(+) invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells on GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT. We found that low doses of adoptively transferred donor CD4(+) iNKT cells protect from GVHD morbidity and mortality through an expansion of donor CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). These Tregs express high levels of the Ikaros transcription factor Helios and expand from the Treg pool of the donor graft. Furthermore, CD4(+) iNKT cells preserve T-cell-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. Our studies reveal new aspects of the cellular interplay between iNKT cells and Tregs in the context of tolerance induction after allogeneic HCT and set the stage for clinical translation. PMID:25293774

  2. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal; Margalit, Alon; Montefiori, David C.; Gross, Gideon

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  3. Clinical Evaluation of the BD FACSPresto™ Near-Patient CD4 Counter in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Angira, Francis; Akoth, Benta; Omolo, Paul; Opollo, Valarie; Bornheimer, Scott; Judge, Kevin; Tilahun, Henok; Lu, Beverly; Omana-Zapata, Imelda; Zeh, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Background The BD FACSPresto™ Near-Patient CD4 Counter was developed to expand HIV/AIDS management in resource-limited settings. It measures absolute CD4 counts (AbsCD4), percent CD4 (%CD4), and hemoglobin (Hb) from a single drop of capillary or venous blood in approximately 23 minutes, with throughput of 10 samples per hour. We assessed the performance of the BD FACSPresto system, evaluating accuracy, stability, linearity, precision, and reference intervals using capillary and venous blood at KEMRI/CDC HIV-research laboratory, Kisumu, Kenya, and precision and linearity at BD Biosciences, California, USA. Methods For accuracy, venous samples were tested using the BD FACSCalibur™ instrument with BD Tritest™ CD3/CD4/CD45 reagent, BD Trucount™ tubes, and BD Multiset™ software for AbsCD4 and %CD4, and the Sysmex™ KX-21N for Hb. Stability studies evaluated duration of staining (18–120-minute incubation), and effects of venous blood storage <6–24 hours post-draw. A normal cohort was tested for reference intervals. Precision covered multiple days, operators, and instruments. Linearity required mixing two pools of samples, to obtain evenly spaced concentrations for AbsCD4, total lymphocytes, and Hb. Results AbsCD4 and %CD4 venous/capillary (N = 189/ N = 162) accuracy results gave Deming regression slopes within 0.97–1.03 and R2 ≥0.96. For Hb, Deming regression results were R2 ≥0.94 and slope ≥0.94 for both venous and capillary samples. Stability varied within 10% 2 hours after staining and for venous blood stored less than 24 hours. Reference intervals results showed that gender—but not age—differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Precision results had <3.5% coefficient of variation for AbsCD4, %CD4, and Hb, except for low AbsCD4 samples (<6.8%). Linearity was 42–4,897 cells/μL for AbsCD4, 182–11,704 cells/μL for total lymphocytes, and 2–24 g/dL for Hb. Conclusions The BD FACSPresto system provides accurate, precise clinical

  4. TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 expression in human CD4+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hayley G.; Roostalu, Urmas; Walter, Gina J.; Gullick, Nicola J.; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Roberts, Ceri A.; Sumner, Jonathan; Baeten, Dominique L.; Gerwien, Jens G.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frederic; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-02-01

    IL-17+ CD4+ T (Th17) cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several human inflammatory diseases. Here we demonstrate that TNF inhibitor (TNFi) drugs induce the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. TNFi-mediated induction of IL-10 in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells is Treg-/Foxp3-independent, requires IL-10 and is overcome by IL-1β. TNFi-exposed IL-17+ CD4+ T cells are molecularly and functionally distinct, with a unique gene signature characterized by expression of IL10 and IKZF3 (encoding Aiolos). We show that Aiolos binds conserved regions in the IL10 locus in IL-17+ CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, IKZF3 and IL10 expression levels correlate in primary CD4+ T cells and Aiolos overexpression is sufficient to drive IL10 in these cells. Our data demonstrate that TNF-α blockade induces IL-10 in CD4+ T cells including Th17 cells and suggest a role for the transcription factor Aiolos in the regulation of IL-10 in CD4+ T cells.

  5. Processing and Memory of Central versus Peripheral Information as a Function of Reading Goals: Evidence from Eye-Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeari, Menahem; van den Broek, Paul; Oudega, Marja

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of reading goals on the processing and memory of central and peripheral textual information. Using eye-tracking methodology, we compared the effect of four common reading goals--entertainment, presentation, studying for a close-ended (multiple-choice) questions test, and studying for an open-ended questions…

  6. Working Memory as a Predictor of Written Arithmetical Skills in Children: The Importance of Central Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Ulf

    2008-01-01

    Background: The study was conducted in an attempt to further our understanding of how working memory contributes to written arithmetical skills in children. Aim: The aim was to pinpoint the contribution of different central executive functions and to examine the contribution of the two subcomponents of children's written arithmetical skills.…

  7. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  8. CD3-T cell receptor modulation is selectively induced in CD8 but not CD4 lymphocytes cultured in agar.

    PubMed

    Oudrhiri, N; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; M'Bemba, E; Gaulard, P; Katz, A; Divine, M; Galazka, A; Reyes, F

    1990-11-01

    The CD3-T cell receptor (TcR) complex is central to the immune response. Upon binding by specific ligands, internalized CD3-TcR molecules increase, and either T cell response or unresponsiveness may ensue depending on the triggering conditions. Using semi-solid agar culture, we have shown previously that quiescent CD4 but not CD8 lymphocytes generate clonal colonies under phytohaemagglutinin stimulation. Here we have demonstrated that the agar induces selective CD3-TcR modulation in the CD8 and not in the CD4 subset. CD8 lymphocytes preactivated in liquid culture and recultured in agar with exogenous recombinant interleukin-2 generate colonies with a modulated CD3-TcR surface expression. The peptides composing the CD3-TcR complex are synthesized in CD8 colonies as well as in CD4; however, the CD3 gamma chain is phosphorylated at a higher level in CD8 colonies. A component of the agar polymer, absent in agarose, appears to be the ligand that induces differential CD3-TcR modulation in the CD8 subset. In contrast to agar culture, CD8 colonies can be derived from quiescent CD8 lymphocytes in agarose. These CD8 colonies express unmodulated CD-TcR. CD3-TcR modulation with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody prior to culturing in agarose inhibits the colony formation. We conclude that given triggering conditions can result in both CD3-TcR modulation and inhibition of the proliferative response selectively in the CD8 lymphocyte subset and not in the CD4. PMID:2146997

  9. CD3-T cell receptor modulation is selectively induced in CD8 but not CD4 lymphocytes cultured in agar.

    PubMed Central

    Oudrhiri, N; Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; M'Bemba, E; Gaulard, P; Katz, A; Divine, M; Galazka, A; Reyes, F

    1990-01-01

    The CD3-T cell receptor (TcR) complex is central to the immune response. Upon binding by specific ligands, internalized CD3-TcR molecules increase, and either T cell response or unresponsiveness may ensue depending on the triggering conditions. Using semi-solid agar culture, we have shown previously that quiescent CD4 but not CD8 lymphocytes generate clonal colonies under phytohaemagglutinin stimulation. Here we have demonstrated that the agar induces selective CD3-TcR modulation in the CD8 and not in the CD4 subset. CD8 lymphocytes preactivated in liquid culture and recultured in agar with exogenous recombinant interleukin-2 generate colonies with a modulated CD3-TcR surface expression. The peptides composing the CD3-TcR complex are synthesized in CD8 colonies as well as in CD4; however, the CD3 gamma chain is phosphorylated at a higher level in CD8 colonies. A component of the agar polymer, absent in agarose, appears to be the ligand that induces differential CD3-TcR modulation in the CD8 subset. In contrast to agar culture, CD8 colonies can be derived from quiescent CD8 lymphocytes in agarose. These CD8 colonies express unmodulated CD-TcR. CD3-TcR modulation with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody prior to culturing in agarose inhibits the colony formation. We conclude that given triggering conditions can result in both CD3-TcR modulation and inhibition of the proliferative response selectively in the CD8 lymphocyte subset and not in the CD4. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:2146997

  10. Frequencies of Virus-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Lymphocytes Secreting Gamma Interferon after Acute Natural Rotavirus Infection in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, María C.; Rojas, Olga Lucía; González, Ana María; Cajiao, Isabela; Charpilienne, Annie; Pothier, Pierre; Kohli, Evelyne; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2002-01-01

    Human rotavirus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied using a flow cytometric assay that detects the intracellular accumulation of cytokines after short-term in vitro antigen stimulation. The frequencies of virus-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon and interleukin-13 (IL-13) were determined in adults and children during the acute or convalescent phase of rotavirus-induced diarrhea, in asymptomatically infected adults and laboratory workers who worked with human stool samples containing rotavirus, and in healthy adults. Significantly higher frequencies of rotavirus-specific interferon gamma-secreting CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but not IL-13-secreting T cells, were detected in symptomatically infected adults and exposed laboratory workers than in healthy adults and children with acute rotavirus diarrhea. The levels of rotavirus-specific T cells returned to levels found in healthy adults by 32 days after the onset of rotavirus diarrhea in most adult subjects. Children with rotavirus diarrhea had undetectable or very low levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that secrete gamma interferon. Adult cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals had frequencies of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells that secrete gamma interferon that were approximately 20 times the level of rotavirus-specific T cells. This result suggests that rotavirus is a relatively poor inducer of circulating memory T cells that secrete gamma interferon. The frequencies of gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the frequencies of IL-13-secreting CD4+ T cells responding to the T-cell superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) were lower in children than in adults. In both adults and children, the frequencies of CD4+ cells secreting gamma interferon in response to SEB were higher than the frequencies of cells secreting IL-13. PMID:11967291

  11. Immunological predictors of CD4+ T cell decline in antiretroviral treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Elena; Resino, Salvador; Moreno, Santiago; de Quiros, Juan Carlos Lopez Bernaldo; Moreno, Ana; Rubio, Rafael; Gonzalez-García, Juan; Arribas, José Ramón; Pulido, Federico; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Ángeles

    2008-01-01

    Background The common response to stopping anti-HIV treatment is an increase of HIV-RNA load and decrease in CD4+, but not all the patients have similar responses to this therapeutic strategy. The aim was to identify predictive markers of CD4+ cell count declines to < 350/μL in CD4-guided antiretroviral treatment interruptions. Methods 27 HIV-infected patients participated in a prospective multicenter study in with a 24 month follow-up. Patients on stable highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4+ count > 600/μL, and HIV-RNA < 50 copies/ml for at least 6 months were offered the option to discontinue antiretroviral therapy. The main outcome was a decline in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Results After 24 months of follow-up, 16 of 27 (59%) patients (who discontinued therapy) experienced declines in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Patients with a CD4+ nadir of < 200 cells/μL had a greater risk of restarting therapy during the follow-up (RR (CI95%): 3.37 (1.07; 10.36)). Interestingly, lymphoproliferative responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD) below 10000 c.p.m. at baseline (4.77 (1.07; 21.12)), IL-4 production above 100 pg/mL at baseline (5.95 (1.76; 20.07)) in PBMC cultured with PPD, and increased IL-4 production of PBMC with p24 antigen at baseline (1.25 (1.01; 1.55)) were associated to declines in CD4+ cell count to < 350/μL. Conclusion Both the number (CD4+ nadir) and the functional activity of CD4+ (lymphoproliferative response to PPD) predict the CD4+ decrease associated with discontinuation of ART in patients with controlled viremia. PMID:18302775

  12. Anthocyanins in aged blueberry-fed rats are found centrally and may enhance memory.

    PubMed

    Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Galli, Rachel L; Jauregui, Olga; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Joseph, James A

    2005-04-01

    Research has shown that fruits and vegetables containing high levels of polyphenolics (flavonoids) display high total antioxidant activity. Our laboratory found that various fruit and vegetable extracts, particularly blueberry (BB), were effective in reversing age-related deficits in neuronal signaling and behavioral parameters following 8 weeks of feeding, possibly due to their polyphenolic content. However, it was unclear if these phytonutrients were able to directly access the brain from dietary BB supplementation (BBS). The present study examined whether different classes of polyphenols could be found in brain areas associated with cognitive performance following BBS. Thus, 19 month old F344 rats were fed a control or 2% BB diet for 8-10 weeks and tested in the Morris water maze (MWM), a measure of spatial learning and memory. LC-MS analyses of anthocyanins in the diet and subsequently in different brain regions of BBS and control rats were carried out. Several anthocyanins (cyanidin-3-O-beta-galactoside, cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, cyanidin-3-O-beta-arabinose, malvidin-3-O-beta-galactoside, malvidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, malvidin-3-O-beta-arabinose, peonidin-3-O-beta-arabinose and delphinidin-3-O-beta-galactoside) were found in the cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus or striatum of the BBS rats, but not the controls. These findings are the first to suggest that polyphenolic compounds are able to cross the blood brain barrier and localize in various brain regions important for learning and memory. Correlational analyses revealed a relationship between MWM performance in BBS rats and the total number of anthocyanin compounds found in the cortex. These findings suggest that these compounds may deliver their antioxidant and signaling modifying capabilities centrally.

  13. Evaluation of the FACSPresto, a New Point of Care Device for the Enumeration of CD4% and Absolute CD4+ T Cell Counts in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Makadzange, Azure Tariro; Bogezi, Carola; Boyd, Kathryn; Gumbo, Anesu; Mukura, Dorinda; Matubu, Allen; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Enumeration of CD4+ T lymphocytes is important for pre-ART disease staging and screening for opportunistic infections, however access to CD4 testing in resource limited settings is poor. Point of care (POC) technologies can facilitate improved access to CD4 testing. We evaluated the analytical performance of a novel POC device the FACSPresto compared to the FACSCalibur as a reference standard and to the PIMA, a POC device in widespread use in sub-Saharan Africa. Method Specimens were obtained from 253 HIV infected adults. Venous blood samples were analyzed on the FACSPresto and the FACSCalibur, in a subset of 41 samples additional analysis was done on the PIMA. Results The absolute CD4 count results obtained on the FACSPresto were comparable to those on the FACSCalibur with low absolute (9.5cells/μl) and relative bias (3.2%). Bias in CD4% values was also low (1.06%) with a relative bias of 4.9%. The sensitivity was lower at a CD4 count threshold of ≤350cells/μl compared with ≤500cells/μl (84.9% vs. 92.8%) resulting in a high upward misclassification rate at low CD4 counts. Specificity at thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl were 96.6% and 96.8% respectively. The PIMA had a high absolute (-68.6cells/μl) and relative bias (-10.5%) when compared with the FACSCalibur. At thresholds of ≤350cells/μl and ≤500cells/μl the sensitivity was 100% and 95.5% respectively; specificity was 85.7% and 84.2% respectively. The coefficients of repeatability were 4.13%, 5.29% and 9.8% respectively. Discussion The analytic performance of the FACSPresto against the reference standard was very good with better agreement and precision than the PIMA. The FACSPresto had comparable sensitivity at a threshold of 500 cells/μl and better specificity than the PIMA. However the FACSPresto showed reduced sensitivity at low CD4 count thresholds. Conclusion The FACSPresto can be reliably used as a POC device for enumerating absolute CD4 count and CD4% values

  14. Control of influenza infection is impaired by diminished interferon-γ secretion by CD4 T cells in the lungs of toddler mice.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, David; Perry, Sheldon; Pryharski, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory viral infections, such as influenza, can lead to delayed viral clearance in toddlers, possibly exacerbating disease morbidity. We hypothesized that defective CD4 T cells in toddlers may contribute to a failure to clear virus at a similar rate to adults. Thus, we developed a young mouse model to examine potential divergent responses between toddlers and adults. We determined that young mice (toddler mice, 21 d old) were actively generating and recruiting effector/memory T cells, whereas memory populations were firmly established in older, adult mice (8-10 wk old). We infected toddler and adult mice with influenza A/PR8/34 (H1N1) and found young mice had elevated morbidity, as measured by enhanced weight loss and lower partial pressure of oxygen levels, throughout the infection, thus, modeling the higher morbidity observed in children (<2 y old) during infection. Early viral loads were comparable to adult mice, but toddler mice failed to clear virus by 10 d postinfection. This delayed clearance corresponded to poor lung recruitment of CD4 T cells, lower antiviral T cell responses, and lower B cell/antibodies in the lungs. Mechanistically, diminished interferon-γ was detected in the lungs of toddler mice throughout the infection and corresponded to intrinsic, rather than extrinsic, CD4 T cell limitations in interferon-γ transcription. Moreover, defects in interferon-γ production appeared downstream from signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 in the interleukin-12 signaling pathway, suggesting maturational delays different from neonates. Importantly, recombinant interferon-γ supplementation rescued CD4 T cell numbers in the lungs and influenza-specific antibody formation. This study highlights the intrinsic limitations in CD4 T cell effector functions that may arise in toddlers and contribute to disease pathology. PMID:26823488

  15. T(FH) memory: more or less T(FH)?

    PubMed

    Barr, Tom; Gray, David

    2012-08-01

    Follicular T-helper (T(FH) ) cells are a subset of CD4(+) T cells that is specialized to help B cells. Their capacity to give rise to enhanced T(FH) memory responses has not been documented. A study by Weber et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2012 42: 1981-1988] in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology addresses this question, and a picture is emerging from this and several other recent studies which suggests that the formation of memory T(FH) and of central memory (T(CM) ) cells are intimately bound and that the heterogeneity of what we currently call "T(FH) '' cells clouds this issue. In this Commentary, we discuss these complexities and ask what memory T(FH) cells are doing given that the germinal centers are a feature of primary, but not secondary immune responses.

  16. CD4/CD8 ratio and CD8 counts predict CD4 response in HIV-1-infected drug naive and in patients on cART

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Rafael; Huang, Ruizhu; Ledergerber, Bruno; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Cavassini, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Hoffmann, Matthias; Rougemont, Mathieu; Günthard, Huldrych F; Held, Leonhard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Plasma HIV viral load is related to declining CD4 lymphocytes. The extent to which CD8 cells, in addition to RNA viral load, predict the depletion of CD4 cells is not well characterized so far. We examine if CD8 cell count is a prognostic factor for CD4 cell counts during an HIV infection. A longitudinal analysis is conducted using data from the Swiss HIV cohort study collected between January 2000 and October 2014. Linear mixed regression models were applied to observations from HIV-1-infected treatment naive patients (NAIVE) and cART-treated patients to predict the short-term evolution of CD4 cell counts. For each subgroup, it was quantified to which extent CD8 cell counts or CD4/CD8 ratios are prognostic factors for disease progression. In both subgroups, 2500 NAIVE and 8902 cART patients, past CD4 cells are positively (P < 0.0001) and past viral load is negatively (P < 0.0001) associated with the outcome. Including additionally past CD8 cell counts improves the fit significantly (P < 0.0001) and increases the marginal explained variation 31.7% to 40.7% for the NAIVE and from 44.1% to 50.7% for the cART group. The past CD4/CD8 ratio (instead of the past CD8 level) is positively associated with the outcome, increasing the explained variation further to 41.8% for NAIVE and 51.9% for cART. PMID:27759638

  17. AFM force measurements of the gp120-sCD4 and gp120 or CD4 antigen-antibody interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Zeng, Gucheng; Chen, Sherry Shiyi; Feng, Qian; Chen, Zheng Wei

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} The unbinding force of sCD4-gp120 interaction was 25.45 {+-} 20.46 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was 51.22 {+-} 34.64 pN. {yields} The unbinding force of gp120 antigen-antibody interaction was 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN. {yields} The interaction forces between various HIV inhibitors and the target molecules are significantly different. {yields} Functionalizing on AFM tip or substrate of an interaction pair caused different results. -- Abstract: Soluble CD4 (sCD4), anti-CD4 antibody, and anti-gp120 antibody have long been regarded as entry inhibitors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy. However, the interactions between these HIV entry inhibitors and corresponding target molecules are still poorly understood. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was utilized to investigate the interaction forces among them. We found that the unbinding forces of sCD4-gp120 interaction, CD4 antigen-antibody interaction, and gp120 antigen-antibody interaction were 25.45 {+-} 20.46, 51.22 {+-} 34.64, and 89.87 {+-} 44.63 pN, respectively, which may provide important mechanical information for understanding the effects of viral entry inhibitors on HIV infection. Moreover, we found that the functionalization of an interaction pair on AFM tip or substrate significantly influenced the results, implying that we must perform AFM force measurement and analyze the data with more caution.

  18. Use of MHC class II tetramers to investigate CD4+ T cell responses: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, Virginia; Moro, Monica; Del Mare, Sara; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-11-01

    MHC-class I tetramers technology enabled the characterization of peptide-specific T cells at the single cell level in a variety of studies. Several laboratories have also developed MHC-class II multimers to characterize Ag-specific CD4+ T cells. However, the generation and use of MHC-class II multimers seems more problematic than that of MHC-I multimers. We have generated HLA-DR*1101 tetramers in a versatile empty form, which can be loaded after purification with peptides of interest. We discuss the impact of critical biological and structural parameters for the optimal staining of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells using HLA-DR*1101 tetramers, such as: (i) activation state of CD4+ T cells; (ii) membrane trafficking in the target CD4+ T cells; (iii) binding characteristics of the loaded CD4 epitope. Our data indicate that reorganization of TCR on the plasma membrane upon CD4+ T cell activation, as well as an homogenous binding frame of the CD4 epitopes to the soluble HLA-DR monomer, are critical for a stable TCR/MHC-class II tetramer interaction. These factors, together with the low frequencies and affinities of specific CD4+ T cells, explain the need for in vitro expansion or ex vivo enrichment of specific T cells for the optimal visualization with MHC-class II tetramers. PMID:18612991

  19. Itk Signals Promote Neuroinflammation by Regulating CD4+ T-Cell Activation and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Arun K.; Kim, Do-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that interleukin-2-inducible T-cell kinase (Itk) signaling in cluster of differentiation 4-positive (CD4+) T cells promotes experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). We show that Itk−/− mice exhibit reduced disease severity, and transfer of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into T cell-deficient recipients results in lower disease severity. We observed a significant reduction of CD4+ T cells in the CNS of Itk−/− mice or recipients of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells during EAE, which is consistent with attenuated disease. Itk−/− CD4+ T cells exhibit defective response to myelin antigen stimulation attributable to displacement of filamentous actin from the CD4+ coreceptor. This results in inadequate transmigration of Itk−/− CD4+ T cells into the CNS and across brain endothelial barriers in vitro. Finally, Itk−/− CD4+ T cells show significant reduction in production of T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cytokines and exhibit skewed T effector/T regulatory cell ratios. These results indicate that signaling by Itk promotes autoimmunity and CNS inflammation, suggesting that it may be a viable target for treatment of MS. PMID:25568116

  20. Electrochemical magneto-actuated biosensor for CD4 count in AIDS diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carinelli, S; Xufré Ballesteros, C; Martí, M; Alegret, S; Pividori, M I

    2015-12-15

    The counting of CD4(+) T lymphocytes is a clinical parameter used for AIDS diagnosis and follow-up. As this disease is particularly prevalent in developing countries, simple and affordable CD4 cell counting methods are urgently needed in resource-limited settings. This paper describes an electrochemical magneto-actuated biosensor for CD4 count in whole blood. The CD4(+) T lymphocytes were isolated, preconcentrated and labeled from 100 μL of whole blood by immunomagnetic separation with magnetic particles modified with antiCD3 antibodies. The captured cells were labeled with a biotinylated antiCD4 antibody, followed by the reaction with the electrochemical reporter streptavidin-peroxidase conjugate. The limit of detection for the CD4 counting magneto-actuated biosensor in whole blood was as low as 44 cells μL(-1) while the logistic range was found to be from 89 to 912 cells μL(-1), which spans the whole medical interest range for CD4 counts in AIDS patients. The electrochemical detection together with the immunomagnetic separation confers high sensitivity, resulting in a rapid, inexpensive, robust, user-friendly method for CD4 counting. This approach is a promising alternative for the costly standard flow cytometry and suitable as diagnostic tool at decentralized practitioner sites in low resource settings, especially in less developed countries.

  1. CD4+CD25+ cells in multiple myeloma related renal impairment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xi-Dai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ cells are critical regulators in almost all of the animal models of human organ-specific autoimmune diseases, transplant rejection and allergic diseases. We aimed to explore the role of CD4+CD25+ cells in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) related renal impairment (RI). Thirty patients with MM related RI and 30 healthy volunteers were studied. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells was examined by flow cytometry. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from each subject. Glomerular injury was assessed by histopathology. Serum IL-2, IL-4 and IL-6 were analyzed by ELISA. CD4+CD25+ cells significantly decreased in MM related RI patients compared to the controls (P<0.05). CD4+CD25+ cell number was negatively associated with blood urea nitrogen (BUN), supernatant IL-4, serum IL-6, monoclonal immunoglobulin and β2-microglobulin, as well as bone marrow plasma cell percentage and proteinuria; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (all P < 0.05). CD4+CD25+ cells gradually decreased as the Clinic Stage increased. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells reduced in MM related RI patients, and was correlated with disease severity. CD4+CD25+ cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MM related RI. PMID:26564056

  2. Electrochemical magneto-actuated biosensor for CD4 count in AIDS diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carinelli, S; Xufré Ballesteros, C; Martí, M; Alegret, S; Pividori, M I

    2015-12-15

    The counting of CD4(+) T lymphocytes is a clinical parameter used for AIDS diagnosis and follow-up. As this disease is particularly prevalent in developing countries, simple and affordable CD4 cell counting methods are urgently needed in resource-limited settings. This paper describes an electrochemical magneto-actuated biosensor for CD4 count in whole blood. The CD4(+) T lymphocytes were isolated, preconcentrated and labeled from 100 μL of whole blood by immunomagnetic separation with magnetic particles modified with antiCD3 antibodies. The captured cells were labeled with a biotinylated antiCD4 antibody, followed by the reaction with the electrochemical reporter streptavidin-peroxidase conjugate. The limit of detection for the CD4 counting magneto-actuated biosensor in whole blood was as low as 44 cells μL(-1) while the logistic range was found to be from 89 to 912 cells μL(-1), which spans the whole medical interest range for CD4 counts in AIDS patients. The electrochemical detection together with the immunomagnetic separation confers high sensitivity, resulting in a rapid, inexpensive, robust, user-friendly method for CD4 counting. This approach is a promising alternative for the costly standard flow cytometry and suitable as diagnostic tool at decentralized practitioner sites in low resource settings, especially in less developed countries. PMID:26264263

  3. Polyfunctional CD4 T cells in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells are crucial in immunity to tuberculosis (TB). Polyfunctional CD4 T cells simultaneously produce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including human TB and HIV. However, the a...

  4. The differentiation and protective function of cytolytic CD4 T cells in influenza infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CD4 T cells that recognize peptide antigen in the context of Class II MHC can differentiate into various subsets that are characterized by their helper functions. However, increasing evidence indicates that CD4 cells with direct cytolytic activity play a role in chronic, as well as, acute infections...

  5. The Interplay Between Monocytes/Macrophages and CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ceri A.; Dickinson, Abigail K.; Taams, Leonie S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining (synovitis). The inflammation in the RA joint is associated with and driven by immune cell infiltration, synovial hyperproliferation, and excessive production of proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interferon γ (IFNγ), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-17, eventually resulting in damage to the cartilage and underlying bone. The RA joint harbors a wide range of immune cell types, including monocytes, macrophages, and CD4+ T cells (both proinflammatory and regulatory). The interplay between CD14+ myeloid cells and CD4+ T cells can significantly influence CD4+ T cell function, and conversely, effector vs. regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets can exert profound effects on monocyte/macrophage function. In this review, we will discuss how the interplay between CD4+ T cells and monocytes/macrophages may contribute to the immunopathology of RA. PMID:26635790

  6. Production of erythrocyte autoantibodies in NZB mice is inhibited by CD4 antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, G G; Hutchings, P R; Roitt, I M; Lydyard, P M

    1994-01-01

    NZB mice spontaneously develop haemolytic anaemia as the result of production of erythrocyte autoantibodies. The mechanisms leading to breakdown in tolerance to erythrocyte autoantigens are unknown. Antibodies to CD4 have been successfully used to treat several murine models of autoimmune disease. In this study we injected NZB mice with non-depleting CD4 antibodies and were able to prevent and abrogate erythrocyte autoantibody production in young (Coombs' negative) and old (Coombs' positive) mice, respectively. Our data indicate the dependency of autoantibody production on CD4+ T cells. However, withdrawal of anti-CD4 antibodies resulted in the appearance of erythrocyte autoantibodies, showing that under these conditions we were unable to re-establish tolerance to autoantigens on erythrocytes using anti-CD4 treatment. PMID:8187337

  7. T lymphocytes in rat germinal centres belong to an ER3+ subpopulation of CD4+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vonderheide, R H; Hunt, S V

    1990-01-01

    Two-colour immunofluorescence histochemistry showed directly that greater than 90% of CD4+ germinal centre T cells in rat spleen or lymph node examined 7 days after immunization bear the antigen recognized by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) ER3. By contrast, only 30-40% of all thoracic duct or lymph node CD4+ cells were ER3+, as determined by two-colour flow cytometry. CD8+ cells were ER3+, but nearly all B cells were ER3-. Thus, germinal centre T cells belong to a subpopulation of CD4+ cells. Because only 25-30% of CD4+ cells that lack higher molecular weight forms of CD45 (i.e. mAb MRC OX32 cells, equivalent to MRC OX22 cells) express ER3, the CD4+ subpopulations defined by ER3 are neither identical nor complementary to the subsets defined by restricted expression of CD45 epitopes. Images Figure 1 PMID:1970805

  8. CD4-Blockade Can Induce Protection from Peanut-Induced Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Joana; Caridade, Marta; Graca, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been shown effective in inducing immune tolerance in a range of animal models of autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation. We investigated whether CD4-blockade, effective in inducing transplantation tolerance, could prevent systemic immune responses leading to anaphylaxis. We found that treatment with a non-depleting anti-CD4 mAb could prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis following subsequent systemic exposure to crude peanut extract (CPE). Furthermore, the effect of CD4-blockade did not interfere with overall immune competence, as anti-CD4 treated mice remained fully competent to respond to unrelated antigens. Protection from anaphylaxis correlated with increased frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), and was abrogated following Treg depletion. Taken together our data suggest that activation of T cells by CPE in presence of CD4-blockade leads to Treg expansion that can prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis. PMID:22566846

  9. Targeting of liposomes to HIV-1-infected cells by peptides derived from the CD4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Slepushkin, V A; Salem, I I; Andreev, S M; Dazin, P; Düzgüneş, N

    1996-10-23

    Liposomes can be targeted to HIV-infected cells by either reconstituting transmembrane CD4 in the membrane or covalently coupling soluble CD4 to modified lipids. We investigated whether synthetic peptides could be used as ligands for targeting liposomes. A synthetic peptide from the complementarity determining region 2 (CDR-2)-like domain of CD4 could bind specifically to HIV-infected cells and mediate the binding of peptide-coupled liposomes to these cells. A peptide from the CDR-3-like domain of CD4 inhibited HIV-induced syncytia formation, but failed to target liposomes to infected cells. This apparent discrepancy may be due to the requirement for a conformational change in the CD4 receptor for the CDR-3 region to interact with the HIV envelope protein. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using synthetic peptides to target liposomes containing antiviral drugs to HIV-infected cells.

  10. Using CD4 Percentage and Age to Optimize Pediatric Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, Meredith G.; Miller, William C.; Castro, Hannah; Fiscus, Susan A.; Harper, Lynda M.; Harrison, Linda J.; Klein, Nigel J.; Lewis, Joanna; Melvin, Ann J.; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; McKinney, Ross E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantifying pediatric immunologic recovery by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation at different CD4 percentage (CD4%) and age thresholds may inform decisions about timing of treatment initiation. METHODS: HIV-1-infected, HAART-naive children in Europe and the Americas were followed from 2002 through 2009 in PENPACT-1. Data from 162 vertically infected children, with at least World Health Organization “mild” immunosuppression and CD4% <10th percentile, were analyzed for improvement to a normal CD4% (≥10th percentile) within 4 years after HAART initiation. Data from 209 vertically infected children, regardless of immune status, were analyzed for CD4% outcomes at 4 years and viral failure within 4 years. RESULTS: Seventy-two percent of baseline immunosuppressed children recovered to normal within 4 years. Compared with “severe” immunosuppression, more children with “mild” immunosuppression (difference 36%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 22% to 49%) or “advanced” immunosuppression (difference 20.8%, 95% CI: 5.8% to 35.9%) recovered a normal CD4%. For each 5-year increase in baseline age, the proportion of children achieving a normal CD4% declined by 19% (95% CI: 11% to 27%). Combining baseline CD4% and age effects resulted in >90% recovery when initiating HAART with “mild” immunosuppression at any age or “advanced” immunosuppression at age <3 years. Baseline CD4% effects became greater with increasing age (P = .02). At 4 years, most immunologic benefits were still significant but diminished. Viral failure was highest in infancy (56%) and adolescence (63%). CONCLUSIONS: Initiating HAART at higher CD4% and younger ages maximizes potential for immunologic recovery. Guidelines should weigh immunologic benefits against long-term risks. PMID:25266426

  11. Effects of CD4 monitoring frequency on clinical endpoints in clinically stable HIV-infected patients with viral suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin Young; Boettiger, David; Law, Matthew; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yunihastuti, Evy; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Lee, Man Po; Sim, Benedict LH; Oka, Shinichi; Wong, Wingwai; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ng, Oon Tek; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Zhang, Fujie; Pujari, Sanjay; Ditangco, Rossana; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Sohn, Annette H.; Choi, Jun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4+ lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression. Methods In a regional HIV observational cohort in the Asia-Pacific, patients with viral suppression (2 consecutive viral loads <400 copies/mL) and a CD4 count ≥200 cells/μL who had CD4 testing 6 monthly were analyzed. Main study endpoints were occurrence of one CD4 count <200 cells/μL (single CD4<200) and two CD4 counts <200 cells/μL within a 6-month period (confirmed CD4<200). A comparison of time to single and confirmed CD4<200 with biannual or annual CD4 assessment was performed by generating a hypothetical group comprised of the same patients with annual CD4 testing by removing every second CD4 count. Results Among 1538 patients, the rate of single CD4<200 was 3.45/100 patient-years, and of confirmed CD4<200 was 0.77/100 patient-years. During 5 years of viral suppression, patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL were significantly more likely to experience confirmed CD4<200 compared with patients with higher baseline CD4 (hazard ratio 55.47 [95% confidence interval 7.36–418.20], p<0.001 versus baseline CD4 ≥500 cells/μL). Cumulative probabilities of confirmed CD4<200 was also higher in patients with baseline CD4 200-249 cells/μL compared with patients with higher baseline CD4. There was no significant difference in time to confirmed CD4<200 between biannual and annual CD4 measurement (p=0.336). Conclusions Annual CD4 monitoring in virally suppressed HIV patients with a baseline CD4 ≥250 cells/μL may be sufficient for clinical management. PMID:25850606

  12. miR-17-92 is required for both CD4 Th1 and TFH responses during viral infection1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tuoqi; Wieland, Andreas; Lee, Judong; Hale, J. Scott; Han, Jin-Hwan; Xu, Xiaojin; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections induce the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into two distinct lineages, Th1 and TFH cells. Two recent studies demonstrated that the microRNA cluster miR-17-92 selectively promotes CD4 TFH responses. However, here we show that miR-17-92 expression is required for the clonal expansion of both virus-specific Th1 and TFH cells. Upon viral infection, miR-17-92-deficient CD4 T cells showed impaired clonal expansion and subsequent memory formation. While miR-17-92 deficiency impaired the clonal expansion of both Th1 and TFH cells, the expansion of Th1 cells was more affected. Over-expression of miR-17-92 in CD4 T cells resulted in increased expansion of both virus-specific Th1 and TFH cells, but selectively enhanced the Th1 response. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-17-92 is necessary for both Th1 and TFH cells to respond efficiently to viral infections and that the Th1 response is more sensitive to the level of miR-17-92 expression. PMID:26276869

  13. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L. K. Metthew; Klimstra, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  14. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  15. Working Memory in the Classroom: An Inside Look at the Central Executive.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren A

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review of working memory and its application to educational settings. A discussion of the varying definitions of working memory is presented. Special attention is given to the various multidisciplinary professionals who work with students with working memory deficits, and their unique understanding of the construct. Definitions and theories of working memory are briefly summarized and provide the foundation for understanding practical applications of working memory to assessment and intervention. Although definitions and models of working memory abound, there is limited consensus regarding universally accepted definitions and models. Current research indicates that developing new models of working memory may be an appropriate paradigm shift at this time. The integration of individual practitioner's knowledge regarding academic achievement, working memory and processing speed could provide a foundation for the future development of new working memory models. Future directions for research should aim to explain how tasks and behaviors are supported by the substrates of the cortico-striatal and the cerebro-cerebellar systems. Translation of neurobiological information into educational contexts will be helpful to inform all practitioners' knowledge of working memory constructs. It will also allow for universally accepted definitions and models of working memory to arise and facilitate more effective collaboration between disciplines working in educational setting.

  16. Working Memory in the Classroom: An Inside Look at the Central Executive.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren A

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review of working memory and its application to educational settings. A discussion of the varying definitions of working memory is presented. Special attention is given to the various multidisciplinary professionals who work with students with working memory deficits, and their unique understanding of the construct. Definitions and theories of working memory are briefly summarized and provide the foundation for understanding practical applications of working memory to assessment and intervention. Although definitions and models of working memory abound, there is limited consensus regarding universally accepted definitions and models. Current research indicates that developing new models of working memory may be an appropriate paradigm shift at this time. The integration of individual practitioner's knowledge regarding academic achievement, working memory and processing speed could provide a foundation for the future development of new working memory models. Future directions for research should aim to explain how tasks and behaviors are supported by the substrates of the cortico-striatal and the cerebro-cerebellar systems. Translation of neurobiological information into educational contexts will be helpful to inform all practitioners' knowledge of working memory constructs. It will also allow for universally accepted definitions and models of working memory to arise and facilitate more effective collaboration between disciplines working in educational setting. PMID:27191215

  17. The CD4+ T cell methylome contributes to a distinct CD4+ T cell transcriptional signature in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Rachael; Whiston, Ronan; Cormican, Paul; Finlay, Emma K.; Couldrey, Christine; Brady, Colm; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that epigenetic regulation of CD4+ T lymphocytes contributes to a shift toward a dysfunctional T cell phenotype which may impact on their ability to clear mycobacterial infection. Combined RNA-seq transcriptomic profiling and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing identified 193 significantly differentially expressed genes and 760 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), between CD4+ T cells from M. bovis infected and healthy cattle. 196 DMRs were located within 10 kb of annotated genes, including GATA3 and RORC, both of which encode transcription factors that promote TH2 and TH17 T helper cell subsets respectively. Gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression levels for the TNFRSF4 and Interferon-γ genes were significantly negatively correlated suggesting a regulatory relationship. Pathway analysis of DMRs identified enrichment of genes involved in the anti-proliferative TGF-β signaling pathway and TGFB1 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood leukocytes from TB-infected cattle. This first analysis of the bovine CD4+ T cell methylome suggests that DNA methylation directly contributes to a distinct gene expression signature in CD4+ T cells from cattle infected with M. bovis. Specific methylation changes proximal to key inflammatory gene loci may be critical to the emergence of a non-protective CD4+ T cell response during mycobacterial infection in cattle. PMID:27507428

  18. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4⁺ T cells to CD4⁻ T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4(+) T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4(+) T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4(+) rather than CD8(+) T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4(+) T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  19. The CD4(+) T cell methylome contributes to a distinct CD4(+) T cell transcriptional signature in Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Rachael; Whiston, Ronan; Cormican, Paul; Finlay, Emma K; Couldrey, Christine; Brady, Colm; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that epigenetic regulation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes contributes to a shift toward a dysfunctional T cell phenotype which may impact on their ability to clear mycobacterial infection. Combined RNA-seq transcriptomic profiling and Reduced Representation Bisulfite Sequencing identified 193 significantly differentially expressed genes and 760 differentially methylated regions (DMRs), between CD4(+) T cells from M. bovis infected and healthy cattle. 196 DMRs were located within 10 kb of annotated genes, including GATA3 and RORC, both of which encode transcription factors that promote TH2 and TH17 T helper cell subsets respectively. Gene-specific DNA methylation and gene expression levels for the TNFRSF4 and Interferon-γ genes were significantly negatively correlated suggesting a regulatory relationship. Pathway analysis of DMRs identified enrichment of genes involved in the anti-proliferative TGF-β signaling pathway and TGFB1 expression was significantly increased in peripheral blood leukocytes from TB-infected cattle. This first analysis of the bovine CD4(+) T cell methylome suggests that DNA methylation directly contributes to a distinct gene expression signature in CD4(+) T cells from cattle infected with M. bovis. Specific methylation changes proximal to key inflammatory gene loci may be critical to the emergence of a non-protective CD4(+) T cell response during mycobacterial infection in cattle. PMID:27507428

  20. Symptomatic Illness and Low CD4 Cell Count at HIV Seroconversion as Markers of Severe Primary HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Sara; Fisher, Martin; Phillips, Andrew; De Luca, Andrea; Ghosn, Jade; Malyuta, Ruslan; Zangerle, Robert; Moreno, Santiago; Vanhems, Philippe; Boufassa, Faroudy; Guiguet, Marguerite; Porter, Kholoud

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk/benefit of initiating ART in primary HIV infection (PHI) is unclear. The benefits are more likely to outweigh the risks in patients with severe PHI. An accepted definition of severe PHI is, however, lacking. Methods CASCADE patients with HIV test interval <6 months were classified as severe and non-severe PHI based on whether the following traits were recorded in the first 6 months following seroconversion: severe specific pre-defined symptoms, central nervous system-implicated illness, and ≥1, ≥2 CD4<350 (and <500) cells/mm3. For each definition, we used Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox survival models to compare time to AIDS/death, censoring at the earlier of last clinic visit or 1/1/1997, when combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) became available. Results Among 1108 included patients mostly males (85%) infected through sex between men (71%), 366 were diagnosed with AIDS/died. The risk of AIDS/death was significantly higher for individuals with severe symptoms, those with ≥1 CD4<350 cells/mm3 or ≥2 CD4 <500 cells/mm3 in the first 6 months [aHR (95% confidence interval) 2.1 (1.4,3.2), 2.0 (1.5,2.7), and 2.3, (1.5–3.5) respectively]. Median [interquantile range] survival for patients with ≥2, ≥1 and no CD4<350 cells/mm3 within 6 months of seroconversion was 3.9 [2.7,6.5], 5.4 [4.5,8.4] and 8.1 [4.3,10.3] years, respectively. The diagnosis of CNS-implicated symptoms was rare and did not appear to be prognostic. Conclusion One CD4 count <350 or two <500 cells/mm3 within 6 months of seroconversion and/or severe illness in PHI may be useful early indicators of individuals at high risk of disease progression. PMID:24244330

  1. Regulation of T cell receptor expression in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by p56lck tyrosine kinase: basis for differential signaling by CD4 and CD8 in immature thymocytes expressing both coreceptor molecules

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Signals transduced through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) are modulated by the src family tyrosine kinase p56lck (lck), which associates in mature T cells with the coreceptor molecules CD4 and CD8. Here we describe a novel function of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes, that of regulating TCR expression. Activation of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes by intrathymic engagement of CD4 maintains low TCR expression by causing most TCR components to be retained and degraded within the endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, activation of lck in immature CD4+CD8+ thymocytes results from engagement of surface CD4 molecules, but not surface CD8 molecules, despite the nearly fourfold greater surface expression of CD8 than CD4. The competence of CD4 to activate lck in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes relates to the fact that a relatively large fraction of surface CD4 molecules (25-50%) are associated with intracellular lck molecules, whereas only 2% of surface CD8 molecules are associated with lck. The amount of lck associated with CD4 in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes is diminished by chronic CD4 engagement in the thymus, as activated lck molecules subsequently dissociate from CD4. Indeed, the amount of lck associated with CD4 in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes is markedly increased in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II- mice that lack the intrathymic ligand for CD4 and in which surface CD4 molecules are consequently not engaged. Thus, the present study demonstrates that (a) activation of lck in CD4+CD8+ thymocytes regulates distribution and expression of TCR components; (b) unlike CD4 molecules, CD8 molecules on CD4+CD8+ thymocytes cannot efficiently activate lck despite their significantly greater surface expression; and (c) the amount of lck associated with CD4 in the CD4+CD8+ thymocytes is inversely related to the extent of CD4 engagement by MHC class II molecules in the thymus. PMID:8228817

  2. Blockade of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production in CD4^+ T Cells by an Intracellular CD4 Expressed Under Control of the Viral Long Terminal Repeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K.

    1993-04-01

    A retroviral vector was constructed in which a gene encoding a mutated soluble CD4 protein that is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (sCD4-KDEL) is expressed under control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory elements. HIV-1 infection of a human T-cell line transduced with this vector led to induction of sCD4-KDEL synthesis and a block in transport of the HIV envelope protein to the cell surface. There was a complete block to maturation of infectious HIV-1 in the transduced cells, no viral spread, and little or no syncytium formation. Infected cells gradually disappeared from the culture over a period of 2 months. This intracellular trap for HIV has potential application in gene therapy for AIDS.

  3. Efficient ex vivo analysis of CD4+ T-cell responses using combinatorial HLA class II tetramer staining

    PubMed Central

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Rims, Cliff; Blahnik, Gabriele; Chow, I-Ting; Kwok, William W.; Buckner, Jane H.; James, Eddie A.

    2016-01-01

    MHC tetramers are an essential tool for characterizing antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. However, their ex vivo analysis is limited by the large sample requirements. Here we demonstrate a combinatorial staining approach that allows simultaneous characterization of multiple specificities to address this challenge. As proof of principle, we analyse CD4+ T-cell responses to the seasonal influenza vaccine, establishing a frequency hierarchy and examining differences in memory and activation status, lineage commitment and cytokine expression. We also observe cross-reactivity between an established epitope and recent variant and provide a means for probing T-cell receptor cross-reactivity. Using cord blood samples, we correlate the adult frequency hierarchy with the naive precursor frequencies. Last, we use our combinatorial staining approach to demonstrate that rheumatoid arthritis patients on therapy can mount effective responses to influenza vaccination. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of combinatorial tetramer staining and suggest that this approach may have broad applicability in human health and disease. PMID:27571776

  4. A single peptide-major histocompatibility complex ligand triggers digital cytokine secretion in CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Brameshuber, Mario; Zeng, Xun; Xie, Jianming; Li, Qi-jing; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Valitutti, Salvatore; Davis, Mark M

    2013-11-14

    We have developed a single-molecule imaging technique that uses quantum-dot-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands to study CD4(+) T cell functional sensitivity. We found that naive T cells, T cell blasts, and memory T cells could all be triggered by a single pMHC to secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) cytokines with a rate of ∼1,000, ∼10,000, and ∼10,000 molecules/min, respectively, and that additional pMHCs did not augment secretion, indicating a digital response pattern. We also found that a single pMHC localized to the immunological synapse induced the slow formation of a long-lasting T cell receptor (TCR) cluster, consistent with a serial engagement mechanism. These data show that scaling up CD4(+) T cell cytokine responses involves increasingly efficient T cell recruitment rather than greater cytokine production per cell. PMID:24120362

  5. Efficient ex vivo analysis of CD4+ T-cell responses using combinatorial HLA class II tetramer staining.

    PubMed

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Rims, Cliff; Blahnik, Gabriele; Chow, I-Ting; Kwok, William W; Buckner, Jane H; James, Eddie A

    2016-01-01

    MHC tetramers are an essential tool for characterizing antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. However, their ex vivo analysis is limited by the large sample requirements. Here we demonstrate a combinatorial staining approach that allows simultaneous characterization of multiple specificities to address this challenge. As proof of principle, we analyse CD4+ T-cell responses to the seasonal influenza vaccine, establishing a frequency hierarchy and examining differences in memory and activation status, lineage commitment and cytokine expression. We also observe cross-reactivity between an established epitope and recent variant and provide a means for probing T-cell receptor cross-reactivity. Using cord blood samples, we correlate the adult frequency hierarchy with the naive precursor frequencies. Last, we use our combinatorial staining approach to demonstrate that rheumatoid arthritis patients on therapy can mount effective responses to influenza vaccination. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of combinatorial tetramer staining and suggest that this approach may have broad applicability in human health and disease. PMID:27571776

  6. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 reverse transcription in quiescent CD4+ T-cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Quiescent CD4+ T lymphocytes are highly refractory to HIV-1 infection due to a block at reverse transcription. Results Examination of SAMHD1 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes shows that SAMHD1 is expressed in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells at levels comparable to those found in myeloid cells. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with Virus-Like Particles (VLP) containing Vpx results in the loss of SAMHD1 expression that correlates with an increased permissiveness to HIV-1 infection and accumulation of reverse transcribed viral DNA without promoting transcription from the viral LTR. Importantly, CD4+ T-cells from patients with Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome harboring mutation in the SAMHD1 gene display an increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection that is not further enhanced by VLP-Vpx-treatment. Conclusion Here, we identified SAMHD1 as the restriction factor preventing efficient viral DNA synthesis in non-cycling resting CD4+ T-cells. These results highlight the crucial role of SAMHD1 in mediating restriction of HIV-1 infection in quiescent CD4+ T-cells and could impact our understanding of HIV-1 mediated CD4+ T-cell depletion and establishment of the viral reservoir, two of the HIV/AIDS hallmarks. PMID:23092122

  7. CD4+ T cells mediate mucosal and systemic immune responses to experimental hookworm infection

    PubMed Central

    DONDJI, B.; SUN, T.; BUNGIRO, R. D.; VERMEIRE, J. J.; HARRISON, L. M.; BIFULCO, C.; CAPPELLO, M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Hookworm infection is associated with anaemia and malnutrition in many resource-limited countries. Ancylostoma hookworms have previously been shown to modulate host cellular immune responses through multiple mechanisms, including reduced mitogen-mediated lymphocyte proliferation, impaired antigen presentation/processing, and relative reductions in CD4+ T cells in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. Syrian hamsters were depleted of CD4+ for up to 9 days following intraperitoneal injection (200 μg) of a murine anti-mouse CD4 monoclonal IgG (clone GK1·5). CD4+ T-cell-depleted hamsters infected with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum exhibited a threefold higher mean intestinal worm burden and more severe anaemia than animals that received isotype control IgG. In addition, depletion of CD4+ T cells was associated with impaired cellular and humoral (serum and mucosal) immune responses to hookworm antigens. These data demonstrate an effector role for CD4+ T cells in hookworm immunity and disease pathogenesis. Ultimately, these studies may yield important insights into the relationship between intestinal nematode infections and diseases that are associated with CD4+ T-cell depletion, including HIV. PMID:20500671

  8. Transmission of survival signals through Delta-like 1 on activated CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Takahiro; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsukumo, Shin-ichi; Hozumi, Katsuto; Maekawa, Yoichi; Matsui, Naoko; Kaji, Ryuji; Yasutomo, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Notch expressed on CD4+ T cells transduces signals that mediate their effector functions and survival. Although Notch signaling is known to be cis-inhibited by Notch ligands expressed on the same cells, the role of Notch ligands on T cells remains unclear. In this report we demonstrate that the CD4+ T cell Notch ligand Dll1 transduces signals required for their survival. Co-transfer of CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− and control mice into recipient mice followed by immunization revealed a rapid decline of CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− mice compared with control cells. Dll1−/− mice exhibited lower clinical scores of experimental autoimmune encephalitis than control mice. The expression of Notch target genes in CD4+ T cells from Dll1−/− mice was not affected, suggesting that Dll1 deficiency in T cells does not affect cis Notch signaling. Overexpression of the intracellular domain of Dll1 in Dll1-deficient CD4+ T cells partially rescued impaired survival. Our data demonstrate that Dll1 is an independent regulator of Notch-signaling important for the survival of activated CD4+ T cells, and provide new insight into the physiological roles of Notch ligands as well as a regulatory mechanism important for maintaining adaptive immune responses. PMID:27659682

  9. CD4+CD25+ T Cells in primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongdong; Luo, Yang; Liang, Yumei; Long, Xidai; Peng, Youming; Liu, Zhihua; Wen, Xiaojun; Jia, Meng; Tian, Ru; Bai, Chengli; Li, Cui; He, Fuliang; Lin, Qiushi; Wang, Xueyan; Dong, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ T cells are critical for maintenance of immunologic self-tolerance. We measured the number of CD4+CD25+ cells in the patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury, to explore the molecular pathogenesis of this disease. We selected 30 patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury and 30 healthy volunteers. Information on clinical characteristics and laboratory tests was obtained from each subject. The number of CD4+CD25+ cells and glomerular injury were assessed by flow cytometry and histopathology, respectively. Both serum IL-2, IL-4, and IL-6 and endothelial cell markers were analyzed by ELISA. ADAMTS13 antibody was detected by Western blotting. CD4+CD25+ cells were significantly reduced in patients with primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury compared to controls (P < 0.05). The number of CD4+CD25+ cells was negatively related to blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid, proteinuria, and supernatant IL-4; whereas positively associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients. Gradually decreasing CD4+CD25+ cells were also found as increasing renal injury. Additionally, patients exhibited increasing supernatant IL-4, serum IL-2 and IL-6, endothelial cell markers, and anti-ADAMTS13 antibody compared with controls (all P < 0.05). CD4+CD25+ cells may play a key role in the pathogenesis of primary malignant hypertension related kidney injury. PMID:27278520

  10. CD4+ T cell–independent DNA vaccination against opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingquan; Ramsay, Alistair J.; Robichaux, Myles B.; Norris, Karen A.; Kliment, Corrine; Crowe, Christopher; Rapaka, Rekha R.; Steele, Chad; McAllister, Florencia; Shellito, Judd E.; Marrero, Luis; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Zhong, Qiu; Kolls, Jay K.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion or dysfunction of CD4+ T lymphocytes profoundly perturbs host defenses and impairs immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we show that plasmid DNA vaccination with a cassette encoding antigen (OVA) and a second cassette encoding full-length CD40 ligand (CD40L), a molecule expressed on activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and critical for T cell helper function, can elicit significant titers of antigen-specific immunoglobulins in serum and Tc1 CD8+ T cell responses in CD4-deficient mice. To investigate whether this approach leads to CD4+ T cell–independent vaccine protection against a prototypic AIDS-defining infection, Pneumocystis (PC) pneumonia, we used serum from mice vaccinated with PC-pulsed, CD40L-modifed DCs to immunoprecipitate PC antigens. Kexin, a PC antigen identified by this approach, was used in a similar DNA vaccine strategy with or without CD40L. CD4-deficient mice receiving DNA vaccines encoding Kexin and CD40L showed significantly higher anti-PC IgG titers as well as opsonic killing of PC compared with those vaccinated with Kexin alone. Moreover, CD4-depleted, Kexin-vaccinated mice showed a 3-log greater protection in a PC challenge model. Adoptive transfer of CD19+ cells or IgG to SCID mice conferred protection against PC challenge, indicating a role of humoral immunity in the protection. The results of these studies show promise for CD4-independent vaccination against HIV-related or other opportunistic pathogens. PMID:16308571

  11. Distribution of CD4 Lymphocyte Cells Among Apparently Healthy HIV Seropositive and Seronegative Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, Abdulazeez A

    2012-01-01

    Background: CD4 lymphocyte cells are often used as prognostic markers for monitoring the progression of immunosupression such as HIV infection. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the distribution of CD4 lymphocytes among apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative and seropositive populations in a Nigerian state. Materials and Methods: A total of 1520 apparently healthy subjects aged 18–64 years, composed of 800 males and 720 females attending some selected health institutions in the state, participated in the study. Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each subject; 5 ml of this was used for HIV antibodies sero-typing while the remaining 5 ml was anticoagulated and used for CD4 lymphocytes level determination. Only samples te