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Sample records for central muscarinic effects

  1. Ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon result from central muscarinic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Houze, Pascal; Pronzola, Laetita; Kayouka, Maya; Villa, Antoine; Debray, Marcel; Baud, Frederic J.

    2008-12-01

    Paraoxon induces respiratory toxicity. Atropine completely reversed parathion- and paraoxon-induced respiratory toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess the peripheral or central origin of ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given paraoxon 0.215 mg/kg subcutaneously and treated with either atropine (10 mg/kg sc) or ascending doses of methylatropine of 5.42 (equimolar to that of atropine), 54.2, and 542 mg/kg administered subcutaneously 30 min after paraoxon. Ventilation at rest was assessed using whole-body plethysmography and rat temperature using infra-red telemetry. Results are expressed as mean {+-} SE. Statistical analysis used two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements. Paraoxon induced a significant decrease in temperature 30 min after injection lasting the 90 min of the study period. This effect was partially corrected by atropine, but not by methylatropine whatever the dose. Paraoxon induced a decrease in respiratory rate resulting from an increase in expiratory time associated with an increase in tidal volume. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon while the equimolar dose of methylatropine had no significant effects. The 54.2 and 542 mg/kg doses of methylatropine had no significant effects. Atropine crosses the blood-brain barrier and reverses peripheral and central muscarinic effects. In contrast, methylatropine does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Atropine completely reversed the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon, while methylatropine had no significant effects at doses up to 100-fold the equimolar dose of atropine. We conclude that the ventilatory effects of low-dose paraoxon are mediated by disrupted muscarinic signaling in the central nervous system.

  2. Effect of central muscarinic receptors on passive-avoidance learning deficits induced by prenatal pentylenetetrazol kindling in male offspring.

    PubMed

    Pourmotabbed, A; Mahmoodi, G; Mahmoodi, S; Mohammadi-Farani, A; Nedaei, S E; Pourmotabbed, T; Pourmotabbed, T

    2014-10-24

    Occurrence of the epileptic seizures during gestation might affect the neurodevelopment of the fetus resulting in cognitive problems for the child later in life. We have previously reported that prenatal pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindling induces learning and memory deficits in the children born to kindled mothers, later in life but the mechanisms involved in this processes are unknown. The cholinergic system plays a major role in learning and memory. The present study was performed to investigate the possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic receptors on learning and memory deficits induced by prenatal PTZ-kindling in male offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were kindled by repetitive i.p. injection of 25mg/kg of PTZ on day 13 of their pregnancy. The effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinjection of scopolamine and pilocarpine, muscarinic cholinergic receptors antagonist and agonist, respectively on passive-avoidance learning of pups were tested at 12weeks of age using shuttle-box apparatus. Our data showed that the retention latencies of pups that received scopolamine (2 or 3μg) were significantly reduced compared to those received normal saline (p<0.05). Interestingly, post training ICV administration of pilocarpine (2μg) retrieved pups' memory deficits (p<0.001). These results demonstrate for the first time, the importance of the central muscarinic cholinergic receptors in learning and memory deficits in pups born to kindled dams and suggest a central mechanism for the cognitive and memory dysfunction, associated with seizures during pregnancy.

  3. Evidence for the pharmacological similarity between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and postsynaptic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, D. M.; Marek, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty antagonist substances with varying potencies for central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors have been examined for effects on the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor. This has been monitored by measuring the stimulating effects of the substances on acetylcholine synthesis by rat neocortical tissue prisms. Dose-response curves for selected agents showed that maximal stimulation of synthesis was to 136-140% of the value without an antagonist. At a concentration of 1 microM, 17 of the substances caused a significant increase in synthesis, whilst at 0.01 microM significant stimulation occurred with only atropine, dexetimide, N-methyl-piperdin-4-yl (R)-2-cyclohexyl-2-hydroxyl-2-phenylacetate, quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and scopolamine. Linear regression analysis between synthesis values obtained with the substances and published data for the effects on either cholinoceptor-agonist induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum or the binding of [3H]-QNB to rat forebrain membranes gave correlation coefficients of r = 0.84 (P less than 0.01), and r = 0.75 (P less than 0.02) respectively. The results provide no indication of a pharmacological difference between the central presynaptic muscarinic autoreceptor and central and peripheral postsynaptic muscarinic receptors. PMID:7186824

  4. Effects of atropine treatment on in vitro and in vivo binding of 4-[125I]-dexetimide to central and myocardial muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Uno, Y; Matsumura, K; Scheffel, U; Wilson, A A; Dannals, R F; Wagner, H N

    1991-01-01

    Upregulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChR) after chronic atropine treatment has been described previously. The present study was designed to evaluate 4-iodine-125 dexetimide as an agent to determine changes in the number of mAChR. Rats were injected subcutaneously with atropine (500 mg/kg) either once or chronically, once daily for 10 days, and sacrificed 24 h later. In vitro binding assays with 4-[125I]-dexetimide showed significant increases in the number of mAChR in cerebra (21%) and ventricles (45%) after chronic atropine treatment but not after acute treatment. The affinity of binding to cerebral and ventricular mAChR declined after acute and chronic atropine treatment. In vivo studies were carried out involving intravenous injection of 4-[125I]-dexetimide 24 h after atropine treatment. Binding was markedly reduced in the brain and heart. Upregulation of mAChR, as seen in in vitro studies, could not be observed because of the remaining atropine. Occupancy of mAChR by atropine persisted as long as 7 days after one dose. The results of these studies indicate that 4-[125I]-dexetimide binding reflects the effects of atropine on central and peripheral muscarinic cholinergic receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:1915471

  5. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  6. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation. PMID:11578817

  7. Memory improving actions of gabapentin in mice: possible involvement of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Baratti, C M

    2001-10-01

    Male CF-1 mice were tested 48 h after training on a one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately post-training, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of the antiepileptic gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexaneacetic acid) (GBP, 10 mg/kg) enhanced retention performance. The effect was prevented by atropine, a central muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) administered after training but 10 min prior to GBP treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training GBP on retention performance. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 mg/kg, i.p.) administered immediately after training, and GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.), given 10 min after training, significantly enhanced retention performance. The effects of GBP (5 mg/kg, i.p.) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (150 mg/kg, i.p.). Considered together, these findings suggest a disinhibitory action of GBP on the activity of central muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are involved in memory consolidation.

  8. Effects of muscarine on single rat adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A; Lingle, C J

    1992-01-01

    1. The action of muscarine on membrane currents and cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) of dissociated rat adrenal chromaffin cells was investigated using standard whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques and microfluorimetry of unclamped single cells. 2. In cells held at a constant holding potential negative to -40 mV, brief (5-10 s) applications of muscarine produced a transient activation of outward current. The activation of this current by muscarine also occurs in the presence of 5 mM-Co2+. 3. The outward current activated by muscarine at holding potentials negative to about -40 mV is blocked over 90% by either 200 microM-curare or 200 nM-apamin. One millimolar TEA produces variable blocking effects at such potentials. 4. The outward current activated by muscarine is transient even in the continuing presence of muscarine. Complete recovery between pairs of muscarine applications occurs over a 1-2 min period. If sufficient time was allowed for recovery between muscarine applications, the muscarine-activated outward current could be reliably elicited in dialysed cells for periods of 20-30 min. 5. Voltage ramps were used to examine effects of muscarine on currents over a range of membrane potentials. Over all potentials, muscarine activates a relatively voltage-independent component which is blocked almost completely by 200 nM-apamin and by 200 microM-curare. At potentials negative to about -40 mV, the apamin- and curare-sensitive current accounts for virtually all muscarine-activated current. This current appears to correspond to a Ca(2+)-activated, voltage-independent current found in these cells. Effects of muscarine on currents activated at potentials positive to 0 mV are complex. At potentials above 0 mV, muscarine can produce either an activation or an inhibition of outward current. The outward current activated at positive potentials was primarily voltage dependent and blocked by 1 mM-TEA. However, in some cells activation of voltage-dependent current was not observed and

  9. Attenuation of Cocaine's Reinforcing and Discriminative Stimulus Effects via Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptor StimulationS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig; Wess, Jürgen; Boon, Joon Y.; Fulton, Brian S.; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Caine, S. Barak

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus. More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M1 and/or M4 receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M1/M4-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M1-selective agonist (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A-343), and the novel M1-selective agonist 1-(1-2-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-one (TBPB) were tested as substitution and/or pretreatment to cocaine. Both muscarinic antagonists partially substituted for cocaine and enhanced its discriminative stimulus. Conversely, muscarinic agonists blunted cocaine discrimination and abolished cocaine self-administration with varying effects on food-maintained behavior. Specifically, increasing selectivity for the M1 subtype (oxotremorine < xanomeline < TBPB) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M1 and M4 receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M1 receptor activation attenuates cocaine's abuse-related effects, whereas non-M1/M4 receptors probably contribute to undesirable effects of muscarinic stimulation. These data provide the first demonstration of anticocaine

  10. In vivo visualization of central muscarinic receptors using [11C]quinuclidinyl benzilate and positron emission tomography in baboons.

    PubMed

    Varastet, M; Brouillet, E; Chavoix, C; Prenant, C; Crouzel, C; Stulzaft, O; Bottlaender, M; Cayla, J; Mazière, B; Mazière, M

    1992-03-24

    The muscarinic antagonist, quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), labeled with carbon 11 was used as a radioligand to visualize in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) the central muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in baboons (Papio papio). The binding characteristics of [11C]QNB showed its specific binding to central mAChR. [11C]QNB brain uptake was high in cerebral cortex and striatum, areas that are rich in mAChR, whereas it decreased rapidly in cerebellum, evidencing non-specific binding in this structure that is almost devoid of mAChR. These results are consistent with the known cerebral distribution of mAChR in primates. [11C]QNB specific cerebral binding was enhanced by pretreatment with methyl-QNB, a peripherally acting muscarinic antagonist. Specifically labeled binding sites alone were blocked by prior administration of dexetimide, a muscarinic antagonist. Specific radioactivity was driven out from mAChR-rich regions by atropine and dexetimide, drugs with high affinity for mAChR. This competition was stereospecific since only dexetimide, the pharmacologically active isomer of benzetimide, was able to compete with the radioligand on its binding sites. A relationship between the occupancy of [11C]QNB-labeled receptors by atropine or dexetimide and the concomitant induction of a pharmacological effect was also detected by simultaneous PET scanning and electroencephalographic recording. Since mAChR form an important part of choline receptors in the central nervous system, [11C]QNB appears to be a suitable radiotracer to monitor cerebral physiological or pathological phenomena linked to the cholinergic system in living subjects. PMID:1521561

  11. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage. PMID:7857246

  12. Memory-improving actions of glucose: involvement of a central cholinergic muscarinic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1994-11-01

    Post-training intraperitoneal administration of alpha-D[+]-glucose (10-300 mg/kg) facilitated 24-h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. Glucose did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The effect of glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by glucose (30 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to glucose treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of glucose (10 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the memory facilitation induced by post-training administration of glucose could result from an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release that, in turn, might modulate the activity of muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms that are critically involved in memory storage.

  13. Muscarinic preferential M(1) receptor antagonists enhance the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies of benztropine analogues have found them to inhibit dopamine uptake like cocaine, but with less effectiveness than cocaine in producing behavioral effects related to drug abuse. Studies have assessed whether nonselective muscarinic antagonists decrease the effects of cocaine because many of the benztropine analogues are also muscarinic antagonists. As previous studies were conducted with nonselective muscarinic antagonists and the benztropine analogues show preferential affinity for the M(1) muscarinic receptor subtype, the present study examined interactions of cocaine and the preferential M(1) antagonists, telenzepine (TZP) and trihexyphenidyl (TXP) on subjective effects in rats trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) from saline injections. Cocaine dose-dependently increased the percentage of responses on the cocaine-appropriate lever, with full substitution at the training dose. In contrast neither TZP nor TXP produced more than 25% cocaine-appropriate responding at any dose. Both M(1) antagonists produced significant leftward shifts in the cocaine dose-effect curve, TZP at 3.0 and TXP at 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg. The present results indicate that preferential antagonist actions at muscarinic M(1) receptors enhance rather than attenuate the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine, and thus those actions unlikely contribute to the reduced cocaine-like effects of BZT analogues.

  14. Positron emission tomographic investigations of central muscarinic cholinergic receptors with three isomers of [76Br]BrQNP.

    PubMed

    Strijckmans, V; Bottlaender, M; Luo, H; Ottaviani, M; McPherson, D W; Loc'h, C; Fuseau, C; Knapp, F F; Mazière, B

    1997-05-01

    We studied the potential of three radiobrominated isomers of BrQNP, (Z(-,-)-[76Br]BrQNP, E(-,-)-[76Br]BrQNP and E(-,+)-[76Br]BrQNP), as suitable radioligands for imaging of central muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain. These radioligands were stereospecifically prepared by electrophilic radiobromodestannylation of the respective tributylstannyl precursors using no-carrier-added [76Br]BrNH4 and peracetic acid. Preliminary pharmacological characterizations were determined by biodistribution, autoradiography, competition, displacement and metabolite studies in rats. The (-,-)-configuration presented important specific uptakes in brain muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR)-rich structures and in heart, low metabolization rates and an apparent M2 selectivity. The (-,+)-configuration revealed more rapid clearance, lower uptake, a higher metabolization rate and an apparent M1 selectivity. Reversibility of the binding was confirmed for the three radiotracers. Positron emission tomography in the living baboon brain revealed high and rapid uptake in the brain and accumulation in the mAChR-rich structures studied. At 30 min p.i., the E(-,-)-radiotracer reached a plateau in cortex, pons and thalamus with concentrations of 29%, 24% and 19% ID/l, respectively. Z(-,-)-[76Br]BrQNP also accumulated in these structures, reaching a maximal uptake (27% ID/l) in the cortex 2 h p.i. At 5 min p.i. a plateau (17% ID/l) was only observed in the cortex for the E(-, +)-[76Br]BrQNP; by contrast, the other structures showed slow washout. After 3 weeks, the (-,-)-radiotracers were studied in the same baboon pretreated with dexetimide (1 mg/kg), a well-known muscarinic antagonist. In all the mAChR structures, the highly reduced uptake observed after this preloading step indicates that these radiotracers specifically bind to muscarinic receptors. Z(-, -)-[76Br]BrQNP, which is displaced in higher amounts from M2 mAChR-enriched structures, reveals an M2 affinity. The two isomers

  15. Central muscarinic cholinergic involvement in serial pattern learning: Atropine impairs acquisition and retention in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task in rats.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Amber M; Fountain, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    Atropine sulfate is a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist which impairs acquisition and retention performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. The present study examined the effects of atropine on acquisition and retention of a highly-structured serial pattern in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task. Rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of either saline or atropine sulfate (50mg/kg) and trained in an octagonal operant chamber equipped with a lever on each wall. They learned to press the levers in a particular order (the serial pattern) for brain-stimulation reward in a discrete-trial procedure with correction. The two groups learned a pattern composed of eight 3-element chunks ending with a violation element: 123-234-345-456-567-678-781-818 where the digits represent the clock-wise positions of levers in the chamber, dashes indicate 3-s pauses, and other intertrial intervals were 1s. Central muscarinic cholinergic blockade by atropine caused profound impairments during acquisition, specifically in the encoding of chunk-boundary elements (the first element of chunks) and the violation element of the pattern, but had a significant but negligible effect on the encoding of within-chunk elements relative to saline-injected rats. These effects persisted when atropine was removed, and similar impairments were also observed in retention performance. The results indicate that intact central muscarinic cholinergic systems are necessary for learning and producing appropriate responses at places in sequences where pattern structure changes. The results also provide further evidence that multiple cognitive systems are recruited to learn and perform within-chunk, chunk-boundary, and violation elements of a serial pattern.

  16. Central Muscarinic Cholinergic Activation Alters Interaction between Splenic Dendritic Cell and CD4+CD25- T Cells in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Valentin A.; Tracey, Kevin J.; Khafipour, Ehsan; Ghia, Jean-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) is based on vagus nerve (VN) activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR) signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs) and sequential CD4+/CD25−T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. Methods The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP)-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25−T cell co-culture were determined. Results McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25−T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. Conclusions Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD. PMID:25295619

  17. The effect of oxime reactivators on muscarinic receptors: functional and binding examinations.

    PubMed

    Soukup, O; Kumar, U K; Proska, J; Bratova, L; Adem, A; Jun, D; Fusek, J; Kuca, K; Tobin, G

    2011-05-01

    The antidotal treatment of organophosphorus poisoning is still a problematic issue since no versatile antidote has been developed yet. In our study, we focused on an interesting property, which does not relate to the reactivation of inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) of some oximes, but refers to their anti-muscarinic effects which may contribute considerably to their treatment efficacy. One standard reactivator (HI-6) and two new compounds (K027 and K203) have been investigated for their antimuscarinic properties. Anti-muscarinic effects were studies by means of an in vitro stimulated atrium preparation (functional test), the [(3)H]-QNB binding assay and G-protein coupled receptor assay (GPCR, beta-Arrestin Assay). Based on the functional data HI-6 demonstrates the highest anti-muscarinic effect. However, only when comparing [(3)H]-QNB binding results and GPCR data, K203 shows a very promising compound with regard to anti-muscarinic potency. The therapeutic impact of these findings has been discussed.

  18. Effect of paraoxon on muscarinic, dopamine and. gamma. -aminobutyric acid receptors of brain and sensitivity to muscarinic antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, J.C.R.; Hoskins, B.; Ho, I.K.

    1986-03-05

    Several acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors decrease muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors in the brain, alteration of dopamine (DA) and ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors after AChE inhibition was also reported. In view of the important interactions among DA, GABA and ACh systems, whether this is a common effect of AChE inhibitors should be established. They report the effect of the AChE inhibitor, paraoxon, on DA, GABA and mACh receptors in the rat. The binding of /sup 3/H-QNB (for mACh), /sup 3/H-spiperone (for DA) and /sup 3/H-muscimol (for GABA) to striatal and hippocampal membranes was analyzed. Also, behavioral sensitivity to atropine was studied. Twenty-four hr after a single dose (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.) of paraoxon, the density of mACh receptors in the striatum was decreased but, at 3 days, no change was seen. In the hippocampus, the mACh receptors were not affected. Repeated treatment with paraoxon (0.3 mg/kg, 48 hourly) for 2 weeks reduced the mACh receptor density in both regions. Neither single nor repeated paraoxon treatment had an effect on DA or GABA receptors. After single or repeated dosing with paraoxon, myoclonus induced by atropine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was enhanced. The results show rapid downregulation of mACh receptors by paraoxon. DA or GABA, however, appear not to be affected under these treatment regimens.

  19. Bilateral injection of fasciculin into the amygdala of rats: effects on two avoidance tasks, acetylcholinesterase activity, and cholinergic muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Quillfeldt, J; Raskovsky, S; Dalmaz, C; Dias, M; Huang, C; Netto, C A; Schneider, F; Izquierdo, I; Medina, J H; Silveira, R

    1990-11-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the bilateral injection of fasciculin-2 (FAS), a natural acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory peptide, into the amygdala of rats on acquisition and retention of two avoidance behaviors. Intraamygdala injection of FAS (150 ng/amygdala) produced a pronounced and long-lasting inhibition of AChE activity: 85% and 74% on day 2 and day 5, respectively. After 48 hr, FAS-treated animals showed no changes in training or test session performance in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (training-test interval was 24 hr). In a 2-way shuttle avoidance task, intraamygdala FAS slightly reduced retention test performance without modifying training session scores. Two and five days after FAS injections into the amygdala, the density of muscarinic receptor decreased about 50% as measured by the specific bindings of 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and 3H-oxotremorine. No alterations were observed in the apparent dissociation constants. On the other hand, the central-type benzodiazepine receptor population of the amygdala remained unchanged, suggesting that FAS microinjection did not produce damage to neuronal components of these nuclei. In conclusion, the results presented have indicated that a clear-cut and long-lasting inhibition of AChE activity in the amygdala is not accompanied by a facilitation of learning and memory of two different avoidance tasks. Compensation of the increased cholinergic activity by a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors could account for these findings.

  20. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte; Werge, Thomas; Bymaster, Frank P; Felder, Christian C; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25880220

  1. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte; Werge, Thomas; Bymaster, Frank P; Felder, Christian C; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  2. Antipsychotic-Like Effect of the Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonist BuTAC in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Dencker, Ditte; Werge, Thomas; Bymaster, Frank P.; Felder, Christian C.; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane (BuTAC) exhibits high affinity for muscarinic receptors with no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors and binding sites, including the dopamine receptors and the dopamine transporter. In the present study, we wanted to examine the possible antipsychotic-like effects of BuTAC in primates. To this end, we investigated the effects of BuTAC on d-amphetamine-induced behaviour in antipsychotic-naive Cebus paella monkeys. Possible adverse events of BuTAC, were evaluated in the same monkeys as well as in monkeys sensitized to antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects. The present data suggests that, the muscarinic receptor ligand BuTAC exhibits antipsychotic-like behaviour in primates. The behavioural data of BuTAC as well as the new biochemical data further substantiate the rationale for the use of muscarinic M1/M2/M4-preferring receptor agonists as novel pharmacological tools in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25880220

  3. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  4. Quantitative ARG microimaging studies of two muscarinic antagonist isomers: Blocking and the effects of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Wang, G.J.; Oster, Z.H.

    1994-05-01

    The distribution of the racemic mixture of IQNP(1-Azabicyclo [2-2-2] oct-3-yl alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate), a muscarinic antagonist was described earlier. Recently, the radioiodinated Z and E-(R,R) IQNP isomers have been prepared. Quantitative ARG studies using the Z and E isomers were performed in control rats and after pretreatment with ({plus_minus}) QNB or cocaine. High uptake of (Z)-IQNP was seen in the heart and brain with GI and urinary excretion. Lung uptake was lower than with the racemic IQNP. (Z)-IQNP uptake was maximal at 15 min p.i. with homogeneous distribution in the heart. In the brain, highest uptake was in the caudate, cortex, hippocampus, pons and thalamus. (Z)-IQNP showed higher cerebellar uptake and lower cortical uptake compared to (E)-IQNP. Clearance from brain was slower than bean. Heart and brain uptake of (E)-IQNP were markedly lower than the Z isomer. After QNB pretreatment, almost complete blocking of (Z)-IQNP uptake in heart and brain occurred. Cocaine did not significantly affect the distribution of IQNP. These data indicate that (Z)-IQNP has high affinity for the M2 muscarinic receptor with potential for brain and heart imaging. Cocaine appears to have little effect on the muscarinic-cholinergic receptors in the brain and heart.

  5. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  6. Muscarinic Preferential M1 Receptor Antagonists Minimally Alter the Discriminative-Stimulus Effects of Cocaine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of benztropine analogues have found them to inhibit dopamine uptake like cocaine, but with less effectiveness than cocaine in producing behavioral effects related to drug abuse. Studies have assessed whether nonselective muscarinic antagonists decrease the effects of cocaine because many of the benztropine analogues are also muscarinic antagonists. As previous studies were conducted with nonselective muscarinic antagonists and the benztropine analogues show preferential affinity for the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype, the present study examined interactions of cocaine and the preferential M1 antagonists, telenzepine (TZP) and trihexyphenidyl (TXP) on subjective effects in rats trained to discriminate cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) from saline injections. Cocaine dose-dependently increased the percentage of responses on the cocaine-appropriate lever, with full substitution at the training dose. In contrast neither TZP nor TXP produced more than 25% cocaine-appropriate responding at any dose. Both M1 antagonists produced significant leftward shifts in the cocaine dose-effect curve, TZP at 3.0 and TXP at 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg. The present results indicate that preferential antagonist actions at muscarinic M1 receptors enhance rather than attenuate the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine, and thus those actions unlikely contribute to the reduced cocaine-like effects of BZT analogues. PMID:17631384

  7. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  8. Effects of nicotinic and muscarinic compounds on biting attack in the cat.

    PubMed

    Berntson, G G; Beattie, M S; Walker, J M

    1976-09-01

    Predatory-like biting attack on a rat, as well as hissing, growling, and other threat behaviors, could be induced in normally non-aggressive cats by systemic administration of the muscarinic agonist, arecoline (7-12 mg/kg). In contrast to arecoline, nicotine was found to suppress aggressive behaviors. Systemic administration of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) prior to arecoline injection resulted in a significant reduction in elicited attack and threat behaviors. Furthermore, nicotine (0.075-0.500 mg/kg) was found to produce a dose-dependent suppression of natural predatory behavior as well. This nicotine-produced suppression of attack did not appear to be due to the induction of general malaise, since attack suppression could be seen in the absence of general behavioral inhibition, and doses of nicotine resulting in complete suppression of attack had little effect on food intake. Results indicate that muscarinic and nicotinic compounds can exert antagonistic control over some types of aggressive behaviors. PMID:1033569

  9. Amnesic effects of the anticholinergic drugs, trihexyphenidyl and biperiden: differences in binding properties to the brain muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Ohue, M; Kitaura, T; Kihira, K

    1999-07-10

    An amnesic effect of anticholinergic drugs was previously described from several behavioral studies. We examined this effect induced by trihexyphenidyl and biperiden, clinically used in the parkinsonism and schizophrenic patients, by using passive avoidance tasks. Both of these drugs (0.1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) showed dose-dependent amnesic effects in the acquisition and retrieval phases. However, the effect induced by trihexyphenidyl was transient, whereas that of biperiden was long-lasting. To clarify the reason for the different duration of the amnesic activity, binding to the muscarinic receptor was examined. In the Scatchard analysis, trihexyphenidyl competed with [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([(3)H]QNB) on the muscarinic receptor (showed increased K(d) and unchanged B(max) value), while biperiden decreased [(3)H]QNB binding (B(max) value) significantly. Furthermore, in an exchange assay for receptor inactivation, trihexyphenidyl binding to muscarinic receptors was exchanged by [(3)H]QNB completely, but biperiden decreased the exchangeable binding of [(3)H]QNB in a dose dependent manner (0.1-100 nM). These results suggested that the binding of trihexyphenidyl and biperiden to muscarinic receptor might be completely reversible and partially irreversible, respectively, whereas the K(i) values of these two drugs were similar. In conclusion, this difference in binding property may explain the difference in the time-course of the amnesic effect induced by trihexyphenidyl and biperiden.

  10. Distribution and effects of the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Groleau, Marianne; Kang, Jun Il; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Vaucher, Elvire

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate the activity and plasticity of the visual cortex. Muscarinic receptors are divided into five subtypes that are not homogeneously distributed throughout the cortical layers and cells types. This distribution results in complex action of the muscarinic receptors in the integration of visual stimuli. Selective activation of the different subtypes can either strengthen or weaken cortical connectivity (e.g., thalamocortical vs. corticocortical), i.e., it can influence the processing of certain stimuli over others. Moreover, muscarinic receptors differentially modulate some functional properties of neurons during experience-dependent activity and cognitive processes and they contribute to the fine-tuning of visual processing. These functions are involved in the mechanisms of attention, maturation and learning in the visual cortex. This minireview describes the anatomo-functional aspects of muscarinic modulation of the primary visual cortex’s (V1) microcircuitry. PMID:26150786

  11. Cholinergic stimulation of pancreatic amylase release and muscarinic receptors: effect of ionophore A23187

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, L.; Morisset, J.

    1985-07-22

    Dispersed rat pancreatic acini were incubated in 0.5 mM calcium medium with increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine, with or without the ionophore A23187 (10/sup -6/M). Addition of the ionophore reduced maximal amylase release, increased the maximal effective concentration of carbamylcholine and dramatically impaired the agonist's capacity to induce enzyme secretion at low concentration. The ionophore also abolished the inhibition of secretion observed at high carbamylcholine concentrations. These effects of the ionophore on the cholinergic secretory response cannot be explained by interaction at the muscarinic receptor since neither the Bmax, the affinity of the receptor for the (/sup 3/H)QNB nor the binding of carbamylcholine were affected by the ionophore. It is suggested that for the conditions studied, the ionophore can interact with the secretory process at one or several points ulterior to the initial recognition site of carbamylcholine on its receptor. 30 references, 3 figures.

  12. Two molecular weight forms of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the avian central nervous system: switch in predominant form during differentiation of synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Large, T H; Rauh, J J; De Mello, F G; Klein, W L

    1985-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from the avian central nervous system were examined for developmental changes that correlated with the differentiation of cholinergic synapses. In contrast to previous studies that showed a single molecular weight form of muscarinic receptors in the mature central nervous system, the current study of receptors from embryonic and newly hatched chick retina showed the presence of two electrophoretic forms having apparent molecular weights of 86,200 +/- 400 and 72,200 +/- 300. Two receptor forms also were observed in embryonic cerebrum, optic tectum, and cerebellum. Each form was present, although decreased in molecular weight by 6000, after treatment with deglycosylating enzymes, consistent with molecular differences occurring in the protein portions, rather than the carbohydrate portions, of the molecules. The relative proportions of the high and low molecular weight receptors in retina showed a striking inversion during development. Before synaptogenesis, receptors were mainly of Mr 86,000, whereas after synaptogenesis, receptors were mainly of Mr 72,000. Development of a predominantly low molecular weight receptor population also occurred in aggregate, but not monolayer, cell culture, suggesting a possible role for cell-cell interactions in triggering the change. Pulse-chase labeling of receptors on cultured cells indicated that both forms were present on the cell surface; the labeled Mr 86,000 population had a half-life of 5 hr, whereas the labeled Mr 72,000 population had a half-life of 19 hr. The change in size of muscarinic receptors during development may reflect the action of regulatory mechanisms critical to the proper assembly and function of synapses in the central nervous system. Images PMID:3866251

  13. Alterations of muscarinic receptor subtypes in pathways relating to memory: Effects of lesions and transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified pharmacologically into two distinct populations designated muscarinic type-one (M-1) and mscarinic type-two (M-2). The semiquantitative technique of receptor autoradiography was used to examine the anatomical and cellular distribution, and densities of M-1 and M-2 receptors in the rate brain. Muscarinic receptors were labeled with the classical antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Differentiation of the muscarinic subtypes was accomplished by competition studies of ({sup 3}H)QNB against the relatively selective M-1 antagonist pirenzepine (PZ), and the relatively selective M-2 antagonist, AFDX-116. In addition, M-1 and M-2 receptors were directly labeled with ({sup 3}H)PZ and ({sup 3}H)AFDX-116, respectively. Cholinergic pathways from the large cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) to the cortex and from the medial septum (MS) to the hippocampus were examined by lesioning with the selective cholinergic neurotoxin, AF64A. Bilateral cerebral cortical infarction was performed in order to analyze potential changes in muscarinic receptor populations in subcortical structures that are sensitive to cortical infarction. Finally, the response of muscarinic receptors to fetal septodiagonal band transplants in the deafferentated hippocampus was examined.

  14. GIRK channel activation via adenosine or muscarinic receptors has similar effects on rat atrial electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Liang, Bo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K⁺ channels (GIRK) are important in the regulation of heart rate and atrial electrophysiology. GIRK channels are activated by G protein-coupled receptors, including muscarinic M₂ receptors and adenosine A₁ receptors. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare the electrophysiological effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and adenosine on GIRK channels in rat atria. Action potential duration at 90% repolarization (APD₉₀), effective refractory period (ERP), and resting membrane potential (RMP) were investigated in isolated rat atria by intracellular recordings. Both the adenosine analog N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) and ACh profoundly shortened APD₉₀ and ERP and hyperpolarized the RMP. No additive or synergistic effect of CPA and ACh coapplication was observed. To antagonize GIRK channel activation, the specific inhibitor rTertiapin Q (TTQ) was applied. The coapplication of TTQ reversed the CPA and ACh-induced effects. When TTQ was applied without exogenous receptor activator, both APD₉₀ and ERP were prolonged and RMP was depolarized, confirming a basal activity of the GIRK current. The results reveal that activation of A₁ and M₂ receptors has a profound and equal effect on the electrophysiology in rat atrium. This effect is to a major extent mediated through GIRK channels. Furthermore, these results support the notion that atrial GIRK currents from healthy hearts have a basal component and additional activation can be mediated via at least 2 different receptor mechanisms. PMID:23609329

  15. Endosulfan and cholinergic (muscarinic) transmission: effect on electroencephalograms and (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in pigeon brain

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, M.; Agrawal, A.K.; Gopal, K.; Sur, R.N.; Seth, P.K.

    1986-08-01

    Single exposure of endosulfan (5 mg/kg) to pigeons (Columbia livia) caused neuronal hyperexcitability as evidence by spike discharges of 200-500 ..mu..V in the electroencephalograms (EEG) from the telencephalon and hyperstriatum, but there was not effect on the ectostriatal area. Cholinergic (muscarinic) receptor binding study using (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)QNB) as a specific ligand indicated that a single exposure to 5 mg/kg of endosulfan caused a significant increase in (/sup 3/H)QNB binding to the striatal membrane. Behavior study further indicated that a single dose of 200 ..mu..g/kg of oxotremorine produced a significant induction in the tremor in endosulfan-pretreated pigeons. The results of this behavioral and biochemical study indicate the involvement of a cholinergic (muscarinic) transmitter system in endosulfan-induced neurotoxicity.

  16. Human electrophysiological correlates of learned irrelevance: effects of the muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden.

    PubMed

    Klinkenberg, Inge; Blokland, Arjan; Riedel, Wim; Sambeth, Anke

    2012-11-01

    Learned irrelevance (LIrr) refers to a reduction in associative learning after pre-exposure of the conditioned and unconditioned stimulus in a non-contingent fashion. This paradigm might serve as a translational model for (pre)attentive information processing deficits in schizophrenia. This is the first study to investigate the event-related potentials (ERPs) of a within-subject LIrr paradigm in humans. Furthermore, the effects of the muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden on LIrr were assessed. As expected, LIrr was found to be intact in young healthy volunteers after placebo. Furthermore, in the placebo condition P3b latency was decreased for target stimuli, which were pre-cued. This suggests that the predictability of the occurrence of these stimuli is mainly reflected by this ERP component. Biperiden had no effect on the behavioural LIrr measures, although prolonged reaction times were evident. Biperiden increased the N1 amplitude of the pre-exposed predictor letters, suggesting an effect of this drug on early perceptual processing. In conclusion, the within-subject paradigm used in the current study in combination with electroencephalography can reveal brain mechanisms involved in LIrr. M1 antagonism did not affect LIrr performance but seemed to influence early information processing.

  17. Effect of the combination of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam and the nootropic agent meclofenoxate on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Popova, J S; Petkov, V D

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of 7-day treatment with the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam (5 mg/kg), the nootropic agent meclofenoxate (100 mg/kg) and their combination in the same doses on the binding activity of muscarinic receptors in four rat brain structures (cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus) were studied using the antagonist [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzylate [( 3H]-QNB) as radio-ligand. 2. Medazepam treatment caused significant decrease of muscarinic receptor binding affinity (Kd) and of the receptor binding capacity (Bmax) in the brain structures studied. The number of muscarinic binding sites was unsignificantly decreased only in the hippocampus. 3. Meclofenoxate treatment caused an increase of muscarinic receptor affinity and a decrease of the binding capacity in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus and an increase of the binding affinity in the striatum and hippocampus. 4. The combination of medazepam and meclofenoxate caused no significant changes of both muscarinic receptor characteristics in the hippocampus and of the receptor affinity in the striatum and hypothalamus in comparison with control rats. The Bmax values were decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hypothalamus when compared with control animals. The differences observed were slighter than those determined after the comparison of medazepam treated rats with control rats. 5. The results obtained afford an opportunity to suggest that the nootropic agent meclofenoxate acts to moderate the effect of the benzodiazepine tranquilizer medazepam on the activity of rat brain muscarinic receptors.

  18. The effect of a muscarinic receptor 1 gene variant on grey matter volume in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cropley, Vanessa L; Scarr, Elizabeth; Fornito, Alex; Klauser, Paul; Bousman, Chad A; Scott, Rodney; Cairns, Murray J; Tooney, Paul A; Pantelis, Christos; Dean, Brian

    2015-11-30

    Previous research has demonstrated that individuals with schizophrenia who are homozygous at the c.267C>A single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2067477) within the cholinergic muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) perform less well on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) than those who are heterozygous. This study sought to determine whether variation in the rs2067477 genotype was associated with differential changes in brain structure. Data from 227 patients with established schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were obtained from the Australian Schizophrenia Research Bank. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry was performed to compare regional grey matter volume (GMV) between the 267C/C (N=191) and 267C/A (N=36) groups. Secondary analyses tested for an effect of genotype on cognition (the WCST was not available). Individuals who were homozygous (267C/C) demonstrated significantly reduced GMV in the right precentral gyrus compared to those who were heterozygous (267C/A). These preliminary results suggest that the rs2067477 genotype is associated with brain structure in the right precentral gyrus in individuals with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder. Future studies are required to replicate these results and directly link the volumetric reductions with specific cognitive processes.

  19. Effects of selected muscarinic cholinergic antagonists on [3H]acetylcholine release from rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Pohorecki, R; Head, R; Domino, E F

    1988-01-01

    A number of cholinergic muscarinic (M) agonists and antagonists were studied for their ability to enhance tritiated acetylcholine ([3H]ACh) release from electrically field-stimulated rat hippocampal slices. A Ca++-free medium and carbachol, but not nicotine, inhibited [3H]ACh release. Atropine, methylatropine and dexetimide produced concentration-dependent increases in [3H]ACh release to a maximum of about 50% above control. Aprophen and benactyzine produced a maximal response 25 to 35% above control. The selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine had the least effect on [3H]ACh release. Of the nonspecific M1-M2 antagonists studied, benactyzine produced the least amount of [3H]ACh release. The order of potency of the M antagonists in promoting a 15% increase in [3H]ACh release was aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than methylatropine greater than dexetimide greater than pirenzepine greater than atropine. However, the order of promoting maximal release of [3H]ACh was atropine greater than dexetimide greater than methylatropine greater than aprophen greater than benactyzine greater than pirenzepine. PMID:3335998

  20. Pharmacological approaches to targeting muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Matera, Carlo; Tata, Ada M

    2014-01-01

    The presence of cholinergic system markers and muscarinic receptor subtypes in several tissues also of nonneuronal type has been largely demonstrated. Acetylcholine, synthesized in the nervous system, can locally contribute to modulate cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Considering that the cholinergic system functions are impaired in a number of disorders, the identification of new drugs regulating these functions appears of great clinical relevance. The possible involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in different pathologies has been proposed in recent years and is becoming an important area of study. However, the lack of selective muscarinic receptor ligands has for long time limited the therapeutic treatment based on muscarinic receptors as targets. To date, some muscarinic ligands such as xanomeline (patent, US5980933) or cevimeline (patents US4855290, US5571918) have been developed for the treatment of several pathologies (Alzheimer's and Sjogren's diseases). The present review will be focused on the potential effects produced by muscarinic receptor activation in different pathologies, including tumors. In fact, the potential use of muscarinic ligands in therapeutic protocols in cancer therapy will be discussed, considering that several muscarinic antagonists, already used in the treatment of genitourinary diseases (e.g. darifenacin, patent, US5096890, US6106864), have also been demonstrated to arrest the tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to analgesia is also reviewed. Finally, some of the most significant achievements in the field of bitopic/dualsteric ligands will be discussed and the molecules patented so far will be presented.

  1. AF-DX 116, a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, potentiates the effects of glucose and reverses the effects of insulin on memory.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    1998-11-01

    Male Swiss mice were tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Low subeffective doses of d-(+)-glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), but not its stereoisomer l-(-)-glucose (30 mg/kg,ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.3 mg/kg,ip), a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, given 10 min after training, interact to improve retention. Insulin (8 IU/kg, ip) impaired retention when injected immediately after training, and the effects were reversed, in a dose-related manner, by AF-DX 116 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, ip) administered 10 min following insulin. Since AF-DX 116 possibly blocks autoreceptors mediating the inhibition of acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerve terminals, the present data support the view that changes in the central nervous system glucose availability, subsequent to modification of circulating glucose levels, influence the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms involved in memory storage of an inhibitory avoidance response in mice. PMID:9774523

  2. AF-DX 116, a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, potentiates the effects of glucose and reverses the effects of insulin on memory.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    1998-11-01

    Male Swiss mice were tested 24 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. Low subeffective doses of d-(+)-glucose (10 mg/kg, ip), but not its stereoisomer l-(-)-glucose (30 mg/kg,ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.3 mg/kg,ip), a presynaptic muscarinic receptor antagonist, given 10 min after training, interact to improve retention. Insulin (8 IU/kg, ip) impaired retention when injected immediately after training, and the effects were reversed, in a dose-related manner, by AF-DX 116 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, ip) administered 10 min following insulin. Since AF-DX 116 possibly blocks autoreceptors mediating the inhibition of acetylcholine release from cholinergic nerve terminals, the present data support the view that changes in the central nervous system glucose availability, subsequent to modification of circulating glucose levels, influence the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms involved in memory storage of an inhibitory avoidance response in mice.

  3. [Allosteric effect of serotonin and mianserin on the kinetics of specific [3H]-ligand binding to adrenergic and muscarinic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex membranes].

    PubMed

    Manukhin, B N; Nesterova, L A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of serotonin receptor activation (by serotonin) and inhibition (by mianserin) on the properties of the α1-, α2-adrenoreceptors, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in subcellular membrane fractions from the rat cerebral cortex were studied. Experimental data on the kinetics of specific antagonists binding to adrenergic and muscarinic receptors were analyzed by graphical and mathematical methods. The results suggest the presence of allosteric (cross-talk) interaction. In the control, α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors were represented by a single pool, and muscarinic receptors, by two pools. Two pools of adrenoreceptors with different affinity were detected against the background of serotonin. It was found that mianserin induces the formation of two pools of only (α2-receptors and muscarinic receptors are represented by two pools differing in the main parameters, such as dissociation constants and adrenoreceptor concentrations, in the control and experimental groups. It was shown that the allosteric effect of serotonin and mianserin is manifested in the inhibition of muscarinic receptors. It was assumed that the adrenergic and cholinergic receptors exist as dimers. The interaction between the adrenergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic systems is likely to be implemented at the cell membrane level.

  4. Effects of acute administration of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic agonists and antagonists on performance in different cost–benefit decision making tasks in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ian A.; Gilbert, Ryan J.; Bizon, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Alterations in cost–benefit decision making accompany numerous neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and addiction. Central cholinergic systems have been linked to the etiology and/or treatment of many of these conditions, but little is known about the role of cholinergic signaling in cost–benefit decision making. Objectives The goal of these experiments was to determine how cholinergic signaling is involved in cost–benefit decision making, using a behavioral pharmacological approach. Methods Male Long-Evans rats were trained in either “probability discounting” or “delay discounting” tasks, in which rats made discrete-trial choices between a small food reward and a large food reward associated with either varying probabilities of omission or varying delays to delivery, respectively. The effects of acute administration of different doses of nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists were assessed in each task. Results In the probability discounting task, acute nicotine administration (1.0 mg/kg) significantly increased choice of the large risky reward, and control experiments suggested that this was due to robust nicotine-induced impairments in behavioral flexibility. In the delay discounting task, the muscarinic antagonists scopolamine (0.03, 0.1, and 0.3 mg/kg) and atropine (0.3 mg/kg) both significantly increased choice of the small immediate reward. Neither mecamylamine nor oxotremorine produced reliable effects on either of the decision making tasks. Conclusions These data suggest that cholinergic receptors play multiple roles in decision making contexts which include consideration of reward delay or probability. These roles should be considered when targeting these receptors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22760484

  5. Synergism between insecticides permethrin and propoxur occurs through activation of presynaptic muscarinic negative feedback of acetylcholine release in the insect central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Vincent; Stankiewicz, Maria; Bonnet, Julien; Grolleau, Françoise; Hougard, Jean Marc; Lapied, Bruno

    2006-07-01

    Although synergism between pesticides has been widely documented, the physiological mechanisms by which an insecticide synergizes another remains unclear. Toxicological and electrophysiological studies were carried out on two susceptible pest species (the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus and the cockroach Periplaneta americana) to understand better the physiological process involved in pyrethroid and carbamate interactions. Larval bioassays were conducted with the susceptible reference strain SLAB of C. quinquefasciatus to assess the implication of multi-function oxidases and non-specific esterases in insecticide detoxification and synergism. Results showed that the general theory of synergism (competition between pesticides for a common detoxification enzyme) was unlikely to occur in the SLAB strain since the level of synergy recorded between permethrin and propoxur was unchanged in the presence of piperonyl butoxide and tribufos, two inhibitors of oxidases and esterases, respectively (synergism ratios were similar with and without synergists). We also showed that addition of a sub-lethal concentration of nicotine significantly increased the toxicity of permethrin and propoxur at the lower range of the dose-mortality regression lines, suggesting the manifestation of important physiological disruptions at synaptic level. The effects of both permethrin and propoxur were studied on the cercal-afferent giant-interneuron synapses in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the cockroach P. americana using the single-fibre oil-gap method. We demonstrated that permethrin and propoxur increased drastically the ACh concentration within the synaptic cleft, which thereby stimulated a negative feedback of ACh release. Atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, reversed the effect of permethrin and propoxur mixtures. This demonstrates the implication of the presynaptic muscarinic receptors in the negative feedback regulation process and in synergism. Based on these findings, we

  6. Anticholinergics for overactive bladder therapy: central nervous system effects.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael; Boone, Timothy

    2012-02-01

    The mainstay of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is anticholinergic therapy using muscarinic receptor antagonists (tertiary or quaternary amines). Muscarinic receptors in the brain play an important role in cognitive function, and there is growing awareness that antimuscarinic OAB drugs may have adverse central nervous system (CNS) effects, ranging from headache to cognitive impairment and episodes of psychosis. This review discusses the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of OAB antimuscarinics that affect their propensity to cause adverse CNS effects, as observed in phase III clinical trials and in specific investigations on cognitive function and sleep architecture. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for "OAB" plus "muscarinic antagonists" or "anticholinergic drug." Additional relevant literature was identified by examining the reference lists of papers identified through the search. Preclinical and clinical trials in adults were assessed, focusing on the OAB antimuscarinics approved in the United States. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a key role in protecting the CNS, but it is penetrable. The lipophilic tertiary amines, particularly oxybutynin, are more likely to cross the BBB than the hydrophilic quaternary amine trospium chloride, for which there are very few reports of adverse CNS effects. In fact, in 2008 the US product labels for oral oxybutynin were modified to include the potential for anticholinergic CNS events and a warning to monitor patients for adverse CNS effects. Even modest cognitive impairment in the elderly may negatively affect independence; therefore, selection of an antimuscarinic OAB drug with reduced potential for CNS effects is advisable.

  7. Silver nanoparticles induce anti-proliferative effects on airway smooth muscle cells. Role of nitric oxide and muscarinic receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Lee, Manuel A; Rosas-Hernández, Héctor; Salazar-García, Samuel; Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; González, Francisco J; Ali, Syed F; González, Carmen

    2014-01-13

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used to manufacture materials with new properties and functions. However, little is known about their toxic or beneficial effects on human health, especially in the respiratory system, where its smooth muscle (ASM) regulates the airway contractility by different mediators, such as acetylcholine (ACh) and nitric oxide (NO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AgNPs on ASM cells. Exposure to AgNPs induced ACh-independent expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at 100 μg/mL, associated with excessive production of NO. AgNPs induced the muscarinic receptor activation, since its blockage with atropine and blockage of its downstream signaling pathway inhibited the NO production. AgNPs at 10 and 100 μg/mL induced ACh-independent prolonged cytotoxicity and decreased cellular proliferation mediated by the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. However, the concentration of 100 μg/mL of AgNPs induced muscarinic receptor-independent apoptosis, suggesting the activation of multiple pathways. These data indicate that AgNPs induce prolonged cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on ASM cells, suggesting an activation of the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. Further investigation is required to understand the full mechanisms of action of AgNPs on ASM under specific biological conditions.

  8. Participation of nitric oxide signaling system in the cardiac muscarinic cholinergic effect of human chagasic IgG.

    PubMed

    Sterin-Borda, L; Leiros, C P; Goin, J C; Cremaschi, G; Genaro, A; Echagüe, A V; Borda, E

    1997-07-01

    The possible role of altered humoral immune response in the pathogenesis of the chronic chagasic cardioneuromyopathy was examined by analyzing the interaction of IgG from T. cruzi infected patients with cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR). Human chagasic IgG by activating cardiac M2 mAChR, simulated the agonist actions triggering negative inotropic effect, inositol phosphate accumulation, nitric oxide synthase stimulation and increased production of cyclic GMP. Inhibitors of phospholipase C, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin, nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase activities; prevented chagasic IgG effects on signaling pathways involved in M2 mAChR activation. In addition, sodium nitroprusside or 8-bromo cyclic GMP, mimicked the chagasic IgG effect associated with cholinergic-mediated cellular transmembrane signals. Moreover, these chagasic IgG immunoprecipitated the mAChRs solubilized from cardiac membranes. By means of SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis, chagasic sera recognized a band of 70-75 kDa. The major protein recognized by chagasic IgG had an Rf coincident with the peak of [3H] propylbenzilylcholine mustard with an apparent molecular weight similar to that of mAChRs, which disappeared in the presence of atropine. The specificity of this interaction was checked by immunoprecipitation of rat cardiac mAChR and immunoblotting of pure human M2 mAChRs. Chronic interaction of chagasic IgG with myocardial mAChRs, behaving as a muscarinic agonist, might lead to cell dysfunction or tissue damage. Also, these antibodies could produce desensitization, internalization or degradation of mAChRs; explaining the progressive blockade of mAChRs in myocardium with parasympathetic denervation, a phenomenon that has been described in the course of Chagas' cardioneuromyopathy. PMID:9236139

  9. Effects of extracellular acetylcholine on muscarinic receptor binding assessed by [125I]dexetimide and a simple probe.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Roa, P M; Wagner, H N; Villemagne, V L; London, E D; Lever, J R

    1998-10-01

    New pharmacologic approaches to enhance brain cholinergic function focus on increasing intrasynaptic acetylcholine. We examined the usefulness of a simple probe and [125I]dexetimide to evaluate in vivo the effects of extracellular acetylcholine on muscarinic receptor binding in the mouse brain. After radiotracer injection continuous time/activity curves were generated over 330 min. [125I]Dexetimide reached a plateau at 90 min post-injection. To increase extracellular acetylcholine, the anticholinesterase physostigmine was administered at 120 min, producing a reversible decrease in [125I]dexetimide specific binding (23%) for 30 min. These findings demonstrate that dynamic changes in extracellular acetylcholine can be evaluated by displacement of [125I]dexetimide binding in vivo using a simple probe system. PMID:9822886

  10. Effects of chain-length and unsaturation on affinity and selectivity at muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, R. B.; Holdup, D. W.; Harris, G.; Veale, M. A.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Lengthening the chain in diphenylacetylcholine decreases affinity for muscarinic cholinoceptors in guinea-pig ileum. Diphenylacetoxypropyldimethylamine and its quaternary trimethylammonium salt are roughly equiactive: the dimethylamine and the piperidine have some selectivity for ileum compared with atria, but are not as active nor as selective as 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP) methobromide (MeBr). With the weaker diphenylacetoxybutyl compounds the base is more active than the quaternary salt. 2. The diphenylacetoxybutyl-, cis-butenyl and trans-butenyl compounds have similar affinities. The quaternary salts are less active than the tertiary bases, but they are less selective than the butynyl analogues studied in earlier work. 3. 1,1-Diphenyl-1-hydroxy-2,4-hexadiynyl dimethylamine and its trimethylammonium salt are inactive in concentrations below 100 microM, as are the (+)-camphor-sulphonyl ester of 4-hydroxy-N-methyl piperidine and its methiodide. The (+/-)-phenylcyclopentylacetyl ester of 4-hydroxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide is more active than its cyclohexyl analogue and than 4-DAMP MeBr but it is less selective than 4-DAMP MeBr. 4. The high selectivity of p-fluoro-hexahydrosila-diphenidol is confirmed but this compound has relatively low affinity (for ileum log K = 7.8). 5. The results indicate steric constraints to binding at muscarinic receptors which could be used to check molecular modelling of the receptor based on its known amino acid sequence. The group binding the charged nitrogen is probably at the mouth of a cavity which can accommodate two large rings (as in 4-DAMP MeBr) but with a depth less than about 7 A so that the rod-like hexadiynes cannot fit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2331586

  11. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Kentaro; Kume, Hiroaki; Oguma, Tetsuya; Shigemori, Wataru; Tohda, Yuji; Ogawa, Emiko; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs) play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM), a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM)-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors. PMID:27657061

  12. Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2013-11-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Although nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA depletions or antagonism leave aspects of appetite and primary food motivation intact, rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D2 antagonists on effort-related choice, and that stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors produces behavioral effects that are similar to those induced by DA antagonism. The present review summarizes the literature on the role of NAc DA and adenosine in effort-related processes, and also presents original data on the effects of local stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in NAc core. Local injections of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine directly into NAc core produces shifts in effort-related choice behavior similar to those induced by DA antagonism or A2A receptor stimulation, decreasing lever pressing but increasing chow intake in rats responding on a concurrent fixed ratio/chow feeding choice task. In contrast, injections into a neostriatal control site dorsal to the NAc were ineffective. The actions of pilocarpine on this task were attenuated by co-administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Thus, drugs that act on DA, adenosine A2A, and muscarinic receptors regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia that can be observed in depression and other disorders.

  13. Effect of partial volume correction on muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, M; Hufnagel, A; Ziemons, K; Griessmeier, M; Sonnenberg, F; Hackländer, T; Langen, K J; Holschbach, M; Elger, C E; Müller-Gärtner, H

    1997-09-01

    Animal experiments and preliminary results in humans have indicated alterations of hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy often present with a reduction in hippocampal volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hippocampal atrophy on the quantification of mAChR with single photon emission tomography (SPET) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Cerebral uptake of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist [123I]4-iododexetimide (IDex) was investigated by SPET in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy of unilateral (n=6) or predominantly unilateral (n=1) onset. Regions of interest were drawn on co-registered magnetic resonance images. Hippocampal volume was determined in these regions and was used to correct the SPET results for partial volume effects. A ratio of hippocampal IDex binding on the affected side to that on the unaffected side was used to detect changes in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density. Before partial volume correction a decrease in hippocampal IDex binding on the focus side was found in each patient. After partial volume no convincing differences remained. Our results indicate that the reduction in hippocampal IDex binding in patients with epilepsy is due to a decrease in hippocampal volume rather than to a decrease in receptor concentration. PMID:9283110

  14. Allosteric Effects of Sodium Ion Binding on Activation of the M3 Muscarinic G-Protein-Coupled Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Caliman, Alisha D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important membrane proteins that mediate cellular signaling and represent primary targets for about one-third of currently marketed drugs. Recent x-ray crystallographic studies identified distinct conformations of GPCRs in the active and inactive states. An allosteric sodium ion was found bound to a highly conserved D2.50 residue in inactive GPCRs, whereas the D2.50 allosteric pocket became collapsed in active GPCR structures. However, the dynamic mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to understand the mechanistic effects of sodium ion binding on dynamic activation of the M3 muscarinic GPCR through long-timescale accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations. Results showed that with the D2.50 residue deprotonated, the M3 receptor is bound by an allosteric sodium ion and confined mostly in the inactive state with remarkably reduced flexibility. In contrast, the D2.50-protonated receptor does not exhibit sodium ion binding to the D2.50 allosteric site and samples a significantly larger conformational space. The receptor activation is captured and characterized by large-scale structural rearrangements of the transmembrane helices via dynamic hydrogen bond and salt bridge interactions. The residue motions are highly correlated during receptor activation. Further network analysis revealed that the allosteric signaling between residue D2.50 and key residues in the intracellular, extracellular, and orthosteric pockets is significantly weakened upon sodium ion binding. PMID:25863070

  15. Type 3 Muscarinic Receptors Contribute to Clearance of Citrobacter rodentium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor exerts anti-inflammatory effects on immune cells, the role of muscarinic receptors in mucosal homeostasis, response to enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function is undefined. The contribution of type 3 muscarinic receptor (M3R) to mucosal homeo...

  16. Muscarinic Ca2+ responses resistant to muscarinic antagonists at perisynaptic Schwann cells of the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Robitaille, R; Jahromi, B S; Charlton, M P

    1997-01-01

    1. Acetylcholine causes a rise of intracellular Ca2+ in perisynaptic Schwann cells (PSCs) of the frog neuromuscular junction. The signalling pathway was characterized using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and fluorescence microscopy. 2. Nicotinic antagonists had no effect on Ca2+ responses evoked by ACh and no Ca2+ responses were evoked with the nicotinic agonist nicotine. The muscarinic agonists muscarine and oxotremorine-M induced Ca2+ signals in PSCs. 3. Ca2+ responses remained unchanged when extracellular Ca2+ was removed, indicating that they are due to the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Incubation with pertussis toxin did not alter the Ca2+ signals induced by muscarine, but did block depression of transmitter release induced by adenosine and prevented Ca2+ responses in PSCs induced by adenosine. 4. The general muscarinic antagonists atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate and N-methyl-scopolamine failed to block Ca2+ responses to muscarinic agonists. Atropine (at 20,000-fold excess concentration) also failed to reduce the proportion of cells responding to a threshold muscarine concentration sufficient to cause responses in less than 50% of cells. Only the allosteric, non-specific blocker, gallamine (1-10 microM) was effective in blocking muscarine-induced Ca2+ responses. 5. In preparations denervated 7 days prior to experiments, low concentrations of atropine reversibly and completely blocked Ca2+ responses to muscarine. 6. The lack of blockade by general muscarinic antagonists in innervated, in situ preparations suggests that muscarinic Ca2+ responses at PSCs are not mediated by any of the five known muscarinic receptors or that post-translational modification prevented antagonist binding. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9365908

  17. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  18. Immunochemical studies of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    André, C; Marullo, S; Guillet, J G; Convents, A; Lauwereys, M; Kaveri, S; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1987-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors have been purified from calf forebrain plasma cell membranes by affinity chromatography on a dexetimide-agarose gel. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a single 70 kDa band. Monoclonal antibodies have been prepared against these affinity purified 70 kDa protein(s). One antibody, M-35, immunoprecipitated up to 80% of digitonin-solubilized muscarinic receptors. M-35 had agonist-like effects on guinea-pig myometrium: it increased the intracellular cyclic GMP content, decreased prostaglandin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and caused muscle contractions. The two first effects were inhibited by atropine. M-35 was used to visualize muscarinic receptors at the surface of human fibroblastic cells. In the particular cell line used, the receptors have a low affinity for pirenzepine, were negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and mediated increase in the phosphatidyl-inositol breakdown. PMID:3040987

  19. Role of muscarinic-3 receptor antibody in systemic sclerosis: correlation with disease duration and effects of IVIG.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Singh, Jagmohan; Kedika, Ramalinga; Mendoza, Fabian; Jimenez, Sergio A; Blomain, Erik S; DiMarino, Anthony J; Cohen, Sidney; Rattan, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility in systemic sclerosis (SSc) is associated with autoantibodies against muscarinic-3 receptor (M3-R). We investigated the temporal course of the site of action of these autoantibodies at the myenteric neurons (MN) vs. the smooth muscle (SM) M3-R in relation to disease duration, and determined the role of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in reversing these changes. Immunoglobulins purified from SSc patients (SScIgG) were used to assess their differential binding to MN and SM (from rat colon) employing immunohistochemistry (IHC). Effect of SScIgG on neural and direct muscle contraction was determined by cholinergic nerve stimulation and bethanechol-induced SM contraction. Effects of IVIG and its antigen-binding fragment F(ab')2 on SScIgG binding were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of rat colonic longitudinal SM myenteric plexus (LSMMP) lysate and to second extracellular loop peptide of M3-R (M3-RL2). SScIgG from all patients demonstrated significantly higher binding to MN than to SM. With progression of SSc duration, binding at MN and SM increased in a linear fashion with a correlation coefficient of 0.696 and 0.726, respectively (P < 0.05). SScIgG-mediated attenuation of neural and direct SM contraction also increased with disease duration. ELISA analysis revealed that IVIG and F(ab')2 significantly reduced SScIgG binding to LSMMP lysate and M3-RL2. Dysmotility in SSc occurs sequentially, beginning with SScIgG-induced blockage of cholinergic neurotransmission (neuropathy), which progresses to inhibition of acetylcholine action at the SM cell (myopathy). IVIG reverses this cholinergic dysfunction at the neural and myogenic receptors by anti-idiotypic neutralization of SScIgG.

  20. Differential effects of muscarinic receptor blockade in prelimbic cortex on acquisition and memory formation of an odor-reward task

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Márquez, Anna; Vale-Martínez, Anna; Guillazo-Blanch, Gemma; Torras-Garcia, Meritxell; Boix-Trelis, Núria; Martí-Nicolovius, Margarita

    2007-01-01

    The present experiments determined the consequences of blocking muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the prelimbic (PL) cortex in the acquisition and retention of an odor-reward associative task. Rats underwent a training test (five trials) and a 24-h retention test (two retention trials and two relearning trials). In the first experiment, rats were bilaterally infused with scopolamine (20 or 5 μg/site) prior to training. Although scopolamine rats showed acquisition equivalent to PBS-injected controls, they exhibited weakened performance in the 24-h retention test measured by number of errors. In the second experiment, rats were injected with scopolamine (20 μg/site) immediately or 1 h after training and tested 24 h later. Scopolamine rats injected immediately showed severe amnesia detected in two performance measures (errors and latencies), demonstrating deficits in retention and relearning, whereas those injected 1 h later showed good 24-h test performance, similar to controls. These results suggest that muscarinic transmission in the PL cortex is essential for early memory formation, but not for acquisition, of a rapidly learned odor discrimination task. Findings corroborate the role of acetylcholine in consolidation processes and the participation of muscarinic receptors in olfactory associative tasks. PMID:17848501

  1. The effects of sigma (σ1) receptor-selective ligands on muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Maninder; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Sumien, Nathalie; Su, Chang; Singh, Meharvan; Chen, Zhenglan; Huang, Ren-Qi; Meunier, Johann; Maurice, Tangui; Mach, Robert H; Luedtke, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury and stroke often involve alterations in cholinergic signalling. Currently available therapeutic drugs provide only symptomatic relief. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to retard and/or arrest the progressive loss of memory. Experimental Approach Scopolamine-induced memory impairment provides a rapid and reversible phenotypic screening paradigm for cognition enhancement drug discovery. Male C57BL/6J mice given scopolamine (1 mg·kg−1) were used to evaluate the ability of LS-1–137, a novel sigma (σ1) receptor-selective agonist, to improve the cognitive deficits associated with muscarinic antagonist administration. Key Results LS-1–137 is a high-affinity (Ki = 3.2 nM) σ1 receptor agonist that is 80-fold selective for σ1, compared with σ2 receptors. LS-1–137 binds with low affinity at D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) dopamine and muscarinic receptors. LS-1–137 was found to partially reverse the learning deficits associated with scopolamine administration using a water maze test and an active avoidance task. LS-1–137 treatment was also found to trigger the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from rat astrocytes. Conclusions and Implications The σ1 receptor-selective compound LS-1–137 may represent a novel candidate cognitive enhancer for the treatment of muscarinic receptor-dependent cognitive deficits. PMID:25573298

  2. Muscarinic presynaptic modulation in GABAergic pallidal synapses of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Aceves, José J; Rueda-Orozco, Pavel E; Hernández-Flores, Teresa; Hernández-González, Omar; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2015-02-01

    The external globus pallidus (GPe) is central for basal ganglia processing. It expresses muscarinic cholinergic receptors and receives cholinergic afferents from the pedunculopontine nuclei (PPN) and other regions. The role of these receptors and afferents is unknown. Muscarinic M1-type receptors are expressed by synapses from striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Because axons from SPNs project to the GPe, one hypothesis is that striatopallidal GABAergic terminals may be modulated by M1 receptors. Alternatively, some M1 receptors may be postsynaptic in some pallidal neurons. Evidence of muscarinic modulation in any of these elements would suggest that cholinergic afferents from the PPN, or other sources, could modulate the function of the GPe. In this study, we show this evidence using striatopallidal slice preparations: after field stimulation in the striatum, the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine significantly reduced the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) from synapses that exhibited short-term synaptic facilitation. This inhibition was associated with significant increases in paired-pulse facilitation, and quantal content was proportional to IPSC amplitude. These actions were blocked by atropine, pirenzepine, and mamba toxin-7, suggesting that receptors involved were M1. In addition, we found that some pallidal neurons have functional postsynaptic M1 receptors. Moreover, some evoked IPSCs exhibited short-term depression and a different kind of modulation: they were indirectly modulated by muscarine via the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Thus pallidal synapses presenting distinct forms of short-term plasticity were modulated differently. PMID:25392165

  3. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  4. Effects of temperature and ethanol on agonist and antagonist binding to rat heart muscarinic receptors in the absence and presence of GTP.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Robberecht, P; Chatelain, P; De Neef, P; Christophe, J

    1985-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the binding of four agonists and three antagonists to rat heart muscarinic receptors was studied in the absence and presence of GTP. The binding of agonists to two states (or classes) of receptors, in the absence of GTP, led to enthalpy and entropy changes that decreased sharply above 25 degrees C, suggesting that agonists induced 'isomerization' reactions (large conformational changes and/or receptor-effector association). Both temperature increase and ethanol decreased hydrophobic interactions, thereby hindering binding and/or agonist-induced 'isomerization' reactions. Addition of GTP to the incubation medium also appeared to reverse (or prevent) 'isomerization' reactions. For agonist binding to the low-affinity state, in the presence of GTP, and for antagonist binding, the thermodynamic parameters observed could be readily explained by simple receptor-ligand associations; large entropy increases and small enthalpy increases, provoked by hydrophobic and ionic interactions, were partly neutralized by entropy and enthalpy decreases, due to hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The muscarinic antagonists used (atropine, n-methylscopolamine and dexetimide), being more hydrophobic molecules than the agonists tested (carbamylcholine, oxotremorine and pilocarpine), induced larger entropy changes or more negative enthalpy changes. PMID:4062907

  5. Central cholinergic control of vasopressin release in conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iitake, K.; Share, L.; Ouchi, Y.; Crofton, J.T.; Brooks, D.P.

    1986-08-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of carbachol into conscious rats evoked a substantial increase in vasopressin secretion and blood pressure in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the muscarinic blocker, atropine (10 g icv), but not by the nicotinic blocker, hexamethonium (10 g icv). Hexamethonium did, however, block the increase in blood pressure, the decrease in heart rate, and they very small elevation in the plasma vasopressin concentration induced by nicotine (10 g icv). These results indicate that stimulation of either central nicotinic or muscarinic receptors can affect the cardiovascular system and suggest that the cholinergic stimulation of vasopressin secretion may involve primarily muscarinic receptors in the conscious rat.

  6. Modulation of neuritogenesis by astrocyte muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, Marina; Moore, Nadia H; Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G

    2008-11-14

    Astrocytes have been shown to release factors that have promoting or inhibiting effects on neuronal development. However, mechanisms controlling the release of such factors from astrocytes are not well established. Astrocytes express muscarinic receptors whose activation stimulates a robust intracellular signaling, although the role of these receptors in glial cells is not well understood. Acetylcholine and acetylcholine receptors are present in the brain before synaptogenesis occurs and are believed to be involved in neuronal maturation. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether stimulation of muscarinic receptors in astrocytes would modulate neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. Rat hippocampal neurons, co-cultured with rat cortical astrocytes previously exposed to the cholinergic agonist carbachol, displayed longer neurites. The effect of carbachol in astrocytes was due to the activation of M3 muscarinic receptors. Exposure of astrocytes to carbachol increased the expression of the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin-1 in these cells. This effect was mediated in part by an increase in laminin-1 and fibronectin mRNA levels and in part by the up-regulation of the production and release of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, an inhibitor of the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix. The inhibition of fibronectin activity strongly reduced the effect of carbachol on the elongation of all the neurites, whereas inhibition of laminin-1 activity reduced the elongation of minor neurites only. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 also induced neurite elongation through a direct effect on neurons. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cholinergic muscarinic stimulation of astrocytes induces the release of permissive factors that accelerate neuronal development.

  7. Expression of muscarinic acetylcholine and dopamine receptor mRNAs in rat basal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, D.M. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Bethesda, MD ); Levey, A.I. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD ); Brann, M.R. )

    1990-09-01

    Within the basal ganglia, acetylcholine and dopamine play a central role in the extrapyramidal control of motor function. The physiologic effects of these neurotransmitters are mediated by a diversity of receptor subtypes, several of which have now been cloned. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are encoded by five genes (m1-m5), and of the two known dopamine receptor subtypes (D1 and D2) the D2 receptor gene has been characterized. To gain insight into the physiological roles of each of these receptor subtypes, the authors prepared oligodeoxynucleotide probes to localize receptor subtype mRNAs within the rat striatum and substantia nigra by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Within the striatum, three muscarinic (m1, m2, m4) receptor mRNAs and the D2 receptor mRNA were detected. The m1 mRNA was expressed in most neurons; the m2 mRNA, in neurons which were both very large and rare; and the m4 and D2 mRNAs, in 40-50% of the neurons, one-third of which express both mRNAs. Within the substantia nigra, pars compacta, only the m5 and D2 mRNAs were detected, and most neurons expressed both mRNAs. These data provide anatomical evidence for the identity of the receptor subtypes which mediate the diverse effects of muscarinic and dopaminergic drugs on basal ganglia function.

  8. Homology modeling of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Trayder; McLean, Kimberley C; McRobb, Fiona M; Manallack, David T; Chalmers, David K; Yuriev, Elizabeth

    2014-01-27

    We have developed homology models of the acetylcholine muscarinic receptors M₁R-M₅R, based on the β₂-adrenergic receptor crystal as the template. This is the first report of homology modeling of all five subtypes of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors with binding sites optimized for ligand binding. The models were evaluated for their ability to discriminate between muscarinic antagonists and decoy compounds using virtual screening using enrichment factors, area under the ROC curve (AUC), and an early enrichment measure, LogAUC. The models produce rational binding modes of docked ligands as well as good enrichment capacity when tested against property-matched decoy libraries, which demonstrates their unbiased predictive ability. To test the relative effects of homology model template selection and the binding site optimization procedure, we generated and evaluated a naïve M₂R model, using the M₃R crystal structure as a template. Our results confirm previous findings that binding site optimization using ligand(s) active at a particular receptor, i.e. including functional knowledge into the model building process, has a more pronounced effect on model quality than target-template sequence similarity. The optimized M₁R-M₅R homology models are made available as part of the Supporting Information to allow researchers to use these structures, compare them to their own results, and thus advance the development of better modeling approaches.

  9. IN VITRO EFFECTS OF CHLORPYRIFOS, PARATHION, METHYL PARATHION AND THEIR OXONS ON CARDIAC MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR BINDING IN NEONATAL AND ADULT RATS. (R825811)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organophosphorus insecticides elicit toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase. Young animals are generally more sensitive than adults to these toxicants. A number of studies reported that some organophosphorus agents also bind directly to muscarinic receptors, in particular...

  10. Involvement of spinal muscarinic and serotonergic receptors in the anti-allodynic effect of electroacupuncture in rats with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Go, Donghyun; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Giseog; Bae, Hyojeong; Quan, Fu Shi

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether the spinal cholinergic and serotonergic analgesic systems mediate the relieving effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic cold allodynia in rats. The cold allodynia induced by an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated by immersing the rat's tail into cold water (4℃) and measuring the withdrawal latency. EA stimulation (2 Hz, 0.3-ms pulse duration, 0.2~0.3 mA) at the acupoint ST36, GV3, or LI11 all showed a significant anti-allodynic effect, which was stronger at ST36. The analgesic effect of EA at ST36 was blocked by intraperitoneal injection of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist (atropine, 1 mg/kg), but not by nicotinic (mecamylamine, 2 mg/kg) receptor antagonist. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of M2 (methoctramine, 10 µg) and M3 (4-DAMP, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, but not M1 (pirenzepine, 10 µg) receptor antagonist, blocked the effect. Also, spinal administration of 5-HT3 (MDL-72222, 12 µg) receptor antagonist, but not 5-HT1A (NAN-190, 15 µg) or 5-HT2A (ketanserin, 30 µg) receptor antagonist, prevented the anti-allodynic effect of EA. These results suggest that EA may have a signifi cant analgesic action against oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain, which is mediated by spinal cholinergic (M2, M3) and serotonergic (5-HT3) receptors. PMID:27382357

  11. Central effects of fingolimod.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Vítor T; Fonseca, Joaquim

    2014-08-01

    Introduccion. El fingolimod, un modulador del receptor de la esfingosina-1-fosfato (S1P) dotado de un mecanismo de accion novedoso, fue el primer tratamiento oral aprobado para la esclerosis multiple remitente recurrente. Su union a los receptores S1P1 de los linfocitos promueve la retencion selectiva de los linfocitos T virgenes y de memoria central en los tejidos linfoides secundarios, lo que impide su salida hacia el sistema nervioso central (SNC). Asimismo, el fingolimod atraviesa con facilidad la barrera hematoencefalica, y diversos estudios le atribuyen un efecto neuroprotector directo en el SNC. Objetivo. Revisar la informacion disponible acerca de los efectos centrales del fingolimod. Desarrollo. El desequilibrio entre los procesos lesivos y reparadores constituye un reflejo de la desmielinizacion cronica, la degeneracion axonal y la gliosis, y parece contribuir a la discapacidad que la esclerosis multiple acarrea. La facilidad con la que el fingolimod atraviesa la barrera hematoencefalica le permite actuar directamente sobre los receptores S1P localizados en las celulas del SNC. Una vez en el interior del SNC, ocupa los receptores S1P de los oligodendrocitos y de sus celulas precursoras, de los astrocitos, los microgliocitos y las neuronas, fomentando la remielinizacion, la neuroproteccion y los procesos endogenos de regeneracion. La eficacia evidenciada en los ensayos clinicos concuerda con un mecanismo de accion que incluiria efectos directos sobre las celulas del SNC. Conclusiones. Los datos disponibles indican que la eficacia del fingolimod en el tratamiento de la esclerosis multiple se debe a su ambivalencia como molecula inmunomoduladora y moduladora directa de los receptores S1P del SNC. Tanto es asi que estudios recientes le atribuyen efectos neuroprotectores en varios modelos que suscitan expectativas en torno a su posible aplicacion terapeutica en la enfermedad de Alzheimer, el paludismo cerebral y el neuroblastoma, asi como en la neuroproteccion

  12. Unexpected antipsychotic-like activity with the muscarinic receptor ligand (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane .

    PubMed

    Bymaster, F P; Shannon, H E; Rasmussen, K; Delapp, N W; Mitch, C H; Ward, J S; Calligaro, D O; Ludvigsen, T S; Sheardown, M J; Olesen, P H; Swedberg, M D; Sauerberg, P; Fink-Jensen, A

    1998-09-01

    (5R,6R)6-(3-propylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3 .2.1]octane (PTAC) is a potent muscarinic receptor ligand with high affinity for central muscarinic receptors and no or substantially less affinity for a large number of other receptors or binding sites including dopamine receptors. The ligand exhibits partial agonist effects at muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors and antagonist effects at muscarinic M1, M3 and M5 receptors. PTAC inhibited conditioned avoidance responding, dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior and D-amphetamine-induced FOS protein M5 expression in the nucleus accumbens without inducing catalepsy, tremor or salivation at pharmacologically relevant doses. The effect of PTAC on conditioned avoidance responding and dopamine receptor agonist-induced behavior was antagonized by the acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. The compound selectively inhibited dopamine cell firing (acute administration) as well as the number of spontaneously active dopamine cells (chronic administration) in the limbic ventral tegmental area (A10) relative to the non-limbic substantia nigra, pars compacta (A9). The results demonstrate that PTAC exhibits functional dopamine receptor antagonism despite its lack of affinity for the dopamine receptors and indicate that muscarinic receptor partial agonists may be an important new approach in the medical treatment of schizophrenia.

  13. Differential Effects of the Gβ5-RGS7 Complex on Muscarinic M3 Receptor–Induced Ca2+ Influx and Release

    PubMed Central

    Karpinsky-Semper, Darla; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Brothers, Shaun P.

    2014-01-01

    The G protein β subunit Gβ5 uniquely forms heterodimers with R7 family regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins (RGS6, RGS7, RGS9, and RGS11) instead of Gγ. Although the Gβ5-RGS7 complex attenuates Ca2+ signaling mediated by the muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R), the route of Ca2+ entry (i.e., release from intracellular stores and/or influx across the plasma membrane) is unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to suppressing carbachol-stimulated Ca2+ release, Gβ5-RGS7 enhanced Ca2+ influx. This novel effect of Gβ5-RGS7 was blocked by nifedipine and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate. Experiments with pertussis toxin, an RGS domain–deficient mutant of RGS7, and UBO-QIC {L-threonine,(3R)-N-acetyl-3-hydroxy-L-leucyl-(aR)-a-hydroxybenzenepropanoyl-2,3-idehydro-N-methylalanyl-L-alanyl-N-methyl-L-alanyl-(3R)-3-[[(2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-4- methyl-1-oxo-2-[(1-oxopropyl)amino]pentyl]oxy]-L-leucyl-N,O-dimethyl-,(7→1)-lactone (9CI)}, a novel inhibitor of Gq, showed that Gβ5-RGS7 modulated a Gq-mediated pathway. These studies indicate that Gβ5-RGS7, independent of RGS7 GTPase-accelerating protein activity, couples M3R to a nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ channel. We also compared the action of Gβ5-RGS7 on M3R-induced Ca2+ influx and release elicited by different muscarinic agonists. Responses to Oxo-M [oxotremorine methiodide N,N,N,-trimethyl-4-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)-2-butyn-1-ammonium iodide] were insensitive to Gβ5-RGS7. Pilocarpine responses consisted of a large release and modest influx components, of which the former was strongly inhibited whereas the latter was insensitive to Gβ5-RGS7. McN-A-343 [(4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride] was the only compound whose total Ca2+ response was enhanced by Gβ5-RGS7, attributed to, in part, by the relatively small Ca2+ release this partial agonist stimulated. Together, these results show that distinct agonists not only have differential M3R functional selectivity, but also confer specific

  14. Cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    van Megen, Y J; Klaassen, A B; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; Kuijpers, W

    1988-11-22

    Specific 3H-1-quinuclidinylbenzilate (3H-1-QNB) binding to rat cochlea homogenates occurs to a homogeneous class of binding sites with Kd = 0.13 +/- 0.01 nM and Bmax = 0.57 +/- 0.07 fmol per cochlea. Binding is stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Dexetimide was more effective than levetimide in displacing 3H-1-QNB from its binding sites (Ki = 4 x 10(-10) M and 6.5 x 10(-6) M, respectively). Pirenzepine inhibits 3H-1-QNB binding with low affinity (Ki = 2 x 10(-6) M), classifying the binding sites as muscarinic M2 receptors. PMID:3214711

  15. Muscarinic receptor immunoreactivity in the superior salivatory nucleus neurons innervating the salivary glands of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hirotaka; Mitoh, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Masako; Kobashi, Motoi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Sugimoto, Tomosada; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Ryuji

    2011-07-15

    The superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) contains preganglionic parasympathetic neurons to the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands. Cevimeline, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, stimulates the salivary glands and is presently used as sialogogue in the treatment of dry mouth. Since cevimeline passes through the blood-brain barrier, it is also able to act on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. Our preliminary experiment using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique has shown that cevimeline excites SSN neurons in rat brain slices, suggesting that SSN neurons have muscarinic acetylcholine receptors; however, it is unclear which subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in SSN neurons. In the present study, we investigated immunohistochemically muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes, M1 receptor (M1R), M2R, M3R, M4R, and M5R in SSN neurons. SSN neurons innervating the salivary glands, retrogradely labeled with a fluorescent tracer from the chorda-lingual nerve, mostly expressed M3R immunoreactivity (-ir) (92.3%) but not M1R-ir. About half of such SSN neurons also showed M2R- (40.1%), M4R- (54.0%) and M5R-ir (46.0%); therefore, it is probable that SSN neurons co-express M3R-ir with at least two of the other muscarinic receptor subtypes. This is the first report to show that SSN neurons contain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

  16. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  17. General pharmacological profile of the novel muscarinic receptor agonist SNI-2011, a drug for xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. 2nd communication: effects on somatic nervous system and on autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Arisawa, Hirohiko; Fukui, Kenji; Fujise, Nobuaki; Masunaga, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    A novel muscarinic receptor agonist SNI-2011 ((+/-)-cis-2-methylspirol[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] monohydrochloride hemihydrate, cevimeline, CAS 153504-70-2), is a candidate therapeutic drug for xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. The general pharmacological properties of this drug on the somatic nervous system and on the autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle were investigated in mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits and cats. 1. Somatic nervous system: SNI-2011 had no effect on the neuromuscular junction in rats and no muscle relaxant effect in mice. No surface anesthetic effect was observed in guinea pigs, but infiltration anesthetic effect was found after intracutaneous injection of solution (1% or higher). 2. Autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle: SNI-2011 tended to cause mydriasis at 3 mg/kg i.v. or higher in rabbits and dose-dependently caused mydriasis at 10 mg/kg p.o. or higher in rats. Mydriasis in rats was also observed by ophthalmic instillation, caused via the peripheral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. SNI-2011 elevated the base line tension of nictitating membrane in cats when it was injected intravenously at 3 mg/kg or higher. In the smooth muscle, SNI-2011 increased the spontaneous movement of isolated rabbit ileum (1 x 10(-6) mol/l or higher), contractions of isolated guinea pig ileum (1 x 10(-6) mol/l or higher) and isolated guinea pig trachea (3 x 10(-6) mol/l or higher). SNI-2011 relaxed the histamine- and noradrenaline-induced contractions of isolated guinea pig aorta and augmented noradrenaline- and phenylephrine-induced contractions of isolated rat vas deferens. These effects were induced by relatively higher concentrations only i.e. 1 x 10(-5) mol/l or higher. From these results, SNI-2011 has muscarinic side effects on the somatic nervous system and on the autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle, however, in the case of oral administration, that is clinical administration route, SNI-2011 caused no muscarinic side effect at

  18. The effect of deficient muscarinic signaling on commonly reported biochemical effects in schizophrenia and convergence with genetic susceptibility loci in explaining symptom dimensions of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Vakalopoulos, Costa

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of DSM 5 criticism has generally centered on a lack of biological validity of the diagnostic criteria. Part of the problem in describing a nosology of psychosis is the tacit assumption of multiple genetic causes each with an incremental loading on the clinical picture that fails to differentiate a clear underlying pathophysiology of high impact. The aim of this paper is to consolidate a primary theory of deficient muscarinic signaling underlying key clinical features of schizophrenia and its regulation by several important genetic associations including neuregulin, DISC and dysbindin. Secondary reductions in markers for GABAergic function and changes in the levels of interneuron calcium binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin can be attributed to dysfunctional muscarinic transduction. A parallel association exists for cytokine production. The convergent pathway hypothesis is likewise used to model dopaminergic and glutamatergic theories of schizophrenia. The negative symptom dimension is correlated with dysfunction of Akt and ERK transduction, a major point of convergence. The present paradigm predicts the importance of a recent finding of a deletion in a copy number variant of PLCB1 and its potential use if replicated, as one of the first testable biological markers differentiating schizophrenia from bipolar disorder and further subtyping of schizophrenia into deficit and non-deficit. Potential limitations of PLCB1 as a prospective marker are also discussed. PMID:25566074

  19. The Role of Muscarinic Receptors in the Pathophysiology of Mood Disorders: A Potential Novel Treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Won Je; Dean, Brian; Scarr, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The central cholinergic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. An imbalance in central cholinergic neurotransmitter activity has been proposed to contribute to the manic and depressive episodes typical of these disorders. Neuropharmacological studies into the effects of cholinergic agonists and antagonists on mood state have provided considerable support for this hypothesis. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have shown that the pan-CHRM antagonist, scopolamine, produces rapid-acting antidepressant effects in individuals with either major depressive disorder (MDD) or bipolar disorder (BPD), such as bipolar depression, contrasting the delayed therapeutic response of conventional mood stabilisers and antidepressants. This review presents recent data from neuroimaging, post-mortem and genetic studies supporting the involvement of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (CHRMs), particularly CHRM2, in the pathophysiology of MDD and BPD. Thus, novel drugs that selectively target CHRMs with negligible effects in the peripheral nervous system might produce more rapid and robust clinical improvement in patients with BPD and MDD. PMID:26630954

  20. Acetylcholine as a mitogen: muscarinic receptor-mediated proliferation of rat astrocytes and human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, M; Costa, P; Peters, J; Costa, L G

    1996-02-22

    The mitogenic effect of muscarinic receptor agonists in glial cells has been characterized in rat cortical astrocytes and human 132 1N1 astrocytoma cells. The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in proliferation, as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. The mitogenic effect was mimicked by several muscarinic, but not nicotinic receptor agonists, and was blocked by muscarinic receptor antagonists. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments indicated the presence of m2, m3 and to a lesser degree, m5 muscarinic receptor mRNA in both astrocytes and astrocytoma cells. Proliferation experiments with subtype-specific muscarinic receptor antagonists suggest that carbachol-induced proliferation is due to activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. The phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) also stimulated glial cell proliferation. Down-regulation of protein kinase C, or the protein kinase C antagonist 1,5-(isoquinolynsulfanyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7) blocked proliferation induced by either TPA or carbachol. Of other neurotransmitters tested, histamine caused glial cell proliferation, norepinephrine and gamma-aminobutyric acid were ineffective, while serotonin and glutamate inhibited basal or serum-stimulated proliferation. PMID:8666059

  1. Enhanced muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression in the corpus striatum of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gireesh, G; Kumar, T Peeyush; Mathew, Jobin; Paulose, CS

    2009-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), the first neurotransmitter to be identified, regulate the activities of central and peripheral functions through interactions with muscarinic receptors. Changes in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of many major diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Previous reports from our laboratory on streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats showed down regulation of muscarinic M1 receptors in the brainstem, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and pancreatic islets. In this study, we have investigated the changes of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) enzyme activity, total muscarinic and muscarinic M1 receptor binding and gene expression in the corpus striatum of STZ – diabetic rats and the insulin treated diabetic rats. The striatum, a neuronal nucleus intimately involved in motor behaviour, is one of the brain regions with the highest acetylcholine content. ACh has complex and clinically important actions in the striatum that are mediated predominantly by muscarinic receptors. We observed that insulin treatment brought back the decreased maximal velocity (Vmax) of acetylcholine esterase in the corpus striatum during diabetes to near control state. In diabetic rats there was a decrease in maximal number (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) of total muscarinic receptors whereas muscarinic M1 receptors were increased with decrease in affinity in diabetic rats. We observed that, in all cases, the binding parameters were reversed to near control by the treatment of diabetic rats with insulin. Real-time PCR experiment confirmed the increase in muscarinic M1 receptor gene expression and a similar reversal with insulin treatment. These results suggest the diabetes-induced changes of the cholinergic activity in the corpus striatum and the regulatory role of insulin on binding parameters and gene expression of total and muscarinic M1 receptors. PMID:19344500

  2. Facilitation of memory storage by the acetylcholine M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist AF-DX 116.

    PubMed

    Baratti, C M; Opezzo, J W; Kopf, S R

    1993-07-01

    Post-training administration of the acetylcholine muscarinic M2 presynaptic receptor antagonist AF-DX 116 (0.1-10.0 mg/kg, ip), facilitated 48 h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. AF-DX 116 did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The influence of AF-DX 116 (1 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by AF-DX 116 (1 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to AF-DX 116 treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training AF-DX 116 on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.1 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of AF-DX 116 (0.1 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the activation of a muscarinic cholinergic presynaptic inhibitory mechanism, probably by increasing brain acetylcholine release, may modulate the activity of post-training processes involved in memory storage. PMID:8216161

  3. Facilitation of memory storage by the acetylcholine M2 muscarinic receptor antagonist AF-DX 116.

    PubMed

    Baratti, C M; Opezzo, J W; Kopf, S R

    1993-07-01

    Post-training administration of the acetylcholine muscarinic M2 presynaptic receptor antagonist AF-DX 116 (0.1-10.0 mg/kg, ip), facilitated 48 h retention, in male Swiss mice, of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task. The dose-response curve was an inverted U. AF-DX 116 did not increase the retention latencies of mice that had not received a footshock during training. The influence of AF-DX 116 (1 mg/kg, ip) on retention was time-dependent, which suggests that the drug facilitated memory storage. The memory facilitation induced by AF-DX 116 (1 mg/kg, ip) was prevented by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip) administered after training, but 10 min prior to AF-DX 116 treatment. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, ip), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, ip) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, ip), two cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonists, prevented the effects of post-training AF-DX 116 on retention. Low subeffective doses of the central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip), administered immediately after training, and AF-DX 116 (0.1 mg/kg, ip), given 10 min after training, acted synergistically to improve retention. The effects of AF-DX 116 (0.1 mg/kg, ip) were not influenced by the peripherally acting anticholinesterase neostigmine (35 micrograms/kg, ip). Considered together, these findings suggest that the activation of a muscarinic cholinergic presynaptic inhibitory mechanism, probably by increasing brain acetylcholine release, may modulate the activity of post-training processes involved in memory storage.

  4. Novel alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridine muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shannon, H E; Bymaster, F P; Hendrix, J C; Quimby, S J; Mitch, C H

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to compare a novel series of alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridines (A-OXTPs) as muscarinic receptor antagonists. The affinity of these compounds for muscarinic receptors was determined by inhibition of [3H]pirenzepine to M1 receptors in hippocampus, [3H]QNB to M2 receptors in brainstem, and [3H]oxotremorine-M to high affinity muscarinic agonist binding sites in cortex. All of the compounds had higher affinity for [3H]pirenzepine than for [3H]QNB or [3H]oxotremorine-M labeled receptors, consistent with an interpretation that they are relatively selective M1 receptor antagonists, although none were as selective as pirenzepine. In addition, dose-response curves were determined for antagonism of oxotremorine-induced salivation (mediated by M3 receptors) and tremor (mediated by non-M1 receptors) in mice. In general, the A-OXTPs were equipotent and equieffective in antagonizing both salivation and tremor, although there were modest differences for some compounds. Dose-response curves also were determined on behavior maintained under a spatial-alternation schedule of food presentation in rats as a measure of effects on working memory. The A-OXTPs produced dose-related decreases in percent correct responding at doses three- to ten-fold lower than those which decreased rates of responding. However, only one compound, MB-OXTP, produced effects on percent correct responding consistent with a selective effect on memory as opposed to non-memory variables. The present results provide evidence that these alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridines are a novel series of modestly M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists, and that one member of the series, MB-OXTP, appears to be more selective in its effects on memory than previously studies muscarinic antagonists. PMID:7753969

  5. Muscarine-like compounds derived from a pyrolysis product of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Defant, Andrea; Mancini, Ines; Matucci, Rosanna; Bellucci, Cristina; Dosi, Federico; Malferrari, Danilo; Fabbri, Daniele

    2015-06-14

    Cellulose represents a key component of a renewable biomass source, from which chiral compounds with a high added value in the application for the synthesis of potentially bioactive molecules can be obtained. The anhydrosugar (1R,5S)-1-hydroxy-3,6-dioxa-bicyclo[3.2.1]octan-2-one (LAC), produced on the gram-scale by catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose, was used as a building block in the synthesis of five new enantiomerically pure muscarine-like products. The structures of the target compounds 4-8 showed different substituents at the C-2 and C-4 positions, but each of them had the same (2S,4R) configuration as the natural (+)-muscarine. A renewed interest in new muscarinic analogues is due to the design and synthesis of molecules exhibiting a higher selectivity for a specific muscarinic receptor and due to the development of effective agents in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders. In this context, products 4-8 were investigated with respect to their binding affinity to human M1-M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. The data indicated that compound 8, emerging as the most active in the series with values comparable to natural (+)-muscarine and a moderate selectivity in favor of the hM2 subtype receptor, also exhibited the highest stability during the interaction with the hM2 (3UON) subtype muscarinic receptor by using a docking calculation.

  6. General pharmacological profile of the novel muscarinic receptor agonist SNI-2011, a drug for xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. 4th communication: Effects on gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive systems and other effects.

    PubMed

    Arisawa, Hirohiko; Fukui, Kenji; Imai, Eiichi; Fujise, Nobuaki; Masunaga, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    A novel muscarinic receptor agonist, SNI-2011 ((+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine] monohydrochloride hemihydrate, cevimeline, CAS 153504-70-2), is a candidate therapeutic drug for xerostomia in Sjögren's syndrome. The general pharmacological properties of this drug on the gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive systems and other tissues were investigated in mice, rats guinea pigs, rabbits and dogs. 1. Gastrointestinal system: SNI-2011 did not cause any effects on the gastrointestinal system, i.e. the intestinal transport of charcoal meal in mice, the secretion of gastric and bile juices, and the formation of ulcer induced by water immersion restraint in rats. 2. Urinary and reproductive systems: SNI-2011 augmented the spontaneous movement of rat pregnant uterus in vivo at 0.3 mg/kg i.v. or higher, and this effect was not observed in the non-pregnant uterus. SNI-2011 increased the spontaneous movement of isolated guinea pig bladder (3 x 10(-6) mol/l or higher) and increased the in vivo spontaneous movement of rat bladder (0.3 mg/kg i.v. or higher). SNI-2011 caused increases in rat urine volume, pH and urinary excretion of Na+ and Cl- at 30 mg/kg p.o. 3. Others: SNI-2011 had no effect on the vascular permeability in mice, hematological parameters and blood coagulation in rats. SNI-2011 had neither hemolytic nor anti-inflammatory effect. These results suggest that SNI-2011 has muscarinic effects on the gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive systems and other tissues at the doses approximately 10-fold higher than the doses needed for saliva secretion. PMID:12040964

  7. Alkylating derivative of oxotremorine interacts irreversibly with the muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.; Jenden, D.J.; Ringdahl, B.

    1984-03-05

    A 2-chloroethylamine derivative of oxotremorine was studied in pharmacological experiments and muscarinic receptor binding assays. The compound, N-(4-(2-chloroethylmethylamino)-2-butynyl)-2-pyrrolidone (BM 123), forms an aziridinium ion in aqueous solution at neutral pH that stimulates contractions of guinea pig ileum with a potency similar to that of oxotremorine. Following the initial stimulation, there is a long lasting period of lack of sensitivity of the guinea pig ileum to muscarinic agonists. BM 123 also produces muscarinic effects in vivo. When homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex were incubated with BM 123 and assayed subsequently in muscarinic receptor binding assays, a loss of binding capacity for the muscarinic antagonist, (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine ((/sup 3/H)NMS), was noted without a change in affinity. Similar observations were made in (/sup 3/H)1-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)-QNB) binding assays on the forebrains of mice that had been injected with BM 123 24 hr earlier. The loss in receptor capacity for both (/sup 3/H)NMS and (/sup 3/H)-QNB was prevented by atropine treatment. Kinetic studies of the interaction of BM 123 with homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex in vitro showed that the half-time for the loss of (/sup 3/H)-QNB binding sites increased from 10 to 45 min as the concentration of BM 123 decreased from 10 to 1 ..mu..M. In contrast to the aziridinium ion, the parent 2-chloroethylamine compound and the alcoholic hydrolysis product were largely devoid of pharmacological and binding activity.

  8. Differential Muscarinic Modulation in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard S.; Hu, Ruilong; DeSouza, Andre; Eberly, Christian L.; Krahe, Krista; Chan, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation of olfactory circuits by acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in odor discrimination and learning. Early processing of chemosensory signals occurs in two functionally and anatomically distinct regions, the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOB and AOB), which receive extensive cholinergic input from the basal forebrain. Here, we explore the regulation of AOB and MOB circuits by ACh, and how cholinergic modulation influences olfactory-mediated behaviors in mice. Surprisingly, despite the presence of a conserved circuit, activation of muscarinic ACh receptors revealed marked differences in cholinergic modulation of output neurons: excitation in the AOB and inhibition in the MOB. Granule cells (GCs), the most abundant intrinsic neuron in the OB, also exhibited a complex muscarinic response. While GCs in the AOB were excited, MOB GCs exhibited a dual muscarinic action in the form of a hyperpolarization and an increase in excitability uncovered by cell depolarization. Furthermore, ACh influenced the input–output relationship of mitral cells in the AOB and MOB differently showing a net effect on gain in mitral cells of the MOB, but not in the AOB. Interestingly, despite the striking differences in neuromodulatory actions on output neurons, chemogenetic inhibition of cholinergic neurons produced similar perturbations in olfactory behaviors mediated by these two regions. Decreasing ACh in the OB disrupted the natural discrimination of molecularly related odors and the natural investigation of odors associated with social behaviors. Thus, the distinct neuromodulation by ACh in these circuits could underlie different solutions to the processing of general odors and semiochemicals, and the diverse olfactory behaviors they trigger. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT State-dependent cholinergic modulation of brain circuits is critical for several high-level cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Here, we provide new evidence that cholinergic

  9. Molecular regulation of receptors: interaction of beta-estradiol and progesterone with the muscarinic system.

    PubMed Central

    Sokolovsky, M; Egozi, Y; Avissar, S

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various substrates on the binding of agonists to muscarinic receptors were studied in the rat hypothalamus and adenohypophysis by competition experiments using the highly specific tritiated muscarinic antagonist N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. It was found that agonist binding properties were affected only by the steroid sex hormones (beta-estradiol and progesterone), both of which resulted in a decrease in the proportion of high-affinity binding sites and a decrease in the dissociation constant. This suggests a link between the muscarinic system and the mechanism by which these steroids exert their gonadotropin-releasing effect on the adenohypophysis. We propose a model to depict the putative relationship between the muscarinic system and other receptor systems, including that which controls the steroid sex hormones. PMID:6946492

  10. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Muscarinic Receptors: Supersensitivity Induced by Long-Term Atropine Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlund, Britta; Abens, Janis; Bartfai, Tamas

    1983-04-01

    Long-term treatment of rats with atropine induced large increases in the numbers of muscarinic receptors and receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the salivary glands. Since receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide coexist with muscarinic receptors on the same neurons in this preparation, the results suggest that a drug that alters the sensitivity of one receptor may also affect the sensitivity of the receptor for a costored transmitter and in this way contribute to the therapeutic or side effects of the drug.

  11. The Prokinetic, Laxative, and Antidiarrheal Effects of Morus nigra: Possible Muscarinic, Ca(2+) Channel Blocking, and Antimuscarinic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akhlaq, Anam; Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Rehman, Abdul; Ashraf, Zohaib; Syed, Sadia; Bawany, Samira Ahmed; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan; Ilyas, Maimoona; Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen

    2016-08-01

    Morus nigra Linn. (black mulberry) is used in gastrointestinal ailments. This study demonstrates gut modulatory properties of M. nigra. The prokinetic, laxative, and antidiarrheal activities of M. nigra were assessed in mice, while isolated rabbit jejunum and guinea-pig ileum were used to explore insight into mechanism(s). At 30 and 70 mg/kg, the crude extract of M. nigra (Mn.Cr) exhibited atropine-sensitive prokinetic and laxative effects, similar to carbachol (CCh). While at higher doses (100, 300, and 500 mg/kg), Mn.Cr offered protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. In rabbit jejunum, Mn.Cr and its chloroform fraction inhibited CCh-induced contractions more potently compared with high K(+) (80 mm). Conversely, petroleum fraction was more potent against high-K(+) -induced contractions. At 0.01 mg/mL, Mn.Cr caused a parallel shift in acetylcholine concentration-response curves (CRCs) followed by a non-parallel shift at 0.03 mg/mL, similar to dicyclomine. At further tested concentrations, Mn.Cr (0.1 and 0.3 mg/mL) and petroleum fraction suppressed Ca(2+) CRCs, similar to verapamil. In guinea-pig ileum, Mn.Cr, its aqueous and ethyl acetate fractions exhibited atropine-sensitive gut stimulant activity along with additional uncharacterized excitatory response in the aqueous fraction only. These results suggest that black mulberry possesses prokinetic, laxative, and antidiarrheal effects, putatively mediated through cholinomimetic, antimuscarinic, and Ca(2+) antagonist mechanisms, respectively. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27230535

  12. A human embryonic lung fibroblast with a high density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    André, C; Marullo, S; Convents, A; Lü, B Z; Guillet, J G; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, D A

    1988-01-15

    Binding studies with the radiolabeled muscarinic antagonists dexetimide, quinuclidinyl benzilate and N-methylscopolamine showed that the human embryonic lung fibroblast CCL137 possesses approximately 2 X 10(5) muscarinic receptors/cell, i.e. 2.1 pmol/mg membrane protein. These receptors showed a marked stereoselectivity towards dexetimide and levetimide and only low affinity for another antagonist, pirenzepine. The muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase and induced phosphatidylinositide turnover in the intact cells. Both effects were inhibited by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Affinity labeling with tritiated propylbenzylcholine mustard revealed a protein of 72 kDa. Finally, down-regulation of the membrane receptors following prolonged treatment with the agonist carbamylcholine was assessed by means of the hydrophilic antagonist N-methylscopolamine. PMID:2828056

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes as potential targets to modulate oligodendrocyte progenitor survival, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Federica; Bernardo, Antonietta; Magnaghi, Valerio; Minghetti, Luisa; Tata, Ada Maria

    2012-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major neurotransmitter but also an important signaling molecule in neuron-glia interactions. Expression of ACh receptors has been reported in several glial cell populations, including oligodendrocytes (OLs). Nonetheless, the characterization of muscarinic receptors in these cells, as well as the description of the cholinergic effects at different stages of OL development, is still incomplete. In this study, we characterized the pattern of expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of rat oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) and mature OLs, at both mRNA and protein levels. We found that muscarinic receptor expression is developmentally regulated. M1, M3, and M4 receptors were the main subtypes expressed in OPC, whereas all receptor subtypes were expressed at low levels in mature OLs. Exposure of OPC to muscarine enhanced cell proliferation, an effect mainly due to M1, M3, and M4 receptor subtypes as demonstrated by pharmacological competition with selective antagonists. Conversely, M2 receptor activation impaired OPC survival. In line with the mitogenic activity, muscarinic receptor activation increased the expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α. Muscarine stimulation increased CX32 and myelin basic protein expression, left unaffected that of myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), and decreased member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ErbB3/ErbB4 receptor expression indicating a predominant role of muscarinic receptors in OPC. These findings suggest that ACh may contribute to the maintenance of an immature proliferating progenitor pool and impair the progression toward mature stage. This hypothesis is further supported by increased expression of Notch-1 in OL on muscarinic activation.

  14. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients. PMID:26109098

  15. Amyloid beta-peptide disrupts carbachol-induced muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J F; Furukawa, K; Barger, S W; Rengen, M R; Mark, R J; Blanc, E M; Roth, G S; Mattson, M P

    1996-06-25

    Cholinergic pathways serve important functions in learning and memory processes, and deficits in cholinergic transmission occur in Alzheimer disease (AD). A subset of muscarinic cholinergic receptors are linked to G-proteins that activate phospholipase C, resulting in the liberation of inositol trisphosphate and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. We now report that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), which forms plaques in the brain in AD, impairs muscarinic receptor activation of G proteins in cultured rat cortical neurons. Exposure of rodent fetal cortical neurons to Abeta25-35 and Abeta1-40 resulted in a concentration and time-dependent attenuation of carbachol-induced GTPase activity without affecting muscarinic receptor ligand binding parameters. Downstream events in the signal transduction cascade were similarly attenuated by Abeta. Carbachol-induced accumulation of inositol phosphates (IP, IP2, IP3, and IP4) was decreased and calcium imaging studies revealed that carbachol-induced release of calcium was severely impaired in neurons pretreated with Abeta. Muscarinic cholinergic signal transduction was disrupted with subtoxic levels of exposure to AP. The effects of Abeta on carbachol-induced GTPase activity and calcium release were attenuated by antioxidants, implicating free radicals in the mechanism whereby Abeta induced uncoupling of muscarinic receptors. These data demonstrate that Abeta disrupts muscarinic receptor coupling to G proteins that mediate induction of phosphoinositide accumulation and calcium release, findings that implicate Abeta in the impairment of cholinergic transmission that occurs in AD. PMID:8692890

  16. Comparison of muscarine- and vasopressin-stimulated inositol phospholipid metabolism in the superior cervical ganglion of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, J.; Anderson, C.; Perlman, R.L.

    1986-03-05

    Both muscarine and vasopressin have previously been shown to increase the accumulation of /sup 3/H-inositol phosphates (/sup 3/H-IP) in superior cervical ganglia in which the phospholipids were labeled with /sup 3/H-inositol. They have compared the effects of muscarine and vasopressin on phospholipid metabolism in the ganglion. The effects of these agents on /sup 3/H-IP accumulation are additive. The response to muscarine plateaus after approximately 10 min whereas the response to vasopressin increases for at least 30 min. Decentralization and maintenance in organ culture appear to potentiate the effect of muscarine on /sup 3/H-IP accumulation but do not effect the response of the ganglia to vasopressin. Muscarine and vasopressin also increase the incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into phospholipids in the ganglion. Autoradiographic techniques were used to localize the inositol-containing phospholipids in the ganglion. Muscarine increases phospholipid labeling primarily in the cell bodies of the principal ganglionic neurons, whereas vasopressin increases phospholipid labeling primarily in the neuropil. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that muscarine and vasopressin stimulate the metabolism of different pools of phospholipids.

  17. Functional subtyping of muscarinic receptors on canine esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Lad, R; Donoff, B; Rangachari, P K

    1991-09-01

    Serosal addition of muscarinic agonists elicited rapid changes in electrical parameters across the isolated canine esophageal epithelium set up in vitro. Both carbachol and the M1-selective agonist, McNeil A343 (McN), increased transmucosal potential differences (PDs), decreased transmucosal resistances (R), and increased short-circuit currents (Isc). Carbachol was more potent and more effective than McN. Muscarinic antagonists were used to define the muscarinic receptor involved. The pA2 values obtained with Schild plots were as follows: atropine 9.14, 4-DAMP 8.98, AFDX-116 6.71, and pirenzepine 7.12. Low concentrations of pirenzepine (10(-8) M), produced a rightward shift in the dose-response curve to McN, without inhibiting responses to carbachol. Thus the receptor subtype is clearly not an M2. As in other glandular systems, M3 receptors are present. Whether M1 receptors also exist requires better definition of receptor densities-reserves in this tissue. Carbachol induced net secretion of Na and Cl and converted a predominantly absorptive tissue to a secretory one. PMID:1716057

  18. Identification of drugs competing with d-tubocurarine for an allosteric site on cardiac muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M

    1994-10-01

    d-Tubocurarine behaved as a weak allosteric inhibitor of N-[3H] methylscopolamine binding to cardiac M2 muscarinic receptors. In a low ionic strength buffer devoid of bivalent ions, d-tubocurarine recognized cardiac M2 receptors in the micromolar concentration range and decreased their affinity for N-[3H]methylscopolamine by at most 4-fold. To identify the compounds that preferentially recognize this accessory site (as opposed to the classical muscarinic binding site), we measured the inhibition by different drugs of N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding, in the absence or presence of d-tubocurarine. The effect of gallamine was competitively inhibited by d-tubocurarine; both drugs compete for the same accessory site on muscarinic receptors. The effects of dexetimide, levetimide, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-ethylpiperidine ethobromide, AF-DX 116, and telenzepine on N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding were not affected or were barely affected by d-tubocurarine; these compounds preferentially recognize another binding site (probably the muscarinic binding site). The dose-effect curves for pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine) bromide and methoctramine were shifted, but at most 10-fold, by d-tubocurarine. It is likely that (in this low ionic strength incubation buffer) methoctramine and pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine)bromide had comparable affinities for the muscarinic site and the accessory site. d-Tubocurarine competitively inhibited their binding to the accessory site and allosterically inhibited their binding to the muscarinic site. This resulted in a large decrease (40-60-fold) of their overall affinity for muscarinic receptors. PMID:7969047

  19. Effects of posttraining administration of glucose on retention of a habituation response in mice: participation of a central cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1996-05-01

    Male Swiss mice were allowed to explore a novel environment, provided by an open-field activity chamber, for 10 min. The procedure was repeated twice with a 24-h interval. The difference in the exploratory activity between the first (training) and the second (testing) exposures to the chamber was taken as an index of retention of this habituation task. Posttraining intraperitoneal administration of glucose (10-300 mg/kg) enhanced retention in a dose-related manner, although only the dose of 30 mg/kg of glucose produced significant effects. Thus, the dose-response curve adopted an inverted U-shaped form. Glucose (30 mg/kg) given to untrained mice did not modify their exploratory performance when recorded 24 h later. The effects of glucose on retention were time-dependent, suggesting an action on memory storage. The memory-improving actions of glucose were prevented by the simultaneous administration of both the central acting muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg) and by the central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg). In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting nicotinic receptor blocker, prevented the effects of glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of glucose (10 mg/kg) and the central anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 microg/kg), but not neostigmine (35 microg/kg), given together, act synergistically and facilitated retention. We suggest that glucose modulates memory storage of one form of learning elicited by stimuli repeatedly presented without reinforcement, probably through an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release. PMID:8616589

  20. Effects of posttraining administration of glucose on retention of a habituation response in mice: participation of a central cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1996-05-01

    Male Swiss mice were allowed to explore a novel environment, provided by an open-field activity chamber, for 10 min. The procedure was repeated twice with a 24-h interval. The difference in the exploratory activity between the first (training) and the second (testing) exposures to the chamber was taken as an index of retention of this habituation task. Posttraining intraperitoneal administration of glucose (10-300 mg/kg) enhanced retention in a dose-related manner, although only the dose of 30 mg/kg of glucose produced significant effects. Thus, the dose-response curve adopted an inverted U-shaped form. Glucose (30 mg/kg) given to untrained mice did not modify their exploratory performance when recorded 24 h later. The effects of glucose on retention were time-dependent, suggesting an action on memory storage. The memory-improving actions of glucose were prevented by the simultaneous administration of both the central acting muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg) and by the central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg). In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting nicotinic receptor blocker, prevented the effects of glucose on retention. Low subeffective doses of glucose (10 mg/kg) and the central anticholinesterase physostigmine (35 microg/kg), but not neostigmine (35 microg/kg), given together, act synergistically and facilitated retention. We suggest that glucose modulates memory storage of one form of learning elicited by stimuli repeatedly presented without reinforcement, probably through an enhancement of brain acetylcholine synthesis and/or its release.

  1. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions. PMID:25514862

  2. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  3. Batrachotoxin changes the properties of the muscarinic receptor in rat brain and heart: possible interaction(s) between muscarinic receptors and sodium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Armon, M; Kloog, Y; Henis, Y I; Sokolovsky, M

    1985-01-01

    The effects of Na+-channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat brain and heart were studied. BTX enhanced the affinity for the binding of the agonists carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in brainstem and ventricle, but not in the cerebral cortex. Analysis of the data according to a two-site model for agonist binding indicated that the effect of BTX was to increase the affinity of the agonists to the high-affinity site. Guanyl nucleotides, known to induce interconversion of high-affinity agonist binding sites to the low-affinity state, canceled the effect of BTX on carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine binding. BTX had no effect on the binding of the agonist oxotremorine or on the binding of the antagonist [3H]-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. The local anesthetics dibucaine and tetracaine antagonized the effect of BTX on the binding of muscarinic agonists at concentrations known to inhibit the activation of Na+ channels by BTX. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in specific tissues the muscarinic receptors may interact with the BTX binding site (Na+ channels). PMID:2582418

  4. Muscarinic antagonists in the treatment of acquired pendular and downbeat nystagmus: a double-blind, randomized trial of three intravenous drugs.

    PubMed

    Barton, J J; Huaman, A G; Sharpe, J A

    1994-03-01

    We performed a double-blind, randomized trial of intravenous scopolamine, benztropine, and glycopyrrolate in 7 patients with acquired nystagmus and oscillopsia. Five patients had pendular nystagmus and 2, downbeat nystagmus. We recorded eye movements with a magnetic search coil technique and tested visual acuity and motion perception before and after administration of each drug. Scopolamine reduced nystagmus in all patients. Benztropine was moderately effective and glycopyrrolate had a negligible impact. Visual acuity improved only with scopolamine; motion discrimination and oscillopsia improved significantly with scopolamine and benztropine. Pendular and downbeat nystagmus respond to intravenous antagonists of central muscarinic receptors.

  5. Differentiation of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons - Implications for anti-motion sickness therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Bruce G.; Peroutka, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Radioligand binding studies were used to analyze muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors were labeled by H-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (H-3-QNB). Scopolamine was equipotent in both brain regions and did not discriminate subtypes of H-3-QNB binding. By contrast, the M1 selective antagonist pirenzepine was approximately 33-fold more potent in human cortex than pons. Carbachol, a putative M2 selective agonist, was more than 100-fold more potent in human pons than cortex. These results demonstrate that the human pons contains a relatively large proportion of carbachol-sensitive muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Drugs targeted to this subpopulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors may prove to be effective anti-motion sickness agents with less side effects than scopolamine.

  6. Distinct Roles of Bulbar Muscarinic and Nicotinic Receptors in Olfactory Discrimination Learning

    PubMed Central

    Devore, Sasha; de Almeida, Licurgo

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) and piriform cortex receive dense cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain. Cholinergic modulation within the piriform cortex has long been proposed to serve important functions in olfactory learning and memory. We here investigate how olfactory discrimination learning is regulated by cholinergic modulation of the OB inputs to the piriform cortex. We examined rats' performance on a two-alternative choice odor discrimination task following local, bilateral blockade of cholinergic nicotinic and/or muscarinic receptors in the OB. Results demonstrate that acquisition, but not recall, of novel discrimination problems is impaired following blockade of OB cholinergic receptors, although the relative contribution of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors depends on task difficulty. Blocking muscarinic receptors impairs learning for nearly all odor sets, whereas blocking nicotinic receptors only affects performance for perceptually similar odors. This pattern of behavioral effects is consistent with predictions from a model of cholinergic modulation in the OB and piriform cortex (de Almeida et al., 2013). Model simulations suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic receptors may serve complementary roles in regulating coherence and sparseness of the OB network output, which in turn differentially regulate the strength and overlap in cortical odor representations. Overall, our results suggest that muscarinic receptor blockade results in a bona fide learning impairment that may arise because cortical neurons are activated less often. Behavioral impairment following nicotinic receptor blockade may not be due to the inability of the cortex to learn, but rather arises because the cortex is unable to resolve highly overlapping input patterns. PMID:25143606

  7. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  8. Organophosphorus Pesticides Decrease M2 Muscarinic Receptor Function in Guinea Pig Airway Nerves via Indirect Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Proskocil, Becky J.; Bruun, Donald A.; Thompson, Charles M.; Fryer, Allison D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies link organophosphorus pesticide (OP) exposures to asthma, and we have shown that the OPs chlorpyrifos, diazinon and parathion cause airway hyperreactivity in guinea pigs 24 hr after a single subcutaneous injection. OP-induced airway hyperreactivity involves M2 muscarinic receptor dysfunction on airway nerves independent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, but how OPs inhibit neuronal M2 receptors in airways is not known. In the central nervous system, OPs interact directly with neurons to alter muscarinic receptor function or expression; therefore, in this study we tested whether the OP parathion or its oxon metabolite, paraoxon, might decrease M2 receptor function on peripheral neurons via similar direct mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings Intravenous administration of paraoxon, but not parathion, caused acute frequency-dependent potentiation of vagally-induced bronchoconstriction and increased electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contractions in isolated trachea independent of AChE inhibition. However, paraoxon had no effect on vagally-induced bradycardia in intact guinea pigs or EFS-induced contractions in isolated ileum, suggesting mechanisms other than pharmacologic antagonism of M2 receptors. Paraoxon did not alter M2 receptor expression in cultured cells at the mRNA or protein level as determined by quantitative RT-PCR and radio-ligand binding assays, respectively. Additionally, a biotin-labeled fluorophosphonate, which was used as a probe to identify molecular targets phosphorylated by OPs, did not phosphorylate proteins in guinea pig cardiac membranes that were recognized by M2 receptor antibodies. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that neither direct pharmacologic antagonism nor downregulated expression of M2 receptors contributes to OP inhibition of M2 function in airway nerves, adding to the growing evidence of non-cholinergic mechanisms of OP neurotoxicity. PMID:20479945

  9. Effects of posttraining administration of insulin on retention of a habituation response in mice: participation of a central cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1999-01-01

    Male Swiss mice were allowed to explore a novel environment, provided by an open-field activity chamber for a 10-min period. The procedure was repeated twice within a 24-h interval. The difference in the exploratory activity between the first (training) and the second exposure (testing) to the chamber was taken as an index of retention of this habituation task. Posttraining intraperitoneal administration of insulin (8, 20, or 80 IU/kg) impaired retention in a dose-related manner, although only the dose of 20 IU/kg of insulin produced significant effects. Thus, the dose-response curve adopted a U-shaped form. Insulin (20 IU/kg) given to untrained mice did not modify their exploratory performance when recorded 24 h later. The effects of insulin on retention were time dependent, suggesting an action on memory storage. An ineffective dose (8 IU/kg) of insulin given together with an ineffective dose of a central acting muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or with a central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg) interacted to impair retention. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting nicotinic receptor blocker, interacted with the subeffective dose of insulin on retention. The impairing effects of insulin (20 IU/kg) on retention were reversed by the simultaneous administration of physostigmine (70 microg/kg) but not neostigmine (70 microg/kg). We suggest that insulin impairs memory storage of one form of learning elicited by stimuli repeatedly presented without reinforcement, probably through a decrement of brain acetylcholine synthesis. PMID:9889072

  10. Effects of posttraining administration of insulin on retention of a habituation response in mice: participation of a central cholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kopf, S R; Baratti, C M

    1999-01-01

    Male Swiss mice were allowed to explore a novel environment, provided by an open-field activity chamber for a 10-min period. The procedure was repeated twice within a 24-h interval. The difference in the exploratory activity between the first (training) and the second exposure (testing) to the chamber was taken as an index of retention of this habituation task. Posttraining intraperitoneal administration of insulin (8, 20, or 80 IU/kg) impaired retention in a dose-related manner, although only the dose of 20 IU/kg of insulin produced significant effects. Thus, the dose-response curve adopted a U-shaped form. Insulin (20 IU/kg) given to untrained mice did not modify their exploratory performance when recorded 24 h later. The effects of insulin on retention were time dependent, suggesting an action on memory storage. An ineffective dose (8 IU/kg) of insulin given together with an ineffective dose of a central acting muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg) or with a central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg) interacted to impair retention. In contrast, neither methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting muscarinic receptor blocker, nor hexamethonium (5 mg/kg), a peripherally acting nicotinic receptor blocker, interacted with the subeffective dose of insulin on retention. The impairing effects of insulin (20 IU/kg) on retention were reversed by the simultaneous administration of physostigmine (70 microg/kg) but not neostigmine (70 microg/kg). We suggest that insulin impairs memory storage of one form of learning elicited by stimuli repeatedly presented without reinforcement, probably through a decrement of brain acetylcholine synthesis.

  11. Binding and functional characterization of the cardioselective muscarinic antagonist methoctramine.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Micheletti, R; Montagna, E; Giachetti, A; Viganò, M A; Ladinsky, H; Melchiorre, C

    1988-03-01

    The antimuscarinic properties of the newly synthetized polymethylene tetramine derivative, methoctramine, were investigated in binding and functional assays. Methoctramine displaced the specific binding of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine [( 3H]NMS) and [3H] pirenzepine from membranes of rat tissues with the following order of affinities: heart = cerebellum greater than cortex greater than submandibular glands, the ratio of the affinities of the compound for the heart and the glands amounting to about 130. Computer fits of binding curves generated in cardiac and cortical membranes were compatible with an interaction at one binding site, whereas those in submandibular glands and cerebellum had slopes significantly lower than 1. Experiments performed in cardiac membranes to investigate the effect of methoctramine on the dissociation kinetics of [3H]-NMS showed that concentrations of compound up to 1 microM did not affect the dissociation of [3H]-NMS elicited by an excess of NMS. At greater concentrations (10-100 microM), methoctramine dose dependently inhibited [3H]-NMS dissociation, thus revealing an allosteric interaction. In in vitro functional assays, methoctramine displayed more than 100 times greater affinity for the muscarinic receptors mediating negative inotropic and chronotropic effects in guinea pig atria than for those responsible for tracheal contraction. Similarly, the compound was a more potent antagonist of the bradycardial response to bethanechol than of the bladder tonus increase, saliva secretion and hypotension induced by the muscarinic agonist in anesthetized cats. Finally, in the pithed rat, methoctramine preferentially inhibited cardiac M2 (vagal bradycardia) over ganglionic M1 (McN-A-343-induced hypertension) responses. The evidence appears to characterize methoctramine as being the most selective M2 muscarinic antagonist described to date.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3252019

  12. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism by cocaine, norcocaine and cocaethylene in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tan, X X; Costa, L G

    1994-05-13

    The interaction of cocaine, its metabolites norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene, which is formed following a combined cocaine and ethanol exposure, with muscarinic receptor binding and phosphoinositide metabolism was investigated in brain from immature rats. Cocaine and norcocaine inhibited binding of [3H]telenzepine and carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in cerebral cortex, while benzoylecgonine was devoid of any inhibitory activity. Cocaethylene was the most potent inhibitor of both binding and phosphoinositide metabolism. The effect of cocaine was more pronounced at the muscarinic receptors, but a small inhibition of histamine--and serotonin--stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism was also observed.

  13. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  14. Impaired vascular responses to parasympathetic nerve stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation in the submandibular gland in nonobese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Berggreen, Ellen; Nyløkken, Krister; Delaleu, Nicolas; Hajdaragic-Ibricevic, Hamijeta; Jonsson, Malin V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Decreased vascular responses to salivary gland stimulation are observed in Sjögren's syndrome patients. We investigate whether impaired vascular responses to parasympathetic stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation in salivary glands parallels hyposalivation in an experimental model for Sjögren's syndrome. Methods Blood flow responses in the salivary glands were measured by laser Doppler flowmeter. Muscarinic receptor activation was followed by saliva secretion measurements. Nitric oxide synthesis-mediated blood flow responses were studied after administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Glandular autonomic nerves and muscarinic 3 receptor distributions were also investigated. Results Maximal blood flow responses to parasympathetic stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation were significantly lower in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice compared with BALB/c mice, coinciding with impaired saliva secretion in nonobese diabetic mice (P < 0.005). Nitric oxide synthase inhibitor had less effect on blood flow responses after parasympathetic nerve stimulation in nonobese diabetic mice compared with BALB/c mice (P < 0.02). In nonobese diabetic mice, salivary gland parasympathetic nerve fibres were absent in areas of focal infiltrates. Muscarinic 3 receptor might be localized in the blood vessel walls of salivary glands. Conclusions Impaired vasodilatation in response to parasympathetic nerve stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation may contribute to hyposalivation observed in nonobese diabetic mice. Reduced nitric oxide signalling after parasympathetic nerve stimulation may contribute in part to the impaired blood flow responses. The possibility of muscarinic 3 receptor in the vasculature supports the notion that muscarinic 3 receptor autoantibodies present in nonobese diabetic mice might impair the fluid transport required for salivation. Parasympathetic nerves were absent in areas of focal infiltrates, whereas a normal distribution was

  15. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Kristine B; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S; Kanui, Titus I; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1-5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies with [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in the formalin test. Administration of 50 mg/kg VU0152100 resulted in a non-significant tendency towards antinociception. The antinociceptive effects were reversed by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. Binding studies indicated presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with a radioligand affinity comparable to that reported in mice. In conclusion, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are present in the naked mole-rat and contribute to antinociception in the naked mole-rat.

  16. Ethanol inhibits neuritogenesis induced by astrocyte muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Guizzetti, Marina; Moore, Nadia H; Giordano, Gennaro; VanDeMark, Kathryn L; Costa, Lucio G

    2010-09-01

    In utero alcohol exposure can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that ethanol alters neuronal development. We have recently shown that stimulation of M(3) muscarinic receptors in astrocytes increases the synthesis and release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, causing neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. As M(3) muscarinic receptor signaling in astroglial cells is strongly inhibited by ethanol, we hypothesized that ethanol may also inhibit neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons induced by carbachol-stimulated astrocytes. In the present study, we report that the effect of carbachol-stimulated astrocytes on hippocampal neuron neurite outgrowth was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner (25-100 mM) by ethanol. This effect was because of the inhibition of the release of fibronectin, laminin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Similar effects on neuritogenesis and on the release of astrocyte extracellular proteins were observed after the incubation of astrocytes with carbachol in the presence of 1-butanol, another short-chain alcohol, which like ethanol is a competitive substrate for phospholipase D, but not by tert-butanol, its analog that is not a substrate for this enzyme. This study identifies a potential novel mechanism involved in the developmental effects of ethanol mediated by the interaction of ethanol with cell signaling in astrocytes, leading to an impairment in neuron-astrocyte communication.

  17. Synaptic muscarinic response types in hippocampal CA1 interneurons depend on different levels of presynaptic activity and different muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bell, L Andrew; Bell, Karen A; McQuiston, A Rory

    2013-10-01

    Depolarizing, hyperpolarizing and biphasic muscarinic responses have been described in hippocampal inhibitory interneurons, but the receptor subtypes and activity patterns required to synaptically activate muscarinic responses in interneurons have not been completely characterized. Using optogenetics combined with whole cell patch clamp recordings in acute slices, we measured muscarinic responses produced by endogenously released acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic medial septum/diagonal bands of Broca inputs in hippocampal CA1. We found that depolarizing responses required more cholinergic terminal stimulation than hyperpolarizing ones. Furthermore, elevating extracellular ACh with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine had a larger effect on depolarizing versus hyperpolarizing responses. Another subpopulation of interneurons responded biphasically, and periodic release of ACh entrained some of these interneurons to rhythmically burst. M4 receptors mediated hyperpolarizing responses by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels, whereas the depolarizing responses were inhibited by the nonselective muscarinic antagonist atropine but were unaffected by M1, M4 or M5 receptor modulators. In addition, activation of M4 receptors significantly altered biphasic interneuron firing patterns. Anatomically, interneuron soma location appeared predictive of muscarinic response types but response types did not correlate with interneuron morphological subclasses. Together these observations suggest that the hippocampal CA1 interneuron network will be differentially affected by cholinergic input activity levels. Low levels of cholinergic activity will preferentially suppress some interneurons via hyperpolarization and increased activity will recruit other interneurons to depolarize, possibly because of elevated extracellular ACh concentrations. These data provide important information for understanding how cholinergic therapies will affect hippocampal network function

  18. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-induced proliferation of astroglial cells by ethanol: mechanisms and implications for the fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Guizzetti, Marina

    2002-12-01

    In utero exposure to ethanol is deleterious to fetal brain development. Children born with the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) display a number of abnormalities, the most significant of which are central nervous system (CNS) dysfunctions, such as microencephaly and mental retardation. An interaction of ethanol with glial cells, particularly astrocytes, has been suggested to contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity of this alcohol. At low concentrations (10-100 mM) ethanol inhibits the proliferation of astroglial cells in vitro, particularly when stimulated by acetycholine through muscarinic M3 receptors. Of the several signal transduction pathways activated by these receptors in astrocytes or astrocytoma cells, which are involved in mitogenic signaling, only some (e.g. protein kinase C (PKC) zeta, p70S6 kinase) appear to be targeted by ethanol at the same low concentrations which effectively inhibit proliferation. Inhibition of astroglial proliferation by ethanol may contribute to the microencephaly seen in FAS.

  19. External Imaging of Cerebral Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelman, William C.; Reba, Richard C.; Rzeszotarski, Waclaw J.; Gibson, Raymond E.; Hill, Thomas; Holman, B. Leonard; Budinger, Thomas; Conklin, James J.; Eng, Robert; Grissom, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  20. External imaging of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.; Reba, R.C.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Hill, T.; Holman, B.L.; Budinger, T.; Conklin, J.J.; Eng, R.; Grissom, M.P.

    1984-01-20

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  1. Atropine-resistant effects of the muscarinic agonists McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on cardiac performance and the release of noradrenaline from sympathetic nerves of the perfused rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, J.R.; Muscholl, E.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of 4-(m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxy)-2-butynyltrimethylammonium chloride (McN-A-343) and N-benzyl-3-pyrrolidyl acetate methobromide (AHR 602) on cardiac performance and noradrenaline release from terminal sympathetic fibres were measured in isolated perfused hearts of rabbits. 2 In the presence of sufficient atropine to block muscarinic receptors, high concentrations of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 caused no cardiac stimulation and there was no increase in the resting output of noradrenaline into the perfusates. 3 McN-A-343 and AHR 602 increased both the mechanical responses and the transmitter overflow evoked by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerves (SNS) but inhibited both parameters during perfusion with 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). The effects were atropine-resistant and qualitatively similar to those seen with cocaine. Hexamethonium inhibited DMPP, but affected neither SNS per se nor the facilitatory effects of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 4 McN-A-343, cocaine and desipramine (but not AHR 602 or hexamethonium) blocked the net cardiac noradrenaline uptake and increased the positive chronotropic effect of noradrenaline. 5 Prior perfusion with concentrations of cocaine and desipramine sufficient to block uptake reduced or abolished the facilitatory effects of both McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 6 Cocaine, McN-A-343 and AHR 602 displayed local anaesthetic properties on the guinea-pig wheal and frog nerve plexus tests, and their relative potencies in this respect were similar to those for inhibition of DMPP-evoked transmitter overflow. Hexamethonium did not produce local anaesthesia. 7 The results indicate that the facilitated release of noradrenaline after SNS and the inhibition of release after DMPP produced by McN-A-343 and AHR 602 are the result of their combined local anaesthetic action and inhibition of amine uptake. PMID:4447857

  2. Muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the mucosal response to neural stimulation of guinea pig ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, H.V.; Tien, X.Y.; Wallace, L.J.; Cooke, H.J.

    1987-09-01

    Muscarinic receptors involved in the secretory response evoked by electrical stimulation of submucosal neutrons were investigated in muscle-stripped flat sheets of guinea pig ileum set up in flux chambers. Neural stimulation produced a biphasic increase in short-circuit current due to active chloride secretion. Atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperadine methiodide (4-DAMP) (10/sup -7/ M) were more potent inhibitors of the cholinergic phase of the response than was pirenzepine. Dose-dependent increases in base-line short-circuit current were evoked by carbachol and bethanechol; 4-hydroxy-2-butynyl trimethylammonium chloride (McN A343) produced a much smaller effect. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of McN A343 but did not alter the responses of carbachol and bethanechol. McN A343 significantly reduced the cholinergic phase of the neurally evoked response and caused a rightward shift of the carbachol dose-response curve. All muscarinic compounds inhibited (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to membranes from muscosal scrapings, with a rank order of potency of 4-DAMP > pirenzepine > McN A343 > carbachol > bethanechol. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from submucosal neurons mediates chloride secretion by interacting with muscarinic cholinergic receptors that display a high binding affinity for 4-DAMP. Activation of neural muscarinic receptors makes a relatively small contribution to the overall secretory response.

  3. Inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channel currents in human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells by muscarine via stimulation of M3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Reeve, H L; Vaughan, P F; Peers, C

    1995-03-01

    The effects of muscarine on whole-cell Ca2+ channel currents in SH-SY5Y cells were studied using conventional and perforated-patch-clamp techniques, with 10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier. Muscarine (10-300 microM) caused concentration-dependent inhibitions of Ca2+ channel currents which were only reversible when perforated-patch recordings were used. Inhibition of currents was associated with slowing of activation kinetics in approximately 50% of cells. In the presence of 5 microM nifedipine, muscarine was still able to inhibit currents, but after pre-exposure of cells to 1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA the inhibitory effects of muscarine were almost completely lost. In the presence of 100 microM muscarine, Bay K 8644 (5 microM) was still able to enhance current amplitudes. Pre-treatment of cells with pertussis toxin (250 ng/ml for 16-24 hr) or inclusion of 1 mM GDP-beta-S in the patch-pipette prevented the inhibitory actions of muscarine. Hexahydrosiladifenidol (0.1-1 microM) antagonized the actions of muscarine (calculated pA2 7.1) but the presence of 10 microM pirenzipine or 0.1 microM methoctramine in the bath solution did not alter the degree of current inhibition caused by 100 microM muscarine. In summary, these results indicate that muscarine in SH-SY5Y cells causes inhibition of N-type Ca2+ channels via a M3 receptor coupled to a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein. PMID:7630487

  4. In vitro pharmacological properties of 4-bromodexetimide for muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Strijckmans, V; Coulon, C; Kassiou, M; Loc'h, C; Mazière, B

    1996-01-01

    The decrease of m-AChR density observed in neurodegenerative disorders has generated considerable interest in non-invasive mapping of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m-AChR) in the central nervous system. The aim of our study was to evaluate the selectivity of 4-bromodexetimide for the M1, M2, M3 and M4 m-AChR subtypes using in vitro binding analysis to determine the potential use of the bromine-76 labelled 4-bromodexetimide in the investigation of m-AChR subtypes in human brain with Positron Emission Tomography. Subtype selectivity of 4-bromodexetimide was determined in competition studies against tritiated subtype selective ligands using various rat or rabbit structure homogenates reflecting a single binding site and in optimal saturation and low non specific binding conditions. These conditions were reached for every subtype studied by analyzing the data from the saturation experiments of the tritiated ligands. 4-bromodexetimide displayed nanomolar affinities for the four m-AChR subtypes and a preferential selectivity for the M1 and M4 subtypes. The saturation analysis of [76Br]4-bromodexetimide, performed with rat cortex membranes showed high affinity for m-AChR receptors (Kd = 1.8 nM). As in vivo studies of [76Br]4-bromodexetimide showed preferential localization in the cortex and the striatum which are M1 and M4 rich structures and since it binds preferentially to the M1 and M4 subtypes, this radiotracer can still allow a combined subtype specific measurement of these muscarinic receptors. PMID:8649190

  5. Muscarinic receptors are involved in LMM3 tumor cells proliferation and angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmaudo, Laura Elizabeth; Torre, Eulalia de la; Sacerdote de Lustig, Eugenia; Sales, Maria Elena . E-mail: mesales@2vias.com.ar

    2005-09-09

    Angiogenesis is a process of new blood vessel development from pre-existing vasculature and it plays an essential role in tumor growth and metastases. Here, we investigate the expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchR) and their participation in tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis ability. Saturation binding assays with the tritiated muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate indicate that LMM3 cells derived from a murine mammary adenocarcinoma express a single class of functional mAchR. Competition binding assays with selective muscarinic antagonists indicate a predominance of M{sub 3} receptor subtype. The muscarinic agonist carbachol (CARB) stimulates LMM3 cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. The maximal effect induced by 10{sup -9} M CARB was totally blunted by atropine and by the selective M{sub 3} and M{sub 1} antagonists, para-fluoro hexahydro sila-difenidol (pf-HHSiD) and pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, pf-HHSiD completely blocked in vivo CARB-induced neovascular formation and vascular endothelial growth factor-A in LMM3 tumor cells. We can conclude that mAchR expressed in LMM3 mammary tumor cells positively regulate proliferation and angiogenesis required for tumor progression.

  6. Muscarinic receptors and amylase secretion of rat pancreatic acini during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Morisset, J; Wood, J; Solomon, T E; Larose, L

    1987-08-01

    This study examines the effects of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis on the secretory response of rat pancreatic acini to carbamylcholine and concentration of acinar muscarinic receptors. Rats were injected subcutaneously every 8 hr with cerulein, 12 micrograms/kg, for two days. They were sacrificed 2 and 4 hr after the first injection, 4 hr after the second and third, and 8 hr after the sixth. By 2 hr after the first injection, carbamylcholine showed decreased potency for stimulating amylase release; decreased potency becomes maximal after the second injection. Four hours after the first injection, carbamylcholine also showed decreased efficacy for causing maximal amylase release. In the course of development of pancreatitis, progressive reductions in muscarinic receptor concentrations were evident from 4 hr after the second injection. Following the complete treatment (8 hr after the sixth injection), no alteration could be observed in the affinity or proportions of each agonist class of muscarinic receptors. These studies indicate that the pancreatic acinar cells still remain functional after acute cerulein-induced pancreatitis, although significant reductions in potency and efficacy of carbamylcholine to cause amylase release and reduced muscarinic receptor concentration occur. PMID:2440647

  7. Influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic brain receptors.

    PubMed

    Weckesser, M; Fixmann, A; Holschbach, M; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    1998-11-01

    The distribution of nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain in vivo has been successfully characterized using radiolabeled tracers and emission tomography. The effect of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft on receptor binding of these tracers has not yet been investigated. The present study examined the influence of acetylcholine on binding of 4-[125I]iododexetimide to muscarinic cholinergic receptors of porcine brain synaptosomes in vitro. 4-Iododexetimide is a subtype-unspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist with high affinity. Acetylcholine competed with 4-[125I]iododexetimide in a dose-dependent manner. A concentration of 500 microM acetylcholine inhibited 50% of total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding to synaptosomes when both substances were given simultaneously. An 800 microM acetylcholine solution reduced total specific 4-[125I]iododexetimide binding by about 35%, when acetylcholine was given 60 min after incubation of synaptosomes with 4-[125I]iododexetimide. Variations in the synaptic acetylcholine concentration might influence muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging in vivo using 4-[123I]iododexetimide. Conversely, 4-[123I]iododexetimide might be an appropriate molecule to investigate alterations of acetylcholine release into the synaptic cleft in vivo using single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:9863566

  8. Mutagenesis of Nucleophilic Residues near the Orthosteric Binding Pocket of M1 and M2 Muscarinic receptors: Effect on the Binding of Nitrogen Mustard Analogs of Acetylcholine and McN-A-343

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Sawyer, Gregory W.

    2010-01-01

    Investigating how a test drug alters the reaction of a site-directed electrophile with a receptor is a powerful method for determining whether the drug acts competitively or allosterically, provided that the binding site of the electrophile is known. In this study, therefore, we mutated nucleophilic residues near and within the orthosteric pockets of M1 and M2 muscarinic receptors to identify where acetylcholine mustard and 4-[(2-bromoethyl)methyl-amino]-2-butynyl-N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate (BR384) bind covalently. BR384 is the nitrogen mustard analog of [4-[[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]oxy]-2-butynyl]trimethylammonium chloride (McN-A-343). Mutation of the highly conserved aspartic acid in M1 (Asp105) and M2 (Asp103) receptors to asparagine largely prevented receptor alkylation by acetylcholine mustard, although modest alkylation still occurred at M2 D103N at high concentrations of the mustard. Receptor alkylation by BR384 was also greatly inhibited in the M1 D105N mutant, but some alkylation still occurred at high concentrations of the compound. In contrast, BR384 rapidly alkylated the M2 D103N mutant. Its affinity was reduced to one tenth, however. The alkylation of M2 D103N by BR384 was competitively inhibited by N-methylscopolamine and allosterically inhibited by gallamine. Mutation of a variety of other nucleophilic residues, some in combination with D103N, had little effect on M2 receptor alkylation by BR384. Our results suggest that BR384 alkylates at least one residue other than the conserved aspartic acid at the ligand-binding site of M1 and M2 receptors. This additional residue seems to be located within or near the orthosteric-binding pocket and is not part of the allosteric site for gallamine. PMID:20643905

  9. Characterization of muscarinic receptors in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Blankesteijn, W M; Siero, H L; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; van Megen, Y J; Russel, F G

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors in mammalian kidney seem to be involved in diuresis. In this study we give a detailed characterization of receptors in rat kidney. Specific binding of [3H](-)-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H]QNB) to membranes of rat kidney cortex was saturable and of high affinity. A dissociation constant of 0.063 +/- 0.003 nM and a receptor density of 1.46 +/- 0.07 pmol/g wet weight were obtained. The dissociation kinetics could be best described by assuming a mono-exponential function (k-1 = (0.52 +/- 0.1) x 10(-4) s-1). The binding of [3H]QNB reached a maximum in 60 min at 0.6 nM at 37 degrees C. Competition experiments with the enantiomers of benzetimide confirmed the muscarinic nature of the [3H]QNB binding sites. The inhibition constants of pirenzepine (0.23 +/- 0.02 microM), (+-)-hexahydrosiladifenidol (0.040 +/- 0.002 microM), AF-DX 116 (1.45 +/- 0.07 microM), methoctramine (1.67 +/- 0.02 microM) and gallamine (78 +/- 3 microM) classified this receptor as an M3 receptor. Inhibition of [3H]QNB binding by the agonists methylfurtrethonium, arecoline, isoarecoline methiodide, arecaidine propargyl ester and McN-A-343 displayed monophasic inhibition curves. With (+/-)-cis-2-methyl-4-dimethylaminomethyl-1,3- dioxolane methiodide in two out of four experiments a small (11%) population of high affinity agonist sites could be detected. The potassium sparing diuretic amiloride inhibited [3H]QNB binding (36 +/- 3 microM). Although in a way related to the amiloride binding site, the muscarinic receptors in rat kidney are unlikely to be the primary target of diuretic action of this drug. PMID:8420789

  10. Direct binding and functional studies on muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Yamazawa, T; Nakayama, K

    1990-02-01

    The muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery were identified and characterized by a binding assay using (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and also by pharmacological method. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding in the coronary artery was saturable and of high affinity (Kd = 0.08 nM), and it showed a pharmacological specificity as well as stereoselectivity which characterized muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic antagonists competed with the (-)-[3H]QNB binding in order: nonlabeled QNB greater than dexetimide greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than levetimide greater than gallamine. Dexetimide was approximately 2000 times as potent as levetimide. The potencies (pKi) of these muscarinic antagonists in competing for (-)-[3H]QNB binding sites in porcine coronary artery correlated well with their pharmacological potencies (pA2 for antagonistic effect of acetylcholine-induced contraction of coronary artery). The decrease in the (-)-[3H]QNB binding by atropine and pirenzepine was due to a reduction in the apparent affinity with little change in the number of maximal binding sites, suggesting a competitive antagonism. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding (Kd and maximal number of binding sites) in porcine coronary artery was not changed by the removal of endothelium. We conclude: 1) (-)-[3H]QNB selectively labels the physiologically relevant muscarinic receptors in porcine coronary artery and 2) the majority of these receptors is localized on vascular smooth muscles and the receptors mediate the acetylcholine-induced contractile response of coronary artery. PMID:2313599

  11. Affinities of brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine, and terfenadine at the five human muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, S U; Yasuda, R P

    1999-04-01

    Anticholinergic effects are presumed to be the mechanism for the efficacy of chlorpheniramine in symptomatic relief of the common cold. Terfenadine, a second-generation antihistamine, reportedly lacks anticholinergic side effects. We evaluated affinities of two commonly used over-the-counter antihistamines, brompheniramine and chlorpheniramine, as well as terfenadine in comparison with atropine at the five human muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes using CHO cells stably transfected with the individual subtypes. Atropine was more potent than all three drugs at m1-m5 (p<0.01). No significant difference was observed between chlorpheniramine and brompheniramine. Atropine, brompheniramine, and chlorpheniramine could not discriminate between m1-m5. Terfenadine demonstrated subtype selectivity at m3. In vitro comparisons in human muscarinic receptor subtypes could potentially be used to predict clinical anticholinergic effects of antihistamines and to target receptor-specific effects of such agents.

  12. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  13. [Interaction of chagasic autoantibodies with the third extracellular domain of the human heart muscarinic receptor. Functional and pathological implications].

    PubMed

    Goin, J C; Pérez Leirós, C; Borda, E; Sterin-Borda, L

    1996-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate by ELISA and immunoblotting the presence in the sera of chagasic patients of circulating autoantibodies against the third extracellular domain of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by using a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence 169-192 of the receptor. Immunoaffinity purified antipeptide antibodies displayed cardiac muscarinic activity as decreased contractility and cAMP production and increased cGMP levels. These effects were specifically blocked by the synthetic peptide and by atropine. A strong association between the existence of circulating autoantibodies and the presence of dysautonomia was shown, making these autoantibodies an appropriate marker of heart autonomic dysfunction.

  14. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    PubMed

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  15. Involvement of central cholinergic mechanisms in the effects of oxytocin and an oxytocin receptor antagonist on retention performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    2000-11-01

    Oxytocin (OT, 0.10 microg/kg, sc) impaired retention of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task when injected into male Swiss mice 10 min after training, as indicated by retention performance 48 h later. In contrast, the immediate post-training administration of the putative oxytocin receptor antagonist d(CH(2))(5)[Tyr(Me)(2), Thr(4), Thy-NH(9)(2)] OVT (AOT, 0.30 microg/kg, sc) significantly enhanced retention performance. Neither OT nor AOT affected response latencies in mice not given footshock on the training trial, and neither the impairing effects of OT nor the enhancing effects of AOT were seen when the training-treatment interval was 180 min, suggesting that both treatments influenced memory storage. The effects of OT (0.10 microg/kg, sc) on retention were prevented by AOT (0.03 microg/kg, sc) given immediately after training, but 10 min prior to OT treatment. The central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35, 70, or 150 microg/kg, i.p.), but not its quaternary analogue neostigmine (150 microg/kg, i.p.), reversed the impairment of retention performance induced by OT, whereas low subeffective doses of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or the central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the enhancement of retention performance caused by AOT. We suggest that oxytocin negatively modulates the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms during the posttraining period that follows an aversively motivated learning experience, leading to an impairment of retention performance of the inhibitory avoidance response. PMID:11031128

  16. Involvement of central cholinergic mechanisms in the effects of oxytocin and an oxytocin receptor antagonist on retention performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    2000-11-01

    Oxytocin (OT, 0.10 microg/kg, sc) impaired retention of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task when injected into male Swiss mice 10 min after training, as indicated by retention performance 48 h later. In contrast, the immediate post-training administration of the putative oxytocin receptor antagonist d(CH(2))(5)[Tyr(Me)(2), Thr(4), Thy-NH(9)(2)] OVT (AOT, 0.30 microg/kg, sc) significantly enhanced retention performance. Neither OT nor AOT affected response latencies in mice not given footshock on the training trial, and neither the impairing effects of OT nor the enhancing effects of AOT were seen when the training-treatment interval was 180 min, suggesting that both treatments influenced memory storage. The effects of OT (0.10 microg/kg, sc) on retention were prevented by AOT (0.03 microg/kg, sc) given immediately after training, but 10 min prior to OT treatment. The central acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (35, 70, or 150 microg/kg, i.p.), but not its quaternary analogue neostigmine (150 microg/kg, i.p.), reversed the impairment of retention performance induced by OT, whereas low subeffective doses of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or the central acting nicotinic cholinergic antagonist mecamylamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the enhancement of retention performance caused by AOT. We suggest that oxytocin negatively modulates the activity of central cholinergic mechanisms during the posttraining period that follows an aversively motivated learning experience, leading to an impairment of retention performance of the inhibitory avoidance response.

  17. Comparison of central and peripheral pharmacologic effects of biperiden and trihexyphenidyl in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, S K; Manzey, L; Scott, D; Giordani, B; Tandon, R

    2000-02-01

    In this double-blind, randomized study, indices of central (memory, sedation) and peripheral (salivation, ratio of R-R interval on electrocardiogram) muscarinic function were evaluated in 14 healthy volunteers who received trihexyphenidyl, biperiden, and placebo. Additionally, serum drug levels were obtained 2 hours after oral administration. All subjects participated in three study sessions. During each session, subjects received two doses of biperiden (4 mg), trihexyphenidyl (5 mg), or placebo, and four series of tests were administered. The tests included the determination of cardiac response to standing (R-R ratio), mouth salivation, finger-tapping speed, digit span (forward and backward), a selective reminding task, and visual analog scales (VAS). On the VAS, subjects rated biperiden as significantly more sedating than either trihexyphenidyl or placebo, and both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl were associated with more dizziness than was placebo. Saliva production was significantly reduced by both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden compared with placebo. Digit span performance was significantly decreased in only the backward direction. The selective reminding task revealed highly significant decrements in the number of words recalled and consistent long-term retrieval after both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl. Delayed recall was significantly decreased by both active drugs. Both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden caused a significant increase in the R-R ratio comparison with placebo. With the exception of the VAS measurement of sedation, the effects caused by biperiden and trihexyphenidyl did not differ. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the side effect profile of biperiden is significantly different from that of trihexyphenidyl.

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat.

    PubMed

    Taton, G; Delhaye, M; Swillens, S; Morisset, J; Larose, L; Longnecker, D S; Poirier, G G

    1985-04-15

    The active enantiomer of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H(-)QNB) was used as a ligand to evaluate the muscarinic receptors. The 3H(-)QNB binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained from normal and neoplastic tissues were studied to determine changes in receptor properties during neoplastic transformation. Saturable and stereospecific binding sites for 3H(-)QNB are present in homogenates of rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The proportions of high- and low-affinity agonist binding sites are similar for neoplastic and normal tissues. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in neoplastic (200 femtomoles/mg protein) than in normal pancreatic homogenates (80 femtomoles/mg protein). The muscarinic binding sites of the neoplastic and fetal pancreas show similar KD values which are higher than those observed for normal pancreas. PMID:2580801

  19. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abd-Ella, Aly; Stankiewicz, Maria; Mikulska, Karolina; Nowak, Wieslaw; Pennetier, Cédric; Goulu, Mathilde; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Licznar, Patricia; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; List, Olivier; Corbel, Vincent; Servent, Denis; Lapied, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low doses of DEET and a

  20. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Ella, Aly; Stankiewicz, Maria; Mikulska, Karolina; Nowak, Wieslaw; Pennetier, Cédric; Goulu, Mathilde; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Licznar, Patricia; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; List, Olivier; Corbel, Vincent; Servent, Denis; Lapied, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low doses of DEET and a

  1. The Repellent DEET Potentiates Carbamate Effects via Insect Muscarinic Receptor Interactions: An Alternative Strategy to Control Insect Vector-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Abd-Ella, Aly; Stankiewicz, Maria; Mikulska, Karolina; Nowak, Wieslaw; Pennetier, Cédric; Goulu, Mathilde; Fruchart-Gaillard, Carole; Licznar, Patricia; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; List, Olivier; Corbel, Vincent; Servent, Denis; Lapied, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Insect vector-borne diseases remain one of the principal causes of human mortality. In addition to conventional measures of insect control, repellents continue to be the mainstay for personal protection. Because of the increasing pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations, alternative strategies to reconstitute pyrethroid repellency and knock-down effects have been proposed by mixing the repellent DEET (N,N-Diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) with non-pyrethroid insecticide to better control resistant insect vector-borne diseases. By using electrophysiological, biochemichal, in vivo toxicological techniques together with calcium imaging, binding studies and in silico docking, we have shown that DEET, at low concentrations, interacts with high affinity with insect M1/M3 mAChR allosteric site potentiating agonist effects on mAChRs coupled to phospholipase C second messenger pathway. This increases the anticholinesterase activity of the carbamate propoxur through calcium-dependent regulation of acetylcholinesterase. At high concentrations, DEET interacts with low affinity on distinct M1/M3 mAChR site, counteracting the potentiation. Similar dose-dependent dual effects of DEET have also been observed at synaptic mAChR level. Additionally, binding and in silico docking studies performed on human M1 and M3 mAChR subtypes indicate that DEET only displays a low affinity antagonist profile on these M1/M3 mAChRs. These results reveal a selective high affinity positive allosteric site for DEET in insect mAChRs. Finally, bioassays conducted on Aedes aegypti confirm the synergistic interaction between DEET and propoxur observed in vitro, resulting in a higher mortality of mosquitoes. Our findings reveal an unusual allosterically potentiating action of the repellent DEET, which involves a selective site in insect. These results open exciting research areas in public health particularly in the control of the pyrethroid-resistant insect-vector borne diseases. Mixing low doses of DEET and a

  2. Verrucotoxin inhibits KATP channels in cardiac myocytes through a muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Wu; Yazawa, Kazuto; Hao, Li-Ying; Onoue, Yoshio; Kameyama, Masaki

    2007-06-01

    Verrucotoxin is the major component of venom from the stonefish (Synanceia verrucosa). Stings from the dorsal spines of the stonefish produce intensive pain, convulsions, hypotension, paralysis, respiratory weakness and collapse of the cardiovascular system, occasionally leading to death. It has been reported that verrucotoxin might modulate ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) current in frog atrial fibers. However, the mechanism by which verrucotoxin acts on KATP current remains unclear. In this study, we examined whether verrucotoxin inhibited KATP current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes, using the patch clamp method. Verrucotoxin suppressed KATP current induced by pinacidil (KATP channel opener) in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half maximum concentration of 16.3 microg/ml. The effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was suppressed by atropine (1 microM), a muscarinic receptor antagonist, or by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (100 nM), a muscarinic M3 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effect of verrucotoxin on KATP current was attenuated by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine (10 microM) and calphostin C (10 microM), yet not by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89 (0.5 microM). These results suggest that verrucotoxin inhibits KATP current through the muscarinic M3 receptor-PKC pathway. These findings enhance our understanding of the toxic effects of verrucotoxin from the stonefish. PMID:17362922

  3. Long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists for the treatment of chronic airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palot, Alain; Sofalvi, Tunde; Pahus, Laurie; Gouitaa, Marion; Tummino, Celine; Martinez, Stephanie; Charpin, Denis; Bourdin, Arnaud; Chanez, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine (neuronal and non-neuronal origin) regulates bronchoconstriction, and mucus secretion. It has an inflammatory effect by inducing attraction, survival and cytokine release from inflammatory cells. Muscarinic receptors throughout the bronchial tree are mainly restricted to muscarinic M1, M2 and M3 receptors. Three long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) were approved for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Europe: once-daily tiotropium bromide; once-daily glycopyrronium bromide; and twice-daily aclidinium bromide. All have higher selectivity for M3 receptors than for M2 receptors, and dissociate more slowly from the M3 receptors than they do from the M2 receptors. Some LAMAs showed anti-inflammatory effects [inhibition of neutrophil chemotactic activity and migration of alveolar neutrophils, decrease of several cytokines in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) including interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and leukotriene (LT)B4] and antiremodeling effects (inhibition of mucus gland hypertrophy and decrease in MUC5AC-positive goblet cell number, decrease in MUC5AC overexpression). In the clinic, LAMAs showed a significant improvement of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), quality of life, dyspnea and reduced the number of exacerbations in COPD and more recently in asthma. This review will focus on the three LAMAs approved in Europe in the treatment of chronic airway diseases. PMID:24587893

  4. Conformational and stereoeletronic investigations of muscarinic agonists of acetylcholine by NMR and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Julio Cesar A.; Ducati, Lucas C.; Rittner, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    NMR solvent effects and theoretical calculations showed muscarinic agonists present a large stability for their near synclinal conformations, indicating the presence of significant stabilization factors. Analysis of the results clearly indicated that this stability is not determined by the dihedral around the substituted C-C ethane bond, as stated by some authors, but a consequence of the geometry adopted in order to maximize N+/O interactions in this type of molecules. It can be assumed that acetylcholine and its muscarinic agonists exhibit their biologic activity when the positively charged nitrogen and the oxygen atoms are in the same side of the molecule within an interatomic distance ranging from 3.0 to 6.0 Å.

  5. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods.

    PubMed

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto; de Valdivia, Ernesto Gonzalez; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M M; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels O; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin R; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2013-09-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In this study, we cloned two structurally related GPCRs from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which, after expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells, proved to be muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. One mAChR (the A-type; encoded by gene CG4356) is activated by acetylcholine (EC50, 5 × 10(-8) M) and muscarine (EC50, 6 × 10(-8) M) and blocked by the classical mAChR antagonists atropine, scopolamine, and 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB), while the other (the B-type; encoded by gene CG7918) is also activated by acetylcholine, but has a 1,000-fold lower sensitivity to muscarine, and is not blocked by the antagonists. A- and B-type mAChRs were also cloned and functionally characterized from the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. Recently, Haga et al. (Nature 2012, 482: 547-551) published the crystal structure of the human m2 mAChR, revealing 14 amino acid residues forming the binding pocket for QNB. These residues are identical between the human m2 and the D. melanogaster and T. castaneum A-type mAChRs, while many of them are different between the human m2 and the B-type receptors. Using bioinformatics, one orthologue of the A-type and one of the B-type mAChRs could also be found in all other arthropods with a sequenced genome. Protostomes, such as arthropods, and deuterostomes, such as mammals and other vertebrates, belong to two evolutionarily distinct lineages of animal evolution that split about 700 million years ago. We found that animals that originated before this split, such as cnidarians (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs.

  6. Airway and lung remodelling in chronic pulmonary obstructive disease: a role for muscarinic receptor antagonists?

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lung tissue remodelling in chronic inflammatory lung diseases has long been regarded as a follow-up event to inflammation. Recent studies have indicated that, although airway and lung tissue remodelling is often independent of inflammation, it precedes or causes inflammation. None of the available therapies has a significant effect on airway and lung tissue remodelling in asthma, bronchiectasis, fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The goal of stopping or reversing lung tissue remodelling is difficult, as the term summarizes the net effect of independent events, including (1) cell proliferation, (2) cell volume increase, (3) cell migration, (4) modified deposition and metabolism of specific extracellular matrix components, and (5) local action of infiltrated inflammatory cells. The extracellular matrix of the lung has a very high turnover, and thus small changes may accumulate to significant structural pathologies, which seem to be irreversible. The most important question is 'why are pathological changes of the lung structure irreversible and resistant to drugs?' Many drugs have the potential to reduce remodelling mechanisms in vitro but fail in clinical trials. New evidence suggests that muscarinic receptor inhibitors have the potential to improve lung function through modifying tissue remodelling. However, the role of muscarinic receptors in lung remodelling, especially their supportive role for other remodelling driving factors, needs to be further investigated. The focus of this review is the role of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue remodelling as it has been reported in the human lung.

  7. Muscarinic receptor subtypes controlling the cationic current in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, Alexander V; Bolton, Thomas B

    1997-01-01

    The effects of muscarinic antagonists on cationic current evoked by activating muscarinic receptors with the stable agonist carbachol were studied by use of patch-clamp recording techniques in guinea-pig single ileal smooth muscle cells. Ascending concentrations of carbachol (3–300 μM) activated the cationic conductance in a concentration-dependent manner with conductance at a maximally effective carbachol concentration (Gmax) of 27.4±1.4 nS and a mean −log EC50 of 5.12±0.03 (mean±s.e.mean) (n=114). Muscarinic antagonists with higher affinity for the M2 receptor, methoctramine, himbacine and tripitramine, produced a parallel shift of the carbachol concentration-effect curve to the right in a concentration-dependent manner with pA2 values of 8.1, 8.0 and 9.1, respectively. All M3 selective muscarinic antagonists tested, 4-DAMP, p-F-HHSiD and zamifenacin, reduced the maximal response in a concentration-dependent and non-competitive manner. This effect could be observed even at concentrations which did not produce any increase in the EC50 for carbachol. At higher concentrations M3 antagonists shifted the agonist curve to the right, increasing the EC50, and depressed the maximum conductance response. Atropine, a non-selective antagonist, produced both reduction in Gmax (M3 effect) and significant increase in the EC50 (M2 effect) in the same concentration range. The depression of the conductance by 4-DAMP, zamifenacin and atropine could not be explained by channel block as cationic current evoked by adding GTPγS to the pipette (without application of carbachol) was unaffected. The results support the hypothesis that carbachol activates M2 muscarinic receptors so initiating the opening of cationic channels which cause depolarization; this effect is potentiated by an unknown mechanism when carbachol activates M3 receptors. As an increasing fraction of M3 receptors are blocked by an antagonist, the effects on cationic current of an increasing proportion of

  8. Environmental effects on the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, G W

    1977-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is designed to respond to the environment and is peculiarly vulnerable to many of the influences found in the environment. Utilizing an anatomical classification (cortex, cerebellum, peripheral nerves) major toxins and stresses are reviewed with selections from recent references. Selective vulnerability of certain areas to particular toxins is apparent at all levels of the CNS, although the amount of damage produced by any noxious agent depends on the age and genetic substrate of the subject. It is apparent that the effects of certain well known and long respected environmental toxins such as lead, mercury, etc., deserve continued surveillance. In addition, the overwhelming impact on the CNS of social damages such as trauma, alcohol, and tobacco cannot be ignored by environmentalists. The effect of the hospital and therapeutic environment has become apparent in view of increased awareness of iatrogenic disorders. The need for particular laboratory tests, for example, examination of CSF and nerve conduction toxicity studies, is suggested. Epidemics such as the recent solvent neuropathies suggest a need for continued animal studies that are chronic, as well as acute evaluations when predicting the potential toxic effects of industrial compounds. PMID:202447

  9. Cocaine treatment causes early and long-lasting changes in muscarinic and dopaminergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, D S; Correia, E E; Vasconcelos, S M M; Aguiar, L M V; Viana, G S B; Sousa, F C F

    2004-02-01

    1. The study of changes that persist after drug discontinuation could be fundamental to understand the mechanisms involved in craving and relapse. 2. In this work the changes occurring in muscarinic, D1- and D2-like receptors after 30 min (immediate), 1 day (early), 5 and 30 days (late) withdrawal periods were studied, in the striatum of rats treated once a day for 7 days with cocaine 20 and 30 mg/kg, i.p. 3. Binding assays were performed in 10% homogenates and ligands used were [3H]-N-methylscopolamine, [3H]-SCH 23390, and [3H]-spiroperidol for muscarinic (M1 + M2-like), D1-, and D2-like receptors, respectively. 4. Muscarinic receptors presented a downregulation at all doses and discontinuation times, while the dissociation constant (Kd) for this receptor decreased after 30 min, 5 and 30 days abstinence times. In relation to D1-like receptors we found an antagonistic effect with 100% increase in receptor number 30 min after the last cocaine injection, but after 1-day withdrawal a downregulation was observed with both doses that persisted up to 30 days, only with the higher dose. The dissociation constant value (Kd) for this receptor showed a decrease only with 5 and 30 days withdrawal. An increase occurred with D2-like receptors at all doses and withdrawal periods studied, while Kd increased in 30-min, 5, and 30 days withdrawal. 5. In this work we found that the subchronic cocaine treatment produces early and long-lasting modifications in cholinergic muscarinic as well in dopaminergic receptors that persist up to 30 days of cocaine withdrawal. PMID:15049517

  10. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  11. Carbamylcholine and phorbol esters desensitize muscarinic receptors by different mechanisms in rat pancreatic acini.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, L M; Paquette, B; Larose, L; Morisset, J

    1990-01-01

    Pretreatment of rat pancreatic acini with phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C (PK-C) activator, caused the desensitization of carbamylcholine (CBC)-induced amylase release in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The less potent phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also provoked a desensitization, but the inactive 4-alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate had no effect. PMA or PDBu also significantly reduced subsequent amylase release induced by caerulein or secretin in contrast to CBC, which only reduced amylase release induced by CBC or secretin. Preincubation of acini with PMA did not lead to a decrease in PMA or A23187-stimulated amylase release. A 3 h resting period did not restore the desensitization induced by PMA or PDBu. Pretreatment with PMA did not cause changes in muscarinic receptor high- and low-affinity populations as observed with CBC pretreatment. The PK-C inhibitor H-7 completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but not that induced by CBC. TMB-8, another PK-C inhibitor, also completely prevented the desensitization induced by PDBu but only partially that induced by CBC. These results suggest that phorbol esters can induce desensitization of muscarinic receptor-stimulated amylase release by a different mechanism than that involved in muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization.

  12. Motor activity-induced dopamine release in the substantia nigra is regulated by muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Daniel R; Björnsson, Evelina; Bergquist, Filip; Nissbrandt, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Nigro-striatal neurons release dopamine not only from their axon terminals in the striatum, but also from somata and dendrites in the substantia nigra. Somatodendritic dopamine release in the substantia nigra can facilitate motor function by mechanisms that may act independently of axon terminal dopamine release in the striatum. The dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra receive a cholinergic input from the pedunculopontine nucleus. Despite recent efforts to introduce this nucleus as a potential target for deep brain stimulation to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease; and the well-known antiparkinsonian effects of anticholinergic drugs; the cholinergic influence on somatodendritic dopamine release is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible regulation of locomotor-induced dopamine release in the substantia nigra by endogenous acetylcholine release. In intact and 6-OHDA hemi-lesioned animals alike, the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, when perfused in the substantia nigra, amplified the locomotor-induced somatodendritic dopamine release to approximately 200% of baseline, compared to 120-130% of baseline in vehicle-treated animals. A functional importance of nigral muscarinic receptor activation was demonstrated in hemi-lesioned animals, where motor performance was significantly improved by scopolamine to 82% of pre-lesion performance, as compared to 56% in vehicle-treated controls. The results indicate that muscarinic activity in the substantia nigra is of functional importance in an animal Parkinson's disease model, and strengthen the notion that nigral dopaminergic regulation of motor activity/performance is independent of striatal dopamine release.

  13. ATP-dependent desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel in rat atrial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Z; Boyett, M R; Zang, W J

    1997-01-01

    1. Fast desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel has been studied in excised patches from rat atrial cells. 2. In inside-out patches, ACh was present in the pipette and GTP was applied via the bath to activate the channel. In outside-out patches, GTP was present in the pipette and ACh was applied via the bath to activate the channel. In both cases, during a 30 s exposure to GTP or ACh there was a decline in channel activity as a result of fast desensitization if ATP was present. 3. In inside-out patches, fast desensitization was still observed if the muscarinic ACh receptor was bypassed and the channel was activated by GTP gamma S. This suggests that fast desensitization is a result of a modification of the channel (or the connecting G protein) and not the receptor. 4. In both inside-out and outside-out patches, channel activity was depressed and fast desensitization was reduced or absent, if ATP was not present. 5. The non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP, AMP-PNP, did not substitute for ATP in its effects on the channel. 6. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that fast desensitization of the muscarinic K+ channel is the result of a dephosphorylation of the channel. Images Figure 12 PMID:9409473

  14. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  15. Stereoselective L-(3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate-binding sites in nervous tissue of Aplysia californica: evidence for muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, T.F.; Mpitsos, G.J.; Siebenaller, J.F.; Barker, D.L.

    1985-12-01

    The muscarinic antagonist L-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (L-(/sup 3/H)QNB) binds with a high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM) to a single population of specific sites (Bmax = 47 fmol/mg of protein) in nervous tissue of the gastropod mollusc, Aplysia. The specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding is displaced stereoselectively by the enantiomers of benzetimide, dexetimide, and levetimide. The pharmacologically active enantiomer, dexetimide, is more potent than levetimide as an inhibitor of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Moreover, the muscarinic cholinergic ligands, scopolamine, atropine, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine are effective inhibitors of the specific L-(/sup 3/H)QNB binding, whereas nicotinic receptor antagonists, decamethonium and d-tubocurarine, are considerably less effective. These pharmacological characteristics of the L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site provide evidence for classical muscarinic receptors in Aplysia nervous tissue. The physiological relevance of the dexetimide-displaceable L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site was supported by the demonstration of the sensitivity of the specific binding to thermal denaturation. Specific binding of L-(/sup 3/H)QNB was also detected in nervous tissue of another marine gastropod, Pleurobranchaea californica. The characteristics of the Aplysia L-(/sup 3/H)QNB-binding site are in accordance with studies of numerous vertebrate and invertebrate tissues indicating that the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site has been highly conserved through evolution.

  16. Stereoselective L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate-binding sites in nervous tissue of Aplysia californica: evidence for muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Murray, T F; Mpitsos, G J; Siebenaller, J F; Barker, D L

    1985-12-01

    The muscarinic antagonist L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (L-[3H]QNB) binds with a high affinity (Kd = 0.77 nM) to a single population of specific sites (Bmax = 47 fmol/mg of protein) in nervous tissue of the gastropod mollusc, Aplysia. The specific L-[3H]QNB binding is displaced stereoselectively by the enantiomers of benzetimide, dexetimide, and levetimide. The pharmacologically active enantiomer, dexetimide, is more potent than levetimide as an inhibitor of L-[3H]QNB binding. Moreover, the muscarinic cholinergic ligands, scopolamine, atropine, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine are effective inhibitors of the specific L-[3H]QNB binding, whereas nicotinic receptor antagonists, decamethonium and d-tubocurarine, are considerably less effective. These pharmacological characteristics of the L-[3H]QNB-binding site provide evidence for classical muscarinic receptors in Aplysia nervous tissue. The physiological relevance of the dexetimide-displaceable L-[3H]QNB-binding site was supported by the demonstration of the sensitivity of the specific binding to thermal denaturation. Specific binding of L-[3H]QNB was also detected in nervous tissue of another marine gastropod, Pleurobranchaea californica. The characteristics of the Aplysia L-[3H]QNB-binding site are in accordance with studies of numerous vertebrate and invertebrate tissues indicating that the muscarinic cholinergic receptor site has been highly conserved through evolution. PMID:4078624

  17. Analgesic and Antineuropathic Drugs Acting Through Central Cholinergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, Alessandro; Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo Di; Ghelardini, Carla

    2011-01-01

    The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in analgesia and neuropathic pain relief is relatively unknown. This review describes how such drugs induce analgesia or alleviate neuropathic pain by acting on the central cholinergic system. Several pharmacological strategies are discussed which increase synthesis and release of acetylcholine (ACh) from cholinergic neurons. The effects of their acute and chronic administration are described. The pharmacological strategies which facilitate the physiological functions of the cholinergic system without altering the normal modulation of cholinergic signals are highlighted. It is proposed that full agonists of muscarinic or nicotinic receptors should be avoided. Their activation is too intense and un-physiological because neuronal signals are distorted when these receptors are constantly activated. Good results can be achieved by using agents that are able to a) increase ACh synthesis, b) partially inhibit cholinesterase activity c) selectively block the autoreceptor or heteroreceptor feedback mechanisms. Activation of M1 subtype muscarinic receptors induces analgesia. Chronic stimulation of nicotinic (N1) receptors has neuronal protective effects. Recent experimental results indicate a relationship between repeated cholinergic stimulation and neurotrophic activation of the glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. At least 9 patents covering novel chemicals for cholinergic system modulation and pain control are discussed. PMID:21585331

  18. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptors in lamb isolated coronary resistance arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, U.; Prieto, D.; Rivera, L.; Hernández, M.; Mulvany, M. J.; García-Sacristán, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. In vitro experiments in a microvascular myograph were designed to characterize postjunctional muscarinic receptors producing contraction both in the presence and absence of the endothelium in coronary resistance arteries (normalized diameter of 150-450 microns), isolated from the left ventricle of hearts from 3-6 month old lambs. Preferential muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to determine the receptor subtype: pirenzepine (M1 receptor), AFDX 116 (M2 receptor), 4-DAMP and pFHHSiD (M3 receptor). 2. The rank order of potency for muscarinic agonist-induced increases in tension in endothelium-intact preparations was oxotremorine-M = methacholine = acetylcholine (ACh) > carbachol. Removal of the endothelium increased the potency of ACh, but this procedure did not change either the sensitivity or maximal response to carbachol. 3. The contractile response to ACh was reproducible. Incubation with 3 x 10(-7)-3 x 10(-6) M pirenzepine induced non-parallel rightward shifts and depressed the maximum of the concentration-response curve to ACh in endothelium-intact arteries. The slope by Schild analysis was 2.9 +/- 0.8 (P < 0.05, n = 7). Atropine, AFDX 116, 4-DAMP and pFHHSiD produced parallel rightward shifts of the curves to ACh and the slopes of the Schild plots were not significantly different from unity. The pKB values for the antagonists from plots constrained to unity in endothelium-intact segments were: atropine (9.4), 4-DAMP (9.0), pFHHSiD (7.9) and AFDX 116 (6.2). 4. In endothelium-denuded arteries, pirenzepine, AFDX 116 and pFHHSiD caused concentration-dependent, parallel rightward displacements of the concentration-response curves to ACh and the slopes of the Schild plots were not significantly different from unity. The plots constrained to a slope of unity gave the following pKB values: pFHHSiD (8.7), pirenzepine (7.5) and AFDX 116 (6.2). 5. In the presence of the endothelium, low concentrations of pirenzepine (10(-9)-10(-7) M) produced leftward shifts of

  19. M3-subtype muscarinic receptor that controls intracellular calcium release and inositol phosphate accumulation in gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Leonard, A; Cuq, P; Magous, R; Bali, J P

    1991-07-25

    The muscarinic receptor subtype which triggers acid secretion was investigated in isolated rabbit gastric parietal cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), measured with the fluorescent indicator FURA-2, increased rapidly after full agonist (carbachol) stimulation (6-8 sec), then returned to an intermediate sustained value. Other M2-agonists, oxotremorine and arecoline, produced a partial [Ca2+]i increase, whereas M1-agonists, pilocarpine and [4-m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxyl]-2-butynyl-trimethylammonium, were without any significant effect. [Ca2+]i rise was inhibited by selective muscarinic antagonists: atropine greater than 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methbromide greater than quinuclidinylbenzilate (QNB) greater than pirenzepine greater than 11-[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one, this sequence being characteristic of the involvement of an M3-subtype. This inhibition was shown to be stereoselective; dexetimide and (-)QNB were more potent than levetimide and (+)QNB. The IC50 values for inhibition of [Ca2+]i increase by muscarinic antagonists were in good agreement with those obtained for inhibition of phospholipase C activation. In conclusion, the muscarinic receptor that controls acid secretion appears to be of the M3-subtype and the biochemical events coupled to the activation of this receptor system are also controlled through the same subtype. PMID:1651079

  20. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  1. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  2. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-03-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 ..mu..M, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. /sup 45/Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated /sup 45/Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 ..mu..M) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant.

  3. Muscarinic component of splanchnic-adrenal transmission in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, S. O.; McIsaac, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of atropine on catecholamine release evoked by stimulation of the splanchnic nerve was studied in the adrenal medulla of the dog. The magnitude of the catecholamine release was estimated biologically on the basis of the pressor response occurring in the perfused and acutely sympathectomized hindquarters of the same dog by comparing it with responses elicited by intravenous injection of adrenaline. 2. Atropine reduced the responses to nerve stimulation, and appeared to have a more prominent effect on the responses elicited by stimulation at moderate frequency (10 pulses/sec). 3. Hexamethonium or nicotine caused a more powerful, but not complete, blockade of transmission; the subsequent injection of atropine caused a further inhibition of the residual responses, leading to a complete, or near complete, abolition of the release by nerve stimulation. 4. The data were taken as evidence that transmission of impulses through muscarinic receptors occurs in normal conditions in the adrenal medulla of the dog, though this type of transmission is less prominent than that through nicotinic receptors. PMID:4306886

  4. Concanavalin A amplifies both beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Hines, D K; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) is a tetrameric plant lectin that disrupts plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interactions and alters plasma membrane fluidity. We used Con A as a probe to explore beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-mediated regulation of cAMP in intact neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Preincubation with Con A, 0.5 micrograms/ml, attenuated 1 microM (-)-norepinephrine (NE)-induced downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors and resulted in a 50% augmentation of cAMP accumulation stimulated by 1 microM NE. Con A also augmented forskolin (1-10 microM)-stimulated cAMP accumulation by an average of 37% (P less than 0.05); however, Con A preincubation had no effect on basal or cholera toxin-stimulated cAMP content. The muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol (1-100 microM) decreased 1 microM NE-stimulated cAMP generation by an average of 32% (n = 7, P less than 0.05); preincubation with Con A further enhanced the inhibitory effect of carbachol by 18% (n = 7, P less than 0.05). Carbachol (1 microM) for 2 h decreased muscarinic cholinergic receptor density in whole cells by 33%; preincubation with Con A prevented this receptor downregulation. Con A pretreatment did not affect (-)-isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell homogenates, suggesting that an intact cytoarchitecture is necessary for Con A to augment cAMP formation. We conclude that Con A, through its modulation of beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor signaling, amplifies both stimulatory and inhibitory adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in intact neonatal ventricular myocytes. These data suggest the possibility that plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interaction is an important regulator of transmembrane signaling because interference with this interaction results in alterations in cAMP accumulation mediated by both beta-adrenergic- and muscarinic cholinergic-adenylate cyclase pathways. PMID:1653274

  5. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  6. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  7. Muscarinic receptors in amygdala control trace fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Baysinger, Amber N; Kent, Brianne A; Brown, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent behavior requires transient memory, which entails the ability to retain information over short time periods. A newly-emerging hypothesis posits that endogenous persistent firing (EPF) is the neurophysiological foundation for aspects or types of transient memory. EPF is enabled by the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and is triggered by suprathreshold stimulation. EPF occurs in several brain regions, including the lateral amygdala (LA). The present study examined the role of amygdalar mAChRs in trace fear conditioning, a paradigm that requires transient memory. If mAChR-dependent EPF selectively supports transient memory, then blocking amygdalar mAChRs should impair trace conditioning, while sparing delay and context conditioning, which presumably do not rely upon transient memory. To test the EPF hypothesis, LA was bilaterally infused, prior to trace or delay conditioning, with either a mAChR antagonist (scopolamine) or saline. Computerized video analysis quantified the amount of freezing elicited by the cue and by the training context. Scopolamine infusion profoundly reduced freezing in the trace conditioning group but had no significant effect on delay or context conditioning. This pattern of results was uniquely anticipated by the EPF hypothesis. The present findings are discussed in terms of a systems-level theory of how EPF in LA and several other brain regions might help support trace fear conditioning.

  8. Role for M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Fedorova, Irina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P D; Rasmussen, Thøger; Thomsen, Morgane; Bolwig, Tom G; Knitowski, Karen M; McKinzie, David L; Yamada, Masahisa; Wess, Jürgen; Basile, Anthony

    2003-10-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors of the M5 subtype are expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmentum. These M5 receptors modulate the activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, which play an important role in mediating reinforcing properties of abused psychostimulants like cocaine. The potential role of M5 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine was investigated using M5 receptor-deficient mice in a model of acute cocaine self-administration. The M5-deficient mice self-administered cocaine at a significantly lower rate than wild-type controls. In the conditioned place preference procedure, a classic test for evaluating the rewarding properties of drugs, M5-deficient mice spent significantly less time in the cocaine-paired compartment than control mice. Moreover, the severity of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome (withdrawal-associated anxiety measured in the elevated plus-maze) was significantly attenuated in mice lacking the M5 receptor. These results demonstrate that M5 receptors play an important role in mediating both cocaine-associated reinforcement and withdrawal.

  9. Thermodynamics of antagonist binding to rat muscarinic M2 receptors: antimuscarinics of the pridinol, sila-pridinol, diphenidol and sila-diphenidol type.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Lambrecht, G.; Mutschler, E.; Kropfgans, M.; Sperlich, J.; Wiesenberger, F.; Tacke, R.; Christophe, J.

    1993-01-01

    of drug binding. 6. Replacement of a pyrrolidino by a piperidino group and increasing the length of the alkylene chain bridging the amino group and the central carbon or silicon atom were associated with either an increase or a decrease of entropy and enthalpy changes of drug binding. However, there was no clear correlation between these structural variations and the thermodynamic effects. 7. Taken together, these results suggest that hydrogen bond-forming OH groups and, to a lesser extent, polarizable phenyl groups contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of interactions between these classes of muscarinic antagonists and M2 muscarinic receptors. PMID:8102927

  10. Muscarinic receptors transform NIH 3T3 cells through a Ras-dependent signalling pathway inhibited by the Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, R R; Sorisky, A; Brann, M R; Macara, I G

    1994-01-01

    Expression of certain subtypes of human muscarinic receptors in NIH 3T3 cells provides an agonist-dependent model of cellular transformation by formation of foci in response to carbachol. Although focus formation correlates with the ability of the muscarinic receptors to activate phospholipase C, the actual mitogenic signal transduction pathway is unknown. Through cotransfection experiments and measurement of the activation state of native and epitope-tagged Ras proteins, the contributions of Ras and Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras-GAP) to muscarinic receptor-dependent transformation were defined. Transforming muscarinic receptors were able to activate Ras, and such activation was required for transformation because focus formation was inhibited by coexpression of either Ras with a dominant-negative mutation or constructs of Ras-GAP that include the catalytic domain. Coexpression of the N-terminal region of GAP or of its isolated SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, but not its SH2 domain, was also sufficient to suppress muscarinic receptor-dependent focus formation. Point mutations at conserved residues in the Ras-GAP SH3 domain reversed its action, leading to an increase in carbachol-dependent transformation. The inhibitory effect of expression of the Ras-GAP SH3 domain occurs proximal to Ras activation and is selective for the mitogenic pathway activated by carbachol, as cellular transformation by either v-Ras or trkA/nerve growth factor is unaffected. Images PMID:7969134

  11. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors on rat pancreatic acini by N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding. Their relationship with calcium 45 efflux and amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Dehaye, J P; Winand, J; Poloczek, P; Christophe, J

    1984-01-10

    N-[3H]Methylscopolamine (NMS) binding, amylase secretion, and 45Ca efflux from dispersed rat pancreatic acini were investigated in parallel, in the presence or absence of 4 muscarinic agonists and 3 muscarinic antagonists. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NMS saturation isotherms gave a KD of 0.9 nM and an average binding capacity of 24,000 sites per cell. Binding competition curves with the antagonists atropine, dexetimide, and NMS gave KD values of 3.5, 3.5, and 0.5 nM, respectively. With the 3 full agonists oxotremorine, muscarine, and carbamylcholine, the receptor population could be divided into two classes of binding sites: a minor one (15%) with high affinity (KD = 20-35 nM) and a major one (85%) with low affinity (KD = 3-65 microM). There was a receptor reserve of about 50% with respect to carbamylcholine-stimulated amylase secretion. Further analysis of dose-effect curves suggests that low affinity binding sites were involved in the secretory response to muscarinic stimulation. Pilocarpine, like muscarinic antagonists, recognized all binding sites with the same affinity but acted as a partial agonist on amylase secretion and 45Ca efflux. PMID:6200472

  12. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  13. Anti-muscarinic adjunct therapy accelerates functional human oligodendrocyte repair.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U; O'Bara, Melanie A; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J; Sim, Fraser J

    2015-02-25

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a(+)O4(+) cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors.

  14. Perirhinal Cortex Muscarinic Receptor Blockade Impairs Taste Recognition Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Ranier; De la Cruz, Vanesa; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of perirhinal cortical cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission for taste recognition memory and learned taste aversion was assessed by microinfusions of muscarinic (scopolamine), NMDA (AP-5), and AMPA (NBQX) receptor antagonists. Infusions of scopolamine, but not AP5 or NBQX, prevented the consolidation of taste recognition…

  15. Anti-Muscarinic Adjunct Therapy Accelerates Functional Human Oligodendrocyte Repair

    PubMed Central

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U.; O'Bara, Melanie A.; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M.; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H.; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C.; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a+O4+ cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors. PMID:25716865

  16. Characterization of muscarinic receptor binding by the novel radioligand, [(3)H]imidafenacin, in the bladder and other tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Shiori; Ito, Yoshihiko; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Shinozuka, Kazumasa; Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to directly characterize specific binding sites of tritium ([(3)H])-labeled imidafenacin, a new radioligand for labeling muscarinic receptors, in the bladder and other peripheral or central nervous tissues of rats. Muscarinic receptors in rat tissues were measured by radioligand binding assay using [(3)H]imidafenacin. Specific [(3)H]imidafenacin binding in rat tissues was saturable, reversible, and of high affinity. Estimated dissociation constants (Kd values) were significantly lower in submaxillary gland and prostate and higher in heart than in bladder, indicating lower Kd values in M1 and M3 subtype- than M2 subtype-dominating tissues. Unlabeled imidafenacin and clinically used antimuscarinic agents competed with [(3)H]imidafenacin for binding sites in bladder and other tissues in a concentration-dependent manner, which indicated pharmacological specificity of [(3)H]imidafenacin binding sites. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard), an irreversible inactivating agent of M3 subtype, significantly decreased the number of [(3)H]imidafenacin binding sites in bladder, submaxillary gland, and colon, but not in heart. [(3)H]imidafenacin labeled muscarinic receptors in M1 and M3 subtype-dominating tissues with higher affinity than [N-methyl-(3)H]scopolamine methyl chloride (NMS). [(3)H]imidafenacin is a useful radioligand to label muscarinic receptors in M1- and M3-dominating tissues with high affinity.

  17. Selective increase of alpha 1-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex after chronic haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Pazo, J H; Levi de Stein, M; Jerusalinsky, D; Novas, M L; Raskovsky, S; Tumilasci, O R; Medina, J H; De Robertis, E

    1987-06-30

    The effect of chronic administration of haloperidol on alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenoceptors, cholinergic muscarinic, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebral cortex of the rat was investigated. Doses of 0.3 and 2 mg/kg of haloperidol during 7 days increased markedly the density of alpha 1-adrenoceptors without changes in affinity. The alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors were not modified after neuroleptic administration. The number of muscarinic receptors were also increased after haloperidol treatment (2 mg/kg/day). However, the GABAA and benzodiazepine binding sites remained unchanged. In the brainstem an increment in the alpha 1-, but not the beta-adrenoceptors was observed. The well known increase in the dopamine receptors in the striatum was confirmed. These observations demonstrate a multireceptor effect of haloperidol in the cerebral cortex.

  18. Agonists with supraphysiological efficacy at the muscarinic M2 ACh receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schrage, R; Seemann, WK; Klöckner, J; Dallanoce, C; Racké, K; Kostenis, E; De Amici, M; Holzgrabe, U; Mohr, K

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Artificial agonists may have higher efficacy for receptor activation than the physiological agonist. Until now, such ‘superagonism’ has rarely been reported for GPCRs. Iperoxo is an extremely potent muscarinic receptor agonist. We hypothesized that iperoxo is a ‘superagonist’. Experimental Approach Signalling of iperoxo and newly synthesized structural analogues was compared with that of ACh at label-free M2 muscarinic receptors applying whole cell dynamic mass redistribution, measurement of G-protein activation, evaluation of cell surface agonist binding and computation of operational efficacies. Key Results In CHO-hM2 cells, iperoxo significantly exceeds ACh in Gi/Gs signalling competence. In the orthosteric loss-of-function mutant M2-Y1043.33A, the maximum effect of iperoxo is hardly compromised in contrast to ACh. ‘Superagonism’ is preserved in the physiological cellular context of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts. Structure–signalling relationships including iperoxo derivatives with either modified positively charged head group or altered tail suggest that ‘superagonism’ of iperoxo is mechanistically based on parallel activation of the receptor protein via two orthosteric interaction points. Conclusion and Implications Supraphysiological agonist efficacy at muscarinic M2 ACh receptors is demonstrated for the first time. In addition, a possible underlying molecular mechanism of GPCR ‘superagonism’ is provided. We suggest that iperoxo-like orthosteric GPCR activation is a new avenue towards a novel class of receptor activators. Linked Article This article is commented on by Langmead and Christopoulos, pp. 353–356 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12142 PMID:23062057

  19. Scopolamine administration modulates muscarinic, nicotinic and NMDA receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Falsafi, Soheil Keihan; Deli, Alev; Höger, Harald; Pollak, Arnold; Lubec, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the effect of scopolamine on memory are abundant but so far only regulation of the muscarinic receptor (M1) has been reported. We hypothesized that levels of other cholinergic brain receptors as the nicotinic receptors and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, known to be involved in memory formation, would be modified by scopolamine administration.C57BL/6J mice were used for the experiments and divided into four groups. Two groups were given scopolamine 1 mg/kg i.p. (the first group was trained and the second group untrained) in the multiple T-maze (MTM), a paradigm for evaluation of spatial memory. Likewise, vehicle-treated mice were trained or untrained thus serving as controls. Hippocampal levels of M1, nicotinic receptor alpha 4 (Nic4) and 7 (Nic7) and subunit NR1containing complexes were determined by immunoblotting on blue native gel electrophoresis.Vehicle-treated trained mice learned the task and showed memory retrieval on day 8, while scopolamine-treatment led to significant impairment of performance in the MTM. At the day of retrieval, hippocampal levels for M1, Nic7 and NR1 were higher in the scopolamine treated groups than in vehicle-treated groups.The concerted action, i.e. the pattern of four brain receptor complexes regulated by the anticholinergic compound scopolamine, is shown. Insight into probable action mechanisms of scopolamine at the brain receptor complex level in the hippocampus is provided. Scopolamine treatment is a standard approach to test cognitive enhancers and other psychoactive compounds in pharmacological studies and therefore knowledge on mechanisms is of pivotal interest.

  20. Ethanol impairs muscarinic receptor-induced neuritogenesis in rat hippocampal slices: Role of astrocytes and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Gennaro; Guizzetti, Marina; Dao, Khoi; Mattison, Hayley A; Costa, Lucio G

    2011-12-01

    In an in vitro co-culture system of astrocytes and neurons, stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in astrocytes had been shown to cause neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons, and this effect was inhibited by ethanol. The present study sought to confirm these earlier findings in a more complex system, in vitro rat hippocampal slices in culture. Exposure of hippocampal slices to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (1mM for 24h) induced neurite outgrowth in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which was mediated by activation of muscarinic M3 receptors. Specifically, carbachol induced a >4-fold increase in the length of the longest neurite, and a 4-fold increase in the length of minor neurites and in the number of branches. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol (50mM) resulted in significant inhibition of the effects induced by carbachol on all parameters measured. Neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons is dependent on various permissive factors that are produced and released by glial cells. In hippocampal slices carbachol increased the levels of two extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin and laminin-1, by 1.6-fold, as measured by Western blot. Co-incubation of carbachol with ethanol significantly inhibited these increases. Carbachol-induced increases in levels of extracellular matrix proteins were antagonized by a M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Furthermore, function-blocking fibronectin or laminin-1 antibodies antagonized the effect of carbachol on neurite outgrowth. These results indicate that in hippocampal slices stimulation of muscarinic M3 receptors induces neurite outgrowth, which is mediated by fibronectin and laminin-1, two extracellular matrix proteins released by astrocytes. By decreasing fibronectin and laminin levels ethanol prevents carbachol-induced neuritogenesis. These findings highlight the importance of glial-neuronal interactions as important targets in the developmental neurotoxicity of alcohol.

  1. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, D B; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A D

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of MBP with the M2 muscarinic receptor is allosteric. This effect of MBP suggests that it may function as an endogenous allosteric inhibitor of agonist binding to the M2 muscarinic receptor. Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by MBP was reversible by treatment with heparin, which binds and neutralizes MBP. Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) also inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors and inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes. On a molar basis, EPO is less potent than MBP. Neither eosinophil cationic protein nor eosinophil-derived neurotoxin affected binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors. Thus both MBP and EPO are selective allosteric antagonists at M2 receptors. The effects of these proteins may be important causes of M2 receptor dysfunction and enhanced vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in asthma. Images PMID:8473484

  2. In vitro and in vivo evidence for the existence of presynaptic muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Consolo, S; Wang, J X; Fusi, R; Vinci, R; Forloni, G; Ladinsky, H

    1984-08-20

    The intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid cleared 50% of muscarinic receptors and favored the detection of a further 20% loss in hippocampal presynaptic muscarinic receptors produced by electrolytic lesion of the medial septal nucleus as determined by Scatchard analysis of the saturation isotherms of [3H]dexetimide binding. In accordance, a decrease of about 20% in the in vivo accumulation of [3H]dexetimide in the hippocampus was found in animals lesioned in the medial septal nucleus. This effect occurred at both the dose of 5 micrograms/kg and at the saturating dose of 100 micrograms/kg of [3H]dexetimide. The results suggest that the loss was due to decreased receptor number rather than decreased receptor affinity. PMID:6488003

  3. Ligand binding properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes (m1-m5) expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, G Z; Kameyama, K; Rinken, A; Haga, T

    1995-07-01

    Five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1-m5) have been expressed in insect cells (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) using the baculovirus system. Up to 6 nmol of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors were produced by 1 liter culture; 0.3 to 0.6 (human m1), 3 to 6 (human m2), 2 to 4 (rat m3), 1 to 2 (rat m4) and 0.5 to 1 (human m5) nmol. Pirenzepine, AF-DX116 and hexahidrosiladifenidol showed the highest affinity for the m1, m2 and m3 subtype, respectively, indicating that these receptors expressed in Sf9 cells retain the same substrate specificity as those in mammalian tissues or cultured cells. Among 32 kinds of muscarinic ligands examined in the present studies, prifinium was found to have the highest affinity for the m4 subtype, and pilocarpine, oxotremorine, McN-A343 and promethazine the highest affinity for the m5 subtype, although the differences in the affinities among the five subtypes were less than 10-fold. Alcuronium increased the binding of [3H]N-methylscopalamine to the m2 subtype, but not the m1, m4 and m5 subtypes and only slightly to the m3 subtype. Similar but smaller effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine were found for [3H]N-methylscopalamine binding to only the m3 subtype. These effects may also be useful for the discrimination of individual subtypes. PMID:7616422

  4. Involvement of the basolateral amygdala in muscarinic cholinergic modulation of extinction memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Baratti, Carlos M; McGaugh, James L

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that drugs affecting neuromodulatory systems within the basolateral amygdala (BLA), including drugs affecting muscarinic cholinergic receptors, modulate the consolidation of many kinds of training, including contextual fear conditioning (CFC). The present experiments investigated the involvement of muscarinic cholinergic influences within the BLA in modulating the consolidation of CFC extinction memory. Male Sprague Dawley rats implanted with unilateral cannula aimed at the BLA were trained on a CFC task, using footshock stimulation, and 24 and 48 h later were given extinction training by replacing them in the apparatus without footshock. Following each extinction session they received intra-BLA infusions of the cholinergic agonist oxotremorine (10 ng). Immediate post-extinction BLA infusions significantly enhanced extinction but infusions administered 180 min after extinction training did not influence extinction. Thus the oxotremorine effects were time-dependent and not attributable to non-specific effects on retention performance. These findings provide evidence that, as previously found with original CFC learning, cholinergic activation within the BLA modulates the consolidation of CFC extinction. PMID:18706510

  5. Involvement of the basolateral amygdala in muscarinic cholinergic modulation of extinction memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Baratti, Carlos M; McGaugh, James L

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that drugs affecting neuromodulatory systems within the basolateral amygdala (BLA), including drugs affecting muscarinic cholinergic receptors, modulate the consolidation of many kinds of training, including contextual fear conditioning (CFC). The present experiments investigated the involvement of muscarinic cholinergic influences within the BLA in modulating the consolidation of CFC extinction memory. Male Sprague Dawley rats implanted with unilateral cannula aimed at the BLA were trained on a CFC task, using footshock stimulation, and 24 and 48 h later were given extinction training by replacing them in the apparatus without footshock. Following each extinction session they received intra-BLA infusions of the cholinergic agonist oxotremorine (10 ng). Immediate post-extinction BLA infusions significantly enhanced extinction but infusions administered 180 min after extinction training did not influence extinction. Thus the oxotremorine effects were time-dependent and not attributable to non-specific effects on retention performance. These findings provide evidence that, as previously found with original CFC learning, cholinergic activation within the BLA modulates the consolidation of CFC extinction.

  6. Sustained Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation Investigated with Centrality Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiangyu; Huang, Wenjing; Napadow, Vitaly; Liang, Fanrong; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Witt, Claudia M.; Nierhaus, Till; Pach, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can have instant and sustained effects, however, its mechanisms of action are still unclear. Here, we investigated the sustained effect of acupuncture by evaluating centrality changes in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging after manually stimulating the acupuncture point ST36 at the lower leg or two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome). Data from a previously published experiment evaluating instant BOLD effects and S2-seed-based resting state connectivity was re-analyzed using eigenvector centrality mapping and degree centrality mapping. These data-driven methods might add new insights into sustained acupuncture effects on both global and local inter-region connectivity (centrality) by evaluating the summary of connections of every voxel. We found higher centrality in parahippocampal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus after ST36 stimulation in comparison to the two control points. These regions are positively correlated to major hubs of the default mode network, which might be the primary network affected by chronic pain. The stronger integration of both regions within the whole-brain connectome after stimulation of ST36 might be a potential contributor to pain modulation by acupuncture. These findings highlight centrality mapping as a valuable analysis for future imaging studies investigating clinically relevant outcomes associated with physiological response to acupuncture stimulation. Clinical trial registration: NCT01079689, ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:27803655

  7. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hudkins, R.L. ); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  8. Intranasal scopolamine affects the semicircular canals centrally and peripherally.

    PubMed

    Weerts, Aurélie P; Putcha, Lakshmi; Hoag, Stephen W; Hallgren, Emma; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-08-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS), a condition caused by an intravestibular conflict, remains an important obstacle that astronauts encounter during the first days in space. Promethazine is currently the standard treatment of SMS, but scopolamine is used by some astronauts to prevent SMS. However, the oral and transdermal routes of administration of scopolamine are known to have substantial drawbacks. Intranasal administration of scopolamine ensures a fast absorption and rapid onset of therapeutic effect, which might prove to be suitable for use during spaceflights. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of intranasally administered scopolamine (0.4 mg) on the semicircular canals (SCCs) and the otoliths. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed on 19 healthy male subjects. The function of the horizontal SCC and the vestibulo-ocular reflex, as well as the saccular function and utricular function, were evaluated. Scopolamine turned out to affect mainly the SCCs centrally and peripherally but also the utricles to a lesser extent. Centrally, the most probable site of action is the medial vestibular nucleus, where the highest density of muscarinic receptors has been demonstrated and afferent fibers from the SCCs and utricles synapse. Furthermore, our results suggest the presence of muscarinic receptors in the peripheral vestibular system on which scopolamine has a suppressive effect. Given the depressant actions on the SCCs, it is suggested that the pharmacodynamic effect of scopolamine may be attributed to the obliteration of intravestibular conflict that arises during (S)MS.

  9. Intranasal scopolamine affects the semicircular canals centrally and peripherally.

    PubMed

    Weerts, Aurélie P; Putcha, Lakshmi; Hoag, Stephen W; Hallgren, Emma; Van Ombergen, Angelique; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Wuyts, Floris L

    2015-08-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS), a condition caused by an intravestibular conflict, remains an important obstacle that astronauts encounter during the first days in space. Promethazine is currently the standard treatment of SMS, but scopolamine is used by some astronauts to prevent SMS. However, the oral and transdermal routes of administration of scopolamine are known to have substantial drawbacks. Intranasal administration of scopolamine ensures a fast absorption and rapid onset of therapeutic effect, which might prove to be suitable for use during spaceflights. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of intranasally administered scopolamine (0.4 mg) on the semicircular canals (SCCs) and the otoliths. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed on 19 healthy male subjects. The function of the horizontal SCC and the vestibulo-ocular reflex, as well as the saccular function and utricular function, were evaluated. Scopolamine turned out to affect mainly the SCCs centrally and peripherally but also the utricles to a lesser extent. Centrally, the most probable site of action is the medial vestibular nucleus, where the highest density of muscarinic receptors has been demonstrated and afferent fibers from the SCCs and utricles synapse. Furthermore, our results suggest the presence of muscarinic receptors in the peripheral vestibular system on which scopolamine has a suppressive effect. Given the depressant actions on the SCCs, it is suggested that the pharmacodynamic effect of scopolamine may be attributed to the obliteration of intravestibular conflict that arises during (S)MS. PMID:25953832

  10. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    PubMed

    Kosentka, Pawel; Sprague, Sarah L; Ryberg, Martin; Gartz, Jochen; May, Amanda L; Campagna, Shawn R; Matheny, P Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades), the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa. PMID:23717644

  11. Evolution of the Toxins Muscarine and Psilocybin in a Family of Mushroom-Forming Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kosentka, Pawel; Sprague, Sarah L.; Ryberg, Martin; Gartz, Jochen; May, Amanda L.; Campagna, Shawn R.; Matheny, P. Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades), the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10–20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa. PMID:23717644

  12. Evolution of the toxins muscarine and psilocybin in a family of mushroom-forming fungi.

    PubMed

    Kosentka, Pawel; Sprague, Sarah L; Ryberg, Martin; Gartz, Jochen; May, Amanda L; Campagna, Shawn R; Matheny, P Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Mushroom-forming fungi produce a wide array of toxic alkaloids. However, evolutionary analyses aimed at exploring the evolution of muscarine, a toxin that stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, and psilocybin, a hallucinogen, have never been performed. The known taxonomic distribution of muscarine within the Inocybaceae is limited, based only on assays of species from temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. Here, we present a review of muscarine and psilocybin assays performed on species of Inocybaceae during the last fifty years. To supplement these results, we used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to determine whether muscarine was present in 30 new samples of Inocybaceae, the majority of which have not been previously assayed or that originated from either the tropics or temperate regions of the southern hemisphere. Our main objective is to test the hypothesis that the presence of muscarine is a shared ancestral feature of the Inocybaceae. In addition, we also test whether species of Inocyabceae that produce psilocybin are monophyletic. Our findings suggest otherwise. Muscarine has evolved independently on several occasions, together with several losses. We also detect at least two independent transitions of muscarine-free lineages to psilocybin-producing states. Although not ancestral for the family as a whole, muscarine is a shared derived trait for an inclusive clade containing three of the seven major lineages of Inocybaceae (the Inocybe, Nothocybe, and Pseudosperma clades), the common ancestor of which may have evolved ca. 60 million years ago. Thus, muscarine represents a conserved trait followed by several recent losses. Transitions to psilocybin from muscarine-producing ancestors occurred more recently between 10-20 million years ago after muscarine loss in two separate lineages. Statistical analyses firmly reject a single origin of muscarine-producing taxa.

  13. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads /sup 60/Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 /sup 60/Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia.

  14. Purification of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; De Backer, J P; Guillet, J C; Vanderheyden, P; Vauquelin, G; Strosberg, A D

    1983-01-01

    Calf forebrain homogenates contain 2.8 pM muscarinic acetylcholine receptors per mg of protein. [3H]Antagonist saturation binding experiments under equilibrium conditions revealed a single class of sites with equilibrium dissociation constants of 0.82 nM for [3H]dexetimide and 0.095 nM for [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. Displacement binding studies with agonists revealed the presence of low and high affinity sites. Here we describe the solubilization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with digitonin and their purification by affinity chromatography using an affinity gel which consisted of dexetimide coupled to Affi-Gel 10 (i.e., carboxy N-hydroxysuccinimide esters linked via a 1 nm spacer arm to agarose beads). Purified proteins were obtained by specific elution with muscarinic drugs, i.e., the antagonist atropine and the irreversible ligand propylbenzilylcholine mustard. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioiodinated purified preparations revealed a major 70-K protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6605245

  15. Endogenous inhibition of the trigeminally evoked neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gorini, C; Philbin, K; Bateman, R; Mendelowitz, D

    2010-10-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs.

  16. Local heating of human skin causes hyperemia without mediation by muscarinic cholinergic receptors or prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Golay, Sandrine; Haeberli, Christian; Delachaux, Anne; Liaudet, Lucas; Kucera, Paul; Waeber, Bernard; Feihl, François

    2004-11-01

    Local changes in surface temperature have a powerful influence on the perfusion of human skin. Heating increases local skin blood flow, but the mechanisms and mediators of this response (thermal hyperemia response) are incompletely elucidated. In the present study, we examined the possible dependence of the thermal hyperemia response on stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and on production of vasodilator prostanoids. In 13 male healthy subjects aged 20-30 yr, a temperature-controlled chamber was positioned on the volar face of one forearm and used to raise surface temperature from 34 to 41 degrees C. The time course of the resulting thermal hyperemia response was recorded with a laser-Doppler imager. In one experiment, each of eight subjects received an intravenous bolus of the antimuscarinic agent glycopyrrolate (4 microg/kg) on one visit and saline on the other. The thermal hyperemia response was determined within the hour after the injections. Glycopyrrolate effectively inhibited the skin vasodilation induced by iontophoresis of acetylcholine but did not influence the thermal hyperemia response. In a second experiment, conducted in five other subjects, 1 g of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin administered orally totally abolished the vasodilation induced in the skin by anodal current but also failed to modify the thermal hyperemia response. The present study excludes the stimulation of muscarinic receptors and the production of vasodilator prostaglandins as essential and nonredundant mechanisms for the vasodilation induced by local heating in human forearm skin. PMID:15247159

  17. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  18. Short-Term Desensitization of Muscarinic K+ Current in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shingo; Inanobe, Atsushi; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) rapidly increases cardiac K+ currents (IKACh) by activating muscarinic K+ (KACh) channels followed by a gradual amplitude decrease within seconds. This phenomenon is called short-term desensitization and its precise mechanism and physiological role are still unclear. We constructed a mathematical model for IKACh to examine the conditions required to reconstitute short-term desensitization. Two conditions were crucial: two distinct muscarinic receptors (m2Rs) with different affinities for ACh, which conferred an IKACh response over a wide range of ACh concentrations, and two distinct KACh channels with different affinities for the G-protein βγ subunits, which contributed to reconstitution of the temporal behavior of IKACh. Under these conditions, the model quantitatively reproduced several unique properties of short-term desensitization observed in myocytes: 1), the peak and quasi-steady states with 0.01–100 μM [ACh]; 2), effects of ACh preperfusion; and 3), recovery from short-term desensitization. In the presence of 10 μM ACh, the IKACh model conferred recurring spontaneous firing after asystole of 8.9 s and 10.7 s for the Demir and Kurata sinoatrial node models, respectively. Therefore, two different populations of KACh channels and m2Rs may participate in short-term desensitization of IKACh in native myocytes, and may be responsible for vagal escape at nodal cells. PMID:24048003

  19. Central tendency effects in time interval reproduction in autism

    PubMed Central

    Karaminis, Themelis; Cicchini, Guido Marco; Neil, Louise; Cappagli, Giulia; Aagten-Murphy, David; Burr, David; Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Central tendency, the tendency of judgements of quantities (lengths, durations etc.) to gravitate towards their mean, is one of the most robust perceptual effects. A Bayesian account has recently suggested that central tendency reflects the integration of noisy sensory estimates with prior knowledge representations of a mean stimulus, serving to improve performance. The process is flexible, so prior knowledge is weighted more heavily when sensory estimates are imprecise, requiring more integration to reduce noise. In this study we measure central tendency in autism to evaluate a recent theoretical hypothesis suggesting that autistic perception relies less on prior knowledge representations than typical perception. If true, autistic children should show reduced central tendency than theoretically predicted from their temporal resolution. We tested autistic and age- and ability-matched typical children in two child-friendly tasks: (1) a time interval reproduction task, measuring central tendency in the temporal domain; and (2) a time discrimination task, assessing temporal resolution. Central tendency reduced with age in typical development, while temporal resolution improved. Autistic children performed far worse in temporal discrimination than the matched controls. Computational simulations suggested that central tendency was much less in autistic children than predicted by theoretical modelling, given their poor temporal resolution. PMID:27349722

  20. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) inhibits ERK phosphorylation by muscarinic receptor modulation in rat pituitary GH3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Secondo, Agnese; De Mizio, Mariarosaria; Zirpoli, Laura; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Mondola, Paolo

    2008-11-07

    The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) belongs to a family of isoenzymes that are able to dismutate the oxygen superoxide in hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. This enzyme is secreted by many cellular lines and it is also released trough a calcium-dependent depolarization mechanism involving SNARE protein SNAP 25. Using rat pituitary GH3 cells that express muscarinic receptors we found that SOD1 inhibits P-ERK1/2 pathway trough an interaction with muscarinic M1 receptor. This effect is strengthened by oxotremorine, a muscarinic M agonist and partially reverted by pyrenzepine, an antagonist of M1 receptor; moreover this effect is independent from increased intracellular calcium concentration induced by SOD1. Finally, P-ERK1/2 inhibition was accompanied by the reduction of GH3 cell proliferation. These data indicate that SOD1 beside the well studied antioxidant properties can be considered as a neuromodulator able to affect mitogen-activated protein kinase in rat pituitary cells trough a M1 muscarinic receptor.

  1. Peptidergic and muscarinic excitation at amphibian sympathetic synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Kuffler, S W; Sejnowski, T J

    1983-01-01

    A single-electrode voltage clamp was used to study the slow muscarinic and late slow peptidergic excitatory post-synaptic currents (e.p.s.c.s) in B cells of the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia of the bull-frog. Conductance decreases were measured during peptidergic e.p.s.c.s in nearly all cells at clamped potentials near the resting level. In about half of the cells the size of the peptidergic e.p.s.c.s increased with hyperpolarization and in some of these cells conductance increases were found at hyperpolarized levels. In the remaining cells conductance decreases occurred at all levels of membrane potential tested, and in a few of these the polarity of the e.p.s.c.s reversed at hyperpolarized potentials. A similar diversity was observed among muscarinic e.p.s.c.s. At least two simple ionic mechanisms are required to explain the heterogeneous voltage dependencies observed: a conductance decrease primarily to K+ that dominates at depolarized potentials and a conductance increase to other ions that is more prominent at hyperpolarized potentials. The proportion of these two mechanisms appears to differ among B cells. The two slow e.p.s.c.s recorded in the same neurone had the same voltage dependence and were accompanied by the same conductance changes in each of eight cells despite differences between cells. The muscarinic e.p.s.c. was reduced during the peptidergic e.p.s.c. in each of twenty-five neurones tested over a range of membrane potentials. Externally-applied luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) produced currents with the same voltage dependence and conductance changes as the nerve-evoked peptidergic e.p.s.c. in each of fifteen cells tested. Bethanechol, a muscarinic agonist, and LHRH produced currents with the same voltage dependence and conductance changes in each of the twelve cells studied. In several cells a saturating response to a prolonged application of LHRH completely occluded the response to bethanechol, and vice versa. Slow currents were

  2. Cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer prevention in Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Berkhof, Johannes; Bogaards, Johannes A; Demirel, Erhan; Diaz, Mireia; Sharma, Monisha; Kim, Jane J

    2013-12-31

    We studied the cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia (CEECA) region. The cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV)16/18 vaccination of 12 year-old girls was calculated for 28 countries, under the assumption that vaccination prevents 70% of all cervical cancer cases and that cervical cancer and all-cause mortality rates are stable without vaccination. At three-dose vaccination costs of I$ 100 per vaccinated girl (currency 2005 international dollars), HPV16/18 vaccination was very cost-effective in 25 out of 28 countries using the country's gross domestic product (GDP) per capita as cost-effectiveness threshold (criterion by World Health Organization). A three-dose vaccination cost of I$ 100 is within the current range of vaccine costs in European immunization programs, and therefore our results indicate that HPV vaccination may be good value for money. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of cervical cancer screening combined with vaccination, we calibrated a published simulation model to HPV genotype data collected in Slovenia, Poland, and Georgia. The screening interval was varied at 3, 6, and 10 years starting at age 25 or 30 and ending at age 60. In Slovenia and Poland, combined vaccination and 10-yearly HPV (DNA) screening (vaccination coverage 70%, screening coverage per round 70%) was very cost-effective when the cost of three-dose vaccination was I$ 100 per vaccinated girl. More intensive screening was very cost-effective when the screening coverage per round was 30% or 50%. In Georgia, 10-yearly Pap screening was very cost-effective in unvaccinated women. Vaccination combined with 10-yearly HPV screening was likely to be cost-effective if the three-dose vaccination cost was I$ 50 per vaccinated girl. To conclude, cervical cancer prevention strategies utilizing both HPV16/18 vaccination and HPV screening are very cost-effective in countries with sufficient resources. In low

  3. alpha-Adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are not involved in the modulation of the parasympathetic baroreflex by the medial prefrontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Resstel, L B M; Fernandes, K B P; Corrêa, F M A

    2005-08-12

    The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is involved in cardiovascular control and baroreflex modulation. Recent studies indicated that stimulation of MPFC muscarinic receptors causes hypotensive responses whereas stimulation of alpha1- but not of alpha2-adrenoceptors causes pressor responses in unanesthetized rats. It has also been shown that the MPFC is involved in the modulation of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex in rats. We report that bilateral injections of CoCl2 in the ventral portion of the MPFC (vMPFC) reduced the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex, thus confirming the involvement of local synapses. We further evaluated the effect of the pharmacologic block of vMPFC alpha1- or alpha2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors on the vMPFC-related modulation of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex in unanesthetized rats. Bilateral microinjections of 10 nmol of the selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101 or 10 nmol of the selective alpha2-adrenoceptors antagonist RX821002 into the MPFC did not affect the baroreflex. Bilateral microinjections of 9 nmol of the muscarinic antagonist atropine also did not affect baroreflex activity. The present results indicate that although vMPFC alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors are involved in cardiovascular regulation, they do not mediate the vMPFC-related modulation of the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex. PMID:15894338

  4. M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in an input-specific fashion

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fang; Wess, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors have long been known as crucial players in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, but our understanding of the cellular underpinnings and the receptor subtypes involved lags well behind. This holds in particular for the hippocampal CA3 region, where the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity depend on the type of afferent input. Williams and Johnston (Williams S, Johnston D. Science 242: 84–87, 1988; Williams S, Johnston D. J Neurophysiol 64: 1089–1097, 1990) demonstrated muscarinic depression of mossy fiber (MF) long-term potentiation (LTP) through a presynaptic site of action and Maeda et al. (Maeda T, Kaneko S, Satoh M. Brain Res 619: 324–330, 1993) proposed a bidirectional modulation of MF LTP by muscarinic receptor subtypes. Since then, this issue, as well as muscarinic regulation of plasticity at associational/commissural (A/C) fiber-CA3 synapses has remained largely neglected, not least because of the lack of highly selective ligands for the different muscarinic receptor subtypes. In the present study, we performed field potential and whole cell recordings from the hippocampal CA3 region of M2 receptor knockout mice to determine the role of M2 receptors in short-term and long-term plasticity at A/C and MF inputs to CA3 pyramidal cells. At the A/C synapse, M2 receptors promoted short-term facilitation and LTP. Unexpectedly, M2 receptors mediated the opposite effect on LTP at the MF synapse, which was significantly reduced, most likely involving a depressant effect of M2 receptors on adenylyl cyclase activity in MF terminals. Our data demonstrate that cholinergic projections recruit M2 receptors to redistribute the gain of LTP in CA3 pyramidal cells in an input-specific manner. PMID:22490561

  5. Pharmacology of butylthio[2.2.2] (LY297802/NNC11-1053): a novel analgesic with mixed muscarinic receptor agonist and antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Shannon, H E; Sheardown, M J; Bymaster, F P; Calligaro, D O; Delapp, N W; Gidda, J; Mitch, C H; Sawyer, B D; Stengel, P W; Ward, J S; Wong, D T; Olesen, P H; Suzdak, P D; Sauerberg, P; Swedberg, M D

    1997-05-01

    Butylthio[2.2.2], ((+)-(S)-3-(4-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2] octane; LY297802/NNC11-1053) is a muscarinic receptor ligand which is equiefficacious to morphine in producing antinociception. In vitro, butylthio[2.2.2] had high affinity for muscarinic receptors in brain homogenates, but had substantially less or no affinity for several other neurotransmiter receptors and uptake sites. In isolated tissues, butylthio[2.2.2] was an agonist with high affinity for M1 receptors in the rabbit vas deferens (IC50 = 0.33 nM), but it was an antagonist at M2 receptors in guinea pig atria (pA2 = 6.9) and at M3 receptors in guinea pig urinary bladder (pA2 = 7.4) and a weak partial agonist in guinea pig ileum, which contains a heterogeneous population of muscarinic receptors. In vivo, butylthio[2.2.2] was without effect on acetylcholine, dopamine and serotonin levels in rat brain. Moreover, butylthio[2.2.2] did not decrease charcoal meal transit in mice, nor did it significantly alter heart rate in rats. Further, butylthio[2.2.2] did not produce parasympathomimetic effects such as salivation or tremor in mice, but it antagonized salivation and tremor produced by the nonselective muscarinic agonist oxotremorine. The present data demonstrate that butylthio[2.2.2] is a novel muscarinic receptor mixed agonist/antagonist and its pharmacological profile suggests that it may have clinical utility in the management of pain as an alternative to opioids. PMID:9152398

  6. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  7. Muscarinic M2 receptors in bovine tracheal smooth muscle: discrepancies between binding and function.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Van Amsterdam, R G; De Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1988-08-01

    Previous work showing that AF-DX 116, a cardioselective muscarinic antagonist in functional experiments, does not discriminate between muscarinic receptors in bovine cardiac and tracheal membranes has been extended. In addition to AF-DX 116 we used the muscarinic antagonists, atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP methobromide, gallamine, hexahydrosiladifenidol and methoctramine, in radioligand binding experiments on bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The functional antagonism of the methacholine-induced contraction of bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips was also evaluated. An excellent correlation was found for all compounds between the binding affinities for muscarinic receptors in cardiac and tracheal smooth muscle membranes; moreover, the affinities found in cardiac membranes correspond with the pA2 values reported for atrial preparations of rat and guinea pig. However, significant and occasionally marked discrepancies were found between binding and functional affinities of these muscarinic antagonists on bovine tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:3215279

  8. Long-term nitric oxide deficiency causes muscarinic supersensitivity and reduces β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation, causing rat detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Mónica, F Z T; Bricola, A A O; Báu, F R; Freitas, L L Lopes; Teixeira, S A; Muscará, M N; Abdalla, F M F; Porto, C S; De Nucci, G; Zanesco, A; Antunes, E

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Overactive bladder is a complex and widely prevalent condition, but little is known about its physiopathology. We have carried out morphological, biochemical and functional assays to investigate the effects of long-term nitric oxide (NO) deficiency on muscarinic receptor and β-adrenoceptor modulation leading to overactivity of rat detrusor muscle. Experimental approach: Male Wistar rats received Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in drinking water for 7–30 days. Functional responses to muscarinic and β-adrenoceptor agonists were measured in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips in Krebs–Henseleit solution. Measurements of [3H]inositol phosphate, NO synthase (NOS) activity, [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) binding and bladder morphology were also performed. Key results: Long-term L-NAME treatment significantly increased carbachol-induced DSM contractile responses after 15 and 30 days; relaxing responses to the β3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37-344 were significantly reduced at 30 days. Constitutive NOS activity in bladder was reduced by 86% after 7 days and maintained up to 30 days of L-NAME treatment. Carbachol increased sixfold the [3H]inositol phosphate in bladder tissue from rats treated with L-NAME. [3H]QNB was bound with an apparent KD twofold higher in bladder membranes after L-NAME treatment compared with that in control. No morphological alterations in DSM were found. Conclusions and implications: Long-term NO deficiency increased rat DSM contractile responses to a muscarinic agonist, accompanied by significantly enhanced KD values for muscarinic receptors and [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in bladder. This supersensitivity for muscarinic agonists along with reductions of β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxations indicated that overactive DSM resulted from chronic NO deficiency. PMID:18297104

  9. Muscarinic receptor occupancy by biperiden in living human brain.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Y; Suhara, T; Suzuki, K; Okubo, Y; Yoshikawa, K; Uchida, S; Sassa, T; Okauchi, T; Sasaki, Y; Matsushita, M

    1999-01-01

    Anticholinergic drug is often used to treat extrapyramidal symptoms. We measured muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAchR) occupancy by the oral administration of biperiden in eight healthy subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate (NMPB). After the baseline scan each subject underwent one or two post-dose PET scans. mAchR occupancy was 10-45% in the frontal cortex three hours after the oral administration of 4 mg of biperiden. The occupancy correlated with the plasma concentration of biperiden in a curvilinear manner.

  10. The modulatory role of M2 muscarinic receptor on apomorphine-induced yawning and genital grooming.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Maria Thereza; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Nasello, Antonia Gladys

    2012-12-01

    The interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of behavioral responses has been previously established. In the brain, M2 receptors are found predominantly in presynaptic cholinergic neurons as autoreceptors, and in dopaminergic neurons as heteroceptors, suggesting a control role of acetylcholine and dopamine release, respectively. Our aim was to investigate the role of M2 receptors on the yawning and genital grooming of rats induced by apomorphine, a dopaminergic receptor agonist, focusing on the interaction between cholinergic and dopaminergic pathways. Initially, the effect of atropine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist, on yawning and genital grooming induced by apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.) was analyzed. Atropine doses of 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before induction of the behavioral responses by apomorphine. Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were quantified over a 60 min period. Apomorphine-induced yawning was increased by low dose (0.5 mg/kg i.p.) but not by high doses (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) of atropine. Genital grooming was antagonized by 2 mg/kg i.p. of atropine and showed no changes at the other doses tested. Tripitramine, a selective M2 cholinergic antagonist, was used as a tool for distinguishing between M2 and all other muscarinic receptor subtypes in yawning and genital grooming. Tripitramine doses of 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 μmol/kg i.p. were administered to Wistar rats 30 min before apomorphine (100 μg/kg s.c.). Number of yawns and time spent genital grooming were also quantified over a 60 min period. Tripitramine 0.01 μmol/kg increased all parameters. Higher doses, which possibly block all subtypes of muscarinic receptor, did not modify the response of apomorphine, suggesting a non-selective effect of tripitramine at these doses. Given that low doses of tripitramine increased the behavioral responses induced by apomorphine and that the main distribution of the M2

  11. Low-level exposure to methylmercury modifies muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding characteristics in rat brain and lymphocytes: physiologic implications and new opportunities in biologic monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Coccini, T; Randine, G; Candura, S M; Nappi, R E; Prockop, L D; Manzo, L

    2000-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) affects several parameters of cholinergic function. These alterations are thought to play a role in MeHg neurotoxicity. In vitro experiments have indicated that MeHg acts as a strong competitive inhibitor of radioligand binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) in rat brain. Furthermore, rat brain mAChRs share several pharmacologic characteristics of similar receptors present on lymphocytes. Using the muscarinic antagonist [(3)H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) to label receptors, we investigated the in vivo interactions of MeHg with rat brain mAChRs. We also investigated whether MeHg-induced central mAChR changes are reflected by similar alterations in splenic lymphocytes. Exposure to low doses of MeHg--0.5 or 2 mg/kg/day in drinking water--for 16 days significantly increased (20-44% of control) mAChRs density (B(max)) in the hippocampus and cerebellum without affecting receptor affinity (K(d)). The effect of MeHg did not occur immediately; it was not apparent until 2 weeks after the termination of treatment. No significant changes in [(3)H]QNB binding were observed in the cerebral cortex. In splenic lymphocytes, mAChR density was remarkably increased (95-198% of control) by day 14 of MeHg exposure and remained enhanced 14 days after the cessation of treatment. These results suggest up-regulation of mAChRs in selected brain regions (hippocampus and cerebellum) after prolonged low-level ingestion of MeHg in rats. These cerebral effects are delayed in onset and are preceded by a marked increase in density of mAChRs on lymphocytes. In chronic MeHg exposure, peripheral lymphocytes may represent a sensitive target for the interaction of MeHg with mAChRs and, therefore, may be predictive indicators of later adaptive response involving cerebral mAChRs. Additionally, the effect of MeHg on lymphocyte mAChRs in vivo indicates that this receptor system should be investigated further as a possible target for MeHg immunotoxicity. Images Figure 1

  12. Coupling of G Proteins to Reconstituted Monomers and Tetramers of the M2 Muscarinic Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Redka, Dar'ya S.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Elmslie, Gwendolynne; Paranthaman, Pranavan; Shivnaraine, Rabindra V.; Ellis, John; Ernst, Oliver P.; Wells, James W.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors can be reconstituted as monomers in nanodiscs and as tetramers in liposomes. When reconstituted with G proteins, both forms enable an allosteric interaction between agonists and guanylyl nucleotides. Both forms, therefore, are candidates for the complex that controls signaling at the level of the receptor. To identify the biologically relevant form, reconstituted monomers and tetramers of the purified M2 muscarinic receptor were compared with muscarinic receptors in sarcolemmal membranes for the effect of guanosine 5′-[β,γ-imido]triphosphate (GMP-PNP) on the inhibition of N-[3H]methylscopolamine by the agonist oxotremorine-M. With monomers, a stepwise increase in the concentration of GMP-PNP effected a lateral, rightward shift in the semilogarithmic binding profile (i.e. a progressive decrease in the apparent affinity of oxotremorine-M). With tetramers and receptors in sarcolemmal membranes, GMP-PNP effected a vertical, upward shift (i.e. an apparent redistribution of sites from a state of high affinity to one of low affinity with no change in affinity per se). The data were analyzed in terms of a mechanistic scheme based on a ligand-regulated equilibrium between uncoupled and G protein-coupled receptors (the “ternary complex model”). The model predicts a rightward shift in the presence of GMP-PNP and could not account for the effects at tetramers in vesicles or receptors in sarcolemmal membranes. Monomers present a special case of the model in which agonists and guanylyl nucleotides interact within a complex that is both constitutive and stable. The results favor oligomers of the M2 receptor over monomers as the biologically relevant state for coupling to G proteins. PMID:25023280

  13. Analgesic and cardiovascular effects of centrally administered substance P.

    PubMed

    Clint, B D; Lipton, J M; Giesecke, A H

    1988-01-01

    Substance P (SP) injected intracerebroventricularly (ICV) into rabbits caused dose-related thermal analgesia with the maximum effect after 2 micrograms. The analgesia was measured by timing the withdrawal of the rabbit's ear from an infrared beam. Equimolar amounts of the related peptides physalaemin and eledoisin-related peptide also caused analgesia, but the SP N-terminal fragment (1-9) was inactive. This suggests that the analgesic message of SP resides within the C-terminal fragment. The analgesia caused by each peptide developed more rapidly but did not last as long as that after central injection of beta-endorphin. In separate experiments, 2 micrograms SP injected ICV increased blood pressure and decreased heart rate. The analgesic, bradycardic and pressor responses to central administration of SP were opposite to effects of peripherally administered SP, described previously. These results indicate that the effect induced by SP depends upon its specific neuroanatomical site of action.

  14. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  15. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  16. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Bonne, T C; Zaar, M; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-06-15

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2 = 12%) after intravenous administration of 1) no drugs (Cont), 2) propranolol (Prop), 3) glycopyrrolate (Glyc), or 4) Prop + Glyc. HR increased with exercise in all drug conditions (P < 0.001) but was always higher at a given workload in hypoxia than normoxia (P < 0.001). Averaged over all workloads, the difference between hypoxia and normoxia was 19.8 ± 13.8 beats/min during Cont and similar (17.2 ± 7.7 beats/min, P = 0.95) during Prop but smaller (P < 0.001) during Glyc and Prop + Glyc (9.8 ± 9.6 and 8.1 ± 7.6 beats/min, respectively). Cardiac output was enhanced by hypoxia (P < 0.002) to an extent that was similar between Cont, Glyc, and Prop + Glyc (2.3 ± 1.9, 1.7 ± 1.8, and 2.3 ± 1.2 l/min, respectively, P > 0.4) but larger during Prop (3.4 ± 1.6 l/min, P = 0.004). Our results demonstrate that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia during exercise partially relies on vagal withdrawal. Conversely, sympathoexcitation either does not contribute or increases heart rate through mechanisms other than β-adrenergic transmission. A potential candidate is α-adrenergic transmission, which could also explain why a tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition.

  17. Carbachol dimers as homobivalent modulators of muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Matucci, Rosanna; Nesi, Marta; Martino, Maria Vittoria; Bellucci, Cristina; Manetti, Dina; Ciuti, Elisa; Mazzolari, Angelica; Dei, Silvia; Guandalini, Luca; Teodori, Elisabetta; Vistoli, Giulio; Romanelli, Maria Novella

    2016-05-15

    A series of homodimers of the well-known cholinergic agonist carbachol have been synthesized, showing the two agonist units symmetrically connected through a methylene chain of variable length. The new compounds have been tested on the five cloned muscarinic receptors (hM1-5) expressed in CHO cells by means of equilibrium binding studies, showing an increase in affinity by rising the number of methylene units up to 7 and 9. Functional experiments on guinea-pig ileum and assessment of ERK1/2 phosphorylation on hM1, hM2 and hM3 on CHO cells have shown that the new compounds are endowed with muscarinic antagonistic properties. Kinetic binding studies have revealed that some of the tested compounds are able to slow the rate of dissociation of NMS, suggesting a bitopic behavior. Docking simulations, performed on the hM1 and hM2 receptors, give a sound rationalization of the experimental data revealing how these compounds are able to interact with both orthosteric and allosteric binding sites depending on the length of their connecting chain. PMID:26996304

  18. Activation of muscarinic receptors by non-neuronal acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Wessler, Ignaz Karl; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2012-01-01

    The biological role of acetylcholine and the cholinergic system is revisited based particularly on scientific research early and late in the last century. On the one hand, acetylcholine represents the classical neurotransmitter, whereas on the other hand, acetylcholine and the pivotal components of the cholinergic system (high-affinity choline uptake, choline acetyltransferase and its end product acetylcholine, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and esterase) are expressed by more or less all mammalian cells, i.e. by the majority of cells not innervated by neurons at all. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that acetylcholine and "cholinergic receptors" are expressed in non-neuronal organisms such as plants and protists. Acetylcholine is even synthesized by bacteria and algae representing an extremely old signalling molecule on the evolutionary timescale. The following article summarizes examples, in which non-neuronal acetylcholine is released from primitive organisms as well as from mammalian non-neuronal cells and binds to muscarinic receptors to modulate/regulate phenotypic cell functions via auto-/paracrine pathways. The examples demonstrate that non-neuronal acetylcholine and the non-neuronal cholinergic system are vital for various types of cells such as epithelial, endothelial and immune cells.

  19. Rizatriptan has central antinociceptive effects against durally evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Cumberbatch, M J; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    The 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist rizatriptan constricts intracranial, extracerebral blood vessels, inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the meninges and is effective clinically against migraine. The present study has investigated whether rizatriptan may also have activity at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors within the central nervous system (CNS) that contributes to its antimigraine effects. Action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the dura-mater were recorded extracellularly from single neurones in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis in anaesthetized rats. Rizatriptan dose dependently inhibited these nociceptive dural responses by up to 63 +/- 9% after 3 mg/kg, i.v. Rizatriptan therefore has central activity which may contribute to its efficacy against migraine headache. PMID:9203565

  20. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  1. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured guinea pig pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, S.R.; Brown, M.E.; Williams, J.A.; Logsdon, C.D.

    1986-07-01

    Regulation of muscarinic receptors in cultured guinea pig pancreatic acini was investigated by assessing the effects of cholinergic agonists on binding of (N-methyl-TH)scopolamine ((TH)NMS) and on amylase release. Freshly dispersed acini bound (TH)NMS with a K/sub d/ of 74 pM and a maximal binding level (B/sub max/) of 908 fmol/mg DNA. Carbachol (CCh) stimulated amylase secretion and inhibited (TH)NMS binding. Incubation of acini for 30 min with 0.1 mM CCh decreased the subsequent efficacy of CCh in stimulating amylase release by threefold but had no effect on its potency. In contrast, amylase release in response to cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) was not altered by CCh preincubation. (TH)NMS binding to acini was decreased only 15-20% after 30-min incubation with CCh. However, culture of acini with 0.1 mM CCh decreased (TH)NMS binding by 50% at 3-4 h and by 85-90% at 24 h. This decrease was attributable primarily to a reduction in B/sub max/ (TH)NMS binding also was decreased to a similar extent by the cholinergic agonists bethanechol and methacholine but not by other secretagogues. The decrease in antagonist binding induced by CCh was dose dependent, with the IC50, 5.8 M, approximating the EC50 for amylase release, 4.3 M. Cultured of acini for 24 h with CCh abolished subsequent amylase release in response to CCh but not to CCK-8. The results indicate that muscarinic receptor turnover in the pancreatic acinus is regulated by receptor activation and that both a decease in receptor numbers and sensitivity to agonists follows prolonged cholinergic agonist exposure.

  2. Development of tolerance after repeated administration of a selective muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salin-Pascual, R J; Granados-Fuentes, D; Galicia-Polo, L; Nieves, E; Gillin, J C

    1993-02-01

    The muscarinic antagonist biperiden produces a dose-dependent inhibition of (REM) sleep on acute administration. The present study addressed the possibility of pharmacological tolerance after repeated biperiden administration. Six healthy volunteers were studied under sleep laboratory conditions in the following situations: one acclimatization, night, two baseline (that were averaged), 4 nights of biperiden administration, and 4 nights of placebo recovery administration. Six milligrams of biperiden and placebo were administered in identical capsules. Volunteers and technicians were blind to the order of the administration of the capsules. REM sleep time was reduced during the first and the second night, but was not significantly different in comparison with baseline by the third night. During placebo recovery nights, REM sleep time was not different from baseline. REM sleep latency was increased during the first and second nights of biperiden administration, but tolerance to this effect was observed by the third night. On placebo nights a dramatic shortening of REM latency was observed. The present findings support the hypothesis that anticholinergic drugs, even a selective M1 antagonist such as biperiden, induce tolerance soon after administration. A similar effect has been reported with scopolamine, a nonselective muscarinic antagonist, but the main difference is that biperiden withdrawal was not followed by an REM sleep rebound. The observed effect on REM sleep latency during placebo administration may be related to a supersensitivity to muscarinic M-1 receptors that trigger the first REM sleep period. Because short REM latency has been the main finding in the sleep of depressed patients, some implications of the present findings are discussed.

  3. Effects of asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix two (D2.50) and three (D3.32) of M1 – M4 muscarinic receptors on the irreversible binding of nitrogen mustard analogs of acetylcholine and McN-A-343

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how asparagine mutagenesis of conserved aspartic acids in helix two (D2.50) and three (D3.32) of M1 – M4 muscarinic receptors alters the irreversible binding of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 (4-[(2-bromoethyl)methyl-amino]-2-butynyl N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate), a nitrogen mustard derivative of McN-A-343 ([4-[[N-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamoyl]oxy]-2-butynyl] trimethylammonium chloride). The D2.50N mutation moderately increased the affinity of the aziridinium ions of acetylcholine mustard and BR384 for M2 – M4 receptors and had little effect on the rate constant for receptor alkylation. The D3.32N mutation greatly reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by acetylcholine mustard, but not by BR384, although the affinity of BR384 was reduced. The combination of both mutations (D2.50N/D3.32N) substantially reduced the rate constant for receptor alkylation by BR384 relative to wild type and mutant D2.50N and D3.32N receptors. The change in binding affinity caused by the mutations suggests that the D2.50N mutation alters the interaction of acetylcholine mustard with D3.32 of M1 and M3 receptors, but not that of the M4 receptor. BR384 exhibited the converse relationship. The simplest explanation is that acetylcholine mustard and BR384 alkylate at least two residues on M1 – M4 receptors and that the D2.50N mutation alters the rate of alkylation of D3.32 relative to another residue, perhaps D2.50 itself. PMID:23826889

  4. Central effects of acetylsalicylic acid on trigeminal-nociceptive stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetylsalicylic acid is one of the most used analgesics to treat an acute migraine attack. Next to the inhibitory effects on peripheral prostaglandin synthesis, central mechanisms of action have also been discussed. Methods Using a standardized model for trigeminal-nociceptive stimulation during fMRI scanning, we investigated the effect of acetylsalicylic acid on acute pain compared to saline in 22 healthy volunteers in a double-blind within-subject design. Painful stimulation was applied using gaseous ammonia and presented in a pseudo-randomized order with several control stimuli. All participants were instructed to rate the intensity and unpleasantness of every stimulus on a VAS scale. Based on previous results, we hypothesized to find an effect of ASA on central pain processing structures like the ACC, SI and SII as well as the trigeminal nuclei and the hypothalamus. Results Even though we did not find any differences in pain ratings between saline and ASA, we observed decreased BOLD signal changes in response to trigemino-nociceptive stimulation in the ACC and SII after administration of ASA compared to saline. This finding is in line with earlier imaging results investigating the effect of ASA on acute pain. Contrary to earlier findings from animal studies, we could not find an effect of ASA on the trigeminal nuclei in the brainstem or within the hypothalamic area. Conclusion Taken together our study replicates earlier findings of an attenuating effect of ASA on pain processing structures, which adds further evidence to a possibly central mechanism of action of ASA. PMID:25201152

  5. Physiological and biochemical studies of newly synthesized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in embryonic chicken heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Exposure of either chicken embryos in ovo or cultured embryonic chicken cardiac cells in vitro to the muscarinic agonist carbachol results in a 70-90% decrease in the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) expressed in cardiac cells. Block of agonist-receptor interactions in ovo with the antagonist atropine or removal of the agonist in vitro results in a gradual increase in mAChR number, reaching the control level in 14 hr. Measurements of physiological sensitivity of atria or cultured cells show that, even after the complete recovery of receptor number, the sensitivity to agonist is reduced. The sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is also decreased at this time. Newly synthesized mAChR which appear following affinity alkylation in cultured cells are also poorly coupled to the stimulation of /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ efflux, indicating that decreased physiological sensitivity is not due to an unknown effect of long-term agonist exposure on general cellular function, but rather reflects an intrinsic property of newly synthesized mAChR. This increase in sensitivity is also not blocked by cycloheximide. The increase in sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated responses is due neither to a lack of expression of newly synthesized mAChR on the surface nor to reduced agonist affinity of the mAChR. The diminished sensitivity and subsequent maturation observed in cells containing newly synthesized receptors is due either to a small change in mAChR, or to a change in an as-yet-undefined component of the mAChR transduction system; this alteration represents a novel locus for modulation of cholinergic signals in the heart.

  6. Endogenous Inhibition of the Trigeminally Evoked Neurotransmission to Cardiac Vagal Neurons by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gorini, C.; Philbin, K.; Bateman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Stimulation of the nasal mucosa by airborne irritants or water evokes a pronounced bradycardia accompanied by peripheral vasoconstriction and apnea. The dive response, which includes the trigeminocardiac reflex, is among the most powerful autonomic responses. These responses slow the heart rate and reduce myocardial oxygen consumption. Although normally cardioprotective, exaggeration of this reflex can be detrimental and has been implicated in cardiorespiratory diseases, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). An essential component of the diving response and trigeminocardiac reflex is activation of the parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the nucleus ambiguus that control heart rate. This study examined the involvement of cholinergic receptors in trigeminally evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in CVNs in an in vitro preparation from rats. CVNs were identified using a retrograde tracer injected into the fat pads at the base of the heart. Application of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor neostigmine significantly decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic neurotransmission to CVNs on stimulation of trigeminal fibers. Whereas nicotine did not have any effect on the glutamatergic responses, the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonist bethanechol significantly decreased the excitatory neurotransmission. Atropine, an mAChR antagonist, facilitated these responses indicating this trigeminally evoked brain stem pathway in vitro is endogenously inhibited by mAChRs. Tropicamide, an m4 mAChR antagonist, prevented the inhibitory action of the muscarinic agonist bethanechol. These results indicate that the glutamatergic synaptic neurotransmission in the trigeminally evoked pathway to CVNs is endogenously inhibited in vitro by m4 mAChRs. PMID:20719927

  7. Affective Analgesia following Muscarinic Activation of the Ventral Tegmental Area in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kender, Robert G.; Harte, Steven E.; Munn, Elizabeth M.; Borszcz, George S.

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic stimulation of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) underlies activation of the brain reward circuitry. Activation of this circuit is proposed to preferentially suppress the affective reaction to noxious stimulation. Vocalization afterdischarges (VADs) are a validated model of the affective response of rats to noxious tailshock. The antinociceptive action of the acetylcholine agonist carbachol microinjected into the VTA on VAD threshold was compared to its effect on the thresholds of other tailshock-elicited responses (VDS = vocalizations during shock, and SMR = spinal motor reflexes). Whereas VADs are organized within the forebrain, VDSs and SMRs are organized at medullary and spinal levels of the neuraxis, respectively. Carbachol (1 μg, 2 μg, and 4 μg) injected into VTA produced dose-dependent increases in VAD and VDS thresholds, although increases in VAD threshold were significantly greater than increases in VDS threshold. Administration of carbachol into VTA failed to elevate SMR threshold. Elevations in vocalization thresholds produced by intra-VTA carbachol were reversed in a dose-dependent manner by local administration of the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine sulfate (30 μg and 60 μg). These results provide the first demonstration of the involvement of the VTA in muscarinic-induced suppression of pain affect. Perspective Cholinergic activation of the brain reward circuit produced a preferential suppression of rats’ affective reaction to noxious stimulation. The neurobiology that relates reinforcement to suppression of pain affect may provide insights into new treatments for pain and its associated affective disorders. PMID:18387853

  8. Tramadol state-dependent memory: involvement of dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jafari-Sabet, Majid; Jafari-Sabet, Ali-Reza; Dizaji-Ghadim, Ali

    2016-08-01

    The effects on tramadol state-dependent memory of bilateral intradorsal hippocampal (intra-CA1) injections of physostigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and atropine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, were examined in adult male NMRI mice. A single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. Post-training intra-CA1 administration of an atypical μ-opioid receptor agonist, tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse), dose dependently impaired memory retention. Pretest injection of tramadol (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under the influence of post-training tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). A pretest intra-CA1 injection of physostigmine (1 μg/mouse) reversed the memory impairment induced by post-training administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1). Moreover, pretest administration of physostigmine (0.5 and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) with an ineffective dose of tramadol (0.25 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) also significantly restored retrieval. Pretest administration of physostigmine (0.25, 0.5, and 1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. A pretest intra-CA1 injection of the atropine (1 and 2 μg/mouse) 5 min before the administration of tramadol (1 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) dose dependently inhibited tramadol state-dependent memory. Pretest administration of atropine (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/mouse, intra-CA1) by itself did not affect memory retention. It can be concluded that dorsal hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor mechanisms play an important role in the modulation of tramadol state-dependent memory.

  9. The muscarinic receptor of chick embryo cells: correlation between ligand binding and calcium mobilization

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    In this report we characterize muscarinic cholinergic receptor on embryonic cells. We established dose-response curves by fluorometric measurement of Ca2+ mobilization in cell suspensions of whole chick embryos stage 23/24. Ca2+ mobilization was quantitated by standardization of chlorotetracycline (CTC) fluorescence changes after stimulation with muscarinic agonists. We determined ED50 values for the agonists acetylcholine and carbachol as 3.4 X 10(-6) and 2.7 X 10(-5) M, respectively. Pilocarpine and oxotremorine were found to act as reversible competitive antagonists with inhibition constants (Kl) of 5.0 X 10(-6) and 1.4 X 10(-6) M, respectively. Bethanechol, which induced only 23% of the maximal effect obtained by acetylcholine, was a partial agonist with an ED50 of 4.8 X 10(-4) M. Its antagonistic component is expressed by an inhibition constant of 1.9 X 10(-4) M. In parallel, binding studies were performed in a competition assay with [3H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate. For the agonists acetylcholine and carbachol, binding parameters were best fitted by a "two binding-sites model." Comparison with dose-response curves indicated that Ca2+ mobilization was triggered via the high-affinity binding site. The inhibition constants of antagonists derived from the shift of dose- response curves corresponded to the fitted KD values of the binding studies when a "one binding-site model" was applied. Combination of dose-response and binding data showed close proportionality between receptor occupancy and calcium mobilization. No spare receptors were present. PMID:2858487

  10. Effects of drought in central and south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, H.E.; Others

    1963-01-01

    The effects of drought upon ground-water storage and discharge, and upon streamflow, vary tremendously in the central third of Texas (the area from the Panhandle to the Gulf of Mexico). Extremes are represented by (a) the Llano Estacado, where the drought had negligible effect upon ground-water resources, which are being progressively depleted by pumping for irrigation; and (b) the Balcones fault-zone aquifer west of San Antonio, whose storage and natural discharge declined substantially during the drought, but increased even more rapidly during succeeding years of more abundant precipitation.

  11. Effect of central glucagon infusion on macronutrient selection in rats.

    PubMed

    Komenami, N; Su, F H; Thibault, L

    1996-02-01

    Compared were the light-dark pattern of absolute energy intake and macronutrient selection of male Wistar rats intracerebroventricularly infused with glucagon (5 ng/h) or saline for 7 days in a three-way selection of macronutrients. Glucagon infusion induced a decrease in 24 h and nocturnal energy intake, whereas no significant change in kcal intake accompanied vehicle infusion. The decrease in kcal intake was due to a suppression of nocturnal ingestion of carbohydrate. This parameter was left unaffected with central vehicle infusion. Glucagon-infused rats had a significantly lower body weight gain than those infused with vehicle. Our study supports the hypothesis of central glucagon's suppressive effect on food intake, but reveals that the latter reflects a lower disposition to eat carbohydrate during the dark phase. The present work emphasizes the role of glucagon in the circadian regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  12. Down-regulation of phospholipase C-beta1 following chronic muscarinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, S D; Linseman, D A; Fisher, S K

    1998-04-01

    To determine whether prolonged activation of a phospholipase C-coupled receptor can lead to a down-regulation of its effector enzyme, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were incubated for 24 h with the muscarinic receptor agonist, oxotremorine-M. Under these conditions, significant reductions (46-53%) in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density, G(alphaq/11) and phospholipase C-beta1 (but not the beta3-or gamma1 isoforms) were observed. These results suggest that a selective down-regulation of phospholipase C-beta1 may play a role in adaptation to chronic muscarinic receptor activation. PMID:9617763

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  14. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  15. Action of cholinergic poisons on the central nervous system and effectiveness of potential antidotes. Annual report 1 Jul 81-30 Jun 82

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, F.; Nelson, S.

    1982-11-01

    The research aim was to determine the effects of soman, related organophosphate toxins and potential antidotes on brain regional functions in rats: The (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose procedure (2-DG) was used for mapping brain regional glucose use. Quantitative autoradiography was used for muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The 2-DG procedure gives a quantitative measure of glucose utilization in brain regions and is in index of the 'functional activity' in brain regions and systems. Values were determined in controls, rats with soman induced seizures, seizures induced by convulsants (DFP, strychnine, picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol, penicillin) and soman pretreated with TAB. Brain regional cholinergic receptor maps were prepared and some regional muscarinic and nicotinic receptor densities have been quantified. Soman (112 micrograms/kg i.m.) causes strong, continuous seizures and a dramatic (2-6 fold) increase in the rate of glucose use in 10 major brain regions. Most intense increases were in septum, substants nigra reticularis and outer layer of hippcampal dendata gyrus. The overt seizures of rats induced by convulsants DFP, strychnine, picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol and penicillin (in hippocampus) were strikingly different from that of rats with soman seizures. High doses (2X LD50) of soman in rats protected with TAB caused a 50% depression of glucose use in most brain regions. The effects of repeated soman exposure on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors are under study.

  16. Radioligand binding to muscarinic receptors of bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Kukovetz, W R

    1991-02-01

    1. Muscarinic receptors on endothelial cells of bovine thoracic aorta were characterized by binding assays in which (-)-[3H]-N-methyl quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-NMeQNB) was used as radioligand. 2. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to crude membranes of freshly isolated endothelial cells was atropine-displaceable and of high affinity (KD = 0.48 nM) to a single class of sites (maximum binding capacity: 14 +/- 3 fmol mg-1 protein). Stereospecificity of the binding sites was demonstrated in experiments in which [3H]-NMeQNB binding was inhibited by dexetimide in the nanomolar range (KI = 0.63 nM) and by levetimide, its stereoisomer in the micromolar range (KI = 3.2 microM) (selectivity factor: approximately 5000). 3. Drug competition curves indicated a single class of binding sites for antagonists and the following apparent affinities (KI, nM): methyl atropine: 1.1: 4-diphenylacetoxy N-methyl piperidine methyl bromide (4-DAMP): 3.4; pirenzepine: 16; 11-[2-diethylamino-methyl)-1-piperidinyl- acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)1,4-benzodiazepine-6-one (AF-DX 116); 2.500. Competition of acetylcholine with [3H]-NMeQNB was best described by two affinity sites (or states) (KH = 0.82 microM, KL = 1.6 microM). In the presence of guanylimido diphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] (100 microM), acetylcholine affinity (IC50) was slightly, but significantly reduced (factor approximately 4). 4. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to freshly harvested intact cells was also atropine-displaceable, stereospecific (selectivity factor: approximately 3500) and of high affinity (KD = 0.35 nM). The maximum binding capacity (9 +/- 2 fmol mg-1 total cell protein) was comparable to that of membranes and corresponded to approximately 900 binding sites per endothelial cell. Binding to enzymatically harvested and cultured endothelial cells, or membranes derived therefrom, showed no atropine-displaceable binding. 5. The results suggest that (1) bovine aortic endothelial cells contain muscarinic binding sites with all necessary

  17. Muscarinic receptor modulation of basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated function of the failing human left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Newton, G E; Parker, A B; Landzberg, J S; Colucci, W S; Parker, J D

    1996-12-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of muscarinic receptor modulation on basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated left ventricular function in patients with heart failure. 21 heart failure patients and 14 subjects with normal ventricular function were studied. In Protocol 1 intracoronary acetylcholine resulted in a 60+/-8% inhibition of the left ventricular +dP/dt response to intracoronary dobutamine in the normal group, and a similar 70+/-13% inhibition in the heart failure group. Acetylcholine also attenuated the dobutamine-mediated acceleration of isovolumic relaxation (Tau) in both groups. Acetylcholine alone had no effect on Tau in the normal group, while it prolonged Tau in the heart failure group. In Protocol 2 intracoronary atropine resulted in a 35+/-10% augmentation of the inotropic response to dobutamine in the normal group, versus a non-significant 12+/-15% augmentation of the dobutamine response in the heart failure group. In Protocol 3, in 6 heart failure patients, both effects of acetylcholine, the slowing of ventricular relaxation and the inhibition of beta-adrenergic responses, were reversed by the addition of atropine. Therefore, in the failing human left ventricle muscarinic stimulation has an independent negative lusitropic effect and antagonizes the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  18. Somatodendritic Targeting of M5 Muscarinic Receptor in the Rat Ventral Tegmental Area: Implications for Mesolimbic Dopamine Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Miguel; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscarinic modulation of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays an important role in reward, potentially mediated through the M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M5R). However, the key sites for M5R-mediated control of dopamine neurons within this region are still unknown. To address this question we examined the electron microscopic immunocytochemical localization of antipeptide antisera against M5R and the plasmalemmal dopamine transporter (DAT) in single sections through the rat VTA. M5R was located mainly to VTA somatodendritic profiles (71%; n = 627), at least one-third (33.2%; n = 208) of which also contained DAT. The M5R immunoreactivity was distributed along cytoplasmic tubulovesicular endomembrane systems in somata and large dendrites, but was more often located at plasmalemmal sites in small dendrites, the majority of which did not express DAT. The M5R-immunoreactive dendrites received a balanced input from unlabeled terminals forming either asymmetric or symmetric synapses. Compared with dendrites, M5R was less often seen in axon terminals, comprising only 10.8% (n = 102) of the total M5R-labeled profiles. These terminals were usually presynaptic to unlabeled dendrites, suggesting that M5R activation can indirectly modulate non–DAT-containing dendrites through presynaptic mechanisms. Our results provide the first ultrastructural evidence that in the VTA, M5R has a subcellular location conducive to major involvement in postsynaptic signaling in many dendrites, only some of which express DAT. These findings suggest that cognitive and rewarding effects ascribed to muscarinic activation in the VTA can primarily be credited to M5R activation at postsynaptic plasma membranes distinct from dopamine transport. PMID:23504804

  19. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  20. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  1. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  2. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, C M; Chen, F F; Sung, T C; Hsu, H F; Wu, D

    1993-09-01

    [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methylchloride ([3H]NMS) was used to characterize the muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) in the intact cardiomyocytes. The specific binding of [3H]NMS was proportional to cell concentration, saturable with respect to [3H]NMS concentration, and time dependent. Scatchard analysis of binding isotherms showed that [3H]NMS bound to the freshly isolated and cultured cardiomyocytes with dissociation constants of 275 +/- 64 and 207 +/- 20 pM as well as maximum receptor densities of 0.13 +/- 0.09 and 5.36 +/- 0.20 fmol/10(5) cells, respectively. Heterogeneity of mAChRs was demonstrated by competitive binding experiments against [3H]NMS with M2 and M3 antagonists. These receptors (80%) exhibited high affinities for 11-([2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]-acetyl)-5,11-dihydro- 6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one (AF-DX-116) and methoctramine similar to those of M2 subtype. The low-affinity M2 antagonist binding constants were close to those reported for M3 receptors and possessed high affinity for 4-diphenylacetoxyl-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP) and hexahydrosiladifenidol. On the basis of biochemical studies, AF-DX-116 blocked adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) inhibition with high affinity (pKB 7.4), while it antagonized inositol phosphate formation with low affinity (pKB 6.5). 4-DAMP possessed high affinity in blocking inositol phosphate formation (pKB 9.0) and low affinity for antagonism of cAMP inhibition (pKB 7.7). Although no other muscarinic receptor mRNA has been detected in these cells, these data suggest the presence of a second population of mAChRs, which may not be identical to the classical cardiac "M2" receptors.

  3. Pharmacological characterization of muscarinic receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, C M; Chen, F F; Sung, T C; Hsu, H F; Wu, D

    1993-09-01

    [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methylchloride ([3H]NMS) was used to characterize the muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) in the intact cardiomyocytes. The specific binding of [3H]NMS was proportional to cell concentration, saturable with respect to [3H]NMS concentration, and time dependent. Scatchard analysis of binding isotherms showed that [3H]NMS bound to the freshly isolated and cultured cardiomyocytes with dissociation constants of 275 +/- 64 and 207 +/- 20 pM as well as maximum receptor densities of 0.13 +/- 0.09 and 5.36 +/- 0.20 fmol/10(5) cells, respectively. Heterogeneity of mAChRs was demonstrated by competitive binding experiments against [3H]NMS with M2 and M3 antagonists. These receptors (80%) exhibited high affinities for 11-([2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]-acetyl)-5,11-dihydro- 6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one (AF-DX-116) and methoctramine similar to those of M2 subtype. The low-affinity M2 antagonist binding constants were close to those reported for M3 receptors and possessed high affinity for 4-diphenylacetoxyl-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP) and hexahydrosiladifenidol. On the basis of biochemical studies, AF-DX-116 blocked adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) inhibition with high affinity (pKB 7.4), while it antagonized inositol phosphate formation with low affinity (pKB 6.5). 4-DAMP possessed high affinity in blocking inositol phosphate formation (pKB 9.0) and low affinity for antagonism of cAMP inhibition (pKB 7.7). Although no other muscarinic receptor mRNA has been detected in these cells, these data suggest the presence of a second population of mAChRs, which may not be identical to the classical cardiac "M2" receptors. PMID:8214023

  4. Genetic deletion of muscarinic M4 receptors is anxiolytic in the shock-probe burying model.

    PubMed

    Degroot, Aldemar; Nomikos, George G

    2006-02-15

    We used muscarinic M2 and M4 receptor knockout (KO) mice to further explore the role of the cholinergic system in anxiety. Using the shock-probe burying model we were able to both assess anxiety and cognition. In this paradigm, an anxiolytic response is reflected by decreased burying behavior. In addition, retention latency depicts long-term memory performance. Whereas muscarinic M2 receptor KO mice did not differ behaviorally from wild-type mice, muscarinic M4 receptor KO mice showed increased anxiolysis, but normal long-term memory compared to wild-type mice. Therefore, muscarinic M4 receptors are of particular significance in anxiety modulation that seems dissociated from changes in long-term memory.

  5. Contractions of the mouse prostate elicited by acetylcholine are mediated by M(3) muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    White, Carl W; Short, Jennifer L; Haynes, John M; Matsui, Minoru; Ventura, Sabatino

    2011-12-01

    Increased smooth muscle tone in the human prostate contributes to the symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. In the mouse prostate gland, cholinergic innervation is responsible for a component of the nerve-mediated contractile response. This study investigates the muscarinic receptor subtype responsible for the cholinergic contractile response in the mouse prostate gland. To characterize the muscarinic receptor subtype, mouse prostates taken from wild-type or M(3) muscarinic receptor knockout mice were mounted in organ baths. The isometric force that tissues developed in response to electrical-field stimulation or exogenously applied cholinergic agonists in the presence or absence of a range of muscarinic receptor antagonists was evaluated. Carbachol elicited reproducible and concentration-dependent contractions of the isolated mouse prostate, which were antagonized by the presence of muscarinic receptor antagonists. Calculation of antagonist affinities (pA(2) values) indicated a rank order of antagonist potencies in the mouse prostate of: darifenacin (9.08) = atropine (9.07) = 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (9.02) > cyclohexyl-hydroxy-phenyl-(3-piperidin-1-ylpropyl)silane (7.85) > cyclohexyl-(4-fluorophenyl)-hydroxy-(3-piperidin-1-ylpropyl)silane (7.39) > himbacine (7.19) > pirenzipine (6.88) > methoctramine (6.20). Furthermore, genetic deletion of the M(3) muscarinic receptor inhibited prostatic contractions to electrical-field stimulation or exogenous administration of acetylcholine. In this study we identified that the cholinergic component of contraction in the mouse prostate is mediated by the M(3) muscarinic receptor subtype. Pharmacological antagonism of the M(3) muscarinic receptor may be a beneficial additional target for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in the human prostate gland.

  6. Role of dopamine receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockade in the antiapomorphine action of neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Langel, Yu.L.; Chereshka, K.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors analyze the role of dopamine and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocking components in the antistereotypic action of neuroleptics with different chemical structure. To determine dopamine-blocking activity in vitro, binding of /sup 3/H-spiperone with membranes of the rat striatum was measured. To study the blocking action of the substances on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzylate with brain membranes was chosen.

  7. Activation of muscarinic M3 receptors inhibits large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channels in rat urinary bladder smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Shankar P.

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels are key regulators of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contraction and relaxation during urine voiding and storage. Here, we explored whether BK channels are regulated by muscarinic receptors (M-Rs) in native freshly isolated rat DSM cells under physiological conditions using the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique and pharmacological inhibitors. M-R activation with carbachol (1 μM) initially evoked large transient outward BK currents, followed by inhibition of the spontaneous transient outward BK currents (STBKCs) in DSM cells. Carbachol (1 μM) also inhibited the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations (STHs) and depolarized the DSM cell membrane potential. Selective inhibition of the muscarinic M3 receptors (M3-Rs) with 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP; 0.1 μM), but not muscarinic M2 receptors with methoctramine (1 μM), blocked the carbachol inhibitory effects on STBKCs. Furthermore, blocking the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptors with xestospongin-C (1 μM) inhibited the carbachol-induced large transient outward BK currents without affecting carbachol inhibitory effects on STBKCs. Upon pharmacological inhibition of all known cellular sources of Ca2+ for BK channel activation, carbachol (1 μM) did not affect the voltage-step-induced steady-state BK currents, suggesting that the muscarinic effects in DSM cells are mediated by mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. In conclusion, our findings provide strong evidence that activation of M3-Rs leads to inhibition of the STBKCs, STHs, and depolarization of DSM cells. Collectively, the data suggest the existence of functional interactions between BK channels and M3-Rs at a cellular level in DSM. PMID:23703523

  8. Prostaglandins and muscarinic agonists induce cyclic AMP attenuation by two distinct mechanisms in the pregnant-rat myometrium. Interaction between cyclic AMP and Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed Central

    Goureau, O; Tanfin, Z; Harbon, S

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant-rat myometrium (day 21 of gestation), isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, resulting from receptor-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, was negatively regulated by prostaglandins [PGE2, PGF2 alpha; EC50 (concn. giving 50% of maximal response) = 2 nM] and by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (EC50 = 2 microM). PG-induced inhibition was prevented by pertussis-toxin treatment, supporting the idea that it was mediated by the inhibitory G-protein Gi through the inhibitory pathway of the adenylate cyclase. Both isoprenaline-induced stimulation and PG-evoked inhibition of cyclic AMP were insensitive to Ca2+ depletion. By contrast, carbachol-evoked attenuation of cyclic AMP accumulation was dependent on Ca2+ and was insensitive to pertussis toxin. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was mimicked by ionomycin. Indirect evidence was thus provided for the enhancement of cyclic AMP degradation by a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity in the muscarinic-mediated effect. The attenuation of cyclic AMP elicited by carbachol coincided with carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate (InsP3, InsP2 and InsP) generation, which displayed an almost identical EC50 (3 microM) and was similarly unaffected by pertussis toxin. Both carbachol effects were reproduced by oxotremorine, whereas pilocarpine (a partial muscarinic agonist) failed to induce any decrease in cyclic AMP accumulation and concurrently was unable to stimulate the generation of inositol phosphates. These data support our proposal for a carbachol-mediated enhancement of a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity, compatible with the rises in Ca2+ associated with muscarinic-induced increased generation of inositol phosphates. They further illustrate that a cross-talk between the two major transmembrane signalling systems contributed to an ultimate decrease in cyclic AMP in the pregnant-rat myometrium near term. PMID:1700899

  9. The M1 Muscarinic Positive Allosteric Modulator PQCA Improves Performance on Translatable Tests of Memory and Attention in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lange, Henry S; Cannon, Christopher E; Drott, Jason T; Kuduk, Scott D; Uslaner, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Improved treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) is a significant unmet medical need that is becoming even more critical given the rise in the number of patients and the substantial economic burden. The current standards of care, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), are hindered by gastrointestinal side effects owing to their nonselective activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. Recently, the highly selective M1 positive allosteric modulator PQCA (1-((4-cyano-4-(pyridine-2-yl)piperidin-1-yl)methyl-4-oxo-4 H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid) has been demonstrated to improve cognition in a variety of rodent and nonhuman primate cognition models without producing significant gastrointestinal side effects. Here we describe the effect of PQCA and the AChEI donepezil on two clinically relevant and highly translatable touchscreen cognition tasks in nonhuman primates: paired-associates learning (PAL) and the continuous-performance task (CPT). Blockade of muscarinic signaling by scopolamine produced significant impairments in both PAL and CPT. PQCA and donepezil attenuated the scopolamine deficits in both tasks, and the action of these two compounds was similar in magnitude. In addition, the combination of subeffective doses of PQCA and donepezil enhanced PAL performance. These results further suggest that M1-positive allosteric modulators, either as monotherapy or as an add-on to current standards of care, have potential to reduce the cognitive deficits associated with AD. PMID:26446308

  10. The involvement of ventral tegmental area cholinergic muscarinic receptors in classically conditioned fear expression as measured with fear-potentiated startle.

    PubMed

    Greba, Q; Munro, L J; Kokkinidis, L

    2000-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) contribute to the complex amygdala-based neurocircuitry that mediates fear-motivated behaviors. Because of acetylcholine's (ACh) role in DA neuronal activation, the involvement of VTA cholinergic muscarinic receptors in Pavlovian conditioned fear responding was evaluated in the present study. Fear-potentiated startle was used to assess the effects of intraVTA infused methylscopolamine on conditioned fear performance in laboratory rats. Application of this nonspecific muscarinic receptor antagonist to VTA neurons was observed to inhibit the ability of a conditioned stimulus (CS) previously paired with footshock to enhance the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex. Doses of methylscopolamine that blocked conditioned fear expression did not alter baseline sensorimotor responding. These results identify ACh neurotransmission in the VTA as a potential excitatory mechanism underlying the fear-arousing properties of threatening environmental stimuli.

  11. Acetylcholine and muscarinic receptor function in cerebral cortex of diabetic young and old male Wistar rats and the role of muscarinic receptors in calcium release from pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Savitha, Balakrishnan; Joseph, Binoy; Peeyush Kumar, T; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-01

    We investigated acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, acetylcholine and muscarinic M1, M3 receptors kinetics in the cerebral cortex of young and old streptozotocin induced and insulin treated diabetic rats. The role of muscarinic receptors in intracellular calcium release from pancreatic islets was studied in vitro. Wistar rats of 7 and 90-weeks old were used. All studies were done in cerebral cortex. AChE assay was done by spectrophotometric method. Radioreceptor binding assays were done for Acetylcholine, Muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors using specific ligands. Calcium imaging was done using fluo4-AM in pancreatic cells. Ninety-weeks old control rats showed significantly decreased Vmax and increased Km for AChE compared to 7-weeks old control rats. An increased Vmax observed in both 7 and 90-weeks old diabetic groups with significant decrease in Km. Scatchard analysis using specific agonists showed significant decrease in the B (max) and K (d) of acetylcholine and muscarinic M1 receptors in 90-weeks old control rats compared to 7-weeks old control. Binding studies for M3 receptors showed no significant change compared to 7-weeks old control. Acetylcholine, muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor number significantly increased in 90-weeks old diabetic rat groups compared to their respective controls. Insulin treatment significantly reversed the binding parameters to near control compared to diabetic group. In vitro studies showed that acetylcholine through muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors' stimulated calcium release from the pancreatic islets. Thus our studies suggest that Insulin signaling play an important part in differentially regulating pancreatic cholinergic activity, and the diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions with age.

  12. Chronic decentralization of the heart differentially remodels canine intrinsic cardiac neuron muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; McGuirt, A S; Hoover, D B; Armour, J A; Ardell, J L

    2001-11-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if chronic interruption of all extrinsic nerve inputs to the heart alters cholinergic-mediated responses within the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICN). Extracardiac nerve inputs to the ICN were surgically interrupted (ICN decentralized). Three weeks later, the intrinsic cardiac right atrial ganglionated plexus (RAGP) was removed and intrinsic cardiac neuronal responses were evaluated electrophysiologically. Cholinergic receptor abundance was evaluated using autoradiography. In sham controls and chronic decentralized ICN ganglia, neuronal postsynaptic responses were mediated by acetylcholine, acting at nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Muscarine- but not nicotine-mediated synaptic responses that were enhanced after chronic ICN decentralization. After chronic decentralization, muscarine facilitation of orthodromic neuronal activation increased. Receptor autoradiography demonstrated that nicotinic and muscarinic receptor density associated with the RAGP was unaffected by decentralization and that muscarinic receptors were tenfold more abundant than nicotinic receptors in the right atrial ganglia in each group. After chronic decentralization of the ICN, intrinsic cardiac neurons remain viable and responsive to cholinergic synaptic inputs. Enhanced muscarinic responsiveness of intrinsic cardiac neurons occurs without changes in receptor abundance.

  13. Effective centrality and explosive synchronization in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, A.; Villacorta-Atienza, J. A.; Leyva, I.; Almendral, J. A.; Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Boccaletti, S.

    2015-12-01

    Synchronization of networked oscillators is known to depend fundamentally on the interplay between the dynamics of the graph's units and the microscopic arrangement of the network's structure. We here propose an effective network whose topological properties reflect the interplay between the topology and dynamics of the original network. On that basis, we are able to introduce the effective centrality, a measure that quantifies the role and importance of each network's node in the synchronization process. In particular, in the context of explosive synchronization, we use such a measure to assess the propensity of a graph to sustain an irreversible transition to synchronization. We furthermore discuss a strategy to induce the explosive behavior in a generic network, by acting only upon a fraction of its nodes.

  14. Neurotrophic effects of neudesin in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Ikuo; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Zhao, Ying; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Neudesin (neuron-derived neurotrophic factor; NENF) was identified as a neurotrophic factor that is involved in neuronal differentiation and survival. It is abundantly expressed in the central nervous system, and its neurotrophic activity is exerted via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Neudesin is also an anorexigenic factor that suppresses food intake in the hypothalamus. It is a member of the membrane-associated progesterone receptor (MAPR) family and shares key structural motifs with the cytochrome b5-like heme/steroid-binding domain. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), the first to be discovered among the MAPR family, binds progesterone to induce “rapid non-genomic effects” in biological responses that are unrelated to the nuclear progesterone receptors (PRs). Hence, neudesin may also be involved in the rapid non-genomic actions of progesterone. In this review, we summarize the identification, structure, and activity of neudesin in the central nervous system, and present an essential overview of the current understanding of its physiological roles and the prospect of elucidating its non-genomic progesterone effects. PMID:23805070

  15. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  16. Antianxiety effect of cannabis: involvement of central benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sethi, B B; Trivedi, J K; Kumar, P; Gulati, A; Agarwal, A K; Sethi, N

    1986-01-01

    The present work, involving clinical, behavioral, and biochemical studies, was undertaken to elucidate the probable mechanism of the observed antianxiety effects of cannabis. The population for the clinical study consisted of 50 male chronic cannabis users who were otherwise healthy and 50 matched controls. When evaluated on Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMA), these subjects had low anxiety scores as compared with the controls. To explore the possible interaction of cannabis with the benzodiazepine receptors, behavioral and biochemical studies in mice were devised, involving acute and chronic cannabis administration. Behavioral study revealed that mice under chronic cannabis treatment scored significantly higher on foot shock-induced aggression, but this was significantly blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonist. Furthermore, chronic cannabis treatment significantly (p less than 0.001) increased the frequency of licking response periodically punished by shocks. This confirms the antianxiety effect of cannabis, which also appears to be mediated through a benzodiazepine receptor, as it was reduced significantly (p less than 0.001) by a benzodiazepine receptor blocker. Specific 3H-diazepam binding was carried out in frontal cortex to assess both the population and affinity of benzodiazepine receptors. Our results indicate that acute cannabis treatment has no significant effect, whereas chronic cannabis treatment significantly increased 3H-diazepam binding as compared with controls. Scatchard analysis further reveals that increased affinity is responsible for increased binding to these receptors. It is therefore our contention that the antianxiety effect of cannabis is mediated through central benzodiazepine receptors.

  17. Assay of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function in cultured cardiac cells by stimulation of /sup 86/Rb+ efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.D.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1985-09-01

    An assay for the increase in potassium permeability mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in cultured cardiac cells is described, using the K+ ion substitute /sup 86/Rb+ as the tracer ion. Cardiac cells accumulate /sup 86/Rb+ from the extracellular medium in a Na+/K+ ATPase-dependent manner. Subsequent efflux of /sup 86/Rb+ in the absence and presence of muscarinic agonists follows kinetics similar to those previously reported for /sup 42/K+. The mAChR agonist carbamylcholine (carbachol) stimulated /sup 86/Rb+ efflux with an EC50 of 50 nM. The half-time for efflux is reduced by greater than 40% at maximally effective concentrations of agonist. Stimulation of /sup 86/Rb+ efflux by carbachol is blocked by the mAChR antagonist atropine with an IC50 of 15 nM. The stimulation of 86Rb+ efflux by carbachol is not affected by the presence of the Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor ouabain. This assay provides a method for quantitating the mAChR-mediated increase in K+ permeability in cardiac cells without the use of /sup 42/K+.

  18. Activation of alpha adrenergic and muscarinic receptors modifies early glucose suppression of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Bo; Dansk, Heléne; Grapengiesser, Eva

    2014-03-14

    Elevation of glucose induces transient inhibition of insulin release by lowering cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) below baseline in pancreatic β-cells. The period of [Ca(2+)]i decrease (phase 0) coincides with increased glucagon release and is therefore the starting point for antisynchronous pulses of insulin and glucagon. We now examine if activation of adrenergic α2A and muscarinic M3 receptors affects the initial [Ca(2+)]i response to increase of glucose from 3 to 20mM in β-cells situated in mouse islets. In the absence of receptor stimulation the elevation of glucose lowered [Ca(2+)]i during 90-120 s followed by rise due to opening of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. The period of [Ca(2+)]i decrease was prolonged by activation of the α2A adrenergic receptors (1 μM epinephrine or 100 nM clonidine) and shortened by stimulation of the muscarinic M3 receptors (0.1 μM acetylcholine). The latter effect was mimicked by the Na/K pump inhibitor ouabain (10-100 μM). The results indicate that prolonged initial decrease (phase 0) is followed by slow [Ca(2+)]i rise and shorter decrease followed by fast rise. It is concluded that the period of initial decrease of [Ca(2+)]i regulates the subsequent β-cell response to glucose.

  19. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of some 2,2-diphenyl propionate (DPP) derivatives of muscarinic antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.K.; Breuer, E.; Padilla, F.N.; Chiang, P.K.

    1987-05-01

    QSAR between biological activities and molecular-chemical properties were investigated to aid in designing more effective and potent antimuscarinic pharmacophores. A molecular modeling program was used to calculate geometrical and topological values of a series of DPP pharmacophores. The newly synthesized pharmacophores were tested for their antagonist activities by: (1) inhibition of (N-methyl-/sup 3/H)scopolamine binding assay to the muscarinic receptors of N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells; (2) blocking of acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea pig ileum; and (3) inhibition of carbachol-induced ..cap alpha..-amylase release from rat pancreas. The differences in the log of these biological activities were directly and significantly related to the distances between the carbonyl oxygen of the DPP and the quaternary nitrogen of the modified pharmacophores. The biological activities, while depending on each particular assay, varied between three and four logs of activity. The charge remained the same in all the pharmacophores. There were no QSAR correlations between molecular volume, molecular connectivity, or principle moments and their antagonistic activities, although multivariate QSAR was not employed. Thus, based on distance geometry, potent muscarinic pharmacophores can be predicted.

  20. Nipecotic acid ethyl ester: a cholinergic agonist that may differentiate muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, S.H.; Duman, R.S.; Enna, S.J.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P.; Micheletti, R.; Giraldo, E.; Giachetti, A.

    1986-03-05

    Reports indicate that nipecotic acid ethyl ester (NAEE) displays cholinomimetic properties in vivo. In the present study a series of physiological and biochemical tests were conducted to characterize this action. NAEE had a negative inotropic effect on the guinea pig atrium, and stimulated contraction of the guinea pig ileum and isolated mouse stomach strip at concentrations similar to bethanechol (BCH). The atrial and ilial effects were reversed by atropine. Unlike BCH, NAEE had no effect on basal acid secretion in the isolated mouse stomach at concentrations < 100 ..mu..M. NAEE was more potent than carbachol (CCH) in displacing /sup 3/H-ONB binding from rat brain membranes. The potency of NAEE to inhibit antagonist binding in rat heart membranes was enhanced by Mg/sup + +/ (Hill coefficient < 1.0) and reduced by Gpp(NH)p. Like CCH, NAEE inhibited GTP-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat brain striatal membranes. As compared to CCH, NAEE had little effect (< 5%) as a stimulator of inositol phosphate (IP) production in rat brain slices. The results indicate that NAEE is a direct-acting muscarinic receptor agonist. Moreover, its differential effects on acid secretion, IP accumulation, and adenylate cyclase suggest that it may be useful for defining cholinergic receptor subclasses.

  1. Central Nervous System Effects of Ginkgo Biloba, a Plant Extract.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Eralp, Emin; Tsambis, Elias; Itil, Kurt Z.; Stein, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) are among the most prescribed drugs in France and Germany. EGb is claimed to be effective in peripheral arterial disorders and in "cerebral insufficiency." The mechanism of action is not yet well understood. Three of the ingredients of the extract have been isolated and found to be pharmacologically active, but which one alone or in combination is responsible for clinical effects is unknown. The recommended daily dose (3 x 40 mg extract) is based more on empirical data than on clinical dose-findings studies. However, despite these, according to double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, EGb has therapeutic effects, at least, on the diagnostic entity of "cerebral insufficiency," which is used in Europe as synonymous with early dementia. To determine whether EGb has significant pharmacological effects on the human brain, a pharmacodynamic study was conducted using the Quantitative Pharmacoelectroencephalogram (QPEEG(R)) method. It was established that the pharmacological effects (based on a predetermined 7.5--13.0-Hz alpha frequency band in a computer-analyzed electroencephalogram = CEEG(R)) of EGb on the central nervous system (CNS) are significantly different than placebo, and the high and low doses could be discriminated from each other. The 120-mg, but particularly the 240-mg, single doses showed the most consistent CNS effects with an earlier onset (1 h) and longer duration (7 h). Furthermore, it was established that the electrophysiological effects of EGb in CNS are similar to those of well-known cognitive activators such as "nootropics" as well as tacrine, the only marketed "antidementia" drug currently available in the United States. PMID:11856998

  2. Central Nervous System Effects of Ginkgo Biloba, a Plant Extract.

    PubMed

    Itil, Turan M.; Eralp, Emin; Tsambis, Elias; Itil, Kurt Z.; Stein, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    Extracts of Ginkgo biloba (EGb) are among the most prescribed drugs in France and Germany. EGb is claimed to be effective in peripheral arterial disorders and in "cerebral insufficiency." The mechanism of action is not yet well understood. Three of the ingredients of the extract have been isolated and found to be pharmacologically active, but which one alone or in combination is responsible for clinical effects is unknown. The recommended daily dose (3 x 40 mg extract) is based more on empirical data than on clinical dose-findings studies. However, despite these, according to double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, EGb has therapeutic effects, at least, on the diagnostic entity of "cerebral insufficiency," which is used in Europe as synonymous with early dementia. To determine whether EGb has significant pharmacological effects on the human brain, a pharmacodynamic study was conducted using the Quantitative Pharmacoelectroencephalogram (QPEEG(R)) method. It was established that the pharmacological effects (based on a predetermined 7.5--13.0-Hz alpha frequency band in a computer-analyzed electroencephalogram = CEEG(R)) of EGb on the central nervous system (CNS) are significantly different than placebo, and the high and low doses could be discriminated from each other. The 120-mg, but particularly the 240-mg, single doses showed the most consistent CNS effects with an earlier onset (1 h) and longer duration (7 h). Furthermore, it was established that the electrophysiological effects of EGb in CNS are similar to those of well-known cognitive activators such as "nootropics" as well as tacrine, the only marketed "antidementia" drug currently available in the United States.

  3. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  4. Effects of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in rats: a comparative study with opioid receptor agonists, a muscarinic receptor antagonist and a synthetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Keto, Y; Nakata, M; Takeuchi, A; Funatsu, T; Akuzawa, S; Sasamata, M; Miyata, K

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) including ramosetron, alosetron, and cilansetron on colonic nociceptive threshold in rats. Furthermore, we established a restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia model in rats, and compared the inhibitory effects of 5-HT3RAs on restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea with those of loperamide, trimebutine, tiquizium and polycarbophil. The colonic nociceptive threshold was measured as the balloon pressure at the time the rat showed a nociceptive response during colonic distension by an intrarectally inserted balloon. Oral administration of ramosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)), or cilansetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)) increased the colonic nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner in non-stressed rats. Restraint stress for 1 h significantly decreased the colonic nociceptive threshold, but ramosetron (0.3-3 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), cilansetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)) and trimebutine (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the decrease in the threshold. Loperamide (3-30 mg kg(-1)), tiquizium (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) and polycarbophil (1000 mg kg(-1)) did not affect the restraint stress-induced decrease in the colonic nociceptive threshold. All drugs tested in this study showed dose-dependent inhibition of restraint stress-induced diarrhoea in rats. These results indicate that, unlike existing antidiarrhoeal and spasmolytic agents, 5-HT3RAs have inhibitory effects on colonic nociception, and prevented restraint stress-induced both diarrhoea and hyperalgesia at almost the same doses in rats. This suggests that the 5-HT3RAs may be useful in ameliorating both colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:18221252

  5. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  6. Autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptors in rat nasal glands.

    PubMed

    Van Megen, Y J; Teunissen, M J; Klaassen, A B; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F

    1988-01-01

    An in vitro method was developed for the biochemical and autoradiographic demonstration of low muscarinic receptor densities in peripheral tissue. Histological criteria point clearly to the necessity for fixation to preserve tissue quality. [3H]l-Quinuclidinylbenzilate bound specifically to a homogeneous class of binding sites in 0.5% glutardialdehyde-fixed cryostat sections (10 microns) of rat nasal glands with high affinity (Kd = 0.47 +/- 0.06 nM) and with a receptor density (Bmax) of 41 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein. This binding was linearly dependent on the thickness of the sections. Kinetic experiments resulted in a Kd value of 0.19 nM. Binding was stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Autoradiograms, generated after incubation with 0.6 nM [3H]l-quinuclidinylbenzilate and dipping in nuclear K2 emulsion, showed specific labelling of the glandular acini and excretory ducts. These in vitro observations provide conclusive evidence for the presence of acetylcholine receptors in the nasal glands of the rat. PMID:2450760

  7. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  8. Seattle Central Questions: Institutional and Educational Effectiveness, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bystrom, Valerie, Ed.; Kempen, Laurie, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this newsletter, published twice a year by the office of Institutional Planning and Research at Seattle Central Community College (Washington), is to help Seattle Central faculty and staff gain access to the institutional data they need, and to help them link and integrate their various planning and assessment activities without…

  9. Stimulation of acid secretion and phosphoinositol production by rat parietal cell muscarinic M sub 2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, A.; Rochlitz, H.; Herz, A.; Paumgartner, G. )

    1988-04-01

    The muscarinic receptor system involved in hydrogen production by enriched rat gastric parietal cells was investigated. Muscarinic receptor density determined by (N-methyl-{sup 3}H)scopolamine binding was 8,100/cell. The receptor appeared to be of the M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor subtype, since it had a low affinity (K{sub d} 189 nM) for the M{sub 1} receptor antagonist pirenzepine compared with atropine. Receptor activation by carbachol rapidly augmented levels of polyphosphoinositides, indicating an activation of phospholipase C. The dose-response relations for the increase in inositol phosphates closely paralleled the binding of carbachol to muscarinic receptors. The inositol phosphate response was antagonized by pirenzepine with a K{sub i} of 177 nM. the stimulation of inositol phosphate levels by carbachol correlated well with the stimulation of ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake, determine as an index of acid secretion. The muscarinic agonists oxotremorine, pilocarpine, and bethanechol elicited partial increases in inositol phosphates at maximal drug concentrations, and these partial increases correlated with their ability to stimulate ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake. These data indicate that inositolpolyphosphates may be a second messenger of M{sub 2} receptors stimulating acid secretion.

  10. The binding of (3H)AF-DX 384 to rat ileal smooth muscle muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Entzeroth, M.; Mayer, N. )

    1991-01-01

    The tritiated cardioselective muscarinic antagonist AF-DX 384 (5,11-dihydro-11-(2-(-(8-dipropylamino)methyl)-1-piperidinyl-ethyl-amino-carbonyl)-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4)benzodiazepin-6-one) was used to label muscarinic receptors in the rat ileum. Saturation binding to membrane suspensions revealed a high affinity binding site with a Kd of 9.2 nM. The maximal number of binding sites labeled in this tissue (Bmax) is 237 fmol/mg protein. The association and dissociation kinetics were well represented by single exponential reactions, and the dissociation constant obtained from the ratio of rate constants was in agreement with that derived from saturation experiments. Specific binding was inhibited by muscarinic antagonists with a rank order of potencies of atropine (pKi: 8.80) greater than 4-DAMP (pKi: 8.23) = AF-DX 384 (pKi: 8.20) greater than AF-DX 116 (pKi: 7.09) = hexahydro-sila-difenidol (pKi: 6.97) greater than pirenzepine (pKi: 6.49) and is consistent with the interaction of (3H)AF-DX 384 with muscarinic receptors of the M2 subtype. It can be concluded that (3H)AF-DX 384 can be used to selectively label M2 muscarinic receptors in heterogeneous receptor populations.

  11. Heterogeneous receptor binding of classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists. I. Bovine tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Ensing, K; in 't Hout, W G; de Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1991-01-01

    In competition experiments with the tertiary radioligand [3H]dexetimide, classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists like ipratropium bromide and N-methylscopolamine bromide distinguished two muscarinic binding sites in bovine brain (total brain minus cerebellum) membranes, in contrast to their tertiary analogues, atropine and scopolamine, which recognized only one binding site. This binding behavior was found to be almost identical in bovine striatal membranes, both in terms of binding affinities and proportions of high (Q1) and low (Q2) affinity binding sites. Both in total brain and in striatal membranes, the Q1/Q2 binding heterogeneity was independent of pirenzepine binding heterogeneity (M1/M2). In peripheral tissues, the binding properties of quaternary muscarinic antagonists varied. Whereas tertiary as well as quaternary compounds showed only high affinity binding towards muscarinic receptors in bovine atrial and left ventricular membranes, heterogeneous binding behavior was observed with quaternary but not with tertiary antagonists in bovine tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The tissue distribution found in the present study suggests that bovine tracheal smooth muscle contraction studies might shed light on the functional significance of the anomalous binding behavior of quaternary muscarinic antagonists. PMID:1824191

  12. Activation of a muscarinic receptor selectively inhibits a rapidly inactivated Ca2+ current in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Wanke, E; Ferroni, A; Malgaroli, A; Ambrosini, A; Pozzan, T; Meldolesi, J

    1987-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons dissociated from the superior cervical ganglion of 2-day-old rats were studied by whole-cell patch clamp and by fura-2 measurements of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i. Step depolarizations in the presence of tetrodotoxin and hexamethonium triggered two Ca2+ currents that differed in the voltage dependence of activation and kinetics of inactivation. These currents resemble the L and N currents previously described in chicken sensory neurons [Nowycky, M. C., Fox, A. P. & Tsien, R. W. (1985) Nature (London) 316, 440-442]. Treatment with acetylcholine resulted in the rapid (within seconds), selective, and reversible inhibition of the rapidly inactivated, N-type current, whereas the long-lasting L-type current remained unaffected. The high sensitivity to blocker drugs (atropine, pirenzepine) indicated that this effect of acetylcholine was due to a muscarinic M1 receptor. Intracellular perfusion with nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogs or pretreatment of the neurons with pertussis toxin had profound effects on the Ca2+ current modulation. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate caused the disappearance of the N-type current (an effect akin to that of acetylcholine, but irreversible), whereas guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate and pertussis toxin pretreatment prevented the acetylcholine-induced inhibition. In contrast, cAMP, applied intracellularly together with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, as well as activators and inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect. Acetylcholine caused shortening of action potentials in neurons treated with tetraethylammonium to partially block K+ channels. Moreover, when applied to neurons loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2, acetylcholine failed to appreciably modify [Ca2+]i at rest but caused a partial blunting of the initial [Ca2+]i peak induced by depolarization with high K+. This effect was blocked by muscarinic antagonists and pertussis toxin and was unaffected by protein kinase

  13. Muscarinic and Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Agonists and Allosteric Modulators for the Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Carrie K; Byun, Nellie; Bubser, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs and nAChRs) are emerging as important targets for the development of novel treatments for the symptoms associated with schizophrenia. Preclinical and early proof-of-concept clinical studies have provided strong evidence that activators of specific mAChR (M1 and M4) and nAChR (α7 and α2β4) subtypes are effective in animal models of antipsychotic-like activity and/or cognitive enhancement, and in the treatment of positive and cognitive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. While early attempts to develop selective mAChR and nAChR agonists provided important preliminary findings, these compounds have ultimately failed in clinical development due to a lack of true subtype selectivity and subsequent dose-limiting adverse effects. In recent years, there have been major advances in the discovery of highly selective activators for the different mAChR and nAChR subtypes with suitable properties for optimization as potential candidates for clinical trials. One novel strategy has been to identify ligands that activate a specific receptor subtype through actions at sites that are distinct from the highly conserved ACh-binding site, termed allosteric sites. These allosteric activators, both allosteric agonists and positive allosteric modulators, of mAChR and nAChR subtypes demonstrate unique mechanisms of action and high selectivity in vivo, and may provide innovative treatment strategies for schizophrenia. PMID:21956443

  14. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy. PMID:24937778

  15. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R.; Landon, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential longterm effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world.

  16. Effects of groundwater development on uranium: Central Valley, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Bryant C; Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R; Landon, Matthew K

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco(2) concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world. PMID:19788559

  17. Effects of groundwater development on uranium: Central Valley, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Bryant C; Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R; Landon, Matthew K

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco(2) concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world.

  18. Neurochemical effects of minaprine, a novel psychotropic drug, on the central cholinergic system of the rat.

    PubMed

    Garattini, S; Forloni, G L; Tirelli, S; Ladinsky, H; Consolo, S

    1984-01-01

    Minaprine, a novel psychotropic drug with antidepressant, anticataleptic and antiaggressive properties, produced an increase in rat brain regional acetylcholine content at a subconvulsant dose of 30 mg/kg IP. The greatest increase (60%) was produced in the striatum, whereas an increase of about 35% was obtained in the hippocampus and the rest of the cortex. A small but significant increase of 14% was also found in the midbrain-hindbrain region. Minaprine decreased choline content only in the striatum. No tolerance to acute challenge was observed after 10-day chronic treatment. In vitro, the drug had no effect on striatal choline acetyltransferase activity up to a concentration of 160 microM and only weakly displaced (3H) dexetimide from its specific muscarinic receptor binding sites in striatum (IC50, 2 X 10(-4) M). After in vivo administration the drug did not affect sodium-dependent high affinity choline uptake by a hippocampal homogenate. On the other hand, the drug inhibited both striatal and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase activity at high (40-160 microM) concentrations in vitro. In vivo the drug produced a brief (5 min), small (18%) decrease in the enzymic activity which corresponded in time to the peak drug level attained in the brain, but was not concomitant with a change in striatal acetylcholine content. By contrast, the increase in striatal acetylcholine appeared after 30 min when there was no longer inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity and when the level of minaprine in brain was reduced by 78%. Blockade of dopamine receptors by pimozide pretreatment partially prevented the increase in striatal acetylcholine produced by minaprine, whereas interference with cholinergic or serontonergic neurotransmission was without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6425901

  19. Hydrologic Effects of Brush Management in Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, J. R.; Slattery, R.

    2011-12-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into traditional savanna grassland ecosystems in central Texas has largely been attributed to land use practices of settlers, most notably overgrazing and fire suppression. Implementing brush management practices (removing the woody vegetation and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area), could potentially change the hydrology in a watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several local, State, and Federal cooperators, studied the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. Two adjacent watersheds of 104 and 159 hectares were used in a paired study. Rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration (Bowen ratio method), and water quality data were collected in both watersheds. Using a hydrologic mass balance approach, rainfall was allocated to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but estimated as the residual of the hydrologic mass balance. After hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for 3 years, approximately 80 percent of the woody vegetation (ashe juniper) was selectively removed from the 159 hectare watershed (treatment watershed). Brush management was not implemented in the other (reference) watershed. Hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for six years after brush management implementation. The resulting data were examined for differences in the hydrologic budget between the reference and treatment watersheds as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods to assess effects of the treatment. Preliminary results indicate there are differences in the hydrologic budget as well as water quality between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods.

  20. Blockade of muscarinic receptors impairs the retrieval of well-trained memory

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Shogo; Suematsu, Naofumi; Shimegi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is known to play an important role in memory functions, and its deficit has been proposed to cause the cognitive decline associated with advanced age and Alzheimer's disease (the cholinergic hypothesis). Although many studies have tested the cholinergic hypothesis for recently acquired memory, only a few have investigated the role of ACh in the retrieval process of well-trained cognitive memory, which describes the memory established from repetition and daily routine. To examine this point, we trained rats to perform a two-alternative forced-choice visual detection task. Each trial was started by having the rats pull upward a central-lever, which triggered the presentation of a visual stimulus to the right or left side of the display monitor, and then pulling upward a stimulus-relevant choice-lever located on both sides. Rats learned the task within 10 days, and the task training was continued for a month. Task performance was measured with or without systemic administration of a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR) antagonist, scopolamine (SCOP), prior to the test. After 30 min of SCOP administration, rats stopped manipulating any lever even though they explored the lever and surrounding environment, suggesting a loss of the task-related associative memory. Three hours later, rats were recovered to complete the trial, but the rats selected the levers irrespective of the visual stimulus, suggesting they remembered a series of lever-manipulations in association with a reward, but not association between the reward and visual stimulation. Furthermore, an m1-AChR, but not nicotinic AChR antagonist caused a similar deficit in the task execution. SCOP neither interfered with locomotor activity nor drinking behavior, while it influenced anxiety. These results suggest that the activation of mAChRs at basal ACh levels is essential for the recall of well-trained cognitive memory. PMID:24782760

  1. The restructuring of muscarinic receptor subtype gene transcripts in c-fos knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Mravec, Boris; Kvetnansky, Richard; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2013-05-01

    Although c-Fos plays a key role in intracellular signalling, the disruption of the c-fos gene has only minor consequences on the central nervous system (CNS) function. As muscarinic receptors (MR) play important roles in many CNS functions (attention, arousal, and cognition), the c-fos knock-out might be compensated through MR changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the M1-M5 MR mRNA in selected CNS areas: frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum (FC, PC, TC, OC, stria, hip, hypo, and crbl, respectively). Knocking out the c-fos gene changed the expression of MR in FC (reduced M1R, M4R and M5R expression), TC (increased M4R expression), OC (decreased M2R and M3R expression) and hippocampus (reduced M3R expression). Moreover, gender differences were observed in WT mice: increased expression of all M1-M5R in the FC in males and M1-M4R in the striatum in females. A detailed analysis of MR transcripts showed pre-existing correlations in the amount of MR-mRNA between specific regions. WT mice showed three major types of cortico-cortical correlations: fronto-occipital, temporo-parietal and parieto-occipital. The cortico-subcortical correlations involved associations between the FC, PC, TC and striatum. In KO mice, a substantial rearrangement of the correlation pattern was observed: only a temporo-parietal correlation and correlations between the FC and striatum remained, and a new correlation between the hypothalamus and cerebellum appeared. Thus, in addition to the previously described dopamine receptor restructuring, the restructuring of MR mRNA correlations reveals an additional mechanism for adaptation to the c-fos gene knockout.

  2. Axonal transport of muscarinic receptors in vesicles containing noradrenaline and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Laduron, P M

    1984-01-01

    Presynaptic muscarinic receptors labeled with [3H]dexetimide and noradrenaline in dog splenic nerves accumulated proximally to a ligature at the same rate of axonal transport. After fractionation by differential centrifugation, specific [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [3H]dexetimide binding revealed a distribution profile similar to that of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and noradrenaline. Subfractionation by density gradient centrifugation showed two peaks of muscarinic receptors; the peak of density 1.17 contained noradrenaline and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase whereas that of density 1.14 was devoid of noradrenaline. Therefore the foregoing experiments provide evidence that presynaptic muscarinic receptors are transported in sympathetic nerves in synaptic vesicles which are similar to those containing noradrenaline and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. This suggests a possible coexistence of receptor and neurotransmitter in the same vesicle. PMID:6198205

  3. Regulation of phospholipase D by muscarinic receptors in rat submandibular ductal cells.

    PubMed

    Pochet, Stéphanie; Métioui, Mourad; Grosfils, Katrina; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Marino, Aida; Dehaye, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    The muscarinic agonist carbachol stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) in rat submandibular gland (RSMG) ductal cells in a time and concentration-dependent manner. This effect was inhibited by chelation of extracellular calcium with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). PLD could also be activated by epinephrine and AlF(4)(-), two polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PPI-PLC) activators, and by the phorbol ester o-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) which activates protein kinase C (PKC). Ionomycin and thapsigargin only slightly increased PLD activity. Ortho-vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, also stimulated PLD activity. Both carbachol and o-vanadate increased the formation of inositol phosphates and the tyrosine phosphorylation of at least two proteins (55-60 and 120 kDa). Calphostin C (a PKC inhibitor), U73122 (a PPI-PLC inhibitor) and genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor) blocked the activation of PLD, of PLC and the phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in response to carbachol and vanadate. Taken together, these results suggest that rat submandibular gland ductal cells express a calcium-dependent PLD activity. This enzyme is regulated by carbachol via a PLC-PKC-tyrosine kinase pathway. PMID:12401525

  4. Activation of Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptors Induces Long-Term Potentiation in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Siobhan H; Pasqui, Francesca; Colvin, Ellen M; Sanger, Helen; Mogg, Adrian J; Felder, Christian C; Broad, Lisa M; Fitzjohn, Steve M; Isaac, John T R; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptors (M1Rs) are highly expressed in the hippocampus, and their inhibition or ablation disrupts the encoding of spatial memory. It has been hypothesized that the principal mechanism by which M1Rs influence spatial memory is by the regulation of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Here, we use a combination of recently developed, well characterized, selective M1R agonists and M1R knock-out mice to define the roles of M1Rs in the regulation of hippocampal neuronal and synaptic function. We confirm that M1R activation increases input resistance and depolarizes hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and show that this profoundly increases excitatory postsynaptic potential-spike coupling. Consistent with a critical role for M1Rs in synaptic plasticity, we now show that M1R activation produces a robust potentiation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal neurons that has all the hallmarks of long-term potentiation (LTP): The potentiation requires NMDA receptor activity and bi-directionally occludes with synaptically induced LTP. Thus, we describe synergistic mechanisms by which acetylcholine acting through M1Rs excites CA1 pyramidal neurons and induces LTP, to profoundly increase activation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. These features are predicted to make a major contribution to the pro-cognitive effects of cholinergic transmission in rodents and humans. PMID:26472558

  5. Ozone-induced changes in muscarinic bronchial reactivity by different testing methods.

    PubMed

    Roum, J H; Murlas, C

    1984-12-01

    We examined the effect of ozone (O3) on muscarinic bronchial reactivity in the guinea pig and compared reactivity determined by two different routes of agonist delivery. Reactivity before and from 4 h to 2 days after O3 exposure (3.0 ppm, 2 h) was determined by measuring specific airway resistance upon administration of intravenous acetylcholine and/or aerosolized methacholine challenge in 34 unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing animals. Before exposure, we observed more gradual and reproducible results to intravenous agonist. After exposure, hyperreactivity to parenteral agonist occurred consistently, but not to inhaled agonist. Hyperreactivity demonstrable by either route was similar in magnitude and time course within 14 h of exposure. Two days later, hyperreactivity to inhaled agonist had remitted; that to intravenous drug persisted. Our results indicate that variability in the occurrence and time course of O3-induced hyperreactivity to inhaled agonist may be a consequence of the technique employed. The consistent occurrence of hyperreactivity after O3 to parenteral agonist suggests mechanisms other than airway mucosal hyperpermeability are responsible for this hyperreactivity.

  6. Extrasynaptic Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors on Neuronal Cell Bodies Regulate Presynaptic Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jason P.; Staab, Trisha A.; Wang, Han; Mazzasette, Chiara; Butte, Zara

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a potent neuromodulator in the brain, and its effects on cognition and memory formation are largely performed through muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). mAChRs are often preferentially distributed on specialized membrane regions in neurons, but the significance of mAChR localization in modulating neuronal function is not known. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the M1/M3/M5 family of mAChRs, gar-3, is expressed in cholinergic motor neurons, and GAR-3-GFP fusion proteins localize to cell bodies where they are enriched at extrasynaptic regions that are in contact with the basal lamina. The GAR-3 N-terminal extracellular domain is necessary and sufficient for this asymmetric distribution, and mutation of a predicted N-linked glycosylation site within the N-terminus disrupts GAR-3-GFP localization. In transgenic animals expressing GAR-3 variants that are no longer asymmetrically localized, synaptic transmission at neuromuscular junctions is impaired and there is a reduction in the abundance of the presynaptic protein sphingosine kinase at release sites. Finally, GAR-3 can be activated by endogenously produced ACh released from neurons that do not directly contact cholinergic motor neurons. Together, our results suggest that humoral activation of asymmetrically localized mAChRs by ACh is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which ACh modulates neuronal function. PMID:23986249

  7. M2 muscarinic receptor activation regulates Schwann cell differentiation and myelin organization.

    PubMed

    Uggenti, Carolina; De Stefano, M Egle; Costantino, Michele; Loreti, Simona; Pisano, Annalinda; Avallone, Bice; Talora, Claudio; Magnaghi, Valerio; Tata, Ada Maria

    2014-07-01

    Glial cells express acetylcholine receptors. In particular, rat Schwann cells express different muscarinic receptor subtypes, the most abundant of which is the M2 subtype. M2 receptor activation causes a reversible arrest of the cell cycle. This negative effect on Schwann cell proliferation suggests that these cells may possibly progress into a differentiating program. In this study we analyzed the in vitro modulation, by the M2 agonist arecaidine, of transcription factors and specific signaling pathways involved in Schwann cell differentiation. The arecaidine-induced M2 receptor activation significantly upregulates transcription factors involved in the promyelinating phase (e.g., Sox10 and Krox20) and downregulates proteins involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state (e.g., c-jun, Notch-1, and Jagged-1). Furthermore, arecaidine stimulation significantly increases the expression of myelin proteins, which is accompanied by evident changes in cell morphology, as indicated by electron microscopy analysis, and by substantial cellular re-distribution of actin and cell adhesion molecules. Moreover, ultrastructural and morphometric analyses on sciatic nerves of M2/M4 knockout mice show numerous degenerating axons and clear alterations in myelin organization compared with wild-type mice. Therefore, our data demonstrate that acetylcholine mediates axon-glia cross talk, favoring Schwann cell progression into a differentiated myelinating phenotype and contributing to compact myelin organization.

  8. Na+ activation of the muscarinic K+ channel by a G-protein-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Muscarinic potassium channels (KACh) are composed of two subunits, GIRK1 and GIRK4 (or CIR), and are directly gated by G proteins. We have identified a novel gating mechanism of KACh, independent of G-protein activation. This mechanism involved functional modification of KACh which required hydrolysis of physiological levels of intracellular ATP and was manifested by an increase in the channel mean open time. The ATP-modified channels could in turn be gated by intracellular Na+, starting at approximately 3 mM with an EC50 of approximately 40 mM. The Na(+)-gating of KACh was operative both in native atrial cells and in a heterologous system expressing recombinant channel subunits. Block of the Na+/K+ pump (e.g., by cardiac glycosides) caused significant activation of KACh in atrial cells, with a time course similar to that of Na+ accumulation and in a manner indistinguishable from that of Na(+)-mediated activation of the channel, suggesting that cardiac glycosides activated KACh by increasing intracellular Na+ levels. These results demonstrate for the first time a direct effect of cardiac glycosides on atrial myocytes involving ion channels which are critical in the regulation of cardiac rhythm. PMID:8923264

  9. Structure and dynamics of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Hu, Jianxin; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Rosemond, Erica; Green, Hillary F.; Liu, Tong; Chae, Pil Seok; Dror, Ron O.; Shaw, David E.; Weis, William I.; Wess, Jürgen; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-03-01

    Acetylcholine, the first neurotransmitter to be identified, exerts many of its physiological actions via activation of a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Although the five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) share a high degree of sequence homology, they show pronounced differences in G-protein coupling preference and the physiological responses they mediate. Unfortunately, despite decades of effort, no therapeutic agents endowed with clear mAChR subtype selectivity have been developed to exploit these differences. We describe here the structure of the G{sub q/11}-coupled M3 mAChR ('M3 receptor', from rat) bound to the bronchodilator drug tiotropium and identify the binding mode for this clinically important drug. This structure, together with that of the G{sub i/o}-coupled M2 receptor, offers possibilities for the design of mAChR subtype-selective ligands. Importantly, the M3 receptor structure allows a structural comparison between two members of a mammalian GPCR subfamily displaying different G-protein coupling selectivities. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations suggest that tiotropium binds transiently to an allosteric site en route to the binding pocket of both receptors. These simulations offer a structural view of an allosteric binding mode for an orthosteric GPCR ligand and provide additional opportunities for the design of ligands with different affinities or binding kinetics for different mAChR subtypes. Our findings not only offer insights into the structure and function of one of the most important GPCR families, but may also facilitate the design of improved therapeutics targeting these critical receptors.

  10. Purification of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, G L; Herron, G S; Yamaki, M; Fullerton, D S; Schimerlik, M I

    1984-01-01

    The muscarinic acetylcholine receptor from porcine atria has been purified 100,000-fold to homogeneity by solubilization in digitonin/cholate and sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, diethylaminoethylagarose, hydroxylapatite, and 3-(2'-aminobenzhydryloxy)tropane-agarose. The yield of purified receptor was 4.3% of that found in the membrane fraction, and the purified receptor bound 11.1-12.8 nmol of L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate per mg of protein, corresponding to a binding component Mr of 78,400-90,000. The purified receptor preparation consisted of two polypeptides in approximately equimolar amounts when examined on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. The larger polypeptide (Mr 78,000 on 8% polyacrylamide gels) was specifically alkylated with [3H]propylbenzilylcholine mustard, whereas the smaller polypeptide (Mr 14,800) was not labeled. The possibility that the small polypeptide is a contaminant fortuitously appearing in equimolar amounts with the large polypeptide cannot be ruled out at this time. The purified preparation was highly stable, with no measurable change in the number of ligand binding sites or the gel pattern after 1 month's storage on ice. Scatchard analysis showed a single class of binding sites for the antagonist L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate with a dissociation constant of 61 +/- 4 pM. Equilibrium titration experiments demonstrated that the antagonist L-hyoscyamine displaced L-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate from a single class of sites (Kd = 475 +/- 30 pM), whereas the agonist carbamoylcholine interacted at two populations of sites (53% +/- 3% high affinity, Kd = 1.1 +/- 0.3 microM; 47% +/- 3% low affinity, Kd = 67 +/- 14 microM). The ligand binding data were very similar to that for the membrane-bound receptor, suggesting that the receptor has not been altered radically during purification. Images PMID:6589642

  11. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  12. Comparative study of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors of human and rat cortical glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Demushkin, V.P.; Burbaeva, G.S.; Dzhaliashvili, T.A.; Plyashkevich, Y.G.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was a comparative studyof muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human and rat glial cells. (/sup 3/H)Quinuclidinyl-benzylate ((/sup 3/H)-QB), atropine, platiphylline, decamethonium, carbamylcholine, tubocurarine, and nicotine were used. The glial cell fraction was obtained from the cerebral cortex of rats weighing 130-140 g and from the frontal pole of the postmortem brain from men aged 60-70 years. The use of the method of radioimmune binding of (/sup 3/H)-QB with human and rat glial cell membranes demonstrated the presence of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in the glial cells.

  13. Affinity of pyridylalkylamines for nicotinic, muscarinic and histaminic recognition sites in brain tissue preparations.

    PubMed

    Repond, C; Pratt, J A; Stolerman, I P; Mayer, J M; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Testa, B

    1986-08-01

    The affinity of 15 regioisomeric and homologous pyridylalkylamines was examined in brain preparations for nicotinic, muscarinic, and H1-histaminic binding sites as labeled by [3H]-nicotine, [3H]-dexetimide and [3H]-mepyramine, respectively. Overall, the compounds show a clear selectivity for the nicotinic versus muscarinic binding sites, and a weak affinity for the H1-histaminic sites. Variations in affinity appear to be partly influenced by steric factors (such as position of attachment, length and rigidity of side-chain) and marginally by lipophilicity. PMID:3778556

  14. Different behavior toward muscarinic receptor binding between quaternary anticholinergics and their tertiary analogues.

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1986-12-01

    A number of corresponding tertiary and quaternary anticholinergic analogues were examined for their ability to inhibit specific (3)H-dexetimide binding to calf brain muscarinic receptors. In all cases the tertiary antagonists (except pirenzepine) showed steep and monophasic inhibition curves, whereas those of the quaternary derivatives were shallow (thiazinamium, methylbenactyzine) or even biphasic (oxyphenonium, methylatropine, methylscopolamine). These observations show that the addition of a methyl group to the nitrogen atom changes the mode of interaction of the anticholinergics to muscarinic receptor binding sites. Whether there are separate binding sites present or differences in interaction mode for only the quaternary moiety is discussed. PMID:24271831

  15. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, B.C.; Fram, M.S.; Belitz, K.; Burow, K.R.; Landon, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world. Journal compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  16. Chronic ethanol feeding produces a muscarinic receptor upregulation, but not a muscarinic supersensitivity in lower esophageal sphincter muscle.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzian, A; Gordon, J H; Willson, C; Urban, G; Fields, J Z

    1992-02-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are important in esophageal physiology, and mAChR alterations may be involved in ethanol-induced esophageal dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that acute ethanol decreases lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP), whereas withdrawal from chronic ethanol results in pressure increases which are reversible by acute ethanol. To see if this increase in LESP is due to upregulation of mAChR, we evaluated both mAChR binding and dose-response curves for bethanechol and atropine-induced changes in LESP before and after acute and chronic ethanol exposure. The number of mAChR sites (Bmax) in LES (3.4 fmol/mg tissue) was lowered by acute ethanol (1.72, -50%); withdrawal from chronic ethanol raised Bmax (5.2, +54%). Acute injection of ethanol into cats in withdrawal reversed this increase in mAChR density (3.1, -10%). These changes correlated with our earlier data on ethanol-induced changes in LESP. However, the dose-response curve for bethanechol-induced pressure increases shifted to the right [ED25 (micrograms/kg); control, 8.6; withdrawal, 21.3], paralleled by an increase in the number of low-affinity agonist binding sites. Thus, 1) the withdrawal-associated increase in Bmax (up-regulation) is more likely to be a compensatory response to deficits (functional subsensitivity) distal to the receptor recognition site than to proximal deficits; 2) the increase in Bmax does not cause LESP hyperactivity; and 3) receptor binding changes do not necessarily translate into physiological changes. PMID:1346638

  17. Mechanism of muscarinic receptor-induced K+ channel activation as revealed by hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (Gk) in the coupling between muscarinic receptor activation and opening of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel [IK(M)] was examined in cardiac atrial myocytes, using hydrolysis-resistant GTP analogues. In the absence of muscarinic agonist, GTP analogues produced a membrane current characteristic of IK(M). The initial rate of appearance of this receptor-independent IK(M) was measured for the various analogues in order to explore the kinetic properties of IK(M) activation. We found that IK(M) activation is controlled solely by the intracellular analogue/GTP ratio and not by the absolute concentrations of the nucleotides. Analogues competed with GTP for binding to Gk with the following relative affinities: GTP gamma S greater than GTP greater than GppNHp greater than GppCH2p. At sufficiently high intracellular concentrations, however, all GTP analogues produced the same rate of IK(M) activation. This analogue- independent limiting rate is likely to correspond to the rate of GDP release from inactive, GDP-bound Gk. Muscarinic receptor stimulation by nanomolar concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), which do not elicit IK(M) under control conditions, catalyzed IK(M) activation in the presence of GTP analogues. The rate of Gk activation by ACh (kACh) was found to be described by the simple relationship kACh = 8.4 X 10(8) min- 1 M-1.[ACh] + 0.44 min-1, the first term of which presumably reflects the agonist-catalyzed rate of GDP release from the Gk.GDP complex, while the second term corresponds to the basal rate of receptor- independent GDP release. Combined with the estimated K0.5 of the IK(M)- [ACh] dose-effect relationship, 160 nM, this result also allowed us to estimate the rate of Gk.GTP hydrolysis, kcat, to be near 135 min-1. These results provide, for the first time, a quantitative description of the salient features of G-protein function in vivo. PMID:2455765

  18. Pharmacological characteristics of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Chang, G J; Su, M J; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M; Ko, F N

    1994-09-01

    1. The pharmacological activities of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, were determined in isolated trachea, ileum and cardiac tissues of guinea-pigs. 2. Liriodenine was found to be a muscarinic receptor antagonist in guinea-pig trachea as revealed by its competitive antagonism of carbachol (pA2 = 6.22 +/- 0.08)-induced smooth muscle contraction. It was slightly more potent than methoctramine (pA2 = 5.92 +/- 0.05), but was less potent than atropine (pA2 = 8.93 +/- 0.07), pirenzepine (pA2 = 7.02 +/- 0.09) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, pA2 = 8.72 +/- 0.07). 3. Liriodenine was also a muscarinic antagonist in guinea-pig ileum (pA2 = 6.36 +/- 0.10) with a pA2 value that closely resembled that obtained in the trachea. 4. Liriodenine was 10 fold less potent in atrial preparations (left atria, pA2 = 5.24 +/- 0.04; right atria, pA2 = 5.35 +/- 0.09 and 5.28 +/- 0.07 for inotropic and chronotropic effects, respectively) than in smooth muscle preparations. 5. High concentration of liriodenine (300 microM) partially depressed the contractions induced by U-46619, histamine, prostaglandin F2 alpha, neurokinin A, leukotriene C4 and high K+ in the guinea-pig trachea. The inhibitions were characterized by a rightward shift in the concentration-response curves with suppression of their maximal contraction. 6. High concentration of liriodenine (300 microM) did not affect U-46619- or neurokinin A-induced tracheal contraction in the presence of nifedipine (1 microM) or in Ca(2+)-free (containing 0.2 mM EGTA) medium. 7. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of guinea-pig trachealis was changed by liriodenine (30-300 microM). 8. It is concluded that liriodenine is a selective muscarinic receptor antagonist in isolated trachea, ileum and cardiac tissues of guinea-pigs. It is more potent in smooth muscle than in cardiac preparations. It also acts as a blocker of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels at a high concentration (300 microM).

  19. β1-Adrenergic and M2 Muscarinic Autoantibodies and Thyroid Hormone Facilitate Induction of Atrial Fibrillation in Male Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Murphy, Taylor; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Bing; Veitla, Vineet; Scherlag, Benjamin J; Kem, David C; Yu, Xichun

    2016-01-01

    Activating autoantibodies to the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors are present in a very high percentage of patients with Graves' disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). The objective of this study was to develop a reproducible animal model and thereby to examine the impact of these endocrine-like autoantibodies alone and with thyroid hormone on induction of thyroid-associated atrial tachyarrhythmias. Five New Zealand white rabbits were coimmunized with peptides from the second extracellular loops of the β1-adrenergic and M2 muscarinic receptors to produce both sympathomimetic and parasympathomimetic antibodies. A catheter-based electrophysiological study was performed on anesthetized rabbits before and after immunization and subsequent treatment with thyroid hormone. Antibody expression facilitated the induction of sustained sinus, junctional and atrial tachycardias, but not AF. Addition of excessive thyroid hormone resulted in induced sustained AF in all animals. AF induction was blocked acutely by the neutralization of these antibodies with immunogenic peptides despite continued hyperthyroidism. The measured atrial effective refractory period as one parameter of AF propensity shortened significantly after immunization and was acutely reversed by peptide neutralization. No further decrease in the effective refractory period was observed after the addition of thyroid hormone, suggesting other cardiac effects of thyroid hormone may contribute to its role in AF induction. This study demonstrates autonomic autoantibodies and thyroid hormone potentiate the vulnerability of the heart to AF, which can be reversed by decoy peptide therapy. These data help fulfill Witebsky's postulates for an increased autoimmune/endocrine basis for Graves' hyperthyroidism and AF. PMID:26517045

  20. 6-Hydroxydopamine inhibits some effects of mescaline centrally administered to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ferri, S; Reina, R A; Braga, P

    1977-12-19

    The narcotic antagonist naloxone does not antagonize antinociception elicited in the rabbit by 100 microgram/kg of mescaline centrally administered, whereas pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) inhibits this mescaline effect. Stereotyped behavior of rabbits following central mescaline administration is also prevented by 6-hda pretreatment. Since 6-OHDA in known to produce a degeneration of catecholamine containing nerve terminals, a crucial role of catecholamines is suggested in the complex of effects seen in the rabbit after central administration of the hallucinogen.

  1. Allosteric activation of M4 muscarinic receptors improve behavioral and physiological alterations in early symptomatic YAC128 mice

    PubMed Central

    Pancani, Tristano; Foster, Daniel J.; Moehle, Mark S.; Bichell, Terry Jo; Bradley, Emma; Bridges, Thomas M.; Klar, Rebecca; Poslusney, Mike; Rook, Jerri M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Niswender, Colleen M.; Jones, Carrie K.; Wood, Michael R.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Xiang, Zixiu; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that lead to Huntington’s disease (HD) result in increased transmission at glutamatergic corticostriatal synapses at early presymptomatic stages that have been postulated to set the stage for pathological changes and symptoms that are observed at later ages. Based on this, pharmacological interventions that reverse excessive corticostriatal transmission may provide a novel approach for reducing early physiological changes and motor symptoms observed in HD. We report that activation of the M4 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor reduces transmission at corticostriatal synapses and that this effect is dramatically enhanced in presymptomatic YAC128 HD and BACHD relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, chronic administration of a novel highly selective M4 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) beginning at presymptomatic ages improves motor and synaptic deficits in 5-mo-old YAC128 mice. These data raise the exciting possibility that selective M4 PAMs could provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of HD. PMID:26508634

  2. Effect of reforestation on streamflow in central New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, William Joseph; Ayer, Gordon Roundy

    1961-01-01

    Hydrologic data have been collected since 1932 in central New York State to determine the effect of reforestation on streamflow. Data are available for three small partly reforested areas and for one nonreforested control area. From 35 to 58 percent of the 3 areas were reforested, mostly with species of pine and spruce. The trees were allowed to grow without thinning or cutting, and by 1958 these reforested areas had developed into dense coniferous woodlots. Intensive statistical analyses of the data from the four study areas were made in 1958. Analyses were made for three hydrologic periods: the dormant season represented by the 6-month period ending April 30, the growing season represented by the 6-month period ending October 31, and the year represented by the 12-month period ending April 30. Analyses of the hydrologic data using multiple correlation with time as a variable and analyses of covariance between early and late periods of record indicated that several significant changes had occurred in the streamflow from the partly reforested study areas. Based on correlation with precipitation, total runoff for the dormant season from the 3 study areas was reduced by annual rates of 0.17 to 0.29 inches per year. Based on correlations with streamflow from a control area, total runoff from the partly reforested Shackham Brook area was reduced by average rates of 0.14 inches per growing season, 0.23 inches per dormant season, and 0.36 inches per hydrologic year. Peak discharges on Shackham Brook during the dormant season were reduced by 1958 by an average of 41 percent for the season, with reductions ranging from an average of 66 percent for November to an average of 16 percent for April. No significant changes were found in the peak discharges for the growing season, rates of base-flow recession, volumes of direct runoff, or annual low flows of streams in the three partly reforested areas. The significant reductions in total runoff are attributed to increases in

  3. Alpha-lipoic acid-mediated activation of muscarinic receptors improves hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Iqbal, Ghazala; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent which readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and accumulates in the brain leading to neurodegenerative disorders, characterised by cognitive impairment. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and has a potential to improve cognitive functions. This study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ALA in AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. Effect of ALA (25mg/kg/day) was evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity (AlCl3 150 mg/kg/day) mouse model on learning and memory using behaviour tests and on the expression of muscarinic receptor genes (using RT-PCR), in hippocampus and amygdala. Following ALA treatment, the expression of muscarinic receptor genes M1, M2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChaT) were significantly improved (p<0.05) relative to AlCl3-treated group. ALA enhanced fear memory (p<0.01) and social novelty preference (p<0.001) comparative to the AlCl3-treated group. Fear extinction memory was remarkably restored (p<0.001) in ALA-treated group demonstrated by reduced freezing response as compared to the AlCl3-treated group which showed higher freezing. In-silico analysis showed that racemic mixture of ALA has higher binding affinity for M1 and M2 compared to acetylcholine. These novel findings highlight the potential role of ALA in cognitive functions and cholinergic system enhancement thus presenting it an enviable therapeutic candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Effects of oxotremorine on local glucose utilization in the rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, M.; Wamsley, J.K.; Rapoport, S.I.; London, E.D.

    1982-08-01

    The (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose technique was used to examine the effects of central muscarinic stimulation on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) in the cerebral cortex of the unanesthetized rat. Systemic administration of the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine (OXO, 0.1 to 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) increased LCGU in the neocortex, mesocortex, and paleocortex. In the neocortex, OXO was more potent in elevating LCGU of the auditory, frontal, and sensorimotor regions compared with the visual cortex. Within these neocortical regions, OXO effects were greatest in cortical layers IV and V. OXO effects were more dramatic in the neocortex than in the meso- or paleocortex, and no significant effect occurred in the perirhinal and pyriform cortices. OXO-induced LCGU increases were not influenced by methylatropine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) but were antagonized completely by scopolamine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Scopolamine reduced LCGU in layer IV of the auditory cortex and in the retrosplenial cortex. The distribution and magnitude of the cortical LCGU response to OXO apparently were related to the distributions of cholinergic neurochemical markers, especially high affinity muscarinic binding sites.

  5. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  6. Muscarinic and Nicotinic Modulation of Thalamo-Prefrontal Cortex Synaptic Pasticity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Junior, Lezio Soares; Lopes-Aguiar, Cleiton; Ruggiero, Rafael Naime; Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo Neves; Leite, João Pereira

    2012-01-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD) is a rich source of afferents to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Dysfunctions in the thalamo-prefrontal connections can impair networks implicated in working memory, some of which are affected in Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia. Considering the importance of the cholinergic system to cortical functioning, our study aimed to investigate the effects of global cholinergic activation of the brain on MD-mPFC synaptic plasticity by measuring the dynamics of long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in vivo. Therefore, rats received intraventricular injections either of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (PILO; 40 nmol/µL), the nicotinic agonist nicotine (NIC; 320 nmol/µL), or vehicle. The injections were administered prior to either thalamic high-frequency (HFS) or low-frequency stimulation (LFS). Test pulses were applied to MD for 30 min during baseline and 240 min after HFS or LFS, while field postsynaptic potentials were recorded in the mPFC. The transient oscillatory effects of PILO and NIC were monitored through recording of thalamic and cortical local field potentials. Our results show that HFS did not affect mPFC responses in vehicle-injected rats, but induced a delayed-onset LTP with distinct effects when applied following PILO or NIC. Conversely, LFS induced a stable LTD in control subjects, but was unable to induce LTD when applied after PILO or NIC. Taken together, our findings show distinct modulatory effects of each cholinergic brain activation on MD-mPFC plasticity following HFS and LFS. The LTP-inducing action and long-lasting suppression of cortical LTD induced by PILO and NIC might implicate differential modulation of thalamo-prefrontal functions under low and high input drive. PMID:23118873

  7. Radioligand binding to muscarinic receptors of bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, F.; Kukovetz, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Muscarinic receptors on endothelial cells of bovine thoracic aorta were characterized by binding assays in which (-)-[3H]-N-methyl quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-NMeQNB) was used as radioligand. 2. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to crude membranes of freshly isolated endothelial cells was atropine-displaceable and of high affinity (KD = 0.48 nM) to a single class of sites (maximum binding capacity: 14 +/- 3 fmol mg-1 protein). Stereospecificity of the binding sites was demonstrated in experiments in which [3H]-NMeQNB binding was inhibited by dexetimide in the nanomolar range (KI = 0.63 nM) and by levetimide, its stereoisomer in the micromolar range (KI = 3.2 microM) (selectivity factor: approximately 5000). 3. Drug competition curves indicated a single class of binding sites for antagonists and the following apparent affinities (KI, nM): methyl atropine: 1.1: 4-diphenylacetoxy N-methyl piperidine methyl bromide (4-DAMP): 3.4; pirenzepine: 16; 11-[2-diethylamino-methyl)-1-piperidinyl- acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)1,4-benzodiazepine-6-one (AF-DX 116); 2.500. Competition of acetylcholine with [3H]-NMeQNB was best described by two affinity sites (or states) (KH = 0.82 microM, KL = 1.6 microM). In the presence of guanylimido diphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] (100 microM), acetylcholine affinity (IC50) was slightly, but significantly reduced (factor approximately 4). 4. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to freshly harvested intact cells was also atropine-displaceable, stereospecific (selectivity factor: approximately 3500) and of high affinity (KD = 0.35 nM). The maximum binding capacity (9 +/- 2 fmol mg-1 total cell protein) was comparable to that of membranes and corresponded to approximately 900 binding sites per endothelial cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2015420

  8. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  9. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

    1987-11-22

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (/sup 3/H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on /sup 3/H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; /sup 3/H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas /sup 3/H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites.

  10. Regional circadian variation of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Por, S.B.; Bondy, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    The level of binding of a labeled acetylcholine muscarinic antagonist (quinuclidinyl benzilate) to different cerebral membranes has been measured. Of the regions examined, circadian rhythmicity of binding could only be detected significantly in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus and not in the cerebral cortex, striatum, or cerebellum.

  11. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shirvan, M.H.; Pollard, H.B.; Heldman, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, the authors found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca{sup 2+} dependent, and both agonists induced {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that ({sup 3}H)Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a K{sub d} value of 3.08 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. They propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features.

  12. Mixed nicotinic and muscarinic features of cholinergic receptor coupled to secretion in bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shirvan, M H; Pollard, H B; Heldman, E

    1991-01-01

    Acetylcholine evokes release from cultured bovine chromaffin cells by a mechanism that is believed to be classically nicotinic. However, we found that the full muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-M (Oxo-M) induced a robust catecholamine (CA) secretion. By contrast, muscarine, pilocarpine, bethanechol, and McN-A-343 did not elicit any secretory response. Desensitization of the response to nicotine by Oxo-M and desensitization of the response to Oxo-M by nicotine suggest that both nicotine and Oxo-M were acting at the same receptor. Additional experiments supporting this conclusion show that nicotine-induced secretion and Oxo-M-induced secretion were similarly blocked by various muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists. Moreover, secretion induced by nicotine and Oxo-M were Ca2+ dependent, and both agonists induced 45Ca2+ uptake. Equilibrium binding studies showed that [3H]Oxo-M bound to chromaffin cell membranes with a Kd value of 3.08 x 10(-8) M and a Hill coefficient of 1.00, suggesting one binding site for this ligand. Nicotine inhibited Oxo-M binding in a noncompetitive manner, suggesting that both ligands bind at two different sites on the same receptor. We propose that the receptor on bovine chromaffin cells that is coupled to secretion represents an unusual cholinergic receptor that has both nicotinic and muscarinic features. Images PMID:2052567

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors (MR3) in saliva of patients with oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Agha-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Mohammadpour, Neda

    2016-09-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a relatively common, chronic, and inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. Xerostomia is also a common complaint of most OLP patients. Considering the significant role of M3 muscarinic receptors (M3R) in secretion of saliva, this study sought to compare the level of this receptor in saliva between OLP patients and healthy controls. Forty OLP patients and 40 healthy controls filled out two questionnaires regarding xerostomia to assess its degree of severity. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary samples were obtained of both groups and the stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates were calculated. Salivary level of M3 muscarinic receptors was measured using the ELISA kit. Data were analyzed and compared using unpaired student's t test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Stimulated and unstimulated salivary flow rates and M3 muscarinic receptors levels were significantly lower but degree of xerostomia was significantly higher in OLP patients compared to healthy controls. Salivary M3 muscarinic receptor seems to be low in the patients with OLP and these patients suffer from xerostomia and reduced salivary flow rate. PMID:27371099

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to purified muscarinic receptor display agonist-like activity.

    PubMed Central

    Leiber, D; Harbon, S; Guillet, J G; André, C; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody M-35, which immunoprecipitates native calf brain acetylcholine muscarinic receptor, mimics agonist stimulation of the intact guinea pig myometrium: the antibody, just like carbamoylcholine hydrochloride, causes a rise in intracellular cyclic GMP content, an inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation due to prostacyclin, and induces uterine contractions. Another antibody, M-23, which reacts with the denatured muscarinic receptor, is devoid of agonist-like activity at the cyclic nucleotide level but is still able to induce contractions of both rat and guinea pig myometrium. The cyclic nucleotide changes caused by both carbamoylcholine and antibody M-35 are inhibited by atropine; this antagonist, which blocks carbamoylcholine-mediated contractions, fails however, to prevent contractions induced by antibodies M-35 and M-23. These results suggest that the information necessary to transmit muscarinic signals is entirely contained in the receptor and that ligands only act to trigger the biological response. The data also imply that the muscarinic receptors of the myometrium are coupled to multiple effector systems. PMID:6087318

  15. Muscarinic and opioid receptor modulation of release of (Met/sup 5/-enkephalin immunoreactive material and catecholamines from the bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Retrogradely perfused bovine adrenal glands were stimulated by acetylcholine (ACh) and 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP), with or without: hexamethonium (C-6), atropine, imipramine, methacholine, pilocarpine, etorphine, or diprenorphine. Stimulation by either ACh DMPP resulted in an increased release of both (Met/sup 5/)-enkephalin immunoreactive material (ME-IRM) and catecholamines as measured by radioimmunoassay and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. ACh (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) and DMPP (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) stimulated the release of norepinephrine greater than the release of epinephrine. The action of these agents was antagonized by C-6(5 x 10/sup -4/ M). Atropine (5 x 10/sup -7/ M) antagonized the action of ACh to stimulate norepinephrine and MI-IRM release while having no effect on DMPP-stimulated release. Imipramine (5 x 10/sup -6/ M) had no effect on either ACh or DMPP-stimulated release. Methacholine (4 x 10/sup -5/ M) potentiated the DMPP (1 x 10/sup -5/ M) stimulation of ME-IRM and catecholamine release; pilocarpine (4 x 10/sup -5/ M) significantly potentiated only the DMPP-stimulated release of norepinephrine. Pilocarpine (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) and muscarine (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) had no effect on the secretion of MI-IRM and catecholamines from the bovine adrenal gland. Etorphine (5 x 10/sup -7/ M) significantly decreased the ACh and DMPP stimulation ME-IRM and catecholamine release. The activity of a muscarinic cholinergic receptor in the bovine adrenal medulla in stimulus-secretion coupling has been controversial. The binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate to chromaffin granule membranes was investigated to further characterize muscarinic receptors in the bovine adrenal gland.

  16. Subclassification of muscarinic receptors in the heart, urinary bladder and sympathetic ganglia in the pithed rat. Selectivity of some classical agonists.

    PubMed

    van Charldorp, K J; de Jonge, A; Thoolen, M J; van Zwieten, P A

    1985-12-01

    In pithed normotensive rats muscarinic receptors were characterized in heart, urinary bladder and sympathetic ganglia; the selectivity of some classical muscarinic agents for these subtypes was investigated. The potencies in decreasing heart rate, increasing bladder pressure and increasing diastolic blood pressure were measured for the following, intraarterially administered cholinergic agonists: McN-A-343 ([4-m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxy]-2-butynyltrimethylammonium), pilocarpine, carbachol, oxotremorine, arecoline, acetyl-beta-methylcholine and acetylcholine. The selective M1-antagonist pirenzepine, the mixed M1/M2-antagonist dexetimide and the cardioselective M2-antagonist gallamine were used as tools for identification of the receptors. All data were obtained after intravenous pretreatment with a high dose of atenolol to eliminate tachycardia induced by stimulating sympathetic ganglionic muscarinic receptors. Dexetimide strongly antagonized the bradycardia as well as the increase in bladder pressure induced by pilocarpine, carbachol, oxotremorine, arecoline, acetyl-beta-methylcholine and acetylcholine, whereas pirenzepine was much less effective. Gallamine antagonized the bradycardia, whereas no influence was found on the bladder contraction. Pilocarpine acted as a partial agonist in reducing heart rate as well as in increasing bladder pressure, whereas McN-A-343 was almost ineffective in doses up to 1 mg/kg. The hypertensive response to pilocarpine and carbachol was less pronounced than that produced by McN-A-343. Pirenzepine and dexetimide significantly antagonized the hypertensive response to McN-A-343 and pilocarpine, whereas gallamine was much less effective. The hypertensive response induced by carbachol was totally blocked by hexamethonium. The other agonists used in this study did not produce a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure in doses that produced a maximal effect on heart rate and urinary bladder pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS

  17. Imaging muscarinic cholinergic receptors in human brain in vivo with Spect, [123I]4-iododexetimide, and [123I]4-iodolevetimide.

    PubMed

    Müller-Gärtner, H W; Wilson, A A; Dannals, R F; Wagner, H N; Frost, J J

    1992-07-01

    A method to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (muscarinic receptors) noninvasively in human brain in vivo was developed using [123I]4-iododexetimide ([123I]IDex), [123I]4-iodolevetimide ([123I]ILev), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [123I]IDex is a high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist. [123I]ILev is its pharmacologically inactive enantiomer and measures nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vitro. Regional brain activity after tracer injection was measured in four young normal volunteers for 24 h. Regional [123I]IDex and [123I]ILev activities were correlated early after injection, but not after 1.5 h. [123I]IDex activity increased over 7-12 h in neocortex, neostriatum, and thalamus, but decreased immediately after the injection peak in cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity was highest in neostriatum, followed in rank order by neocortex, thalamus, and cerebellum. [123I]IDex activity correlated with muscarinic receptor concentrations in matching brain regions. In contrast, [123I]ILev activity decreased immediately after the injection peak in all brain regions and did not correspond to muscarinic receptor concentrations. [123I]IDex activity in neocortex and neostriatum during equilibrium was six to seven times higher than [123I]ILev activity. The data demonstrate that [123I]IDex binds specifically to muscarinic receptors in vivo, whereas [123I]ILev represents the nonspecific part of [123I]IDex binding. Subtraction of [123I]ILev from [123I]IDex images on a pixel-by-pixel basis therefore reflects specific [123I]IDex binding to muscarinic receptors. Owing to its high specific binding, [123I]IDex has the potential to measure small changes in muscarinic receptor characteristics in vivo with SPECT. The use of stereoisomerism directly to measure nonspecific binding of [123I]IDex in vivo may reduce complexity in modeling approaches to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in human brain. PMID:1618935

  18. Hemodynamic effects of centrally administered, norcocaine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Barber, D A; Tackett, R L

    1992-01-01

    Norcocaine is the N-demethylated metabolite of cocaine. It is present in the CNS and is reported to be pharmacologically active. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiovascular actions of norcocaine following central administration. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital and instrumented for measurement of blood pressure and renal and hindlimb blood flow (via Doppler flowprobes). A cerebroventricular cannula was placed in the lateral ventricle for drug administration. Cocaine or norcocaine was administered centrally in a dose range of 0.025 to 4.0 mg/kg. Under the above experimental conditions, 4.0 mg/kg of norcocaine decreased blood pressure without a significant change in either hind limb or renal blood flow. Central administration of cocaine also produced a similar depressor response. In conscious, unrestrained rats, cocaine produced a pressor response while norcocaine did not significantly alter blood pressure. The depressor response to both cocaine and norcocaine in the anesthetized animal is speculated to be due to the local anesthetic properties of the drugs.

  19. Brain regional acetylcholinesterase activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in rats after repeated administration of cholinesterase inhibitors and its withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Haruo . E-mail: hk1664@iwate-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Tadahiko; Sakamoto, Maki; Hashimoto, Wataru; Kashiwada, Keiko; Sato, Itaru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Satoh, Tetsuo

    2007-03-15

    Activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and specific binding of [{sup 3}H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB), [{sup 3}H]pirenzepine (PZP) and [{sup 3}H]AF-DX 384 to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) preparations in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex of rats were determined 1, 6 and 11 days after the last treatment with an organophosphate DDVP, a carbamate propoxur or a muscarinic agonist oxotremorine as a reference for 7 and 14 days. AChE activity was markedly decreased in the three regions 1 day after the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days with a gradual recovery 6 to 11 days, and much less decreased 1, 6 and 11 days after the treatment with propoxur for 7 days but not for 14 days in the hippocampus and cortex. The binding of [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 in the three regions was generally decreased by the treatment with DDVP for 7 and 14 days. Such down-regulations were generally restored 6 or 11 days after the treatment for 7 but not for 14 days. The down-regulation or up-regulation as measured by [{sup 3}H]-QNB, PZP and AF-DX 384 was observed 1, 6 or 11 days after treatment with propoxur for 7 days and/or 14 days. Repeated treatment with oxotremorine produced similar effects except AChE activity to DDVP. These results suggest that repeated inhibition of AChE activity may usually cause down-regulation of mAChRs with some exception in the hippocampus when a reversible antiChE propoxur is injected.

  20. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  1. Simultaneous modulation of retrieval by dopaminergic D(1), beta-noradrenergic, serotonergic-1A and cholinergic muscarinic receptors in cortical structures of the rat.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Mello e Souza, T; De David, T; Choi, H; Aguzzoli, A; Madche, C; Ardenghi, P; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2001-09-28

    Retrieval of inhibitory avoidance has been recently shown to require intact glutamate receptors, protein kinases A and C and mitogen-activated protein kinase in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus and in the entorhinal, posterior parietal and anterior cingulate cortex. These enzymatic activities are known to be modulated by dopamine D(1), beta-noradrenergic, 5HT1A and cholinergic muscarinic receptors. Here we study the effect on retrieval of this task of well-known agonists and antagonists of these receptors infused in the same brain cortical regions and into the basolateral amygdala, in rats. The drugs used were SKF38393 (D(1) agonist), noradrenaline, 8-HO-DPAT (5HT1A agonist), oxotremorine (muscarinic agonist), SCH23390 (D(1) antagonist), timolol (beta antagonist), NAN-190 (5HT1A antagonist) and scopolamine (muscarinic antagonist). All were studied at two different dose levels. The localised infusion of SKF38393, noradrenaline, NAN-190 and oxotremorine into any of the cortical structures mentioned 10 min prior to a 24-h retention test session of one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance enhanced retention test performance. SCH2330, timolol, 8-HO-DPAT and scopolamine hindered retention test performance. In the basolateral amygdala only an enhancing effect of noradrenaline and an inhibitory effect of timolol were seen. Three hours after the infusions, retention test performance returned to normal in all cases. None of the treatments affected locomotion or rearing in an open field or behaviour in the elevated plus maze. Therefore, their effects on retention testing can be attributed to an influence on retrieval. In conclusion, memory retrieval of this apparently simple task requires the participation of CA1, entorhinal, posterior parietal and anterior cingulate cortex, and is strongly modulated by, dopaminergic D(1), beta-noradrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic and 5HT1A receptors in the four areas. The first three types of receptor enhance, and the latter inhibits

  2. Direct muscarinic and nicotinic receptor-mediated excitation of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelan, K. D.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have utilized intracellular recording techniques to investigate the cholinoceptivity of rat medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons in a submerged brain slice preparation. Exogenous application of the mixed cholinergic agonists, acetylcholine (ACh) or carbachol (CCh), produced predominantly membrane depolarization, induction of action potential firing, and decreased input resistance. Application of the selective muscarinic receptor agonist muscarine (MUSC), or the selective nicotinic receptor agonists nicotine (NIC) or 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP) also produced membrane depolarizations. The MUSC-induced depolarization was accompanied by decreased conductance, while an increase in conductance appeared to underlie the NIC- and DMPP-induced depolarizations. The muscarinic and nicotinic receptor mediated depolarizations persisted in tetrodotoxin and/or low Ca2+/high Mg2+ containing media, suggesting direct postsynaptic receptor activation. The MUSC-induced depolarization could be reversibly blocked by the selective muscarinic-receptor antagonist, atropine, while the DMPP-induced depolarization could be reversibly suppressed by the selective ganglionic nicotinic-receptor antagonist, mecamylamine. Some neurons exhibited a transient membrane hyperpolarization during the depolarizing response to CCh or MUSC application. This transient inhibition could be reversibly blocked by the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) antagonist, bicuculline, suggesting that the underlying hyperpolarization results indirectly from the endogenous release of GABA acting at GABA receptors. This study confirms the cholinoceptivity of MVN neurons and establishes that individual MVN cells possess muscarinic as well as nicotinic receptors. The data provide support for a prominent role of cholinergic mechanisms in the direct and indirect regulation of the excitability of MVN neurons.

  3. Muscarinic receptors of the vascular bed: radioligand binding studies on bovine splenic veins.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Kukovetz, W R

    1986-01-01

    Despite an obvious lack of parasympathetic innervation to the spleen, pharmacological evidence suggests the presence of cholinergic receptors in isolated bovine splenic veins. We therefore studied muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in a bovine splenic vein preparation by direct radioligand binding techniques using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) as radioactive probe. Saturation experiments indicated one homogeneous class of high-affinity binding sites, with a KD of 0.11 nM and a binding site density Bmax of 55 fmol/mg protein. The rate constants at 37 degrees C for formation and dissociation of the [3H]QNB receptor complex were 2.7 X 10(9) M-1 h-1 and 0.38 h-1, respectively, yielding a KD of 0.14 nM. The binding sites showed a high stereospecificity, which was evident from competition experiments with dexetimide (KI = 1.3 nM) and levetimide (KI = 4.6 microM). In competition experiments with muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists and some antidepressants, only one binding site was found, whereas with muscarinic agonists, two binding sites were detected. In the presence of 0.1 mM guanyl-imido-diphosphate, only one binding site could be identified with the muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine. The affinity of [3H]QNB, on the other hand, was slightly decreased, and Bmax values were unchanged. It is concluded that specific, saturable, high-affinity muscarinic binding sites in the bovine splenic vein have been identified and characterized that exhibit properties similar to cholinergic receptors of brain and peripheral tissues and probably mediate acetylcholine-induced relaxation of splenic veins. PMID:2427809

  4. Potentiation of Muscarinic and α -adrenergic Responses by an Analogue of Guanosine 5'-triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, M. G.; Marty, A.

    1986-06-01

    Ca2+-dependent K+ and Cl- currents were recorded in isolated and dialyzed rat lacrimal gland cells by use of the tight-seal whole-cell recording technique. Under control conditions, application of acetylcholine (0.5-1.0 μ M) resulted in the full activation of both types of current. When 50-200 μ M guanosine 5'-[γ -thio]triphosphate (GTP[S], a nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue) was added to the intracellular solution, activation of both currents was seen with 1 nM acetylcholine, a dose 1/100th that needed under control conditions. Dialysis with solutions containing 200 μ M GTP or cAMP had no, or only slight, potentiation effects. The effects of GTP[S] were obtained only when ATP was included in the intracellular solution. The potentiated responses to acetylcholine were blocked by increasing 10-fold the intracellular Ca2+-buffering capacity and were not dependent on external Ca2+. Thus, the potentiated responses appeared to result from a release of Ca2+ from internal stores. GTP[S] also greatly potentiated the Ca2+-dependent adrenergic (norepinephrine) response of this preparation. In addition, GTP[S] elicited in some cells transient responses without application of acetylcholine or norepinephrine. Finally, rapid and sustained responses were seen as soon as the cells were dialyzed with inositol trisphosphate (20 μ M). These findings are discussed in terms of a possible role of a GTP-binding protein as a link between activation of muscarinic or adrenergic receptors and initiation of Ca2+ release by inositol trisphosphate.

  5. Atmospheric chemistry effects of the 1998 Mexican/Central American fires measured in central New Mexico USA.

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C. J.

    1998-12-16

    Atmospheric effects from large fires have received a great deal of interest recently, especially when the fires have the potential to effect human health when the plumes are transported long distances over areas of high population density. Examples are the recent large fires in Southeast Asia in 1997 (1) and the wildfires occurring in southern Mexico and Central America that were manifested in decreased visibility and high aerosol concentrations in the United States at distances of 2500-4000 km from the fires. In addition to fine aerosols, these biomass fires have the potential to produce and transport large quantities of oxygenated organic species such as aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids, hydrocarbons, and sulfate and nitrate species. Most of the literature reports dealing with products of biomass burning have been related to fireplace and wood burning stove emissions (2,3) and with local effects from forest fires(4). The recent super-large fires occurring in Indonesia and Mexico/Central America also bring about the issue of atmospheric reactivity because long-range transport affords long reaction times for photochemical reactions, wet and dry deposition and surface reactions on the aerosol particles. The smoke/haze conditions prompted considerable concern among the general population in New Mexico regarding health hazards and a large number of calls to the Albuquerque, NM Air Quality Division which reported the PM{sub 10} samples collected showed no significant increase in mass(5). The conclusion was that the particles were very fine and therefore had considerable influence on the visibility but did not violate health standards. In this study, organic and inorganic chemical species in the gaseous and aerosol phases have been identified and quantified under non-smoky and smoky conditions in Central New Mexico approximately 3000 km from the source of the fires.

  6. Central nervous system effects of local anaesthetic agents.

    PubMed

    Englesson, S; Matousek, M

    1975-02-01

    A review is given of an experimental study on cats where the influence of acid-base changes on central nervous system toxicity of local anaesthetic agents was studied. The conclusion of this study was that a respiratory acidosis increased the central nervous system toxicity of local anaesthetics and that the underlying metabolic conditions modified this increase. Thus a respiratory acidosis increased this toxicity more if it was based on a metabolic acidosis than on a metabolic alkalosis (Englesson, 1974; Englesson and Grevsten, 1974). An extended analysis is presented where automatic frequency analysis was performed on the e.e.g. recordings performed during the i.v. infusion of lignocaine, bupivacaine, L 134, HS 37 and its optical isomers. The preliminary results show that the electrical changes appearing in the e.e.g. from the start of the i.v. infusion until seizure activity were the same if this time interval was as short as 1 min or as long as 8 min. It also revealed remarkable individual differences between agents, for instance lignocaine displaying marked electrical changes already in the first third of this time period where bupivacaine showed no changes until shortly before seizures. PMID:238556

  7. Ovulation requires the activation on proestrus of M₁ muscarinic receptors in the left ovary.

    PubMed

    Cruz, M E; Flores, A; Alvarado, B E; Hernández, C G; Zárate, A; Chavira, R; Cárdenas, M; Arrieta-Cruz, I; Gutiérrez-Juárez, R

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the effects of chemically blocking type 1 muscarinic receptors (M1R) on either the left or right ovary on ovulation rate, number of ova shed and steroid hormones levels. M1R were unilaterally blocked in ovary with the M1R selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZP). PZP was delivered into the bursa ovarica of the left or right ovary of adult rats at 13:00 h on proestrus day. PZP treatment in the left but not in the right ovary blocked ovulation. PZP did not modify the number of ova shed, nor progesterone or 17β-estradiol serum levels. The surge of luteinizing hormone levels was diminished while that of follicle-stimulating hormone did not change in animals treated with PZP in the left ovary. Interestingly, treatment with either synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone or human chorionic gonadotropin 1 h after PZP administration in the left ovary restored ovulation in both ovaries. The presence of M1R protein in the theca cells of the ovarian follicles as well as in cells of the corpus luteum was detected on proestrus day. These results suggest that M1R activation in the left ovary is required for pre-ovulatory gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and ovulation. Furthermore, these results also suggest that M1R in the left ovary might be regulating ovulation asymmetrically through a stimulatory neural signal relayed to the hypothalamus via the vagus nerve to induce the GnRH secretion which then triggers ovulation.

  8. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. )

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  9. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Alexandre A; Costa, Ana Paula R; Bicca, Maíra A; Matheus, Filipe C; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L; Bortolotto, Zuner A; de Lima, Thereza C M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine--a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist--displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine--an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)--prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies. PMID:26795565

  10. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Alexandre A; Costa, Ana Paula R; Bicca, Maíra A; Matheus, Filipe C; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L; Bortolotto, Zuner A; de Lima, Thereza C M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine--a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist--displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine--an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)--prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies.

  11. Deletion of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors increases amyloid pathology in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Albert A.; Fritz, Jason J.; Wess, Jürgen; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that causes dementia and poses a major public health crisis as the population ages. Aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is strongly implicated as a proximal event in AD pathophysiology, but the neurochemical signals that regulate APP processing in the brain are not completely understood. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) has been shown to affect APP processing and AD pathology, but less is known about the roles of specific mAChR subtypes. In this study, we used M1 mAChR knockout mice (M1KO) to isolate the effects of the M1 mAChR on APP processing in primary neurons and on the development of amyloid pathology in a transgenic mouse model of AD. We demonstrate that the loss of M1 mAChRs increases amyloidogenic APP processing in neurons, as evidenced by decreased agonist-regulated shedding of the neuroprotective APP ectodomain APPsα and increased production of toxic Aβ peptides. Expression of M1 mAChRs on the M1KO background rescued this phenotype, indicating that M1 mAChRs are sufficient to modulate non-amyloidogenic APP processing. In APPSwe/Ind transgenic mice, the loss of M1 mAChRs resulted in increased levels of brain Aβ1-40 and greater accumulation of amyloid plaque pathology. Analysis of APP metabolites in APPSwe/Ind brain tissue indicates that the loss of M1 mAChRs increases amyloidogenic APP processing. These results indicate that the M1 mAChR is an important regulator of amyloidogenesis in the brain and provide strong support for targeting the M1 mAChR as a therapeutic candidate in AD. PMID:20335454

  12. Netherlands to aid central, eastern Europe in halting pollution effects

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, D.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Last year, about 75 project proposals were made to the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning and the Environment, and the number likely will be greater this year. They were submitted mainly by Dutch industrial and consultancy firms, and covered a broad area of activity - policy planning, support for environmental groups, environmental monitoring networks, emissions abatement, water quality research, and the like. Various criteria are used to evaluate project proposals - typically the priority of the problem being addressed, and the environmental benefit expected to arise from the solution. Special attention is given to Dutch initiatives centering on large-scale problems, such as curbing nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide emissions from power plants. This paper reports how expanded Dutch policy will bring economic, advisory aid aimed at abating pollution, managing environment to nations of central eastern Europe.

  13. Activation of muscarinic cholinoceptor ameliorates tumor necrosis factor-α-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Rafiqul Islam; Uwada, Junsuke; Yazawa, Takashi; Islam, Md Tariqul; Krug, Susanne M; Fromm, Michael; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Suzuki, Yuichi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Sada, Kiyonao; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2015-11-30

    Impaired intestinal barrier function is one of the critical issues in inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate muscarinic cholinoceptor (mAChR)-mediated signaling for the amelioration of cytokine-induced barrier dysfunction in intestinal epithelium. Rat colon challenged with TNF-α and interferon γ reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). This barrier injury was attenuated by muscarinic stimulation. In HT-29/B6 intestinal epithelial cells, muscarinic stimulation suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption. Finally, muscarinic stimulation promoted the shedding of TNFR1, which would be a mechanism for the attenuation of TNF-α/NF-κB signaling and barrier disruption via mAChR.

  14. A Novel Selective Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 1 Antagonist Reduces Seizures without Impairing Hippocampus-Dependent LearningS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Williams, Richard; Bridges, Thomas M.; Xiang, Zixiu; Kane, Alexander S.; Byun, Nellie E.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Mock, Mathew M.; Zheng, Fang; Lewis, L. Michelle; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Weaver, Charles D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that selective antagonists of specific subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) may provide a novel approach for the treatment of certain central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including epileptic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Unfortunately, previously reported antagonists are not highly selective for specific mAChR subtypes, making it difficult to definitively establish the functional roles and therapeutic potential for individual subtypes of this receptor subfamily. The M1 mAChR is of particular interest as a potential target for treatment of CNS disorders. We now report the discovery of a novel selective antagonist of M1 mAChRs, termed VU0255035 [N-(3-oxo-3-(4-(pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole-4 sulfonamide]. Equilibrium radioligand binding and functional studies demonstrate a greater than 75-fold selectivity of VU0255035 for M1 mAChRs relative to M2-M5. Molecular pharmacology and mutagenesis studies indicate that VU0255035 is a competitive orthosteric antagonist of M1 mAChRs, a surprising finding given the high level of M1 mAChR selectivity relative to other orthosteric antagonists. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrate that VU0255035 inhibits potentiation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor currents by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in hippocampal pyramidal cells. VU0255035 has excellent brain penetration in vivo and is efficacious in reducing pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice. We were surprised to find that doses of VU0255035 that reduce pilocarpine-induced seizures do not induce deficits in contextual freezing, a measure of hippocampus-dependent learning that is disrupted by nonselective mAChR antagonists. Taken together, these data suggest that selective antagonists of M1 mAChRs do not induce the severe cognitive deficits seen with nonselective mAChR antagonists and could provide a novel approach for the treatment certain of CNS disorders. PMID:19407080

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [125I]- and [123I]-4-iododexetimide, a potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A A; Dannals, R F; Ravert, H T; Frost, J J; Wagner, H N

    1989-05-01

    A series of halogenated racemic analogues of dexetimide (1) was synthesized and their affinity for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor measured. One analogue, 4-iododexetimide (21), was efficiently labeled with 125I and 123I at high specific activity. In vitro binding studies and in vivo biodistribution studies suggest that 123I-labeled 21 may be useful for imaging muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the living human brain with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:2785211

  16. Central and peripheral testosterone effects in men with heart failure: An approach for cardiovascular research

    PubMed Central

    Bušić, Željko; Čulić, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a syndrome recognized as a health problem worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, patients with HF still have increased morbidity and mortality. Testosterone is one of the most researched hormones in the course of HF. Growing interest regarding the effect of testosterone, on a variety of body systems, has increased the knowledge about its mechanisms of action. The terms central and peripheral effects are used to distinguish the effects of testosterone on cardiac and extracardiac structures. Central effects include influences on cardiomyocytes and electrophysiology. Peripheral effects include influences on blood vessels, baroreceptor reactivity, skeletal muscles and erythropoesis. Current knowledge about peripheral effects of testosterone may explain much about beneficiary effects in the pathophysiology of HF syndrome. However, central, i.e., cardiac effects of testosterone are to be further explored. PMID:26413227

  17. An effective and biocompatible antibiofilm coating for central venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Silva Paes Leme, Annelisa Farah; Ferreira, Aline Siqueira; Alves, Fernanda Aparecida Oliveira; de Azevedo, Bruna Martinho; de Bretas, Liza Porcaro; Farias, Rogerio Estevam; Oliveira, Murilo Gomes; Raposo, Nádia Rezende Barbosa

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and the tissue reaction of an antibiofilm coating composed of xylitol, triclosan, and polyhexamethylene biguanide. The antimicrobial activity was analyzed by a turbidimetric method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the antiadherent property of central venous catheter (CVC) fragments impregnated with an antibiofilm coating (I-CVC) in comparison with noncoated CVC (NC-CVC) fragments. Two in vivo assays using subcutaneous implantation of NC-CVC and I-CVC fragments in the dorsal area of rats were performed. The first assay comprised hematological and microbiological analysis. The second assay evaluated tissue response by examining the inflammatory reactions after 7 and 21 days. The formulation displayed antimicrobial activity against all tested strains. A biofilm disaggregation with significant reduction of microorganism's adherence in I-CVC fragments was observed. In vivo antiadherence results demonstrated a reduction of early biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, mainly in an external surface of the I-CVC, in comparison with the NC-CVC. All animals displayed negative hemoculture. No significant tissue reaction was observed, indicating that the antibiofilm formulation could be considered biocompatible. The use of I-CVC could decrease the probability of development of localized or systemic infections. PMID:25826042

  18. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1989-05-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure.

  19. Describing an "Effective" Principal: Perceptions of the Central Office Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parylo, Oksana; Zepeda, Sally J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how district leaders of two school systems in the USA describe an effective principal. Membership categorisation analysis revealed that district leaders believed an effective principal had four major categories of characteristics: (1) documented characteristics (having a track record and being a…

  20. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  1. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  2. Land use change effects on GHG dynamics in Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C. J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.

    2012-12-01

    The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as native or managed ecosystems are being converted to intense agricultural crops for biofuel purposes. Agriculture represents the single largest terrestrial flux of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere resulting from nutrient applications. Livestock grazing also accounts for a significant release of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Together, CO2, N2O and CH4 represent the dominant greenhouse gasses (GHG) that are emitted to the atmosphere through anthropogenic influences. Significant alterations to the land surface, particularly associated with changes in nutrient application rates, ability of vegetation to uptake nutrients, or changes in the stocking density of livestock, could have a meaningful impact on GHG emissions. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect soil GHG dynamics is essential to quantify the impact of land use change on the global climate system. Large-scale changes to land cover type in Central Florida Highlands County is currently occurring in which improved pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) is being replaced by energy cane (genus Saccharum L.). Fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), soil carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) were obtained over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle in a grazed pasture and an energy cane plantation located in Highlands County, FL. In addition, we also investigated the biotic and environmental drivers that regulate soil GHG fluxes in these ecosystems. We predicted decreased rates of CH4 released to the atmosphere after the conversion process was completed to energy cane due to the absence of grazing cattle. We also predicted increased N2O emissions from aggressive fertilization of energycane. Using static chamber measurements, we collected gas samples from four energy cane crops at varying ages and improved pastures paired to each energy cane plot. The gas samples were analyzed using gas chromatography

  3. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  4. Essential role of UCP1 modulating the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Crespo, Mayte; Csikasz, Robert I.; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Diéguez, Carlos; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan; López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Classically, metabolic effects of thyroid hormones (THs) have been considered to be peripherally mediated, i.e. different tissues in the body respond directly to thyroid hormones with an increased metabolism. An alternative view is that the metabolic effects are centrally regulated. We have examined here the degree to which prolonged, centrally infused triiodothyronine (T3) could in itself induce total body metabolic effects and the degree to which brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis was essential for such effects, by examining uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) KO mice. Methods Wildtype and UPC1 KO mice were centrally-treated with T3 by using minipumps. Metabolic measurements were analyzed by indirect calorimetry and expression analysis by RT-PCR or western blot. BAT morphology and histology were studied by immunohistochemistry. Results We found that central T3-treatment led to reduced levels of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and elevated body temperature (0.7 °C). UCP1 was essential for the T3-induced increased rate of energy expenditure, which was only observable at thermoneutrality and notably only during the active phase, for the increased body weight loss, for the increased hypothalamic levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and for the increased food intake induced by central T3-treatment. Prolonged central T3-treatment also led to recruitment of BAT and britening/beiging (“browning”) of inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT). Conclusions We conclude that UCP1 is essential for mediation of the central effects of thyroid hormones on energy balance, and we suggest that similar UCP1-dependent effects may underlie central energy balance effects of other agents. PMID:27069867

  5. Parallel maturation of the pancreatic secretory response to cholinergic stimulation and the muscarinic receptor population.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Y.; Larose, L.; Morisset, J.; Poirier, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    1 The appearance of pancreatic muscarinic receptors during development has been measured by use of the specific ligand [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB). 2 QNB binding sites are present in foetal pancreas; their maximal concentration is attained at the age of 30 days and a significant decrease is observed in one year old animals. 3 Affinity of [3H]-QNB for the muscarinic receptor does not change with age. 4 An evaluation of the pancreatic secretory response to a cholinoceptor agonist as a function of age indicates that the development of this response parallels that of the receptor population. 5 It is suggested that, at all ages from 3 days after birth onwards, the maximal secretory response of the exocrine pancreas to a cholinoceptor agonist mobilizes the same proportion of the total population of QNB binding sites. PMID:6165420

  6. Solubilization and characterization of guanine nucleotide-sensitive muscarinic agonist binding sites from rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Berrie, C. P.; Birdsall, N. J.; Hulme, E. C.; Keen, M.; Stockton, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors from rat myocardial membranes may be solubilized by digitonin in good yield at low temperatures in the presence of Mg2+. Under these conditions, up to 60% of the soluble receptors show high affinity binding for the potent agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M (KA = 10(9)M-1), which is inhibited by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate. The muscarinic binding site labelled with [3H]-oxotremorine-M has a higher sedimentation coefficient (13.4 s) than sites labelled with a 3H antagonist in the presence of guanylylimidodiphosphate (11.6 s) and probably represents a complex between the ligand binding subunit of the receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. PMID:6478115

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against the native or denatured forms of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    André, C; Guillet, J G; De Backer, J P; Vanderheyden, P; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with affinity-purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from calf brain and their splenocytes fused with NS1 myeloma cells. Hybrid cultures were grown and selected for production of antibodies on the basis of enzyme immunoassays on calf and rat forebrain membrane preparations. Thirty-four clones were retained and six of them further subcloned. Two of these subclones produced antibodies that selectively recognized muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-bearing membranes. The M-35b antibodies interacted only with native digitonin-solubilized receptors, and not with denatured receptors. The M-23c antibodies did not react with active digitonin-solubilized receptors but recognized the denatured form. The M-23c antibodies should thus be useful in the purification of the receptor and its precursor translation products, while the M-35b antibodies could be used for the immunocytochemical localization of the receptor in cells and tissues of different species. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6200320

  8. Muscarinic M(3) facilitation of acetylcholine release from rat myenteric neurons depends on adenosine outflow leading to activation of excitatory A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Vieira, C; Duarte-Araújo, M; Adães, S; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2009-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the myenteric plexus, and it regulates its own release acting via muscarinic autoreceptors. Adenosine released from stimulated myenteric neurons modulates ACh release preferentially via facilitatory A(2A) receptors. In this study, we investigated how muscarinic and adenosine receptors interplay to regulate ACh from the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Blockade of the muscarinic M(2) receptor with 11-[[2-1[(diethylamino) methyl-1-piperidinyl]- acetyl

  9. Persistent Sodium Current Drives Conditional Pacemaking in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons under Muscarinic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are normally quiescent but can fire spontaneously when stimulated by muscarinic agonists. In brain slice recordings from mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, we examined the ionic basis of this activity using interleaved current-clamp and voltage-clamp experiments. Both in control and after muscarinic stimulation, the steady-state current–voltage curve was dominated by inward TTX-sensitive persistent sodium current (INaP) that activated near −75 mV and increased steeply with depolarization. In control, total membrane current was net outward (hyperpolarizing) near −70 mV so that cells had a stable resting potential. Muscarinic stimulation activated a small nonselective cation current so that total membrane current near −70 mV shifted to become barely net inward (depolarizing). The small depolarization triggers regenerative activation of INaP, which then depolarizes the cell from −70 mV to spike threshold. We quantified the relative contributions of INaP, hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), and calcium current to pacemaking by using the cell's own firing as a voltage command along with specific blockers. TTX-sensitive sodium current was substantial throughout the entire interspike interval, increasing as the membrane potential approached threshold, while both Ih and calcium current were minimal. Thus, spontaneous activity is driven primarily by activation of INaP in a positive feedback loop starting near −70 mV and providing increasing inward current to threshold. These results show that the pacemaking “engine” from INaP is an inherent property of CA1 pyramidal neurons that can be engaged or disengaged by small shifts in net membrane current near −70 mV, as by muscarinic stimulation. PMID:24048831

  10. Central effects of angiotensin II, its fragment and analogues.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, V P; Klousha, V E; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Svirskis, S V; Mountsinietse, R K; Anouans, Z E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the octapeptide angiotensin II (AT II), its fragment Ile8 AT3-8 and the analogues Sar1 Ala8 AT II, Ala8 AT II and Ile8 AT II were studied with respect to: the level of biogenic amines (DA, 5-HT and their metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA) in the forebrain; the behaviour of the animals--haloperidol catalepsy, apomorphine stereotypy, unconditioned jumping reaction (UJR), convulsive threshold. Good correlation was found between the biochemical and behavioural effects. The fragment of AT II where phenylalanine is substituted at the C-terminal by Ile reduces the haloperidol-increased content of HVA, potentiates apomorphine stereotypy and reduces catalepsy, whereas the AT II analogues (where the C-terminal phenylalanine is substituted by Ala, and the N-terminal--by Sar) potentiate the effect of haloperidol increasing the HVA content, reduce apomorphine stereotypy and potentiate catalepsy; saralasine independently applied induces brief catalepsy; AT II, its fragment and analogues inhibit UJR, in combination with amphetamine and PTZ this effect becomes deeper; the duration of hexobarbital sleep is increased. The peptides investigated increase the convulsive threshold. The results show that the hexapeptide fragment has preserved the effects of AT II, whereas in the analogues (with changed C- and N-terminals) they are changed. The results obtained may be explained with the modulating influence of AT II-receptors on the DA-ergic receptors in the brain structures with which AT II and its fragment and analogues enter in contact.

  11. Costs and water quality effects of wastewater treatment plant centralization

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    The costs and water quality impacts of two regional configurations of municipal wastewater treatment plants in Northeastern Illinois are compared. In one configuration, several small treatment plants are consolidated into a smaller number of regional facilities. In the other, the smaller plants continue to operate. Costs for modifying the plants to obtain various levels of pollutant removal are estimated using a simulation model that considers the type of equipment existing at the plants and the costs of modifying that equipment to obtain a range of effluent levels for various pollutants. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine the water quality effects of the various treatment technologies and pollutant levels. Cost and water quality data are combined and the cost-effectiveness of the two treatment configurations is compared. The regionalized treatment-plant configuration is found to be the more cost-effective.

  12. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibits glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Li-min; Chen, Hong-zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the actions of the muscarinic agonist carbachol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: PC12 cells were treated with different concentrations of glutamate for 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was measured using MTT assay, and the expression and activation of GSK-3β were detected with Western blot. β-Catenin translocation was detected using immunofluorescence. Luciferase reporter assay and real-time PCR were used to analyze the transcriptional activity of β-catenin. Results: Glutamate (1, 3, and 10 mmol/L) induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, treatment of the cells with glutamate (1 mmol/L) caused significant overactivation of GSK-3β and prevented β-catenin translocation to the nucleus. Pretreatment with carbachol (0.01 μmol/L) blocked glutamate-induced cell death and GSK-3β overactivation, and markedly enhanced β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion: Activation of muscarinic receptors exerts neuroprotection in PC12 cells by attenuating glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation, suggesting potential benefits of muscarinic agonists for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23685950

  13. Murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 expresses all subtypes of muscarinic receptors and multiple nicotinic receptor subunits: Down-regulation of α4- and β4-subunits during early differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, Susanne; Schmitz, Luise; Michel-Schmidt, Rosmarie; Anspach, Laura; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Wessler, Ignaz

    2015-11-01

    Non-neuronal acetylcholine mediates its cellular effects via stimulation of the G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors and the ligand-gated ion channel nicotinic receptors. The murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 synthesizes and releases non-neuronal acetylcholine. In the present study a systematic investigation of the expression of nicotinic receptor subunits and muscarinic receptors was performed, when the stem cells were grown in the presence or absence of LIF, as the latter condition induces early differentiation. CGR8 cells expressed multiple nicotinic receptor subtypes (α3, α4, α7, α9, α10, β1, β2, β3, β4, γ, δ, ε) and muscarinic receptors (M1, M3, M4, M5); M2 was detected only in 2 out of 8 cultures. LIF removal caused a down-regulation only of the α4- and β4-subunit. In conclusion, more or less the whole repertoire of cholinergic receptors is expressed on the murine embryonic stem cell line CGR8 for mediating cellular signaling of non-neuronal acetylcholine which acts via auto- and paracrine pathways. During early differentiation of the murine CGR8 stem cell signaling via nicotinic receptors containing α4- or β4 subunits is reduced. Thus, the so-called neuronal α4 nicotine receptor composed of these subunits may be involved in the regulation of pluripotency in this murine stem cell line.

  14. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, impairs signal transduction associated with muscarinic acetylcholine and metabotropic glutamate receptors: possible action on G alpha(q/11).

    PubMed

    Blanc, E M; Kelly, J F; Mark, R J; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-08-01

    Considerable data indicate that oxidative stress and membrane lipid peroxidation contribute to neuronal degeneration in an array of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast, the impact of subtoxic levels of membrane lipid peroxidation on neuronal function is largely unknown. We now report that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, disrupts coupling of muscarinic cholinergic receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors to phospholipase C-linked GTP-binding proteins in cultured rat cerebrocortical neurons. At subtoxic concentrations, HNE markedly inhibited GTPase activity, inositol phosphate release, and elevation of intracellular calcium levels induced by carbachol (muscarinic agonist) and (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenyl glycine (metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist). Maximal impairment of agonist-induced responses occurred within 30 min of exposure to HNE. Other aldehydes, including malondialdehyde, had little effect on agonist-induced responses. Antioxidants that suppress lipid peroxidation did not prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses by HNE, whereas glutathione, which is known to bind and detoxify HNE, did prevent impairment of agonist-induced responses. HNE itself did not induce oxidative stress. Immunoprecipitation-western blot analysis using an antibody to HNE-protein conjugates showed that HNE can bind to G alpha(q/11). HNE also significantly suppressed inositol phosphate release induced by aluminum fluoride. Collectively, our data suggest that HNE plays a role in altering receptor-G protein coupling in neurons under conditions of oxidative stress that may occur both normally, and before cell degeneration and death in pathological settings. PMID:9231714

  15. Increase in muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) response by adenovirus-mediated Stim1-mKO1 gene transfer to rat submandibular acinar cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takao; Nezu, Akihiro; Tojyo, Yosuke; Tanimura, Akihiko

    2013-10-01

    Adenoviruses have been used for gene transfer to salivary gland cells in vivo. Their use to study the function of salivary acinar cells was limited by a severe inflammatory response and by the destruction of fluid-secreting acinar cells. In the present study, low doses of adenovirus were administered to express Stim1-mKO1 by retrograde ductal injection to submandibular glands. The approach succeeded in increasing muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) responses in acinar cells without inflammation or decreased salivary secretions. This increased Ca(2+) response was notable upon weak muscarinic stimulation and was attributed to increased Ca(2+) release from internal stores and increased Ca(2+) entry. The basal Ca(2+) level was higher in Stim1-mKO1-expressing cells than in mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. Exposure of permeabilized submandibular acinar cells, where Ca(2+) concentration was fixed at 50 nM, to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) produced similar effects on the release of Ca(2+) from stores in Stim1-mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. The low toxicity and relative specificity to acinar cells of the mild gene transfer method described herein are particularly useful for studying the molecular functions of salivary acinar cells in vivo, and may be applied to increase salivary secretions in experimental animals and human in future.

  16. Muscarinic Type 3 Receptor Induces Cytoprotective Signaling in Salivary Gland Cells through Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Ichimonji, Isao; Min, Christine; Zhu, Tongbo; Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing; Almazrooa, Soulafa A.; Cha, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Muscarinic type 3 receptor (M3R) plays a pivotal role in the induction of glandular fluid secretions. Although M3R is often the target of autoantibodies in Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), chemical agonists for M3R are clinically used to stimulate saliva secretion in patients with SjS. Aside from its activity in promoting glandular fluid secretion, however, it is unclear whether activation of M3R is related to other biological events in SjS. This study aimed to investigate the cytoprotective effect of chemical agonist-mediated M3R activation on apoptosis induced in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. Carbachol (CCh), a muscarinic receptor-specific agonist, abrogated tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced apoptosis through pathways involving caspase 3/7, but its cytoprotective effect was decreased by a M3R antagonist, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt inhibitor, or an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor. Ligation of M3R with CCh transactivated EGFR and phosphorylated ERK and Akt, the downstream targets of EGFR. Inhibition of intracellular calcium release or protein kinase C δ, both of which are involved in the cell signaling of M3R-mediated fluid secretion, did not affect CCh-induced ERK or Akt phosphorylation. CCh stimulated Src phosphorylation and binding to EGFR. A Src inhibitor attenuated the CCh/M3R-induced cytoprotective effect and EGFR transactivation cascades. Overall, these results indicated that CCh/M3R induced transactivation of EGFR through Src activation leading to ERK and Akt phosphorylation, which in turn suppressed caspase 3/7-mediated apoptotic signals in HSG cells. This study, for the first time, proposes that CCh-mediated M3R activation can promote not only fluid secretion but also survival of salivary gland cells in the inflammatory context of SjS. PMID:22511543

  17. Reduction of ventricular M2 muscarinic receptors in cardiomyopathic hamster (CHF 147) at the necrotic stage of the myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, M; Horackova, M; Giles, A

    1994-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that isolated ventricular myocytes from cardiomyopathic hamsters (CHF 147) during the necrotic stage (70-100 days) exhibit an attenuated contractile response to muscarinic stimulation. In the present study we have investigated whether this dysfunction may be related to a change in the density (or affinity) of cardiac muscarinic receptors. Thus, we have characterized and quantified the binding of the muscarinic antagonist [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine (NMS) to M2 muscarinic receptors in cardiac micropunches and in suspensions of isolated intact cardiomyocytes obtained from cardiomyopathic (CHF 147) and Golden Syrian hamsters. The hamsters were either 70-100 days old, when the cardiomyopathy had reached the cytolytic and necrotic stage or 30 days old, i.e. before the onset of the cardiomyopathy. In both preparations (micropunches and dissociated cardiomyocytes) the specific binding of [3H]-NMS was stereospecific, reversible, saturable, of high affinity and linearly dependent upon increasing amounts of tissue and cells. The binding site also possessed the drug specificity typical of an M2 muscarinic receptor. Saturation binding analysis revealed that the hearts of the older CHF 147 hamsters contain significantly fewer M2 muscarinic receptors than the control Golden Syrian hamsters while the affinity (Kd) was not altered. This reduction of M2 receptor number was not observed in CHF 147 hamsters at 30 days. Further, we found no differences in beta-adrenergic or in alpha 1-adrenergic binding in the two strains of hamster at either age. Thus, our results indicate that the parasympathetic regulation of cardiac function in CHF 147 hamsters may be compromised by a decreased number of muscarinic receptors at the necrotic stage of the cardiomyopathy.

  18. The effects of mirtazapine on central noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    de Boer, T

    1995-12-01

    Mirtazapine is a new antidepressant with a unique mode of action: it preferentially blocks the noradrenergic alpha2-auto- and heteroreceptors held responsible for controlling noradrenaline and serotonin release. In addition, mirtazapine has a low affinity for serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors but potently blocks 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. It increases serotonergic cell-firing in the dorsal raphe and 5-HT release in the hippocampus as measured by microdialysis. These effects are explained by noradrenergic enhancement of 5-HT cell-firing and blockade of noradrenaline-mediated inhibition of hippocampal 5-HT release. Because mirtazapine blocks 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors, only 5-HT1-mediated transmission is enhanced. The noradrenergic activation and the consequent indirect enhancement of serotonergic transmission most probably underlie the marked therapeutic activity of mirtazapine. The blockade of 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors prevents development of the side effects associated with non-selective 5-HT activation and may contribute to the anxiolytic and sleep-improving properties of this new compound. Therefore mirtazapine can be described as a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). PMID:8930006

  19. Oscillatory chloride current evoked by temperature jumps during muscarinic and serotonergic activation in Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Parker, I; Sumikawa, K

    1987-01-01

    1. Membrane currents were recorded from voltage-clamped oocytes of Xenopus laevis, during temperature jumps imposed by a heating light. Resting oocytes usually showed little response, but large oscillatory membrane currents developed in response to cooling steps applied during activation of 'native' muscarinic receptors. 2. Similar temperature jump (Tjump) currents were seen during activation of oscillatory chloride currents mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin, glutamate and noradrenaline receptors, expressed in the oocyte following injection with messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) from rat brain. The Tjump response during muscarinic activation was selectively blocked by atropine, and that during serotonergic activation by methysergide. In contrast, the 'smooth' membrane currents elicited by nicotinic ACh, kainate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were not accompanied by Tjump responses. 3. Rapid cooling of the oocyte gave larger Tjump currents than a gradual cooling over a few seconds. The size of the Tjump current elicited by a fixed cooling step increased linearly with the preceding time of warming, becoming maximal at intervals greater than about 100 s. 4. The Tjump current was inward at a clamp potential of -60 mV and reversed direction at about -22 mV, which corresponds to the chloride equilibrium potential in the oocyte. In low-chloride solution the reversal potential was shifted to more positive potentials, but it was almost unchanged by changes in potassium and sodium concentration. The size of the Tjump current decreased as the membrane potential was made more negative than about -40 mV. 5. The period of oscillation of the Tjump current increased with decreasing temperature, following a Q10 of 3.15. Depolarization also caused a small increase in period. 6. The Tjump current was not abolished in calcium-free solution, or by addition of manganese or lanthanum to the bathing solution. However, it was abolished by intracellular injection of

  20. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  1. Topographic effects on the hill of Nocera Umbra, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischiutta, Marta; Cultrera, Giovanna; Caserta, Arrigo; Luzi, Lucia; Rovelli, Antonio

    2010-08-01

    During the MW 5.7 and 6.0 Umbria-Marche earthquakes of 1997 September 26, the historical centre of Nocera Umbra suffered MCS intensity VII-VIII. The zone is located on the top of a hill, a condition potentially favourable to ground motion amplification. However, also vulnerability is higher on the hill because of the ancient age of buildings. A temporary array of eight seismological stations was installed across the hill to quantify the amplification effect due to topography. Waveforms of 14 aftershocks (2.6 < ML < 4.1) are selected for the analysis. During each earthquake the largest amplitudes are observed on the hilltop, spectral ratios are computed using rotated horizontal components to search for directional effects. Amplifications are found in two separate frequency bands: one in the range 2-4 Hz, where the increase of amplitude is moderate (never exceeding a factor of 4) and the polarization is transversal to the hill major axis; the second above 10 Hz, where amplifications are larger and reach values as high as 25 Hz. High-frequency polarization varies for different sites and frequencies suggesting that smaller-scale complexities control the high frequency response. Synthetic seismograms of 2-D models confirm the occurrence of amplification, although not all details are fit by numerical simulations and the agreement between observations and models is significant only in terms of the fundamental resonance frequency, around 3 Hz. In the models, amplifications are much smaller than the observed ones. We conclude that topography could have been responsible for a small increase of damage in the hill zone but the most significant role on damage was played by the locally higher vulnerability.

  2. Evidence of central cholinergic mechanisms in the appearance of affective aggressive behaviour: dissociation of aggression from autonomic and motor phenomena.

    PubMed

    Beleslin, D B; Samardzić, R

    1979-04-11

    Carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine injected into the cerebral ventricles of conscious cats evoked emotional behaviour with aggression, autonomic and motor phenomena as well as clonic-tonic convulsions. The main and the most impressive feature of the gross behavioural effects of intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine in conscious cats was the affective type of aggression. However, neostigmine produced aggressive behaviour only in about one-quarter of the experiments. After intraventricular hemicholinium-3 and triethylcholine carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine elicited autonomic and motor phenomena. In these cats cholinomimetics and anticholinesterases evoked only slight hissing and snarling. Choline administered into the cerebral ventricles of hemicholinium-3 and triethylcholine-treated cats restored the emotional behaviour with aggression, autonomic and motor phenomena as well as clonic-tonic convulsions to intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine. The restored gross behavioural changes to eserine were almost of the same intensity, while those to carbachol and muscarine were of lesser intensity than in control cats. From these experiments it is concluded that cholinergic neurones are involved in the appearance of the affective type of aggression resulting from intraventricular carbachol, muscarine, eserine and neostigmine. PMID:111280

  3. Late effects of cancer therapy on the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.; Moore, I.M.

    1989-02-01

    The number of studies documenting the long-term morbidity of CNS treatment has increased dramatically in recent years. Cranial irradiation, in particular, has been associated with cognitive deficits and neuroanatomic pathology. Children who are treated at an early age and individuals who receive higher doses (2,400 cGy or greater) appear to be at greatest risk for these sequelae. Much more research on the pathogenesis of delayed injury following CNS treatment is needed. Although several compelling mechanisms have been proposed, little empirical evidence is available. This knowledge is essential to the identification of agents that may protect normal brain tissue from injury. Even less is known about the effects of age at time of treatment, type of treatment (radiation v chemotherapy), or dose of radiation in relation to delayed injury. Of utmost importance are studies that will establish the predictive relationship between brain injury and cognitive deficits. This would allow clinicians to predict patients who are at risk for cognitive impairment in order to institute appropriate preventive or remedial interventions.65 references.

  4. Psychopharmacological evidences for the involvement of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors on sweet substance-induced analgesia in Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Irusta, A E; Savoldi, M; Kishi, R; Resende, G C; Freitas, R L; Carvalho, A D; Coimbra, N C

    2001-06-01

    In order to investigate the effects of sweet substance intake on pain modulation, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received either tap water or sucrose solutions (250 g/l) for 14 days as their only source of liquid. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6 g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test (probably a spinal reflex) were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after treatment. The index (mean +/- SEM, N = 8) for the groups receiving sucrose solution plus saline (NaCl; 0.9%) for 14 days was 0.70 +/- 0.01. Atropine (1 and 2 mg/kg)-treated rats (N = 8) after intake of sucrose exhibited an analgesia index of 0.39 +/- 0.09 and 0.39 +/- 0.08, respectively, while mecamylamine (1 and 2 mg/kg)-treated rats (N = 10) after intake of sucrose had an index of -0.02 +/- 0.07 and 0.03 +/- 0.07, respectively. These results indicate that the effect of sucrose intake on nociceptive thresholds is controlled by neurotransmission of acetylcholine and depends on the nicotinic cholinergic receptors for its major analgesic effect, although muscarinic receptors were also involved in this antinociceptive process.

  5. An investigation of the factors that regulate muscarinic receptor expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seo, Myoung Suk; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2014-09-01

    We previously identified a group of subjects with schizophrenia who, on average, have a 75% decrease in cholinergic receptor, muscarinic 1 (CHRM1) in Brodmann's area (BA) 9. To extend this finding, we determined i) if the decrease in CHRM1 was present in another functionally related CNS region (BA6), ii) whether the marked decrease in CHRM1 was accompanied by changes in levels of other CHRMs and iii) potential factors responsible for the decreased CHRM1 expression. We measured CHRM1 and CHRM3 using in situ radioligand binding with [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]4-DAMP respectively in BA6 from 20 subjects with schizophrenia who had low levels of CHRM1 in BA9 (SzLow[(3)H]PZP), 18 subjects with schizophrenia whose levels of CHRM1 were similar to controls (SzNormal[(3)H]PZP) and 20 control subjects. Levels of CHRM1, 3 and 4 mRNA were measured using qPCR and levels of the transcription factors, SP1 and SP3, were determined using Western blots. In BA6, the density of [(3)H]pirenzepine binding was decreased in subjects with SzLow[(3)H]PZP (p<0.001) compared to controls. The density of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding, levels of CHRM1, 3 and 4 mRNA and levels of SP1 and SP3 was not significantly different between the three groups. This study shows that the previously identified decrease in CHRM1 expression is not confined to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex but is present in other cortical areas. The effect shows some specificity to CHRM1, with no change in levels of binding to CHRM3. Furthermore, this decrease in CHRM1 does not appear to be associated with low levels of CHRM1 mRNA or to simply be regulated by the transcription factors, SP1 and SP3, suggesting that other mechanisms are responsible for the decreased CHRM1 in these subjects.

  6. Circadian activity of corticosterone in an animal model of depression: response to muscarinic cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Retana-Márquez, S; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-González, M; Vázquez-Palacios, G

    2010-06-16

    Neonatal treatment with clomipramine (CMI) in rats induces multiple behavioral alterations during adulthood that resemble certain symptoms of human depression, such as impairments of pleasure-seeking behaviors. CMI may also induce permanent changes in the reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA) to different stimuli; however, the endocrinal changes induced by this treatment are still a matter of debate. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of corticosterone in rats treated in the neonatal period with CMI in basal conditions (0, 6, 12 and 18 h after lights on) and after treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX; 5mg/kg for 14 days). To evaluate the response of the HPA axis to a cholinergic agonist, we analyzed the effect of oxotremorine administration (OXO; 0.4, 0.8 mg/kg) on plasma levels of corticosterone. Administration of OXO took place at the beginning of each one of the two phases of the light-dark cycle (time points 0 and 12h, respectively). Results showed an increase in basal plasma levels of corticosterone in CMI-treated rats at time point zero and at 6h after the onset of the light period. While treatment with FLX reversed the increase in corticosterone plasma levels in CMI-treated rats, the results regarding cholinergic stimulation indicate that those rats do not respond to the administration of a low dose of OXO (0.4 mg/kg) at the onset of the dark phase (time point 12h). In conclusion, this study supports the hypothesis that neonatal treatment with CMI induces a hypersecretion of corticosterone in adulthood that was reversed through treatment with the antidepressant FLX. The CMI-treated rats showed a hyporesponse to cholinergic stimulation with OXO at low doses and at the beginning of the dark phase. Thus, the present results do not support the assumption that an increased sensitivity of the muscarinic cholinergic system is one of the possible correlates of the behavioral alterations seen in CMI-treated rats.

  7. Effects of resistance training on central blood pressure in obese young men

    PubMed Central

    Croymans, DM; Krell, SL; Oh, CS; Katiraie, M; Lam, CY; Harris, RA; Roberts, CK

    2014-01-01

    Central blood pressure is a predictor of the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the effects of resistance training (RT) on central blood pressure are largely unknown. This study explored the effects of high-intensity RT on central blood pressure, indices of arterial stiffness and wave reflection and inflammatory/atherogenic markers in overweight or obese, sedentary young men. Thirty-six participants were randomized to RT (12 weeks of training, 3/wk, n = 28) or control groups (C, 12 weeks of no training, n = 8) and assessed for changes in central and brachial blood pressures, augmentation index (AIx), carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), body composition, lipids and inflammatory/atherogenic markers. High-intensity RT resulted in decreased central and brachial systolic/diastolic blood pressures (all P≤0.03), despite not altering AIx (P = 0.34) or cfPWV (P = 0.43). The vascular endothelial growth factor increased (P = 0.03) after RT, without any change in cIMT, C-reactive protein, oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or other inflammatory markers (all P≥0.1). Changes in the central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) were positively correlated with changes in oxLDL (r = 0.42, P = 0.03) and soluble E-selectin (r = 0.41, P = 0.04). In overweight/obese young men, high-intensity RT decreases cSBP, independently of weight loss and changes in arterial stiffness. The cardioprotective effects of RT may be related to effects on central blood pressure. PMID:24005959

  8. Pharmacological characteristics of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, a novel muscarinic receptor antagonist in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C H; Chang, G J; Su, M J; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M; Ko, F N

    1994-01-01

    1. The pharmacological activities of liriodenine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, were determined in isolated trachea, ileum and cardiac tissues of guinea-pigs. 2. Liriodenine was found to be a muscarinic receptor antagonist in guinea-pig trachea as revealed by its competitive antagonism of carbachol (pA2 = 6.22 +/- 0.08)-induced smooth muscle contraction. It was slightly more potent than methoctramine (pA2 = 5.92 +/- 0.05), but was less potent than atropine (pA2 = 8.93 +/- 0.07), pirenzepine (pA2 = 7.02 +/- 0.09) and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP, pA2 = 8.72 +/- 0.07). 3. Liriodenine was also a muscarinic antagonist in guinea-pig ileum (pA2 = 6.36 +/- 0.10) with a pA2 value that closely resembled that obtained in the trachea. 4. Liriodenine was 10 fold less potent in atrial preparations (left atria, pA2 = 5.24 +/- 0.04; right atria, pA2 = 5.35 +/- 0.09 and 5.28 +/- 0.07 for inotropic and chronotropic effects, respectively) than in smooth muscle preparations. 5. High concentration of liriodenine (300 microM) partially depressed the contractions induced by U-46619, histamine, prostaglandin F2 alpha, neurokinin A, leukotriene C4 and high K+ in the guinea-pig trachea. The inhibitions were characterized by a rightward shift in the concentration-response curves with suppression of their maximal contraction. 6. High concentration of liriodenine (300 microM) did not affect U-46619- or neurokinin A-induced tracheal contraction in the presence of nifedipine (1 microM) or in Ca(2+)-free (containing 0.2 mM EGTA) medium. 7. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of guinea-pig trachealis was changed by liriodenine (30-300 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7812621

  9. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  10. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (^56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (^60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to ^56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  11. The allosteric interaction of otenzepad (AF-DX 116) at muscarinic M2 receptors in guinea pig atria.

    PubMed

    Lanzafame, A; Christopoulos, A; Mitchelson, F

    2001-03-30

    The effects of the muscarinic receptor antagonist, otenzepad, in combination with the competitive antagonists N-methylscopolamine, dexetimide and atropine, or the allosteric modulators, C(7)/3'-phth, gallamine and alcuronium, were measured in the guinea pig electrically driven left atrium using the agonists, carbachol or acetylcholine. Otenzepad, in combination with C(7)/3'-phth or gallamine, gave concentration-ratios close to additive and in agreement with theoretical model predictions for combination of two allosteric modulators acting at a common site. However, when otenzepad was combined with alcuronium, dexetimide or N-methylscopolamine, supra-additive effects were observed. For either competitive antagonist in combination with otenzepad, the degree of supra-additivity was more evident after 2-h equilibration than after 40 min. When otenzepad was combined with atropine, no supra-additivity was observed with carbachol as the agonist, but was evident with acetylcholine. Otenzepad was also unable to fully inhibit [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding when the radioligand was employed at a concentration of approximately 100 x K(D). It is concluded that the action of otenzepad involves an allosteric site and a number of possibilities are discussed for its location. PMID:11290374

  12. Central cholinergic involvement in sequential behavior: impairments of performance by atropine in a serial multiple choice task for rats.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Stephen B; Rowan, James D; Wollan, Michael O

    2013-11-01

    Two experiments examined whether muscarinic cholinergic systems play a role in rats' ability to perform well-learned highly-structured serial response patterns, particularly focusing on rats' performance on pattern elements learned by encoding rules versus by acquisition of stimulus-response (S-R) associations. Rats performed serial patterns of responses in a serial multiple choice task in an 8-lever circular array for hypothalamic brain-stimulation reward. Two experiments examined the effects of atropine, a centrally-acting muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, on rats' ability to perform pattern elements where responses were controlled by rules versus elements, such as rule-inconsistent "violation elements" and elements following "phrasing cues," where responses were controlled by associative cues. In Experiment 1, 3-element chunks of both patterns were signaled by pauses that served as phrasing cues before chunk-boundary elements, but one pattern also included a violation element that was inconsistent with pattern structure. Once rats reached a high criterion of performance, the drug challenge was intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of 50 mg/kg atropine sulfate. Atropine impaired performance on elements learned by S-R learning, namely, chunk-boundary elements and the violation element, but had no effect on performance of rule-based within-chunk elements. In Experiment 2, patterns were phrased and unphrased perfect patterns (i.e., without violation elements). To control for peripheral effects of atropine, rats were treated with a series of doses of either centrally-acting atropine or peripherally-acting atropine methyl nitrate (AMN), which does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Once rats reached a high criterion, the drug challenges were on alternate days in the order 50, 25, and 100 mg/kg of either atropine sulfate or AMN. Atropine, but not AMN, impaired performance in the phrased perfect pattern for pattern elements where S-R associations were

  13. Selective Activation of M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reverses MK-801-Induced Behavioral Impairments and Enhances Associative Learning in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) represent a novel approach for the treatment of psychotic symptoms associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently reported that the selective M4 PAM VU0152100 produced an antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4 PAMs, enabling a more extensive characterization of M4 actions in rodent models. We used VU0467154 to test the hypothesis that selective potentiation of M4 receptor signaling could ameliorate the behavioral, cognitive, and neurochemical impairments induced by the noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist MK-801. VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced deficits in M4 KO mice. VU0467154 also enhanced the acquisition of both contextual and cue-mediated fear conditioning when administered alone in wild-type mice. These novel findings suggest that M4 PAMs may provide a strategy for addressing the more complex affective and cognitive disruptions associated with schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25137629

  14. Changes in EEG power spectra and behavioral states in rats exposed to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor chlorpyrifos and muscarinic agonist oxotremorine.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, O A; Gordon, C J

    2001-03-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity causing cholinergic stimulation in the central nervous system (CNS). Cholinergic systems are crucial in electroencephalogram (EEG) generation and regulation of behavior; however, little is known about how OP exposure affects the EEG and behavioral states. We recorded EEG, core temperature and motor activity before and after exposure to the OP pesticide chlorpyrifos (CHP) in adult female rats implanted with telemetric transmitters. The recording and reference electrodes were placed in the occipital and frontal bones, respectively. The animals received CHP, 25 mg/kg, p.o., or oxotremorine (OX), 0.2 mg/kg, s.c. CHP led to a significant increase in delta (0.1-3.5 Hz), slow theta (4-6.5 Hz), gamma 2 (35.5-50 Hz), reduction in fast theta (7-8.5 Hz), alpha/sigma (9-14 Hz), beta 1 (14.5-24 Hz), beta 2 (24.5-30 Hz) and gamma 1 (30.5-35 Hz) powers, slowing of peak frequencies in 1-9 Hz range, hypothermia and decrease in motor activity. The drop in 7-14 Hz was associated with cholinergic suppression of sleep spindles. Changes in behavioral state were characterized by dramatic diminution of sleep postures and exploring activity and prolongation of quiet waking. There was recovery in all bands in spite of continued inhibition of AChE activity [44,45] in rats exposed to CHP. OX-induced EEG and behavioral alterations were similar to CHP except there was no increase in delta and the onset and recovery were more rapid. We did not find a correlation between the EEG and core temperature alterations. Overall, changes in EEG (except in delta band) and behavior following CHP were attributable to muscarinic stimulation. Cortical arousal together with increased quiet waking and decreased sleep after CHP occurred independently from inhibition of motor activity and lowering of core temperature. PMID:11223004

  15. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors in murine atria: phosphatidylinositol breakdown and receptor interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Upon stimulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, there is a decrease in the force of contraction rate of firing in heart, while stimulation of ..cap alpha.. adrenergic receptors causes an increase in the force of contraction with no change in the heart rate. Yet both receptors stimulate the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol (PI). Therefore, the breakdown of PI was examined to determine how the process differed between the two receptor systems. Murine atria, prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)inositol, were stimulated with the muscarinic cholinergic agonists, carbamylcholine (CARB), and oxotremorine (OXO); and with the ..cap alpha.. adrenergic agonists, norepinephrine (NE) and phenylephrine (PE); either singly or in combination. Breakdown of PI was assessed by measurement of individual inositol phosphates by anion exchange chromatography. Binding of CARB to atrial muscarinic receptors was measured by competition with (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate.

  16. 75 FR 18499 - The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... AGENCY The Effects of Mountaintop Mines and Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian... Valley Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian Coalfields'' (EPA/600/R-09/138A) and (2... Fills on Aquatic Ecosystems of the Central Appalachian Coalfields'' and ``A Field-based Aquatic...

  17. Pharmacological and ionic characterizations of the muscarinic receptors modulating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, E.M.; Otero, D.H.

    1985-05-01

    The muscarinic receptors that modulate acetylcholine release from rat cortical synaptosomes were characterized with respect to sensitivity to drugs that act selectively at M1 or M2 receptor subtypes, as well as to changes in ionic strength and membrane potential. The modulatory receptors appear to be of the M2 type, since they are activated by carbachol, acetylcholine, methacholine, oxotremorine, and bethanechol, but not by pilocarpine, and are blocked by atropine, scopolamine, and gallamine (at high concentrations), but not by pirenzepine or dicyclomine. The ED50S for carbachol, acetylcholine, and oxotremorine are less than 10 microM, suggesting that the high affinity state of the receptor is functional. High ionic strength induced by raising the NaCl concentration has no effect on agonist (oxotremorine) potency, but increases the efficacy of this compound, which disagrees with receptor-binding studies. On the other hand, depolarization with either KCl or with veratridine (20 microM) reduces agonist potencies by approximately an order of magnitude, suggesting a potential mechanism for receptor regulation.

  18. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    PubMed Central

    Stanke, Jennifer J; Lehman, Bret; Fischer, Andy J

    2008-01-01

    Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative) out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells) by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1) during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2) the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3) appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning. PMID:18254959

  19. Selectivity of muscarinic agonists including (+/-)-aceclidine and antimuscarinics on the human intraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H; DeSantis, L; Patil, P N

    1998-08-01

    The average EC50 value and the maximum response of carbachol on the human circular ciliary muscle obtained within 24 h of postmortem hypoxia was 517 nmol/l and 135 mg, respectively. These values for carbachol did not differ significantly from that of the longitudinal ciliary muscle. However, when tested at 1 mumol/l of carbachol, the peak response of the longitudinal muscle occurred at 59 sec vs 173 sec for that of the circular muscle of 70 year old donors. The relative potency of the muscarinic agonists on the circular muscle was oxotremorine-M, 1 > carbachol, 1/4 > pilocarpine, 1/19 > aceclidine, 1/132. The relative order of potency of agonists was similar for the longitudinal muscle. Only pilocarpine and aceclidine were partial agonists which produced 80-85% of the maximum response. When compared with the EC50 values of aceclidine on the iris sphincter and the longitudinal ciliary muscles, the agonist potency was only 1/28 for the latter tissue. Implications of these findings in relation to the use of these agonists in glaucoma are discussed. The pKB values of muscarinic antagonists on the circular ciliary muscle were: atropine, 8.8; cyclopentolate, 7.8; tropicamide, 7.4; P.F. HHSiD, 7.0; pirenzepine, 6.4; and methoctramine, 5.7. Nearly equal pKB values of each antagonist were obtained for the longitudinal ciliary muscle and iris sphincter. Based on the affinity constants of various competitive antagonists, the human iris as well as ciliary muscles may contain M3, M2 or M4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors.

  20. Affinity and efficacy of racemic, (+)-, and (-)-methacholine in muscarinic inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release.

    PubMed

    Fuder, H; Jung, B

    1985-02-01

    The right postganglionic sympathetic nerves of rat isolated perfused hearts (previously loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline) were stimulated electrically with 10 trains of 10 pulses at 10 Hz. The inhibition by methacholine of stimulation-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow into the perfusate (determined in the presence of corticosterone, desipramine, phentolamine, and propranolol) was taken as a measure for activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors. The evoked [3H]-noradrenaline overflow was inhibited by (+)-, racemic, and (-)-methacholine in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration causing 50% inhibition (IC50) was 0.1, 0.26, and 65 microM, respectively, resulting in an isomeric potency ratio IC50 (+)/IC50(-) of 650. The dissociation constant KA of the (+/-)- or (+)-methacholine-presynaptic receptor complex was determined after fractional receptor inactivation according to Furchgott & Bursztyn (1967) with phenoxybenzamine or propylbenzilylcholine mustard as irreversible antagonists of muscarinic receptors. KA for (-)-methacholine was estimated according to Mackay (1966). KA of (+)-, (+/-)-, and (-)-methacholine were 2.5, 4 and 440 microM, resulting in an isomeric affinity ratio KA (+)/KA(-) of 180. The discrepancy between the isomeric IC50 ratio and the isomeric KA ratio is explained by a higher intrinsic efficacy of the (+)-enantiomer compared to the (-)-enantiomer. Thus, (+)-methacholine has to occupy fewer receptors to induce a given inhibition of release than its antipode as revealed by a plot of fractional receptor occupancy vs response. The results show that, in the effector system of presynaptic muscarinic inhibition, methacholine enantiomers differ greatly not only in affinity for the receptor, but also to some extent in the efficiency of signal transmission, and both parameters contribute to the high isomeric potency ratio. The activity of the racemate is fully accounted for by the activity of the (+)-enantiomer.

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of statins in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Amelia J; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; Arora, Devinder S; Grant, Gary D; McDermott, Catherine M; Perkins, Anthony V; Davey, Andrew K

    2014-11-10

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly referred to as statins, are widely used in the treatment of dyslipidaemia, in addition to providing primary and secondary prevention against cardiovascular disease and stroke. Statins' effects on the central nervous system (CNS), particularly on cognition and neurological disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, have received increasing attention in recent years, both within the scientific community and in the media. Current understanding of statins' effects is limited by a lack of mechanism-based studies, as well as the assumption that all statins have the same pharmacological effect in the central nervous system. This review aims to provide an updated discussion on the molecular mechanisms contributing to statins' possible effects on cognitive function, neurodegenerative disease, and various neurological disorders such as stroke, epilepsy, depression and CNS cancers. Additionally, the pharmacokinetic differences between statins and how these may result in statin-specific neurological effects are also discussed.

  2. Affinities of pirenzepine for muscarinic cholinergic receptors in membranes isolated from bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.M.; Jones, C.A.; Tom-Moy, M.; Brown, J.K.

    1987-03-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified into subtypes based on their high (M-1 subtype) or low (M-2 subtype) affinities for the nonclassic antagonist pirenzepine, and this classification has important experimental and therapeutic implications. Because muscarinic receptors are abundant in the airways where they mediate several different cellular responses, the goal of this study was to characterize the affinities of pirenzepine for the muscarinic receptors in bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle. After isolating membrane particulates from mucosa and smooth muscle, as well as from bovine cerebral cortex (a known source of M-1 receptors), we used /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate to label muscarinic receptors in the particulates and performed competition radioligand binding assays in the presence of either atropine or pirenzepine. Receptors from all 3 tissues (mucosa, smooth muscle, and cerebral cortex) were of a relatively uniform affinity for atropine (range of KI values: 0.8 +/- 0.4 X 10(-9) to 2.4 +/- 1.7 X 10(-9) M), as would be predicted for this classic muscarinic antagonist. By contrast, affinities for pirenzepine differed depending on the tissue. In cerebral cortex, the majority of receptors were of high affinity for pirenzepine (KI = 1.8 +/- 1.4 X 10(-8) M). In both mucosa and smooth muscle, receptors were of low affinity for pirenzepine (Kl = 4.8 +/- 0.4 to 6.9 +/- 3.8 X 10(-7) M). We conclude that muscarinic cholinergic receptors in bovine tracheal mucosa and smooth muscle are predominantly of the M-2 subtype.

  3. L-689,660, a novel cholinomimetic with functional selectivity for M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, R. J.; McKnight, A. T.; Scholey, K.; Newberry, N. R.; Street, L. J.; Hutson, P. H.; Semark, J. E.; Harley, E. A.; Patel, S.; Freedman, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    1. L-689,660, 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, 3-(6-chloropyrazinyl)maleate, a novel cholinomimetic, demonstrated high affinity binding (pKD (apparent) 7.42) at rat cerebral cortex muscarinic receptors. L-689,660 had a low ratio (34) of pKD (apparent) values for the displacement of binding of the antagonist ([3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]-NMS) compared with the displacement of the agonist [3H]-oxotremorine-M ([3H]-Oxo-M), in rat cerebral cortex. Low NMS/Oxo-M ratios have been shown previously to be a characteristic of compounds that are low efficacy partial agonists with respect to stimulation of phosphatidyl inositol turnover in the cerebral cortex. 2. L-689,660 showed no muscarinic receptor subtype selectivity in radioligand binding assays but showed functional selectivity in pharmacological assays. At M1 muscarinic receptors in the rat superior cervical ganglion, L-689,660 was a potent (pEC50 7.3 +/- 0.2) full agonist in comparison with (+/-)-muscarine. At M3 receptors in the guinea-pig ileum myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle or in trachea, L-689,660 was again a potent agonist (pEC50 7.5 +/- 0.2 and 7.7 +/- 0.3 respectively) but had a lower maximum response than carbachol. In contrast L-689,660 was an antagonist at M2 receptors in guinea-pig atria (pA2 7.2 (95% confidence limits 7, 7.4)) and at muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampal slices. 3. The putative M1-selective muscarinic agonist, AF102B (cis-2-methylspiro-(1,3-oxathiolane 5,3')-quinuclidine hydrochloride) was found to have a profile similar to L-689,660 but had up to 100 times less affinity in binding and functional assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1422595

  4. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    1. Intracellular current clamp recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Experiments were performed in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonists to block all fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. A single stimulus, delivered extracellularly in the stratum oriens, caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation in response to a depolarizing current step delivered 2 s after the stimulus. A 2- to 10-fold increase in stimulus intensity evoked a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) which was associated with a small increase in input resistance. The peak amplitude of the EPSP occurred approximately 2.5 s after the stimulus and its magnitude (up to 30 mV) and duration (10-50 s) increased with increasing stimulus intensity. 2. The slow EPSP was unaffected by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+)-MCPG; 1000 microM) but was greatly enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (1-5 microM). Both the slow EPSP and the stimulus-evoked reduction in spike frequency adaptation were inhibited by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine (1-5 microM). These results are consistent with these effects being mediated by mAChRs. 3. Both the mAChR-mediated EPSP (EPSPm) and the associated reduction in spike frequency adaptation were reversibly depressed (up to 97%) by either adenosine (100 microM) or its non-hydrolysable analogue 2-chloroadenosine (CADO; 0.1-5.0 microM). These effects were often accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (up to 8 mV) and a reduction in input resistance (up to 11%). The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonists 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA; 0.1-0.4 microM) and R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; 1 microM) both depressed the EPSPm. In contrast, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5

  5. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T.

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Muscarinic receptors in rat nasal mucosa are predominantly of the low affinity agonist type.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues de Miranda, J F; Scheres, H M; Salden, H J; Beld, A J; Klaassen, A B; Kuijpers, W

    1985-07-31

    Specific [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to rat nasal mucosa homogenates occurs to a homogeneous class of binding sites with Kd = 60 +/- 2 10(-12) M and Bmax = 8.1 +/- 2 pmol/g tissue. Binding is stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Pirenzepine inhibits [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding with low affinity (Ki = 5.0 10(-7) M), classifying the binding sites as muscarinic M2-receptors. Methylfurtrethonium and methacholine inhibit [3H]l-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding following an almost sigmoid curve at high concentrations pointing to the presence of mainly low affinity agonist binding sites. PMID:3840092

  7. Selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Dileo, G; Waelbroeck, M; Mash, D C; Flynn, D D

    1994-12-01

    We report here a novel strategy for the selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype, based on the distinct kinetics of the muscarinic antagonists dexetimide and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) and on the selectivity profile of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 for the m1-m5 muscarinic receptor subtypes expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Incubation with 10 nM dexetimide, a nonselective antagonist, resulted in > 90% occupancy of each of the m1-m5 receptor subtypes. The relatively rapid rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of < 12.5 min) and the slower rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m3 and m5 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of 65 and 75 min, respectively) favored the labeling of the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes with short incubations with [3H]NMS. Inclusion of 200 nM guanylpirenzepine and 250 nM AF-DX 116 prevented the binding of [3H]NMS to the majority of the m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively, resulting in primary labeling of the m4 receptor subtype. Brief dissociation of the radioligand in the presence of 1 microM atropine improved the ratio of m4 to m2 labeling by selectively removing [3H]NMS from the m2 subtype. Under these conditions, the ratio of [3H]NMS binding to the m4 versus m1, m2, m3, and m5 receptor subtypes was 4:1. In vitro autoradiography combined with these m4-selective labeling conditions demonstrated that the M4 (m4) receptor subtype was localized to the primary visual area (V1, area 17, occipital cortex) and the basal ganglia, a distribution distinct from that demonstrated for the M1 (m1), M2 (m2), and M3 (m3) receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate that a combination of the distinct kinetics of dexetimide and NMS and the receptor subtype selectivity of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 provides a valuable labeling strategy to examine the distribution and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype in brain, peripheral tissues, and cell lines

  8. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Voith, G; Dingermann, T

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I gamma promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. PMID:9636297

  9. Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex Related to Its Function in the Control of Grasshopper Acoustic Communication

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Michael; Pförtner, Ramona; Aschenbrenner, Katja; Heinrich, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The central complex selects and coordinates the species- and situation-specific song production in acoustically communicating grasshoppers. Control of sound production is mediated by several neurotransmitters and modulators, their receptors and intracellular signaling pathways. It has previously been shown that muscarinic cholinergic excitation in the central complex promotes sound production whereas both GABA and nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling suppress its performance. The present immunocytochemical and pharmacological study investigates the question whether GABA and nitric oxide mediate inhibition of sound production independently. Muscarinic ACh receptors are expressed by columnar output neurons of the central complex that innervate the lower division of the central body and terminate in the lateral accessory lobes. GABAergic tangential neurons that innervate the lower division of the central body arborize in close proximity of columnar neurons and thus may directly inhibit these central complex output neurons. A subset of these GABAergic tangential neurons accumulates cyclic GMP following the release of nitric oxide from neurites in the upper division of the central body. While sound production stimulated by muscarine injection into the central complex is suppressed by co-application of sodium nitroprusside, picrotoxin-stimulated singing was not affected by co-application of this nitric oxide donor, indicating that nitric oxide mediated inhibition requires functional GABA signaling. Hence, grasshopper sound production is controlled by processing of information in the lower division of the central body which is subject to modulation by nitric oxide released from neurons in the upper division. PMID:21980504

  10. In vivo and in vitro pharmacological characterization of SVT-40776, a novel M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist, for the treatment of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, C; Davalillo, S; Cabellos, J; Lagunas, C; Balsa, D; Pérez-del-Pulgar, S; Ballarín, M; Fernández, AG

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Highly selective M3 muscarinic receptor antagonists may represent a better treatment for overactive bladder syndrome, diminishing side effects. Cardiac side effects of non-selective antimuscarinics have been associated with activity at M2 receptors as these receptors are mainly responsible for muscarinic receptor-dependent bradycardia. We have investigated a novel antimuscarinic, SVT-40776, highly selective for M3 over M2 receptors (Ki = 0.19 nmol·L−1 for M3 receptor affinity). This study reports the functional activity of SVT-40776 in the bladder, relative to its activity in atria. Experimental approach: In vitro and ex vivo (oral dosing) inhibition of mouse detrusor and atrial contractile responses to carbachol were used to study the functional activity of SVT-40776. The in vivo efficacy of SVT-40776 was characterized by suppression of isovolumetric spontaneous bladder contractions in anaesthetized guinea pigs after intravenous administration. Key results: SVT-40776 was the most potent in inhibiting carbachol-induced bladder contractions of the anti-cholinergic agents tested, without affecting atrial contractions over the same range of concentrations. SVT-40776 exhibited the highest urinary versus cardiac selectivity (199-fold). In the guinea pig in vivo model, SVT-40776 inhibited 25% of spontaneous bladder contractions at a very low dose (6.97 µg·kg−1 i.v), without affecting arterial blood pressure. Conclusions and implications: SVT-40776 is a potent inhibitor of M3 receptor-related detrusor contractile activity. The absence of effects on isolated atria preparations represents an interesting characteristic and suggests that SVT-40776 may lack unwanted cardiac effects; a feature especially relevant in a compound intended to treat mainly elderly patients. British Journal of Pharmacology (2009) doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00082.x PMID:19222482

  11. Effects of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell counts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Lin, Tao; Pan, Yingzhe

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic keratopathy is an ocular complication that occurs with diabetes. In the present study, the effect of diabetic keratopathy on corneal optical density, central corneal thickness, and corneal endothelial cell count was investigated. One hundred and eighty diabetic patients (360 eyes) were enrolled in the study during the period from March, 2012 to March, 2013. The patients were divided into three age groups: <5, 5–10 and >10 years, with 60 patients per group (120 eyes). During the same period, 60 healthy cases (120 eyes) were selected and labeled as the normal control group. The Pentacam was used to measure the corneal optical density, and central corneal thickness. Specular microscopy was used to examine the corneal endothelial cell density. The coefficient of partial correlation was used to control age and correlate the analysis between the corneal optical density, corneal endothelial cell density, and central corneal thickness. The stage of the disease, the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness was analyzed in the diabetes group. The corneal optical density in the diabetes group increased compared with that of the normal control group. The medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were positively correlated with the course of the disease. However, the corneal endothelial cell density was not associated with the course of diabetes. There was a positive association between the medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness of the diabetic patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that medial and intimal corneal optical density and central corneal thickness were sensitive indicators for early diabetic keratopathy. PMID:27588090

  12. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  13. [Central effect of Ca2+ channel blockers: multiple sites of action].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, T; Watanabe, Y

    1992-09-01

    To develop a new concept of central acting drugs, the modulation of brain Ca2+ flux must be considered as one of the important factors. This is because excessive Ca2+ influx to neuronal cells damages or kills these cells, and also because abnormal intracellular Ca2+ concentrations induce several types of mental disorders. Recently, both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicated that some Ca2+ channel blockers (Ca antagonists) will be useful for the treatment of grand mal, manic depressive insanity, panic disorder and anxiety. Furthermore, it has been estimated by animal studies and clinical pharmacology that ischemia-induced neuronal death can be prevented by the treatment with a Ca antagonist. However, the latter data, especially, has been mainly explained by pharmacological effects on the cerebrovascular system, not because of possible direct central actions. To invoke the notion of direct central action, it must be assumed that Ca antagonists might pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This potentiality that some Ca antagonists (i.e., flunarizine, nicardipine, nimodipine, etc.) can pass the BBB has been initially explored. If substantiated, such direct central effects of Ca antagonists may explain both the psychotropic effects and neuronal protection by these agents. To investigate the actual therapeutic effects of Ca2+ antagonists on psychotropic disorders and neuronal death, a suitable animal model and reasonable methods and criteria must be established. Then, both preclinical and clinical studies can be expected to relate to atypical central acting drugs modulating the brain Ca2+ channels, and also to the development of new pharmacological properties of Ca2+ antagonists.

  14. Contrasting effects of chronic ethanol feeding on centrally and peripherally evoked hypotension in telemetered female rats.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2004-03-01

    Our previous studies have shown that ethanol compromises hypotension produced by centrally acting antihypertensive agents in normotensive and hypertensive male rats. The present study investigated whether female rats are as susceptible as male rats to the deleterious effect of ethanol on centrally evoked hypotension. The study was extended to investigate ethanol effects on the time-domain indices of variability in blood pressure [standard deviation of mean arterial pressure (SDMAP)] and heart rate [standard deviation of beat-to-beat intervals (SDRR) and root mean square of successive differences in R-R intervals (rMSSD)]. The hemodynamic effects of a single intraperitoneal dose of clonidine (30 microg/kg) were evaluated in radiotelemetered ethanol-fed (5%, 12 weeks) and pair-fed control Sprague-Dawley rats. In control rats, clonidine caused a significant reduction in MAP that continued for at least 6 h and was associated with reductions in SDMAP and SDRR but not rMSSD, suggesting inhibition of central sympathetic tone. A maximum hypotensive response of -16.4+/-1.7 mm Hg was demonstrated 40 min after clonidine administration. Ethanol feeding significantly attenuated clonidine hypotension whereas it potentiated the associated reduction in SDMAP. To verify the selectivity of ethanol-clonidine interaction, the effects of ethanol on peripherally mediated hemodynamic responses to hydralazine (0.5 mg/kg ip) were investigated. In contrast to its antagonistic effect on clonidine hypotension, ethanol significantly potentiated the hypotensive effect of hydralazine. Together, these findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol feeding exerts opposite effects on centrally (attenuation) and peripherally (potentiation) evoked hypotension in female rats. The interaction of ethanol with antihypertensive agents may not be related to changes in hemodynamic variability.

  15. Analogues of the muscarinic agent 2'-methylspiro[1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3,4'-[1,3]dioxolane]: synthesis and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Nordvall, G; Sundquist, S; Glas, G; Gogoll, A; Nilvebrant, L; Hacksell, U

    1992-05-01

    A number of tetrahydrofuran analogues of 2'-methylspiro[1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3,4'-[1,3]dioxolane] (1) have been prepared with the aim to obtain information about the relative importance of each of the oxygens in 1 for efficacy and for selectivity. In addition, the dimethyl and desmethyl analogues of 1 were prepared. The new compounds were compared to cis- and trans-1 with regard to their ability to displace (-)-[3H]-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate ((-)-[3H]QNB) from muscarinic receptors in cerebral cortex, heart, parotid gland, and urinary bladder from guinea pigs. Functional studies were made on isolated guinea pig bladder and ileum. The new compounds exhibited both lower affinity and efficacy than cis-1. A conformational study was performed, and the effects of steric and electronic factors on the biological activity of the compounds are discussed.

  16. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.L.; Redburn, D.A.; Harwerth, R.S.; Maguire, G.W.

    1984-02-01

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using /sup 3/H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine.

  17. Heterologously expressed serotonin 1A receptors couple to muscarinic K+ channels in heart.

    PubMed Central

    Karschin, A; Ho, B Y; Labarca, C; Elroy-Stein, O; Moss, B; Davidson, N; Lester, H A

    1991-01-01

    In cardiac atrial cells, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors activate a K+ current directly via a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). Serotonin type 1A receptors may activate a similar pathway in hippocampal neurons. To develop a system in which receptor/G protein/K+ channel coupling can be experimentally manipulated, we have used a highly efficient recombinant vaccinia virus vector system to express human serotonin 1A receptors in primary cultures of rat atrial myocytes. The expressed 1A receptors activated the inwardly rectifying K+ conductance that is normally activated by the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Maximal responses to either agonist occluded further activation by the other agonist. The average activation time constants for serotonin were about 5 times slower than for acetylcholine. The data support suggestions that the intracellular signaling pathway from seven-helix receptors to G proteins and directly to ion channels is widespread in excitable cells. After a fraction of the G proteins are activated irreversibly by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, subsequent transduction proceeds more efficiently. One possible interpretation is that multiple G-protein molecules are required to activate each channel. Vaccinia virus expression vectors are thus useful for expressing seven-helix receptors in primary cultures of postmitotic cells and have provided a heterologous expression system for the signaling pathway from seven-helix receptors to G proteins and directly to ion channels. Images PMID:1905814

  18. Heart ventricles specific stress-induced changes in β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Tillinger, Andrej; Novakova, Martina; Krizanova, Olga; Kvetnansky, Richard; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2014-01-01

    The left and right ventricles fulfill different role in heart function. Here we compare chamber specific changes in local catecholamine concentrations; gene expression and the receptor protein amount of all three β-adrenoceptors (β-AR) in rat right heart ventricles exposed to acute (1 session) and repeated (7 sessions) immobilization stress (IMMO) vs. previously observed changes in left ventricles. Density of muscarinic receptors as main cardio-inhibitive receptors was also measured. In the right ventricles, noradrenaline and adrenaline were increased. No β1-AR changes were observed, in spite of the increased sympathetic activity. On the other hand, we have found a decrease of β2-AR gene expression (reduction to 30%) after 7 IMMO and protein (to 59%) after 1 IMMO. β3-AR gene expression was increased after 7 IMMO. Muscarinic receptor density was not changed. When comparing correlation in left and right ventricles, there was strong correlation between adrenaline and β2-AR gene expression, protein and β3-AR gene expression in the left ventricles while only correlation between adrenaline and β2-AR mRNA and protein in the right ventricles was found. Our results show that maintenance of cardiac homeostasis under stress conditions are to a great extent achieved by a balance between different receptors and also by a balanced receptor changes in left vs. right ventricles. Taken together, decrease of cardio-stimulating β2-AR represents a new important mechanism by which β2-AR contributes to the heart physiology.

  19. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  20. Differentiation between ligand trapping into intact cells and binding on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, A; Maloteaux, J M; Trouet, A; Laduron, P

    1984-05-22

    Binding properties of [3H] dexetimide , L-quinuclidinyl[phenyl-4-3H] benzilate and [3H]methylscopolamine were compared with intact 108 CC 15 cells and membrane preparations of those. The ability of the three ligands to label specifically muscarinic receptors on membrane fractions was quite similar. By contrast, when performed with intact cells, [3H] dexetimide and L-quinuclidinyl [phenyl-4-3H]benzilate revealed higher nonspecific binding which was prevented by methylamine, suggesting a trapping of the ligands within the cells presumably in the lysosomes. To the contrary, such nonspecific 'binding' or trapping was not detectable when [3H]methylscopolamine was used as ligand, a fact which makes this ligand particularly appropriate for labelling cell surface muscarinic receptors. It is concluded that more caution is needed in binding studies when performed with intact cells; indeed, besides specific binding on receptor sites, [3H]ligand can be entrapped within the cell and can even sometimes give the illusion of specific binding. The use of lysosomal agents which do not interfere with specific receptors on membrane preparations should allow one, in most cases, to discard the possibility of a trapping phenomenon in intact cells. PMID:6722181

  1. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  2. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  3. Expression of the rat muscarinic receptor gene m3 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Voith, G; Kramm, H; Zündorf, I; Winkler, T; Dingermann, T

    1998-10-01

    We functionally expressed the rat muscarinic m3 receptor (rm3) in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter. Cells transfected with the authentic rm3 receptor gene expressed about 100 functional receptor molecules per cell, corresponding to a Bmax for [3H]-NMS of 36 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein in isolated membranes. Genetic fusion of the Dictyostelium contact site A (csA) leader peptide to the amino terminus of rm3 increased the receptor expression by about 17-fold. Remarkable, in [3H]-NMS ligand binding experiments performed with whole cells no characteristic saturable binding was observed and there was no significant difference in [3H]-NMS binding to whole cells of rm3 and csA/rm3 transformants. The recombinant rm3 receptor showed an about 10-fold higher affinity to the M3-selective antagonist p-F-HHSiD compared to the M2-selective antagonist AQ-RA 741, suggesting that membranes derived from transgenic D. discoideum cells may be useful for the search of new subtype-specific muscarinic receptor ligands. PMID:9812338

  4. Central and peripheral effects of sculpin pancreatic polypeptide and anglerfish peptide Y in rats.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, A; Rigel, D F; Chance, W T; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    Sculpin pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and anglerfish peptide Y (aPY-amide) are 36-residue peptide amides isolated from the pancreas of the respective species of fish. They are 86% homologous, and exhibit about 65% homology to porcine neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY). This homology to mammalian peptides suggests that the fish peptides may constitute a good model system for structure-activity investigations. We therefore synthesized sculpin PP and aPY-amide by the solid phase method and investigated their central and peripheral effects on feeding and blood pressure, respectively. These investigations revealed that both peptides, like NPY, increased blood pressure and induced feeding in rats, presumably by interacting with receptors of NPY. Although there were comparable responses to both peptides on feeding, aPY-amide exhibited a more potent pressor effect than sculpin PP. These observations suggest that the central and peripheral effects of NPY may be mediated by different subclasses of NPY receptors. PMID:1581637

  5. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC.

  6. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC.

  7. A new closeness centrality measure via effective distance in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuxian; Gao, Cai; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yong; Sadiq, Rehan; Deng, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Closeness centrality (CC) measure, as a well-known global measure, is widely applied in many complex networks. However, the classical CC presents many problems for flow networks since these networks are directed and weighted. To address these issues, we propose an effective distance based closeness centrality (EDCC), which uses effective distance to replace conventional geographic distance and binary distance obtained by Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. The proposed EDCC considers not only the global structure of the network but also the local information of nodes. And it can be well applied in directed or undirected, weighted or unweighted networks. Susceptible-Infected model is utilized to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Numerical examples simulated on four real networks are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed EDCC. PMID:25833434

  8. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important CNS functions have yet to be clarified. Here we review murine evidence about the effects of exercise on discrete brain regions involved in important CNS functions. Exercise effects on circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, stress responses in the brain stem and hypothalamic pituitary axis, and movement are examined. The databases Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for articles investigating regional brain adaptations to exercise. Brain regions examined included the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. We found evidence of multiple regional adaptations to both forced and voluntary exercise. Exercise can induce molecular adaptations in neuronal function in many instances. Taken together, these findings suggest that the regional physiological adaptations that occur with exercise could constitute a promising field for elucidating molecular and cellular mechanisms of recovery in psychiatric and neurological health conditions.

  9. Neonatal overfeeding attenuates acute central pro-inflammatory effects of short-term high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Guohui; Dinan, Tara; Barwood, Joanne M.; De Luca, Simone N.; Soch, Alita; Ziko, Ilvana; Chan, Stanley M. H.; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Li, Songpei; Molero, Juan; Spencer, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal obesity predisposes individuals to obesity throughout life. In rats, neonatal overfeeding also leads to early accelerated weight gain that persists into adulthood. The phenotype is associated with dysfunction in a number of systems including paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) responses to psychological and immune stressors. However, in many cases weight gain in neonatally overfed rats stabilizes in early adulthood so the animal does not become more obese as it ages. Here we examined if neonatal overfeeding by suckling rats in small litters predisposes them to exacerbated metabolic and central inflammatory disturbances if they are also given a high fat diet in later life. In adulthood we gave the rats normal chow, 3 days, or 3 weeks high fat diet (45% kcal from fat) and measured peripheral indices of metabolic disturbance. We also investigated hypothalamic microglial changes, as an index of central inflammation, as well as PVN responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Surprisingly, neonatal overfeeding did not predispose rats to the metabolic effects of a high fat diet. Weight changes and glucose metabolism were unaffected by the early life experience. However, short term (3 day) high fat diet was associated with more microglia in the hypothalamus and a markedly exacerbated PVN response to LPS in control rats; effects not seen in the neonatally overfed. Our findings indicate neonatally overfed animals are not more susceptible to the adverse metabolic effects of a short-term high fat diet but may be less able to respond to the central effects. PMID:25628527

  10. Analgesia and central side-effects: two separate dimensions of morphine response

    PubMed Central

    Droney, Joanne M; Gretton, Sophy K; Sato, Hiroe; Ross, Joy R; Branford, Ruth; Welsh, Kenneth I; Cookson, William; Riley, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Aims To present a statistical model for defining interindividual variation in response to morphine and to use this model in a preliminary hypothesis-generating multivariate genetic association study. Methods Two hundred and sixty-four cancer patients taking oral morphine were included in a prospective observational study. Pain and morphine side-effect scores were examined using principal components analysis. The resulting principal components were used in an exploratory genetic association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genes coding for the three opioid receptors, OPRM1, OPRK1 and OPRD1. Associations in multivariate models, including potential clinical confounders, were explored. Results Two principal components corresponding to residual pain and central side-effects were identified. These components accounted for 42 and 18% of the variability in morphine response, respectively, were independent of each other and only mildly correlated. The genetic and clinical factors associated with these components were markedly different. Multivariate regression modelling, including clinical and genetic factors, accounted for only 12% of variability in residual pain on morphine and 3% of variability in central side-effects. Conclusions Although replication is required, this data-driven analysis suggests that pain and central side-effects on morphine may be two separate dimensions of morphine response. Larger study samples are necessary to investigate potential genetic and clinical associations comprehensively. PMID:23072578

  11. Type 3 muscarinic receptors contribute to intestinal mucosal homeostasis and clearance of nippostrongylus brasiliensis through induction of Th2 cytokines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite increased appreciation for the role of nicotinic receptors in the modulation of and response to inflammation, the contribution of muscarinic receptors to mucosal homeostasis, clearance of enteric pathogens, and modulation of immune cell function remains relatively undefined. Uninfected and N...

  12. Modulation of muscarinic and micotinic cholinergic receptor mediated catecholamine secretion in guinea pig chromaffin cells by phorbol esters

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, J.C.; Fisher, S.K.; Horowitz, M.I.

    1986-05-01

    Isolated guinea pig chromaffin cells possess both nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic (mAChR) cholinergic receptors that are positively coupled to catecholamine (CA) release. Sixty to 70% of CA release is mediated by nAChRs and 30-40% by mAChRs. In the absence of added calcium, nAChR mediated CA release was reduced by 65% whereas the muscarinic response was unaffected. The addition of 100nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), also resulted in an increased CA release. Temporally and quantitatively, this response resembled that of mAChR activation. Addition of optimal concentrations of nicotine (50..mu..M) and TPA (100nM) induced a synergistic increase in CA release. Addition of muscarine (1mM) and TPA resulted in an additive response despite a 40-60% inhibition of mAChR mediated inositol phosphate release by TPA. Thus, in guinea pig chromaffin cells, it appears that PKC activation alone is a sufficient stimulus for CA release and that activation of both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors may further increase this enzyme's activity.

  13. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma {times} glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard (({sup 3}H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. ({sup 3}H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 {mu}M atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties.

  14. Effects of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra on the central nervous system in mice.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Nilgün; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Aydin, Süleyman; Oztürk, Yusuf; Caliş, Ihsan

    2002-11-01

    A methanolic extact of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra roots has been investigated for its possible effects on the central nervous system of mice. At doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg (i.p.), the methanol extract of Gentiana roots caused a significant increase in the swimming endurance test and exhibited slight analgesic activity, but no lethality in mice suggesting some activity on the central nervous system. However, there was no indication of sedation or muscular fatigue at the doses employed. HPLC analysis showed that three secoiridoid compounds, gentiopicroside, swertiamarine and sweroside were present and may have been responsible for the CNS effects of the methanol extract of Gentiana lutea ssp. symphyandra roots.

  15. Central mediators involved in the febrile response: effects of antipyretic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zampronio, Aleksander R; Soares, Denis M; Souza, Glória E P

    2015-01-01

    Fever is a complex signal of inflammatory and infectious diseases. It is generally initiated when peripherally produced endogenous pyrogens reach areas that surround the hypothalamus. These peripheral endogenous pyrogens are cytokines that are produced by leukocytes and other cells, the most known of which are interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Because of the capacity of these molecules to induce their own synthesis and the synthesis of other cytokines, they can also be synthesized in the central nervous system. However, these pyrogens are not the final mediators of the febrile response. These cytokines can induce the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2, which produces prostaglandins. These prostanoids alter hypothalamic temperature control, leading to an increase in heat production, the conservation of heat, and ultimately fever. The effect of antipyretics is based on blocking prostaglandin synthesis. In this review, we discuss recent data on the importance of prostaglandins in the febrile response, and we show that some endogenous mediators can still induce the febrile response even when known antipyretics reduce the levels of prostaglandins in the central nervous system. These studies suggest that centrally produced mediators other than prostaglandins participate in the genesis of fever. Among the most studied central mediators of fever are corticotropin-releasing factor, endothelins, chemokines, endogenous opioids, and substance P, which are discussed herein. Additionally, recent evidence suggests that these different pathways of fever induction may be activated during different pathological conditions. PMID:27227071

  16. Central mediators involved in the febrile response: effects of antipyretic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zampronio, Aleksander R; Soares, Denis M; Souza, Glória E P

    2015-01-01

    Fever is a complex signal of inflammatory and infectious diseases. It is generally initiated when peripherally produced endogenous pyrogens reach areas that surround the hypothalamus. These peripheral endogenous pyrogens are cytokines that are produced by leukocytes and other cells, the most known of which are interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6. Because of the capacity of these molecules to induce their own synthesis and the synthesis of other cytokines, they can also be synthesized in the central nervous system. However, these pyrogens are not the final mediators of the febrile response. These cytokines can induce the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2, which produces prostaglandins. These prostanoids alter hypothalamic temperature control, leading to an increase in heat production, the conservation of heat, and ultimately fever. The effect of antipyretics is based on blocking prostaglandin synthesis. In this review, we discuss recent data on the importance of prostaglandins in the febrile response, and we show that some endogenous mediators can still induce the febrile response even when known antipyretics reduce the levels of prostaglandins in the central nervous system. These studies suggest that centrally produced mediators other than prostaglandins participate in the genesis of fever. Among the most studied central mediators of fever are corticotropin-releasing factor, endothelins, chemokines, endogenous opioids, and substance P, which are discussed herein. Additionally, recent evidence suggests that these different pathways of fever induction may be activated during different pathological conditions. PMID:27227071

  17. [Central analgesic effects of non-steroidal anti-rheumatic agents].

    PubMed

    Jurna, I

    1991-01-01

    NSAIDs, including acetylsalicylic acid, are frequently classified as peripherally-acting analgesics. This is based on the fact that these substances, among other effects, inhibit the biosynthesis of prostaglandines. A few solid arguments, however, stand against an exclusively peripheral mode of the analgesic action of NSAIDs in the sense of an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. It should be noted here that the analgesically-effective doses do not suffice to block prostaglandin synthesis. Furthermore, the inhibiting effects of paracetamol and metamizol are far weaker or are not at all present, although both substances are reliably-effective analgesics. The NSAIDs indometacin, ibuprofen, and diclofenac are capable of suppressing the sensory response of the nociceptive system via a central effect. In experimental studies with rats under urethane anesthesia, the nociceptive activity of individual neurons of the thalamus (the dorsomedial part of the ventral nucleus) was measured. The activity was triggered via an electric stimulation of afferent C-fibres in the ipsilateral or contralateral sural nerve. The NSAIDs named suppressed the evoked nociceptive activity in a dose-dependent manner. At the highest doses, the suppression resulted in a difference of approx. 60% of the control activity. The ED50 values were 5 mg/kg for indometacin, 10.9 mg/kg for diclofenac, and 15.6 mg/kg for ibuprofen. These results support the theory that the central effects of NSAIDs contribute to their analgesic efficacy. The possible mechanisms of these effects will be discussed. A practical significance of the central analgesic effects of NSAIDs could be that their therapeutic applicability is not limited only to the treatment of pain, which results from an activation of nociceptors.

  18. Divergent effects of central melanocortin signalling on fat and sucrose preference in humans

    PubMed Central

    van der Klaauw, Agatha A.; Keogh, Julia M.; Henning, Elana; Stephenson, Cheryl; Kelway, Sarah; Trowse, Victoria M.; Subramanian, Naresh; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Fletcher, Paul C.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf

    2016-01-01

    Melanocortin-4-receptor (MC4R)-expressing neurons modulate food intake and preference in rodents but their role in human food preference is unknown. Here we show that compared with lean and weight-matched controls, MC4R deficient individuals exhibited a markedly increased preference for high fat, but a significantly reduced preference for high sucrose food. These effects mirror those in Mc4r null rodents and provide evidence for a central molecular circuit influencing human macronutrient preference. PMID:27701398

  19. Seismic effects and buckling behavior of pipelines in the central and eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Nyman, D.J.; Hammond, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The status of knowledge on the seismic effects and buckling behavior of pipelines in the central and eastern United States is reviewed. Types of ground response to earthquake motions that result in pipeline failure and pipeline response to such motions are discussed. The primary focus is on oil and gas transmission lines constructed of welded steel pipe. Results of vulnerability studies, the need for better determination of the potential for existing pipeline failures, and design procedures for new pipelines are presented.

  20. Defects in muscarinic receptor-coupled signal transduction in isolated parotid gland cells after in vivo irradiation: evidence for a non-DNA target of radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppes, R P; Meter, A; Latumalea, S P; Roffel, A F; Kampinga, H H

    2005-01-01

    Radiation-induced dysfunction of normal tissue, an unwanted side effect of radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, is usually considered to be caused by impaired loss of cell renewal due to sterilisation of stem cells. This implies that the onset of normal tissue damage is usually determined by tissue turnover rate. Salivary glands are a clear exception to this rule: they have slow turnover rates (>60 days), yet develop radiation-induced dysfunction within hours to days. We showed that this could not be explained by a hypersensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis or necrosis of the differentiated cells. In fact, salivary cells are still capable of amylase secretion shortly after irradiation while at the same time water secretion seems specifically and severely impaired. Here, we demonstrate that salivary gland cells isolated after in vivo irradiation are impaired in their ability to mobilise calcium from intracellular stores (Ca2+i), the driving force for water secretion, after exposure to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. Using radioligand-receptor-binding assays it is shown that radiation caused no changes in receptor density, receptor affinity nor in receptor-G-protein coupling. However, muscarinic acetylcholine agonist-induced activation of protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), measured as translocation to the plasma membrane, was severely affected in irradiated cells. Also, the phorbol ester PMA could no longer induce PKCα translocation in irradiated cells. Our data hence indicate that irradiation specifically interferes with PKCα association with membranes, leading to impairment of intracellular signalling. To the best of our knowledge, these data for the first time suggest that, the cells' capacity to respond to a receptor agonist is impaired after irradiation. PMID:15668705

  1. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions.

  2. The cholinergic immune regulation mediated by a novel muscarinic acetylcholine receptor through TNF pathway in oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Dong, Wenjing; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Muscarinic receptors, which selectively take muscarine as their ligand, are critical for the immunological and physiological processes in animals. In the present study, the open region frame (ORF) of a homologue of muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (mAChR) was amplified from oyster Crassostrea gigas (named as CgmAChR-1), whose full length was 1983 bp and the protein it encoded contained 660 amino acids with a seven transmembrane region. Phylogeny analysis suggested that CgmAChR-1 shared homology with M5 muscarinic receptor found in invertebrates including Habropoda laboriosa, Acromyrmex echinatior and Echinococcus granulosus. After cell transfection of CgmAChR-1 into HEK293T cells and ACh incubation, the level of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP increased significantly (p < 0.05). Such trend could be reverted with the addition of M3 and M5 muscarinic receptor antagonists DAMP and DAR. The CgmAChR-1 transcripts were ubiquitously detectable in seven different tissues with the maximal expression level in adductor muscle. When the oysters received LPS stimulation, CgmAChR-1 mRNA expression in haemocyte was increased to the highest level (6.05-fold, p < 0.05) at 24 h, while blocking CgmAChR-1 using receptor antagonists before LPS stimulation promoted the expression of oyster TNF, resulting in the increase of haemocyte apoptosis index. These results suggested that CgmAChR-1 was the key molecule in cholinergic neuroendocrine-immune system contributing to the regulation of TNF expression and apoptosis process. PMID:27394930

  3. Pharmacology of amezinium, a novel antihypotensive drug. VI. Effect on central nervous functions.

    PubMed

    Teschendorf, H J; Kretzschmar, R; Kreiskott, H; Weifenbach, H

    1981-01-01

    4-Amino-6-methoxy-1-phenyl-pyridazinium methyl sulfate (ameziniummetilsulfate, LU 1631, Regulton), in this study briefly called amezinium, was tested for possible central effects taking particular account of the mechanisms of action found for this substance in other studies. 1. The most conspicuous action of amezinium was in modifying reserpine-induced ptosis and reserpine-induced hypothermia. When amezinium is given before reserpine, the ED50 values are 0.15 and 3.9 mg/kg p.o. for both mouse and rat. These effects can be explained by a peripheral site of action since peripheral sympathomimetic effects can also be demonstrated in this dose range. Higher doses (10 mg/kg and upwards p.o.) were required to abolish reserpine-induced hypothermia 17 h after reserpine administration, an effect which probably requires a central site of action. But for imipramine, desipramine and pargyline the effective doses are the same in both experimental models (administration before and after reserpine, respectively). 2. Amezinium potentiated the effect of a threshold dose of L-dopa. Based on the central symptoms, higher doses (10 mg/kg p.o.) were also required for this effect. 3. With blood pressure increasing doses, the sleeping-waking pattern was modified in that duration and number of REM-episodes were reduced; in cats there was no parallel increase of wakefulness whilst in rats there was a slight relative increase of wakefulness. 4. Amezinium, particularly at high doses (46.4 mg/kg and upwards), exhibited a central depressant effect on the spontaneous behaviour of mice and rats and on orientational hyperactivity of mice. Based on the modification of aggregation toxicity, the effect of methamphetamine was reduced. In no dose range was there any evidence of methamphetamine-like effects (increase of motor activity, inhibition of food intake and increase of aggregation toxicity). 5. Amezinium did not affect the duration of hexobarbital anaesthesia or the coordination of mice on a

  4. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  5. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Amonyingcharoen, Sumet; Suriyo, Tawit; Thiantanawat, Apinya; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1-40 µM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth.

  6. The acute effects of smokeless tobacco on central aortic blood pressure and wave reflection characteristics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey S; Beck, Darren T; Gurovich, Alvaro N; Braith, Randy W

    2010-10-01

    The main objectives of this study were to examine the acute effect of a single dose of smokeless tobacco (ST) on central aortic blood pressure and wave reflection characteristics. Fifteen apparently healthy male subjects (aged 30.6 ± 6.2 y) were given a 2.5 g oral dose of ST after baseline measurements were recorded. Pulse wave analysis using radial artery applanation tonometry was performed in triplicate at baseline (0 min) and at 10-min intervals during (10, 20 and 30 min) and after (40, 50 and 60 min) ST use. An acute dose of ST was associated with a significant increase in heart rate (HR), central aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral brachial systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and aortic augmentation index normalized to a fixed heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75). Furthermore, ejection duration and round trip travel time of the reflected pressure wave (Δt(p)) were significantly decreased as a result of one time ST use. As a result of changes in aortic pressure wave reflection characteristics, there was a significant increase in wasted left ventricular pressure energy (LVE(w)) and the tension-time index (TTI) as a result of ST use. In conclusion, one time use of ST elicits significant transient increases in HR, central aortic pressures, AIx@75, the TTI and LVE(w). Chronic users subjected to decades of elevated central pressures and left ventricular work may have an increased cardiovascular risk as central aortic pressures are even more strongly related to cardiovascular outcomes than peripheral blood pressures.

  7. The effect of hypercapnia and hypercapnia associated with central cooling on breathing in unanesthetized fetal lambs.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, I M; Maertzdorf, W J; De Jong, D S; Hanson, M A; Blanco, C E

    1997-01-01

    In utero breathing activity is present periodically, but it must become continuous at birth. We investigated the effect of hypercapnia and of hypercapnia combined with central cooling on fetal breathing in seven chronically instrumented fetal lambs of 131-134-d gestation, using an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) system to control fetal blood gases and fetal temperature. During fetal hypercapnia (from a partial pressure of arterial CO2 (Paco2) 6.18 +/- 0.11 kPa to Paco2 7.39 +/- 0.15 kPa) frequency, amplitude, and incidence of fetal breathing movements during low voltage electrocortical activity (LV ECoG) increased significantly compared with isocapnic control on ECMO, but breathing remained absent during high voltage electrocortical activity (HV ECoG). During hypercapnia accompanied by central cooling (Paco2 7.90 +/- 0.13 kPa, temperature decreased by 2.1 degrees C) there were similar changes in fetal breathing movements during LV ECoG, but in four out of seven fetuses fetal breathing movements continued throughout HV ECoG. Hypercapnia accompanied by central cooling can thus override the inhibitory effects of HV ECoG on fetal breathing movements. This may be due to changes in sensitivity to CO2 produced by an increase in afferent input to the CNS.

  8. Central Effects of Camphor on GnRH and Sexual Hormones in Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Sima; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Aghajanpour, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi Kani, Seyedeh Narges; Pourbagher, Roghieh; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Esmaili, Mohsen; Yoonesi, Ali Asghar; Zarghami, Amin; Alinezhad, Farid

    2012-01-01

    In Persian traditional medicine is believed that camphor (a crystalline ketone obtained from cinnamomum camphora) is a suppressor of sexual behaviors. This study examined the central effects of camphor on sexual hormones (LH, FSH and testosterone) and GnRH plasma levels in male rat. Male Wistar rats weighing 250-260gr were selected and divided into control (no treatment), sham (ICV injection of EtOH 10%) and treatment (ICV injection of camphor in three doses 4, 20, 40 µg/ 10µl in alcohol) groups. The serum samples were used for assaying of GnRH, LH, FSH and testosterone. There were no significant differences in the levels of hormones between the groups of study. Despite the central administration of camphor in hypothalamus - pituitary - gonad (HPG) axis, no significant differences were seen in sex hormone`s levels compared to the control. With this finding, it can be concluded that camphor may not effectively handle the axis via central pathway. These data recommend further studies of camphor on the HPG axis. PMID:24551777

  9. Cholinolytic antagonism to the disruptive effects of oral low doses of pyridostigmine on simple discrimination performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, W F

    1991-12-01

    We have previously reported that acute oral administration of low doses (less than or equal to 12 mg/kg) of pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) to rats resulted in a dose-dependent decrement in reinforcement rate under two different multiple schedules of response-produced water presentation, which involved motivational dysfunction rather than motor impairment and alterations in visual perception. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine further if the anticipated operant behavioral deficits of PYR are mediated by central and/or peripheral cholinergic mechanisms. Lever-press responses of male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained under a multiple fixed-ratio GO/differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate NO GO, brightness discrimination, schedule of water reinforcement. The effects of the muscarinic antagonists atropine (ATR) and methylatropine (MAT), both at doses of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg (SC), against a single oral low dose of PYR (12 mg/kg)-induced behavioral disruption were compared. ATR partially antagonized the reinforcement loss of PYR with concomitant dose-related increases in nonreinforced responses, whereas MAT completely antagonized the reinforcement loss without affecting the frequency of nonreinforced responses. These results suggest that in rats, the debilitating effects of oral PYR on operant behavior are primarily due to the stimulation of peripheral muscarinic receptors via its anticholinesterase activity. The increments of nonreinforced responses observed after coadministration of PYR with ATR may reflect a central, excitatory action of ATR which could affect the discrimination performance. The present results have practical implications for the clinical utilization of PYR in combination with the peripherally active muscarinic antagonist in situations where optimal performance is required.

  10. Accelerated structure-based design of chemically diverse allosteric modulators of a muscarinic G protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Goldfeld, Dahlia Anne; Moo, Ee Von; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; McCammon, J Andrew; Valant, Celine

    2016-09-20

    Design of ligands that provide receptor selectivity has emerged as a new paradigm for drug discovery of G protein-coupled receptors, and may, for certain families of receptors, only be achieved via identification of chemically diverse allosteric modulators. Here, the extracellular vestibule of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) is targeted for structure-based design of allosteric modulators. Accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations were performed to construct structural ensembles that account for the receptor flexibility. Compounds obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were docked to the receptor ensembles. Retrospective docking of known ligands showed that combining aMD simulations with Glide induced fit docking (IFD) provided much-improved enrichment factors, compared with the Glide virtual screening workflow. Glide IFD was thus applied in receptor ensemble docking, and 38 top-ranked NCI compounds were selected for experimental testing. In [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine radioligand dissociation assays, approximately half of the 38 lead compounds altered the radioligand dissociation rate, a hallmark of allosteric behavior. In further competition binding experiments, we identified 12 compounds with affinity of ≤30 μM. With final functional experiments on six selected compounds, we confirmed four of them as new negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) and one as positive allosteric modulator of agonist-mediated response at the M2 mAChR. Two of the NAMs showed subtype selectivity without significant effect at the M1 and M3 mAChRs. This study demonstrates an unprecedented successful structure-based approach to identify chemically diverse and selective GPCR allosteric modulators with outstanding potential for further structure-activity relationship studies. PMID:27601651

  11. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M. . E-mail: laurie.chan@mcgill.ca

    2005-05-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl{sub 2} and MeHg on [{sup 3}H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([{sup 3}H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B {sub max}) and ligand affinity (K {sub d}). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl{sub 2} or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K {sub i}). Results demonstrate that HgCl{sub 2} is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [{sup 3}H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies.

  12. Role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in an experimental model of epilepsy-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Bassi, Gabriel Shimizu; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2004-10-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The neurotransmission in the postictal period has been the focus of many studies, and there is evidence suggesting antinociceptive mechanisms following tonic-clonic seizures in both animals and men. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of acetylcholine in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). Analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in eight albino Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increases in tail-flick latencies (TFLs) at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of atropine (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated by peripheral administration of mecamylamine, a nicotinic cholinergic receptor blocker, at the same doses (0.25, 1 and 4 mg/kg) used for the muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist. The recruitment of the muscarinic receptor was made 10 min postconvulsions and in subsequent periods of postictal analgesia, whereas the involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor was implicated only after 30 min postseizures. The cholinergic antagonists caused a minimal reduction in body temperature, but did not impair baseline TFL, spontaneous exploration or motor coordination in the rotarod test at the maximal dose of 4 mg/kg. These results indicate that acetylcholine may be involved as a neurotransmitter in postictal analgesia.

  13. Critical metabolic roles of β-cell M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Azua, Inigo Ruiz; Gautam, Dinesh; Jain, Shalini; Guettier, Jean-Marc; Wess, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (mAChRs; M1–M5) regulate the activity of an extraordinarily large number of important physiological processes. We and others previously demonstrated that pancreatic β-cells are endowed with M3 mAChRs which are linked to G proteins of the Gq family. The activation of these receptors by ACh or other muscarinic agonists leads to the augmentation of glucose-induced insulin release via multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, in humans, ACh acting on human β-cell mAChRs is released from adjacent α-cells which express both choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (vAChT), indicative of the presence of a non-neuronal cholinergic system in human pancreatic islets. In order to shed light on the physiological roles of β-cell M3 receptors, we recently generated and analyzed various mutant mouse models. Specifically, we carried out studies with mice which overexpressed M3 receptors or mutant M3 receptors in pancreatic β-cells or which selectively lacked M3 receptors or M3-receptor-associated proteins in pancreatic β-cells. Our findings indicate that β-cell M3 receptors play a key role in maintaining proper insulin release and whole body glucose homeostasis and that strategies aimed at enhancing signaling through β-cell M3 receptors may prove useful to improve β-cell function for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). PMID:22525375

  14. Role of G-proteins in muscarinic receptor inward and outward currents in rabbit jejunal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Komori, S; Bolton, T B

    1990-01-01

    1. Single smooth muscle cells obtained by enzymic dispersion of the longitudinal muscle layer of rabbit jejunum were held under voltage clamp using patch pipettes and membrane currents measured. The effects of carbachol or caffeine applied externally were examined in cells dialysed with normal pipette solutions or with a solution containing heparin (which blocks receptors for D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, InsP3), guanosine 5-O-(gamma-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) or guanosine 5-O-(beta-thio)diphosphate (GDP beta S). 2. Outward current in response to application of carbachol or caffeine was considered to represent the opening of calcium-activated potassium channels in response to a localized rise in the free ionized calcium concentration occasioned by the rapid discharge of stored calcium (Ca) by these agents. 3. Heparin included in the pipette solution blocked outward current to muscarinic receptor activation by carbachol but not that to caffeine, suggesting that receptor-evoked discharge of stored cellular Ca is caused by InsP3 action. However, heparin did not affect muscarinic-receptor inward current. 4. After dialysis with 0.1-0.5 mM-GTP gamma S, carbachol inward current was evoked in two out of three of the cells; after dialysis with 0.1-0.2 mM-GTP gamma S for an average of 7.7 min it was 80% of the normal response; after dialysis for an average of 8.6 min with 0.5 mM-GTP gamma S it was 31% of the normal response. In contrast, 0.1 mM-GTP gamma S reduced caffeine outward current by 93% after an average 4.5 min dialysis and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) were abolished in 2.9 min on average. 5. Carbachol inward current (at -40 or -50 mV) and carbachol outward current (at 0 mV) in responding cells were reduced only by half after 8-10 min dialysis with 1 mM-GDP beta S which has been shown in portal vein cells to antagonize the depletion of Ca stores by intracellular GTP gamma S (Komori & Bolton, 1989). After 8-10 min dialysis with 5 m

  15. Seasonal and interannual effects of hypoxia on fish habitat quality in central Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arend, Kristin K.; Beletsky, Dmitry; DePinto, Joseph; Ludsin, Stuart A.; Roberts, James J.; Rucinski, Daniel K.; Scavia, Donald; Schwab, David J.; Höök, Tomas O.

    2011-01-01

    1. Hypoxia occurs seasonally in many stratified coastal marine and freshwater ecosystems when bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are depleted below 2–3 mg O2 L-1. 2. We evaluated the effects of hypoxia on fish habitat quality in the central basin of Lake Erie from 1987 to 2005, using bioenergetic growth rate potential (GRP) as a proxy for habitat quality. We compared the effect of hypoxia on habitat quality of (i) rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax mordax Mitchill (young-of-year, YOY, and adult), a cold-water planktivore, (ii) emerald shiner, Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque (adult), a warm-water planktivore, (iii) yellow perch, Perca flavescens Mitchill (YOY and adult), a cool-water benthopelagic omnivore and (iv) round goby Neogobius melanostomus Pallas (adult) a eurythermal benthivore. Annual thermal and DO profiles were generated from 1D thermal and DO hydrodynamics models developed for Lake Erie’s central basin. 3. Hypoxia occurred annually, typically from mid-July to mid-October, which spatially and temporally overlaps with otherwise high benthic habitat quality. Hypoxia reduced the habitat quality across fish species and life stages, but the magnitude of the reduction varied both among and within species because of the differences in tolerance to low DO levels and warm-water temperatures. 4. Across years, trends in habitat quality mirrored trends in phosphorus concentration and water column oxygen demand in central Lake Erie. The per cent reduction in habitat quality owing to hypoxia was greatest for adult rainbow smelt and round goby (mean: -35%), followed by adult emerald shiner (mean: -12%), YOY rainbow smelt (mean: -10%) and YOY and adult yellow perch (mean: -8.5%). 5. Our results highlight the importance of differential spatiotemporally interactive effects of DO and temperature on relative fish habitat quality and quantity. These effects have the potential to influence the performance of individual fish species as well as population dynamics

  16. [Neurobiology of endocannabinoids and central effects of tetrahydrocannabinol contained in indian hemp].

    PubMed

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis indica, is an addictive drug with multiple effects including both peripheral and central damages. All these effects are due to interference with endocannabinoidergic transmission. This endocannabinoid system subtly regulates many physiologicalfunctions. This regulation involves various ligands derived from arachidonic acid (anandamide, di-arachidonoylglycerol, virodhamin, noladin ether, N arachidonoyl dopamine, etc.) which stimulate two main types of receptor CB1 in the central nervous system and CB2 in the periphery. CB1 receptors are very numerous and ubiquitous in the brain. They influence various important functions (awakening, attention, delirium, hallucinations, memory, cognition, anxiety, humor stability, motor coordination, brain maturation, etc.). Far from mimicking endocannabinoids, THC caricatures their effects. It affects all brain structures, simultaneously, intensely and durably, inducing down-regulation of CB1 receptors and thereby reducing the effects of their physiological ligands. On account of its exceptional lipophilia, THC accumulates for days and even weeks in the brain. It is not a soft drug but rather a slow drug: its abuse induces long-lasting modifications and deterioration of brain function, potentially leading to various mental and psychiatric disorders.

  17. [Neurobiology of endocannabinoids and central effects of tetrahydrocannabinol contained in indian hemp].

    PubMed

    Costentin, Jean

    2014-03-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychotropic component of Cannabis indica, is an addictive drug with multiple effects including both peripheral and central damages. All these effects are due to interference with endocannabinoidergic transmission. This endocannabinoid system subtly regulates many physiologicalfunctions. This regulation involves various ligands derived from arachidonic acid (anandamide, di-arachidonoylglycerol, virodhamin, noladin ether, N arachidonoyl dopamine, etc.) which stimulate two main types of receptor CB1 in the central nervous system and CB2 in the periphery. CB1 receptors are very numerous and ubiquitous in the brain. They influence various important functions (awakening, attention, delirium, hallucinations, memory, cognition, anxiety, humor stability, motor coordination, brain maturation, etc.). Far from mimicking endocannabinoids, THC caricatures their effects. It affects all brain structures, simultaneously, intensely and durably, inducing down-regulation of CB1 receptors and thereby reducing the effects of their physiological ligands. On account of its exceptional lipophilia, THC accumulates for days and even weeks in the brain. It is not a soft drug but rather a slow drug: its abuse induces long-lasting modifications and deterioration of brain function, potentially leading to various mental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:26427295

  18. The Effects of Tai Chi in Centrally Obese Adults with Depression Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Kostner, Karam; Crompton, David; Williams, Gail; Brown, Wendy J.; Lopez, Alan; Xue, Charlie C.; Oei, Tian P.; Byrne, Gerard; Martin, Jennifer H.; Whiteford, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obese people with elevated depression symptoms. In total, 213 participants were randomized to a 24-week Tai Chi intervention program or a wait-list control group. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks. Outcomes were severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, leg strength, central obesity, and other measures of metabolic symptom. There were statistically significant between-group differences in favor of the Tai Chi group in depression (mean difference = −5.6 units, P < 0.001), anxiety (−2.3 units, P < 0.01), and stress (−3.6 units, P < 0.001) symptom scores and leg strength (1.1 units, P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. These changes were further improved or maintained in the Tai Chi group relative to the control group during the second 12 weeks of follow-up. Tai Chi appears to be beneficial for reducing severity of depression, anxiety, and stress and leg strength in centrally obese people with depression symptoms. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the findings. This trial is registered with ACTRN12613000010796. PMID:25688280

  19. Central effects of beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog

    SciTech Connect

    Radosevich, P.M.; Lacy, D.B.; Brown, L.L.; Williams, P.E.; Abumrad, N.N.

    1989-02-01

    The effects of centrally administered beta-endorphins on glucose homeostasis in the conscious dog were studied. Intracerebroventricular administration of beta-endorphin (0.2 mg/h) caused a 70% increase in plasma glucose. The mechanism of the hyperglycemia was twofold: there was an early increase in glucose production and a late inhibition of glucose clearance. These changes are explained by marked increases in plasma epinephrine (30-fold) and norepinephrine (6-fold) that occurred during infusion of beta-endorphin. Central administration of beta-endorphin also resulted in increased levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol. In addition there was an increase in plasma insulin but no increase in plasma glucagon. Intravenous administration of beta-endorphin did not alter glucose homeostasis. Intracerebroventricular administration of acetylated beta-endorphin did not perturb glucose kinetics or any of the hormones that changed during infusion of the unacetylated peptide. We conclude that beta-endorphin acts centrally to cause hyperglycemia by stimulating sympathetic outflow and the pituitary-adrenal axis. Acetylation of beta-endorphin abolishes the in vivo activity of the peptide.

  20. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing. PMID:27306460

  1. The effects of tai chi in centrally obese adults with depression symptoms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Vitetta, Luis; Kostner, Karam; Crompton, David; Williams, Gail; Brown, Wendy J; Lopez, Alan; Xue, Charlie C; Oei, Tian P; Byrne, Gerard; Martin, Jennifer H; Whiteford, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Tai Chi, a low-impact mind-body movement therapy, on severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in centrally obese people with elevated depression symptoms. In total, 213 participants were randomized to a 24-week Tai Chi intervention program or a wait-list control group. Assessments were conducted at baseline and 12 and 24 weeks. Outcomes were severity of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, leg strength, central obesity, and other measures of metabolic symptom. There were statistically significant between-group differences in favor of the Tai Chi group in depression (mean difference = -5.6 units, P < 0.001), anxiety (-2.3 units, P < 0.01), and stress (-3.6 units, P < 0.001) symptom scores and leg strength (1.1 units, P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. These changes were further improved or maintained in the Tai Chi group relative to the control group during the second 12 weeks of follow-up. Tai Chi appears to be beneficial for reducing severity of depression, anxiety, and stress and leg strength in centrally obese people with depression symptoms. More studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the findings. This trial is registered with ACTRN12613000010796. PMID:25688280

  2. Effects of aging on peripheral and central auditory processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Margarida; Lepore, Franco; Prévost, François; Guillemot, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Hearing loss is a hallmark sign in the elderly population. Decline in auditory perception provokes deficits in the ability to localize sound sources and reduces speech perception, particularly in noise. In addition to a loss of peripheral hearing sensitivity, changes in more complex central structures have also been demonstrated. Related to these, this study examines the auditory directional maps in the deep layers of the superior colliculus of the rat. Hence, anesthetized Sprague-Dawley adult (10 months) and aged (22 months) rats underwent distortion product of otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) to assess cochlear function. Then, auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were assessed, followed by extracellular single-unit recordings to determine age-related effects on central auditory functions. DPOAE amplitude levels were decreased in aged rats although they were still present between 3.0 and 24.0 kHz. ABR level thresholds in aged rats were significantly elevated at an early (cochlear nucleus - wave II) stage in the auditory brainstem. In the superior colliculus, thresholds were increased and the tuning widths of the directional receptive fields were significantly wider. Moreover, no systematic directional spatial arrangement was present among the neurons of the aged rats, implying that the topographical organization of the auditory directional map was abolished. These results suggest that the deterioration of the auditory directional spatial map can, to some extent, be attributable to age-related dysfunction at more central, perceptual stages of auditory processing.

  3. In vivo evaluation of Z-(R,R)-IQNP as a candidate for the study of M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors by SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, D.W.; Greenbaum, M.; Beets, A.L.

    1997-05-01

    The ability to image alternations of M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors is of importance in the study of dementias and heart failure. We have developed a QNB analogue, Z-(R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl (R)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-alpha-phenylacetate (Z-(R,R)-IQNP), which demonstrates high in vitro binding affinity for both the M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor subtypes.

  4. Synthesis of radiotracers for studying muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the living human brain using positron emission tomography: [11C]dexetimide and [11C]levetimide.

    PubMed

    Dannals, R F; Långström, B; Ravert, H T; Wilson, A A; Wagner, H N

    1988-01-01

    Dexetimide (Fig. 1a), a potent muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, and levetimide (Fig. 1b), its pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, were labeled with 11C for non-invasive in vivo studies of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the human brain using positron emission tomography. The syntheses were completed in approximately 32 min using [alpha-11C]benzyl iodide as the precursor. The synthesis, purification, characterization and determination of specific activity are presented and discussed. PMID:2838435

  5. Characterization and agonist regulation of muscarinic ([3H]N-methyl scopolamine) receptors in isolated ventricular myocytes from rat.

    PubMed

    Horackova, M; Robinson, B; Wilkinson, M

    1990-11-01

    Cell surface muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been characterized and quantified for the first time, in intact, isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes. The cells were previously established as functionally fully compatible with cellular responses in intact cardiac tissue. The specific binding of the hydrophilic radioligand, [3H]-NMS, (N-methyl-[3H]-scopolamine methylchloride) was found to be stereo-specific, saturable, reversible and of high affinity. Binding of [3H]-NMS demonstrated appropriate drug specificity and was positively correlated with increasing cell concentrations. Bmax for [3H]-NMS binding to ventricular myocytes, enzymatically dissociated from adult male rats, was 15.8 +/- 1.03 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells (at 4 degrees C) and KD was 0.27 +/- 0.05 nM (n = 14). Binding assays performed at a higher incubation temperature (30 degrees C) yielded a higher Bmax value (22.1 +/- 1.6 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells; n = 11; P less than 0.005 vs. Bmax at 4 degrees C) but an unchanged KD (0.23 +/- 0.06 nM). Pretreatment of myocytes with the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 mM) at 37 degrees C resulted in a reduction (down-regulation) in specific binding of the hydrophilic ligand [3H]-NMS. The magnitude of this reduction and its rate of recovery were dependent on the time of the exposure to carbachol. Exposures of 30-60 min elicited down-regulated by 35% (Bmax = 14.29 +/- 1.66 changed to 9.5 +/- 1.79 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells, without change in KD P less than 0.01, n = 4). The down-regulation of the muscarinic receptors by carbachol was insensitive to application of bacitracin - an inhibitor of endocytosis. On the other hand preincubation with 10(-9)M atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, hindered the agonist-induced receptor "loss" from the cell surface confirming the muscarinic nature of these receptors. We conclude that our preparation of intact, isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes is ideally suited for the study of cell surface muscarinic receptor regulation under physiological and

  6. Characterization and agonist regulation of muscarinic ([3H]N-methyl scopolamine) receptors in isolated ventricular myocytes from rat.

    PubMed

    Horackova, M; Robinson, B; Wilkinson, M

    1990-11-01

    Cell surface muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been characterized and quantified for the first time, in intact, isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes. The cells were previously established as functionally fully compatible with cellular responses in intact cardiac tissue. The specific binding of the hydrophilic radioligand, [3H]-NMS, (N-methyl-[3H]-scopolamine methylchloride) was found to be stereo-specific, saturable, reversible and of high affinity. Binding of [3H]-NMS demonstrated appropriate drug specificity and was positively correlated with increasing cell concentrations. Bmax for [3H]-NMS binding to ventricular myocytes, enzymatically dissociated from adult male rats, was 15.8 +/- 1.03 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells (at 4 degrees C) and KD was 0.27 +/- 0.05 nM (n = 14). Binding assays performed at a higher incubation temperature (30 degrees C) yielded a higher Bmax value (22.1 +/- 1.6 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells; n = 11; P less than 0.005 vs. Bmax at 4 degrees C) but an unchanged KD (0.23 +/- 0.06 nM). Pretreatment of myocytes with the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 mM) at 37 degrees C resulted in a reduction (down-regulation) in specific binding of the hydrophilic ligand [3H]-NMS. The magnitude of this reduction and its rate of recovery were dependent on the time of the exposure to carbachol. Exposures of 30-60 min elicited down-regulated by 35% (Bmax = 14.29 +/- 1.66 changed to 9.5 +/- 1.79 fmol/25 x 10(3) cells, without change in KD P less than 0.01, n = 4). The down-regulation of the muscarinic receptors by carbachol was insensitive to application of bacitracin - an inhibitor of endocytosis. On the other hand preincubation with 10(-9)M atropine, a muscarinic antagonist, hindered the agonist-induced receptor "loss" from the cell surface confirming the muscarinic nature of these receptors. We conclude that our preparation of intact, isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes is ideally suited for the study of cell surface muscarinic receptor regulation under physiological and

  7. Analgesic effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on central post-stroke pain.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sea-Hyun; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Kyung-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Pain that occurs after a stroke lowers the quality of life. Such post-stroke pain is caused in part by the brain lesion itself, called central post-stroke pain. We investigated the analgesic effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients through quantitative sensory testing. Fourteen participants with central post-stroke pain (7 female and 7 male subjects) were recruited and were allocated to either tDCS (n = 7) or sham-tDCS (n = 7) group. Their ages ranged from 45 to 55 years. tDCS was administered for 20 min at a 2-mA current intensity, with anodal stimulations were performed at primary motor cortex. The sham-tDCS group was stimulated 30-second current carrying time. Both group interventions were given for 3 days per week, for a period of 3 weeks. Subjective pain was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. Sensations of cold and warmth, and pain from cold and heat were quantified to examine analgesic effects. The sham-tDCS group showed no statistically significant differences in time. In contrast, tDCS group showed decreased VAS scores and skin temperature (p < 0.05). The threshold temperatures for the sense of cold and pain from cold increased (p < 0.05), and those for the sense of warmth and pain from heat decreased (p < 0.05). Our findings indicate that tDCS improved sensory identification and exerted analgesic effects in the stroke patients with central post-stroke pain. PMID:25341455

  8. Contribution of the central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nishant S; Tandi, Lakshyapati; Verma, Lokesh

    2015-12-01

    The antipsychotic properties of haloperidol are primarily attributed to its ability to block dopamine D2 receptors. Histaminergic transmission modulates some of the behavioral effects of haloperidol. Hence, the present study investigated the contribution of central histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effect of haloperidol respectively, using bar test and conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in a two-way shuttle box. The studies revealed that haloperidol (0.50 or 1 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited cataleptic behavior and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (CAR) in the doses 0.25 or 0.50 mg in rats. The rats, pretreated centrally (i.c.v.) with histamine precursor, L-histidine (1, 2.5 μg) or histamine neuronal inducer (H3 receptor antagonist), thioperamide (20, 50 μg/rat), showed an enhanced cataleptic effect with sub-maximal dose of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) in CAR was also potentiated in the rats pretreated with L-histidine (2.5 μg) or thioperamide (50 μg/rat). Further, the cataleptic effect of haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was attenuated in rats pretreated with the H1 receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (60, 80 μg/rat, i.c.v.) or H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.). However, the neuroleptic effect of haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was completely reversed by pretreatment with ranitidine (60 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and partially attenuated by chlorpheniramine (80 μg/rat, i.c.v.). These findings suggest the possible involvement of histaminergic transmission in the cataleptic and neuroleptic effects of haloperidol probably via H1 or H2 receptor stimulation.

  9. Otoacoustic Emissions (Part I) and central auditory effects: A moderated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Verhulst, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The following is an edited transcript of a recorded discussion session on the topics of "Otoacoustic Emissions" and "Central Auditory Effects". The discussion, moderated by the authors, took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. All participants knew that the session was being recorded. In view of both the spontaneous nature of the discussion and the editing, however, this transcript may not represent the considered or final views of the participants, and may not represent a consensus of experts in the field. The reader is advised to consult additional independent publications.

  10. Effect of the May-June Mount St. Helens eruptions on precipitation chemistry in central Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, William M.; Grant, Michael C.

    Bulk precipitation chemistry for the interval 17 May to 12 June 1980, when the Mount St. Helens volcano was intermittently erupting, was compared with similar data over the same interval in previous years at a site in central Colorado. Although phosphorus, chloride and paniculate loading values were higher than in previous years, no significant differences exist for these or other variables, indicating that the volcanic effect on chemical loading from the atmosphere at this site was within the ordinary range of variability for bulk precipitation chemistry.

  11. Effects of cholinergic and noradrenergic agents on locomotion in the mudpuppy (Necturus maculatus).

    PubMed

    Fok, M; Stein, R B

    2002-08-01

    Some neurotransmitters act consistently on the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion in a wide range of vertebrates. In contrast, acetylcholine (ACh) and noradrenaline (NA) have various effects on locomotion in different preparations. The roles of ACh and NA have not been studied in amphibian walking, so we examined their effects in an isolated spinal cord preparation of the mudpuppy ( Necturus maculatus). This preparation contains a CPG that produces locomotor activity when N-methyl- D-aspartic acid (NMDA), an excitatory amino acid agonist, is added to the bath. The addition of carbachol, a long acting ACh agonist, to the bath disrupted the walking rhythm induced by NMDA, while not changing the level of activity in flexor and extensor motoneurons. Adding clonidine, an alpha(2)-noradrenergic agonist, had no effect on the NMDA-induced walking rhythm. Physostigmine, an ACh-esterase inhibitor, disrupted the walking rhythm, presumably by potentiating the effects of endogenously released ACh. Atropine, an ACh antagonist that binds to muscarinic ACh receptors, blocked the effects of carbachol, indicating that the action is mediated, at least in part, by muscarinic receptors. In the absence of carbachol, atropine had no effect. Locomotion was not induced by carbachol, atropine or clonidine in a resting spinal cord preparation. Cholinergic actions do not seem to be essential to the CPG for walking in the mudpuppy, but ACh may convert a rhythmic walking state to a more tonic state with occasional bursts of EMG activity for postural adjustments.

  12. Functional biomarkers for the acute effects of alcohol on the central nervous system in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zoethout, Remco W M; Delgado, Wilson L; Ippel, Annelies E; Dahan, Albert; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) effects of acute alcohol administration have been frequently assessed. Such studies often use a wide range of methods to study each of these effects. Unfortunately, the sensitivity of these tests has not completely been ascertained. A literature search was performed to recognize the most useful tests (or biomarkers) for identifying the acute CNS effects of alcohol in healthy volunteers. All tests were grouped in clusters and functional domains. Afterwards, the effect of alcohol administration on these tests was scored as improvement, impairment or as no effect. Furthermore, dose–response relationships were established. A total number of 218 studies, describing 342 different tests (or test variants) were evaluated. Alcohol affected a wide range of CNS domains. Divided attention, focused attention, visuo-motor control and scales of feeling high and of subjective drug effects were identified as the most sensitive functional biomarkers for the acute CNS effects of alcohol. The large number of CNS tests that are used to determine the effects of alcohol interferes with the identification of the most sensitive ones and of drug–response relationships. Our results may be helpful in selecting rational biomarkers for studies investigating the acute CNS effects of alcohol or for future alcohol- interaction studies. PMID:21284693

  13. Primary structure of rat cardiac beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained by automated DNA sequence analysis: further evidence for a multigene family.

    PubMed Central

    Gocayne, J; Robinson, D A; FitzGerald, M G; Chung, F Z; Kerlavage, A R; Lentes, K U; Lai, J; Wang, C D; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two cDNA clones, lambda RHM-MF and lambda RHB-DAR, encoding the muscarinic cholinergic receptor and the beta-adrenergic receptor, respectively, have been isolated from a rat heart cDNA library. The cDNA clones were characterized by restriction mapping and automated DNA sequence analysis utilizing fluorescent dye primers. The rat heart muscarinic receptor consists of 466 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 51,543. The rat heart beta-adrenergic receptor consists of 418 amino acids and has a calculated molecular weight of 46,890. The two cardiac receptors have substantial amino acid homology (27.2% identity, 50.6% with favored substitutions). The rat cardiac beta receptor has 88.0% homology (92.5% with favored substitutions) with the human brain beta receptor and the rat cardiac muscarinic receptor has 94.6% homology (97.6% with favored substitutions) with the porcine cardiac muscarinic receptor. The muscarinic cholinergic and beta-adrenergic receptors appear to be as conserved as hemoglobin and cytochrome c but less conserved than histones and are clearly members of a multigene family. These data support our hypothesis, based upon biochemical and immunological evidence, that suggests considerable structural homology and evolutionary conservation between adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing automated DNA sequence analysis to determine the structure of a gene. Images PMID:2825184

  14. Irrigation effects in the northern lake states: Wisconsin central sands revisited.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George J; Clancy, Katherine; Mechenich, David J; Haucke, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture has expanded greatly in the water-rich U.S. northern lake states during the past half century. Source water there is usually obtained from glacial aquifers strongly connected to surface waters, so irrigation has a potential to locally decrease base flows in streams and water levels in aquifers, lakes, and wetlands. During the nascent phase of the irrigation expansion, water availability was explored in works of some fame in the Wisconsin central sands by Weeks et al. (1965) on the Little Plover River and Weeks and Stangland (1971) on "headwater area" streams and lakes. Four decades later, and after irrigation has grown to a dominant landscape presence, we revisited irrigation effects on central sands hydrology. Irrigation effects have been substantial, on average decreasing base flows by a third or more in many stream headwaters and diminishing water levels by more than a meter in places. This explains why some surface waters have become flow and stage impaired, sometimes to the point of drying, with attendant losses of aquatic ecosystems. Irrigation exerts its effects by increasing evapotranspiration by an estimated 45 to 142 mm/year compared with pre-irrigated land cover. We conclude that irrigation water availability in the northern lake states and other regions with strong groundwater-surface water connections is tied to concerns for surface water health, requiring a focus on managing the upper few meters of aquifers on which surface waters depend rather than the depletability of an aquifer.

  15. Irrigation effects in the northern lake states: Wisconsin central sands revisited.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George J; Clancy, Katherine; Mechenich, David J; Haucke, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Irrigated agriculture has expanded greatly in the water-rich U.S. northern lake states during the past half century. Source water there is usually obtained from glacial aquifers strongly connected to surface waters, so irrigation has a potential to locally decrease base flows in streams and water levels in aquifers, lakes, and wetlands. During the nascent phase of the irrigation expansion, water availability was explored in works of some fame in the Wisconsin central sands by Weeks et al. (1965) on the Little Plover River and Weeks and Stangland (1971) on "headwater area" streams and lakes. Four decades later, and after irrigation has grown to a dominant landscape presence, we revisited irrigation effects on central sands hydrology. Irrigation effects have been substantial, on average decreasing base flows by a third or more in many stream headwaters and diminishing water levels by more than a meter in places. This explains why some surface waters have become flow and stage impaired, sometimes to the point of drying, with attendant losses of aquatic ecosystems. Irrigation exerts its effects by increasing evapotranspiration by an estimated 45 to 142 mm/year compared with pre-irrigated land cover. We conclude that irrigation water availability in the northern lake states and other regions with strong groundwater-surface water connections is tied to concerns for surface water health, requiring a focus on managing the upper few meters of aquifers on which surface waters depend rather than the depletability of an aquifer. PMID:21707615

  16. Effects of hydrologic infrastructure on flow regimes of California's Central Valley rivers: Implications for fish populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Larry R.; Bauer, Marissa L.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration of natural flow regimes is generally acknowledged to have negative effects on native biota; however, methods for defining ecologically appropriate flow regimes in managed river systems are only beginning to be developed. Understanding how past and present water management has affected rivers is an important part of developing such tools. In this paper, we evaluate how existing hydrologic infrastructure and management affect streamflow characteristics of rivers in the Central Valley, California and discuss those characteristics in the context of habitat requirements of native and alien fishes. We evaluated the effects of water management by comparing observed discharges with estimated discharges assuming no water management ("full natural runoff"). Rivers in the Sacramento River drainage were characterized by reduced winter–spring discharges and augmented discharges in other months. Rivers in the San Joaquin River drainage were characterized by reduced discharges in all months but particularly in winter and spring. Two largely unaltered streams had hydrographs similar to those based on full natural runoff of the regulated rivers. The reduced discharges in the San Joaquin River drainage streams are favourable for spawning of many alien species, which is consistent with observed patterns of fish distribution and abundance in the Central Valley. However, other factors, such as water temperature, are also important to the relative success of native and alien resident fishes. As water management changes in response to climate change and societal demands, interdisciplinary programs of research and monitoring will be essential for anticipating effects on fishes and to avoid unanticipated ecological outcomes.

  17. Effects of temperature anomalies on the Palmer Drought Severity Index in the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, Qi; Willson, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to improve our understanding of temperature and precipitation effects on the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). Both theoretical and observational analyses were applied to separate and compare temperature and precipitation effects on PDSI. The results showed that because of the dependence of PDSI on the ‘climatologically appropriate rainfall’, which is a function of time and varies with surface air temperature, the PDSI can be equally affected by temperature and precipitation, when both have similar magnitudes of anomalies. Calculations using observational data further illustrated the temperature influence on PDSI in different climate regions in the central United States. The temperature effect on PDSI complicates the usage of the index in interpreting precipitation anomalies and its application in inferring precipitation variations, particularly from reconstructed PDSI.

  18. Effectiveness of traditional climatic responses in the central Texas region in maintaining thermal comfort