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Sample records for central west greenland

  1. Gyrfalcon diet in central west Greenland during the nestling period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, Travis; Fuller, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied food habits of Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) nesting in central west Greenland in 2000 and 2001 using three sources of data: time-lapse video (3 nests), prey remains (22 nests), and regurgitated pellets (19 nests). These sources provided different information describing the diet during the nesting period. Gyrfalcons relied heavily on Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus). Combined, these species contributed 79-91% of the total diet, depending on the data used. Passerines were the third most important group. Prey less common in the diet included waterfowl, arctic fox pups (Alopex lagopus), shorebirds, gulls, alcids, and falcons. All Rock Ptarmigan were adults, and all but one arctic hare were young of the year. Most passerines were fledglings. We observed two diet shifts, first from a preponderance of ptarmigan to hares in mid-June, and second to passerines in late June. The video-monitored Gyrfalcons consumed 94-110 kg of food per nest during the nestling period, higher than previously estimated. Using a combination of video, prey remains, and pellets was important to accurately document Gyrfalcon diet, and we strongly recommend using time-lapse video in future diet studies to identify biases in prey remains and pellet data.

  2. Gyrfalcon diet in central west Greenland during the nesting period

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, T.L.; Fuller, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied food habits of Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) nesting in central west Greenland in 2000 and 2001 using three sources of data: time-lapse video (3 nests), prey remains (22 nests), and regurgitated pellets (19 nests). These sources provided different information describing the diet during the nesting period. Gyrfalcons relied heavily on Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus) and arctic hares (Lepus arcticus). Combined, these species contributed 79-91% of the total diet, depending on the data used. Passerines were the third most important group. Prey less common in the diet included waterfowl, arctic fox pups (Alopex lagopus), shorebirds, gulls, alcids, and falcons. All Rock Ptarmigan were adults, and all but one arctic hare were young of the year. Most passerines were fledglings. We observed two diet shifts, first from a preponderance of ptarmigan to hares in mid-June, and second to passerines in late June. The video-monitored Gyrfalcons consumed 94-110 kg of food per nest during the nestling period, higher than previously estimated. Using a combination of video, prey remains, and pellets was important to accurately document Gyrfalcon diet, and we strongly recommend using time-lapse video in future diet studies to identify biases in prey remains and pellet data.

  3. The Vaigat Rock Avalanche Laboratory, west-central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, S.; Rosser, N. J.; Szczucinski, W.; Norman, E. C.; Benjamin, J.; Strzelecki, M.; Long, A. J.; Drewniak, M.

    2013-12-01

    Rock avalanches have unusually high mobility and pose both an immediate hazard, but also produce far-field impacts associated with dam breach, glacier collapse and where they run-out into water, tsunami. Such secondary hazards can often pose higher risks than the original landslide. The prediction of future threats posed by potential rock avalanches is heavily reliant upon understanding of the physics derived from an interpretation of deposits left by previous events, yet drawing comparisons between multiple events is normally challenging as interactions with complex mountainous terrain makes deposits from each event unique. As such numerical models and the interpretation of the underlying physics which govern landslide mobility is commonly case-specific and poorly suited to extrapolation beyond the single events the model is tuned to. Here we present a high-resolution LiDAR and hyperspectral dataset captured across a unique cluster of large rock avalanche source areas and deposits in the Vaigat straight, west central Greenland. Vaigat offers the unprecedented opportunity to model a sample of > 15 rock avalanches of various age sourced from an 80 km coastal escarpment. At Vaigat many of the key variables (topography, geology, post-glacial history) are held constant across all landslides providing the chance to investigate the variations in dynamics and emplacement style related to variable landslide volume, drop-heights, and thinning/spreading over relatively simple, unrestricted run-out zones both onto land and into water. Our data suggest that this region represents excellent preservation of landslide deposits, and hence is well suited to calibrate numerical models of run out dynamics. We use this data to aid the interpretation of deposit morphology, structure lithology and run-out characteristics in more complex settings. Uniquely, we are also able to calibrate our models using a far-field dataset of well-preserved tsunami run-up deposits, resulting from the 21

  4. A Comparison of Geoid Undulations for West Central Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Daniel R.; Csatho, Beata; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Thomas, Robert H.; Krabill, William B.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Forsberg, Rene

    1997-01-01

    The accuracy of a new local gravity field model, GEOID94A, is examined at a site on the western Greenland ice sheet. The model, developed by the Danish National Survey and Cadastre, incorporates several new gravity data sets including an extensive amount of airborne gravity data. Model-derived geoid undulations were compared to independently determined undulations found by differencing the elevations from Global Positioning System controlled airborne laser altimetry and optical leveling surveys. Differences between the two sets of undulations were less than +/- 6 cm RMS. The comparison improved (+/- 5 cm RMS) when GEOID94A undulations were adjusted by local gravity observations also acquired at the site. Our comparisons demonstrate that GEOID94A adequately models the long to intermediate wavelengths of the gravity field. We conclude that GEOID94A constitutes a reliable reference model for studies of Greenland's gravity field.

  5. Paleoceanography and Ice Sheet-Ocean Interactions on the Central West Greenland Margin, LGM through Deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, A. E.; Andrews, J. T.; Ó Cofaigh, C.; St-Onge, G.; Belt, S. T.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Dowdeswell, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hemipelagic sediments in several central West Greenland trough mouth fan cores are critical for testing whether an ice shelf covered Baffin Bay during the late LGM and H1 (core HU2008029-12PC) and to investigate the role of ocean warming in initiating and/or sustaining retreat of the Greenland Ice Sheet from the shelf edge (cores JR175-VC29 & -VC46). We use benthic and planktic foram assemblages, IP25 sea ice biomarker, ice-rafted detritus (IRD), lithofacies and quantitative mineralogy to reconstruct paleoceanographic conditions. HU2008029-12PC comprises bioturbated, thin turbidites and hemipelagic sediments with Greenlandic provenance from >19.2 to 16.7 cal ka BP. Abundance spikes of planktic forams provide the radiocarbon dates in this interval and coincide with abundance spikes of benthic foram species indicative of chilled Atlantic Water and episodic marine productivity. IRD and IP25 are rare in this interval. These characteristics are consistent with the ice margin at the shelf edge meeting a heavily sea-ice covered ocean with chilled Atlantic Water at depth, rather than an ice shelf-covered ocean. Initial deglaciation from the West Greenland margin began c. 16.7 ka BP, as recorded by a lithofacies shift from turbidites to bioturbated mud with dispersed IRD and continued presence of Atlantic Water benthic species. After 16.7 ka BP, IP25, large diatoms and benthic forams indicative of sea-ice edge productivity show warming conditions. By 15.2 ka BP Greenlandic IRD and meltwater species, Elphidium excavatum, reflect accelerated ice sheet ablation. By 14.4 ka BP a strong rise in IP25 content, introduction of key Atlantic Water species Cassidulina neoteretis, and IRD spikes rich in detrital carbonate with a northern Baffin Bay provenance provide evidence for increased advection of West Greenland Current, collapse of the LIS ice streams, and formation of an IRD belt along the W. Greenland margin during the Bølling-Allerod and early Holocene warm intervals.

  6. Impact of fine debris on ice melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Linighan, James; Cumming, Alex M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Losses from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) have increased sharply in recent years, due to accelerated glacier discharge and increased surface melting. In 2012, 99% of the Greenland ice sheet experienced melt, which was exceptional on centennial timescales, but is expected to occur frequently in the future, as climate warms. Ice albedo is a primary control on melt rates and remotely sensed data shows that the GrIS has darkened substantial in recent decades, due to both inorganic and biological material. This has been particularly marked in south- and central-west Greenland and can lead to the development of positive feedbacks. Consequently, it is important to understand the relationship between melt and surface albedo on the GrIS. Here we use a combination of satellite remote sensing and field data to assess the impact of fine debris on melt rates at Russell Glacier, central-west Greenland. Our field data demonstrate that areas with a greater percentage coverage of fine, largely inorganic debris experienced higher melt rates than in areas with a sparse coverage. However, the relationship between melt and debris cover was highly spatially variable. Furthermore, the debris cover evolved substantially over time and we saw marked changes over a period of a few days. Using ASTER imagery, we show that the spatial extent of debris has expanded markedly in this section of the GrIS during the last decade, which could substantially accelerate melting. However, the complex and variable relationship between debris cover and melt rates highlights the need for further research, in order to accurately forecast its impact on GrIS melt rates.

  7. Ocean forcing of Ice Sheet retreat in central west Greenland from LGM to the early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Anne E.; Andrews, John T.; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Onge, Guillaume St.; Sheldon, Christina; Belt, Simon T.; Cabedo-Sanz, Patricia; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    2017-08-01

    Three radiocarbon dated sediment cores from trough mouth fans on the central west Greenland continental slope were studied to determine the timing and processes of Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) retreat from the shelf edge during the last deglaciation and to test the role of ocean forcing (i.e. warm ocean water) thereon. Analyses of lithofacies, quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy, benthic foraminiferal assemblages, the sea-ice biomarker IP25, and δ18 O of the planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma sinistral from sediments in the interval from 17.5-10.8 cal ka BP provide consistent evidence for ocean and ice sheet interactions during central west Greenland (CWG) deglaciation. The Disko and Uummannaq ice streams both retreated from the shelf edge after the last glacial maximum (LGM) under the influence of subsurface, warm Atlantic Water. The warm subsurface water was limited to depths below the ice stream grounding lines during the LGM, when the GIS terminated as a floating ice shelf in a sea-ice covered Baffin Bay. The deeper Uummannaq ice stream retreated first (ca. 17.1 cal ka BP), while the shallower Disko ice stream retreated at ca. 16.2 cal ka BP. The grounding lines were protected from accelerating mass loss (calving) by a buttressing ice shelf and by landward shallowing bathymetry on the outer shelf. Calving retreat was delayed until ca. 15.3 cal ka BP in the Uummannaq Trough and until 15.1 cal ka BP in the Disko Trough, during another interval of ocean warming. Instabilities in the Laurentide, Innuitian and Greenland ice sheets with outlets draining into northern Baffin Bay periodically released cold, fresh water that enhanced sea ice formation and slowed GIS melt. During the Younger Dryas, the CWG records document strong cooling, lack of GIS meltwater, and an increase in iceberg rafted material from northern Baffin Bay. The ice sheet remained in the cross-shelf troughs until the early Holocene, when it retreated rapidly by calving and strong

  8. Reconstructing the late Holocene expansion of mountain ice caps in west-central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briner, J. P.; Schweinsberg, A.; Miller, G. H.; Bennike, O.; Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The retreat of glaciers is one of the most profound visual manifestations of global warming. Yet without the longer-term context of glacier history, the magnitude of retreat observed today is less meaningful. We are reconstructing the late Holocene history of mountain ice caps in west-central Greenland to determine: 1) the precedence of their current size, 2) the pattern of Neoglaciation across the northwestern North Atlantic, and 3) how their record of Neoglaciation compares with that of the adjacent Greenland Ice Sheet. Our chronology is built on radiocarbon ages from in situ surface moss emerging from receding ice cap margins. We assert that the moss died during ice cap expansion across tundra surfaces, and has since been entombed beneath non-erosive ice cap sectors that we strategically target. Although this project is in its beginning stages, two initial radiocarbon ages from in situ moss that recently were exposed in front of Lyngmarksbræen, a plateau ice cap on southern Disko island, are 3580-3700 and 3450-3570 cal yr BP. The moss became ice free sometime during the summer in which they were collected, and historical imagery shows the sites are tens of meters behind the ice margin in August 23, 2004. The radiocarbon ages indicate that Lyngmarksbræen has not been as small as it is today since ~3500 yr ago. Other age constraints on Neoglaciation from the Disko Bugt region are similar to the ages we obtained here: reworked marine fauna in Greenland Ice Sheet moraines indicate ice sheet growth at this time, and relative sea level records indicate that landscape submergence (due to ice sheet growth) initiated around this time. Furthermore, ice cap melt records demonstrate that ice caps in this sector of the Arctic are melting more today than they have in the past 4000 years. Additional ages from multiple ice cap margins on Disko island, the Nuussuaq peninsula and various locations in the Uummannaq region will be presented. This dataset of ice cap expansion in

  9. Rise in central west Greenland surface melt unprecedented over the last three centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusel, Luke; Das, Sarah; Osman, Matthew; Evans, Matthew; Smith, Ben; McConnell, Joe; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface melting has intensified and expanded over the last several decades and is now a leading component of ice sheet mass loss. Here, we constrain the multi-century temporal evolution of surface melt across central west Greenland by quantifying layers of refrozen melt within well-dated firn and ice cores collected in 2014 and 2015, as well as from a core collected in 2004. We find significant agreement among ice core, satellite, and regional climate model melt datasets over recent decades, confirming the fidelity of the ice core melt stratigraphy as a reliable record of past variability in the magnitude of surface melt. We also find a significant correlation between the melt records derived from our new 100-m GC-2015 core (2436 m.a.s.l.) and the older (2004) 150-m D5 core (2472 m.a.s.l.) located 50 km to the southeast. This agreement demonstrates the robustness of the ice core-derived melt histories and the potential for reconstructing regional melt evolution from a single site, despite local variability in melt percolation and refreeze processes. Our array of upper percolation zone cores reveals that although the overall frequency of melt at these sites has not increased, the intensification of melt over the last three decades is unprecedented within at least the last 365 years. Utilizing the regional climate model RACMO 2.3, we show that this melt intensification is a nonlinear response to warming summer air temperatures, thus underscoring the heightened sensitivity of this sector of Greenland to further climate warming. Finally, we examine spatial correlations between the ice core melt records and modeled melt fields across the ice sheet to assess the broader representation of each ice core record. This analysis reveals wide-ranging significant correlations, including to modeled meltwater runoff. As such, our ice core melt records may furthermore offer unique, observationally-constrained insights into past variability in ice sheet mass loss.

  10. Spacing and physical habitat selection patterns by peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    We examined nest-site spacing and selection of nesting cliffs by Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Our sample included 67 nesting cliffs that were occupied at least once between 1972 and 1999 and 38 cliffs with no known history of Peregrine Falcon occupancy. We measured 29 eyrie, cliff, and topographical features at each occupied nesting cliff and unused cliff in 1998a??1999 and used them to model the probability of peregrines occupying a cliff for a breeding attempt. Nearest-neighbor distance was significantly greater than both nearest-cliff distance and nearest-occupied distance (the distance between an occupied cliff and one occupied at least once, 1972a??1999). Thus, spacing among occupied cliffs was probably the most important factor limiting nesting-cliff availability, and, ultimately, peregrine nesting densities. Although some unused cliffs were unavailable in a given year because of peregrine spacing behavior, physical characteristics apparently made some cliffs unsuitable, regardless of availability. We confirmed the importance of several features common to descriptions of peregrine nesting habitat and found that peregrines occupied tall nesting cliffs with open views. They chose nesting cliffs with eyrie ledges that provided a moderate degree of overhang protection and that were inaccessible to ground predators. Overall, we concluded that certain features of a cliff were important in determining its suitability as a nest site, but within a given breeding season there also must be sufficient spacing between neighboring falcon pairs. Our habitat model and information on spacing requirements may be applicable to other areas of Greenland and the Arctic, and can be used to test the generalities about features of Peregrine Falcon nesting cliffs throughout the species' widespread distribution.

  11. Gyrfalcon feeding behavior during the nestling period in central west Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booms, Travis; Fuller, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    We studied gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) food delivery and feeding behavior during the nestling period in central West Greenland during the 2000 and 2001 field seasons. We used time-lapse video cameras installed at three nests to record 2677.25 hours of nestling video. Ptarmigan delivered to nests were usually plucked prior to delivery and included the breast and superior thoracic vertebrae. Arctic hare leverets were rarely plucked and often delivered in parts. The most commonly delivered leveret part was the hind legs attached to the lower back. Passerines were rarely plucked and usually delivered whole. After feeding the young, adults removed 20.9% of prey items from the nest, which included items both with and without obvious muscle still attached. Prey delivery rates were similar among nests and increased as nestlings aged. Prey delivery frequency peaked in the morning and evening, with a distinct lull in the late evening and early morning hours. Male and female adults delivered a similar number of prey, though males typically delivered smaller prey than females. Gyrfalcons cached and re-delivered at least 9.1% of all items delivered, and one item was cached and retrieved three times.

  12. Paleoecology and paleoclimatology of a late holocene peat deposit from Braendevinsskaer, Central West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Bennike, O. )

    1992-08-01

    The macroscopical plant and animal remains of a nearshore peat deposit in West Greenland are described and documented. The assemblages contain a mixture of limnic, terrestrial, and marine plants and animals. These are divided into four local macrofossil assemblage zones, of which zone 3, ca. A.D. 950 to ca. A.D. 1760, represents a wet phase which is correlated in part with the Little Ice Age.

  13. Seismic architecture and evolution of the Disko Bay trough-mouth fan, central West Greenland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julia C.; Knutz, Paul C.; Nielsen, Tove; Kuijpers, Antoon

    2016-09-01

    The present study is the first to document the large-scale glacigenic evolution of a West Greenland trough-mouth fan (TMF) system, i.e. the Disko Bay TMF, from onset of shelf-based glaciation to present. We have constrained the paleo-ice sheet configuration in the Disko Bay region and determine the controlling factors of ice-stream development using 2D- and 3D-seismic reflection data, seabed bathymetry and stratigraphic information from two exploration wells. This has revealed three stages of the Disko Bay TMF development. The early stage, probably of Pliocene-early Pleistocene age, marks the onset of a central depocentre located below the modern mid-shelf and constructed by sediment progradation delivered through at least two erosive pathways related to fast-flowing, grounded ice. At that time, ice-stream routing in the Disko Bay shelf region was strongly controlled by the pre-glacial topography and structural boundaries associated with fracture zones and deep-seated faults. During the middle evolutionary stage, the focus of deposition shifted from the mid-shelf to two elongate areas fringing the outer margin. The marginal depocentres were not only related to glacial processes but also alongslope deposition by contour currents, which may have developed as a consequence of basin subsidence surrounding the Davis Strait High and the Kangerluk Structure. The late stage of TMF development, presumably representing the late Pleistocene to Holocene, is characterized by the marginal depocentres becoming less significant and sediment aggradation occurring over wide parts of the mid-outer shelf, while features of subglacial erosion are generally absent. In contrast to the inferred fast-flowing ice streams of the early-middle evolutionary stages, this points to the existence of a rather thin and "lightly" grounded ice sheet, i.e. at the threshold of floatation. The "lightly" grounded ice sheet scenario, applying to the late Pleistocene interval of the Disko Bay TMF, was

  14. 3D-seismic observations of Late Pleistocene glacial dynamics on the central West Greenland margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julia; Knutz, Paul; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.

    2016-04-01

    suggesting the transition between grounded ice and a glacimarine setting. The back-stepping scarps are suggestive of slide scars that were created as a result of mass movement induced by instabilities along the NW slope. The buried section contains morphologies indicating an asymmetric feature with a steeper side facing south. It comprises a thickness of c. 100 m and a length of c. 28 km. The detailed surface observations and seismic geometries suggest that the northern area represents a relict grounding-zone wedge (GZW). The wedge is covered by stratified deposits suggesting that it was at least occasionally submarine after its formation and may have served as pinning-point for floating ice shelves during periods of the Late TMF Stage. Important implications of the study are the intermittent development of floating ice shelves during the course of the Late Stage of TMF development and the presence of shelf-edge terminating grounded Late Weichselian ice outside of the troughs. Hofmann, J.C., Knutz, P.C., Nielsen, T., Kuijpers, A., submitted. Seismic architecture and evolution of the Disko Bay trough-mouth fan, central West Greenland margin. Quaternary Science Reviews.

  15. Spatio-temporal Variability in the Glacier-Ocean Boundary in Central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catania, G. A.; Fried, M.; Bartholomaus, T.; Peters, D.; Felikson, D.; Carroll, D.; Sutherland, D.; Stearns, L. A.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Outlet glacier termini represent the boundary between ice and ocean systems. As such, spatio-termporal differences in terminus shape and position may be indicative of how the ice and ocean systems interact. We examine over 40 years of remote-sensing imagery collected by multiple satellites to characterize the termini of 15 outlet glaciers in Central Western Greenland with unprecedented detail. Our record consists of an average of ~300 terminus observations per glacier; during the last 5 years, we average ~20 observations per year. We find that many glaciers in this region initiated retreat around 1998, coincident with retreat further south at Jakobshavn Isbræ, although the rate and duration of retreat varies from glacier-to-glacier. We explore variations in retreat rate and extent by examining individual fjord geometries, namely changes in fjord width and depth from available ship-based sounding observations. We also explore variations in retreat rate by examining spatial variations in surface melt-induced terminus ablation using a buoyant plume model coupled with field observations. Finally, we identify glaciers in the region that did not undergo significant retreat and examine the balance of forces that may be responsible for their stability.

  16. 10Be dating reveals early-middle Holocene age of the Drygalski Moraines in central West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronauer, Sandra L.; Briner, Jason P.; Kelley, Samuel E.; Zimmerman, Susan R. H.; Morlighem, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    We reconstruct the history of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin on the Nuussuaq Peninsula in central West Greenland through the Holocene using lake sediment analysis and cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating of the prominent Drygalski Moraines. Erratics perched on bedrock outboard of the Drygalski Moraines constrain local deglaciation to ∼9.9 ± 0.6 ka (n = 2). Three Drygalski Moraine crests yield mean 10Be ages of 8.6 ± 0.4 ka (n = 2), 8.5 ± 0.2 ka (n = 3), and 7.6 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) from outer to inner. Perched erratics between the inner two moraines average 7.8 ± 0.1 ka (n = 2) and are consistent with the moraine ages. Sediments from a proglacial lake with a catchment area extending an estimated 2 km beneath (inland of) the present ice sheet terminus constrain an ice sheet minimum extent from 5.4 ka to 0.6 ka. The moraine chronology paired with the lake sediment stratigraphy reveals that the ice margin likely remained within ∼2 km of its present position from ∼9.9 to 5.4 ka. This unexpected early Holocene stability, preceded by rapid ice retreat and followed by minimum ice extent between ∼5.4 and 0.6 ka, contrasts with many records of early Holocene warmth and the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation maximum. We suggest ice margin stability may instead be tied to adjacent ocean temperatures, which reached an optimum in the middle Holocene.

  17. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central west Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.; Fuller, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat.

  18. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on distribution, occupancy patterns, and productivity of breeding peregrine falcons in central West Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wightman, C.S.; Fuller, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    We used occupancy and productivity data collected at 67 cliffs used for nesting from 1972 to 1999 to assess patterns of distribution and nest-site selection in an increasing population of Peregrine Falcons (Falco peregrinus) in central West Greenland. Peregrine Falcons breeding at traditionally occupied cliffs used for nesting had significantly lower variation in productivity and thus these cliffs were better quality sites. This indicates that Peregrine Falcons occupied cliffs according to a pattern of despotic distribution. Falcons breeding at cliffs that were consistently occupied during the breeding season had higher average productivity and lower variation in productivity than falcons at inconsistently occupied cliffs, and thus consistent occupancy also was indicative of cliff quality. Features of high quality habitat included tall cliffs, greater change in elevation from the lowest point within 3 km of the cliff to the cliff top (elevation gain), and protection from weather on the eyrie ledge. Spacing of suitable and occupied cliffs also was an important feature, and the best cliffs generally were more isolated. Increased spacing was likely a mechanism for reducing intraspecific competition. Our results suggest that Peregrine Falcons use a resource defense strategy to compete for better quality habitats and may use spacing and physical features of a nest site to identify good quality breeding habitat. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  19. Ice stream retreat following the LGM and onset of the west Greenland current in Uummannaq Trough, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Christina; Jennings, Anne; Andrews, John T.; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Hogan, Kelly; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Seidenkrantz, Marit-Solveig

    2016-09-01

    The deglacial history and oceanography of Uummannaq Trough, central West Greenland continental shelf, was investigated using foraminiferal, sedimentological, and bathymetric records together with a radiocarbon chronology, providing a timeline for the retreat of glacial ice after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). To map ice stream retreat, data were collected from cores from the outer (JR175-VC45 and JR175-VC43) and inner (JR175-VC42) Uummannaq Trough. A large ice stream, fed by confluent glaciers draining the interior of the Greenland Ice Sheet, extended across the outer shelf during the LGM and was in retreat by 15.0 cal kyr BP. Foraminiferal data indicate that the 'warm' West Greenland Current (WGC) was established prior to 14.0 cal kyr BP, which is the hitherto earliest record of Atlantic Water found on the West Greenland shelf. For each of the cores, foraminifera indicate that ice sheet retreat was followed quickly by incursion of the WGC, suggesting that the warm water may have enhanced ice retreat. Prior to the Younger Dryas cold event, the radiocarbon chronology indicates that the ice sheet retreated to the mid-shelf, where it subsequently stabilised and formed a large grounding-zone wedge (GZW). After the Younger Dryas, around 11.5 cal kyr BP, the ice retreated rapidly from the GZW and into the fjords.

  20. The multifaceted West Greenland passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Sonja; Damm, Volkmar; Block, Martin; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Heyde, Ingo; Nelson, Catherine; Kouwe, Wim

    2013-04-01

    The Baffin Bay located between Greenland and Canada, is the northward extension of the Labrador Sea. The Davis Strait High separates these two marine basins. The evolution of these basins is closely linked, and is as well affiliated to the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. The opening history started in the Cretaceous with the formation of several terrestrial rift basins with a block-faulted, metamorphic Precambrian basement. The further opening of the Baffin Bay coincides with the volcanic activity (60.9-52.5 Ma) along the West Greenland margin (Storey et al., 1998). The subsequent seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay is linked to the Labrador Sea by the Ungava Fault Zone (UFZ), which is the most prominent transform fault in this region. Two main problems are still unsolved: 1) There are clear indications for normal seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay like the seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) on the Canadian side (Skaarup et al., 2006) and on the Greenland side based on our data. On the other hand, associated magnetic spreading anomalies are not yet discovered in the Baffin Bay or are not formed. These findings may either point to slow or ultraslow spreading or underlying strongly extended continental crust and/or serpentinised mantle. 2) The Greenlandic margin is much wider than the Canadian. In addition, a breakup unconformity can only be traced on the Greenland side and is not reported for the Canadian side. Which process causes this asymmetric margin and differences in shelf width? Is it a result of asymmetric spreading or connected to volcanic activity during breakup processes? In summer 2008, a marine geoscientific expedition (MSM09/03) was conducted with the research vessel "Maria S. Merian" in the Davis Strait and southern Baffin Bay. Approximately 1800 km of multichannel reflection seismic data were acquired. To supplement the database, a subsequent marine geoscientific expedition ARK-XXV/3 with RV POLARSTERN in summer 2010 was conducted. In our

  1. Buoyant Currents West and East of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Y.; Bacon, S.; Nurser, G.; Coward, A.

    2014-12-01

    Low salinity buoyant polar waters exit the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic, affecting deep convection in the Nordic and Labrador Seas with potential impacts on the meridional overturning circulation. The pathways of the polar water in Davis Strait, Fram Strait and then to the south are well documented by observations and model simulations. In contrast, measurements upstream of Fram Strait are too sparse to allow us to explain what causes the outflows to exit either west or east of Greenland or to attribute the variability in the Arctic outflows to atmospheric or oceanic mechanisms. Two high-resolution global ocean general circulation models (OGCM), NEMO-ORCA025, of ~12 km resolution, and NEMO-ORCA12, of ~4 km resolution, have been used to examine the dynamics and seasonal variability of the outflow west and east of Greenland. Montgomery potential analysis is used to investigate the dynamics of the currents in the area. The model results suggest wind as a driving mechanism for the seasonal variability of the ocean circulation in the area.

  2. Crustal Structure in Central-Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, A.; Thybo, H.

    2013-12-01

    We present the seismic structure in the interior of Greenland based on the first measurements by the seismic refraction/wide angle reflection method. Previous seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coast of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up and may not be representative of the interior of the island. Acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated by the presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The EW-trending profile extends 310 km inland from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near Scoresby Sund across the centre of the ice cap. The planned extension of the profile by use of OBSs and air gun shooting in Scoresbysund Fjord to the east coast of Greenland was unfortunately cancelled, because navigation was prevented by ice drift. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 100 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Two-dimensional velocity model based on forward ray tracing and tomography modelling shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part to 40 km in the eastern part of the profile. Earlier studies show that crustal thickness further decreases eastward to ca. 30 km below the fjord system, but details of the changes are unknown. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may indicate past collision tectonics or may be related or to the passage of the Iceland mantle plume. The origin of the pronounced circum-Atlantic mountain ranges in Norway and eastern Greenland, which have

  3. West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Lydie, N; Robinson, N J

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews scientific and other literature during the 1990s that links migration and mobility with the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS. The focus is on key population groups linked to the spread of HIV and STDs in West and Central Africa: migrant laborers, truck drivers, itinerant traders, commercial sex workers (CSWs), and refugees. Countries with high emigration and immigration tend to have high levels of HIV infection, with the exception of Senegal. The main destination of immigrants are Senegal, Nigeria, and Cote d'Ivoire in West Africa and Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Congo in Central Africa. The risk of infection and the spread of HIV is variable among migrants. There is little in the literature that substantiates hypotheses about the strong association between migration and HIV-positive status. Information is needed on the duration, frequency of return visits, living conditions, sexual activities with multiple partners, and information before departure, along the routes, at final destination, and at the time of returns. Action-based research in five West African countries (Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, and Senegal) should produce results in late 1998. Comparable studies in Central Africa are unknown. Regional studies should be complemented by local studies. Prevention would benefit from studies on the relative size of these five population groups by geographic location.

  4. Central Greenland Holocene Deuterium Excess Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Jouzel, J.; Falourd, S.; Cattani, O.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Johnsen, S.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A. E.; White, J. W. C.

    Water stable isotopes (oxygen 18 and deuterium) have been measured along the Holocene part of two deep ice cores from central Greenland, GRIP and North GRIP. Theoretical studies have shown that the second-order isotopic parameter, the deu- terium excess (d=dD-8d18O), is an indicator of climatic changes at the oceanic mois- ture source reflecting at least partly changes in sea-surface-temperature. The two deu- terium excess records from GRIP and North GRIP show a long term increasing trend already observed in Antarctic deep ice cores and related to changes in the Earth's obliquity during the Holocene : an decreased obliquity is associated with a larger low to high latitude annual mean insolation gradient, warmer tropics, colder poles, and a more intense atmospheric transport from the tropics to the poles, resulting in a higher moisture source temperature and higher deuterium excess values. Superimposed onto this long term trend, central Greenland deuterium excess records also exhibit small abrupt events (8.2 ka BP and 4.5 ka BP) and a high frequency variability.

  5. Force balance along Isunnguata Sermia, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, Toby; Harper, Joel; Johnson, Jesse

    2016-09-01

    Ice flows when gravity acts on gradients in surface elevation, producing driving stresses. In the Isunnguata Sermia and Russel Glacier catchments of western Greenland, a 50% decline in driving stress along a flow line is juxtaposed with increasing surface flow speed. Here, these circumstances are investigated using modern observational data sources and an analysis of the balance of forces. Stress gradients in the ice mass and basal drag which resist the local driving stress are computed in order to investigate the underlying processes influencing the velocity and stress regimes. Our results show that the largest resistive stress gradients along the flowline result from increasing surface velocity. However, the longitudinal coupling stresses fail to exceed 15 kPa, or 20% of the local driving stress. Consequently, computed basal drag declines in proportion to the driving stress. In the absence of significant resistive stress gradients, other mechanisms are therefore necessary to explain the observed velocity increase despite declining driving stress. In the study area, the observed velocity - driving stress feature occurs at the long-term mean position of the equilibrium line of surface mass balance. We hypothesize that this position approximates the inland limit where surface meltwater penetrates the bed, and that the increased surface velocity reflects enhanced basal motion associated with seasonal meltwater perturbations.

  6. Crustal structure of the West Greenland margin in North Baffin Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, V.; Block, M.; Berglar, K.; Ehrhardt, A.; Heyde, I.; Schnabel, M.; Schreckenberger, B.; Altenbernd, T.; Suckro, S.

    2012-04-01

    The tectonic and geodynamic evolution of the Baffin Bay is interpreted to be closely associated with mantle dynamics and plume activity. The initial opening of the Baffin Bay coincides with the volcanic activity along the West Greenland margin between 60.7 and 59.4 Ma (Storey at al., 1998), attributed to the arrival of the Iceland plume beneath Greenland (Lawver and Müller, 1994, Larsen and Saunders, 1998). Rifting in the Baffin Bay is linked to oceanic spreading in the Labrador Sea, but there is no consensus about the nature of the underlying crust in central Baffin Bay. The geodynamic evolution of the Baffin Bay and plate tectonic reconstructions for Greenland relative to North America are still a matter of debate though they are of special importance in the circum-Arctic geodynamic framework. Due to lack of data the plate boundary between the North American plate and the Greenland plate is not well defined and the nature of the continent-ocean transition zone is widely unknown. Evidence indicating that the deep sea area of the Baffin Bay crust is oceanic has been provided by Keen and Barrett (1972) based on seismic refraction data. However, Reid and Jackson (1997) did not find evidence for layered oceanic crust and interpreted the deep part of Baffin Bay as serpentinized mantle material. They suggest that rifting was amagmatic and separation of passive continental margins was comparable to ultra-slow spreading ridges. Linear magnetic anomaly patterns in this region were not clearly identified. The position of the extinct spreading axis was defined by a northwest-trending linear gravity anomaly of central Baffin Bay (Chalmers and Pulvertaft, 2001). Spreading in the Baffin Bay took obviously place in Paleocene and Eocene times in two phases which may be distinguished by a reorientation of the directions of plate motion for Greenland starting about 55 Ma ago (Chalmers and Pulvertaft, 2001). It is not fully explained how a postulated major transform fault

  7. The diel cycle of water vapor in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2014-08-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of small-scale (~100 km) atmospheric circulation in west Greenland which is dominated by interactions of marine and continental air masses. Water vapor concentration and isotopic ratios measured continuously over a 25 day period in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland were used to monitor the convergence of easterly katabatic winds and westerly sea breezes that form a front between the dry, isotopically depleted, glacial air mass and the moist, isotopically enriched, marine air mass. During the latter 16 days of the measurement period, an interval with no large-scale synoptic interference, the inland penetration of the sea breeze controlled the largest day-to-day humidity and vapor isotopic variations. Kangerlussuaq experienced sea breezes in the afternoon on 9 days, consistent with the long-term average of such occurrences on 56% of days in July and August. The inland position of the sea breeze front is controlled by the katabatic wind strength, which is stronger during times of reduced cloud coverage and/or higher-pressure gradient between the coast and the Greenland ice sheet. The position and movement of the front will likely respond to changes in the general atmospheric circulation and regional radiation balance resulting from global warming, which will, in turn, impact the local hydrological cycle and ecosystem processes.

  8. Seafloor geomorphology and glacimarine sedimentation associated with fast-flowing ice sheet outlet glaciers in Disko Bay, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streuff, Katharina; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Hogan, Kelly; Jennings, Anne; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Noormets, Riko; Nielsen, Tove; Kuijpers, Antoon; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm

    2017-08-01

    Fast-flowing outlet glaciers currently drain the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), delivering ice, meltwater and debris to the fjords around Greenland. Although such glaciers strongly affect the ice sheet's mass balance, their glacimarine processes and associated products are still poorly understood. This study provides a detailed analysis of lithological and geophysical data from Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait in central West Greenland. Disko Bay is strongly influenced by Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland's fastest-flowing glacier, which currently drains ∼7% of the ice sheet. Streamlined glacial landforms record the former flow of an expanded Jakobshavn Isbræ and adjacent GIS outlets through Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait towards the continental shelf. Thirteen vibrocores contain a complex set of lithofacies including diamict, stratified mud, interbedded mud and sand, and bioturbated mud deposited by (1) suspension settling from meltwater plumes and the water column, (2) sediment gravity flows, and (3) iceberg rafting and ploughing. The importance of meltwater-related processes to glacimarine sedimentation in West Greenland fjords and bays is emphasised by the abundance of mud preserved in the cores. Radiocarbon dates constrain the position of the ice margin during deglaciation, and suggest that Jakobshavn Isbræ had retreated into central Disko Bay before 10.6 cal ka BP and to beyond Isfjeldsbanken by 7.6-7.1 cal ka BP. Sediment accumulation rates were up to 1.7 cm a-1 for ice-proximal glacimarine mud, and ∼0.007-0.05 cm a-1 for overlying distal sediments. In addition to elucidating the deglacial retreat history of Jakobshavn Isbræ, our findings show that the glacimarine sedimentary processes in West Greenland are similar to those in East Greenland, and that variability in such processes is more a function of time and glacier proximity than of geographic location and associated climatic regime.

  9. Paleomagnetism and multi-model stereo photogrammetry of the West Greenland flood volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, J.; Riisager, P.; Pedersen, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model photogrammetry data from the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). During fieldwork the paleomagnetic sampling sites were photographed from helicopter with stereoscopic overlap and in colour. The photographs have been set up for multi-model photogrammetry allowing three-dimensional lithological mapping, giving us important information for interpreting the paleomagnetic data in their stratigraphic context. Another advantage of the multi-model photogrammetry coverage is that individual lavas can be traced in three-dimensional space allowing very precise measurements of the attitude of strata (+/-0.5°) to be made for tectonic correction of the paleomagnetic data. The paleomagnetic study is based on a large collection of 586 oriented paleomagnetic drill cores collected from 81 lava flows. All sampled flows carry stable thermoremanent magnetization of reversed polarity. The earliest part of the volcanic sequence (i.e. Vaigat Fm.) is characterized by several consecutive flows recording statistically indistinguishable paleomagnetic field directions. The thickest Vaigat Fm. directional group consists of 37 lava flows (combined thickness 104 meter), which based on photogrammetry and XRF observations we interpret to represent a single flow field (i.e. one eruption consisting of several lavas erupted in a short period of time). If Paleocene paleosecular variation was similar to Holocene variations, the thick directional groups would form within 100 years implying an extreme volcanic activity at the onset of NAIP volcanism on West Greenland. Based on directional groups we obtain a new well-defined paleomagnetic pole for Greenland, which is statistically similar to a recently published NAIP pole from Faroe Islands (Riisager et al., 2002) rotated to Greenland. The corresponding paleolatitude of the central NAIP in Paleocene is ~20° south of the present latitude of the Iceland hotspot, indicating that the

  10. Vegetation phenology gradients along the west and east coasts of Greenland from 2001 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Karami, Mojtaba; Hansen, Birger Ulf; Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Abermann, Jakob; Lund, Magnus; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Elberling, Bo

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize the spatiotemporal variations of vegetation phenology along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Greenland, and to examine local and regional climatic drivers. Time-series from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed to obtain various phenological metrics for the period 2001-2015. MODIS-derived land surface temperatures were corrected for the sampling biases caused by cloud cover. Results indicate significant differences between West and East Greenland, in terms of both observed phenology during the study period, as well as the climatic response. The date of the start of season (SOS) was significantly earlier (24 days), length of season longer (25 days), and time-integrated NDVI higher in West Greenland. The sea ice concentration during May was found to have a significant effect on the date of the SOS only in West Greenland, with the strongest linkage detected in mid-western parts of Greenland.

  11. Levels and temporal trends of HCH isomers in ringed seals from West and East Greenland.

    PubMed

    Rigét, Frank; Vorkamp, Katrin; Dietz, Rune; Muir, Derek C G

    2008-08-01

    Levels and temporal trends of the hexachlorocyclohexane isomers alpha-, beta- and gamma-HCH were analysed in blubber of juvenile ringed seals from West Greenland (1994 to 2006) and juvenile and adult ringed seals from East Greenland (1986 to 2006). No significant differences in the concentration levels in the juvenile seals were found between East and West Greenland for any of the three isomers. alpha-HCH concentrations were not significantly different between juvenile and adult ringed seals from East Greenland, whereas beta- and gamma-HCH concentrations were significantly higher in adult ringed seals. alpha- and beta-HCH in Greenland ringed seals were approximately a factor two lower than in the Canadian Arctic, and alpha-HCH was a factor 2-3 higher than in ringed seals from an area east of Svalbard, Norway. Annual decreases in ringed seals from Greenland during the study periods were detected to be 9.1-11.7%, 1.4-3.9% and 6.0-6.4% for alpha-, beta- and gamma-HCH, respectively, being quite similar in both East and West Greenland. Similar levels and trends in East and West Greenland support the general understanding of the pathways of HCH isomers to and in the Arctic.

  12. Divergent parasite faunas in adjacent populations of West Greenland caribou: suggested natural and anthropogenic influences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal parasite diversity was characterized for two adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) through examinations of abomasa and small intestines of adult and subadult females collected during late winter. Three trichostrongyline (Trichostrongylina: ...

  13. Soil Response to Aeolian Disturbance in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Culler, L. E.; Chipman, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic soils are a critical ecological resource, yet are increasingly vulnerable to global change. In the Kangerlussuaq region of West Greenland, aeolian disturbance is the greatest threat to soil stability, with strong katabatic winds eroding vegetation and soil down to the underlying glacial till or bedrock. Little is known about what controls the distribution and rate of the aeolian erosion, which initially results in a state change from tundra to a deflated and nearly unvegetated ground. It is unclear if vegetation can eventually reestablish after erosion occurs, potentially aided by the biological soil crust (BSC) that develops within the eroded areas, or if this soil loss is an irreversible change in vegetation and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Our analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that across the entire study region, deflated ground covers 22% of the terrestrial landscape. Aeolian erosion occurs more frequently closer to the Greenland Ice Sheet and on S-facing slopes. Using lichenometry, we estimate that erosional fronts move across the landscape at rates of 2.5 cm yr-1, leaving unproductive ground in their wake. The onset of widespread aeolian erosion occurred roughly 700-1000 years ago, pointing toward regional cooling and aridity as the drivers behind erosion. Finally, we consider whether the BSCs can improve soil quality enough to allow for full vegetation regrowth. Preliminary results show that while the BSCs fix atmospheric N and increase C storage, the rate of soil quality recovery is extremely slow. Understanding the thresholds between vegetated tundra and eroded ground is critical for predicting how the Kangerlussuaq landscape will respond to anticipated changes in climate and ice sheet dynamics.

  14. Anomalous subglacial heat flow in central Greenland induced by the Iceland plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey G.; Rogozhina, Irina; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse; Koulakov, Ivan; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    3000 m of ice sheet thickness has ensured that central Greenland has kept it geothermal heat flow (GHF) distribution enigmatic. Some few direct ice temperature measurements from deep ice cores reveal a GHF of 50 to 60 mW/m² in the Summit region and this is noticeably above what would be expected for the underlying Early Proterozoic lithosphere. In addition, indirect estimates from zones of rapid basal melting suggest extreme anomalies 15 to 30 times continental background. Subglacial topography indicates caldera like topographic features in the zones hinting at possible volcanic activity in the past [1], and all of these observations combined hint at an anomalous lithospheric structure. Further supporting this comes from new high-resolution P-wave tomography, which shows a strong thermal anomaly in the lithosphere crossing Greenland from east to west [2]. Rock outcrops at the eastern and western end of this zone indicate significant former magmatic activity, older in the east and younger in the west. Additionally, plate modelling studies suggest that the Greenland plate passed over the mantle plume that is currently under Iceland from late Cretaceous to Neogene times, consistent with the evidence from age of magmatism. Evidence of rapid basal melt revealed by ice penetrating radar along the hypocentre of the putative plume track indicates that it continues to affect the Greenland continental geotherm today. We analyse plume-induced thermal disturbance of the present-day lithosphere and their effects on the central Greenland ice sheet by using a novel evolutionary model of the climate-ice-lithosphere-upper mantle system. Our results indicate that mantle plume-induced erosion of the lithosphere has occurred, explaining caldera-type volcanic structures, the GHF anomaly, and requiring dyke intrusion into the crust during the early Cenozoic. The residual thermo-mechanical effect of the mantle plume has raised deep-sourced heat flow by over 25 mW/m² since 60 Ma and

  15. Mantle wedge involvement in the petrogenesis of Archaean grey gneisses in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenfelt, Agnete; Garde, Adam A.; Moyen, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    The Archaean crust in West Greenland is dominated by grey orthogneiss complexes formed in periods of crustal accretion at around 3.8, 3.6, 3.2, 3.0-2.9 and 2.8-2.7 Ga. The majority of the gneisses have tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) compositions, while subordinate quartz-dioritic and dioritic gneisses have calc-alkaline compositions. The major and trace element chemistry of gneiss samples has been compiled from three large regions representing different terranes and ages in southern and central West Greenland, the Godthåbsfjord, Fiskefjord and Disko Bugt regions. The TTG gneisses are typical for their kind and show little variation, except marked Sr enrichment in the Fiskefjord area and slight Cr enrichment in a unit within the Disko Bugt region. Thus, while most of the crust has probably formed from magmas derived by slab melting, local involvement of mantle-derived components is suggested. Most of the diorites have geochemical signatures compatible with mantle-derived parental magmas, i.e., elevated Mg, Cr and flat chondrite-normalised REE patterns. A group of quartz-diorite and diorite samples from the Fiskefjord region exhibits marked enrichment in Sr, Ba, P, K and REE, combined with steep REE patterns. A similar but much more pronounced enrichment in the same elements characterises Palaeoproterozoic subduction-related monzodiorites within the Nagssugtoqidian orogen, as well as carbonatites and carbonatitic lamprophyres within the same part of West Greenland. We argue that the parental magmas of the enriched diorites are derived by partial melting from regions within the mantle that have been metasomatised by carbonatite-related material, e.g., in the form of carbonate-apatite-phlogopite veins. Alternatively, ascending slab melts may have reacted with carbonatite-metasomatised mantle. Carbonatitic carbonates have high Sr and Ba, and carbonatitic apatite has high P 2O 5 and very steep REE spectra. Adding such a component to a peridotite-derived magma

  16. Measurement campaign for wind power potential in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønnow Jakobsen, Kasper

    2013-04-01

    Experiences and results from a wind resource exploring campaign 2003- in west Greenland. Like many other countries, Greenland is trying to reduce its dependency of fossil fuel by implementing renewable energy. The main challenge is that the people live on the coast in scattered settlements, without power infrastructure. Based on this a wind power potential project was established in 2002, funded by the Greenlandic government and the Technical University of Denmark. We present results and experiences of the campaign. 1 Field campaign There were only a few climate stations in or close to settlements and due to their positioning and instrumentation, they were not usable for wind resource estimation. To establish met stations in Arctic areas with complex topography, there are some challenges to face; mast positioning in complex terrain, severe weather conditions, instrumentation, data handling, installation and maintenance budget. The terrain in the ice free and populated part, mainly consists of mountains of different heights and shapes, separated by deep fjords going from the ice cap to the sea. With a generally low wind resource the focus was on the most exposed positions close to the settlements. Data from the nearest existing climate stations was studied for background estimations of predominant wind directions and extreme wind speeds, and based on that the first 10m masts were erected in 2003. 2 Instruments The first installations used standard NRG systems with low cost NRG instruments. For most of the sites this low cost setup did a good job, but there were some problems with the first design, including instrument and boom strains. In subsequent years, the systems were updated several times to be able to operate in the extreme conditions. Different types of instruments, data logger and boom systems were tested to get better data quality and reliability. Today 11 stations with heights ranging from 10-50m are installed and equipped according to the IEC standard

  17. Recent trends in the west Greenland salmon fishery, and implications for Thick-billed Murres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatt, John F.; Reddin, David G.

    1982-01-01

    In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a high net-mortality of seabirds, particularly Thick-billed Murres (Uria lomvia), was associated with the west Greenland salmon fishery. Since 1972, the domestic fishery has been controlled by quotas and fishery opening dates and non-Greenlandic offshore drift-net fishery was phased out in 1975. These restrictions probably resulted in a substantial decrease in murre net-mortality. However, the Greenlandic fishery has changed considerably since 1972 when seabird bycatch was last examined in detail. Fishing vessels now use monofilament nylon nets almost exclusively; fishing effort has redistributed closer to murre breeding colonies and intensive drift-netting occurs offshore on the continental shelf. These factors, combined with a change in 1981 to a later fishing season have probably resulted in a renewal of significant murre net-morality at west Greenland.

  18. Temporal trends of mercury in marine biota of west and northwest Greenland.

    PubMed

    Rigét, Frank; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W; Sonne, Christian; Hobson, Keith A

    2007-01-01

    Temporal trends in mercury concentrations ([Hg]) during the last two to three decades were determined in liver of shorthorn sculpin, ringed seal and Atlantic walrus from northwest Greenland (NWG, 77 degrees N) and in liver of shorthorn sculpin and ringed seal from central west Greenland (CWG, 69 degrees N) during the last decade. Stable-nitrogen (delta(15)N) and carbon (delta(13)C) isotope values were determined in muscle of ringed seals to provide insight into potential trophic level changes through time. Log-linear regressions on annual median [Hg] did not reveal any temporal trend in shorthorn sculpin from CWG and NWG and walrus from NWG. In ringed seals from NWG, an increase in [Hg] of 7.8% per year was observed. When based on delta(15)N-adjusted [Hg] this rate increased to 8.5% but was still non-significant. In ringed seal from CWG no trend was found in [Hg] during the period 1994-2004. However, during the last part of the period (1999-2004) the [Hg] increased significantly. Including tissue delta(15)N values as a covariate had a marked effect on these results. The annual changes in delta(15)N-adjusted [Hg] was estimated to -5.0% for the whole period and 2.2% during the last 5 years compared to -1.3% and 12.4%, respectively, for the non-adjusted [Hg].

  19. Seismic stratigraphic architecture of the Disko Bay trough-mouth fan system, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julia C.; Knutz, Paul C.

    2015-04-01

    Spatial and temporal changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the continental shelf bordering Baffin Bay remain poorly constrained. Then as now, fast-flowing ice streams and outlet glaciers have played a key role for the mass balance and stability of polar ice sheets. Despite their significance for Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics and evolution, our understanding of their long-term behaviour is limited. The central West Greenland margin is characterized by a broad continental shelf where a series of troughs extend from fjords to the shelf margin, acting as focal points for trough-mouth fan (TMF) accummulations. The sea-ward bulging morphology and abrupt shelf-break of these major depositional systems is generated by prograding depocentres that formed during glacial maxima when ice streams reached the shelf edge, delivering large amounts of subglacial sediment onto the continental slope (Ó Cofaigh et al., 2013). The aim of this study is to unravel the seismic stratigraphic architecture and depositional processes of the Disko Bay TMF, aerially the largest single sedimentary system in West Greenland, using 2D and 3D seismic reflection data, seabed bathymetry and stratigraphic information from exploration well Hellefisk-1. The south-west Disko Bay is intersected by a deep, narrow trough, Egedesminde Dyb, which extends towards the southwest and links to the shallower and broader cross-shelf Disko Trough (maximum water depths of > 1000 m and a trough length of c. 370 km). Another trough-like depression (trough length of c. 120 km) in the northern part of the TMF, indicating a previous position of the ice stream, can be distinguished on the seabed topographic map and the seismic images. The Disko Bay TMF itself extends from the shelf edge down to the abyssal plain (abyssal floor depths of 2000 m) of the southern Baffin Bay. Based on seismic stratigraphic configurations relating to reflection terminations, erosive patterns and seismic facies (Mitchum et al., 1977), the TMF

  20. Surface and sub-surface multi-proxy reconstruction of middle to late Holocene palaeoceanographic changes in Disko Bugt, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Matthias; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Perner, Kerstin; Krawczyk, Diana; Blanz, Thomas; de Vernal, Anne; Ouellet-Bernier, Marie-Michele; Kuijpers, Antoon; Jennings, Anne E.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Schneider, Ralph; Jansen, Eystein

    2016-01-01

    We present new surface water proxy records of meltwater production (alkenone derived), relative sea surface temperature (diatom, alkenones) and sea ice (diatoms) changes from the Disko Bugt area off central West Greenland. We combine these new surface water reconstructions with published proxy records (benthic foraminifera - bottom water proxy; dinocyst assemblages - surface water proxy), along with atmospheric temperature from Greenland ice core and Greenland lake records. This multi-proxy approach allows us to reconstruct centennial scale middle to late Holocene palaeoenvironmental evolution of Disko Bugt and the Western Greenland coastal region with more detail than previously available. Combining surface and bottom water proxies identifies the coupling between ocean circulation (West Greenland Current conditions), the atmosphere and the Greenland Ice Sheet. Centennial to millennial scale changes in the wider North Atlantic region were accompanied by variations in the West Greenland Current (WGC). During periods of relatively warm WGC, increased surface air temperature over western Greenland led to ice sheet retreat and significant meltwater flux. In contrast, during periods of cold WGC, atmospheric cooling resulted in glacier advances. We also identify potential linkages between the palaeoceanography of the Disko Bugt region and key changes in the history of human occupation. Cooler oceanographic conditions at 3.5 ka BP support the view that the Saqqaq culture left Disko Bugt due to deteriorating climatic conditions. The cause of the disappearance of the Dorset culture is unclear, but the new data presented here indicate that it may be linked to a significant increase in meltwater flux, which caused cold and unstable coastal conditions at ca. 2 ka BP. The subsequent settlement of the Norse occurred at the same time as climatic amelioration during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and their disappearance may be related to harsher conditions at the beginning of the

  1. Crustal structure of the Central-Eastern Greenland: results from the TopoGreenland refraction profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Until present, seismic surveys have only been carried out offshore and near the coasts of Greenland, where the crustal structure is affected by oceanic break-up. We present the deep seismic structure of the crust of the interior of Greenland, based on the new and the only existing so far seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile. The seismic data was acquired by a team of six people during a two-month long experiment in summer of 2011 on the ice cap in the interior of central-eastern Greenland. The presence of an up to 3.4 km thick ice sheet, permanently covering most of the land mass, made acquisition of geophysical data logistically complicated. The profile extends 310 km inland in E-W direction from the approximate edge of the stable ice cap near the Scoresby Sund across the center of the ice cap. 350 Reftek Texan receivers recorded high-quality seismic data from 8 equidistant shots along the profile. Explosive charge sizes were 1 ton at the ends and ca. 500 kg along the profile, loaded with about 125 kg at 35-85 m depth in individual boreholes. Given that the data acquisition was affected by the thick ice sheet, we questioned the quality of seismic records in such experiment setup. We have developed an automatic routine to check the amplitudes and spectra of the selected seismic phases and to check the differences/challenges in making seismic experiments on ice and the effects of ice on data interpretation. Using tomographic inversion and forward ray tracing modelling we have obtained the two-dimensional velocity model down to a 50 km depth. The model shows a decrease of crustal thickness from 47 km below the centre of Greenland in the western part of the profile to 40 km in its eastern part. Relatively high lower crustal velocities (Vp 6.8 - 7.3 km/s) in the western part of the TopoGreenland profile may result from past collision tectonics or, alternatively, may be related to the speculated passage of the Iceland mantle plume. Comparison of our results

  2. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Bird, Kenneth J.; Brown, Philip J.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Gautier, Donald L.; Houseknecht, David W.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Shah, Anjana; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the West Greenland?East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal effort. The West Greenland?East Canada Province is essentially the offshore area between west Greenland and east Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including Kane Basin. The tectonic evolution of the West Greenland?East Canada Province led to the formation of several major structural domains that are the geologic basis for the five assessment units (AU) defined in this study. The five AUs encompass the entire province. Each AU was assessed in its entirety for undiscovered, technically recoverable (assuming absence of sea ice) oil and gas resources, but the assessment results reported here are only for those portions of each AU that are north of the Arctic Circle, as that latitude defines the area of the Circum-Arctic oil and gas assessment.

  3. Observed runoff, jokulhlaups and suspended sediment load from the Greenland ice at Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland, 2007 and 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Hasholt, Bent

    2009-01-01

    This study fills the gap in hydrologic measurements of runoff exiting a part of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland. The observations are of value for obtaining knowledge about the terrestrial freshwater and sediment output from part of the GrIS and the strip of land between the GrIS and the ocean, in the context of varying ice sheet surface melt and influx entering the ocean. High-resolution stage, discharge and suspended sediment load show a decrease in runoff of {approx} 25% and in sediment load of {approx} 40% from 2007 to 2008 in response to a decrease in the summer accumulated number of positive degree days. During the 2007 and 2008 runoff season, joekulhlaups are observed at Kangerlussuaq, drained from an ice-dammed lake at the margin of the GrIS.

  4. One million years of glaciation and denudation history in west Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Strunk, Astrid; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, David L.; Jansen, John D.; Levy, Laura B.; Jacobsen, Bo H.; Larsen, Nicolaj K.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of major Quaternary climatic changes on growth and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and associated erosional impact on the landscapes, is virtually unknown beyond the last deglaciation. Here we quantify exposure and denudation histories in west Greenland by applying a novel Markov-Chain Monte Carlo modelling approach to all available paired cosmogenic 10Be-26Al bedrock data from Greenland. We find that long-term denudation rates in west Greenland range from >50 m Myr−1 in low-lying areas to ∼2 m Myr−1 at high elevations, hereby quantifying systematic variations in denudation rate among different glacial landforms caused by variations in ice thickness across the landscape. We furthermore show that the present day ice-free areas only were ice covered ca. 45% of the past 1 million years, and even less at high-elevation sites, implying that the Greenland Ice Sheet for much of the time was of similar size or even smaller than today. PMID:28098141

  5. One million years of glaciation and denudation history in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunk, Astrid; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, David L.; Jansen, John D.; Levy, Laura B.; Jacobsen, Bo H.; Larsen, Nicolaj K.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of major Quaternary climatic changes on growth and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and associated erosional impact on the landscapes, is virtually unknown beyond the last deglaciation. Here we quantify exposure and denudation histories in west Greenland by applying a novel Markov-Chain Monte Carlo modelling approach to all available paired cosmogenic 10Be-26Al bedrock data from Greenland. We find that long-term denudation rates in west Greenland range from >50 m Myr-1 in low-lying areas to ~2 m Myr-1 at high elevations, hereby quantifying systematic variations in denudation rate among different glacial landforms caused by variations in ice thickness across the landscape. We furthermore show that the present day ice-free areas only were ice covered ca. 45% of the past 1 million years, and even less at high-elevation sites, implying that the Greenland Ice Sheet for much of the time was of similar size or even smaller than today.

  6. One million years of glaciation and denudation history in west Greenland.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Astrid; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Egholm, David L; Jansen, John D; Levy, Laura B; Jacobsen, Bo H; Larsen, Nicolaj K

    2017-01-18

    The influence of major Quaternary climatic changes on growth and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and associated erosional impact on the landscapes, is virtually unknown beyond the last deglaciation. Here we quantify exposure and denudation histories in west Greenland by applying a novel Markov-Chain Monte Carlo modelling approach to all available paired cosmogenic (10)Be-(26)Al bedrock data from Greenland. We find that long-term denudation rates in west Greenland range from >50 m Myr(-1) in low-lying areas to ∼2 m Myr(-1) at high elevations, hereby quantifying systematic variations in denudation rate among different glacial landforms caused by variations in ice thickness across the landscape. We furthermore show that the present day ice-free areas only were ice covered ca. 45% of the past 1 million years, and even less at high-elevation sites, implying that the Greenland Ice Sheet for much of the time was of similar size or even smaller than today.

  7. Abrupt Holocene climate change as an important factor for human migration in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, William J; Huang, Yongsong; Fritz, Sherilyn C; Anderson, N John

    2011-06-14

    West Greenland has had multiple episodes of human colonization and cultural transitions over the past 4,500 y. However, the explanations for these large-scale human migrations are varied, including climatic factors, resistance to adaptation, economic marginalization, mercantile exploration, and hostile neighborhood interactions. Evaluating the potential role of climate change is complicated by the lack of quantitative paleoclimate reconstructions near settlement areas and by the relative stability of Holocene temperature derived from ice cores atop the Greenland ice sheet. Here we present high-resolution records of temperature over the past 5,600 y based on alkenone unsaturation in sediments of two lakes in West Greenland. We find that major temperature changes in the past 4,500 y occurred abruptly (within decades), and were coeval in timing with the archaeological records of settlement and abandonment of the Saqqaq, Dorset, and Norse cultures, which suggests that abrupt temperature changes profoundly impacted human civilization in the region. Temperature variations in West Greenland display an antiphased relationship to temperature changes in Ireland over centennial to millennial timescales, resembling the interannual to multidecadal temperature seesaw associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  8. Chapter 41: Geology and petroleum potential of the West Greenland-East Canada Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal programme. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geological basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Petroleum System. Potential petroleum source rocks include strata of Ordovician, Lower and Upper Cretaceous, and Palaeogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study - the Eurekan Structures AU, NW Greenland Rifted Margin AU, NE Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU - encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered technically recoverable resources. The mean volumes of undiscovered resources for the West Greenland-East Canada Province are 10.7 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 75 ?? 1012 cubic feet of gas, and 1.7 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. For the part of the province that is north of the Arctic Circle, the estimated mean volumes of these undiscovered resources are 7.3 ?? 109 barrels of oil, 52 ?? 1012 cubic feet of natural gas, and 1.1 ?? 109 barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  9. Abrupt Holocene climate change as an important factor for human migration in West Greenland

    PubMed Central

    D’Andrea, William J.; Huang, Yongsong; Fritz, Sherilyn C.; Anderson, N. John

    2011-01-01

    West Greenland has had multiple episodes of human colonization and cultural transitions over the past 4,500 y. However, the explanations for these large-scale human migrations are varied, including climatic factors, resistance to adaptation, economic marginalization, mercantile exploration, and hostile neighborhood interactions. Evaluating the potential role of climate change is complicated by the lack of quantitative paleoclimate reconstructions near settlement areas and by the relative stability of Holocene temperature derived from ice cores atop the Greenland ice sheet. Here we present high-resolution records of temperature over the past 5,600 y based on alkenone unsaturation in sediments of two lakes in West Greenland. We find that major temperature changes in the past 4,500 y occurred abruptly (within decades), and were coeval in timing with the archaeological records of settlement and abandonment of the Saqqaq, Dorset, and Norse cultures, which suggests that abrupt temperature changes profoundly impacted human civilization in the region. Temperature variations in West Greenland display an antiphased relationship to temperature changes in Ireland over centennial to millennial timescales, resembling the interannual to multidecadal temperature seesaw associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation. PMID:21628586

  10. Tidewater Margin Dynamics in Central East Greenland Over two Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiskoot, H.; Juhlin, D.; St. Pierre, H.; Citterio, M.

    2010-12-01

    About 50% (~50000 km2) of the glaciers peripheral to the Greenland Ice Sheet are located in central East Greenland (67°-72°N). This region of extreme topography contains ice caps, mountain glaciers and large outlet glacier systems. Regional runoff to the North Atlantic is important in global thermohaline circulation and sea ice dynamics. The region has very limited glaciological research and only few quantitative remote sensing studies. Because of factors including East Greenland being predicted as a hotspot in global climate models, the positive regional correlation between the timing of sea ice break-up and increased surface melt, and the regional glacier characteristics, it is assumed that central East Greenland is highly sensitive to climate change. Many glaciers are tidewater terminating and will have a direct dynamic response to increased ocean temperatures and rising sea level, which has in some cases already led to upstream speed-up. Additionally, some glaciers are inferred polythermal, hence projected climate change may affect their thermal regime and ice dynamic behaviour. Moreover, 30-70% of regional glaciers are of surge-type, and redistribution of glacier volume to lower elevations increases ablation. Terminus fluctuations associated with surges, as well as large multi-annual calving fluxes, complicate extraction of glacioclimatic responses. In order to assess glacier characteristics, recent changes, and climate sensitivity we compiled a detailed glacier inventory of the Geikie Plateau region, using semi-automated digitization from satellite imagery between 2000 and 2005. A mosaic was created using 68 ASTER and 6 Landsat7 scenes. Glaciers were identified using a supervised Mahalanobis Distance classification. Small polygons and irregularities were removed using the Lee Filter and manual correction. The glacier inventory contains 330 glaciers (41591 km2). The largest glacier, Kong Christian IV (10696 km2), is in part an outlet of the Greenland Ice

  11. Nuuk, Greenland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-23

    Nuuk or Gadthab is the capital and largest city of Greenland. It is located at the mouth of the Nuup Kangerlua inlet on the west coast of Greenland. This image was acquired August 2, 2004 by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  12. Mountain glaciers vs Ice sheet in Greenland - learning from a new monitoring site in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abermann, Jakob; van As, Dirk; Wacker, Stefan; Langley, Kirsty

    2017-04-01

    Only 5 out of the 20.000 peripheral glaciers and ice caps surrounding Greenland are currently monitored due to logistical challenges and despite their significance for sea level rise. Large spatial coast-to-icesheet mass and energy balance gradients limit simple upscaling methods from ice-sheet observations, which builds the motivation for this study. We present results from a new mass and energy balance time series at Qasigiannguit glacier (64°09'N; 51°21'W) in Southwest Greenland. Inter-annual variability is discussed and the surface energy balance over two summers is quantified and a ranking of the main drivers performed. We find that short-wave net radiation is by far the most dominant energy source during summer, followed by similar amounts of net longwave radiation and sensible heat, respectively. We then relate these observations to synchronous measurements at similar latitude on an outlet glacier of the ice sheet a mere 100 km away. We find very pronounced horizontal surface mass balance gradients, with generally more positive values closer to the coast. We conclude that despite minor differences of atmospheric parameters (i.e. humidity, radiation, and temperature) the main reason for the strongly different signal is a pronounced winter precipitation gradient that translates in a different duration of ice exposure and through that an albedo gradient. Modelled energy balance gradients converted into mass changes show good agreement to measured surface mass balance gradients and we explore a latitudinal signal of these findings.

  13. Undercutting of marine-terminating glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, Eric; Fenty, Ian; Xu, Yun; Cai, Cilan; Kemp, Chris

    2015-07-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers control most of Greenland's ice discharge into the ocean, but little is known about the geometry of their frontal regions. Here we use side-looking, multibeam echo sounding observations to reveal that their frontal ice cliffs are grounded deeper below sea level than previously measured and their ice faces are neither vertical nor smooth but often undercut by the ocean and rough. Deep glacier grounding enables contact with subsurface, warm, salty Atlantic waters (AW) which melts ice at rates of meters per day. We detect cavities undercutting the base of the calving faces at the sites of subglacial water (SGW) discharge predicted by a hydrological model. The observed pattern of undercutting is consistent with numerical simulations of ice melt in which buoyant plumes of SGW transport warm AW to the ice faces. Glacier undercutting likely enhances iceberg calving, impacting ice front stability and, in turn, the glacier mass balance.

  14. Forest resources of west central Alabama

    Treesearch

    A.R. Spillers

    1940-01-01

    Lying west of Birmingham and north of Demopolis, West Central Alabama (Forest survey Unit Alabama No. 4) includes almost 4.5 million acres within the following 9 counties: Bibb, Fayette, Greene, Hale, Lamar, Marion, Perry, Pickens, and Tuscaloosa (map, fig. 1). This distinctly rural area includes only one incorporated city or town with a population of 2,500 people or...

  15. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Onshore and offshore geomorphological mapping and deglacial chronologies from West Greenland constrain the nature and magnitude of ice advance and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) during the last glacial cycle. Several ice stream troughs are known to have fed ice to the shelf edge during the last glacial cycle. Their offshore expression suggests that many were coalescent systems fed by smaller outlet glaciers and ice streams onshore but their central flow pathways were also controlled by geology and preglacial topography. The bed morphology of these large ice streams shows they operated over soft, deforming beds with drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations and grounding zone wedges marking an offshore transition from predominant areal scour onshore. Records of offshore deglacial chronology remain sparse but the Uummannaq and Disko Bugt ice stream corridors are now well constrained. The Uummannaq ice stream (UIS) completely deglaciated from the continental shelf between 14.8 ka and 11.0 ka in response to rising air temperatures, increasing JJA solar radiation and sea-level rise, but temporary standstills and the asynchronous retreat history of its feeder zones suggest that topography/bathymetry strongly modulated retreat rates as ice became 'locked' back into the coastal fjord system. Initial reconstructions of behaviour UIS discounted an oceanic role in early deglaciation and favoured retreat from the mid-shelf and inner-shelf prior to the Younger Dryas but both these concepts remain under investigation. In Disko Bugt, Jakobshavn Isbrae deglaciated later than the UIS and remained on the outer shelf during the Younger Dyras stadial (12.8 - 11.7 cal. kyrs BP) only reaching in the inner coast fjords at approximately 10.0 ka. The later deglaciation of the Disko system (despite similar external forcing mechanisms) was controlled by regional topographic/bathymetric contrasts in their respective trough morphologies. This hypothesis is supported by recent model

  16. Deglaciation of a major palaeo-ice stream in Disko Trough, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Kelly A.; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Jennings, Anne E.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Hiemstra, John F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent work has confirmed that grounded ice reached the shelf break in central West Greenland during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Here we use a combination of marine sediment-core data, including glacimarine lithofacies and IRD proxy records, and geomorphological and acoustic facies evidence to examine the nature of and controls on the retreat of a major outlet of the western sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) across the shelf. Retreat of this outlet, which contained the ancestral Jakobshavns Isbræ ice stream, from the outer shelf in Disko Trough was rapid and progressed predominantly through iceberg calving, however, minor pauses in retreat (tens of years) occurred on the middle shelf at a trough narrowing forming subtle grounding-zone wedges. By 12.1 cal kyr BP ice had retreated to a basalt escarpment and shallow banks on the inner continental shelf, where it was pinned and stabilised for at least 100 years. During this time the ice margin appears to have formed a calving bay over the trough and melting became an important mechanism of ice-mass loss. Fine-grained sediments (muds) were deposited alternately with IRD-rich sediments (diamictons) forming a characteristic deglacial lithofacies that may be related to seasonal climatic cycles. High influxes of subglacial meltwater, emanating from the nearby ice margins, deposited muddy sediments during the warmer summer months whereas winters were dominated by iceberg calving leading to the deposition of the diamictons. This is the first example of this glacimarine lithofacies from a continental-shelf setting and we suggest that the calving-bay configuration of the ice margin, plus the switching between calving and melting as ablation mechanisms, facilitated its deposition by channelling meltwater and icebergs through the inner trough. The occurrence of a major stillstand on the inner shelf in Disko Trough demonstrates that the ice-dynamical response to local topography was a crucial control on the behaviour

  17. Outbreak of trichinellosis associated with consumption of game meat in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Møller, Lone Nukâraq; Petersen, Eskild; Kapel, Christian M O; Melbye, Mads; Koch, Anders

    2005-09-05

    The Inuit population of the Arctic has always been at risk of acquiring trichinellosis and severe outbreaks have been recorded in Alaska and Canada. In West Greenland, a number of large outbreaks took place during the 1940s and 1950s; they involved total 420 cases including 37 deaths. Since then only sporadic cases have been reported. Here, we describe an outbreak of infection with Trichinella spp. after consumption of infected meat presumably from walrus or polar bear caught in western Greenland. Six persons who had eaten of the walrus and polar bear meat were two males and four females, age range 6--47 years. Using ELISA and Western blot analysis (Trichinella-specific IgG antibodies against excreted/secreted antigen and synthetic tyvelose antigen, respectively) four of these persons were found to be sero-positive for Trichinella antibodies, with three of these having clinical symptoms compatible with trichinellosis. On re-test, 12--14 months later one of the two sero-negative persons had sero-converted, probably due to a new, unrelated infection. This study demonstrates that acquiring Trichinella from the consumption of marine mammals remains a possibility in Greenland, and that cases may go undetected. Trichinellosis in Greenland can be prevented by the implementation of public health measures.

  18. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the West Greenland-East Canada Province as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal program. The province lies in the offshore area between western Greenland and eastern Canada and includes Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, Lancaster Sound, and Nares Strait west of and including part of Kane Basin. A series of major tectonic events led to the formation of several distinct structural domains that are the geologic basis for defining five assessment units (AU) in the province, all of which are within the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS). Potential petroleum source rocks within the TPS include strata of Ordovician, Early and Late Cretaceous, and Paleogene ages. The five AUs defined for this study-the Eurekan Structures AU, Northwest Greenland Rifted Margin AU, Northeast Canada Rifted Margin AU, Baffin Bay Basin AU, and the Greater Ungava Fault Zone AU-encompass the entire province and were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources.

  19. Mapping and classifying the seabed of the West Greenland continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougeon, S.; Kemp, K. M.; Blicher, M. E.; Yesson, C.

    2017-03-01

    Marine benthic habitats support a diversity of marine organisms that are both economically and intrinsically valuable. Our knowledge of the distribution of these habitats is largely incomplete, particularly in deeper water and at higher latitudes. The western continental shelf of Greenland is one example of a deep (more than 500 m) Arctic region with limited information available. This study uses an adaptation of the EUNIS seabed classification scheme to document benthic habitats in the region of the West Greenland shrimp trawl fishery from 60°N to 72°N in depths of 61-725 m. More than 2000 images collected at 224 stations between 2011 and 2015 were grouped into 7 habitat classes. A classification model was developed using environmental proxies to make habitat predictions for the entire western shelf (200-700 m below 72°N). The spatial distribution of habitats correlates with temperature and latitude. Muddy sediments appear in northern and colder areas whereas sandy and rocky areas dominate in the south. Southern regions are also warmer and have stronger currents. The Mud habitat is the most widespread, covering around a third of the study area. There is a general pattern that deep channels and basins are dominated by muddy sediments, many of which are fed by glacial sedimentation and outlets from fjords, while shallow banks and shelf have a mix of more complex habitats. This first habitat classification map of the West Greenland shelf will be a useful tool for researchers, management and conservationists.

  20. Runoff simulations from the Greenland ice sheet at Kangerlussuaq from 2006-2007 to 2007/08. West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Hasholt, Bent; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Liston, Glen

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on runoff from a large sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) - the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland - for the runoff observation period 2006/07 to 2007/08. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate winter accumulation and summer ablation processes, including runoff. Independent in situ end-of-winter snow depth and high-resolution runoff observations were used for validation of simulated accumulation and ablation processes. Runoff was modeled on both daily and hourly time steps, filling a data gap of runoff exiting part of the GrIS. Using hourly meteorological driving data instead of smoothed daily-averaged data produced more realistic meteorological conditions in relation to snow and melt threshold surface processes, and produced 6-17% higher annual cumulative runoff. The simulated runoff series yielded useful insights into the present conditions of inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of Kangerlussuaq runoff, and provided an acceptable degree of agreement between simulated and observed runoff. The simulated spatial runoff distributions, in some areas of the GrIS terminus, were as high as 2,750 mm w.eq. of runoff for 2006/07, while only 900 mm w.eq was simulated for 2007/08. The simulated total runoff from Kangerlussuaq was 1.9 km{sup 3} for 2006/07 and 1.2 km{sup 3} for 2007/08, indicating a reduction of 35-40% caused by the climate conditions and changes in the GrIS freshwater storage. The reduction in runoff from 2006/07 to 2007/08 occurred simultaneously with the reduction in the overall pattern of satellite-derived GrIS surface melt from 2007 to 2008.

  1. The Mantle Transition Zone in Central-Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, H. A.; Thybo, H.; Vinnik, L. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of a Receiver Function (RF) study of the mantle transition zone (TZ) in Central-Eastern Greenland. The base of this study is data from 19 broad-band seismometers, which were temporarily installed from 2009 to 2012 in the region between Scoresbysund and Summit (~ 70º N) plus 5 permanent stations from the GLISN network. One half of these stations were installed on the ice, the other half on bedrock.Our analysis is based on low frequency PRF, which use the difference in travel times between converted and not converted phasesat discontinuities. Most of our RFs show clear signals for P410s and P660s. Their delay times suggest a surprisingly thin mantle transition zone for most parts of the study area in comparison to standard Earth models, and much thinner than below other continental shield and platform areas. This could indicate a fairly recent heating of the TZ. Another observation is an M-shaped signal around the 410 km - discontinuity at some of the stations mainly in the western part around Summit. This observation is contrary to the expected simple negative signal. It may indicate a thin low velocity layer between 410 km and 520 km, as it has previously been observed in several settings based on converted waves and also explosion data. Most of our stations show positive travel time anomalies for the upper mantle, which again is contrary to simple models of old continental shields.

  2. Characterizing West Greenland ice sheet runoff losses from modeled and measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Overeem, I.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; van As, D.; Hall, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Increased surface meltwater runoff from the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) accounts for half or more of total mass loss. Despite its importance, modeled meltwater runoff fluxes are poorly constrained, primarily due to a lack of direct in situ observations. Here, we present an inter-comparison of modeled and observed discharge for three drainage basins -Naujat Kuat (Nuuk), Watson, and North River (Thule) - moving from south to north along West Greenland. Modeled runoff outputs are obtained from the surface mass balance Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR), and integrated for several catchment realizations. Our analyses reveal that (1) MAR is overestimating runoff losses for all three catchments and (2) drainage basin delineation can cause great uncertainty in model runoff estimates. This study's findings offers a unique opportunity to examine runoff estimates of surface mass balance models and will inform future development and parameterization of these models.

  3. Alkenone and Isotopic Records of Holocene Climatic and Environmental Change From Laminated West Greenland Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, W. J.; Huang, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Long chain alkenones (LCAs) are a key class of biomarkers for paleotemperature reconstructions. These compounds are ubiquitous in ocean sediments, but rare in lake sediments. Here we report the first discovery of LCAs in a downcore profile and surface sediments of five Greenland lakes. The concentrations of LCAs in surface sediments of these lakes are one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported previously in other lake surface sediments around the world. Alkenones are present in five Greenland lakes with elevated salinity, but absent from five freshwater lakes. The alkenones have exceptionally low \\delta13C values ranging from -40 to -43\\permil, and are depleted by 10 to 15\\permil relative to short-chain fatty acids and sterols within the same samples. These \\delta13C values are the lowest ever reported for alkenones in a natural setting and have important implications for tracing the alkenone producers in lakes. Using the published calibration for lake sediments, the alkenone unsaturation indices in the surface sediments of the Greenland lakes record late spring/early summer temperature when algal blooms occur, suggesting the applicability of lacustrine alkenones as a paleotemperature proxy. LCA unsaturation indices and \\deltaD from sediment cores taken from these Greenland lakes will help elucidate the environmental controls on these sedimentary parameters, and will aid the reconstruction of Holocene climate variability in West Greenland. Ongoing work on the saline lakes includes determining high resolution alkenone unsaturation ratios/abundances and bulk/compound-specific isotopic values from sediment cores, algal culturing, and establishing microbial community structure in the saline lakes using DNA/RNA fingerprinting. Up-to-date results will be presented in the meeting.

  4. Surface exposure dating of Little Ice Age ice cap advances on Disko Island, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy; Jomelli, Vincent; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Brunstein, Daniel; Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Swingedouw, Didier; Favier, Vincent; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    Little Ice Age (LIA: 1200-1920 AD) glacier advances in Greenland often form the most extensive positions of Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) ice cap and margins since the Early Holocene. Across Greenland these advances are commonly represented by un-vegetated moraines, usually within 1-5 km of the present ice margin. However, chronological constraints on glacier advances during this period are sparse, meaning that GrIS and ice cap behavior and advance/retreat chronology remains poorly understood during this period. At present the majority of ages are based on historical accounts, ice core data, and radiocarbon ages from proglacial threshold lakes. However, developments in the accuracy and precision of surface exposure methods allow dating of LIA moraine boulders, permitting an opportunity to better understand of ice dynamics during this period. Geomorphological mapping and surface exposure dating (36Cl) were used to interpret moraine deposits from the Lyngmarksbræen on Disko Island, West Greenland. A Positive Degree Day (PDD) model was used to estimate Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) and mass balance changes for two distinct paleo-glacial extents. Three moraines (M1, M2, and M3) were mapped in the field, and sampled for 36Cl surface exposure dating. The outermost moraine (M1) was of clearly different morphology to the inner moraines, and present only in small fragments. M2 and M3 were distinct arcuate termino-lateral moraines within 50 m of one another, 1.5 km from the present ice margin. The weighted average of four 36Cl ages from M1 returned an early Holocene age of 8.4 ± 0.6 ka. M2 (four samples) returned an age of 0.57 ± 0.04 ka (1441 AD) and M3 (four samples) returned an age of 0.28 ± 0.02 ka (1732 AD). These surface exposure ages represent the first robustly dated Greenlandic ice cap moraine sequence from the LIA. The two periods of ice cap advance and marginal stabilisation are similar to recorded periods of LIA GrIS advance in west Greenland, constrained

  5. Investigating a newly discovered firn aquifer on Disko Ice Cap, west Greenland: Insights from ground observations, remote sensing, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusel, L. D.; Das, S. B.; Smith, B.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Evans, M. J.; Frey, K. E.; Osman, M.; York, A.

    2015-12-01

    Expanding and intensifying surface melt have accelerated contributions from Greenland to global sea level rise in recent decades. Yet, important questions remain regarding the evolution and eventual fate of this meltwater over time and space, a fact underscored by recent observations of expansive aquifers within the Greenland Ice Sheet firn. In April 2015 we observed liquid water retained at depth in an ice cap on Disko Island, central west Greenland. Two adjacent ~20 m firn/ice cores were collected before intercepting a layer saturated with liquid water as evident by water drainage from our cores. Borehole temperature profiling confirms increasing temperature with depth, revealing 0°C isothermal firn below ~10 m depth. Detailed physical stratigraphic analyses conducted on these cores allow us to assess firn properties and their small scale (< 1m) spatial heterogeneity. Notably, multiple, thick (>1 m) and likely impermeable refrozen melt horizons exist above the inferred aquifer surface, raising questions about processes of aquifer formation. To discern the spatial character of the observed firn liquid water and melt stratigraphy, we utilize ground penetrating radar collected in 2014, as well as airborne radar data collected through NASA Operation IceBridge in 2012 and 12 days prior to our field observations in 2015. Glaciochemical analyses on our ice cores reveal preservation of an annual signal allowing derivation of net snow accumulation rates. Combined with surface mass balance modeled by RACMO2.3 and melt assessed via microwave remote sensing, we investigate the recently prevailing climatic and glaciological conditions on Disko. This work will provide new insights into mechanisms of firn aquifer formation and sustenance more broadly, as well as the representation of aquifers in existing radar observations and firn models.

  6. Simulating Ice-Flow and Calving on Store Glacier, West Greenland, with a 3D Full Stokes Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.; Zwinger, T.; Luckman, A. J.; Benn, D.

    2015-12-01

    The mass balance and long-term stability of the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica depend heavily on the dynamics of their ice-ocean margins. Iceberg calving accounts for the majority of the net annual loss of ice in Antarctica and around half of that from Greenland. Furthermore, climate driven changes to dynamics at these calving margins can be transmitted far inland. Thus, predicting future sea level contribution from the cryosphere requires an improved understanding of calving, and the processes which link it to climate and ice-sheet flow. We present results from a new 3D calving model coupled to a full-Stokes, time evolving glacier dynamic model, implemented for Store Glacier, a 5-km-wide calving glacier in the Uummannaq region of West Greenland, which flows at a rate of 20 m/day at its terminus. The model is developed using the open source finite element package Elmer/Ice, with the criterion that calving occurs when surface and basal crevasses meet. Crevasses open in response to tensile stresses near the terminus and water pressure at the bed. When the model was applied in 2D for the central flowline of Store Glacier, we found that basal topography exerts overarching control on the long term position of the calving front, while ice mélange buttressing allows the seasonal extension of a floating tongue, which collapses in early summer. New results emerging from implementation of calving in a 3D model indicate significant spatial heterogeneity in calving dynamics because the northern half of the terminus is grounded whereas the southern half is floating. This contrasting setting affects calving dynamics, further underlining the importance of geometry and basal topography, and suggesting that lower dimensional calving models may miss important aspects of calving dynamics. Our results also suggest that implementing grounding line dynamics is important for modelling calving, even for glaciers which are, for the most part, firmly grounded.

  7. Identifying potential seasonal and historical drivers of marine-terminating glacier retreat in Disko and Uummannaq Bays, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, A.; Frey, K. E.; Das, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    The variability in outlet glacier termini positions is an important indicator of overall glacier health and the net effects of ice-ocean-atmosphere interactions. Glacier margins fluctuate on both seasonal and interannual time scales and satellite imagery provides a critical spatially- and temporally-extensive resource for monitoring glacier behavior. Outlet glaciers have generally been retreating globally over recent decades, but the magnitude of seasonal variation, overall retreat, and foremost drivers have proven unique to each glacier. The outlet glaciers in central West Greenland are generally experiencing the same regional atmospheric forcing, yet previous studies have shown varying magnitudes of retreat over the last forty years. In this study, we utilize Landsat imagery between the years 1985 and 2014 to digitize a time series of glacier front positions of 18 marine-terminating outlet glaciers in the Disko and Uummannaq Bay regions of West Greenland. We examine potential drivers of trends in outlet glacier retreat through satellite observations of adjacent sea ice concentrations and sea surface temperatures. Additionally, reanalysis data and long-term automatic weather station measurements are investigated to contextualize the role of atmospheric drivers at both a regional and local scale. Results indicate retreat of all glaciers in the region over the study period and no indication of a south to north trend in magnitude of retreat on either a seasonal or long-term scale. The 11 glaciers in Uummannaq Bay retreated between 25 m and 3.5 km, an average of 1.22 ± 1.20 km over the entire study period. The retreat of 7 glaciers in Disko Bay ranged from 181 m to 2.3 km, an average of 1.0 ± 0.78 km over the period. Although the mean terminus retreat rate between the two bays is comparable, there remains a wide range of total retreat amounts among the glaciers. We investigate the degree of seasonal variation in terminus position as an indicator of longer

  8. Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchez, R.; Jouzel, J.; Landais, A.; Chappellaz, J.; Lorrain, R.; Tison, J.-L.

    2006-12-01

    Environmental conditions prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from gas isotopes from basal ice of the GRIP ice core to show that central Greenland was vegetated during invasion by the ice sheet. The δ 13CCH4 and δ 18O of O2 values obtained were never encountered before in ice core studies. Such values are indeed the signature of a significant biological activity.

  9. Sm-Nd age of the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Myers, John S.; Kalsbeek, Feiko

    1989-01-01

    A Sm-Nd isotopic study on samples from the Fiskenaesset Anorthosite Complex in West Greenland was conducted to estimate the age of crystallization of the complex. A five-point isochron, including data for whole-rock samples of anorthosite, metagabbro, metaperidotite, and separates of calcic plagioclase and mafic matrix from a coarse megacrystic leucogabbro, corresponds to an age of 2.86 + or - 0.05 Ga, with initial sigma(Nd) of +2.9 + or - 0.4. This implies a relatively short time interval, on the order of 70 Ma, during which anorthosite formation, tonalite emplacement, and high-grade metamorphism took place.

  10. Warble infestations by Hypoderma tarandi (Diptera; Oestridae) recorded for the first time in West Greenland muskoxen☆

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Fredrik; Nejsum, Peter; Raundrup, Katrine; Hansen, Tina Vicky Alstrup; Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen

    2013-01-01

    In the northern hemisphere, Caribou (Rangifer spp.) populations are known to be infested with the skin-penetrating ectoparasite, Hypoderma tarandi (Diptera; Oestridae). Although regarded as host specific, H. tarandi has been reported from other species, and has become of increasing concern as a zoonosis infecting humans. In February 2012, concurrent with the hunting of muskoxen, we examined carcasses for muscle and tissue parasites, and recorded warble larvae infestations. DNA extracted from samples of larvae was amplified targeting 579 bp of the COI gene, and subsequently sequenced, to be confirmed as H. tarandi. Infestation by oestrid flies has not previously been reported in muskoxen in West Greenland. PMID:24533338

  11. Study of subaqueous melting of Store Glacier, West Greenland using ocean observations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Rignot, E. J.; Menemenlis, D.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Ice discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet is mainly through tidewater glaciers that terminate in the ocean and melt in contact with ocean waters. Subaqueous melting at the calving front is a direct mechanism for mass loss and a potential trigger for glacier acceleration. We present an analysis of oceanographic data collected in the fjord of Store Glacier, West Greenland during August 2010 and 2012. Using these data, we calculate the subaqueous melt rates. Independently, we employ the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), modified to include melting at the calving front and outflow of subglacial water to model the ice melt rates of Store Glacier. Previous 2-D sensitivity studies showed that the subaqueous melt rate reaches several meters per day during the summer, increases non-linearly with subglacial runoff and linearly with ocean thermal forcing, and ceases when subglacial discharge is off during winter. We present new 3-D simulations at very high resolution, with measured oceanic temperature/salinity as boundary conditions, and subglacial runoff from the University of Utrecht's Regional Atmospheric Climate Model outputs on different years and seasons. We compare the ocean observations and numerical simulations and discuss the seasonal and inter-annual variations of subaqueous melting. This study helps evaluate the impact of the ocean on the subaqueous melting of Greenland tidewater glaciers and in turn on glacier mass balance. This work was carried out at University of California, Irvine and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA Cryosphere Science Program.

  12. Monitoring South-West Greenland's ice sheet melt with ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Mikesell, Dylan; Harig, Christopher; Lipovsky, Brad; Prieto, German

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) accounts for ~ 70% of global ice sheet mass loss and contributes to sea level rise at a rate of 0.7 mm/yr. Therefore, the GIS needs to be carefully monitored. The spaceborne techniques commonly used to monitor the GIS mass balance contain inherent uncertainties. These uncertainties can be reduced by comparing independent datasets and techniques. However, spaceborne methods remain inadequate in the sense that they offer low spatial and/or temporal resolution. This fact highlights the need for other complementary methods to monitor the GIS more accurately and with greater resolution. Here we use a seismic method: the correlation of seismic noise recorded at South-West Greenland seismic stations to show that the GIS seasonal melt produces significant variations of seismic wave speed in the Greenland crust. The amplitudes of the measured velocity variations during 2012-2013 correlate with the total ice plus atmospheric mass variations measured by the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission. We explain the phase delay between mass maxima and velocity minima ( 50 days) using a non-linear poroelastic model that includes a 55 cm-thick layer of till between the ice sheet and the bedrock. We, thus, interpret the velocity variations as pore pressure variations in the bedrock resulting from the loading and unloading of the overlying glacier and atmosphere. This method provides a new and independent way to monitor in near real-time the first-order state of the GIS, giving new constraints on its evolution and its contribution to the global sea level rise. By increasing the density of seismic stations in the region it will be possible to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the method and create detailed maps of ice-mass variations across Greenland.

  13. Monitoring South-West Greenland's ice sheet melt with ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Mikesell, T. D.; Harig, C.; Lipovsky, B.; Prieto, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GIS) accounts for ~ 70% of global ice sheet mass loss and contributes to sea level rise at a rate of 0.7 mm/yr. Therefore, the GIS needs to be carefully monitored. The spaceborne techniques commonly used to monitor the GIS mass balance contain inherent uncertainties. These uncertainties can be reduced by comparing independent datasets and techniques. However, spaceborne methods remain inadequate in the sense that they offer low spatial and/or temporal resolution. This fact highlights the need for other complimentary methods to monitor the GIS more accurately and with greater resolution. Here we use a seismic method: the correlation of seismic noise recorded at South-West Greenland seismic stations to show that the GIS seasonal melt produces significant variations of seismic wave speed in the Greenland crust. The amplitudes of the measured velocity variations during 2012-2013 correlate with the total ice plus atmospheric mass variations measured by the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite mission. We explain the phase delay between mass maxima and velocity minima ( 50 days) using a non-linear poroelastic model that includes a 55 cm-thick layer of till between the ice sheet and the bedrock. We, thus, interpret the velocity variations as pore pressure variations in the bedrock resulting from the loading and unloading of the overlying glacier and atmosphere. This method provides a new and independent way to monitor in near real-time the first-order state of the GIS, giving new constraints on its evolution and its contribution to the global sea level rise. By increasing the density of seismic stations in the region it will be possible to increase the spatial and temporal resolution of the method and create detailed maps of ice-mass variations across Greenland.

  14. Cenozoic uplift on the West Greenland margin: active sedimentary basins in quiet Archean terranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Scott; Stephenson, Randell; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonically induced uplift within the Cenozoic. Examination of evidence, onshore and offshore, has been interpreted to imply the presence of kilometre scale uplift across the margins of the Barents Sea, North Sea, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea. Development of topography on the West Greenland margin (Baffin Bay), in particular, has been subject to much discussion and dispute. A series of low temperature thermochronological (AFT and AHe) studies onshore and interpretation of seismic architecture offshore have suggested uplift of the entire margin totalling ~3km. However, challenges to this work and recent analysis on the opposing margin (Baffin Island) have raised questions about the validity of this interpretation. The present work reviews and remodels the thermochronological data from onshore West Greenland with the aim of re-evaluating our understanding of the margin's history. New concepts within the discipline, such as effect of radiation damage on Helium diffusivity, contemporary modelling approaches and denudational mapping are all utilised to investigate alternative interpretations to this margins complex post rift evolution. In contrast to earlier studies our new approach indicates slow protracted cooling across much of the region; however, reworked sedimentary samples taken from the Cretaceous Nuussuaq Basin display periods of rapid reheating and cooling. These new models suggest the Nuussuaq Basin experienced a tectonically active Cenozoic, while the surrounding Archean basement remained quiet. Faults located within the basin appear to have been reactivated during the Palaeocene and Eocene, a period of well-documented inversion events throughout the North Atlantic, and may have resulted in subaerial kilometre scale uplift. This interpretation of the margin's evolution has wider implications for the treatment of low temperature thermochronological data and the geological history of the North

  15. Multibeam Bathymetry Surveys in Fjords and Coastal Areas of West-Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinrebe, W.; Kuijpers, A.; Klaucke, I.; Fink, M.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetric maps are not available for many of the sparsely populated fjords in West-Greenland as those areas are remote and difficult to navigate. During a recent (2007) cruise of RV Maria S. Merian large coastal areas of West-Greenland including some of these fjords were mapped in detail with multibeam bathymetry, among them many parts which never had been investigated before. The surveys covered the Godthabfjord, Nordre Stroemfjord, Disko Bay, Vaigat, Uumannaq-Fjord and the Marmorilik area. The data acquired by a Kongsberg EM120 deep water multibeam and a Kongsberg EM1002 shallow water multibeam system were of very good quality. In summer 2008 the survey in the Disko Bay area was extended far into the Ilulissat Icefjord using a local boat and a portable Seabeam 1180 multibeam system. The seafloor in these areas is intensively shaped by glacial processes which create characteristic submarine landforms. Revealing the morphology helps to understand these processes, high-resolution bathymetry displays the relief and morphology of the seafloor. In particular, rims and sills which may mark ancient ice margins have been identified in the bathymetry. Multibeam mapping was continued also during transits off the coast in the Davis Strait. Here areas sculptured intensively by iceberg plough marks were found. Several distinct patterns of directions can be identified which probably represent different phases of drift. The water depth here is generally greater than 240 m documenting rather deep going icebergs.

  16. New petrological and age data from the eclogite province in the central segment of the Greenlandic Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Thorsten; Fassmer, Kathrin; Froitzheim, Niko; Fonseca, Raul; Sprung, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The Caledonian orogen in northeastern Greenland is a 1200 km long, west-vergent nappe pile mirroring the much better explored Caledonides in Scandinavia. The Greenlandic orogen has traditionally been viewed as the retro-wedge of the Scandinavian Caledonides, which is generally accepted to be the result of west-directed subduction of the Iapetus oceanic realm and the Baltic continental margin. This concept, however, is challenged by the finding of widely distributed high-pressure metamorphism as well as the large amount of horizontal shortening accommodated in the Greenlandic nappe pile (Gasser 2014, and references therein). While eclogites in Liverpool Land in the very south have been interpreted to belong to a window into Baltica, the vast domains of eclogite-bearing basement in the central segment of the orogen are attributed to the Lauretian continental margin. Existing ages for high-pressure metamorphism in this area using U-Pb-zircon and Sm-Nd-garnet dating scatter at 420-390 Ma with an exceptionally young age of 370-330 Ma found for the so far only ultrahigh-pressure location in a very internal position of the orogen (e.g. Gilotti et al. 2004). Eclogite-facies metamorphism in Greenland seems thus coeval to or even younger than the main Scandian orogeny in Scandinavia. However, the relatively high temperatures of metamorphism leave room for the interpretation of the Sm-Nd ages as cooling ages. We present petrologic and Lu-Hf-garnet-age data from three locations in the central eclogite province in Greenland and discuss the implications for tectonic scenarios. Investigated rocks are high-temperature eclogites/high-pressure mafic granulites, and garnet pyroxenites. Samples from the well-known location Danmarkshavn record ultra-high-pressure metamorphic conditions by means of SiO2-exsolutions in clinopyroxene and thermobarometric results. An eclogite yielded a Lu-Hf garnet-whole-rock age of 360 Ma thus confirming the existing young age for ultrahigh

  17. Links between central Greenland stable isotopes, blocking and extreme climate variability over Europe at decadal to multidecadal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbu, N.; Lohmann, G.; Werner, M.; Ionita, M.

    2016-10-01

    The link between central Greenland stable oxygen isotopes, atmospheric blocking frequency and cold temperature extremes at decadal to multidecadal time scales is investigated using observed and proxy data as well as model experiments. A composite analysis reveals that positive stable isotope anomalies in central Greenland are associated with enhanced blocking activity in the Atlantic European region. Several indices of blocking activity in the Atlantic European region are higher correlated with central Greenland stable isotope time series than with the North Atlantic Oscillation indices both in observations and model simulation. Furthermore, the blocking frequency anomaly pattern associated with central Greenland stable isotope variability is similar to the blocking anomaly pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. A composite analysis reveals that stable isotope variations in central Greenland are related to a large-scale pattern in the frequency of extreme low temperature events with significant positive anomalies over Europe and a southwest to northeast dipolar pattern over Asia. During observational period central Greenland isotope records, blocking and extreme temperature indices over Europe show enhanced variability 10-30 and 50-70 years. Similar quasi-periodicities dominate the spectrum of central Greenland isotope variability during the last millennium. We argue that long-term variations of climate extreme indices over Europe and Asia, as derived from observational data, can be put into a long-term perspective using central Greenland stable isotope ice core records.

  18. Links between central Greenland stable isotopes, blocking and extreme climate variability over Europe at decadal to multidecadal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbu, N.; Lohmann, G.; Werner, M.; Ionita, M.

    2017-07-01

    The link between central Greenland stable oxygen isotopes, atmospheric blocking frequency and cold temperature extremes at decadal to multidecadal time scales is investigated using observed and proxy data as well as model experiments. A composite analysis reveals that positive stable isotope anomalies in central Greenland are associated with enhanced blocking activity in the Atlantic European region. Several indices of blocking activity in the Atlantic European region are higher correlated with central Greenland stable isotope time series than with the North Atlantic Oscillation indices both in observations and model simulation. Furthermore, the blocking frequency anomaly pattern associated with central Greenland stable isotope variability is similar to the blocking anomaly pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. A composite analysis reveals that stable isotope variations in central Greenland are related to a large-scale pattern in the frequency of extreme low temperature events with significant positive anomalies over Europe and a southwest to northeast dipolar pattern over Asia. During observational period central Greenland isotope records, blocking and extreme temperature indices over Europe show enhanced variability 10-30 and 50-70 years. Similar quasi-periodicities dominate the spectrum of central Greenland isotope variability during the last millennium. We argue that long-term variations of climate extreme indices over Europe and Asia, as derived from observational data, can be put into a long-term perspective using central Greenland stable isotope ice core records.

  19. Glacial evolution of Central-East Greenland Margin: a GLANAM project contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Nielsen, Tove

    2017-04-01

    The dynamic evolution of the Greenland Ice Sheet is directly related to the Northern Hemisphere glaciation. The ice sheet has influenced the Greenland margins construction conditioning their morphology and their reply to other control factors in the evolution, as tectonic and oceanographic events. Thus, the sedimentary record preserved around Greenland has registered the glacial oscillations of the Northern Hemisphere, as well as the influence of other conditioning factors in the development of a permanent ice sheet on Greenland. The aim of this work is to summarize the new insights of Central-East Greenland glacial evolution reached within the framework of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN-FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN): Glaciated North Atlantic Margins (GLANAM) project. Several multichannel seismic profiles have been acquired along Central-East Greenland Margin, with both research and exploration proposes. They enable the large-scale reconstruction of the major stratigraphic events from late Miocene to Present, in agreement with an age correlation with ODP sites along the margin. High-resolution seismic, sub-bottom profiles, swath bathymetry and sediment cores are also locally available supporting detailed interpretation of the Quaternary sedimentary record. While ice-rafter debris (IRD) in the northern seas have been interpreted as indicators of tidewater glaciers on Greenland, the acoustic and seismic evidences summarized in this work allow reconstruction of different episodes of cross-shelf advances of the Greenland Ice Sheet along the central-east margin. The results of this work reveal an early cross-shelf glaciation occurred off Blosseville Kyst during late Miocene and early Pliocene followed by major ice-stream activity off Scoresby Sund during early Quaternary and glacial advance off Liverpool Land in late Quaternary. Higher resolution of the Quaternary data off Liverpool Land suggests that the intense ice-stream of the Scoresby Sund fjord was gradually

  20. Use of Glacial Fronts by Narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laidre, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial fronts in Greenland are known to be important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros), as freshwater runoff and sediment discharge may aggregate prey at the terminus. We investigated the importance of glacial habitat characteristics in determining narwhal visitation. Narwhals (n=18) were instrumented with satellite transmitters in September 1993-1994 and 2006-2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. Daily narwhal locations were interpolated using a correlated random walk based on observed filtered locations and associated positional error. We also compiled a database on physical features of 41 glaciers along the northwest Greenland coast. This covered the entire coastal region with narwhal activity. Parameters included glacier ice velocity (km/yr) from radar satellite data, glacier front advance and retreat, and glacier width (km) at the ice-ocean interface derived using front position data digitized from 20-100m resolution radar image mosaics and Landsat imagery. We also quantified relative volumes and extent of glacial ice discharge, thickness of the glacial ice at the terminus (m), and water depth at the terminus (m) from gravity and airborne radar data, sediment flux from satellite-based analysis, and freshwater runoff from a regional atmospheric climate model (RACMO2.3). We quantified whale visits to glaciers at three distances (5, 7, and 10 km) and conducted proximity analyses on annual and monthly time steps. We estimated 1) narwhal presence or absence, 2) the number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers, and 3) the fraction of study animals that visited each glacier. The use of glacial habitat by narwhals expanded to the north and south between the 1990s (n=9 unique glaciers visited) and the 2000s (n=30 visited), likely due to loss of summer fast ice and later fall freeze-up trends (3.5 weeks later since 1979). We used a generalized linear mixed effects framework to quantify the glacier and fjord habitat characteristics preferred by narwhals.

  1. Snowmelt and runoff modelling of an Arctic hydrological basin in west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøggild, C. E.; Knudby, C. J.; Knudsen, M. B.; Starzer, W.

    1999-09-01

    This paper compares the performance of a conceptual modelling system and several physically-based models for predicting runoff in a large hydrological basin, Tasersuaq, in west Greenland. This basin, which is typical of many Greenland basins, is interesting because of the fast hydrological response to changing conditions. Due to the predominance of exposed bedrock surface and only minor occurrence of sediments and organic soils, there is little restraint to run-off, making the treatment of the snowmelt component of primary importance.Presently a conceptual modelling system, HBV, is applied in Greenland and also in most of the arctic regions of Scandinavia for operational forecasting. A general wish to use hydrological models for other purposes, such as to improve data collection and to gain insight into the hydrological processes has promoted interest in the more physically-based hydrological models. In this paper, two degree-day models, the Danish version of the physically-based SHE distributed hydrological modelling system (MIKE SHE) and the conceptual HBV model are compared with a new model that links MIKE SHE and a distributed energy balance model developed for this study, APUT.The HBV model performs the best overall simulation of discharge, which presently makes it most suited for general forecasting. The combination of MIKE SHE and APUT i.e. a physically based modelling system shows promising results by improving the timing of the initiation of spring flood, but does not perform as well throughout the remaining part of the snowmelt season. The modelling study shows that local parameters such as the snow depletion curve, the temporal snow albedo and perhaps also melt water storage need to be more precisely determined from field studies before physically-based modelling can be improved.

  2. Geomicrobiology of subglacial meltwater samples from Store Landgletscher and Russell Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, K. A.; Dieser, M.; Choquette, K.; Christner, B. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Harrold, Z.; Liu, L.; Sletten, R. S.; Junge, K.

    2012-12-01

    The melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet provides direct connections between atmospheric, supraglacial and subglacial environments. The intraglacial hydrological pathways that result are believed to accommodate the microbial colonization of subglacial environments; however, little is known about the abundance, diversity and activity of microorganisms within these niches. The Greenland Ice Sheet (1.7 million square kilometers) and its associated surpaglacial and subglacial ecosystems may contribute significantly to biogeochemical cycling processes. We analyzed subglacial microbial assemblages in subglacial outflows, near Thule and Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland. The investigative approach included correlating microbial diversity, inferred function, abundance, melt water chemistry, O-18 water isotope ratios, alkalinity and sediment load. Using Illumina sequencing, bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA hypervariable regions have been targeted and amplified from both extracted DNA and reverse transcribed rRNA. Over 3 billion sequence reads have been generated to create a comprehensive diversity profile. Total abundances ranged from 2.24E+04 to 1.58E+06 cells mL-1. In comparison, the total abundance of supraglacial early season snow samples ranged from 3.35E+02 to 2.8E+04 cells mL-1. 65 % of samples incubated with cyano ditoyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), used to identify actively respiring cells, contained CTC-positive cells. On average, these cells represented 1.9 % of the estimated total abundance (1.86E+02 to 2.19E+03 CTC positive cells mL-1; 1.39E+03 cells mL-1 standard deviation); comparative to those measured in temperate freshwater lakes. The overarching objective of our research is to provide data that indicates the role of microbial communities, associated with ice sheets, in elemental cycling and in the release of biomass and nutrients to the surrounding marine biome.

  3. Helicopter-based Photography for use in SfM over the West Greenland Ablation Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, T. L.; Tedesco, M.; Astuti, I.; Cotten, D.; Jordan, T.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Results of low-elevation high-resolution aerial photography from a helicopter are reported for a supraglacial watershed in West Greenland. Data were collected at the end of July 2015 over a supraglacial watershed terminating in the Kangerlussuaq region of Greenland and following the Utrecht University K-Transect of meteorological stations. The aerial photography reported here were complementary observations used to support hyperspectral measurements of albedo, discussed in the Greenland Ice sheet hydrology session of this AGU Fall meeting. A compact digital camera was installed inside a pod mounted on the side of the helicopter together with gyroscopes and accelerometers that were used to estimate the relative orientation. Continuous video was collected on 19 and 21 July flights, and frames extracted from the videos are used to create a series of aerial photos. Individual geo-located aerial photos were also taken on a 24 July flight. We demonstrate that by maintaining a constant flight elevation and a near constant ground speed, a helicopter with a mounted camera can produce 3-D structure of the ablation zone of the ice sheet at unprecedented spatial resolution of the order of 5 - 10 cm. By setting the intervalometer on the camera to 2 seconds, the images obtained provide sufficient overlap (>60%) for digital image alignment, even at a flight elevation of ~170m. As a result, very accurate point matching between photographs can be achieved and an extremely dense RGB encoded point cloud can be extracted. Overlapping images provide a series of stereopairs that can be used to create point cloud data consisting of 3 position and 3 color variables, X, Y, Z, R, G, and B. This point cloud is then used to create orthophotos or large scale digital elevation models, thus accurately displaying ice structure. The geo-referenced images provide a ground spatial resolution of approximately 6 cm, permitting analysis of detailed features, such as cryoconite holes, evolving small

  4. Fjord circulation promotes significant glacier-wide submarine melting at a west Greenland tidewater glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Donald A.; Straneo, Fiamma; Das, Sarah B.; Nienow, Peter W.

    2017-04-01

    In recent decades, rapid change at Greenland's marine-terminating glaciers has significantly impacted the contribution of the ice sheet to sea level. While these changes have been widely linked to a warming of the ocean around Greenland, process understanding linking ocean forcing to glacier response, for example by submarine melting, remains at an early stage. The most rapid submarine melting likely occurs where buoyant plumes, initiated by subglacial discharge, rise up tidewater glacier calving fronts. Plumes have therefore received much attention, yet a plume typically occupies only a small fraction of the submerged calving front area. Thus melting within the plume itself may be a small contributor to the front-wide melting experienced by the glacier. A plume may however promote melting over a much larger area by inducing a fjord-scale circulation which, by increasing water velocities at the ice/ocean interface, can give rise to increased melting over the entire glacier face. Here we address this fjord-scale, plume-driven circulation and its impact on submarine melting by combining observations collected within 100 m of marine-terminating Saqqarliup Sermia in west Greenland with high-resolution fjord modelling using the MITgcm. Both field data and modelling show that water from the main plume flows away from the glacier as a subsurface jet, and that entrainment into this jet generates regions of fjord water recirculating back towards the glacier. The modelling further suggests that these recirculations drive elevated across-glacier water motion thereby promoting significant submarine melting over the full 4 km-width of the calving front, resulting in total melt volumes which substantially exceed those generated directly by the relatively narrow plume. Our results highlight the value of combining detailed field observations with modelling and demonstrate how the secondary fjord circulation generated by plumes may play a significant role in driving submarine

  5. Investigating near-glacier circulation and plume theory with high-resolution fjord surveys in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. H.; Nash, J. D.; Shroyer, E.; Sutherland, D.; Fried, M.; Catania, G. A.; Carroll, D.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The plumes that emanate from Greenland's glaciers are hotspots of mixing between meltwater and ambient fjord waters. The dynamics of these plumes affect both submarine melting of glacier termini and the dilution of freshwater as it is exported into the ocean. Modeling studies often rely on buoyant plume theory to represent the circulation and mixing at the ocean/ice interface. However, a dearth of measurements in the near-glacier region has left open many questions about glacial plumes, entrainment, and the applicability of idealized plume theory to these environments. Here, we present near-glacier ocean surveys from Kangerdlugssuaq Sermerssua in central West Greenland in three consecutive summers (2013-2015). High-resolution measurements of velocity and water properties were collected by ship, by surface drifters, and by a remotely operated surface vessel - all focusing on the region within 2 km of the glacier terminus. These novel measurements of the 3D circulation capture a persistent near-surface plume, along with its time-evolution over a tidal cycle and between different summers. Concurrent multibeam sonar measurements of the submarine terminus morphology show that the plume emerges from a large undercut subglacial channel outlet. Plume theory, when applied with this fjord's stratification and any flux of subglacial discharge, cannot match the observed plume's volume flux and water properties. The discrepancy between our observations and plume theory suggests that there is enhanced entrainment at depth that is not adequately represented in plume theory. The details of this entrainment have important consequences for submarine melt rates, terminus morphology, and fjord circulation.

  6. The early archaean crustal history of West Greenland as recorded by detrital zircons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinny, P. D.; Compston, W.; Mcgregor, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    The isotope systematics of some of the oldest samples on Earth from both Greenland and Australia was discussed. The antiquity was confirmed of the 4.1 to 4.2 Ga zircons from Western Australia; the model Lu-Hf age of these zircons, as measured with the ANU ion probe is 4.14 + or - 0.24 Ga, although the oldest preserved rock units there are anorthosites with a Lu-Hf model age of about 3.73 Ga. U-Pb ion probe ages of detrital zircons ranging between 2.87 and 3.89 Ga from an Akilia association quartzite was reported, whose age of deposition is probably around 3.8 Ga. It was argued that the younger age in this range are discordant because of late Pb-loss, probably associated with a high grade metamorphic event at about 3.6 Ga. It was also argued that the earliest crust in West Greenland and elsewhere is about 3.9 Ga, but in some places, such as Western Australia, crustal evolution took place much earlier, perhaps starting as far back as 4.3 Ga. This would account for the presence in that terrane of abundant K rich granitoid, the paucity of tonalitic and trondhjemitic materials, and the existence of Eu anomalies in early Archean sediments.

  7. Using reflection seismics to identify and monitor the basal conditions of Russell Glacier South West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstede, Coen; Kleiner, Thomas; Bondzio, Johannes; Eisen, Olaf; Wilhelms, Frank; Bohleber, Pascal; Fritzsche, Diedrich; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Russell Glacier is a land terminating glacier in South West Greenland. Survey site SHR lies at several kilometers from the terminus and is closely monitored. In recent years in Summer months, site SHR has seen unusual high ice velocities of up to 400m/a which have been linked to increased Summer melt. To capture the probably changing basal conditions of Russell Glacier at SHR we carried out two seismic surveys at site SHR, one in September 2013 at the end of the melt season and one in May 2014 at the start of the melt season. The seismic data were recorded using a 300m snow streamer and explosives. The data reveal an ice thickness of about 550m and 30 to 40m thick accreted subglacial sediments with varying degrees of water saturation in both ice and sediment. We speculate the increased ice velocity is caused by sediments that become temporarily liquefied in the Summer months.

  8. High basal melt rates observed on Store Glacier, West Greenland, using phase-sensitive FMCW radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, T. J.; Christoffersen, P.; Nicholls, K. W.; Lok, L. B.; Doyle, S. H.; Hubbard, B. P.; Stewart, C.; Hofstede, C. M.; Bougamont, M. H.; Todd, J.; Brennan, P. V.; Hubbard, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet is losing mass, and is currently contributing 1 mm/year to global sea level rise. The large majority of these changes can be attributed to the recent acceleration in flow of marine-terminating outlet glaciers within the last several decades. Such fast ice flow is characterised by ice deformation, as well as basal motion. However, there are few direct observations of either of these contributing mechanisms due to the difficulty of accessing the subglacial environment. In particular, although basal melt rates have been measured on ice shelves for decades, there exist almost no equivalent observations for grounded ice sheets. We present the first time series of directly-measured rates of basal melting at the bed of Store Glacier, a major outlet glacier flowing into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland. The measurements were obtained using a phase-sensitive, frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar system installed 30 km upflow of the calving terminus at a location where the surface velocity of the glacier is 700 m/year. Radar data were recorded every 4 hours from 26 July to 11 December 2014. The same site was used to instrument 610-m-deep boreholes drilled to the bed as part of the Subglacial Access and Fast Ice research Experiment (SAFIRE). With internal and basal reflector ranges captured at high spatial (millimetre) and temporal (hourly) resolutions, we obtained a unique, 6-month-long time series of ice deformation and basal melting coincident with englacial and subglacial borehole measurements. Here, we report sustained basal melting of 3 m/year during winter, and maxima of 20 m/year during summer when basal motion is enhanced by surface water delivered to the bed. The lower, but more constant rate of winter basal melting is likely to be driven by frictional heat generated from basal sliding. These discoveries indicate that basal melting beneath Greenland's fast flowing outlet glaciers is considerably higher than basal melting reported

  9. Significance of the late Archaean granulite facies terrain boundaries, Southern West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, C. R. L.; Nutman, A. P.; Mcgregor, V. R.

    1988-01-01

    Three distinct episodes and occurrences of granulite metamorphism in West Greenland are described: (1) the oldest fragmentary granulites occur within the 3.6-Ga Amitsoq gneisses and appear to have formed 200 Ma after the continental crust in which they lie (Spatially associated rapakivi granites have zircon cores as old as 3.8 Ga, but Rb-Sr, whole-rock Pb-Pb, and all other systems give 3.6 Ga, so these granulites apparently represent a later metamorphic event); (2) 3.0-Ga granulites of the Nordlandet Peninsula NW of Godthaab, developed immediately after crustal formation in hot, dry conditions, are carbonate-free, associated with voluminous tonalite, and formed at peak metamorphic conditions of 800 C and 7 to 8 kbar (Synmetamorphic trondhjemite abounds and the activity of H2O has been indicated by Pilar to have varied greatly); and (3) 2.8-Ga granulites south of Godthaab, lie to the south of retrogressed amphibolite terranes. Prograde amphibolite-granulite transitions are clearly preserved only locally at the southern end of this block, near Bjornesund, south of Fiskenaesset. Progressively deeper parts of the crust are exposed from south to north as a major thrust fault is approached. Characteristic big hornblende pegmatites, which outcrop close to the thrust in the east, have been formed by replacement of orthopyroxene. Comparable features were not seen in South Indian granulites. It was concluded that no one mechanism accounts for the origin of all granulites in West Greenland. Various processes have interacted in different ways, and what happened in individual areas must be worked out by considering all possible processes.

  10. High-resolution, terrestrial radar velocity observations and model results reveal a strong bed at stable, tidewater Rink Isbræ, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Walker, R. T.; Stearns, L. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Cassotto, R.; Catania, G. A.; Felikson, D.; Fried, M.; Sutherland, D.; Nash, J. D.; Shroyer, E.

    2015-12-01

    At tidewater Rink Isbræ, on the central west coast of Greenland, satellite observations reveal that glacier velocities and terminus positions have remained stable, while the lowest 25 km have thinned 30 m since 1985. Over this same time period, other tidewater glaciers in central west Greenland have retreated, thinned and accelerated. Here we present field observations and model results to show that the flow of Rink Isbræ is resisted by unusually high basal shear stresses. Terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI) observations over 9 days in summer 2014 demonstrate weak velocity response to 4 km wide, full thickness calving events. Velocities at the terminus change by +/- 10% in response to rising and falling tides within a partial-width, 2.5-km-long floating ice tongue; however these tidal perturbations damp out within 2 km of the grounding line. Inversions for basal shear stress and force balance analyses together show that basal shear stresses in excess of 300 kPa support the majority of the driving stress at thick, steep Rink Isbræ. These observational and modeling results tell a consistent story in which a strong bed may limit the unstable tidewater glacier retreats observed elsewhere. Rink Isbræ has an erosion resistant quartzite bed with low fracture density. We hypothesize that this geology may play a major role in the bed strength.

  11. Towards multi-decadal to multi-millennial ice core records from coastal west Greenland ice caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sarah B.; Osman, Matthew B.; Trusel, Luke D.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Smith, Ben E.; Evans, Matthew J.; Frey, Karen E.; Arienzo, Monica; Chellman, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic region, and Greenland in particular, is undergoing dramatic change as characterized by atmospheric warming, decreasing sea ice, shifting ocean circulation patterns, and rapid ice sheet mass loss, but longer records are needed to put these changes into context. Ice core records from the Greenland ice sheet have yielded invaluable insight into past climate change both regionally and globally, and provided important constraints on past surface mass balance more directly, but these ice cores are most often from the interior ice sheet accumulation zone, at high altitude and hundreds of kilometers from the coast. Coastal ice caps, situated around the margins of Greenland, have the potential to provide novel high-resolution records of local and regional maritime climate and sea surface conditions, as well as contemporaneous glaciological changes (such as accumulation and surface melt history). But obtaining these records is extremely challenging. Most of these ice caps are unexplored, and thus their thickness, age, stratigraphy, and utility as sites of new and unique paleoclimate records is largely unknown. Access is severely limited due to their high altitude, steep relief, small surface area, and inclement weather. Furthermore, their relatively low elevation and marine moderated climate can contribute to significant surface melting and degradation of the ice stratigraphy. We recently targeted areas near the Disko Bay region of central west Greenland where maritime ice caps are prevalent but unsampled, as potential sites for new multi-decadal to multi-millennial ice core records. In 2014 & 2015 we identified two promising ice caps, one on Disko Island (1250 m. asl) and one on Nuussuaq Peninsula (1980 m. asl) based on airborne and ground-based geophysical observations and physical and glaciochemical stratigraphy from shallow firn cores. In spring 2015 we collected ice cores at both sites using the Badger-Eclipse electromechanical drill, transported by a medley

  12. Recent changes in North West Greenland climate documented by NEEM shallow ice core data and simulations, and implications for past temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Stack records of accumulation, d18O and deuterium excess were produced from up to 4 shallow ice cores at NEEM (North-West Greenland), spanning 1724-2007 and updated to 2011 using pit water stable isotope data. Signal-to-noise ratio is high for d18O (1.3) and accumulation (1.2) but is low for deuterium excess (0.4). No long-term trend is observed in the accumulation record. By contrast, NEEM d18O shows multi-decadal increasing trends in the late 19th century and since the 1980s. Decadal d18O and accumulation variability is in phase with Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation indices, and enhanced at the beginning of the 19th century. Large-scale spatial coherency is detected between NEEM and other Greenland ice core and temperature records, strongest for North-West Greenland d18O and summer South-West coastal temperature instrumental records. The strength of correlations with the North Atlantic Oscillation is smaller than in central or south Greenland. The strongest positive d18O values are recorded at NEEM in 2010, followed by 1928, while maximum accumulation occurs in 1933. The coldest/driest decades are depicted at NEEM in 1815-1825 and 1836-1836. The spatial structure of these warm/ wet years and cold/dry decades is investigated using all available Greenland ice cores. During the period 1958-2011, the NEEM accumulation and d18O records are highly correlated with simulated precipitation, temperature and d18O from simulations performed with MAR, LMDZiso and ECHAM5iso atmospheric models, nudged to atmospheric reanalyses. Model-data agreement is better using ERA reanalyses than NCEP/NCAR and 20CR ones. Model performance is poor for deuterium excess. Gridded temperature reconstructions, instrumental data and model outputs at NEEM are used to estimate the d18O-temperature relationship for the strong warming period in 1979-2007. The estimated slope of this relationship is 1.1±0.2‰ per °C, about twice larger than previously used to estimate last interglacial temperature

  13. The use of electromagnetic induction methods for establishing quantitative permafrost models in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingeman-Nielsen, Thomas; Brandt, Inooraq

    2010-05-01

    The sedimentary settings at West Greenlandic town and infrastructural development sites are dominated by fine-grained marine deposits of late to post glacial origin. Prior to permafrost formation, these materials were leached by percolating precipitation, resulting in depletion of salts. Present day permafrost in these deposits is therefore very ice-rich with ice contents approaching 50-70% vol. in some areas. Such formations are of great concern in building and construction projects in Greenland, as they loose strength and bearing capacity upon thaw. It is therefore of both technical and economical interest to develop methods to precisely investigate and determine parameters such as ice-content and depth to bedrock in these areas. In terms of geophysical methods for near surface investigations, traditional methods such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Refraction Seismics (RS) have generally been applied with success. The Georadar method usually fails due to very limited penetration depth in the fine-grained materials, and Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) methods are seldom applicable for quantitative interpretation due to the very high resistivities causing low induced currents and thus small secondary fields. Nevertheless, in some areas of Greenland the marine sequence was exposed relatively late, and as a result the sediments may not be completely leached of salts. In such cases, layers with pore water salinity approaching that of sea water, may be present below an upper layer of very ice rich permafrost. The saline pore water causes a freezing-point depression which results in technically unfrozen sediments at permafrost temperatures around -3 °C. Traditional ERT and VES measurements are severely affected by equivalency problems in these settings, practically prohibiting reasonable quantitative interpretation without constraining information. Such prior information may be obtained of course from boreholes, but equipment capable of drilling

  14. Investigations on soil organic carbon stocks and active layer thickness in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gries, Philipp; Wagner, Julia; Kandolf, Lorenz; Henkner, Jessica; Kühn, Peter; Scholten, Thomas; Schmidt, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    The soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the first 300 cm of arctic soils includes about 50 % of the estimated global terrestrial belowground organic carbon, which makes about 1024 Pg C and up to 496 Pg within the upper permafrost one meter. Being a sensible ecosystem, the Arctic is sensitive to climate change. Hence, thawing of permafrost-affected soils to greater depth and for longer periods increases the release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, which queries soils as an important carbon pool. Especially in arctic environments, sparse soil data and limited knowledge of soil processes cause underestimation of SOC stocks. Due to different regional climatic conditions, changing soil-environmental conditions result in varying soil organic carbon contents in Greenland. In West Greenland, coastal oceanic conditions turn into continental climate at the ice margin showing less precipitation, higher insolation and increasing permafrost thickness. The objectives of this study are (i) to determine SOC stocks and active layer thickness (ALT), (ii) to identify main environmental factors influencing SOC stocks and ALT, and (iii) to specify differences of SOC stocks, ALT and influencing factors induced by a climatic trend in West Greenland. Respecting different climatic conditions, one study area is situated next to the ice margin in the Kangerlussuaq area and the second one is located near Sisimiut at the coast. Both study areas (2 km2) are representative for each region and have similar environmental settings. Soil samples were taken from depth increments (0-25, 25-50, 50-100, and 100-200 cm) at 80 sampling locations in each study area. Additionally, we addressed soil moisture content (TDR-measurements), ALT, and soil horizons, vegetation (types, coverage), and terrain characteristics (aspect, geomorphology) at each sampling point. As a preliminary result, at the coast the average SOC stock is 13.1 kg/m2 in the upper 25 cm and about 35.9 kg/m2 in the first 200 cm. The amount of

  15. Ice-dammed lake drainage in west Greenland: Drainage pattern and implications on ice flow and bedrock motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Nielsen, Karina; Mouginot, Jeremie

    2017-07-01

    Ice-dammed lakes drain frequently in Greenland, but the impacts of these events differ between sites. Here we study the quasi-cyclic behavior of the 40 km2 Lake Tininnilik in west Greenland and its impact on ice flow and crustal deformation. Data reveal rapid drainage of 1.83 ± 0.17 km3 of water in less than 7 days in 2010, leading to a speedup of the damming glacier, and an instantaneous modeled elastic bedrock uplift of 18.6 ± 0.1 mm confirmed by an independent lakeside GPS record. Since ice-dammed lakes are common on Greenland, our results highlight the importance of including other sources of surface loading in addition to ice mass change, when assessing glacial isostatic adjustment or elastic rebound using geodetic data. Moreover, the results illustrates a linkage between subglacial discharge and ice surface velocity, important for assessing ice flux, and thus mass balance, in a future warming climate.

  16. Understanding the Factors That Control Snow Albedo Over Central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, P.; Bergin, M. H.; Dibb, J. E.; Domine, F.; Carmagnola, C.; Courville, Z.; Sokolik, I. N.; Lefer, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Snow albedo plays a critical role in the energy balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. In particular, the snow albedo influences the extent to which absorbing aerosols over Greenland (i.e. dust and black carbon) force climate. With this in mind the spectral snow albedo, physical snow properties, and snow chemistry were measured during May, June, and July 2011 at Summit, Greenland to investigate the variability in snow spectral albedo and its impact on aerosol direct radiative forcing. Optical and chemical properties of aerosol and aerosol optical depth were also measured as part of this study. Strellis et. al. will present a preliminary assessment of aerosol radiative forcing at Summit in summer 2011, in a separate presentation at this meeting. Spectral albedo was measured from 350-2500 nm with an ASD FieldSpec Pro spectroradiometer daily at four permanent sites and a moving fifth site where snow was sampled for characterization, as well as in more intensive diurnal and spatial surveys. Snow specific surface area (SSA), the ratio of snow crystal surface area to mass, was measured with a Dual Frequency Integrating Sphere (DUFISSS) at 1310 nm and 1550 nm, as well as with dyed and cast samples collected for stereology analysis. Snow stratigraphy, crystal size, and density were also measured on a daily basis, and snow samples will be analyzed for microstructural parameters determined from micro-CT imaging. Snow chemistry measurements include specific elements, major ions, and elemental and organic carbon. The time series of daily albedo measurements ranged from 0.88 to nearly 1.0 in visible wavelengths and from 0.42 to 0.65 in the near infrared. Changes as large as 0.1 were observed between consecutive daily measurements across the spectrum. Preliminary results show a strong correlation between variation in albedo and co-located measurements of snow specific surface area, specifically in the near infrared. By conducting our measurements near solar noon every day, and

  17. East Asian origin of central Greenland last glacial dust: just one possible scenario?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Svensson, Anders; Klötzli, Urs Stephan; Manning, Christina; Németh, Tibor; Kovács, János

    2016-04-01

    Dust in Greenland ice cores is used to reconstruct the activity of dust emitting regions and atmospheric circulation for the last glacial period. However, the source dust material to Greenland over this period is the subject of considerable uncertainty. Here we use new clay mineral and Sr-Nd isotopic data from eleven loess samples collected around the Northern Hemisphere and compare the 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic signatures of fine (<10 μm) separates to existing Greenland ice core dust data (GISP2, GRIP; [1]; [2]). Smectite contents and kaolinite/chlorite (K/C) ratios allow exclusion of continental US dust emitting regions as potential sources, because of the very high (>3.6) K/C ratios and extremely high (>~70%) smectite contents. At the same time, Sr-Nd isotopic compositions demonstrate that ice core dust isotopic compositions can be explained by East Asian (Chinese loess) and/or Central/East Central European dust contributions. Central/East Central European loess Sr-Nd isotopic compositions overlap most with ice core dust, while the Sr isotopic signature of Chinese loess is slightly more radiogenic. Nevertheless, an admixture of 90‒10 % from Chinese loess and circum-Pacific volcanic material would also account for the Sr‒Nd isotopic ratios of central Greenland LGM dust. At the same time, sourcing of ice core dust from Alaska, continental US and NE Siberia seems less likely based on Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. The data demonstrate that currently no unique source discrimination for Greenland dust is possible using both published and our new data [3]. Thus, there is a need to identify more diagnostic tracers. Based on initial Hf isotope analyses of fine separates of three loess samples (continental US, Central Europe, China), an apparent dependence of Hf isotopic signatures on the relative proportions of radiogenic clay minerals (primarily illite) was found, as these fine dust fractions are apparently zircon-free. The observed difference between

  18. Accumulation rates during 1311-2011 CE in North Central Greenland derived from air-borne radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Nanna; Eisen, Olaf; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Freitag, Johannes; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Lewis, Cameron; Nielsen, Lisbeth; Paden, John; Winter, Anna; Wilhelms, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Radar-detected internal layering contains information on past accumulation rates and patterns. In this study, we assume that the radar layers are isochrones, and use the layer stratigraphy in combination with ice-core measurements and numerical methods to retrieve accumulation information for the northern part of central Greenland. Measurements of the dielectric properties of an ice core from the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, allow for correlation of the radar layers with volcanic horizons to obtain an accurate age of the layers. We obtain accumulation patterns averaged over 100 a for the period 1311-2011. Our results show a clear trend of high accumulation rates west of the ice divide and low accumulation rates east of the ice divide. At the NEEM site the accumulation pattern is persistent during our study period and only small temporal variations occur in the accumulation rate. However, from approximately 200 km south of the NEEM drill site, the accumulation rate shows temporal variations based on our centennial averages. We attribute this variation to shifts in the location of the high-low accumulation boundary that usually is aligned with the ice divide, but appears to have moved across the divide in the past.

  19. A synthesis of the ongoing seasonal work in a west Greenland tidewater outlet glacier fjord, Godthåbsfjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, J.; Bendtsen, J.; Rysgaard, S.

    2015-12-01

    The coastal waters off west Greenland is subjected to significant temperature fluctuations which might affect the mass loss from local tidewater outlet glaciers from the Greenland Ice Sheet in different ways. We present a comprehensive hydrographic data set from a west Greenland fjord, Godthåbsfjord, a fjord in contact with the Greenland Ice Sheet through tidewater outlet glaciers. We analyze with respect to water masses, dynamics, seasonal and interannual hydrographic variability. Through seasonal observations of hydrographic and moored observations we recognize a seasonal pattern in the fjords circulation system, where an intermediate baroclinic circulation mode driven by tidal currents at the fjord entrance is associated as an important local heat source for the fjord. Four distinct circulation modes are observed in the fjord of which all can contribute to glacial ice melt. In water observation of a subglacial plume core will be presented and discussed with respect to vertical distribution of water masses and local heat budget in the fjord. The example of the extreme case of subglacial plume will be discussed (ice-dammed lake drainage).

  20. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  1. General view of central and west wings with loading dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of central and west wings with loading dock from north - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mess Hall, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Accumulation rates from central North Greenland during the past 700 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Eisen, Olaf; Nielsen, Lisbeth T.; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Paden, John D.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Winter, Anna; Wilhelms, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A key variable when interpreting the evolution and mass loss from polar ice sheets is the input from the surface mass balance. While ice core records contain information on past accumulation rates, they always only provide information for a single location. Here, we present spatially distributed accumulation rates from central northern Greenland, specifically the area between the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling) and NGRIP (North Greenland Ice Core Project) ice core drill sites. The accumulation rates have been reconstructed using ice-penetrating radar, firn core measurements and inverse methods, and we are able to retrieve both spatial and temporal changes in the accumulation over an area spanning 300 km by 300 km. We investigate the stability of the accumulation pattern over the past several hundred years, and we address the question of how well the measured accumulation rates at the ice core sites capture the regional variations in accumulation. We find that while the accumulation rates at NEEM have been stable for the past 700 years, the NGRIP site has experienced fluctuations in accumulation rate. We interpret this as an indication of shifts in the dominating weather pattern over the ice divide in central North Greenland.

  3. Multi-decadal and seasonal variability of dust observations in West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Mockford, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Since the early 1900s expedition records from west Greenland have reported local dust storms. The Kangerlussuaq region, near the inland ice, is dry (mean annual precipitation <160 mm) with, on average, 150 snow-free days per year. The main local dust sources are active, proglacial outwash plains although reworking of loess deposits may also be important. This paper presents an analysis of 70-years of dust storm observations (1945-2015) based on WMO weather codes 6 (dust haze), 7 (raised dust or sand) and 9 (distant or past dust storm) and associated wind data. The 70-year average number of dust observations days is 5 per year but variable ranging from 0 observations to 23 observations in 1985. Over the past 7 decades the number of dust days has increased from <30 in 1945-54 to >75 in 1995-2004 and 2005-2015. The seasonality of dust observations has remained consistent throughout most of the period. Dust days occur all year round but are most frequent in May-June and September-October and are associated with minimum snow cover and glacial meltwater-driven sediment supply to the outwash plains during spring and fall flood events. Wind regime is bimodal dominated by katabatic winds from the northeast, which are strongest and most frequent during winter months (Nov-Jan), with less frequent, southwesterly winds generated by Atlantic storms mostly confined to spring (May, June). The southwesterly winds are those most likely to transport dust onto the Greenland ice sheet.

  4. Basin-Wide Mass Balance of Jakobshavn Isbræ (West Greenland) during 1880-2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muresan, I. S.; Khan, S. A.; Aschwanden, A.; Langen, P. L.; Khroulev, C.; Box, J. E.; Kjaer, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Greenland's main outlet glaciers have more than doubled their contribution to global sea-level rise over the past decade through acceleration of ice discharge. Jakobshavn Isbræ (JI) in west Greenland is the largest outlet glacier in terms of drainage area.Here we use a 3-D modeling approach to study the mechanisms controlling dynamic changes at the terminus of JI over a period of 220 years. Over 100 simulations are performed with different sets of parameters where the calving fronts and the grounding lines are free to evolve in time under atmospheric and oceanic forcing. We find that the thinning and the retreat that starts at the calving front and then propagates upstream is mostly controlled by a loss of resistive stresses at the terminus through glacier dynamics induced calving rather than by changes in oceanic temperatures. Three major accelerations are identified in 1928, 1998 and in the summer of 2003. The acceleration which started in 1928 slowly faded by 1948, while the accelerations in 1998 and 2003 sustain the high velocities observed at JI in the last decade. Further, we find that under atmospheric RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 forcing (no RCP ocean forcing included), an increase in ocean temperatures of just 0.7 °C (relative to 1880-2012) is enough to trigger a collapse of the JI's southern tributary by 2050 which further destabilizes JI and unleashes a major glacial collapse of ~25 km. JI's contribution to SLR is found to be ~2.8 mm (~1014 Gt) for the period 1880 to 2014, from which the contribution between 1997 to 2014 represents 27 %. By the end of the century contributions to SLR as high as ~11 mm (~4000 Gt under RCP 8.5 and almost 300% increase relative to 1880-2014) can be expected from Jakobshavn Isbræ only. Our choice of ice sheet model comprises the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM).

  5. Variability of subglacial discharge recorded with thermal infrared timelapse of a tidewater glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, L. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Brunsell, N. A.; Catania, G. A.; Fried, M.; Bartholomaus, T.; Felikson, D.; Sutherland, D.; Carroll, D.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.; Walker, R. T.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Subglacial hydrology and the dynamics therein are important modulators of ice flow in the Greenland Ice Sheet. At tidewater outlet glaciers the characteristics of proglacial discharge affect fjord circulation, sediment deposition, submarine melt rates, and iceberg calving. Information about the spatio-temporal variability of discharge is limited by the challenges of in situ data collection at tidewater glaciers. Here, we present summertime measurements of subglacial discharge variability using a thermal infrared (7.5μm to 13μm) camera and intervalometer at Kangerlussuup Sermia (KS), a ~4km wide outlet glacier in the Uummannaq Bay region of West Greenland (71.46 N, 51.43 W). KS has an advantageous geometry for this investigation because of its shallow grounding zone and well-entrenched subglacial hydrologic system. In tandem, these characteristics promote buoyant freshwater to rise to the fjord surface from discrete outlets at the glacier's base. We investigate the timing of plume activity at these outlets and discuss potential controls on outlet switching. Raw camera measurements cannot be accurately converted to surface temperature without correcting for environmental variables and scene geometry, both of which are time-evolving during data acquisition. Our processing methodology relies on a variety of existing techniques -- image segmentation, ray casting, atmospheric radiative transfer modeling, Monte Carlo simulations -- and a variety of ancillary data products -- satellite imagery, atmospheric reanalysis, meteorologic and hydrologic measurements -- to produce the final results. What is gained is an unprecedented view into interactions between the cryosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere that control the dynamic and sensitive terminus region of a tidewater outlet glacier.

  6. Modelled and observed present-day state of the Jakobshavn Isbræ, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Muresan, I. S.; Aschwanden, A.; Khroulev, C.

    2014-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ located in west Greenland drains approximately 7.5 % of the area of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS). Understanding its sensitivity to climatic forcing is critical for assessing mass balance of the GrIS. Here we use a high-resolution, three dimensional and time-dependent regional outlet glacier model developed as part of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) forced by climatology datasets from RACMO2 to model present-day state of Jakobshavn Isbræ. Our choice of modelling consists of a forward integration in time (hindcasting) for 1990-2012 with monthly climatic forcing. To assess the modeled mass change, we use observed ice volume change from airborne and satellite laser altimetry from ATM, ICESat, and LVIS during 1997-2013 and convert to mass change. However, the airborne and satellite measurements are conducted few times per year, and may provide yearly mass loss rates only. To assess weekly to monthly scale mass variability, we use measurements of bedrock displacement from permanent GPS sites during 2005-2013. The GPS data provide daily to monthly scale estimates of bedrock displacements caused by the earth's elastic response to ice mass change from Jakobshavn Isbræ. Additionally, we assess modeled ice velocities (and velocity changes) with observed velocities obtained from measurements of ice motion by satellite interferometric synthetic-aperture radar (InSAR) data from the RADARSAT-1 satellite.Our results show good agreement between modeled and observed mass change and velocity change from weekly to long-term timespan. Both model and observations show huge mass loss anomalies in 2010 and 2012 caused by enhanced melting during summer months.

  7. The Holocene sedimentary history of the Kangerlussuaq Fjord-valley fill, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Joep E. A.; de Winter, Ilja L.; Overeem, Irina; Drijkoningen, Guy G.; Lykke-Andersen, Holger

    2012-03-01

    West Greenland has been intensively studied to reconstruct and better understand past relative sea level changes and deglacial history. This study extends these efforts by linking sea level and deglacial history to the sedimentary infill successions of Kangerlussuaq Fjord and associated landward valleys. Based on published and new land- and sea-based geophysical data, radiocarbon dates and geological observations we have characterized the infill and reconstructed the sedimentation history during the Holocene. Based on a revised sea level curve and data presented in this paper we defined three depositional phases. Phase I (>7000 yr BP) is represented by dominant glaciomarine deposition associated with a tide-water glacier system. As the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) continued to retreat it became land based. During phase II (7000-1500 yr BP) two separate depocenters formed. Keglen delta depocenter arose from a temporary stabilization phase of the GIS and prograded rapidly over the glaciomarine deposits of Phase I. Further inland, proglacial lake formation and subsequent sedimentary infill associated with the ongoing GIS retreat is represents the second depocenter. The Watson River connected both depocenters by a flood plain which transferred sediment from the GIS to the Keglen delta. Ongoing sea level fall due to glacio-isostastic uplift combined with a gradually cooler and dryer climate resulted in terrace formation along the Watson River flood plain. Around 4000 yr BP, the GIS margin reached its most landward location and began to advance to its present location. The final phase (Phase III; <1500 yr BP) is represented by a stabilized GIS position and a relative sea level rise which led to aggrading conditions near the present-day delta plain of Watson River. Simultaneously, subaqueous channels were formed at the delta front by hyperpycnal flows associated with jökulhlaup events.

  8. A 3D Full-Stokes Calving Model Applied to a West Greenland Outlet Glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Joe; Christoffersen, Poul; Zwinger, Thomas; Råback, Peter; Chauché, Nolwenn; Hubbard, Alun; Toberg, Nick; Luckman, Adrian; Benn, Doug; Slater, Donald; Cowton, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Iceberg calving from outlet glaciers accounts for around half of all mass loss from both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The diverse nature of calving and its complex links to both internal dynamics and external climate make it challenging to incorporate into models of glaciers and ice sheets. Consequently, calving represents one of the most significant uncertainties in predictions of future sea level rise. Here, we present results from a new 3D full-Stokes calving model developed in Elmer/Ice and applied to Store Glacier, the second largest outlet glacier in West Greenland. The calving model implements the crevasse depth criterion, which states that calving occurs when surface and basal crevasses penetrate the full thickness of the glacier. The model also implements a new 3D rediscretization approach and a time-evolution scheme which allow the calving front to evolve realistically through time. We use the model to test Store's sensitivity to two seasonal environmental processes believed to significantly influence calving: submarine melt undercutting and ice mélange buttressing. Store Glacier discharges 13.9 km3 of ice annually, and this calving rate shows a strong seasonal trend. We aim to reproduce this seasonal trend by forcing the model with present day levels of submarine melting and ice mélange buttressing. Sensitivity to changes in these frontal processes was also investigated, by forcing the model with a) increased submarine melt rates acting over longer periods of time and b) decreased mélange buttressing force acting over a reduced period. The model displays a range of observed calving behaviour and provides a good match to the observed seasonal evolution of the Store's terminus. The results indicate that ice mélange is the primary driver of the observed seasonal advance of the terminus and the associated seasonal variation in calving rate. The model also demonstrates a significant influence from submarine melting on calving rate. The results

  9. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Doyle, S. H.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Bougamont, M. H.; Todd, J.; Toberg, N.; Nicholls, K. W.; Box, J.; Walter, J. I.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by 1 mm per year. The basal controls on these fast-flowing glaciers are, however, poorly understood, with the implication that numerical ice sheet models needed to predict future dynamic ice loss from Greenland relies on uncertain and often untested basal parameterizations. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment - SAFIRE - is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by drilling to the bed of Store Glacier, a fast-flowing outlet glacier terminating in Uummannaq Fjord, West Greenland. In 2014, we gained access to the bed in four boreholes drilled to depths of 603-616 m near the center of the glacier, 30 km inland from the calving terminus where ice flows at a rate of 700 m/year. A seismic survey showed the glacier bed to consist of water-saturated, soft sediment. The water level in all four boreholes nevertheless dropped rapidly to 80 m below the ice surface when the drill connected with a basal water system, indicating effective drainage over a sedimentary bed. We were able to install wired sensor strings at the bed (water pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity and turbidity) and within the glacier (temperature and tilt) in three boreholes. The sensors operated for up to 80+ days before cables stretched and ultimately snapped due to high internal strain. The data collected during this sensor deployment show ice as cold as -21 degrees Celcius; yet, temperature of water in the basal water system was persistently above the local freezing point. With diurnal variations detected in several sensor records, we hypothesise that surface water lubricates the ice flow while also warming basal ice. The fast basal motion of Store Glacier not only occurs by basal sliding, but from high rates of concentrated strain in the bottom third of the glacier

  10. 13C-Depleted carbon microparticles in >3700-Ma sea-floor sedimentary rocks from west greenland

    PubMed

    Rosing

    1999-01-29

    Turbiditic and pelagic sedimentary rocks from the Isua supracrustal belt in west Greenland [more than 3700 million years ago (Ma)] contain reduced carbon that is likely biogenic. The carbon is present as 2- to 5-micrometer graphite globules and has an isotopic composition of delta13C that is about -19 per mil (Pee Dee belemnite standard). These data and the mode of occurrence indicate that the reduced carbon represents biogenic detritus, which was perhaps derived from planktonic organisms.

  11. Arctic Outflow West Of Greenland: Nine Years Of Volume And Freshwater Transports From Observations In Davis Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, B.; Lee, C.; Petrie, B.; Moritz, R. E.; Kwok, R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent Arctic changes suggest alterations in the export of freshwater from the Arctic to the North Atlantic, with conceivable impacts on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning circulation. Approximately 50% of the Arctic outflow exits west of Greenland, traveling through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and into Baffin Bay before crossing Davis Strait. The CAA outflow contributes over 50% of the net southward freshwater outflow through Davis Strait. The remainder is deeper outflow from Baffin Bay, flow from the West Greenland Current and runoff from West Greenland and CAA glaciers. Since September 2004, an observational program in Davis Strait has quantified volume and freshwater transport variability. The year-round program includes velocity, temperature and salinity measurements from 15 moorings spanning the full width (330 km) of the strait accompanied by autonomous Seagliders surveys (average profile separation = 4 km) and autumn ship-based hydrographic sections. Over the shallow Baffin Island and West Greenland shelves, moored instrumentation provides temperature and salinity measurements near the ice-ocean interface. From 2004-2013, the average net volume and liquid freshwater transports are -1.6 ± 0.2 Sv, -94 ± 7 mSv, respectively (salinity referenced to 34.8 and negative indicates southward transport); sea ice contributes an additional -10 ± 1 mSv. Over this period, volume and liquid freshwater transports show significant interannual variability and no clear trends, but a comparison with reanalyzed 1987-90 data indicate a roughly 40% decrease in net southward liquid volume transport and a corresponding an almost 30% decrease in freshwater transport. Connections between the Arctic are also captured, e.g., a unique yearlong Davis Strait freshening event starting September 2009 that was likely driven by an earlier freshening (January 2009 - April/May 2010) in the Canadian Arctic. The Davis Strait autumn 2009 salinity minimum was fresher (by about 0

  12. The origin of decoupled Hf-Nd isotope compositions in Eoarchean rocks from southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J. Elis; Münker, Carsten; Polat, Ali; Rosing, Minik T.; Schulz, Toni

    2011-11-01

    Radiogenic isotope compositions of Hf and Nd are typically coupled in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic mafic rocks due to a similar behaviour of Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd during mantle melting. Eoarchean rocks, for instance those from southern West Greenland, exhibit an apparent decoupling of Hf and Nd isotope compositions. This apparent decoupling may either indicate metamorphic disturbance or, alternatively, mirror early differentiation processes in the silicate Earth. To evaluate the issue, we performed combined measurements of Hf-Nd isotope compositions together with major and trace element concentrations for well preserved >3720 to >3800 Ma old tholeiitic metabasalts and gabbros from the ˜3700 Ma and ˜3800 Ma old terranes of the Isua Supracrustal Belt, southern West Greenland. In contrast to younger mafic rocks, calculated initial ɛHf-ɛNd values of the Isua tholeiites show similar spreads and are both near chondritic to strongly depleted (-0.7 to +6.3 and -0.8 to +4.4, respectively), also in contrast to previously reported more depleted signatures in nearby boninite-like metabasalts of the Garbenschiefer unit. An evaluation of alteration effects based on preserved major and trace element arrays reveals pristine magmatic trends and therefore the measured isotope compositions indeed in most cases characterize contrasting Eoarchean mantle sources. In accord with this view, compositions of the Isua metabasalts yield Eoarchean regression ages in Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isochron spaces, overlapping with emplacement ages inferred from crosscutting relationships with tonalites. Lutetium-Hf systematics of the Isua metabasalts studied here, yield clear isochron relationships. For both terranes, there is some scatter in Sm-Nd space, indicating early disturbance of the Sm-Nd system close in time to the extrusion ages, possibly by seafloor alteration. Trace element compositions of the metabasalts indicate an arc setting and a strong source overprint by melt-like subduction components. It is

  13. Active seismic profile in east-central Greenland. Seismic explosion sources on an ice cap.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgin, Alexey; Thybo, Hans

    2017-04-01

    Controlled source seismic investigation of crustal structure below ice covers is an emerging technique. We have recently conducted an explosive refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic experiment on the ice cap in east-central Greenland. The data quality is high for all shot points and a full crustal model is modelled. A crucial challenge for applying the technique is to control the sources. Here, we present data that describe the efficiency of explosive sources in the ice cover. Analysis of the data shows, that the ice cap traps a significant amount of energy, which is observed as a strong ice wave. The ice cap leads to low transmission of energy into the crust such that charges need be larger than in conventional onshore experiments to obtain reliable seismic signals. The strong reflection coefficient at the base of the ice generates strong multiples which may mask for secondary phases. This effect may be crucial for acquisition of reflection seismic profiles on ice caps. Our experience shows that it is essential to use optimum depth for the charges and to seal the boreholes carefully. We also present the crustal structure model in the continental part of Greenland along the profile based on the joint reflection/refraction tomographic inversion. The model shows strong lateral variations in the crustal thickness. The modeled Moho depth is changing from 39 to 47 km. The large volume of the lower most crust is observed in the central region of Greenland, while been absent in the costal region. The observed crustal structure corresponds to the transition from the younger terrane affected by the Caledonian orogeny to the stable cratonic region. Furthermore, the presence of the Icelandic plume ca. 60-40 Ma in the study area may also have a significant effect on the crustal evolution of the Greenland Caledonides and its transition to the Greenland Craton.

  14. Modelling of subglacial hydrological development during a rapid lake drainage event, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, C. F.; Kulessa, B.; Pimentel, S.; Tsai, V. C.; Doyle, S. H.; Rutt, I. C.; Jones, G. A.; Booth, A. D.; Hubbard, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from a local-scale model of subglacial hydrological development during a rapid lake drainage event on the Russell Glacier catchment in West Greenland. Previous models applied to rapid lake drainage events include a turbulent radial model (Tsai and Rice, 2010) and a 1-D flowband model (Pimentel and Flowers, 2011). Both models have limitations for application to lake drainage events. For the former, the radial extent of water flow is restricted to several ice thicknesses and no provision is made for the development of basal channels. For the latter model, the input of water directly from the lake to the bed without modulation by englacial flow, together with the fact that lateral basal flux is neglected, causes unrealistic subglacial pressure levels. To resolve these limitations, we link the two models together, thus allowing both local radial flux and downstream development of a coupled efficient and distributed drainage system. Our model is constrained by inputs from fieldwork completed in summer 2010 at a rapid lake drainage site in the land-terminating region of West Greenland. Passive seismic records indicate the region of basal water injection. Reflection seismic amplitude vs. angle (AVA) surveys allow analysis of the basal material characteristics. Lake drainage rate and differential GPS vertical and horizontal motion records are used as constraints for our model outputs. Our preliminary results suggest that large basal channels do not necessarily form during the rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes. A lack of an efficient drainage system has an impact on the local ice dynamics and the treatment of lake drainage events in larger-scale dynamic models. References: Pimentel, S and Flowers, G. (2011). A numerical study of hydrologically driven glacier dynamics and subglacial flooding, Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Science, 467 (2126): doi: 10.1098/rspa.2010.0211. Tsai, V.C. and Rice, J.R. (2010). A

  15. Two years of Irminger Ring observations offshore of the West Greenland Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femke de Jong, M.; Bower, Amy S.; Furey, Heather; Lilly, Jonathan M.

    2013-04-01

    Anti-cyclonic eddies, called Irminger Rings, shed from the boundary current along the west coast of Greenland, transport warm and saline Irminger Current water into the interior Labrador Sea. The transport of heat and salt by Irminger Rings into the relatively fresh and cold Labrador Sea is thought to be important in the restratification of the basin after convection. However, since there are few observations, recent estimates of the importance of Irminger Rings are mostly based on models. This study shows new data from a mooring deployed offshore of the west Greenland shelf near the local maximum of eddy kinetic energy associated with the shedding of Irminger Rings. The mooring was deployed between September 2007 and September 2009. It recorded the hydrographic properties and current velocities of the water column, thus obtaining a time series of passing Irminger Rings. During the 2 year mooring deployment 12 eddies fitting the description of an Irminger Ring were observed to pass the mooring location. The Irminger Ring core properties show a seasonal cycle in temperature and salinity with a range of about 2°C and 0.05 psu, with maxima observed in late fall. This results in larger heat and salt contribution estimates compared to observations in literature, which were either taken earlier in the year or further downstream sampling older modified Irminger Rings. Some inter-annual variability was also observed. Most of the 12 Irminger Rings described here were observed during the first year. The decrease in the number of observed eddies during the second year of deployment appears to be due to a change in boundary current strength, as determined from satellite altimetry and surveys of the AR7W section. The resulting change in the circulation pattern was evident in the current meter records at the mooring site. More information about the seasonal to inter-annual variability is needed to fully understand the exchange between the boundary current and the interior

  16. INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FIRST FLOOR WEST CENTRAL ELEVATOR LOBBY DETAIL VIEW, FACING SOUTHEAST. - NASA Industrial Plant, Systems Integration & Checkout Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Bedrock topography of west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, R.E.; Runkle, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Bedrock in Iowa (Hershey 1969) generally is overlain by deposits of glacial drift and alluvium. The drift, consisting of glacial till and glacial outwash, ranges in thickness from zero to more than 500 feet in western Iowa; the alluvium in stream valleys ranges in thickness from less than 1 to more than 70 feet. The configuration of the bedrock surface is the result of a long period of preglacial erosion and during shorter, but more intense, periods of interglacial erosion. This map, for a 12-county area in west-central Iowa, is the eighth of a series of nine reports that will provide statewide coverage of the bedrock topograhy of Iowa. 

  18. Precipitation zones of west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Medina, Rose L.

    2007-01-01

    Whether Nevada can sustain its fast rate of growth depends in part on accurately quantifying the amount of water that is available, including precipitation. The Precipitation-Zone Method (PZM) is a way of estimating mean annual precipitation at any point. The PZM was developed using data from west-central Nevada and northeastern California, but preliminary analysis indicates it can be applied to the entire state. Patterns in the spatial distribution of precipitation were identified by mapping station locations and plotting 1971-2000 precipitation normals versus station elevation. Precipitation zones are large areas where precipitation is linearly related to elevation. Four precipitation zones with different linear relations were delineated; these zones cover much of west-central Nevada. Regression equations with adjusted R2 values of 0.89 to 0.95 were developed for each zone. All regression equations estimate similar precipitation rates at 4,000 feet, but the slopes of the regression equations become progressively shallower to the south. A geographic information system, 30-meter digital elevation model, and the regression equations were used to estimate the distribution and volumes of precipitation in each zone and in hydrographic areas of the Walker River Basin. Comparison between the PZM and Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) indicate PRISM estimates are linearly related to elevation at low elevations in each zone, but PRISM estimates become non-linear at high elevations and are up to 2.5 times greater than the normals. However, PRISM under-estimates more than it over-estimates precipitation compared to the PZM. The PZM estimated the same or larger volumes of precipitation compared to PRISM in three of the zones, and the larger volumes mostly were from areas that receive greater than 15 inches/year of precipitation. Additional work is needed to accurately estimate mean annual precipitation throughout Nevada.

  19. Ice Sheet Meltwater Impacts on Biological Productivity in High-Latitude Coastal Zones - Observations and Model Results for West Antarctica and Southwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, P. L.; Oliver, H.; Sherrell, R. M.; Stammerjohn, S. E.; St-Laurent, P.; Hofmann, E. E.; Mote, T. L.; Castelao, R. M.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Arrigo, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Surface mass balance observations and models confirm that both the west Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets have undergone accelerating ice mass losses during the past decade. These losses enhance freshwater discharge to the ocean and have important implications for ocean circulation and sea level, but they can also impact marine ecosystems and carbon cycling. High-latitude primary productivity is limited by light or nutrients (or both), and phytoplankton access to these limiting factors can be altered by freshwater additions. Mechanisms for delivering meltwater to the ocean are complex and depend in part on whether the melt occurs at the ice-atmosphere or ice-ocean interface. Marine-terminus glaciers may generate buoyant plumes at depth, similar to upwelling whereas runoff from glacial termini on land will behave more like a riverine point source at the ocean surface. Here, we present preliminary results from two ongoing efforts to understand these impacts: one from the Amundsen Sea Polynya (ASP) in west Antarctica (NSF-funded INSPIRE), and another from NASA-IDS Ice Sheet Impact Study in coastal Greenland. Field observations from the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE) showed how the enormous phytoplankton bloom in the central ASP depends on an iron supply from the Dotson Ice Shelf (DIS). This outcome implied a three-dimensional pathway for iron, from the DIS cavity to the euphotic zone of the ASP bloom region located 20-100 km offshore. Such a pathway differs from the traditional one-dimensional view, where nutrients are injected into the euphotic zone by vertical mixing. Mesoscale structures and eddies may play a central role. A ROMS model is used to investigate key physical and biogeochemical processes in the ASP region. A similar effort is underway to investigate the fate of extreme melt from Greenland and its impact on primary productivity. In coastal Greenland, meltwater is modeled as surface runoff and the resulting shallower

  20. Quantitative reconstruction of Holocene sea ice and sea surface temperature off West Greenland from the first regional diatom data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, D. W.; Witkowski, A.; Moros, M.; Lloyd, J. M.; Høyer, J. L.; Miettinen, A.; Kuijpers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Holocene oceanographic conditions in Disko Bay, West Greenland, were reconstructed from high-resolution diatom records derived from two marine sediment cores. A modern data set composed of 35 dated surface sediment samples collected along the West Greenland coast accompanied by remote sensing data was used to develop a diatom transfer function to reconstruct April sea ice concentration (SIC) supported by July sea surface temperature (SST) in the area. Our quantitative reconstruction shows that oceanographic changes recorded throughout the last 11,000 years reflect seasonal interplay between spring (April SIC) and summer (July SST) conditions. Our records show clear correlation with climate patterns identified from ice core data from GISP2 and Agassiz-Renland for the early to middle Holocene. The early Holocene deglaciation of western Greenland Ice Sheet was characterized in Disko Bay by initial strong centennial-scale fluctuations in April SIC with amplitude of over 40%, followed by high April SIC and July SST. These conditions correspond to a general warming of the climate in the Northern Hemisphere. A decrease in April SIC and July SST was recorded during the Holocene Thermal Optimum reflecting more stable spring-summer conditions in Disko Bay. During the late Holocene, high April SIC characterized the Medieval Climate Anomaly, while high July SST prevailed during the Little Ice Age, supporting previously identified antiphase relationship between surface waters in West Greenland and climate in NW Europe. This antiphase pattern might reflect seasonal variations in regional oceanographic conditions and large-scale fluctuations within the North Atlantic Oscillation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  1. Divergent parasite faunas in adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou: Natural and anthropogenic influences on diversity☆

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Jillian; Orsel, Karin; Cuyler, Christine; Hoberg, Eric P.; Schmidt, Niels M.; Kutz, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal parasite diversity was characterised for two adjacent populations of west Greenland caribou (Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus) through examinations of abomasa and small intestines collected from adult and subadult females during late winter. Three trichostrongyline (Trichostrongylina: Nematoda) species were identified from the abomasa, although none were recovered from the small intestines, with faunal composition differing between the caribou populations. In caribou from Kangerlussuaq-Sisimiut, Marshallagia marshalli and Teladorsagia boreoarcticus were highly prevalent at 100% and 94.1%, respectively. In contrast, Ostertagia gruehneri was found at 100% prevalence in Akia-Maniitsoq caribou, and was the only abomasal parasite species present in that population. We hypothesise that parasite faunal differences between the populations are a consequence of parasite loss during caribou colonisation of the region approximately 4000–7000 years ago, followed by a more recent spill-over of parasites from muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus wardi) and semi-domesticated Norwegian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) introduced to Kangerlussuaq-Sisimiut and Akia-Maniitsoq regions, respectively, in the 20th century. PMID:24533335

  2. Use of glacial fronts by narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Kristin L; Moon, Twila; Hauser, Donna D W; McGovern, Richard; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Dietz, Rune; Hudson, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Glacial fronts are important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros); however, no studies have quantified which glacial properties attract whales. We investigated the importance of glacial habitats using telemetry data from n = 15 whales tagged in September of 1993, 1994, 2006 and 2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. For 41 marine-terminating glaciers, we estimated (i) narwhal presence/absence, (ii) number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers and (iii) the fraction of narwhals that visited each glacier (at 5, 7 and 10 km) in autumn. We also compiled data on glacier width, ice thickness, ice velocity, front advance/retreat, area and extent of iceberg discharge, bathymetry, subglacial freshwater run-off and sediment flux. Narwhal use of glacial habitats expanded in the 2000s probably due to reduced summer fast ice and later autumn freeze-up. Using a generalized multivariate framework, glacier ice front thickness (vertical height in the water column) was a significant covariate in all models. A negative relationship with glacier velocity was included in several models and glacier front width was a significant predictor in the 2000s. Results suggest narwhals prefer glaciers with potential for higher ambient freshwater melt over glaciers with silt-laden discharge. This may represent a preference for summer freshwater habitat, similar to other Arctic monodontids. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Biogeochemical data from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in a periglacial catchment, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindborg, Tobias; Rydberg, Johan; Tröjbom, Mats; Berglund, Sten; Johansson, Emma; Löfgren, Anders; Saetre, Peter; Nordén, Sara; Sohlenius, Gustav; Andersson, Eva; Petrone, Johannes; Borgiel, Micke; Kautsky, Ulrik; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2016-09-01

    Global warming is expected to be most pronounced in the Arctic where permafrost thaw and release of old carbon may provide an important feedback mechanism to the climate system. To better understand and predict climate effects and feedbacks on the cycling of elements within and between ecosystems in northern latitude landscapes, a thorough understanding of the processes related to transport and cycling of elements is required. A fundamental requirement to reach a better process understanding is to have access to high-quality empirical data on chemical concentrations and biotic properties for a wide range of ecosystem domains and functional units (abiotic and biotic pools). The aim of this study is therefore to make one of the most extensive field data sets from a periglacial catchment readily available that can be used both to describe present-day periglacial processes and to improve predictions of the future. Here we present the sampling and analytical methods, field and laboratory equipment and the resulting biogeochemical data from a state-of-the-art whole-ecosystem investigation of the terrestrial and aquatic parts of a lake catchment in the Kangerlussuaq region, West Greenland. This data set allows for the calculation of whole-ecosystem mass balance budgets for a long list of elements, including carbon, nutrients and major and trace metals. The data set is freely available and can be downloaded from PANGAEA: doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.860961.

  4. Use of glacial fronts by narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in West Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Twila; Hauser, Donna D. W.; McGovern, Richard; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Dietz, Rune; Hudson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Glacial fronts are important summer habitat for narwhals (Monodon monoceros); however, no studies have quantified which glacial properties attract whales. We investigated the importance of glacial habitats using telemetry data from n = 15 whales tagged in September of 1993, 1994, 2006 and 2007 in Melville Bay, West Greenland. For 41 marine-terminating glaciers, we estimated (i) narwhal presence/absence, (ii) number of 24 h periods spent at glaciers and (iii) the fraction of narwhals that visited each glacier (at 5, 7 and 10 km) in autumn. We also compiled data on glacier width, ice thickness, ice velocity, front advance/retreat, area and extent of iceberg discharge, bathymetry, subglacial freshwater run-off and sediment flux. Narwhal use of glacial habitats expanded in the 2000s probably due to reduced summer fast ice and later autumn freeze-up. Using a generalized multivariate framework, glacier ice front thickness (vertical height in the water column) was a significant covariate in all models. A negative relationship with glacier velocity was included in several models and glacier front width was a significant predictor in the 2000s. Results suggest narwhals prefer glaciers with potential for higher ambient freshwater melt over glaciers with silt-laden discharge. This may represent a preference for summer freshwater habitat, similar to other Arctic monodontids. PMID:27784729

  5. Lu-Hf total-rock age for the Amitsoq gneisses, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettingill, H. S.; Patchett, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Lu-Hf total-rock data for the Amitsoq gneisses of West Greenland yield an age of 3.55 + or - 0.22 billion years, based on the decay constant for Lu-176 of 1.96 x 10 to the -11th/year, and an initial Hf-176/Hf-177 ratio of 0.280482 + or - 33. The result is in good agreement with Rb-Sr total-rock and U-Pb zircon ages. In spite of severe metamorphism of the area at 2.9 billion years, zircons from two of the samples have remained on the total-rock line, and define points close to the initial Hf ratio. The initial Hf-176/Hf-177 lies close to a chondritic Hf isotopic evolution curve from 4.55 billion years to present. This is consistent with the igneous precursors to the Amitsoq gneisses having been derived from the mantle at or shortly before 3.6 billion years. Anomalous relationships between Hf concentration and the Lu-176/Hf-177 ratio may suggest that trace element abundances in the Amitsoq gneisses are partly controlled by processes related to metamorphism.

  6. A new Eimeria species (Protozoa: Eimeriidae) from caribou in Ameralik, West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Skirnisson, K; Cuyler, C

    2016-04-01

    Fecal samples of 11 calves shot in the Ameralik area, West Greenland, in August-September 2014 were examined for coccidian parasites. The calves belonged to a population of interbreeding indigenous caribou Rangifer tarandus groenlandicus and feral semi-domestic Norwegian reindeer Rangifer tarandus tarandus. Two coccidian species were found: Eimeria rangiferis and a coccidium that was identified and described as a new species. The latter's sporulated oocyst is spherical or slightly subspherical. Average size is 25.6 × 24.8 μm. The oocyst has two distinct walls. Wall thickness is ∼1.4 μm. The unicolored outer wall is brown, the inner wall is dark gray. The oocysts contain a small polar granule but are devoid of a microphyle. The oocysts enclose four ovoid-shaped sporocysts with a rounded end opposite to the Stieda body. The average size of sporocysts is 15.2 × 7.8 μm. Sporocysts contain a granular sporocyst residuum that forms a spherical cluster between the sporocysts, one large refractile body is present in each sporozoite. The spherical form easily distinguishes oocysts of the new species from the seven previously described eimerid species in R. tarandus. This is the first eimerid described as a new species to the sciences from caribou in the Nearctic.

  7. Plant and vegetation dynamics on Disko Island, west Greenland: snapshots separated by over 40 years.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Terry V; Christensen, Torben R; Jantze, Elin J

    2011-09-01

    We report on a revisit in 2009 to sites where vegetation was recorded in 1967 and 1970 on Disko Island, West Greenland. Re-sampling of the same clones of the grass Phleum alpinum after 39 years showed complete stability in biometrics but dramatic earlier onset of various phenological stages that were not related to changes in population density. In a fell-field community, there was a net species loss, but in a herb-slope community, species losses balanced those that were gained. The type of species establishing and increasing in frequency and/or cover abundance at the fell-field site, particularly prostrate dwarf shrubs, indicates a possible start of a shift towards a heath, rather than a fell-field community. At the herb-slope site, those species that established or increased markedly in frequency and/or cover abundance indicate a change to drier conditions. This is confirmed both by the decrease in abundance of Alchemilla glomerulans and Epilobium hornemanii, and the drying of a nearby pond. The causes of these changes are unknown, although mean annual temperature has risen since 1984.

  8. Zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Central East Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, R.; Born, E.W.; Agger, C.T.; Nielsen, C.O.

    1995-02-01

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 38 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) caught in the Scoresby Sound area, Central East Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. In general, cadmium concentrations were low in muscle, liver and kidney tissue. This finding can be explained by low cadmium levels in the blubber of ringed seals. The concentration of mercury in muscle tissue was low, whereas concentrations in liver and kidney tissue were relatively high. Mercury and cadmium were positively correlated with age in liver and kidney. Zinc was positively correlated with in kidney, and selenium was correlated with age in liver. Contrary to other marine mammals, polar bears had higher mercury levels in the kidneys than in the liver. In all three tissues polar bears had significantly lower cadmium levels than ringed seals from the same area. Mercury levels were significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, where-as levels in the liver and kidney were significantly higher. The previous geographic trend for cadmium and mercury found in Canadian polar bears could be extended to cover East Greenland as well. Hence cadmium levels were higher in Greenland than in Canada, while the opposite was the case for mercury. Greenland polar bears had higher mercury and cadmium contents in livers and kidneys than polar bears from Svalbard. The mercury levels in muscle and liver tissue from polar bears from East Greenland were twice as high as found in bears from western Alaska, but half the levels found in northern Alaska. Cadmium and zinc were partially correlated in kidney tissue, and this was found for mercury and selenium as well. Cadmium and zinc showed molar ratios close to unity with the highest concentrations occurring in kidney tissue, while the levels of zinc exceeded cadmium in muscle and liver tissue by up to several decades. Mercury and selenium showed molar ratios close to unity in liver and kidneys. 56 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. 1. General view to west along Central Street. Photo shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view to west along Central Street. Photo shows Calvin T. Call House (HABS No. NH-224), with Thompson House to right. - William Thompson House, 45 Central Street, Franklin, Merrimack County, NH

  10. Meltwater flux and runoff modeling in the abalation area of jakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Chylek, Petr; Liston, Glen; Steffen, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    The temporal variability in surface snow and glacier melt flux and runoff were investigated for the ablation area of lakobshavn Isbrae, West Greenland. High-resolution meteorological observations both on and outside the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were used as model input. Realistic descriptions of snow accumulation, snow and glacier-ice melt, and runoff are essential to understand trends in ice sheet surface properties and processes. SnowModel, a physically based, spatially distributed meteorological and snow-evolution modeling system was used to simulate the temporal variability of lakobshavn Isbrre accumulation and ablation processes for 2000/01-2006/07. Winter snow-depth observations and MODIS satellite-derived summer melt observations were used for model validation of accumulation and ablation. Simulations agreed well with observed values. Simulated annual surface melt varied from as low as 3.83 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to as high as 8.64 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05). Modeled surface melt occurred at elevations reaching 1,870 m a.s.l. for 2004/05, while the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) fluctuated from 990 to 1,210 m a.s.l. during the simulation period. The SnowModel meltwater retention and refreezing routines considerably reduce the amount of meltwater available as ice sheet runoff; without these routines the lakobshavn surface runoff would be overestimated by an average of 80%. From September/October through May/June no runoff events were simulated. The modeled interannual runoff variability varied from 1.81 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2001/02) to 5.21 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3} (2004/05), yielding a cumulative runoff at the Jakobshavn glacier terminus of {approx}2.25 m w.eq. to {approx}4.5 m w.eq., respectively. The average modeled lakobshavn runoff of {approx}3.4 km{sup 3} y{sup -1} was merged with previous estimates of Jakobshavn ice discharge to quantify the freshwater flux to Illulissat Icefiord. For both runoff and ice discharge the average trends are

  11. Paleomagnetism of large igneous provinces: case-study from West Greenland, North Atlantic igneous province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, Janna; Riisager, Peter; Pedersen, Asger Ken

    2003-09-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model stereo photogrammetry data from lava sequences in the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). The joint analyses of paleomagnetic and photogrammetric data yield a well-defined paleomagnetic pole located at Lat=73.6°N, Long=160.5°E ( N=44, α95=6.2°, K=13.1; age ˜61-55 Ma), which is statistically indistinguishable from a pole recently obtained for the Eurasian part of the NAIP on Faroe Islands [Riisager et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 201 (2002) 261-276]. Combining the two datasets we obtain a joint NAIP paleomagnetic pole in Greenland coordinates: Lat=71.1°N, Long=161.1°E ( N=87, α95=4.3°, K=13.6; age ˜61-54 Ma). The results presented here represent the first study in which photogrammetry profiles were photographed at the exact same locations where paleomagnetic fieldwork was carried out, and a direct flow-to-flow comparison of the two datasets is possible. Photogrammetry is shown to be particularly useful because of (i) highly precise dip/strike measurements and (ii) detailed 'field observations' that can be made in the laboratory. Highly precise determination of the structural attitude of well-exposed Kanisut Mb lava sequences demonstrates that their apparently reliable in-field dip/strike measurements typically are up to ˜6° wrong. Erroneous dip/strike readings are particularly problematic as they offset paleomagnetic poles without affecting their confidence limits. Perhaps more important for large igneous provinces is the recognition of a variable temporal relationship between consecutive lava flows. We demonstrate how correct interpretation of paleosecular variation, facilitated by the detailed photogrammetry analysis, is crucial for the rapidly emplaced Vaigat Formation lavas. Inaccurate tectonic correction, non-averaged paleosecular variation and unrecognized excursional directions may, perhaps, explain why coeval paleomagnetic poles from large igneous provinces are often

  12. Modeling the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets: New dynamic, thermodynamic, and isostatic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizek, Byron R.

    Numerical simulations indicate that the apparent long-term persistence and short-term variability of the Ross ice streams in West Antarctica are tied to regional thermal conditions and local basal lubrication. Modelling results suggest that the flux of latent heat in a throughgoing hydrologic system fed by melt beneath thick inland ice maintains the lubrication of the ice streams despite their tendency to freeze to the bed, and would allow additional thinning and grounding-line retreat. However, the efficiency of basal water distribution may be a constraint on the system. Because local thermal deficits promote basal freeze-on (especially on topographic highs), observed short-term variability is likely to persist. Furthermore, simulations indicate that the ice streams have experienced only small deglacial thickness changes and are thinning more rapidly than their beds are rising isostatically. Thickness changes of O (100)m are modelled at the modern grounding line through the last glacial cycle. Coupled ice and bedrock models indicate isostatic rebound is raising the ice sheet at the modern grounding line faster than the rising sea level is submerging it. While, in and of itself, this could potentially lead to a grounding-line re-advance, ice flow is modelled to respond to recent changes in temperature, accumulation rate, and basal processes more rapidly than it does to bedrock-elevation and/or sea-level fluctuations. Future projections of the Greenland ice sheet indicate a faster contribution to sea-level rise in a warming world than previously believed, based on numerical modelling using a parameterization of recent results showing surface-meltwater lubrication of Greenland ice flow (Zwally et al., 2002). Numerous simulations were conducted to test a wide range of parameter space linking surface melt with a new sliding law based on Zwally et al. data under different global warming scenarios. Comparisons to reconstructions generated with a traditional sliding

  13. 110 years of local glacier and ice cap changes in Central- and North East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjork, A. A.; Aagaard, S.; Kjaer, K. H.; Khan, S. A.; Box, J.

    2014-12-01

    The local glaciers and ice caps of Greenland are becoming more apparent players in global sea-level rise, and their contribution to future changes is significant. Very little information on their historical fluctuations exists as much of the focus has been on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Now, we can for the first time present historic data that spans 110 years for more than 200 of the local glaciers and ice caps covering this large and important region of the Arctic. The central- and north eastern part of Greenland is of particular interest as these areas are predicted to exhibit a more active behavior with higher mass loss in the future - simultaneously with an increase in precipitation. Our results show that the glaciers and ice caps in the region are responding very rapidly to changes in temperature and precipitation. The present retreat is the fastest observed within the last eight decades, only surpassed by the rapid post LIA retreat. The 1930s was the golden era for scientific exploration in Central- and North East Greenland as several large expeditions visited the area and photographed from land, sea and air. We use historic recordings from Danish and Norwegian aerial missions and terrestrial recordings from the renowned American Explorer Louise Boyd. These unique pictures from the early 1930s form the backbone of the study and are supplemented the more recent aerial photographs the 1940s and onwards and satellite imagery from the mid-1960s and up until present. From high resolution aerial photographs we are able to map the maximum extent of the glaciers during the LIA (Little Ice Age), from which retreat in this area is estimated to commence in 1900. Using a new SMB (Surface Mass Balance) model and its components covering the entire observational period along with high resolution DEMs and historic sea-ice records we are now able to extract valuable information on the past and present triggers of glacial change.

  14. Modeling of Ice Flow and Internal Layers Along a Flow Line Through Swiss Camp in West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W. L.; Zwally, H. Jay; Abdalati, W.; Luo, S.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An anisotropic ice flow line model is applied to a flow line through Swiss Camp (69.57 N, 49.28 W) in West Greenland to estimate the dates of internal layers detected by Radio-Echo Sounding measurements. The effect of an anisotropic ice fabric on ice flow is incorporated into the steady state flow line model. The stress-strain rate relationship for anisotropic ice is characterized by an enhancement factor based on the laboratory observations of ice deformation under combined compression and shear stresses. By using present-day data of accumulation rate, surface temperature, surface elevation and ice thickness along the flow line as model inputs, a very close agreement is found between the isochrones generated from the model and the observed internal layers with confirmed dates. The results indicate that this part of Greenland ice sheet is primarily in steady state.

  15. Larval outbreaks in West Greenland: Instant and subsequent effects on tundra ecosystem productivity and CO2 exchange.

    PubMed

    Lund, Magnus; Raundrup, Katrine; Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; López-Blanco, Efrén; Nymand, Josephine; Aastrup, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Insect outbreaks can have important consequences for tundra ecosystems. In this study, we synthesise available information on outbreaks of larvae of the noctuid moth Eurois occulta in Greenland. Based on an extensive dataset from a monitoring programme in Kobbefjord, West Greenland, we demonstrate effects of a larval outbreak in 2011 on vegetation productivity and CO2 exchange. We estimate a decreased carbon (C) sink strength in the order of 118-143 g C m(-2), corresponding to 1210-1470 tonnes C at the Kobbefjord catchment scale. The decreased C sink was, however, counteracted the following years by increased primary production, probably facilitated by the larval outbreak increasing nutrient turnover rates. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time in tundra ecosystems, the potential for using remote sensing to detect and map insect outbreak events.

  16. Estimating ice-melange properties with repeat UAV surveys over Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toberg, Nick; Ryan, Johnny; Christoffersen, Poul; Snooke, Neal; Todd, Joe; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, tidewater outlet glaciers of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) have thinned and retreated when compared to the 1980s when the ice sheet was in a state of dynamic balance. With a growing amount of ice discharged into the sea by tidewater glaciers as well as more ice melting on the surface, the Greenland Ice Sheet has become the single largest cryospheric source of global sea level rise. Today, the ice sheet causes sea level rise of 1 mm per year, highlighting the need to understand the ice sheet's response to climate change. Atmospheric warming will inevitably continue to increase surface meltwater production, but the dynamic response, which includes hundreds of fast-flowing tidewater glaciers, is largely unknown. To develop new understanding of ice sheet dynamics, we investigated the mechanism whereby icebergs break off tidewater glaciers and form a proglacial ice melange. This melange is rigid in winter when sea ice and friction along the sidewalls of the fjord, or even at the sea floor, hold it together. The result is a resistive force, which reduces the rate of iceberg calving when the ice melange is rigid and is lost when the melange disappears in the summer. From early May to late July 2014, we launched unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from a basecamp on a bluff overlooking the calving front of Store Glacier, a 5 km wide tidewater glacier flowing into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland. The Skywalker X8 UAVs had a wing-span of 2.1m and a payload containing a high resolution camera, an autopilot system and a GPS data logger. We generated almost 70,000 georeferenced images during 63 sorties over the glacier during a 10 week field season starting 13 May 2014. The images were used to construct orhorectified mosaics and digital elevation models of the proglacial melange with Photoscan structure-from-motion software. The imagery and the DEMs were analysed statistically to understand the spatial characteristics of the ice melange. By combining the

  17. Levels and spatial and temporal trends of contaminants in Greenland biota: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Riget, F; Dietz, R; Vorkamp, K; Johansen, P; Muir, D

    2004-09-20

    Knowledge of contaminant levels in Greenland biota has increased substantially in recent years, particularly for persistent organic pollutants. This paper reviews and updates knowledge of spatial and temporal trends of Cd, Hg and organochlorines (PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, HCB and chlordane-related compounds) in Greenland terrestrial, freshwater and marine biota. The most comprehensive studies of spatial trends of Cd and Hg in the terrestrial ecosystem concern lichens, with relatively complete coverage, and caribou (Rangifer tarandus), with coverage mainly in different regions of central West Greenland and Southwest Greenland. The Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) is the only freshwater organism for which studies of spatial trends of Hg levels have been completed. Information on spatial trends of Cd and Hg in the marine environment is available from studies of fish, seabirds, ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Geographical patterns of Cd and Hg in Greenland biota were not always consistent among different species or different studies. In landlocked Arctic char the concentrations of Hg decreased from south to north. In marine animals levels of Hg tended to be higher in East Greenland than in West Greenland and Cd levels were highest in biota from Disko Island in central West Greenland. The observed regional differences are difficult to explain but in most cases the causes appear to be natural rather than anthropogenic. Only a few time series covering the last 20 years exist for Cd and Hg. The one time series indicating a temporal change is for ringed seals in Northwest Greenland, which shows an increasing trend of Hg and a decreasing trend of Cd since 1984. Whether the changes reflect anthropogenic inputs, seal behaviour or other environmental factors is unknown. The most significant new insights have concerned organochlorines. In general, levels of these compounds were very low in terrestrial biota compared to marine species. Concentrations in

  18. The Archean geology of the Godthabsfjord Region, southern west Greenland (includes excursion guide)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, V. R.; Nutman, A. P.; Friend, C. R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The part of the West Greenland Archean gneiss complex centered around Godthabsfjord and extending from Isukasia in the north to south Faeringehavn is studied. Extensive outcrops of 3800 to 3400 Ma rocks can provide some direct evidence of conditions and processes that operated on the Earth in the early Archean. However, the ways in which primary characteristics have been modified by later deformation, metamorphism, and chemical changes are first taken into account. The rocks exposed are the products of two major phases of accretion of continental crust, at 3800 to 3700 Ma and 3100 to 29 Ma. The main features of these two accretion phases are similar, but careful study of the least modified rocks may reveal differences related to changes in the Earth in the intervening period. The combination of excellent exposure over an extensive area, relatively detailed geological mapping of much of the region, and a considerable volume of isotopic and other geochemical data gives special insights into processes that operated at moderately deep levels of the crust in the Archean. Of particular interest is the effect of late Archean granulite facies metamorphism on early Archean rocks, especially the extent to which isotope systems were disturbed. Similar processes may well have partly or wholly destroyed evidence of more ancient components of other high grade terrains. This account does not attempt to be an exhaustive review of all work carried out on the geology of the region. Rather, it attempts to summarize aspects of the geology and some interest in the context of early crustal genesis.

  19. Influence of the Little Ice Age on the biological structure of lakes in South West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, S.; Hogan, E. J.; Jones, V.; Anderson, N. J.; Simpson, G.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental change, with biological remains in lake sediment records being interpreted as reflecting climate forcing. However the influence that differences in catchment properties and lake morphometries have on the sedimentary record is rarely considered. We investigated sediment cores from three lakes located close to the inland ice sheet margin in the Kangerlussuaq area of South West Greenland but within a few kilometres of one another. This regional replication allowed for direct comparisons of biological change in lakes exposed to identical environmental pressures (cooling, increased wind speeds) over the past c.2000 years. Sedimentary pigments were used as a proxy for whole-lake production and to investigate differences in phytoplankton community structure whilst fossil diatom assemblages were studied to determine differences in ecological responses during this time. We noted several major effects of the Little Ice Age cooling (LIA, c. 1400-1850AD). The organic content of sediments in all three lakes declined, and this effect was most pronounced in lakes closest to the inland ice sheet margin, which suggests that aeolian inputs derived from the glacial outwash plains (sandurs), and wind-scouring of the thin catchment soils by strong katabatic winds associated with the regional cooling might have both contributed to this sedimentary change. During the LIA total algal production (as indicated by chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments) was lower in all three lakes, most likely because of extended ice-cover and shorter growing seasons, and the ratio of planktonic: benthic diatom taxa increased, possibly because of lower light availability or fertilization from loess material. Despite this coherence in lake response to the LIA, diatom community composition changes in individual lakes differed, reflecting individual lake morphometry and catchment characteristics. These findings highlight the importance of

  20. Molecular diversity patterns among various phytoplankton size-fractions in West Greenland in late summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elferink, Stephanie; Neuhaus, Stefan; Wohlrab, Sylke; Toebe, Kerstin; Voß, Daniela; Gottschling, Marc; Lundholm, Nina; Krock, Bernd; Koch, Boris P.; Zielinski, Oliver; Cembella, Allan; John, Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Arctic regions have experienced pronounced biological and biophysical transformations as a result of global change processes over the last several decades. Current hypotheses propose an elevated impact of those environmental changes on the biodiversity, community composition and metabolic processes of species. The effects on ecosystem function and services, particularly when invasive or toxigenic harmful species become dominant, can be expressed over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales in plankton communities. Our study focused on the comparison of molecular biodiversity of three size-fractions (micro-, nano-, picoplankton) in the coastal pelagic zone of West Greenland and their association with environmental parameters. Molecular diversity was assessed via parallel amplicon sequencing the 28S rRNA hypervariable D1/D2 region. We showed that biodiversity distribution within the area of Uummannaq Fjord, Vaigat Strait and Disko Bay differed markedly within and among size-fractions. In general, we observed a higher diversity within the picoplankton size fraction compared to the nano- and microplankton. In multidimensional scaling analysis, community composition of all three size fractions correlated with cell size, silicate and phosphate, chlorophyll a (chl a) and dinophysistoxin (DTX). Individually, each size fraction community composition also correlated with other different environmental parameters, i.e. temperature and nitrate. We observed a more homogeneous community of the picoplankton across all stations compared to the larger size classes, despite different prevailing environmental conditions of the sampling areas. This suggests that habitat niche occupation for larger-celled species may lead to higher functional trait plasticity expressed as an enhanced range of phenotypes, whereas smaller organisms may compensate for lower potential plasticity with higher diversity. The presence of recently identified toxigenic harmful algal bloom (HAB) species (such

  1. The impact of local topography on glacial geomorphological records in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Lane, Tim

    2015-04-01

    The Holocene glacial record of Lyngmarksbræen, an ice cap in West Greenland, has been used to explore the impacts of local topography on landform generation and preservation. It is well-established that glacial response to regional climate drivers may be locally modulated by local-scale topography, but there has been little systematic investigation of its impacts on the geomorphological record. Establishing the relative influence of regional and local-scale drivers on landform development is important as it will allow us to make more robust reconstructions of past ice dynamics. Detailed geomorphological analysis of seven outlet valleys from Lyngmarksbræen, Disko Island has been undertaken. Satellite imagery and field mapping have been used to explore the topographic variations of neighbouring valleys, and the resulting geomorphological record. Comparisons between valleys are made on the basis of existing morphostratigraphic correlations (Ingólfsson, 1990) and recent surface exposure ages (Lane et al., In prep), which indicate that the majority of the landforms were deposited during the Little Ice Age (LIA). The valleys draining Lyngmarksbræen vary considerably in terms of geometry, landform characteristics (type, size, location), and ice extent (Holocene to present day). This allows us to explore geomorphological dynamics in contrasting, but geographically proximal, settings. During the LIA, ice extended up to 3 km beyond the present ice margins. In all outlets, glacial landforms are confined to the radial valleys and there is only limited evidence of deposition in the larger trunk valleys. To the north and east of Lyngmarksbræen, large latero-frontal moraines are well-preserved and often impound small proglacial lakes. In the west, the LIA and present day ice margins are more diffuse, and there is evidence of ice-cored moraine, kettle holes, and buried ice. To the south of the ice cap, landform preservation is limited. We discuss the extent to which these

  2. Fatty Acid Composition of Muscle, Adipose Tissue and Liver from Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) Living in West Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Susana P.; Raundrup, Katrine; Cabo, Ângelo; Bessa, Rui J. B.; Almeida, André M.

    2015-01-01

    Information about lipid content and fatty acid (FA) composition of muskoxen (Ovibos moschatos) edible tissues is very limited in comparison to other meat sources. Thus, this work aims to present the first in-depth characterization of the FA profile of meat, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver of muskoxen living in West Greenland. Furthermore, we aim to evaluate the effect of sex in the FA composition of these edible tissues. Samples from muscle (Longissimus dorsi), subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver were collected from female and male muskoxen, which were delivered at the butchery in Kangerlussuaq (West Greenland) during the winter hunting season. The lipid content of muscle, adipose tissue and liver averaged 284, 846 and 173 mg/g of dry tissue, respectively. This large lipid contents confirms that in late winter, when forage availability is scarce, muskoxen from West Greenland still have high fat reserves, demonstrating that they are well adapted to seasonal feed restriction. A detailed characterization of FA and dimethylacetal composition of muskoxen muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and liver showed that there are little differences on FA composition between sexes. Nevertheless, the 18:1cis-9 was the most abundant FA in muscle and adipose tissue, reaching 43% of total FA in muscle. The high content of 18:1cis-9 suggests that it can be selectively stored in muskoxen tissues. Regarding the nutritional composition of muskoxen edible tissues, they are not a good source of polyunsaturated FA; however, they may contribute to a higher fat intake. Information about the FA composition of muskoxen meat and liver is scarce, so this work can contribute to the characterization of the nutritional fat properties of muskoxen edible tissues and can be also useful to update food composition databases. PMID:26678792

  3. Origin of cratonic lithospheric mantle roots: A geochemical study of peridotites from the North Atlantic Craton, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, N.; Pearson, D. G.; Webb, M.; Ottley, C. J.; Irvine, G. J.; Kopylova, M.; Jensen, S. M.; Nowell, G. M.

    2008-09-01

    A critical examination of the extent to which geodynamic information on the initial mantle depletion and accretion event(s) is preserved in kimberlite-borne cratonic SCLM peridotite xenoliths is attempted by using new major and trace element data of whole-rock peridotites ( n = 55) sampled across the North Atlantic Craton (NAC; West Greenland). We also present additional whole-rock trace element data of mantle xenoliths from Somerset Island, the Slave and Kaapvaal cratons for comparison. Peridotites comprising the West Greenland SCLM are distinctly more olivine-rich and orthopyroxene-poor than most other cratonic peridotites, in particular those from the Kaapvaal craton. The West Greenland peridotites have higher Mg/Si but lower Al/Si, Al 2O 3 and CaO than cratonic mantle from the Kaapvaal Craton. We suggest that the more orthopyroxene depleted, harzburgite to dunite character of the NAC peridotites reflects more of the original melting history than peridotites from other cratons and in that sense may be more typical of cratonic lithosphere compositions prior to extensive modification. Despite this, some modal and cryptic metasomatism has clearly taken place in the West Greenland lithosphere. The insensitivity of major elements to pressure of melting at high degrees of melt extraction combined with the ease with which these elements may be changed by modal metasomatism mean that we cannot confidently constrain the depth of melting of peridotites using this approach. Mildly incompatible trace elements offer much more promise in terms of providing geodynamic information about the original Archean melting regime. The very low, systematically varying heavy REE abundances in NAC whole-rock peridotites and in peridotites from all other cratons where high-quality data are available provide ubiquitous evidence for a shallow melting regime in the absence of, or to the exhaustion of garnet. This finding explicitly excludes large extents of deep (iso- and polybaric) melting

  4. Analysis of Induced Polarization effects in airborne TEM data - a case study from central East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maack Rasmussen, Thorkild; Brethes, Anaïs; Pierpaolo Guarnieri, Pierpaolo; Bauer, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Data from a high-resolution airborne SkyTEM time-domain electromagnetic survey conducted in central East Greenland were analysed. An analysis based on utilization of a Self Organizing Map procedure for response curve characterization and analyses based on data inversion and modelling are presented. The survey was flown in 2013 along the eastern margin of the Jameson Land basin with the purpose of base metal exploration and with sulphide mineralization as target. The survey area comprises crystalline basement to the East and layered Early Triassic to Jurassic sediments to the West. The layers are dipping a few degrees towards West. The Triassic sequence is 1 to 2 km thick and mostly of continental origin. The fluviatile Early Triassic arkoses and conglomerates, the Upper Triassic grey limestone and black shale beds and overlying gypsiferous sandstones and mudstones are known to host disseminated sulphides. E-W oriented lines were flown with an average terrain clearance of 30m and a separation of 300m. The data were initially processed and inverted by SkyTEM Aps. The conductivity models showed some conductive layers as well as induced polarization (IP) effects in the data. IP effects in TEM data reflect the relaxation of polarized charges in the ground which can be good indicators of the presence of metallic particles. Some of these locations were drilled during the following field season but unfortunately did not reveal the presence of mineralization. The aim of this study is therefore to understand the possible causes of these IP effects. Electrical charge accumulation in the ground can be related to the presence of sulphides, oxides or graphite or to the presence of clays or fibrous minerals. Permafrost may also cause IP effects and is then expected to be associated with a highly resistive subsurface. Several characteristics of the transient curves (IP indicators) of the SkyTEM survey were extracted and analysed by using the Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM

  5. 100. DETAIL OF PATCHBOARD LOCATED CENTRALLY ON WEST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. DETAIL OF PATCHBOARD LOCATED CENTRALLY ON WEST SIDE OF LANDLINE INSTRUMENTATION ROOM. Two rows of equipment cabinets west of (behind) patchboard are not accessible for photography. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. Understory composition of hardwood stands in north central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    M.J. Twery

    1991-01-01

    Understory composition was measured on 960 10.5 m2 plots in 16 stands on the West Virginia University Forest in north-central West Virginia. The overstory composition was dominated by oaks (Quercus spp.) on 50% of the stands and by a mixture of oaks and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) on 50%. All...

  7. 13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of west entrance to central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  8. 88. 451 MADISON AVENUE, LIBRARY, SOUTH WALL, WEST CENTRAL SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. 451 MADISON AVENUE, LIBRARY, SOUTH WALL, WEST CENTRAL SECTION SHOWING WINDOW AND RADIATOR (Pair with NY-5635-89) - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  9. INTERIOR FROM MEZZANINE LEVEL OF CENTRAL SECTION, VIEW FACING WEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR FROM MEZZANINE LEVEL OF CENTRAL SECTION, VIEW FACING WEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Aircraft Storehouse, Between Midway & Card Streets at Enterprise Avenue intersection, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  10. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  11. Accumulation of organotin compounds and mercury in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) from the Danish waters and West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jakob; Larsen, Martin M; Lockyer, Christina

    2005-11-01

    The concentrations of butyltin (summation operatorBT=TBT+DBT+MBT) and mercury (Hg) were determined in the liver of 35 harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), which were found dead along the coastlines or caught as by-catch in the Danish North Sea and the Inner Danish waters. In addition, three harbour porpoises hunted in West Greenland were analysed. High levels of butyltin and mercury, within the range of 68-4605 mg BT/kg ww and 0.22-92 mg Hg/kg ww, were found in the liver of the Danish harbour porpoises and both substances tend to accumulate with age. The levels in the harbour porpoise from West Greenland were 2.0-18 mg BT/kg ww and 6.3-6.9 mg Hg/kg ww, respectively. The concentrations of butyltin and mercury were both found to be higher in stranded than in by-caught harbour porpoises but only the butyltin concentration was significantly higher in stranded porpoises in the age group 1-5 years. These substances are suspected of inducing adverse effects on immune and endocrine systems in mammals and they may thereby pose a threat to the animals. This study suggests that organotin compounds are also important, when assessing the risks of contaminants on the health and viability of harbour porpoises in Danish waters.

  12. Modeling experiments on the deceleration and reactivation of Kangerlussuup Sermusa, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvanbehbahani, S.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.; Catania, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variations in outlet glacier velocity due to basal sliding are well-documented and typically involve acceleration early in the melt season due to enhanced sliding as a result of inefficient drainage of surface water reaching the bed. However, velocity observations from Kangerlussuup Sermusa (KS) in West Greenland contradict this pattern. Instead, ice velocity at KS shows no significant change in early spring compared with the previous winter. This sluggish response of the glacier to spring melt is often followed by an extreme, and short-lived, deceleration. For example, in August 2010, the lower 20 km of the trunk decelerated from about 1600 m a-1 to less than 250 m a-1; this event was followed by a rapid reactivation back to the previous velocity in less than 60 days. Available records since 2006 show that the sequence of steady spring velocity, followed by summer deceleration, and rapid fall reactivation occurs annually; however, the magnitudes of deceleration vary. In this regard, the response of KS to regional environmental forcings is unique compared to its neighboring glaciers. In this study, we investigate whether the unique behavior of KS can be explained by the interaction between changes in basal conditions and the local geometry of the glacier. We model the glacier flow by solving full-Stokes equations using the finite element method in the open-source FEniCS framework. Assuming isothermal ice within the lower trunk, we run experiments on the mechanical properties and boundary conditions of the glacier. These experiments include spatio-temporal changes in basal slipperiness, periodic melt-water influx to the bed, and ice viscosity variations due to changes in melt-water supply to the bed. We also conduct sensitivity analyses on the glacier flow with different ice geometries (e.g. thickness and surface slope) to investigate conditions under which we can produce the unique seasonal behavior of KS. Finally, we assess the impact of the combination

  13. Regime Change of Ice Draft in Nares Strait to the West of Greenland 2003 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, P. A.; Muenchow, A.; Huntley, H.

    2014-12-01

    The last of remaining multi-year ice exits the Arctic Ocean via Nares Strait to the west of northern Greenland. Measuring ice draft and velocity directly, we maintained moored sensors in Nares Strait from 2003 through 2009. Two ice profiling sonars measured acoustic travel times from about 100-m depth to the bottom of the sea ice. Estimates of ice draft result, if vertically averaged density, speed of sound, and depth of the sensor are known. We use concurrently measured temperature, salinity, and pressure at nearby mooring locations for those properties at daily time scales. Sensitivity tests reveal that our ice draft estimates are accurate to within 0.1 m. With ice drafts sampled at 15 second intervals, we construct ice draft probability density functions to define ice categories and to compare these at inter-annual and seasonal time sales. Categories are open water (no ice), thin ice (< 0.5 m), first year ice (0.5- 2 m; FYI), multi year ice (>2 m; MYI). FYI dominated the ice draft distribution from 2003 to 2006 when it was observed about half of the time. It diminished to ~20% from 2006 to 2009 when much FYI was replaced by a combination of thin ice and MYI. We interpret this finding as a transition towards a more dynamic and advective ice regime in Nares Strait. At seasonal time scales we found the largest ice drafts always during the period prior to prolonged periods of zero ice velocity, that is, the onset of landfast ice conditions. The duration of this landfast season reduced from more than 180 days per year on average for the 2003-06 period to less than 20 days per year on average for the 2006-09 period. Implications on ice flux are profound as the transition from landfast to mobile ice conditions enhances both local wind forcing, local ice formation (thin ice), and ice export. We emphasize that this transition precedes the record setting Arctic ice minimum in the summer of 2007.

  14. Processes and timescales of melt metasomatism in the continental lower crust of West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Matthijs; Waight, Tod; Nielsen, Troels

    2017-04-01

    The lower continental crust is infiltrated by mantle-derived melts that are at extreme chemical disequilibrium with this reservoir. The chemical effect, and the degree and extent of melt infiltration within the lower crust are important parameters to investigating the role of this process in modifying local and regional crustal composition. However, in spite of ground-breaking contributions in this field, the processes of melt metasomatism within the lower crust are not entirely clear. Challenges lie in obtaining primary petrological, geochemical and chronological information from deep crustal rocks that are difficult to sample and are often repeatedly recrystallized and chemically modified. In this study, we investigated mafic granulite xenoliths from the crustal root of the Archean North Atlantic Craton (Sarfartôq location) and the adjoining Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtôqidian Orogen (Sisimiut location), West Greenland. These rocks were chosen because: 1) they are xenolith and hence are unaffected by tectonic overprinting, 2) they show a rich petrological record of melt infiltration formed in the run up to their scavenging by the host aillikite magmas, 3) they represent two locations with similar crustal composition and architecture, but different underlying lithospheric mantle enabling teasing-out of the role of melt-mantle interaction. We used various imaging techniques and in-situ chemical analysis by electron-probe micro-analyzer to characterize the different melt pockets within the samples, their textural relationships, as well as their composition. In addition, we performed thermometry and multi-method speedometry (Fe-in-rutile, majors-in-garnet) to assess the conditions and duration of melt infiltration for melts of different texture and composition. The primary granular assemblage of the xenoliths has been infiltrated by three different types of melts, each of which is found in grain boundaries, melt-corroded cracks, and voids formed by melt

  15. Measuring short term velocity changes of Kangilerngata Sermia, west Greenland using a Gamma Portable Radar Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, E.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Li, X.; Millan, R.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Nakayama, Y.; Scheuchl, B.

    2016-12-01

    Kangilerngata Sermia, west Greenland, is a 4 km wide marine terminating glacier that experienced rapid retreat from 2005-2010, withdrawing from a stabilizing sill at 150 m depth to its current state, grounded 350 m below sea level. The ice front retreated 2.3 km over a 5 year period with ice speeds increasing to 3x the average rate as the front retreated into deeper water. With a bed that is continuously 200-450 m below sea level for 30 km upstream, this glacier might continue to retreat rapidly for decades to come. We conducted a 16-day field campaign in July 2016 aimed to increase the temporal resolution of ice flow velocity measurements during the peak calving season by using a Gamma Portable Radar Interferometer (GPRI) deployed at 100m elevation about 3 km from the glacier front, scanning the glacier every 3 minutes. In addition we conducted an hydrography survey, collecting a set of 11 CTDs (conductivity, temperature, depth plus dissolved oxygen) about 1 km from the calving front, to estimate the amount of ice melted by the ocean. We compare these results to simulations of ice melt of a calving face using the MITgcm ocean model to help evaluate the model results on one glacier. With the GPRI we form a time series of radar images that show the dynamics of the ocean surface in front of the glacier as a result of wind, sub-glacial water discharge and calving events. We form time series of radar interferograms to analyze the time evolution of glacier speed, especially in relation to calving events, both small and large. Velocity records are used to detect changes in speed, prior, during and post-calving and to determine how long these changes persisted. These results are then analyzed in relation to bed topography (mapped with multi-beam) and tidal cycle. We also compare our results with TerraSAR-X ice velocity maps. We conclude on the impacts of calving events on short-term ice dynamics and implications for the future of this glacier. This work was preformed at

  16. Measurements of supraglacial lake drainage and surface streams over West Greenland and effects on ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedesco, M.; Willis, I. C.; Alexander, P. M.; Banwell, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011 we measured the filling and draining of two surface lakes in the Paakitsoq region of the West Greenland Ice Sheet (49.79 W, 69.57 N), together with the level of streams flowing into the basins feeding the lakes. We also used GPS to record the horizontal and vertical movement of the ice sheet surface at five locations surrounding the lakes for a two week period (overlapping the draining of the two lakes). In this talk we report results concerning the processes of lake filling and draining between the two lakes. 'Lake Half Moon', with a smaller catchment area, filled slowly at a steady rate over several days, then drained gradually over a 24 hour period as an existing moulin located outside the bottom of the lake became active; the lake level continued to drop very slowly over the remaining week as the surface stream leading from the lake to the moulin incised. 'Lake Ponting', with the larger catchment area, filled more rapidly and at an accelerating rate as depressions upstream of the lake filled with water, overflowed and delivered increasing volumes of water to the lake. Lake Ponting drained by hydrofracture following a particularly rapid rise in water level, generating a new ~ 800m long extensional crevasse on the ice sheet surface. The entire ~ 3 x 106 m3 lake drained within a few hours. For the Lake Pointing, we show, for the first time, a movie of the lake draining, showing many features that we observed right after its drainage. The rate of lake level lowering during the drainage varied; initially moderately rapid while the fractures formed and accommodated the water, then exceptionally rapid as the fractures reached the bed allowing the lake to drain completely. The analysis of the GPS data suggest that the different styles of lake draining affect the vertical and horizontal movement of the ice sheet in different ways. We also anticipate that the effect of the draining of Lake Ponting was affecting the GPS sensors in a different

  17. Accessory Mineral Records of Early Earth Crust-Mantle Systematics: an Example From West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, C. D.; Hawkesworth, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Conditions for the formation and the nature of Earth's early crust are enigmatic due to poor preservation. Before c.4 Ga the only archives are detrital minerals eroded from earlier crust, such as the Jack Hills zircons in western Australia, or extinct isotope systematics. Zircons are particularly powerful since they retain precise records of their ages of crystallisation, and the Lu-Hf radiogenic isotope and O stable isotope systematics of the reservoir from which they crystallised. In principle, this allows insight into the nature of the crust, the mantle reservoir from which the melt was extracted and any reworked material incorporated into that melt. We have used in situ methods to measure U-Pb, O and Lu-Hf within single zircon crystals from tonalitic gneisses from West Greenland in the vicinity of the Isua Supracrustal Belt. They have little disturbed ages of c.3.8 Ga, mantle-like O isotope signatures and Lu-Hf isotope signatures that lie on the CHUR evolution line at 3.8 Ga. These samples have previously been subjected to Pb isotope feldspar and 142Nd whole rock analysis and have helped constrain models in which early differentiation of a proto-crust must have occurred. The CHUR-like Lu-Hf signature, along with mantle-like O signature from these zircons suggests juvenile melt production at 3.8 Ga from undifferentiated mantle, yet the other isotope systems preclude this possibility. Alternatively, this is further strong evidence for a heterogeneous mantle in the early Earth. Whilst zircons afford insight into the nature of the early crust and mantle, it is through the Sm-Nd system that the mantle has traditionally been viewed. Titanite often contains several thousand ppm Nd, making it amenable to precise analysis, and is a common accessory phase. It has a reasonably high closure temperature for Pb and O, and it can retain cores with older ages and distinct REE chemistry. It is often the main accessory phase alongside zircon, and it is the main carrier of Nd

  18. Parasites as biological tags to track an ontogenetic shift in the feeding behaviour of Gadus morhua off West and East Greenland.

    PubMed

    Münster, Julian; Klimpel, Sven; Fock, Heino O; MacKenzie, Ken; Kuhn, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Parasites, being an integral part of every ecosystem and trophically transmitted along the food webs, can provide detailed insights into the structure of food webs and can close the information gap between short-term stomach content analyses and long-term fish otolith analyses. They are useful for tracking ontogenetic shifts in the host's diet, the occurrence of specific organisms or migratory behaviour of their hosts, even in inaccessible environments. In the present study, stomach content analyses and parasitological examinations were performed on 70 Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, one of the most important high-level predators of small fish in the North Atlantic, caught during one research vessel cruise from West and East Greenlandic waters. Analyses revealed significant differences in fish size with higher values for East Greenland (average total length (TL) of 50.5 cm) compared to West Greenland (average TL of 33.3 cm). Clear differences were also present in prey and parasite composition. Crustacea was the main food source for all fish (IRI = 10082.70), while the importance of teleosts increased with fish size. With a prevalence of 85 % in West Greenland and 100 % in East Greenland, Nematoda were the most abundant parasite group. The results indicate an ontogenetic shift in the diet, which are discussed in the context of the common distribution theory, stock dynamics and migratory behaviour.

  19. Mechanisms that Amplify, Attenuate and Deviate Glacier Response to Climate Change in Central East Greenland. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiskoot, H.

    2013-12-01

    A multidecadal review of glacier fluctuations and case-studies of glacier processes and environments in central East Greenland will be used to demonstrate Mechanisms that Amplify, Attenuate and Deviate glacier response to climate forcings (MAAD). The different spatial and temporal scales at which MAAD affect mass balance and ice flow may complicate interpretation and longterm extrapolation of glacier response to climate change. A framework of MAAD characterisation and best-practice for interpreting climate signals while taking into account MAAD will be proposed. Glaciers in the Watkins Bjerge, Geikie Plateau and Stauning Alps regions of central East Greenland (68°-72°N) contain about 50000 km2 of glacierized area peripheral to the Greenland Ice Sheet. Within the region, large north-south and coast-inland climatic gradients, as well as complicated topography and glacier dynamics, result in discrepant glacier behaviour. Average retreat rates have doubled from about 2 to 4 km2 a-1 between the late 20th and early 21st centuries. However, glaciers terminating along the Atlantic coast display two times the retreat, thinning, and acceleration rates compared to glaciers terminating in inland fjords or on land. Despite similar climatic forcing variable glacier behaviour is apparent: individual glacier length change ranges from +57 m a-1 to -428 m a-1, though most retreat -20 to -100 m a-1. Interacting dynamic, mass balance and glacio-morphological mechanisms can amplify, attenuate or deviate glacier response (MAAD) to climate change, thus complicating the climatological interpretation of glacier length, area, and thickness changes. East Greenland MAAD include a range of common positive and negative feedback mechanisms in surface mass balance and terminus and subglacial boundary conditions affecting ice flow, but also mechanisms that have longterm or delayed effects. Certain MAAD may affect glacier change interpretation on multiple timescales: e.g. surging glaciers do not

  20. Hydrogeochemistry of Groundwater as Part of the Greenland Analogue Project in an Area of Continuous Permafrost Adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet, Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkemans, E.; Frape, S.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Claesson-Liljedahl, L.; Lehtinen, A.; Annable, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    Studying groundwater in areas of continuous permafrost is often limited to studies of springs and open pingos (eg. Pollard et al. 1999 and Allen et al. 1976). Boreholes in such locations are expensive, risky and logistically challenging (eg. Stotler et al. 2011) resulting in a limited understanding of the interaction between continental scale ice sheets and groundwater. Continental ice sheet models are often coupled to groundwater flow systems; however, there is a lack of modern field data with which to compare the results of models and their treatment of groundwater flow systems under the influence of glaciation. The Greenland Analogue Project (GAP) aims to eliminate some of the uncertainties in modeling ice sheets by using the Greenland ice sheet as a modern analogue for past glaciations. Since 2009, 3 boreholes have been drilled, 2 of which contain sampling systems. DH-GAP01 is a 191 m deep borehole drilled at an angle into a talik and has been sampled and studied since 2009. DH-GAP04 is a 632 m deep, angled borehole that intersects the groundwater flow system directly beneath Isunguata Sermia and is producing preliminary groundwater samples. Additional information on groundwater in the Kangerlussuaq area comes from a spring located directly in front of the Leverett ice lobe. Geochemical and isotopic (δ18O, δ2H, δ37Cl, 87Sr/86Sr, and δ34S and δ18O of SO4) tools are used to interpret geochemical processes acting on groundwaters and provide insight into groundwater flow. Analyses of δ18O and δ2H in groundwaters from DH-GAP01 show the borehole waters fall along the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). Evaporation is an important process affecting the δ18O-δ2H of surface waters in the region causing lakes to plot along a local evaporation line (Leng and Anderson, 2003). The waters from the Leverett spring plot to the right of the GMWL as possibly a mixture of groundwater and surface evaporated fluids. However, both the waters from DH-GAP01 and the Leverett

  1. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    As reflected in δ18O values in ice cores, the North Atlantic area experienced a series of abrupt, dramatic climatic fluctuations over the last glacial during which oceanic and atmospheric conditions alternated between full glacial (stadial) and relatively mild (interstadial) conditions [1,2]. Beyond the δ18O profiles, calcium ion concentration data (hereafter [Ca2+]) also exhibit particularly clear stadial/interstadial contrasts [3]. The Ca2+/dust concentration records are considered as a proxy for the amount of terrestrial dust reaching the ice sheet [4] and/or changing dust storm activity in the source areas around the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in East Asia [5,6]. The mode of the dust size distributions is thought to reflect transit times during transport, with larger modes indicating shorter transit times and transport routes, i.e. changed atmospheric circulation patterns [5]. However, based on clay mineralogy and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of loess sediments Újvári, et al. [7] suggested that Central European dust cannot be excluded as a potential source of Greenland dust. As such, it is vital to analyze dust deposition in the key dust depocentres of Eastern Europe. As a record of Carpathian Basin dust source activity, we therefore studied loess sedimentation and grain size changes in the Dunaszekcsö loess sequence in Southern Hungary. For this record, we developed the highest resolution geochronological dataset for European loess based on 61 AMS 14C dates from molluscs and charcoal fragments. This allowed us to establish a uniquely high precision Bayesian age-depth model, with the mean 95% confidence ranges that vary between 119 and 798 yr. Sedimentation rates (SR) calculated from the age-depth model vary between 0.36-1.7 mm yr-1 and the estimated bulk dust mass accumulation rates (MAR) range from 551 to 2525 g m-2 yr-1. Both the SR and MAR display millennial/sub-millennial scale variations, visible uniquely due to the high precision dating, together

  2. Ice sheet development in Central Greenland: implications from the Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic compositions of basal material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Demaiffe, D.; Souchez, R.; Gow, A. J.; Meese, D. A.

    1997-07-01

    The Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic compositions of silt particles from the basal silty ice of the two deep ice cores in Central Greenland, GISP 2 and GRIP, are compared to those of the subglacial rock material at GISP 2 (dolerite boulder, till and granitic bedrock). The silt particles embedded in the GRIP basal ice result from the reworking of the subglacial till unit overlying granitic bedrock at GISP 2, 28 km to the east. This implies that the till unit is continuous in Central Greenland. The silt particles embedded in the GISP 2 basal ice result from local erosion of the granitic bedrock. An erratic dolerite boulder in the subglacial till at GISP 2 is from a mafic dyke that can be related to the Carolinidian mid-Proterozoic fold belt exposed in East Greenland. This study supports the hypothesis that the Greenland Ice Sheet in the Summit area did not result from in situ growth from local snowbanks. The composition of the dolerite boulder points to East Greenland as the most probable source region for the ice sheet.

  3. 3. VIEW OF CENTRAL AVENUE LOOKING WEST FROM JUST EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CENTRAL AVENUE LOOKING WEST FROM JUST EAST OF THE INTERSECTION OF CENTRAL AVENUE AND THE EAST PERIMETER ROAD. THE ROCKY FLATS PLANT IS ABOUT 16 MILES NORTHWEST OF DENVER ON A PLATEAU AT THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE FRONT RANGE OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Habitat associations of bats in south-central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Michael R. Schirmacher; Steven B. Castleberry; W. Mark Ford; Karl V. Miller

    2007-01-01

    We conducted acoustic surveys at National Park Service and state park properties in south-central West Virginia to create bat habitat association models across a large, topographically complex and relatively intact Appalachian Hardwood landscape representative of the Allegheny Plateau portion of the central Appalachians. We developed generalized and species-specific...

  5. Annual accumulation over recent centuries at four sites in central Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, J. Ryan; McConnell, Joseph R.

    2007-05-01

    Accurate accumulation records are fundamental to understanding mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. Ice cores can provide multicentury, high-resolution ground-based point estimates of water accumulation. In 2003 and 2004, four new ice cores were collected in the central western (D4 and D5) and Summit (Sandy and Katie) regions of Greenland. Annual layer counting based on multiple glaciochemical parameters (primarily hydrogen peroxide, sea salt, and dust proxies) was used to date the ice cores, resulting in annual dating. The bottom depth ages for D4, D5, Sandy, and Katie were estimated at 1738, 1673, 1844, and 1934 A.D., with mean annual accumulation rates of 41.4, 35.2, 22.4, and 22.4 cmweq yr-1, respectively. These new records were in good agreement with previous accumulation maps and four previously published records from nearby multicentury ice cores. Spatial variability was quantified through an analysis of variance, thereby allowing for more meaningful comparisons to atmospheric processes. More regionally representative accumulation records were constructed for the central western and Summit regions spanning recent centuries using a principle component analysis of both the new and previously reported ice core measurements. These regional records exhibited 6-7% interannual variability (1 standard deviation of the mean) and had lower spatial variability uncertainties than individual accumulation records. Correlations indicate that ˜20% of the variance in the central western region was explained by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and suggests that an array of more northern ice cores may correlate more closely with NAO.

  6. Variations of the glacio-marine air mass front in West Greenland through water vapor isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopec, B. G.; Lauder, A. M.; Posmentier, E. S.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    While the isotopic distribution of precipitation has been widely used for research in hydrology, paleoclimatology, and ecology for decades, intensive isotopic studies of atmospheric water vapor has only recently been made possible by spectral-based technology. New instrumentation based on this technology opens up many opportunities to investigate short-term atmospheric dynamics involving the water cycle and moisture transport. We deployed a Los Gatos Water Vapor Isotope Analyzer (WVIA) at Kangerlussuaq, Greenland from July 21 to August 15, and measured the water vapor concentration and its isotopic ratios continuously at 10s intervals. A Danish Meteorological Institute site is located about 1 km from the site of the deployment, and meteorological data is collected at 30 min intervals. During the observation period, the vapor concentration of the ambient air ranges from 5608.4 to 11189.4 ppm; dD and d18O range from -254.5 to -177.7 ‰ and -34.2 to -23.2 ‰, respectively. The vapor content (dew point) and the isotopic ratios are both strongly controlled by the wind direction. The easterly winds are associated with dry, isotopically depleted air masses formed over the glacier, while westerly winds are associated with moist and isotopically enriched air masses from the marine/fjord surface. This region typically experiences katabatic winds off of the ice sheet to the east. However, during some afternoons, the wind shifts 180 degrees, blowing off the fjord to the west. This wind switch marks the onset of a sea breeze, and significant isotopic enrichment results. Enrichment in deuterium is up to 60 ‰ with a mean of 15‰, and oxygen-18 is enriched by 3‰ on average and up to 8 ‰. Other afternoons have no change in wind, and only small changes in humidity and vapor isotopic ratios. The humidity and isotopic variations suggest the local atmosphere circulation is dominated by relatively high-pressure systems above the cold glaciers and cool sea surface, and diurnal

  7. A modeling study of the effect of runoff variability on the effective pressure beneath Russell Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurian, Basile; Morlighem, Mathieu; Seroussi, Helene; Rignot, Eric; Broeke, Michiel R.; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Mouginot, Jeremie; Smeets, Paul C. J. P.; Tedstone, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    Basal sliding is a main control on glacier flow primarily driven by water pressure at the glacier base. The ongoing increase in surface melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet warrants an examination of its impact on basal water pressure and in turn on basal sliding. Here we examine the case of Russell Glacier, in West Greenland, where an extensive set of observations has been collected. These observations suggest that the recent increase in melt has had an equivocal impact on the annual velocity, with stable flow on the lower part of the drainage basin but accelerated flow above the Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA). These distinct behaviors have been attributed to different evolutions of the subglacial draining system during and after the melt season. Here we use a high-resolution subglacial hydrological model forced by reconstructed surface runoff for the period 2008 to 2012 to investigate the cause of these distinct behaviors. We find that the increase in meltwater production at low elevation yields a more efficient drainage system compatible with the observed stagnation of the mean annual flow below the ELA. At higher elevation, the model indicates that the drainage system is mostly inefficient and is therefore strongly sensitive to an increase in meltwater availability, which is consistent with the observed increase in ice velocity.

  8. Analysis of Arctic outflows west and east of Greenland in an eddying global sea ice-ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Bacon, Sheldon; Regan, Heather; Nurser, George; Coward, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Low salinity buoyant polar waters exit the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic, affecting deep convection in the Nordic and Labrador Seas with potential impacts on the meridional overturning circulation. The pathways of the polar water in Davis Strait, Fram Strait and then to the south are well documented by observations and model simulations. In contrast, measurements upstream of Fram Strait are too sparse to allow us to explain what causes the outflows to exit either west or east of Greenland or to attribute the variability in the Arctic outflows to atmospheric or oceanic mechanisms. A high-resolution global ocean general circulation model, NEMO-ORCA12, has been used to examine the dynamics of the outflow north of Greenland, above the Belgica Bank and in Nares Strait. Montgomery potential analysis is used to investigate the dynamics of the currents in the area. The model results suggest wind as a driving mechanism for the variability of the ocean circulation in these areas.

  9. Modelling calving front dynamics using a level-set method: application to Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, Johannes H.; Seroussi, Hélène; Morlighem, Mathieu; Kleiner, Thomas; Rückamp, Martin; Humbert, Angelika; Larour, Eric Y.

    2016-03-01

    Calving is a major mechanism of ice discharge of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets, and a change in calving front position affects the entire stress regime of marine terminating glaciers. The representation of calving front dynamics in a 2-D or 3-D ice sheet model remains non-trivial. Here, we present the theoretical and technical framework for a level-set method, an implicit boundary tracking scheme, which we implement into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). This scheme allows us to study the dynamic response of a drainage basin to user-defined calving rates. We apply the method to Jakobshavn Isbræ, a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the West Greenland Ice Sheet. The model robustly reproduces the high sensitivity of the glacier to calving, and we find that enhanced calving triggers significant acceleration of the ice stream. Upstream acceleration is sustained through a combination of mechanisms. However, both lateral stress and ice influx stabilize the ice stream. This study provides new insights into the ongoing changes occurring at Jakobshavn Isbræ and emphasizes that the incorporation of moving boundaries and dynamic lateral effects, not captured in flow-line models, is key for realistic model projections of sea level rise on centennial timescales.

  10. Longitudinal Inter-Comparison of Modeled and Measured West Greenland Ice Sheet Meltwater Runoff Losses (2004-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Overeem, I.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Hall, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Increased surface meltwater runoff, that exits the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) margin via supra-, en-, and sub-glacial drainage networks into fjords, pro-glacial lakes and rivers, accounts for half or more of total mass loss. Despite its importance, modeled meltwater runoff fluxes are poorly constrained, primarily due to a lack of direct in situ observations. Here, we present the first ever longitudinal (north-south) inter-comparison of a multi-year dataset (2004-2014) of discharge for four drainage basins - Watson, Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua, Naujat Kuat, and North Rivers - along West Greenland. These in situ hydrologic measurements are compared with modeled runoff output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) regional climate model, and the performance of the model is examined. An analysis of the relationship between modeled and actual ice sheet runoff patterns is assessed, and provides insight into the model's ability to capture inter-annual and intra-annual variability, spatiotemporal patterns, and extreme melt events. This study's findings will inform future development and parameterization of ice sheet surface mass balance models.

  11. Bathymetry data reveal glaciers vulnerable to ice-ocean interaction in Uummannaq and Vaigat glacial fjords, west Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Fenty, I.; Xu, Y.; Cai, C.; Velicogna, I.; Cofaigh, C. Ó.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Weinrebe, W.; Catania, G.; Duncan, D.

    2016-03-01

    Marine-terminating glaciers play a critical role in controlling Greenland's ice sheet mass balance. Their frontal margins interact vigorously with the ocean, but our understanding of this interaction is limited, in part, by a lack of bathymetry data. Here we present a multibeam echo sounding survey of 14 glacial fjords in the Uummannaq and Vaigat fjords, west Greenland, which extends from the continental shelf to the glacier fronts. The data reveal valleys with shallow sills, overdeepenings (>1300 m) from glacial erosion, and seafloor depths 100-1000 m deeper than in existing charts. Where fjords are deep enough, we detect the pervasive presence of warm, salty Atlantic Water (AW) (>2.5°C) with high melt potential, but we also find numerous glaciers grounded on shallow (<200 m) sills, standing in cold (<1°C) waters in otherwise deep fjords, i.e., with reduced melt potential. Bathymetric observations extending to the glacier fronts are critical to understand the glacier evolution.

  12. Gravity Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-04-06

    Modeled Bouger Gravity data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies Gravity Database of the U.S. at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was opened in an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was then converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and gravity (in milligals). This data was then converted to grid and then contoured using ESRI Spatial Analyst. This dataset contains the original spreadsheet data, a point shapefile showing gravity station locations and Bouger gravity, and a line shapefile showing 1 milligal contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Gravity Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.366690 East -105.478730 North 40.932318 South 36.961606 Gravity Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.366692 East -105.478847 North 40.932361 South 36.961606 Data from From University of Texas: Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies

  13. The metamorphic record of subduction-accretion processes in the Neoarchaean: the Nuuk region, southern West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziggel, Annika; Kolb, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    The Nuuk region of southern West Greenland exposes an exceptionally well preserved section through Archaean mid- to lower continental crust, and therefore provides a natural laboratory to study the tectonic processes in the Archaean. The area mainly consists of amphibolite to granulite facies TTG gneisses, narrow supracrustal belts, and minor late-tectonic granites. It is made up of several distinct terranes, including, from NW to SE, the Færingehavn, Tre Brødre, and Tasiusarsuaq terranes. Extensive high-grade metamorphism and a clockwise PT evolution of the Færingehavn terrane in the Neoarchaean (2.72-2.71 Ga) have been interpreted as a result of crustal thickening and thrusting of the Tasiusarsuaq terrane on top of the Tre Brødre and Færingehavn terranes (Nutman and Friend, 2007). Prior to final collision, the Tasiusarsuaq terrane (the upper plate in a plate tectonic model) underwent a prolonged period of compressive deformation between 2.8 and 2.72 Ga (Kolb et al., 2012). The structural evolution was associated with near-isobaric cooling from medium-pressure granulite facies conditions of ca. 850°C and 7.5 kbar to amphibolite facies conditions of ca. 700°C and 6.5-7 kbar (Dziggel et al., 2012). Despite this long period of crustal convergence, there is no evidence for exhumation and/or loading, pointing to a rheologically weak and unstable Archaean crust perhaps due to low density differences and ongoing melt extraction. Rocks of the structurally underlying Færingehavn terrane record a distinctly different metamorphic evolution. Although generally more strongly retrogressed, relict higher-pressure mineral assemblages in mafic granulites and felsic gneisses record conditions of > 8-9 kbar and >= 750°C, indicating burial to depths of at least 30 km along an apparent geothermal gradient of 20-25°C/km. The peak of metamorphism was followed by isothermal decompression at ca. 2.715 Ga (Nutman and Friend, 2007), indicating rapid exhumation of lower crustal

  14. Impairment of cellular immunity in west Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris) dietary exposed to polluted minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Larsen, Hans J S; Loft, Klaus Earl; Kirkegaard, Maja; Letcher, Robert J; Shahmiri, Soheila; Móller, Per

    2006-03-15

    Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) blubber is rich in organohalogen contaminants, mercury, and n-3 fatty acids. In the present study we show that a daily intake of 50-200 g of minke whale blubber causes an impairment of the nonspecific and specific cellular immune system in the West Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris). Immune reactions were measured by mitogen (PHA, Con A) and antigen (KLH) intradermal testing, and as the study used exposure levels similar to those of Inuits and polar bears (Ursus maritimus), it is reasonable to infer that Inuits and polar bears suffer from similar decreased resistance to diseases. It is speculated that food sources are depleted by thinning sea ice due to climate change and that more research should assess the forecasted rise in additive immunopathy effects in polar bears. Additionally, our study suggests that the fatty acid composition may be of importance when investigating combined immunotoxic effects of contaminated food resources in future Inuit and polar bear studies.

  15. The newly discovered Jurassic Tikiusaaq carbonatite-aillikite occurrence, West Greenland, and some remarks on carbonatite-kimberlite relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Steenfelt, Agnete; Heaman, Larry M.; Simonetti, Antonio

    2009-11-01

    We discuss mineral chemistry data and report ten high-precision U-Pb (zircon, baddeleyite, pyrochlore, and perovskite) and Rb-Sr phlogopite ages for the newly discovered Tikiusaaq carbonatite intrusion and associated ultramafic dykes from the North Atlantic craton, West Greenland. At Tikiusaaq, massive dolomite-calcite carbonatite sheets intruded an 2 × 3 km area along a ductile shear zone between ca. 158 and 155 Ma. The accompanying carbonatite and carbonate-rich ultramafic silicate dykes were emplaced between ca. 165 and 157 Ma in close proximity to this carbonatite centre utilizing pre-existing brittle fractures. The deep volatile-rich magmatism at Tikiusaaq forms part of a larger Jurassic alkaline province in southern West Greenland and represents the earliest manifestation of rifting processes related to the opening of the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Labrador Sea Basin. Although the ultramafic silicate dykes macroscopically resemble hypabyssal kimberlites, they are identified as kimzeyite-bearing monticellite aillikites (carbonate-rich ultramafic lamprophyres) using a modern mineralogical-genetic classification. The overlapping emplacement ages of the carbonatite sheets and aillikite dykes, along with the carbonate-rich nature of the latter, suggest a genetic relationship between these magma types. The aillikites carry garnet peridotite xenoliths and have mineralogical characteristics of primitive magmas such as highly forsteritic olivine (up to Fo 90 mol%) and Cr-rich spinel (up to 46 wt.% Cr 2O 3) microphenocrysts; whereas the carbonatite sheets reveal a higher degree of differentiation such as Fe-rich dolomite compositions (up to 9 wt.% FeO). The initial findings reported here from Tikiusaaq suggest that a link between these magma types by an increasing degree of partial melting of a common carbonated upper mantle peridotite source region, as commonly envisaged for the compositionally similar Sarfartoq complex, is untenable. Rather, proto-aillikite magma may be

  16. Using Coastal Ice Cap Records to Investigate Maritime Climate and Ice Sheet Processes in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Evans, M. J.; Frey, K. E.; Osman, M. B.; Smith, B. E.; Stevens, L. A.; Trusel, L. D.; York, A.; Bingham, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent changes, including outlet glacier retreat and speedup, and increased rates of surface melting, have dramatically increased the Greenland ice sheet contribution to sea-level rise over the past few decades. Increasingly studies point towards the influence of coupled ocean-ice processes in modulating Greenland ice sheet mass balance and glacier behavior in response to climate change, but many of these studies are limited to the past few years to decades, restricting our ability to understand these ocean-ice relationships over longer time periods. Ice core records have the potential to provide unique, high-resolution records of interest (e.g. accumulation and melt variability, as well as contemporaneous proxy records of regional air temperature and sea surface conditions), but suitable Greenland ice sheet coring regions are often located far inland (>200 km) from many maritime regions of interest. In this study we focus on new records from previously unstudied maritime ice caps (10-30 km from the coast) to reconstruct past environmental conditions in the Disko, Ummannaq and Baffin Bay regions. Here we present results from our recent 2014 field investigation of three high altitude ice caps (1300-2000 m) on Disko Island and the Nuussuaq Peninsula, as well as complementary results from two sites in the western ice sheet accumulation zone. Geophysical observations provide constraints on ice thickness, layering, and ice flow. Physical and chemical stratigraphic observations from snow pits and shallow firn cores are used to reconstruct recent accumulation rate and melt variability, as well as to develop and test environmental proxy relationships over the satellite era. Multi-century records from longer coastal ice cores, to be drilled in 2015, will contribute a key missing component to the existing observational record documenting ice, ocean and atmospheric changes in this region over a time period of dramatic change in Greenland ice sheet behavior (retreat and

  17. The effect of long range nitrogen deposition on nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth in lakes in South West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, E. J.; Mcgowan, S.; Anderson, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence of ecological change in Arctic lakes. The majority of this evidence comes from lake sediment records which suggest that the composition of algal communities has changed, and that algal productivity has increased in the past 150 years. This change has commonly been attributed to a change in climate. However, such interpretation often ignores other drivers of change such as long range nitrogen (N) deposition, which has been shown to occur over a similar period of time. The region of South West Greenland is typical of much of the Arctic in terms of lake density, precipitation patterns and vegetation. It also provides a unique opportunity to investigate long range N deposition as a possible driver of ecological change as it has not experienced rapid 20th century warming which has been observed elsewhere in the Arctic. There is also evidence from ice core records that long range N deposition has increased in Greenland during the past 150 years. The effect of N deposition on nutrient limitation of phytoplankton growth was investigated in 20 freshwater lakes situated in 3 study regions in South West Greenland. The three regions span a gradient of increasing precipitation (and predicted N deposition) from the inland ice sheet margin to the coast. Nutrient limitation was investigated 3 times between August 2010 and July 2011, allowing both seasonal and regional differences to be explored. Phytoplankton growth was assessed over 14 days following in vivo fluorescence of sub-surface water samples treated with one of six nutrient additions: control (no addition), P (6 μM NaH2PO4), NH4+ (90 μM NH4Cl), NO3- (90 μM NaNO3), P + NH4+ (final concentrations as before), P + NO3- (final concentrations as before). A clear response to nutrient addition was found in 95 % of all bioassays, and of these, co-nutrient limitation was most commonly recorded (70 %). Regardless of region, phytoplankton growth appeared to show a seasonal change in nutrient limitation

  18. Forest statistics for west central Oregon.

    Treesearch

    John W. Hazard; Melvin E. Metcalf

    1965-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the latest reinventory of four counties centrally located in western Oregon: Benton, Lane, Lincoln, and Linn. This block of four counties is one of 10 such blocks set up in the States of Oregon and Washington by the Forest Survey to facilitate orderly reinventories of the timber resources. Each block will be reinventoried at...

  19. 10Be ages from central east Greenland constrain the extent of the Greenland ice sheet during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Håkansson, Lena; Briner, Jason; Alexanderson, Helena; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2007-10-01

    Traditional ice sheet reconstructions have suggested two distinctly different ice sheet regimes along the East Greenland continental margin during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM): ice to the shelf break south of Scoresby Sund and ice extending no further than to the inner shelf at and north of Scoresby Sund. We report new 10Be ages from erratic boulders perched at 250 m a.s.l. on the Kap Brewster peninsula at the mouth of Scoresby Sund. The average 10Be ages, calculated with an assumed maximum erosion rate of 1 cm/ka and no erosion (respectively, 17.3±2.3 ka and 15.1±1.7 ka) overlap with a period of increased sediment input to the Scoresby Sund fan (19-15 ka). The results presented here suggest that ice reached at least 250 m a.s.l. at the mouth of Scoresby Sund during the LGM and add to a growing body of evidence indicating that LGM ice extended onto the outer shelf in northeast Greenland.

  20. Identifying and assessing the role of warm air advection (Atmospheric Rivers) along the west coast of Greenland comparing various reanalyses for the period 2000-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Shupe, Matthew; Compo, Gilbert P.

    2017-04-01

    Neff et al. (2014) examined the 2012 summer Greenland melt episode and compared it to the last episode in 1889 using the Twentieth Century Reanalysis (20CR, Compo et al. 2011). A key factor in both 2012 and 1889 was the presence of an Atmospheric River (AR) that transported warm air over the Atlantic Ocean and thence to the west coast of Greenland. ARs are thin filaments of high-moisture air occurring at frontal boundaries and represent an efficient poleward transport mechanism for warm moist air (Newell et al. 1992) to the Arctic (Bonne et al. 2015; Neff et al. 2014) and the Antarctic (Gorodetskaya et al. 2014). The cases in 1889 and 2012 share a similar synoptic situation with lows just south and/or west of Baffin Island and highs to the southeast of Greenland. Although the details in the position of the moisture plumes are different, they both produce an anomaly in integrated water vapor (IWV) just off the southwest coast of Greenland suggesting this location as a key diagnostic location for potential AR impact on west Greenland. As part of a long-term goal to assess the frequency of such events that affect the surface energy budget of Greenland back to 1871 using the 20CR, we have compared in more detail transport signatures using 20CR, ERA-I, and NCEP-NCAR reanalyses for the period 2000-2012. In particular, we used reanalysis data at 50oW, 60oN, which lies just off the southwest coast of Greenland. These data included wind speed and direction, integrated precipitable water vapor (IWV), and specific humidity (q) at 850 hPa (which is a nominal height for the southerly coastal jet identified in previous AR events (Neff et al. 2014).) We found substantial agreement in the various reanalyses in terms of wind direction and speed distributions. We found IWV spatial distributions during southerly wind speed and IWV maxima that range from "blobs" to well-organized transport events. Using compositing techniques we also have examined the subsequence evolution of

  1. 15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View west of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  2. 16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View west from center of central corridor between filtration beds which are located to the left and right of the photograph. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  3. 4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT HAS MOST OF THE AMENITIES OF A SMALL TOWN - WATER SUPPLY, WASTE WATER TREATMENT, POLICE FORCE, FIRE DEPARTMENT, FOOD SERVICES, HOSPITAL, COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK, STEAM GENERATION, VEHICLE MAINTENANCE, TRANSPORTATION, AND A GOVERNMENT. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 2. WEST (REAR) SIDE. The central bay contains the stairhall. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST (REAR) SIDE. The central bay contains the stairhall. The date of the house is 1774. The date of the first floor rooms on either side of the stairhall are uncertain, and they may be filled-in porches original with the house. - Lewisfield, U.S. Route 52 vicinity, Moncks Corner, Berkeley County, SC

  5. Forest statistics for West-Central Tennessee counties

    Treesearch

    Renewable Resource Evaluation Research Work Unit

    1982-01-01

    These tables were derived from data obtained during a 1980 inventory of 11 counties comprising the West Central Unit of Tennessee (fig. 1). The data on forest acreage and timber volume were secured by systematic sampling method involving a forest-non-forest classification on aerial photographs and on-the-ground measurements of trees at sample locations. The sample...

  6. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH WEST OVER CENTRAL ATLANTIC WITH ATLANTIC OCEAN IN THE FOREGROUND. DENNIS HOTEL, BLENHEIM HOTEL, AND MARLBOROUGH HOTEL (LEFT TO RIGHT) ARE LOCATED IN THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE CLARIDGE HOTEL IS THE HIGHRISE IMMEDIATELY TO THE RIGHT OF THE MARLBOROUGH HOTEL - Marlborough, Blenheim & Dennis Hotels (aerial views), Between Park Place, Michigan Avenue & Boardwalk, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  7. Forest statistics for West-Central Tennessee counties - 1989

    Treesearch

    Dennis M. May; John S. Vissage

    1989-01-01

    Tabulated results were derived from data obtained during a recent inventory of 11 counties comprising the West-Central unit of Tennessee (fig. 1). Tables 1-25 were developed to provide compatibility among Forest Inventory and Analysis Projects. Tables 26-40 are supplementary tables and may change from unit to unit or State to State to address specific resource issues...

  8. Vascular plants of west-central Montana-identification guidebook

    Treesearch

    Klaus Lackschewitz

    1991-01-01

    This comprehensive guidebook provides keys, illustrations, and descriptions that aid identification of the 1,600+ species and varieties of vascular plants growing in west-central Montana. The area covered encompasses Ravalli County and southern Missoula County, and it includes the Bitterroot National Forest and portions of the Lolo National Forest. This guidebook uses...

  9. Enterobacteriaceae isolated from iguanid lizards of west-central Texas.

    PubMed Central

    Mathewson, J J

    1979-01-01

    The prevalence of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the intestines of seven species of iguanid lizards native to west-central Texas was determined. Of the 67 lizard specimens examined, 48.7% were infected with Salmonella and 9% were infected with Salmonella arizonae. Two lizard species (Sceloporus olivaceus and Crotaphytus collaris) were shown to have a 100% prevalence of Salmonella. PMID:533273

  10. A 1200-year high-resolution sedimentary record in Holsteinsborg Dyb on the West Greenland shelf: foraminiferal and diatom indication of oceanographic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reng Erbs-Hansen, Dorthe; Luise Knudsen, Karen; Ambrosius Underbjerg, Jens; Sha, Longbin; Jiang, Hui; Lykke-Andersen, Holger; Joest Andersen, Thorbjørn; Heinemeier, Jan; Símonarson, Leifur A.; Eiríksson, Jón

    2010-05-01

    A deep buried valley, crossing the West Greenland continental shelf from the town of Sisimiut towards the southwest, appears to have been repeatedly eroded and subsequently filled up by a series of Quaternary deposits. Two gravity cores (GA306-GC3 and GA306-GC4; 435 cm and 501 cm long) were obtained during the Galathea 3 expedition in 2006, at water depths of 425 and 445 m, respectively. Each of the cores is supplemented with a boxcore, covering the top part of the record. Age models for the two cores, established by the help of radiocarbon dating, combined with lead-210 dating for the younger parts, show that 7000 cal. years are represented at core site GA306-GC3 and 1200 cal. years at GA306-GC4. The present water masses along the West Greenland coast are dominated by two components. Closest to the shore, the East Greenland Current component brings water of Polar origin northward along the West Greenland Coast. This water is diluted by run-off water from the various fjord systems on its way, and the current turns westward towards Canada at around 65-66 degrees N. Atlantic Water masses, representing a current component originating from Irminger Water and the North Atlantic Current, is found below and to the west of the Polar Water component of the West Greenland Current. This water mass can be traced all the way along West Greenland to Thule in the north. Our core sites are located in the present "Irminger Mode Water" with temperature around 4 degrees C and salinity around 34.9 PSU. The foraminiferal and diatom assemblages in the sedimentary record at the GA306-GC4 site show that there have been considerable changes in the oceanography during the last 1200 years. The time interval between AD 715 and 840 is characterised by relatively strong bottom water currents and probably stratification of the water column. Between AD 840 and 1290, corresponding in time to the Medieval Warm Period (MWP), there is foraminiferal indication of reduced bottom current speed and

  11. Palynology of the late Holocene in Disko Bugt, West Greenland: evidence for centennial variability in sea-surface conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Estelle; de Vernal, Anne; Matthias, Moros; Marie-Michèle, Ouellet-Bernier

    2016-04-01

    The palynological analyses of a sediment core collected in Disko Bay (core 343310; 68° 38,861'N, 53° 49,493'W) provide a dinocyst record of the last 1500 years with 5-30 year time resolution and thus permit reconstruction of changes in surface water, including sea-ice cover, temperature and salinity. Dinocyst assemblages are characterized by high taxonomic diversity (18 taxa) with dominance of Islandinium minutum, Pentapharsodinium dalei, Brigantedinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare and by very high concentrations (>105 cysts.cm-3) leading to calculate fluxes of the order of (>104 cysts.cm-2.years-1). The modern analogue technique (MAT) was applied to dinocyst assemblages to quantitatively reconstruct paleo-sea-surface conditions. The seasonal sea ice cover shows large amplitude variations from 2 to 8 months.yr-1(sea ice coverage >50%), with maxima at 1050-1300 AD, 1400-1500 AD, 1550-1600 AD and 1770-1800 AD, which reflect episodic cooling during the last millennium. In the overall record, sea ice cover and salinity variation are correlated with increase sea ice extent corresponding with decrease salinity and vice versa, which suggests strong linkages between the regional freshwater/meltwater budget and winter sea ice. Relationship between sea ice cover and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is also possible. The increased sea ice being associated with dominant NAO+ mode can be linked with change of the regional properties of the West Greenland Current, the marked by lower influence of warm and saline Atlantic waters relative to an increase influence of the polar and low salinity in Arctic waters from East Greenland Current under NAO+ situation.

  12. Nuuk, Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuuk (or Gadthab) is the capital and largest city of Greenland. It is located at the mouth of the Nuup Kangerlua inlet on the west coast of Greenland. It has a population of about 15,000. The site has a long history of different inhabitation: first by the Inuit people around 2000 B.C., later by Viking explorers in the 10th century. Inuit and Vikings lived together for about 500 years until about 1500, when human habitation suddenly stopped, most likely due to change in climate and vegetation.

    The image was acquired August 2, 2004, covers an area of 22.7 x 26 km, and is located at 64.2 degrees north latitude, 51.8 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  13. Nuuk, Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nuuk (or Gadthab) is the capital and largest city of Greenland. It is located at the mouth of the Nuup Kangerlua inlet on the west coast of Greenland. It has a population of about 15,000. The site has a long history of different inhabitation: first by the Inuit people around 2000 B.C., later by Viking explorers in the 10th century. Inuit and Vikings lived together for about 500 years until about 1500, when human habitation suddenly stopped, most likely due to change in climate and vegetation.

    The image was acquired August 2, 2004, covers an area of 22.7 x 26 km, and is located at 64.2 degrees north latitude, 51.8 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Northern Greenland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-09-16

    The northernmost land in the world is located in Pearyland, Greenland, at a latitude of 83 degrees, 39.6 minutes. This is a land of permanent snows, glaciers, and 24-hours of daylight during the summer months. The ASTER image was acquired May 17, 2003, covers an area of 47.9 x 42.1 km, and is located at 83.6 degrees north latitude, 33.4 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11169

  15. Middle to late Holocene fluctuations of the Vindue glacier, an outlet glacier of the Greenland Ice Sheet, central East Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, L.; Hammer, S. K.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Hall, B. L.; Howley, J. A.; Wilcox, P.; Medford, A.

    2014-12-01

    The margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet are currently responding to present-day climate changes. Determining how the ice sheet margins have responded to past climate changes provides a means to understand how they may respond in the future. Here we present a multi-proxy record used to reconstruct the Holocene fluctuations of the Vindue glacier, an ice sheet outlet glacier in eastern Greenland. Lake sediment cores from Qiviut lake (informal name), located ~0.75 km from the present-day Vindue glacier margin contain a sharp transition from medium sand/coarse silt to laminated gyttja just prior to 6,340±130 cal yr BP. We interpret this transition to indicate a time when the Vindue glacier retreated sufficiently to cease glacial sedimentation into the lake basin. Above this contact the core contains laminated gyttja with prominent, ~0.5 cm thick, silt layers. 10Be ages of boulders on bedrock located between Qiviut lake and the present-day ice margin date to 6.81 ± 0.67 ka (n = 3), indicating the time of deglaciation. These ages also agree well with the radiocarbon age of the silt-gyttja transition in Qiviut lake cores. 10Be ages on boulders on bedrock located more proximal to the ice margin (~0.5 km) yield ages of 2.67 ± 0.18 ka (n = 2). These ages indicate either the continued recession of the ice margin during the late Holocene or an advance at this time. Boulders on the historical moraines show that ice retreated from the moraine by AD 1620 ± 20 yrs (n = 2). These results are in contrast with some areas of the western margin of the ice sheet where 10Be ages indicate that the ice sheet was behind its Historical limit from the middle Holocene (~6-7 ka) to Historical time. This may indicate that the eastern margin may have responded to late Holocene cooling more sensitively or that the advance associated with the Historical moraines overran any evidence of late Holocene fluctuations along the western margin of the ice sheet.

  16. Tidewater dynamics at Store Glacier, West Greenland from daily repeat UAV surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Jonathan; Hubbard, Alun; Toberg, Nick; Box, Jason; Todd, Joe; Christoffersen, Poul; Neal, Snooke

    2017-04-01

    A significant component of the Greenland ice sheet's mass wasteage to sea level rise is attributed to the acceleration and dynamic thinning at its tidewater margins. To improve understanding of the rapid mass loss processes occurring at large tidewater glaciers, we conducted a suite of daily repeat aerial surveys across the terminus of Store Glacier, a large outlet draining the western Greenland Ice Sheet, from May to July 2014 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-y8kauAVAfE). The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were equipped with digital cameras, which, in combination with onboard GPS, enabled production of high spatial resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEMs) using standard structure-from-motion techniques. These data provide insight into the short-term dynamics of Store Glacier surrounding the break-up of the sea-ice mélange that occurred between 4 and 7 June. Feature tracking of the orthophotos reveals that mean speed of the terminus is 16 - 18 m per day, which was independently verified against a high temporal resolution time-series derived from an expendable/telemetric GPS deployed at the terminus. Differencing the surface area of successive orthophotos enable quantification of daily calving rates, which significantly increase just after melange break-up. Likewise, by differencing bulk freeboard volume of icebergs through time we could also constrain the magnitude and variation of submarine melt. We calculate a mean submarine melt rate of 0.18 m per day throughout the spring period with relatively little supraglacial runoff and no active meltwater plumes to stimulate fjord circulation and upwelling of deeper, warmer water masses. Finally, we relate calving rates to the zonation and depth of water-filled crevasses, which were prominent across parts of the terminus from June onwards.

  17. Modelling the dynamic response of Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland, to calving rate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Kleiner, T.; Rückamp, M.; Humbert, A.; Larour, E.

    2015-10-01

    Calving is a major means of ice discharge of the Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets. The breaking off of icebergs changes the ice front configuration of marine terminating glaciers, which affects the stress regime of their upstream areas. Recent observations show the close correlation between the ice front position and the behaviour of many outlet glaciers. However, modelling of a glacier subject to calving poses various challenges. No universal calving rate parametrisation is known, and tracking of a moving ice front and the related boundary conditions in two or three spatial dimensions is non-trivial. Here, we present the theoretical and technical framework for a Level-Set Method, an implicit boundary tracking scheme, which we implemented into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). The scheme allows us to study the dynamic response of a drainage basin to user-defined front ablation rates. We apply the method in a suite of experiments to Jakobshavn Isbræ, a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the western Greenland Ice Sheet. The model robustly reproduces the high sensitivity of the glacier to frontal ablation in form of calving. We find that enhanced calving is able to trigger significant acceleration of the ice stream. Upstream acceleration is sustained through a combination of various feedback mechanisms. However, lateral stress and ice influx into the trough are able to stabilise the ice stream. This study contributes to the present discussion on causes and effects of the continued changes occurring at Jakobshavn Isbræ, and emphasises that the incorporation of seasonal calving and dynamic lateral effects is key for realistic model projections of future global sea level rise on centennial time scales.

  18. Tidewater Dynamics at Store Glacier, West Greenland from Daily Repeat UAV Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A., II; Ryan, J.; Toberg, N.; Todd, J.; Christoffersen, P.; Snooke, N.; Box, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    A significant component of the Greenland ice sheet's mass wasteage to sea level rise is attributed to the acceleration and dynamic thinning at its tidewater margins. To improve understanding of the rapid mass loss processes occurring at large tidewater glaciers, we conducted a suite of daily repeat aerial surveys across the terminus of Store Glacier, a large outlet draining the western Greenland Ice Sheet, from May to July 2014 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-y8kauAVAfE). A suite flock of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) were equipped with digital cameras, which, in combination with onboard GPS, enabled production of high spatial resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models (DEMs) using standard structure-from-motion techniques. These data provide insight into the short-term dynamics of Store Glacier surrounding the break-up of the sea-ice mélange that occurred between 4 and 7 June. Feature tracking of the orthophotos reveals that mean speed of the terminus is 16 - 18 md-1, which was independently verified against a high temporal resolution time-series derived from an expendable/telemetric GPS deployed at the terminus. Differencing the surface area of successive orthophotos enable quantification of daily calving rates, which significantly increase just after melange break-up. Likewise, by differencing bulk freeboard volume of icebergs through time we could also constrain the magnitude and variation of submarine melt. We calculate a mean submarine melt rate of 0.18 md-1 throughout the spring period with relatively little supraglacial runoff and no active meltwater plumes to stimulate fjord circulation and upwelling of deeper, warmer water masses. Finally, we relate calving rates to the zonation and depth of water-filled crevasses, which were prominent across parts of the terminus from June onwards.

  19. Subglacial Meltwater Drainage at Paakitsoq, West Greenland: Insights From a Distributed, Physically Based Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, S. M.; Willis, I.; Arnold, N.; Ahlstrom, A. P.

    2008-12-01

    Recent results indicate that surface melting influences the dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin through meltwater input to a subglacial drainage system, but the hydrological characteristics of this drainage system and the degree to which variations in subglacial water pressure enhance or impede ice flow remain uncertain. Investigating the hydrology of this relatively inaccessible subglacial system requires a numerical modeling approach in which spatial and temporal variations in subglacial water pressures are calculated in response to the main controlling variables (subglacial drainage system structure and morphology and surface water inputs). We present the preliminary findings of such a study for the Paakitsoq region of W. Greenland, north of Jakobshavn Isbrae. Recent airborne radar data are used to construct surface and bed DEMs of the region from which patterns of subglacial hydraulic potential are derived. These are used to define the subglacial drainage system structure (the location, alignment and interconnection of major drainage pathways). Water flow along these pathways is modeled using a component of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) modified to allow for enlargement and closure of ice walled channels (cf. Arnold et al., Hydrol. Processes, 12, 1998). We assess the model's ability to deal with two types of input: rapid lake drainage events, and diurnally varying melt inputs calculated from a degree-day model. We perform sensitivity tests to determine the effects of model parameters on modeled channel cross-sectional area, water pressure and subglacial flow. Finally, we simulate drainage beneath the ice sheet for a summer melt season and compare the results with measured proglacial stream discharges. Preliminary results suggest that channelized flow is only possible close to the ice sheet margin where ice is thin and water inputs are large. Distributed drainage is predicted beneath thicker inland

  20. Rerouting of subglacial water flow between neighboring glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Winnie; Creyts, Timothy T.; Bell, Robin E.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the Greenland ice sheet's subglacial hydrological system show that the connectivity of different regions of the system influences how the glacier velocity responds to variations in surface melting. Here we examine whether subglacial water flow paths can be rerouted beneath three outlet glaciers in the ablation zone of western Greenland. We use Lamont-Doherty and Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of University of Kansas (CReSIS) ice-penetrating radar data to create a new ice thickness map. We then use a simple subglacial water flow model to examine whether flow paths can be rerouted and identify the topographic conditions that are sensitive to subglacial rerouting. By varying water pressures within an observationally constrained range, we show that moderate changes in pressure can cause flow paths to reroute and exchange water from one subglacial catchment to another. Flow across subglacial overdeepenings is particularly sensitive to rerouting. These areas have low hydraulic gradients driving flow, so subtle water pressure variations have a strong influence on water flow direction. Based on correlations between water flow paths and ice velocity changes, we infer that water piracy between neighboring catchments can result in a different spatial pattern of hydrologically induced ice velocity speedup depending on the amount and timing of surface melt. The potential for subglacial water to reroute across different catchments suggests that multiple hydrographs from neighboring glaciers are likely necessary to accurately ascertain melt budgets from proglacial point measurements. The relationship between surface runoff, ice dynamics, and proglacial discharge can be altered by rerouting of subglacial water flow within and across outlet glaciers.

  1. Microfossils from silicified stromatolitic carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1989-01-01

    Silicified flake conglomerates and in situ stratiform stromatolites of the Upper Proterozoic (c. 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland, contain well preserved microfossils. Five stratigraphic horizons within the 1200 m succession contain microbial mat assemblages, providing a broad palaeontological representation of late Proterozoic peritidal mat communities. Comparison of assemblages demonstrates that the taxonomy and diversity of mat builder, dweller, and allochthonous populations all vary considerably within and among horizons. The primary mat builder in most assemblages is Siphonophycus inornatum, a sheath-forming prokaryote of probable but not unequivocally established cyanobacterial affinities. An unusual low diversity unit in Bed 17 is dominated by a different builder, Tenuofilum septatum, while a thin cryptalgal horizon in Bed 18 is built almost exclusively by Siphonophycus kestron. Although variable taphonomic histories contribute to observed assemblage variation, most differences within and among horizons appear to reflect the differential success or failure of individual microbial populations in colonizing different tidal flat microenvironments. Twenty-two taxa are recognized, of which two are described as new: Myxococcoides stragulescens n.sp. and Scissilisphaera gradata n. sp.

  2. Paleobiology of distinctive benthic microfossils from the upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Golubic, S.; Swett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of Polybessurus bipartitus Fairchild ex Green et al., a large morphologically distinctive microfossil, occur in silicified carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic (700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland. Large populations of well-preserved individuals permit reconstruction of P. bipartitus as a coccoidal unicell that "jetted" upward from the sediment by the highly unidirectional secretion of extracellular mucopolysaccharide envelopes. Reproduction by baeocyte formation is inferred on the basis of clustered envelope stalks produced by small cells. Sedimentological evidence indicates that P. bipartitus formed surficial crusts locally within a shallow peritidal carbonate platform. Among living microorganisms a close morphological, reproductive, and behavioral counterpart to Polybessurus is provided by populations of an as yet underscribed cyanobacterium found in coastal Bahamian environments similar to those in which the Proterozoic fossils occur. In general morphology and "jetting" behavior, this population resembles species of the genus Cyanostylon, Geitler (1925), but reproduces via baeocyte formation. Polybessurus is but one of the more than two dozen taxa in the richly fossiliferous biota of the Limestone-Dolomite "Series." This distinctive population, along with co-occurring filamentous cyanobacteria and other microfossils, contributes to an increasingly refined picture of ecological heterogeneity in late Proterozoic oceans.

  3. Microfossils from oolites and pisolites of the Upper Proterozoic Eleonore Bay Group, Central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1988-01-01

    Silicified oolites and pisolites from Bed 18 of the Upper Proterozoic (about 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series" of the Eleonore Bay Group, central East Greenland, contain a diverse suite of organically preserved microfossils that is, for the most part. [Of the] assemblages previously described from Proterozoic cherts and shales. Three principal assemblages occur in these rocks: 1) a class bound assemblage found in detrital carbonate grains (now silicified) that served as nuclei for ooid and pisoid growth, as well as in uncoated mud and mat clasts that were carried into the zone of ooid and pisoid deposition; 2) an epilithic and interstitial assemblage consisting of microorganisms that occurred on top of and between grains; and 3) a euendolithic assemblage composed of microbes that actively bored into coated grains. The Upper Proterozoic euendolithic assemblage closely resembles a community of euendolithic cyanobacteria found today in shallow marine ooid sands of the Bahama Banks. Thirteen species are described, of which eight are new, five representing new genera: Eohyella dichotoma n. sp., Eohyella endoatracta n. sp., Eohyella rectoclada n. sp., Thylacocausticus globorum n. gen. and sp., Cunicularius halleri n. gen. and sp., Graviglomus incrustus n. gen. and sp., Perulagranum obovatum n. gen. and sp., and Parenchymodiscus endolithicus n. gen. and sp.

  4. Microfossils from oolites and pisolites of the Upper Proterozoic Eleonore Bay Group, Central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1988-01-01

    Silicified oolites and pisolites from Bed 18 of the Upper Proterozoic (about 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series" of the Eleonore Bay Group, central East Greenland, contain a diverse suite of organically preserved microfossils that is, for the most part. [Of the] assemblages previously described from Proterozoic cherts and shales. Three principal assemblages occur in these rocks: 1) a class bound assemblage found in detrital carbonate grains (now silicified) that served as nuclei for ooid and pisoid growth, as well as in uncoated mud and mat clasts that were carried into the zone of ooid and pisoid deposition; 2) an epilithic and interstitial assemblage consisting of microorganisms that occurred on top of and between grains; and 3) a euendolithic assemblage composed of microbes that actively bored into coated grains. The Upper Proterozoic euendolithic assemblage closely resembles a community of euendolithic cyanobacteria found today in shallow marine ooid sands of the Bahama Banks. Thirteen species are described, of which eight are new, five representing new genera: Eohyella dichotoma n. sp., Eohyella endoatracta n. sp., Eohyella rectoclada n. sp., Thylacocausticus globorum n. gen. and sp., Cunicularius halleri n. gen. and sp., Graviglomus incrustus n. gen. and sp., Perulagranum obovatum n. gen. and sp., and Parenchymodiscus endolithicus n. gen. and sp.

  5. Paleobiology of distinctive benthic microfossils from the upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Golubic, S.; Swett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of Polybessurus bipartitus Fairchild ex Green et al., a large morphologically distinctive microfossil, occur in silicified carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic (700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland. Large populations of well-preserved individuals permit reconstruction of P. bipartitus as a coccoidal unicell that "jetted" upward from the sediment by the highly unidirectional secretion of extracellular mucopolysaccharide envelopes. Reproduction by baeocyte formation is inferred on the basis of clustered envelope stalks produced by small cells. Sedimentological evidence indicates that P. bipartitus formed surficial crusts locally within a shallow peritidal carbonate platform. Among living microorganisms a close morphological, reproductive, and behavioral counterpart to Polybessurus is provided by populations of an as yet underscribed cyanobacterium found in coastal Bahamian environments similar to those in which the Proterozoic fossils occur. In general morphology and "jetting" behavior, this population resembles species of the genus Cyanostylon, Geitler (1925), but reproduces via baeocyte formation. Polybessurus is but one of the more than two dozen taxa in the richly fossiliferous biota of the Limestone-Dolomite "Series." This distinctive population, along with co-occurring filamentous cyanobacteria and other microfossils, contributes to an increasingly refined picture of ecological heterogeneity in late Proterozoic oceans.

  6. Microfossils from silicified stromatolitic carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. W.; Knoll, A. H.; Swett, K.

    1989-01-01

    Silicified flake conglomerates and in situ stratiform stromatolites of the Upper Proterozoic (c. 700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite 'Series', central East Greenland, contain well preserved microfossils. Five stratigraphic horizons within the 1200 m succession contain microbial mat assemblages, providing a broad palaeontological representation of late Proterozoic peritidal mat communities. Comparison of assemblages demonstrates that the taxonomy and diversity of mat builder, dweller, and allochthonous populations all vary considerably within and among horizons. The primary mat builder in most assemblages is Siphonophycus inornatum, a sheath-forming prokaryote of probable but not unequivocally established cyanobacterial affinities. An unusual low diversity unit in Bed 17 is dominated by a different builder, Tenuofilum septatum, while a thin cryptalgal horizon in Bed 18 is built almost exclusively by Siphonophycus kestron. Although variable taphonomic histories contribute to observed assemblage variation, most differences within and among horizons appear to reflect the differential success or failure of individual microbial populations in colonizing different tidal flat microenvironments. Twenty-two taxa are recognized, of which two are described as new: Myxococcoides stragulescens n.sp. and Scissilisphaera gradata n. sp.

  7. The crust and upper mantle of central East Greenland - implications for continental accretion and rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Christian; Balling, Niels; Ebbing, Jörg; Holm Jacobsen, Bo; Bom Nielsen, Søren

    2016-04-01

    The geological evolution of the North Atlantic Realm during the past 450 Myr, which has shaped the present-day topographic, crustal and upper mantle features, was dominated by the Caledonian orogeny and the formation of the North Atlantic and associated igneous activity. The distinct high altitude-low relief landscapes that accompany the North Atlantic rifted passive margins are the focus of a discussion of whether they are remnant and modified Caledonian features or, alternatively, recently uplifted peneplains. Teleseismic receiver function analysis of 11 broadband seismometers in the Central Fjord Region in East Greenland indicates the presence of a fossil subduction complex, including a slab of eclogitised mafic crust and an overlying wedge of hydrated mantle peridotite. This model is generally consistent with gravity and topography. It is shown that the entire structure including crustal thickness variations and sub-Moho heterogeneity gives a superior gravity and isostatic topographic fit compared to a model with a homogeneous lithospheric layer (1). The high topography of >1000 m in the western part of the area is supported by the c. 40 km thick crust. The eastern part requires buoyancy from the low velocity/low density mantle wedge. The geometry, velocities and densities are consistent with structures associated with a fossil subduction zone. The spatial relations with Caledonian structures suggest a Caledonian origin. The results indicate that topography is isostatically compensated by density variations within the lithosphere and that significant present-day dynamic topography seems not to be required. Further, this structure is suggested to be geophysically very similar to the Flannan reflector imaged north of Scotland, and that these are the remnants of the same fossil subduction zone, broken apart and separated during the formation of the North Atlantic in the early Cenozoic (2). 1) Schiffer, C., Jacobsen, B.H., Balling, N., Ebbing, J. and Nielsen, S

  8. Regional flood-frequency relations for west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seijo, M.A.; Giovannelli, R.F.; Turner, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents regional relations for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods on streams in west-central Florida. Flood prediction equations derived cover 20, 5-, 25-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals. Annual floods for three geographic areas of west-central Florida were found to relate significantly to basin characteristics. Basin characteristics include drainage area, soils index, slope, and lake area. The average standard error of estimate for regional flood relations ranged from 38.4 to 52.1 percent with a mean of 43.5 percent. The average multiple correlation coefficient if 0.94. Regional relations apply to gaged and ungaged sites whose drainage areas are greater than 10 but less than 2,500 square miles. Tables of maximum known floods for 64 streamflow stations used in the analysis are included. Tables comparing station, weighted, and regional flood-peak discharges are also included. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. Evolution of a trough-fan system: Scoresby Sund fjord, central-east Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Lara F.; Nielsen, Tove; Knutz, Paul C.; Kuijpers, Antoon; Damm, Volkmar

    2016-04-01

    The continental shelf along the east margin of Greenland is shaped by several, glacially carved transverse troughs that constitute the oceanward extension of the major fjords. Scoresby Sund is the most prominent fjord of central-east Greenland and separates Liverpool Land, to the north, from Blosseville Kyst to the south. Offshore of Scoresby Sund a large glacial trough mouth fan (TMF) has been built through successive phases of glacial advances. Morpho-structural and seismo-stratigraphic analyses of the Scoresby Sund TMF have been done using all Multichannel Seismic (MCS) profiles available in the area. The ODP site 987 of the leg 162 is located in the abyssal plain offshore of Scoresby Sund and was used for age estimations. The width of the continental shelf in the study area ranges from a 65 km narrow part along the Blosseville Kyst to 120 km off Scoresby Sund. The average water depth is shallower than 300 m, deepening to 600 m along Scoresby Sund glacial trough. Oceanwards a steep slope, seafloor falls into the 2250 m deep abyssal plain of the south Greenland Sea. The sedimentary cover displays maximum thickness along the middle continental shelf (2.8 s TWTT on average). Seven major stratigraphic discontinuities could be identified within the sedimentary record. They restrict eight major seismic units, named from 8 to 1, in upward stratigraphic order. The distribution and seismic facies of these units reveal the evolutionary sequence of the study area from early Cenozoic to Present. The lowest unit, Unit 8, is post-basalt to middle-late Miocene age and represents a pre-glacial depositional stage when tectonic events controlled the sedimentation. Deposition of Unit 7 occurred by late Miocene, revealing glacial-related deposits and ice-stream along Scoresby Sund fjord. Unit 6 was formed during early Pliocene by glacial advance over the continental shelf leading to strong erosive surfaces in the shelf area and Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) in the northern abyssal

  10. Herbicide hardwood crop tree release in central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; Shepard M. Zedaker; James E. Johnson; David W. Smith; Gary W. Miller

    2001-01-01

    Chemical crop tree release treatments were applied to young hardwood stands at three sites in central West Virginia to evaluate the effectiveness of glyphosate as Accord (41.5% SL), imazapyr as Arsenal AC (53.1% SL) and Chopper (27.6% EC), and triclopyr as Garlon 3A (44.4% triethylamine salt SL), and Garlon 4 (61.6% butoxyethyl ester EC) using hack-and-squirt injection...

  11. 7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT WAS BUILT ON THE SITE WITH FOUR SEPARATE PRODUCTION AREAS, AND AN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA. THIS PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE CORE ADMINSTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA, BUILT IN THE EARLY 1950S. IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 442, USED TO TEST ALL HEPA FILTERS ON SITE. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96 West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  13. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96 West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  14. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96 West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  15. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96 West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  16. 40 CFR 81.264 - West Central Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false West Central Illinois Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.264 West Central Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The West Central Illinois Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area...

  17. 40 CFR 81.234 - North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central West Virginia Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.234 North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial...

  18. 40 CFR 81.231 - Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central West Virginia Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.231 Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Central West Virginia Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed...

  19. Subglacial Meltwater Drainage at Paakitsoq, West Greenland: Insights from a Distributed, Physically Based Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwell, Alison; Willis, Ian; Arnold, Neil; Ahlstrom, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that surface meltwater is reaching the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) and modulating glacier sliding rates at the ice sheet margin. However, the hydrological characteristics of this drainage system and the degree to which variations in subglacial water pressure enhance or impede ice flow remain uncertain. As the subglacial hydrological system beneath the GrIS is physically inaccessible and beyond the resolution of geophysical imaging techniques, numerical models are an important tool for investigating the stability of plausible hydrological systems. We present preliminary results of a numerical model that investigates theoretically-constructed hydrological systems of the Paakitsoq region of W. Greenland, north of Jakobshavn Isbrae. Subglacial drainage system structures (the location, alignment and interconnection of major drainage channels) are defined from patterns of subglacial hydrological potential derived from surface and bed DEMs. Discharge and hydraulic head within subglacial channels are modelled using a component of the US EPA Storm Water Management Model (SWMM), modified to allow for enlargement and closure of ice walled channels (Arnold et al., Hydrol. Processes, 12, 1998). We assess the model's ability to deal with two types of input: rapid lake drainage events; and diurnally varying melt inputs calculated from a degree-day model. We perform sensitivity tests to determine the effects of individual model parameters on modelled channel cross-sectional area, water pressure and subglacial flow. Finally, we simulate drainage beneath the ice sheet for a summer melt season and compare the results with measured proglacial stream discharges. Through a recent code modification allowing subglacial water pressures to reach values in excess of ice overburden pressures, we find that consistently high inland subglacial water pressures assist with keeping marginal conduits full and counteract the effects of creep closure, allowing

  20. Modeling of ocean-induced ice melt rates of five west Greenland glaciers over the past two decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rignot, E.; Xu, Y.; Menemenlis, D.; Mouginot, J.; Scheuchl, B.; Li, X.; Morlighem, M.; Seroussi, H.; den Broeke, M. van; Fenty, I.; Cai, C.; An, L.; Fleurian, B. de

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution, three-dimensional simulations from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model ocean model are used to calculate the subaqueous melt rate of the calving faces of Umiamako, Rinks, Kangerdlugssup, Store, and Kangilerngata glaciers, west Greenland, from 1992 to 2015. Model forcing is from monthly reconstructions of ocean state and ice sheet runoff. Results are analyzed in combination with observations of bathymetry, bed elevation, ice front retreat, and glacier speed. We calculate that subaqueous melt rates are 2-3 times larger in summer compared to winter and doubled in magnitude since the 1990s due to enhanced subglacial runoff and 1.6 ± 0.3°C warmer ocean temperature. Umiamako and Kangilerngata retreated rapidly in the 2000s when subaqueous melt rates exceeded the calving rates and ice front retreated to deeper bed elevation. In contrast, Store, Kangerdlugssup, and Rinks have remained stable because their subaqueous melt rates are 3-4 times lower than their calving rates, i.e., the glaciers are dominated by calving processes.

  1. Epidemiological study of viral hepatitis types A, B, C, D and E among Inuits in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Langer, B C; Frösner, G G; von Brunn, A

    1997-09-01

    A descriptive study was performed to evaluate the relative frequencies and molecular epidemiological features of viral hepatitis types A to E among the Inuit population in West Greenland. Serum samples were collected from 503 Inuits (186 males and 317 females; mean age 35 years; range 7-79 years) and were tested for markers of viral hepatitis infection. The hepatitis A prevalence averaged 54%, with a significant rise from 9% to 50% between the second and third decade of life. As for hepatitis B, 42% of the total study population showed serological evidence of current or past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and 7% were hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers. Among the carriers, 6% were also positive for hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), and HBV DNA could be detected in 49% of carriers by polymerase chain reaction. Typing of the HBV isolates revealed genomic group D in 83% (serotype ayw2) and group A in 17% (serotype adw 2). Less than 1% of the study population had antibodies to the hepatitis C virus. None were positive for HCV RNA. Serological evidence of hepatitis D infection was found in 7% of those with hepatitis B helper virus infection markers and in 40% of the HBsAg carriers. As for hepatitis E, 3% of the Inuits showed reactivity in an enzyme immunoassay that detected hepatitis E virus antibody. HEV RNA could not be detected.

  2. Multi-Year Elevation Changes Near the West Margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet from Satellite Radar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.; Brenner, Anita C.; Zwally, H. Jay; DiMarzio, John P.

    1991-01-01

    Mean changes in the surface elevation near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet are measured using Seasat altimetry and altimetry from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The Seasat data extend from early July through early October 1978. The ERM data extend from winter 1986-87 through fall 1988. Both seasonal and multi-year changes are measured using altimetry referenced to GEM T2 orbits. The possible effects of orbit error are minimized by adjusting the orbits into a common ocean surface. Seasonal mean changes in the surface height are recognizable during the Geosat ERM. The multi-year measurements indicate the surface was lower by 0.4 +/- 0.4 m on average in late summer 1987 than in late summer 1978. The surface was lower by 0.2 +/- 0.5 m on average in late summer 1988 than in late summer 1978. As a control case, the computations art also carried out using altimetry referenced to orbits not adjusted into a common ocean surface.

  3. Multi-year elevation changes near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet from satellite radar altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lingle, C.S.; Brenner, A.C.; Zwally, H.J.; DiMarzio, J.P.

    1992-03-01

    Mean changes in the surface elevation near the west margin of the Greenland ice sheet are measured using Seasat altimetry and altimetry from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The Seasat data extend from early July through early October 1978. The ERM data extend from winter 1986-87 through fall 1988. Both seasonal and multi-year changes are measured using altimetry referenced to GEM T2 orbits. The possible effects of orbit error are minimized by adjusting the orbits into a common ocean surface. Seasonal mean changes in the surface height are recognizable during the Geosat ERM. The multi-year measurements indicate the surface was lower by 0.4 +/- 0.4 m on average in late summer 1987 than in late summer 1978. The surface was lower by 0.2 +/- 0.5 m on average in late summer 1988 than in late summer 1978. As a control case, the computations are also carried out using altimetry referenced to orbits not adjusted into a common ocean surface.

  4. Applying foraminiferal stratigraphy as a biomarker for heavy metal contamination and mining impact in a fiord in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Elberling, Bo; Knudsen, Karen Luise; Kristensen, Peter H; Asmund, Gert

    2003-04-01

    Sulphidic mine waste disposed in marine environments constitutes an environmental risk to aquatic life due to potential uptake and accumulation of heavy metals in biota. Fiord sediments near the former Black Angel Mine in West Greenland are contaminated by lead and zinc as a result of submarine tailings disposal in 1973-1990. In 1999 cores were taken up to 10 km away from the disposal area. Analyses include heavy metals, radiochemical dating (210Pb) and high-resolution foraminiferal stratigraphy. The mining operation resulted in significant changes in the assemblage composition. In addition, up to 20% of the Melonis barleeanus population found in sediment deposited during nearby tailings disposal was deformed compared to a natural background of less than 5%. Throughout cores representing the last 100 years of sedimentation, the total numbers and frequency of morphological abnormalities among M. barleeanus revealed some correlation with heavy metals concentrations (up to r2 = 79%). We conclude that abnormalities among foraminifera may represent a useful biomarker for evaluating trends in the biological impact resulting of submarine tailings disposal as well as long-term environmental impact and subsequent recovery.

  5. Trans-generational and neonatal humoral immune responses in West Greenland sledge dogs (Canis familiaris) exposed to organohalogenated environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Larsen, Hans Jørgen S; Kirkegaard, Maja; Letcher, Robert J; Dietz, Rune

    2010-11-01

    Previous investigations in the Arctic have suggested OHC (organohalogen contaminant) induced immune toxic effects on e.g. polar bears (Ursus maritimus). We therefore studied the dietary impact from minke whale blubber (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and OHCs, on the humoral immunity of 7 captive West Greenland sledge dog (Canis familiaris) bitches and their 4 pups constituting a sentinel model species for polar bears. A control group was composed of 8 bitches and their 5 pups all fed pork (Suis scrofa) fat. The study included serum IgG measurements (bitches and pups) and specific immune responses towards tetanus toxoid (bitches) and diphtheria toxoid (pups) as well as influenza virus (pups). The analyses showed that IgG concentrations were non-significantly lowest in exposed bitches and pups (t-test: all p>0.05). In addition, significant lower antibody response was detected in exposed pups immunized with influenza virus at age 3 months (t-test: both p<0.05). No clear group differences were found for tetanus toxoid in bitches and diphtheria toxoid in pups. The results suggest that the humoral immune system of sledge dogs may be suppressed by the dietary blubber composition of OHCs and polyunsaturated fatty acids while a larger follow-up study is recommended in order to investigate this relationship further.

  6. Recognition of > or = 3850 Ma water-lain sediments in West Greenland and their significance for the early Archaean Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutman, A. P.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Friend, C. R.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A layered body of amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF), and ultramafic rocks from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, is cut by a quartz-dioritic sheet from which SHRIMP zircon 206Pb/207Pb weighted mean ages of 3865 +/- 11 Ma and 3840 +/- 8 Ma (2 sigma) can be calculated by different approaches. Three other methods of assessing the zircon data yield ages of >3830 Ma. The BIFs are interpreted as water-lain sediments, which with a minimum age of approximately 3850 Ma, are the oldest sediments yet documented. These rocks provide proof that by approximately 3850 Ma (1) there was a hydrosphere, supporting the chemical sedimentation of BIF, and that not all water was stored in hydrous minerals, and (2) that conditions satisfying the stability of liquid water imply surface temperatures were similar to present. Carbon isotope data of graphitic microdomains in apatite from the Akilia island BIF are consistent with a bio-organic origin (Mojzsis et al. 1996), extending the record of life on Earth to >3850 Ma. Life and surface water by approximately 3850 Ma provide constraints on either the energetics or termination of the late meteoritic bombardment event (suggested from the lunar cratering record) on Earth.

  7. Recognition of > or = 3850 Ma water-lain sediments in West Greenland and their significance for the early Archaean Earth.

    PubMed

    Nutman, A P; Mojzsis, S J; Friend, C R

    1997-01-01

    A layered body of amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF), and ultramafic rocks from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, is cut by a quartz-dioritic sheet from which SHRIMP zircon 206Pb/207Pb weighted mean ages of 3865 +/- 11 Ma and 3840 +/- 8 Ma (2 sigma) can be calculated by different approaches. Three other methods of assessing the zircon data yield ages of >3830 Ma. The BIFs are interpreted as water-lain sediments, which with a minimum age of approximately 3850 Ma, are the oldest sediments yet documented. These rocks provide proof that by approximately 3850 Ma (1) there was a hydrosphere, supporting the chemical sedimentation of BIF, and that not all water was stored in hydrous minerals, and (2) that conditions satisfying the stability of liquid water imply surface temperatures were similar to present. Carbon isotope data of graphitic microdomains in apatite from the Akilia island BIF are consistent with a bio-organic origin (Mojzsis et al. 1996), extending the record of life on Earth to >3850 Ma. Life and surface water by approximately 3850 Ma provide constraints on either the energetics or termination of the late meteoritic bombardment event (suggested from the lunar cratering record) on Earth.

  8. Recognition of > or = 3850 Ma water-lain sediments in West Greenland and their significance for the early Archaean Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutman, A. P.; Mojzsis, S. J.; Friend, C. R.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    A layered body of amphibolite, banded iron formation (BIF), and ultramafic rocks from the island of Akilia, southern West Greenland, is cut by a quartz-dioritic sheet from which SHRIMP zircon 206Pb/207Pb weighted mean ages of 3865 +/- 11 Ma and 3840 +/- 8 Ma (2 sigma) can be calculated by different approaches. Three other methods of assessing the zircon data yield ages of >3830 Ma. The BIFs are interpreted as water-lain sediments, which with a minimum age of approximately 3850 Ma, are the oldest sediments yet documented. These rocks provide proof that by approximately 3850 Ma (1) there was a hydrosphere, supporting the chemical sedimentation of BIF, and that not all water was stored in hydrous minerals, and (2) that conditions satisfying the stability of liquid water imply surface temperatures were similar to present. Carbon isotope data of graphitic microdomains in apatite from the Akilia island BIF are consistent with a bio-organic origin (Mojzsis et al. 1996), extending the record of life on Earth to >3850 Ma. Life and surface water by approximately 3850 Ma provide constraints on either the energetics or termination of the late meteoritic bombardment event (suggested from the lunar cratering record) on Earth.

  9. Comparison of remote sensing reflectance from above-water and in-water measurements west of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait, and west of Iceland.

    PubMed

    Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-07-01

    The need to obtain ocean color essential climate variables (OC-ECVs) using hyperspectral technology has gained increased interest in recent years. Assessing ocean color on a large scale in high latitude environments using satellite remote sensing is constrained by polar environmental conditions. Nevertheless, on a small scale we can assess ocean color using above-water and in-water remote sensing. Unfortunately, above-water remote sensing can only determine apparent optical properties leaving the sea surface and is susceptible to near surface environmental conditions for example sky and sunglint. Consequently, we have to rely on accurate in-water remote sensing as it can provide both synoptic inherent and apparent optical properties of seawater. We use normalized water leaving radiance LWN or the equivalent remote sensing reflectance RRS from 27 stations to compare the differences in above-water and in-water OC-ECVs. Analysis of above-water and in-water RRS spectra provided very good match-ups (R2 > 0.97, MSE < 1.8*10(-7)) for all stations. The unbiased percent differences (UPD) between above-water and in-water approaches were determined at common OC-ECVs spectral bands (410, 440, 490, 510 and 555) nm and the classic band ratio (490/555) nm. The spectral average UPD ranged (5 - 110) % and band ratio UPD ranged (0 - 12) %, the latter showing that the 5% uncertainty threshold for ocean color radiometric products is attainable. UPD analysis of these stations West of Greenland, Labrador Sea, Denmark Strait and West of Iceland also suggests that the differences observed are likely a result of environmental and instrumental perturbations.

  10. Adjacent fjords and glaciers respond differently to ice sheet surface melt in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.; Sutherland, D.; Shroyer, E.; Nash, J. D.; Walker, R. T.; Catania, G. A.; Felikson, D.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M.; Noel, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Neighboring tidewater glaciers often exhibit asynchronous dynamic behavior, despite relatively uniform regional atmospheric and oceanic forcings. This variability may be controlled by a combination of local factors, including glacier and fjord geometry, fjord heat content and circulation, and glacier surface melt. In order to characterize and understand contrasts in adjacent tidewater glacier and fjord dynamics, we made coincident ice-ocean-atmosphere observations at high temporal resolution (minutes to weeks) within a 10,000 km^2 area near Uummannaq, Greenland. Water column velocity, temperature and salinity measurements reveal systematic differences in neighboring fjords that imply contrasting circulation patterns. The observed ocean velocity and hydrography, combined with numerical modeling, suggest that subglacial discharge plays a major role in setting fjord conditions. In addition, satellite remote sensing of seasonal ice flow speed and terminus position reveal both speedup and slow-down in response to melt, as well as differences in calving style among the neighboring glaciers. Glacier force budgets and modeling also point toward subglacial discharge as a key factor in glacier behavior. For the studied region, individual glacier and fjord geometry modulate subglacial discharge, which leads to contrasts in both fjord and glacier dynamics.

  11. Transformation of landforms and sediments in the periglacial setting of West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Česnulevičius, Algimantas; Šeirienė, Vaida

    2009-06-01

    The article deals with the cryogenic processes taking place in the terminal zone of the recessing glacier of SW Greenland, which modify the sediment layers and transform the landforms. The sediment horizons were examined in natural outcrops and in trenches. Structural analysis of periglacial sediments in the slopes has shown that subdued evaporation and shallow permafrost favour the development of cryoturbations. In relief declensions, the formation of polygonal surfaces is predetermined by shallow beds of magmatic rocks, permafrost and especially slow evaporation during short warm seasons. Aeolian processes are most active in the valleys sculptured by glaciofluvial flows where cold arid winds blow out or rework inequigranular deposits. Dust is blown out by wind erosion, whereas the coarse-grained material is transported by creeping or saltation. Sand ripple and embryo dune terrains are widespread in glaciofluvial valleys. Wind erosion processes forming pebble-boulder deflation pavements take place in relief declensions. Outcrops sized 10-60 m2 and niches develop in the hill slopes. Diatoms indicate that sedimentation in small closed basins took place under cold, oligotrophic, acidophilous conditions.

  12. U-Pb Zircon Provenance of Metasedimentary Basement of the Northwestern Terrane, Svalbard: A central East Greenland correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petterssen, C.; Frei, D.; Pease, V.

    2007-12-01

    Svalbard's Caledonian and older bedrock consists of three main exotic terranes separated by north-south trending strike-slip faults. Early in the 19-century Kulling (1930, 1934) noted the striking similarity between the Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks from East Greenland and Svalbard's Eastern Terrane. After this pioneering work Harland et al. (1969) documented their remarkable similarities through detailed stratigraphic correlation of Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. Recent work in the Northwestern and the eastern part of the Eastern terrane shows that this metasedimentary basement has a strong resemblance to the Krummedal and Smallefjord sequences of central East Greenland, with Grenville age (sensu lato) granitoid intrusion followed by Caledonian migmatization and granite genesis. We present the first LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon provenance study on quartzites and mica schists from the Kongsfjorden Group of the Northwestern Terrane of Svalbard. These results indicate a strong correlation with the Krummedal of central East Greenland and help to constrain paleogeographic reconstructions of the Northwestern Terrane. References: Kulling, O. 1930. Stratigraphic studies of the geology of Northeast Greenland. Meddelelser on Gronland, 74, 317- 346. Kulling, O. 1934. Scientific results of the Swedish-Norwegian Arctic Expedition in the summer of 1931. Part XI, The "Hecla Hoek Formation" round Hinlopenstredet. Geografiska Annaler, 16, 161-254. Gee, D. G. and Tebenkov, A. M., 2004. Svalbard: a fragment of the Laurentian margin.? In: Gee, D. G. and Pease, V. (eds) The Neoproterozoic Timanide Orogen of eastern Baltica. Geological Society, London, Memoirs, 30, 191- 206. Harland, W. B. 1969. Contribution of Spitsbergen to understanding of tectonic evolution of North Atlantic region. North Atlantic Geology and Continental Drift. Memoirs of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, 12, 817-851.

  13. A Fully Automated Supraglacial lake area and volume Tracking ("FAST") algorithm: development and application using MODIS imagery of West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Arnold, Neil; Banwell, Alison; Willis, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Supraglacial lakes (SGLs) on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) influence ice dynamics if draining rapidly by hydrofracture, which can occur in under 24 hours. MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are often used to investigate SGLs, including calculating SGL area changes through time, but no existing work presents a method that tracks changes in individual (and total) SGL volume in MODIS imagery over a melt season. Here, we present such a method. First, we tested three automated approaches to derive SGL areas from MODIS imagery by comparing calculated areas for the Paakitsoq and Store Glacier regions in West Greenland with areas derived from Landsat-8 (LS8) images. Second, we applied a physically-based depth-calculation algorithm to the pixels within the SGL boundaries from the best performing method, and validated the resultant depths with those calculated using the same method applied to LS8 imagery. Our results indicated that SGL areas are most accurately generated using dynamic thresholding of MODIS band 1 (red) with a 0.640 threshold value. Calculated SGL area, depth and volume values from MODIS were closely comparable to those derived from LS8. The best performing area- and depth-detection methods were then incorporated into a Fully Automated SGL Tracking ("FAST") algorithm that tracks individual SGLs between successive MODIS images. It identified 43 (Paakitsoq) and 19 (Store Glacier) rapidly draining SGLs during 2014, representing 21% and 15% of the respective total SGL populations, including some clusters of rapidly draining SGLs. We found no relationship between the water volumes contained within these rapidly draining SGLs and the ice thicknesses beneath them, indicating that a critical water volume linearly related to ice thickness cannot explain the incidence of rapid drainage. The FAST algorithm, which we believe to be the most comprehensive SGL tracking algorithm developed to date, has the potential to investigate statistical

  14. Gravity survey of Dixie Valley, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Donald H.

    1983-01-01

    Dixie Valley, a northeast-trending structural trough typical of valleys in the Basin and Range Province, is filled with a maximum of about 10,000 feet of alluvial and lacustrine deposits , as estimated from residual-gravity measurements obtained in this study. On the basis of gravity measurements at 300 stations on nine east-west profiles, the gravity residuals reach a maximum of 30 milligals near the south-central part of the valley. Results from a three-dimensional inversion model indicate that the central depression of the valley is offset to the west of the geographic axis. This offset is probably due to major faulting along the west side of the valley adjacent to the Stillwater Range. Comparison of depths to bedrock obtained during this study and depths obtained from a previous seismic-refraction study indicates a reasonably good correlation. A heterogeneous distribution of densities within the valley-fill deposits would account for differing depths determined by the two methods. (USGS)

  15. Changing surface-atmosphere energy exchange and refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, C.; van As, D.; Box, J. E.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Colgan, W. T.; Doyle, S. H.; Hubbard, A. L.; MacFerrin, M.; Machguth, H.; Smeets, C. J. P. P.

    2015-11-01

    We present 5 years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station measurements from the lower accumulation area (1840 m a.s.l. - above sea level) of the Greenland ice sheet in the Kangerlussuaq region. Here, the summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in a strongly negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface meltwater run-off. The observed run-off was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented meltwater from percolating to available pore volume below. Analysis reveals an anomalously low 2012 summer-averaged albedo of 0.71 (typically ~ 0.78), as meltwater was present at the ice sheet surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season, the ice sheet surface absorbed 28 % (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than the average of all other years. A surface energy balance model is used to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface energy fluxes. The model reproduces the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. A sensitivity analysis reveals that 71 % of the additional solar radiation in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 36 % (0.64 m) of the 2012 surface lowering. The remaining 64 % (1.14 m) of surface lowering resulted from high atmospheric temperatures, up to a +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year at this site even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature, and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) show that 2012 was the first strongly negative SMB year, with the lowest albedo, at this elevation on record. The warm conditions of recent years have resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity in the lower accumulation area. If high temperatures continue, the current lower accumulation area will turn into a region with superimposed ice in coming years.

  16. Preliminary results from hot-water drilling and borehole instrumentation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, S. H.; Christoffersen, P.; Hubbard, B. P.; Young, T. J.; Hofstede, C. M.; Box, J.; Todd, J.; Bougamont, M. H.; Hubbard, A.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) pressurised hot water was used to drill four 603-616 m-long boreholes to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet at a site located 30 km from the calving front of fast-flowing, marine-terminating Store Glacier (70° N, ~1000 m elevation). Despite the boreholes freezing within hours, 4 wired sensor strings were successfully deployed in three of the boreholes. These included a thermistor string to obtain the englacial temperature profile installed in the same borehole as a string of tilt sensors to measure borehole deformation, and two sets of water pressure, electrical conductivity and turbidity sensors installed just above the bed in separate, adjacent boreholes. The boreholes made a strong hydrological connection to the bed during drilling, draining rapidly to ~80 m below the ice surface. The connection of subsequent boreholes was observed as a perturbation in water pressure and temperature recorded in neighbouring boreholes, indicating an effective hydrological sub- or en-glacial connection between them. The sensors, which were all connected to loggers at the surface by cables, operated for between ~30 and 80+ days before indications suggest that the cables stretched and then snapped - with the lowermost sensors failing first. The records obtained from these sensors reveal (i) high and increasing water pressure varying diurnally close to overburden albeit of a small magnitude (~ 0.3 m H2O), (ii) a minimum extrapolated englacial temperature of -21°C with above-freezing temperatures at the bed, and (iv) high rates of internal deformation and strain increasing towards the bed as evinced by increasing tilt with depth. These borehole observations are complemented by GPS measurements of ice motion, meteorological data, and seismic and radar surveys.

  17. Local and synoptic controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Andrew; Banwell, Alison; Arnold, Neil; Willis, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Many supraglacial lakes within the ablation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) are known to drain rapidly (in <1 day) in the mid- to late melt season, delivering large meltwater pulses to the subglacial drainage system, thus affecting basal water pressures and ice-sheet dynamics. Although it is now generally recognised that rapid lake drainage is caused by hydrofracture, the precise controls on hydrofracture initiation remain poorly understood: they may be linked to a local critical water-volume threshold, or they may be associated with synoptic-scale factors, such as ice thickness, driving stresses, ice velocities and strain rates. A combination of the local water-volume threshold and one or more synoptic-scale factors may explain the overall patterns of rapid lake drainage, but this requires verification using targeted field- and remotely-based studies that cover large areas of the GrIS and span long timescales. Here, we investigate a range of potential controls on rapid supraglacial lake drainage in the land-terminating Paakitsoq region of the ice sheet, northeast of Jakobshavn Isbræ, for the 2014 melt season. We have analysed daily 250-m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery in order to calculate lake areas, depths and volumes, and have developed an automatic lake-tracking algorithm to determine the dates on which all rapid lake drainage events occur. For each rapidly draining lake, the water volumes immediately prior to drainage are compared with other local factors, notably lake-filling rate and ice thickness, and with a variety of synoptic-scale features, such as slope angles, driving stresses, surface velocities, surface strain rates and the incidence of nearby lake-drainage events. We present the outcomes of our statistical analysis to elicit the statistically significant controls on hydrofracture beneath supraglacial lakes.

  18. The mantle transition zone and the upper mantle in Central-Eastern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anja Kraft, Helene; Thybo, Hans; Vinnik, Lev

    2016-04-01

    We present a receiver function (RF) study of the mantle transition zone (MTZ) and upper mantle in central-eastern Greenland. Our results are based on data from 18 temporary broad-band seismometers and 5 additional stations from the GLISN and GLATIS networks. The stations were operating in the region between Scoresby Sund and Summit (~ 70 ° N) with half of them installed on ice, the other half on bedrock. For our analysis we calculated low frequency PRF and SRF, which use the difference in travel times between converted and not converted phases at discontinuities. We see clear signals from P410s and P660s in most of our PRF and from S410p in the SRF. Their delay times suggest a surprisingly thin MTZ for most parts of the study area with up to 25 km of thinning compared to standard Earth models. The only exception is a small region in the centre of the study area, which shows times close to standard. It is mainly the delay time for P410s, that varies, while P660s is stable throughout our study area. This indicates, that the thinning of the MTZ is mainly due to topography on the 410-discontinuity. We furthermore observe an M-shaped signal for P410s at stations in the western part around Summit. A similar, complicated signal has been observed previously in different settings and is interpreted as a thin low velocity layer between 410 km and 520 km. In addition we jointly inverted the PRF and SRF for upper mantle velocities. These results show velocities slower than IASP91 for the entire study area. Both the low velocities in the upper mantle and the thinning of the MTZ are in contrary to simple models of old continental shields and might indicate a fairly recent heating event.

  19. Petrology of the Plutonic Rocks of west-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.

    1970-01-01

    A series of plutons in west-central Alaska defines the Hogatza plutonic belt which extends for about 200 miles in an east-west direction from the northeastern Seward Peninsula to the Koyukuk River. The plutonic rocks have an aggregate area of about 1,200 square miles and their composition, distribution, and possible petrogenesis are discussed for the first time in this report. Field, petrographic and chemical data supported by K/Ar age dating indicate the plutonic rocks are divisible into two suites differing in age, location, and composition. The western plutons are mid-Cretaceous (~100 m.y.) in age and consist of a heterogeneous assemblage of monzonite, syenite, quartz monzonite. Associated with these granitic rocks is a group of alkaline sub-silicic rocks that forma belt of intrusive complexes extending for a distance of at least 180 miles from west-central Alaska to the Bering Sea. The complex at Granite Mountain shows a rare example of zoning from an alkaline rim to a quartz-bearing core. The occurrence of a similar complex at Cape Dezhnev on the easternmost tip of Siberia suggests the alkaline province may extend into Siberia. The easternmost plutons are Late Cretaceous (180 m.y.) in age and composed primarily of granodiorite and quartz monzonite similar to calc-alkaline plutons found throughout the North America Cordillera. The plutons are epizonal and intrude deformed but unmetamorphosed Lower Cretaceous andesitic volcanics and volcanic graywacke which constitute the highly mobile Yukon-Koyukuk volcanogenic province of west-central Alaska. No older rocks have been found within the confines of this vast tract; the occurrence of a bounding ophiolite sequence has lead to the suggestion that the province was formed by large-scale rifting and is underlain by oceanic crust. The possibility of no juvenile sialic crust over much of the area suggests that the potassium-rich magma now represented by the alkaline rocks originated in the mantle. The distribution of the

  20. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  1. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  2. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  3. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and the...

  4. 9 CFR 93.320 - Horses from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses Central America and the West Indies 17 § 93.320 Horses from Central America and the West Indies. Horses from Central America and...

  5. Changing Surface-Atmosphere Energy Exchange and Refreezing Capacity of the Lower Accumulation Area, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampidis, C.; van As, D.; Machguth, H.; Smeets, P.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Box, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present five years (2009-2013) of automatic weather station (AWS) data from the lower accumulation area (1840 m above sea level) of the Kangerlussuaq region, western Greenland ice sheet. The summers of 2010 and 2012 were both exceptionally warm, but only 2012 resulted in negative surface mass budget (SMB) and surface runoff. The observed runoff was due to a large ice fraction in the upper 10 m of firn that prevented melt water from percolating to available pore space below. Analysis of the in situ data reveals a relatively low 2012 summer albedo of ~0.7 as melt water was present at the surface. Consequently, during the 2012 melt season the surface absorbed 30% (213 MJ m-2) more solar radiation than in 2010. We drive a surface energy balance model with the AWS data to evaluate the seasonal and interannual variability of all surface energy fluxes. The model is able to reproduce the observed melt rates as well as the SMB for each season. While the drive for melt is solar radiation, year-to-year differences are controlled by terrestrial radiation, apart from 2012 when solar radiation dominated melt. Sensitivity tests reveal that 72% of the excess solar energy in 2012 was used for melt, corresponding to 40% (0.67 m) of the 2012 surface ablation. The remaining ablation (0.99 m) was primarily due to the relatively high atmospheric temperatures up to +2.6 °C daily average, indicating that 2012 would have been a negative SMB year in the lower accumulation area even without the melt-albedo feedback. Longer time series of SMB, regional temperature and remotely sensed albedo (MODIS) suggest that 2012 was the first negative SMB year with the lowest albedo at this elevation on record. The warming conditions of the last years resulted in enhanced melt and reduction of the refreezing capacity of the lower accumulation area. If the warming continues the lower accumulation area will be transformed into superimposed ice.

  6. Ocean properties, ice-ocean interactions, and calving front morphology at two major west Greenland glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauché, N.; Hubbard, A.; Gascard, J.-C.; Box, J. E.; Bates, R.; Koppes, M.; Sole, A.; Patton, H.

    2013-11-01

    Warm sub-polar mode water (SPMW) has been identified as a primary driver of mass loss of marine terminating glaciers draining the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) yet, the specific mechanisms by which SPMW interacts with these tidewater termini remain uncertain. We present oceanographic data from Rink Glacier (RG) and Store Glacier (SG) fjords, two major marine outlets draining the western sector of the GrIS into Baffin Bay over the contrasting melt-seasons of 2009 and 2010. Submarine melting occurs wherever ice is in direct contact with warmer water and the consistent presence of 2.8 °C SPMW adjacent to both ice fronts below 400 m throughout all surveys indicates that melting is maintained by a combination of molecular diffusion and large scale, weak convection, diffusional (hereafter called ubiquitous) melting. At shallower depths (50-200 m), cold, brine-enriched water (BEW) formed over winter appears to persist into the summer thereby buffering this melt by thermal insulation. Our surveys reveal four main modes of glacier-ocean interaction, governed by water depth and the rate of glacier runoff water (GRW) injected into the fjord. Deeper than 200 m, submarine melt is the only process observed, regardless of the intensity of GRW or the depth of injection. However, between the surface and 200 m depth, three further distinct modes are observed governed by the GRW discharge. When GRW is weak (≲1000 m3 s-1), upward motion of the water adjacent to the glacier front is subdued, weak forced or free convection plus diffusional submarine melting dominates at depth, and seaward outflow of melt water occurs from the glacier toe to the base of the insulating BEW. During medium intensity GRW (∼1500 m3 s-1), mixing with SPMW yields deep mixed runoff water (DMRW), which rises as a buoyant plume and intensifies local submarine melting (enhanced buoyancy-driven melting). In this case, DMRW typically attains hydrostatic equilibrium and flows seaward at an intermediate depth of

  7. Volume and Freshwater Flux to the West of Greenland: Nares Strait from 2003 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenchow, A.; Melling, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nares Strait is a 30-40 km wide channel between northern Greenland and Canada where we collected time series observation of velocity, subsurface pressure, and salinity from 2003 to 2009 to quantify volume and freshwater flux. Direct sub-surface observations are augmented by ice velocity and dynamical constraints to interpolate observations to the surface. Measurements indicate a mean volume flux of 1.0 +/- 0.08 Sv (Sv=10^6 m^3/s) and a mean freshwater flux of 62 mSv from the Arctic Ocean through Nares Strait to the south. About 20% of the volume and 50% of the freshwater flux reside in the top 30-m of the water column. Flux variability peaks at a 20-day time scale and correlates strongly with along-channel pressure gradients which explain more than 80% of the flux variance. Seasonal volume flux variations have an amplitude of about 0.1 Sv and a phase that result in maximal and minimal southward transports in March and November, respectively. Ice cover is usually land-fast in March and mobile in November suggesting that the frictional dynamics in a surface layer under the ice are secondary in importance to the along-channel pressure gradient that peaks in early spring with high sea level in the Arctic and low sea level in the more southerly Baffin Bay. Observed changes in the duration of land-fast ice conditions impact ocean stratification and flux through Nares Strait. For example, volume and freshwater fluxes increased by 50% and 100% in years when the ice was mobile almost year-round from 2006 through 2010 as compared to the 2003 to 2006 period when the ice was not mobile for more than 6 month per year on average. Local winds explain almost 50% of the variance during the 2007 to 2009 period of year-round mobile ice when a southern ice arch did not form. This ice arch returned to southern Nares Strait in 2011 resulting in long periods of land-fast ice cover and, we hypothesize, reduced ocean flux.

  8. Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychloronaphthalenes in Nuuk, South-West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Rossana; Skov, Henrik; Vorkamp, Katrin; Christensen, Jesper; Rastogi, Suresh C.; Egeløv, Axel; Petersen, Dorthe

    Atmospheric concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychloronaphthalenes (PCNs) were measured for the first time in Nuuk, Greenland in 2004 and 2005. The annual mean concentrations of the measured OCs were: α-HCH 20.2 pg m -3, γ-HCH (lindane) 5.1 pg m -3, endosulfan 4.8 pg m -3 and dieldrin 1.9 pg m -3. Concentrations of Σ-chlordanes, DDEs and heptachlor epoxide were generally similar and lower than those of α-HCH and γ-HCH. The concentrations of most chlorinated pesticides did not show any clear seasonal variation, with the exception of γ-HCH, which had maximum concentration in August in both years. The average annual mean for ΣPBDEs was 1.14 ± 0.81 pg m -3. The predominant congeners measured in Nuuk were BDE-47 and BDE-99 followed by BDE-100, -153 and -28, indicating the use of penta-BDE technical products as the main source. A clear seasonal variation of PBDE concentrations was observed with maximum concentrations occurring in the summer months. The ΣPCNs concentrations ranged between 0.062 and 0.258 pg m -3 with an annual mean concentration of 0.161 ± 0.004 pg m -3. The PCNs profile was dominated by the tetra-PCNs (74% of the annual mean) and the penta-PCNs (18% of the annual mean). A seasonal trend for ΣPCNs was not observed. Atmospheric concentrations of the investigated compounds were correlated with temperature and anthropogenic CO in order to obtain information about their transport pattern. Positive correlations were found between CO and chlordanes, p, p'-DDE and trifluralin, while a negative correlation was found for γ-HCH. A significant correlation with temperature variations was found for dieldrin, heptachlor epoxide, α-HCH, γ-HCH, BDE-47, BDE-99 and tetra-PCNs, which indicates that re-emission of these compounds from previously contaminated surfaces as an important factor for the observed variations in concentrations.

  9. Floods of May 1981 in west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.; Fassler, John W.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive flooding occurred in west-central Montana during May 22-23, 1981, as a result of a series of rainstorms. Flooding was particularly severe in the communities of East Helena, Belt, and Deer Lodge. Although no lives were lost, total flood damages were estimated by the Montana Disaster Emergency Services Division to be in excess of $30 million. Peak discharges were determined at 75 sites in the flooded area. At 25 sites the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the computed 100-year frequency flood, and at 29 sites, where previous flow records are available, the May 1981 peak discharge exceeded the previous peak of record. (USGS)

  10. Geologic Map of the Nulato Quadrangle, West-Central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, W.W.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction The Nulato quadrangle encompasses approximately 17,000 km2 (6,500 mi2) of west-central Alaska within the Yukon River drainage basin. The quadrangle straddles two major geologic features-the Yukon-Koyukuk sedimentary basin, a huge triangle-shaped Cretaceous depression that stretches across western Alaska from the Brooks Range to the Yukon delta; and the Ruby geanticline,a broad uplift of pre-Cretaceous rocks that borders the Yukon-Koyukuk basin on the southeast. The Kaltag Fault crosses the quadrangle diagonally from northeast to southwest and dextrally offsets all major geologic features as much as 130 km.

  11. Mesoarchean melting and Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic metasomatism during the formation of the cratonic mantle keel beneath West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Acken, D.; Luguet, A.; Pearson, D. G.; Nowell, G. M.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Nagel, T. J.; Schulz, T.

    2017-04-01

    Highly siderophile element (HSE) concentration and 187Os/188Os isotopic heterogeneity has been observed on various scales in the Earth's mantle. Interaction of residual mantle peridotite with infiltrating melts has been suggested to overprint primary bulk rock HSE signatures originating from partial melting, contributing to the heterogeneity seen in the global peridotite database. Here we present a detailed study of harzburgitic xenolith 474527 from the Kangerlussuaq suite, West Greenland, coupling the Re-Os isotope geochemistry with petrography of both base metal sulfides (BMS) and silicates to assess the impact of overprint induced by melt-rock reaction on the Re-Os isotope system. Garnet harzburgite sample 474527 shows considerable heterogeneity in the composition of its major phases, most notably olivine and Cr-rich garnet, suggesting formation through multiple stages of partial melting and subsequent metasomatic events. The major BMS phases show a fairly homogeneous pentlandite-rich composition typical for BMS formed via metasomatic reaction, whereas the 187Os/188Os compositions determined for 17 of these BMS are extremely heterogeneous ranging between 0.1037 and 0.1981. Analyses by LA-ICP-MS reveal at least two populations of BMS grains characterized by contrasting HSE patterns. One type of pattern is strongly enriched in the more compatible HSE Os, Ir, and Ru over the typically incompatible Pt, Pd, and Re, while the other type shows moderate enrichment of the more incompatible HSE and has overall lower compatible HSE/incompatible HSE composition. The small-scale heterogeneity observed in these BMS highlights the need for caution when utilizing the Re-Os system to date mantle events, as even depleted harzburgite samples such as 474527 are likely to have experienced a complex history of metasomatic overprinting, with uncertain effects on the HSE.

  12. Metamorphism of the ca. 3800 Ma supracrustal rocks at Isua, West Greenland: implications for early Archaean crustal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boak, Jeremy L.; Dymek, Robert F.

    1982-06-01

    A detailed mineralogical and petrological study has been carried out on samples from two clastic metasedimentary lithologies from the ˜ 3800 Ma Isua Supracrustal Belt, West Greenland. Semipelitic to pelitic "garnet-biotite schist" contains the limiting AKFM assemblage: muscovite-biotite-garnet-staurolite (+ quartz + plagioclase + ilmenite), whereas "muscovite-biotite gneiss", derived from felsic volcanogenic graywacke, locally contains kyanite (+ quartz+ plagioclase + Ca-, Mn-rich garnet). Temperatures calculated from Fe-Mg partitioning between coexisting garnet- biotite indicate equilibration for garnet coresat T ˜550°C, and ˜460°C for garnet rims. We interpret the higher T as a minimum estimate for prograde regional metamorphism which we argue occurred before 3600 Ma, whereas the lower T reflects later retrogression as indicated by the development of chlorite ± sericite in many samples. The presence of kyanite as the stable aluminosilicate polymorph, combined with phase assemblage data, indicate P ˜5 kbar during prograde metamorphism, and a depthof burial of at least 15 km. The Isua supracrustals are the oldest comprehensively dated rocks on Earth, and the metamorphic mineral assemblages reported here constitute the earliest direct record of thermal regimes in Archaean crust. Therefore, characterization of the metamorphic history of the Isua region places an important constraint on models of early Earth history. Our data and observations indicate that prograde regional metamorphism at Isua occurred at conditions which are considered "normal" for an orogenic system, with a metamorphic thermal gradient ˜35°C/km. Moreover, our results contraindicate the universal occurrence of "thin" Archaean crust and excessively "steep" crustal thermal gradients as proposed by some investigators. Such conclusion appears at odds with estimates for higher terrestrial heat production during the early Archaean, but can be resolved by appealing to more rapid convection and

  13. Changes in ice geometry and supraglacial hydrology, Sermeq Avannarleq ablation zone, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLamb, W. S.; Colgan, W.; Phillips, T. P.; Abdalati, W.; Steffen, K.; Motyka, R. J.; Rajaram, H.

    2010-12-01

    distribution. We also manually extracted major supraglacial lakes from both the 1985 map and 2009 imagery. No significant difference was found in lake locations or area distribution over the study interval. From this we hypothesize that despite an increase in melt water production, Sermeq Avannarleq’s supraglacial lakes have experienced an acceleration in their filling and draining cycle over the study period. Generally, the high rates of thinning (reaching a maximum of 5.79 ± 1.29 m/a) are too great to be explained by surface balance and along-flow ice flux alone. We suggest that an increase in across-flow ice flux, associated with the acceleration of Jakobshavn Isbrae to the south, has resulted in significant dynamic thinning. The observations of marginal recession of land-terminating ice and a thinning and steepening of the ablation zone are also consistent with model predictions the Greenland Ice Sheet’s dynamic response to a warming climate.

  14. Ground Magnetic Data for west-central Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-03-08

    Ground Magnetic Data for west-central Colorado Modeled ground magnetic data was extracted from the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies database at http://irpsrvgis08.utep.edu/viewers/Flex/GravityMagnetic/GravityMagnetic_CyberShare/ on 2/29/2012. The downloaded text file was then imported into an Excel spreadsheet. This spreadsheet data was converted into an ESRI point shapefile in UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection, showing location and magnetic field strength in nano-Teslas. This point shapefile was then interpolated to an ESRI grid using an inverse-distance weighting method, using ESRI Spatial Analyst. The grid was used to create a contour map of magnetic field strength. This dataset includes the raw spreadsheet data, an ESRI point shapefile showing magnetic sample locations and magnetic field strength, and an ESRI line shapefile showing magnetic contours. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Magnetic Contour Shapefile Extent: West -108.698836 East -105.283977 North 41.048206 South 36.950086 Magnetic Point Shapefile Extent: West -108.698832 East -105.283908 North 41.048142 South 36.950086

  15. 22. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. AERIAL VIEW LOOKING EAST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE FROM WEST OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT AREA OF THE PLANT. ON THE LEFT (NORTH) SIDE OF THE STREET IN THE FOREGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 111, THE GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BUILDING. TO THE EAST OF BUILDING 111 IS BUILDING 112, THE CAFETERIA. FURTHER TO THE EAST IS BUILDING 331, THE VEHICLE MAINTENANCE GARAGE AND FIRE DEPARTMENT; BUILDING 333, THE PAINT SHOP; BUILDING 334, THE ELECTRICAL AND GENERAL MAINTENANCE SHOP; AND BUILDING 551, THE GENERAL WAREHOUSE. ON THE RIGHT (SOUTH) SIDE OF CENTRAL AVENUE, IN THE FOREGROUND IS BUILDING 121, FIREARMS REPAIR. BEHIND BUILDING 121 IS BUILDING 122, EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES, AND BUILDING 123, HEALTH PHYSICS LABORATORY. BUILDING 441, THE PRODUCTION ... - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  16. Status of the Topeka shiner in west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Clay; Bakevich, Bryan D.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The Topeka shiner Notropis topeka is a federally endangered fish species that is estimated to occupy only 20% of its historic range. In Iowa Topeka shiners have been in decline for decades. Our goal was to determine the present distribution of Topeka shiners in the west-central portion of their range in Iowa and to characterize the extent of its decline. We compared the current distribution to distributions generated from earlier collections. We found Topeka shiners in six of 22 watersheds where they occurred historically. Status of Topeka shiners was judged to be stable in 27% of the watersheds, at risk in 45% of the watersheds, and possibly extirpated in 27% of the watersheds. None were classified as increasing. Based on comparison of the historical distribution with more recent ones, Topeka shiners in west-central Iowa showed a 27% decline a decade ago and currently exhibits a 73% decline in their distribution. The collective evidence from four of five other states in the species’ range reveals similar declines. This study provides further information on the local distribution and extent of decline for this federally endangered species with a greatly reduced and fragmented overall distribution.

  17. The diorite at West Warren, south-central Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomeroy, John S.

    1974-01-01

    Follated, syntectonic, concordant intrusive bodies of mostly diorite and meladiorite with less abundant quartz diorite and norite have been mapped in the West Warren area of south-central Massachusetts. The rocks of the pluton range from a medium colored phase of diorite and quartz diorite to a dark colored phase of meladiorite and norite. Major minerals In the dioritic rocks are calcic andesine, green hornblende, brown biotite, and hypersthene. Igneous textures are dominant, and retrograde or deuteric effects are generally minor. Silica and alumina contents of the dioritic rocks are somewhat higher than for average diorites; conversely, the oxides of iron, magnesium, and calcium are generally lower. Normative quartz, albite, and anorthite are higher and orthoclase is lower in the samples than In the average diorite. Sizeable plutons of diorite-norite are uncommon in central Massachusetts. The West Warren body, roughly 26 km2 (10 square miles) in area, bears little petrochemical relation to adjacent rock units. The pluton can be construed as belonging to a belt of intrusive mafic rocks which stretches from southeastern New York to coastal Maine.

  18. Northern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The northernmost land in the world is located in Pearyland, Greenland, at a latitude of 83 degrees, 39.6 minutes. This is a land of permanent snows, glaciers, and 24-hours of daylight during the summer months. The ASTER image was acquired May 17, 2003, covers an area of 47.9 x 42.1 km, and is located at 83.6 degrees north latitude, 33.4 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Mantle Sources, Mantle Melting and the Genesis of the Central East Greenland Plateau Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. L.; Barfod, G. H.; Lesher, C. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Central East Greenland (CEG) plateau lavas (56-54 Ma) contain a very complete geochemical record of the opening of the North Atlantic basin in response to the breakup of Pangaea. This record provides an unique opportunity for identifying the mantle source compositions and melting processes involved in the genesis of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP). The plateau lavas consist of three compositional suites: the volumetrically dominant high-Ti suite (TiO2 ca. 1.67 - 4 wt. %) (HTS) and the minor low-Ti (TiO2 < 1.96 wt. %) and very high-Ti (TiO2 ca. 4 - 6 wt. %) suites (LTS and VHTS, respectively). We present detailed Hf-Nd-Sr data and trace element data for VHTS and LTS lavas closely associated within the lava succession. These uncontaminated lava suites represent the extreme compositional ranges of the plateau lavas and show limited variability in ɛHf (9.58 - 10.96 [VHTS] and 14.39 - 14.68 [LTS]) and a somewhat broader variation in ɛNd (5.42 - 6.73 [VHTS] and 8.29 - 9.68 [LTS]). The LTS and VHTS source compositions bracket the chemical range observed for the HTS lavas. Drawing from the model of [1], we propose that the mantle sources for the VHTS and LTS were intimately associated within the mantle melting regime beneath CEG and were present throughout the generation of the plateau lavas. Correlations between trace element and isotopic data can be accounted for by a forward melting model involving a heterogeneous source containing fusible eclogite and refractory peridotite. These findings are in contrast to the model of [2] proposing that temporal sampling of three distinct and isolated mantle domains within a zoned plume is the dominant control on plateau lava chemistry. Our study highlights the importance of combining isotope and trace element data in understanding melt production in the NAIP and elsewhere. (1) Tegner et al., 1998, Nature, v 395, p 591-594; (2) Barker et al., 2006, Geology, v 34, p 481-484

  20. Geology and total petroleum systems of the West-Central Coastal province (7203), West Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.

    2006-01-01

    The West-Central Coastal Province of the Sub-Saharan Africa Region consists of the coastal and offshore areas of Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Angola (including the disputed Cabinda Province), and Namibia. The area stretches from the east edge of the Niger Delta south to the Walvis Ridge. The West-Central Coastal Province includes the Douala, Kribi-Campo, Rio Muni, Gabon, Congo, Kwanza, Benguela, and Namibe Basins, which together form the Aptian salt basin of equatorial west Africa. The area has had significant exploration for petroleum; more than 295 oil fields have been discovered since 1954. Since 1995, several giant oil fields have been discovered, especially in the deep-water area of the Congo Basin. Although many total petroleum systems may exist in the West-Central Coastal Province, only four major total petroleum systems have been defined. The area of the province north of the Congo Basin contains two total petroleum systems: the Melania-Gamba Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous source and reservoir rocks, and the Azile-Senonian Total Petroleum System, consisting of Albian to Turonian source rocks and Cretaceous reservoir rocks. Two assessment units are defined in the West-Central Coastal Province north of the Congo Basin: the Gabon Subsalt and the Gabon Suprasalt Assessment Units. The Congo Basin contains the Congo Delta Composite Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous to Tertiary source and reservoir rocks. The Central Congo Delta and Carbonate Platform and the Central Congo Turbidites Assessment Units are defined in the Congo Delta Composite Total Petroleum System. The area south of the Congo Basin contains the Cuanza Composite Total Petroleum System, consisting of Lower Cretaceous to Tertiary source and reservoir rocks. The Cuanza-Namibe Assessment Unit is defined in the Cuanza Composite Total Petroleum System. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the

  1. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  2. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  3. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  4. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  5. 9 CFR 93.423 - Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ruminants from Central America and the... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants Central America and West Indies 9 § 93.423 Ruminants from Central America and the West Indies. (a) Ruminants intended...

  6. Seasonal and regional variability in dissolved and particulate iron fluxes via glacial runoff along the West Greenland coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquette, K.; Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Harrold, Z.; Liu, L.; Dieser, M.; Cameron, K. A.; Christner, B. C.; Junge, K.

    2012-12-01

    Subglacial weathering, due to biogeochemical and physical weathering processes, can affect the chemical evolution of subglacial waters and release dissolved and particulate iron via glacial runoff. Iron is a growth limiting nutrient and plays a critical role in the biogeochemical cycles of coastal and marine waters. More recently, dissolved and colloidal iron derived from subglacial sources have been considered an important contributor of Fe fluxes to the ocean; however, their dependency on lithology, grain size, and microbial activity is not well understood. This study characterizes the solute chemistry, in particular iron mineralogy and dissolved iron concentrations, released from beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS), from two locations along the West Greenland coast, Thule (76°N, 68°W) and Kangerlussuaq (67°N, 50°W). We hypothesize that the subglacial lithology has a control on Fe fluxes from the GrIS to coastal and marine systems. The underlying bedrock in Thule is the Precambrian Dundas and Narssarssuk sedimentary formations which include sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The bedrock in Kangerlussuaq is dominated by Archean granodioritic gneiss and amphibolite within the Nagssugtoqidian Orogen. Supra and subglacial meltwater samples were collected directly in front of the Ice Sheet over an entire melt season in 2011 (North River, Thule) and 2012 (Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua River, Kangerlussuaq). In situ parameters such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and electrical conductivity were recorded in order to interpret meltwater chemistry. Dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) species were fixed immediately and analyzed within 24 hours after sampling in the field laboratory using a spectrophotometer and 10 cm cell. Total dissolved iron (FeT) of different size fractions (<0.22 and <0.05 μm) of iron were determined back in the home laboratory using reaction cell ICP MS. Preliminary results demonstrate that subglacial meltwater of North River has average Fe

  7. Effects of the Boko Haram Insurgency Group in West and Central Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    THE EFFECTS OF THE BOKO HARAM INSURGENCY GROUP IN WEST AND CENTRAL AFRICA A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S...JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effects of the Boko Haram Insurgency Group in West and Central Africa 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Haram, Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Cameroon, West Africa, Central Africa, Insurgency, Phase Zero, Government, Social, Economic, Military 16. SECURITY

  8. Substantial contribution to sea-level rise during the last interglacial from the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed

    Cuffey; Marshall

    2000-04-06

    During the last interglacial period (the Eemian), global sea level was at least three metres, and probably more than five metres, higher than at present. Complete melting of either the West Antarctic ice sheet or the Greenland ice sheet would today raise sea levels by 6-7 metres. But the high sea levels during the last interglacial period have been proposed to result mainly from disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet, with model studies attributing only 1-2 m of sea-level rise to meltwater from Greenland. This result was considered consistent with ice core evidence, although earlier work had suggested a much reduced Greenland ice sheet during the last interglacial period. Here we reconsider the Eemian evolution of the Greenland ice sheet by combining numerical modelling with insights obtained from recent central Greenland ice-core analyses. Our results suggest that the Greenland ice sheet was considerably smaller and steeper during the Eemian, and plausibly contributed 4-5.5 m to the sea-level highstand during that period. We conclude that the high sea level during the last interglacial period most probably included a large contribution from Greenland meltwater and therefore should not be interpreted as evidence for a significant reduction of the West Antarctic ice sheet.

  9. Climatic factors influencing triatomine occurrence in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joyce Mendes; de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Sousa, Adair Vieira; de Paula, Aécio Moraes; Machado, Ricardo Bomfim; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    We estimated the geographic distributions of triatomine species in Central-West Region of Brazil (CW) and analysed the climatic factors influencing their occurrence. A total of 3,396 records of 27 triatomine species were analysed. Using the maximum entropy method, ecological niche models were produced for eight species occurring in at least 20 municipalities based on 13 climatic variables and elevation. Triatoma sordida and Rhodnius neglectus were the species with the broadest geographic distributions in CW Brazil. The Cerrado areas in the state of Goiás were found to be more suitable for the occurrence of synanthropic triatomines than the Amazon forest areas in the northern part of the state of Mato Grosso. The variable that best explains the evaluated models is temperature seasonality. The results indicate that almost the entire region presents climatic conditions that are appropriate for at least one triatomine species. Therefore, it is recommended that entomological surveillance be reinforced in CW Brazil. PMID:23778666

  10. Past sea-level data from Lakse Bugt, Disko Island, West Greenland from ground-penetrating radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Priscila E.; Nielsen, Lars; Kroon, Aart; Clemmensen, Lars B.

    2016-04-01

    Beach-ridge deposits have been used as sea-level indicators in numerous studies from temperate coastal regions. However, their present surface morphology in artic regions may not accurately correspond to past sea-level, because subsequent surface erosion, solifluction processes and/or later sediment deposition may have altered the surface significantly. The internal structure of these beach ridges, however, is often well-preserved and thus constitutes an important key to reconstruction of past sea levels as seen elsewhere. In the present study, high-resolution reflection GPR data and high-precision topographic data were collected at Lakse Bugt (Disko Island, West Greenland) using a shielded 250 MHz antennae system and a RTK-Trimble R8 DGPS, respectively. Three transects were collected across a sequence of fossil, raised beach ridge deposits, and two transects were obtained across modern beach deposits at the shoreline of the mesotidal regime. Along all radar profiles we observed downlap reflection points, which we interpret to represent the boundary between sediments deposited on the beachface and sediments deposited in the upper shoreface regime. Both the upper shoreface and the beachface deposits exhibit reflection patterns dipping in the seaward direction. The beachface deposits show the strongest dip. At or just below the downlap points strong diffractions are often observed indicating the presence of a layer containing stones. These stones are large enough to generate significant signal scattering. At the present day beach a sharp transition defined by the presence of large stones is observed near the low tide water level: cobbles characterize the seaside, while the land side is characterized by sand and gravel. Therefore, it seems reasonable to conclude that downlap points observed in the GPR data serve as indicators of past low-tide levels (at the time of deposition). The downlap points show a consistent offset with respect to present surface topography

  11. Seasonal Variation and Controls on Subglacial Riverine CO2 Concentrations From a Small Catchment, West Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, G.; Jacobson, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that subglacial discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) may have the potential to be a significant source of CO2 to the atmosphere in a warming world (Ryu and Jacobson, 2011). To trace the flux, sources of, and controls on subglacial CO2, we sampled the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua River subglacial portal, which receives water from the Isunnguata and Russell Glaciers, west GrIS, six times throughout June - August, 2014. Additionally, we sampled two nearby supraglacial streams. We present preliminary data on pCO2 values, DIC and DOC concentrations, major cation and anion concentrations, δ13CDIC isotopes, as well as ∆14C-DIC and -DOCisotopes. Waters emerging from the subglacial portal are 2 - 2.5x supersaturated in CO2 with respect to atmospheric equilibrium. pCO2 values rise from ~700 to 1000ppm between June and July then return to ~700ppm in August. Although subglacial pCO2 and ∆14CDIC values vary, throughout the summer they exhibit similar trends as contemporaneous supraglacial stream values, suggesting that subglacial CO2 is at least partially derived from supraglacial meltwater which has accessed the ice sheet base through moulins and crevasses. δ13CDIC isotopes of supraglacial streams are highly depleted (-24‰), suggesting that CO2 is sourced from microbial respiration of surficial organic carbon. Subglacial portal δ13CDIC isotopes are also relatively depleted (-17‰) but are sufficiently different relative to supraglacial streams so as to require an additional δ13CDIC enriched source. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.89, n= 6) between subglacial Ca+Mg concentrations and alkalinity (≈ HCO3) suggests that the additional source of DIC to these waters is dissolution of carbonate. Finally, the correlation (R2 = 0.55, n = 6) between subglacial pCO2 and ∆14CDOC values suggest that one control on variable CO2 concentrations throughout the melt season is the age, and presumably, the lability, of organic carbon available to

  12. Plate Tectonics at 3.8-3.7 Ga: Field Evidence from the Isua Accretionary Complex, Southern West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Komiya; Maruyama; Masuda; Nohda; Hayashi; Okamoto

    1999-09-01

    A 1&rcolon;5000 scale mapping was performed in the Isukasia area of the ca. 3.8-Ga Isua supracrustal belt, southern West Greenland. The mapped area is divided into three units bounded by low-angle thrusts: the Northern, Middle, and Southern Units. The Southern Unit, the best exposed, is composed of 14 subunits (horses) with similar lithostratigraphy, bound by layer-parallel thrusts. Duplex structures are widespread in the Isua belt and vary in scale from a few meters to kilometers. Duplexing proceeded from south to north and is well documented in the relationship between link- and roof-thrusts. The reconstructed lithostratigraphy of each horse reveals a simple pattern, in ascending order, of greenstone with low-K tholeiitic composition with or without pillow lava structures, chert/banded iron-formation, and turbidites. The cherts and underlying low-K tholeiites do not contain continent- or arc-derived material. The lithostratigraphy is quite similar to Phanerozoic "oceanic plate stratigraphy," except for the abundance of mafic material in the turbidites. The evidence of duplex structures and oceanic plate stratigraphy indicates that the Isua supracrustal belt is the oldest accretionary complex in the world. The dominantly mafic turbidite composition suggests that the accretionary complex was formed in an intraoceanic environment comparable to the present-day western Pacific Ocean. The duplex polarity suggests that an older accretionary complex should occur to the south of the Isua complex. Moreover, the presence of seawater (documented by a thick, pillow, lava unit at the bottom of oceanic plate stratigraphy) indicates that the surface temperature was less than ca. 100 degrees C in the Early Archean. The oceanic geotherm for the Early Archean lithosphere as a function of age was calculated based on a model of transient half-space cooling at given parameters of surface and mantle temperatures of 100 degrees and 1450 degrees C, respectively, suggesting that the

  13. Ice-Ocean Interactions to the North-West of Greenland: Glaciers, Straits, Ice Bridges, and the Rossby Radius (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenchow, A.; Falkner, K. K.; Melling, H.; Johnson, H. L.; Huntley, H. S.; Ryan, P.; Friends Of Petermann

    2010-12-01

    Petermann Glacier at 81 N latitude is a major outlet glacier adjacent to Nares Strait. It terminates in a long (70 km), narrow (16 km) and thin (50 m) floating tongue and has a grounding line more than 500 m below sea level. A calving event in 2010 reduced the floating area by 25% and produced a single 240 km2 ice island currently moving south in Nares Strait where it will likely interact with island to potentially create a temporary polynya in Nares Strait. The 2010 calving from Petermann Glacier contributes <10% to its mass balance as more than 80% is lost due to basal melting by the ocean. Hence the largely unexplored physics at the ice-ocean interface determine how a changing climate impacts this outlet glacier. Conducting exploratory surveys inside Petermann Fjord in 2003, 2007, and 2009, we find a 1100 m deep fjord connected to Nares Strait via a sill at 350-450 m depth. The fjord receives about 3 times the amount of heat required for the basal melt rates. Furthermore, limited data and analytical modeling suggests a 3-dimensional circulation over the upper 300-m of the water column with a coastally trapped buoyant outflow. We integrate these findings with more complete oceanic time series data from an array moored in Nares Strait from 2003 through 2009 near 80.5 N. In the past Nares Strait and Petermann Fjord were covered by land fast sea ice during the 9-10 month long winter season. Archeological and remotely sensed records indicate that an ice bridge formed regularly at the southern end of Nares Strait creating the North-Water polynya near 79 N latitude. Since 2006 this ice bridge has largely failed to form, leading, perhaps, to the occasional formation of a secondary ice bridge 300 km to the north where Nares Strait connects to the Arctic Ocean. However, this ice bridge appears to form for shorter periods only. Consequently Arctic sea ice can now exit the Arctic in winter via pathways to the west of Greenland all year. We speculate that this changed ocean

  14. Multiresolution quantification of deciduousness in West Central African forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennois, G.; Barbier, N.; Fabre, I.; Couteron, P.

    2013-04-01

    The characterization of leaf phenology in tropical forests is of major importance and improves our understanding of earth-atmosphere-climate interactions. The availability of satellite optical data with a high temporal resolution has permitted the identification of unexpected phenological cycles, particularly over the Amazon region. A primary issue in these studies is the relationship between the optical reflectance of pixels of 1 km or more in size and ground information of limited spatial extent. In this paper, we demonstrate that optical data with high to very-high spatial resolution can help bridge this scale gap by providing snapshots of the canopy that allow discernment of the leaf-phenological stage of trees and the proportions of leaved crowns within the canopy. We also propose applications for broad-scale forest characterization and mapping in West Central Africa over an area of 141 000 km2. Eleven years of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data were averaged over the wet and dry seasons to provide a dataset of optimal radiometric quality at a spatial resolution of 250 m. Sample areas covered at a very-high (GeoEye) and high (SPOT-5) spatial resolution were used to identify forest types and to quantify the proportion of leaved trees in the canopy. The dry season EVI was positively correlated with the proportion of leaved trees in the canopy. This relationship allowed the conversion of EVI into canopy deciduousness at the regional level. On this basis, ecologically important forest types could be mapped, including young secondary, open Marantaceae, Gilbertiodendron dewevrei and swamp forests. We show that in west central African forests, a large share of the variability in canopy reflectance, as captured by the EVI, is due to variation in the proportion of leaved trees in the upper canopy, thereby opening new perspectives for biodiversity and carbon-cycle applications.

  15. Multiresolution quantification of deciduousness in West-Central African forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennois, G.; Barbier, N.; Fabre, I.; Couteron, P.

    2013-11-01

    The characterization of leaf phenology in tropical forests is of major importance for forest typology as well as to improve our understanding of earth-atmosphere-climate interactions or biogeochemical cycles. The availability of satellite optical data with a high temporal resolution has permitted the identification of unexpected phenological cycles, particularly over the Amazon region. A primary issue in these studies is the relationship between the optical reflectance of pixels of 1 km or more in size and ground information of limited spatial extent. In this paper, we demonstrate that optical data with high to very-high spatial resolution can help bridge this scale gap by providing snapshots of the canopy that allow discernment of the leaf-phenological stage of trees and the proportions of leaved crowns within the canopy. We also propose applications for broad-scale forest characterization and mapping in West-Central Africa over an area of 141 000 km2. Eleven years of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) data were averaged over the wet and dry seasons to provide a data set of optimal radiometric quality at a spatial resolution of 250 m. Sample areas covered at a very-high (GeoEye) and high (SPOT-5) spatial resolution were used to identify forest types and to quantify the proportion of leaved trees in the canopy. The dry-season EVI was positively correlated with the proportion of leaved trees in the canopy. This relationship allowed the conversion of EVI into canopy deciduousness at the regional level. On this basis, ecologically important forest types could be mapped, including young secondary, open Marantaceae, Gilbertiodendron dewevrei and swamp forests. We show that in West-Central African forests, a large share of the variability in canopy reflectance, as captured by the EVI, is due to variation in the proportion of leaved trees in the upper canopy, thereby opening new perspectives for biodiversity and

  16. Ordovician sponges from west-central and east-central Alaska and western Yukon Territory, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigby, J.K.; Blodgett, R.B.; Britt, B.B.

    2008-01-01

    Moderate collections of fossil sponges have been recovered over a several-year period from a few scattered localities in west-central and east-central Alaska, and from westernmost Yukon Territory of Canada. Two fragments of the demosponge agelasiid cliefdenellid, Cliefdenella alaskaensis Stock, 1981, and mostly small unidentifiable additional fragments were recovered from a limestone debris flow bed in the White Mountain area, McGrath A-4 Quadrangle in west-central Alaska. Fragments of the agelasiid actinomorph girtyocoeliids Girtyocoeliana epiporata (Rigby & Potter, 1986) and Girtyocoelia minima n. sp., plus a specimen of the vaceletid colospongiid Corymbospongia amplia Rigby, Karl, Blodgett & Baichtal, 2005, were collected from probable Ashgillian age beds in the Livengood B-5 Quadrangle in east-central Alaska. A more extensive suite of corymbospongiids, including Corymbospongia betella Rigby, Potter & Blodgett, 1988, C. mica Rigby & Potter, 1986, and C.(?) perforata Rigby & Potter, 1986, along with the vaceletiid colospongiids Pseudo-imperatoria minima? (Rigby & Potter, 1986), and Pseudoimperatoria media (Rigby & Potter, 1986), and with the heteractinid Nucha naucum? Pickett & Jell, 1983, were recovered from uppermost part of the Jones Ridge Limestone (Ashgillian), on the south flank of Jones Ridge, in the Sheep Mountain Quadrangle, in westernmost Yukon Territory, Canada. The fossil sponges from the McGrath A-4 and Livengood B-5 quadrangles were recovered from attached Siberian terranes, and those from the Sheep Mountain Quadrangle were recovered from an allochthonous Laurentian terrane in the Yukon Territory.

  17. Deglaciation and postglacial vegetation history of the West Mountains, west-central Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doerner, J.P.; Carrara, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    The West Mountains, west-central Idaho, were deglaciated before ca. 11,500 BP, as indicated by radiocarbon ages and Glacier Peak tephra, at several sites in cirques. Pollen analysis of a sediment core, and plant macrofossils from sediments recovered from the cirque at the head of Van Wyck Creek, indicate that a closed spruce-pine forest surrounded the site from ca. 11,500 to 9800 BP. Early in this period, spruce (probably krummholz) was already growing near the present-day altitudinal limit of large upright spruce. Hence, the climate during this period was significantly warmer than before 11,500 BP. Between ca. 9800 and 3200 BP the climate was warmer and drier than present. Pollen data indicate that from ca. 9300 to the time of Mazama tephra deposition (ca. 6700 BP), the climate was warmer and drier than at any time since 11,500 BP. From ca. 6700 to 3200 BP there was a small decrease in temperature with a minor increase in effective moisture. Beginning ca. 3200 BP, the climate was characterized by cooler temperatures and more mesic conditions. Modern plant communities were established by ca. 1500 BP.

  18. Levels and trends of radioactive contaminants in the Greenland environment.

    PubMed

    Dahlgaard, Henning; Eriksson, Mats; Nielsen, Sven P; Joensen, Hans Pauli

    2004-09-20

    Levels of radioactive contaminants in various Greenland environments have been assessed during 1999-2001. The source of 137Cs, 90Sr and (239,240)Pu in terrestrial and fresh water environments is mainly global fallout. In addition, the Chernobyl accident gave a small contribution of 137Cs. Reindeer and lamb contain the largest observed 137Cs concentrations in the terrestrial environment--up to 80 Bq kg(-1) fresh weight have been observed in reindeer. Due to special environmental conditions, 137Cs is transferred to landlocked Arctic char with extremely high efficiency in South Greenland leading to concentrations up to 100 Bq kg(-1) fresh weight. In these cases very long ecological half-lives are seen. Concentrations of 99Tc, 137Cs and 90Sr in seawater and in marine biota decrease in the order North-East Greenland and the coastal East Greenland current > South-West Greenland > Central West Greenland and North-West Greenland > Irmiger Sea-Faroe Islands. The general large-scale oceanic circulation combined with European coastal discharges and previous contamination of the Arctic Ocean causes this. As the same tendency is seen for the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) DDT and PCB in marine biota, it is suggested that long-distance oceanic transport by coastal currents is a significant pathway also for POPs in the Greenland marine environment. The peak 99Tc discharge from Sellafield 1994-1995 has only been slightly visible in the present survey year 2000. The concentrations are expected to increase in the future, especially in East Greenland. The Bylot Sound at the Thule Airbase (Pituffik) in North-West Greenland was contaminated with plutonium and enriched uranium in a weapons accident in 1968. Biological activity has mixed accident plutonium efficiently into the new sediments resulting in continued high surface sediment concentrations three decades after the accident. Transfer of plutonium to benthic biota is low--and lower than observed in the Irish Sea. This is

  19. Melting at the base of the Greenland Ice Sheet explained by the Iceland mantle plume history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Petrunin, Alexey G.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse V.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Calov, Reinhard; Rickers, Florian; Thomas, Maik; Koulakov, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Ice-penetrating radar measurements and ice core drilling have shown that large parts of the north-central Greenland Ice Sheet are melting from below. Locally these observational data indicate that an anomalously high geothermal flux is needed to explain the observed basal ice melting. In this study we reconstruct the distribution of geothermal flux in Greenland and identify a large-scale geothermal anomaly beneath the thick ice cover. The anomaly represents a continuous 400-km-wide band of elevated heat flux, crossing Greenland from west to east. Our combined analysis of seismic, gravity and tectonic data links the origin of this anomaly to Greenland's passage over the Iceland mantle plume between roughly 80 and 35 million years ago. Most of the observed subglacial melting as well as previously suggested hydrological networks operating under the ice sheet occur within the anomalous zone. Also the position of the enigmatic 750-km-long northeastern Greenland ice stream is controlled by the enhanced ice deformation and basal sliding induced by the elevated heat flux. This rapid ice flow initiates at the very heart of the reconstructed anomaly, where our study and observations indicate some of the highest rates of basal ice melting in interior Greenland. Our findings suggest that the present-day subglacial hydrology and rapid ice flow of the north-central Greenland Ice Sheet have their origin in tectonic events that predate the onset of Greenland glaciations by many tens of millions of years.

  20. Drivers of Streamflow Variability in West and Central Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieppois, B.; Sidibe, M.; Lawler, D.; Mahe, G. M.; Paturel, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    The unprecedented droughts episodes that struck West Africa during 1970s and 1980s, have triggered a plethora of studies investigating rainfall variability and its impacts on food production systems. In general, studies exploring impacts of rainfall variability on streamflow were restrained to basin scale with few of them investigating impacts at the regional scale. This study aims at bridging the gap through an estimation of streamflow variability over West and Central Africa. First, streamflow time series retrieved from the HSM-SIEREM database are completed based on correlations between gauging stations. This is an important outcome of this study, which proposes to create a homogeneous streamflow database, for the first time, over this region. Runoff variability and trends in the region over the past decades are assessed using multi-temporal trend analysis on the filled time series between 1950 and 2010. Second, a wavelet-based approach is used to detect the dominant timescales of streamflow variability. The challenge is to separate human (e.g. land use) induced and climate induced variability in the changes of hydrological regimes. The detected trends are significant for most of the stations and highlight the fluctuations of rainfall during the past decades. The findings emphasize interannual to decadal variability and significant correlations between rainfall and streamflow for some of the regions implying the importance of climate variability on hydrological regimes. Regions where no significant correlations with climatic variables are found underline the impacts of anthropogenic activity mainly land use and water management practices on streamflow variability. Even though, relationships between rainfall and streamflow are very complex and difficult to capture, defining the issue on a regional scale provides hints to improve hydrological modelling practices.

  1. A TEX86 lake record suggests simultaneous shifts in temperature in Central Europe and Greenland during the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaga, Cornelia I.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Lotter, André F.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2013-03-01

    High-resolution quantitative temperature records from continents covering glacial to interglacial transitions are scarce but important for understanding the climate system. We present the first decadal resolution record of continental temperatures in Central Europe during the last deglaciation (~14,600-10,600 cal. yr B.P.) based on the organic geochemical palaeothermometer TEX86. The TEX86-inferred temperature record from Lake Lucerne (Vierwaldstättersee, Switzerland) reveals typical oscillations during the Late Glacial Interstadial, followed by an abrupt cooling of 2°C at the onset of Younger Dryas and a rapid warming of 4°C at the onset of the Holocene, within less than 350 years. The remarkable resemblance with the Greenland and regional stable oxygen isotope records suggests that temperature changes in continental Europe were dominated by large-scale reorganizations in the northern hemispheric climate system.

  2. Increasing Freshwater Runoff and Tidal Action Influences on Spatial Mixing Patterns in Søndre Strømfjord, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, C. R.; Kamenos, N.; Hoey, T.; Cottier, F.; Ellam, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet melt has the potential to affect global sea levels and the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC). Investigating spatial mixing patterns of seawater in Greenlandic fjords can help reveal characteristics of changes in runoff from the GrIS; for example higher runoff may be associated with lower salinity within GrIS fjords, which can be recorded by palaeoenvironmental proxies (Kamenos et al 2012). The Kangerlussuaq Drainage Basin mirrors melt patterns of the whole GrIS and drains into Søndre Strømfjord, a 170km long fjord on the west coast of Greenland. Temperature and salinity profiles to 40m depth were obtained at 11 stations along Søndre Strømfjord during the 2014 melt season. Each station was sampled twice once at high KDB runoff and once at low KDB runoff. With increasing freshwater runoff, salinity decreases by 1.65 - 2.91 at each station over a 7 hour time period. Higher salinities occur at low run-off. In addition, with increasing run-off, the disparity between surface and deeper water (30m) becomes greater with a 19.3 difference between the surface and 30m. With higher KDB runoff temperature increases by 0.47oC - 2.34oC. This information will be integrated with oxygen and deuterium isotope patterns to pinpoint the exact source of the runoff causing salinity reductions. Our data show a relationship between KDB runoff and salinity of Søndre Strømfjord, data that will enable further calibration of marine proxies of GrIS melt.

  3. The tholeiite-TTG connection during Eoarchean crust formation in Isua, southern West Greenland: the role of subduction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J. E.; Münker, C.; Nagel, T. J.; Næraa, T.; Polat, A.; Rosing, M. T.

    2012-04-01

    The processes and the geodynamic settings that generated Earth's oldest parts of continental crust are still a matter of debate. A pertinent issue is the genetic relationship between the tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) suite and the mafic fragments that are found as inclusions within this felsic crust. Here we propose a coherent model for the geodynamic evolution of the oldest (3.65 to 3.85 Ga) continental crust in southern West Greenland. Within the Isua Supracrustal Belt, the best preserved and largest fragment of mafic Eoarchean crust worldwide, tholeiitic and boninite-like amphibolites dominate the sequence, both yielding trace element patterns consistent with a subduction-related origin. The tholeiites yield correlated trace element variations in Nb/Th, La/Yb, Gd/Yb, Zr/Nb, in agreement with a subduction zone setting where a depleted mantle source is overprinted by melt-like slab components (Hoffmann et al., 2011a). Boninite-like rocks in Isua are derived from ultradepleted sources with epsHf(3720) of up to ca. +12.9 (Hoffmann et al., 2010). Petrological phase equilibrium modeling combined with trace element modeling suggests a relationship between the typical Isua arc tholeiites and the TTGs (Nagel et al., 2012). Notably, Hf-Nd isotope signatures between the two lithologies overlap (epsHf(t) = -0.7 to +2.5; epsNd(t) = -0.8 to +4.4), both showing the characteristic decoupling of initial Hf-Nd isotope compositions. Systematically elevated 142Nd anomalies of tholeiites and TTGs are also in agreement with a related origin of both rock types (e.g., Caro et al., 2006). Trace element modeling shows that the Isua TTGs likely formed by melting of thickened mafic arc crust with tholeiite compositions (Hoffmann et al., 2011b) and that the decoupled Hf-Nd signature is likely an inherited feature from melting of the tholeiites. This is also underlined by new Hf and O in zircon data from TTGs in the area (Næraa et al., submitted) that indicate melting of a

  4. Ancient graphite in the Eoarchean quartz-pyroxene rocks from Akilia in southern West Greenland I: Petrographic and spectroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papineau, Dominic; De Gregorio, Bradley T.; Cody, George D.; Fries, Marc D.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Steele, Andrew; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2010-10-01

    Because all known Eoarchean (>3.65 Ga) volcano-sedimentary terranes are locked in granitoid gneiss complexes that have experienced high degrees of metamorphism and deformation, the origin and mode of preservation of carbonaceous material in the oldest metasedimentary rocks remain a subject of vigorous debate. To determine the biogenicity of carbon in graphite in such rocks, carbonaceous material must be demonstrably indigenous and its composition should be consistent with thermally altered biogenic carbon as well as inconsistent with abiogenic carbon. Here we report the petrological and spectroscopic characteristics of carbonaceous material, typically associated with individual apatite grains, but also with various other minerals including calcite, in a >3.83 Ga granulite-facies ferruginous quartz-pyroxene unit (Qp rock) from the island of Akilia in southern West Greenland. In thin sections of the fine-grained parts of Akilia Qp rock sample G91-26, mapped apatites were found to be associated with graphite in about 20% of the occurrences. Raman spectra of this carbonaceous material had strong G-band and small D-band absorptions indicative of crystalline graphite. Three apatite-associated graphites were found to contain curled graphite structures, identified by an anomalously intense second-order D-band (or 2D-band) Raman mode. These structures are similar to graphite whiskers or cones documented to form at high temperatures. Raman spectra of apatite-associated graphite were consistent with formation at temperatures calculated to be between 635 and 830 °C, which are consistent with granulite-facies metamorphic conditions. Three graphite targets extracted by focused ion beam (FIB) methods contained thin graphite coatings on apatite grains rather than inclusions sensu stricto as inferred from transmitted light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. TEM analyses of graphite in these FIB sections showed a (0 0 0 2) interplanar spacing between 3.41 and 3.64 Å for apatite

  5. The hydrology of Lake Rousseau, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Lake Rousseau, about 4 miles southwest of Inglis, Florida, was formed in 1909 by impoundment of the Withlacooche River by Inglis Dam, west of Dunnellon, Florida. The lake was to have been part of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal; a lock and channel associated with the presently inactive project were completed in 1969. Lake Rousseau is about 11 miles long, covers about 4,000 acres, and contains about 34,000 acre-feet of water at the normal pool elevation of 27.5 feet above mean sea level. Inflow to the lake is relatively constant and responds slowly to rainfall. The estimated 100-year peak inflow, 10,400 cubic feet per second, is only 19 percent higher than the 100-year high monthly inflow. Water in Lake Rousseau is a calcium-bicarbonate type and is hard. Mean total phosphorus and organic nitrogen concentrations are considerably lower in Lake Rousseau than in north-central Florida lakes which have been considered to be eutrophic by other investigators, however, the lake supports of prolific aquatic plant community. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations near the water surface are occasionally less than 3 mg/liter. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Stable isotopes differentiate bottlenose dolphins off west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barros, Nélio B.; Ostrom, P. H.; Stricker, Craig A.; Wells, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Distinguishing discrete population units among continuously distributed coastal small cetaceans is challenging and crucial to conservation. We evaluated the utility of stable isotopes in assessing group membership in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) off west-central Florida by analyzing carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope values (δ13C, δ15N, and δ34S) of tooth collagen from stranded dolphins. Individuals derived from three putative general population units: Sarasota Bay (SB), nearshore Gulf of Mexico (GULF), and offshore waters (OFF). Animals of known history (SB) served to ground truth the approach against animals of unknown history from the Gulf of Mexico (GULF, OFF). Dolphin groups differed significantly for each isotope. Average δ13C values from SB dolphins (−10.6‰) utilizing sea grass ecosystems differed from those of GULF (−11.9‰) and OFF (−11.9‰). Average δ15N values of GULF (12.7‰) and OFF (13.2‰) were higher than those of SB dolphins (11.9‰), consistent with differences in prey trophic levels. δ34S values showed definitive differences among SB (7.1‰), GULF (11.3‰), and OFF (16.5‰) dolphins. This is the first application of isotopes to population assignment of bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico and results suggest that isotopes may provide a powerful tool in the conservation of small cetaceans.

  7. Silurian gastropoda from southeastern and west-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rohr, D.M.; Blodgett, R.B.; Fryda, J.

    2008-01-01

    Additional Silurian (Ludlovian) gastropods are described from the Heceta Formation in the Alexander terrane on Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska. Species include Spinicharybdis krizi n. sp., Spinicharybdis boucoti n. sp., Morania wagneri n. sp., Haplospira craigi n. sp., Australonema sp., Pachystrophia cf. gotlandica (Lindstro??m, 1884), and Medfrazyga gilmulli n. sp. An additional new Silurian species, Morania nixonforkensis n. sp., is described from the Nixon Fork subterrane of the Farewell terrane of west-central Alaska. The spine-bearing Spinicharybdis is placed into a new subfamily Spinicharybdiinae together with Hystricoceras Jahn, 1894. Joint occurrences of genera Beraunia, Coelocaulus, and Morania, as well as members of subfamily Spinicharybdiinae in the gastropod fauna from the Heceta Formation, support its close relationship with gastropod fauna of Bohemia. Additionally, the occurrence of the genus Medfrazyga suggests a faunal link between the Alexander and Farewell terranes of Alaska. Medfrazyga gilmulli n. sp. is the oldest known and the only early Paleozoic member of the family Palaeozygopleuridae. Copyright ?? 2008, The Paleontological Society.

  8. Qassiarsuk, Greenland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-16

    The first Norse settlement of Greenland was at Brattahlid (now Qassiarsuk), which yielded a radiocarbon date of about 1000. According to the sagas, it was also in the year 1000 that Leif Erikson left the settlement to explore the regions around Vinland, which is generally assumed to be Newfoundland. Norse settlements at their height had an estimated population of a few thousand. After 450 years, the settlements were all abandoned. Causes include: cumulative environmental damage; gradual climate change; conflicts with hostile neighbors; and loss of contact and support from Europe. The image was acquired June 13, 2016, covers an area of 30.9 by 27.7 km, and is located at 61.1 degrees north, 45.5 degrees west. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20996

  9. Strontium and neodymium isotopic variations in early Archean gneisses affected by middle to late Archean high-grade metamorphic processes: West Greenland and Labrador

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collerson, K. D.; Mcculloch, M. T.; Bridgwater, D.; Mcgregor, V. R.; Nutman, A. P.

    1986-01-01

    Relicts of continental crust formed more than 3400 Ma ago are preserved fortuitously in most cratons. The cratons provide the most direct information about crust and mantle evolutionary processes during the first billion years of Earth history. In view of their polymetamorphic character, these terrains are commonly affected by subsequent tectonothermal events. Hence, their isotope systematics may be severely disturbed as a result of bulk chemical change or local isotopic homogenization. This leads to equivocal age and source information for different components within these terrains. The Sr and Nd isotopic data are presented for early Archean gneisses from the North Atlantic Craton in west Greenland and northern Labrador which were affected by younger metamorphic events.

  10. Increasing freshwater runoff and tidal action influences on spatial mixing patterns in Søndre Strømfjord, West Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Crystal; Kamenos, Nick; Hoey, Trevor; Cottier, Finlo; Ellam, Rob

    2015-04-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet melt has the potential to affect global sea levels and the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC). Investigating spatial mixing patterns of seawater in Greenlandic fjords can help reveal characteristics of changes in runoff from the GrIS; for example higher runoff may be associated with lower salinity within GrIS fjords, which can be recorded by palaeoenvironmental proxies (Kamenos et al 2012). The Kangerlussuaq Drainage Basin mirrors melt patterns of the whole GrIS and drains into Søndre Strømfjord, a 170km long fjord on the west coast of Greenland. Temperature and salinity profiles to 40m depth were obtained at 11 stations along Søndre Strømfjord during the 2014 melt season. Each station was sampled twice once at high KDB runoff and once at low KDB runoff. With increasing freshwater runoff, salinity decreased by 1.65 - 2.91 and temperature increased by 0.47oC- 2.34oC at each station over a 7 hour time period. Higher salinities occurred at low run-off. In addition, with increasing run-off, the disparity between surface and deeper water (30m) salinity became greater with a 19.3 difference between the surface and 30m. This information was integrated with oxygen and deuterium isotopic signatures collected at 10 m depth from each station to pinpoint the exact source of the runoff causing salinity reductions. With increasing freshwater runoff, the chemistry of the fjord exhibits an enrichment of the heavier isotope. δ18Ovsmow values enrich by 7.40 permil while δDvsmow enrich 53.26 permil. Our data shows a relationship between KDB runoff, salinity, and oxygen, hydrogen isotopic chemistry of Søndre Strømfjord, data that will enable further calibration of marine proxies of GrIS melt. References Kamenos, N.A, Hoey, T.B, Nienow, P., Fallick, A.E., & Claverie, T., 2012: Reconstructing Greenland Ice Sheet runoff using coralline algae; Geological Society of America, Geology, doi: 10.1130/G33405.1

  11. Fagaceae pollen from the early Cenozoic of West Greenland: revisiting Engler's and Chaney's Arcto-Tertiary hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Grimm, Guido W; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup; Pedersen, Asger Ken; Denk, Thomas

    In this paper we document Fagaceae pollen from the Eocene of western Greenland. The pollen record suggests a remarkable diversity of the family in the early Cenozoic of Greenland. Extinct Fagaceae pollen types include Eotrigonobalanus, which extends at least back to the Paleocene, and two ancestral pollen types with affinities to the Eurasian Quercus Group Ilex and the western North American Quercus Group Protobalanus. In addition, modern lineages of Fagaceae are unambiguously represented by pollen of Fagus, Quercus Group Lobatae/Quercus, and three Castaneoideae pollen types. These findings corroborate earlier findings from Axel Heiberg Island that Fagaceae were a dominant element at high latitudes during the early Cenozoic. Comparison with coeval or older mid-latitude records of modern lineages of Fagaceae shows that modern lineages found in western Greenland and Axel Heiberg likely originated at lower latitudes. Further examples comprise (possibly) Acer, Aesculus, Alnus, Ulmus, and others. Thus, before fossils belonging to modern northern temperate lineages will have been recovered from older (early Eocene, Paleocene) strata from high latitudes, Engler's hypothesis of an Arctic origin of the modern temperate woody flora of Eurasia, termed 'Arcto-Tertiary Element', and later modification by R. W. Chaney and H. D. Mai ('Arcto-Tertiary Geoflora') needs to be modified.

  12. Precipitation over Greenland and its relation to the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromwich, David H.; Chen, Qiu-Shi; Li, Yufang; Cullather, Richard I.

    1999-09-01

    The ω equation method based on an equivalent isobaric geopotential height in σ coordinates has been used to retrieve the precipitation over Greenland. This approach is designed to accurately represent the topographic effects of the Greenland Ice Sheet on atmospheric motion and precipitation. The 11 year mean precipitation from 1985 to 1996 over all of Greenland is 376 mm yr-1, which is close to the long-term mean precipitation of 346 mm yr-1 estimated from glaciological data. The precipitation over all of Greenland shows that the largest value in 1986 is 472 mm yr-1 and the smallest value in 1995 is 309 mm yr-1. The major interannual variability of the atmospheric circulation in the North Atlantic can be represented by the variation of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index, which is most pronounced during winter. It is found that if the NAO index increases, the total precipitation over Greenland decreases, and vice versa. The correlation coefficient between these two series for 1985-1995 is -0.75. The mean precipitation over southern Greenland, where the majority of precipitation falls, is more closely related to the NAO index in winter, and their correlation coefficient is -0.80. This relationship can be understood from the composite maps of sea level pressure and Greenland precipitation for the high and low index months. During months of high NAO index values, the Icelandic Low is strong. During months of low NAO index values, the monthly mean low is located to the southwest of Greenland over the Labrador Sea. Precipitation amounts over the southeast coast of Greenland are about 100 mm larger during the low NAO index months than the high NAO index months. Precipitation over all of Greenland during the low NAO index months is higher. There are significant downward trends in annual precipitation from 1985-1995 for all of Greenland and its southern and central west coastal regions, amounting to about 3% per year.

  13. The speed and timing of climate change: Detailed ice core stable isotope records from NorthGRIP, Greenland and Mt. Moulton, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Trevor J.

    Objective projections of future climate change require a detailed understanding of the natural variability and behavior of the climate system observed in the past. This dissertation endeavors to characterize the speed and timing of past climate changes on both orbital and extremely abrupt time scales from new high-resolution stable isotope time series from ice cores collected at NorthGRIP in Greenland and Mt. Moulton in West Antarctica. Greenland ice cores are uniquely suited for study of abrupt climate events because relatively high snow accumulation rates allow single years to be identified well into the last glacial period. Deuterium (deltaD) and deuterium excess time series at near annual resolution or better across the three major abrupt transitions of the last glacial termination are examined from the precisely dated NGRIP ice core. These records have been synchronized to within a few years or less to similar isotopic series developed from the GISP2 ice core which was collected 320 km SSE of the NGRIP site. 300-500 year time intervals were examined in detail at the end of the Younger Dryas (YD, 11.7 ka), the beginning of the YD (12.9 ka), and at the onset of Bolling (14.7 ka). Transition timing, duration and amplitudes were determined for each transition at both sites via a statistical ramp fitting approach. At each transition a complete mode shift between two climate states recorded by deltaD or excess, or both, was detected in as little as a single year with one exception at the cooling at the onset of the YD at GISP2. NGRIP and GISP2 share much common variance, sometimes in remarkable detail, in the timing and evolution of the climate transitions. Complete mode shifts in excess were synchronous to within a year or better between NGRIP and GISP2 for the two cold-to-warm transitions and represent a significant regional reorganization of atmospheric circulation delivering moisture from lower latitude source regions to the high latitudes of Greenland. At the

  14. Peritidal microbial assemblages from the Late Proterozoic limestone/dolomite series, central east Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, A.H.; Green, J.W.; Golubic, S.; Swett, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Late Riphean (700-800 Ma) Limestone/Dolomite sequence of the East Greenland Caledonides comprises some 1100 meters of carbonates and minor interbedded siliciclastic units deposited in tidal flat to shallow subtidal marine environments. Several horizons within this succession contain exceptionally well preserved microfossil assemblages. Peritidal associations include: 1) the remnants of two distinct microbial mat communities containing Lyngbya- or Phormidium-like cyanobacterial mat builders and associated mat dwellers; 2) a microbenthic association dominated by populations morphologically and behaviorally indistinguishable from modern cyanobacteria assigned to the genus Cyanostylon; 3) thin horizons of Eoentophysalis which occasionally cap laminae of the previous association; and 4) endolithic microfossils preserved in silicified ooids and pisoliths. Fossil endoliths include one population that is morphologically, developmentally, and ecologically comparable to the modern cyanobacterium, Hyella gigas, and additionally contain several other fossil cyanobacterial and algal populations. The unusually good preservation of these assemblages, apparently associated with rapid burial during storms, permits reconstruction of some measure of the ecological dynamics of these several peritidal communities. Comparable microbial communities occur today in Bahamian peritidal environments. Such detailed knowledge of microbial paleoecology is necessary for realistic biostratigraphic and evolutionary evaluations of the Proterozoic fossil record.

  15. Melting at the base of the Greenland ice sheet explained by Iceland hotspot history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogozhina, Irina; Petrunin, Alexey G.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse V.; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Calov, Reinhard; Rickers, Florian; Thomas, Maik; Koulakov, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    Ice-penetrating radar and ice core drilling have shown that large parts of the north-central Greenland ice sheet are melting from below. It has been argued that basal ice melt is due to the anomalously high geothermal flux that has also influenced the development of the longest ice stream in Greenland. Here we estimate the geothermal flux beneath the Greenland ice sheet and identify a 1,200-km-long and 400-km-wide geothermal anomaly beneath the thick ice cover. We suggest that this anomaly explains the observed melting of the ice sheet’s base, which drives the vigorous subglacial hydrology and controls the position of the head of the enigmatic 750-km-long northeastern Greenland ice stream. Our combined analysis of independent seismic, gravity and tectonic data implies that the geothermal anomaly, which crosses Greenland from west to east, was formed by Greenland’s passage over the Iceland mantle plume between roughly 80 and 35 million years ago. We conclude that the complexity of the present-day subglacial hydrology and dynamic features of the north-central Greenland ice sheet originated in tectonic events that pre-date the onset of glaciation in Greenland by many tens of millions of years.

  16. The timberland and woodland resources of central and west Oklahoma, 1989

    Treesearch

    James F. Rosson

    1995-01-01

    SRS Publications Principal findings of the first forest survey of central and west Oklahoma are presented. Topics examined include forest area, forest types, stand structure, basal area, timber volume, growth, and mortality. Information is presented for timberland and woodland forests.

  17. Decoupling of Hf-Nd isotope ratios in early Archean rocks from southern West Greenland - primary or secondary disturbance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Munker, C.; Polat, A.; Rosing, M.

    2010-12-01

    In contrast to the strongly coupled behaviour of the Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd systems in Phanerozoic and Proterozoic rocks, early Archean rocks, e.g. those from SW-Greenland, exhibit an apparent decoupling of both systems [e.g., 1]. This apparent decoupling may either indicate metamorphic disturbance or, alternatively, mirror early differentiation processes such as magma ocean crystallisation involving cumulate segregation [1]. To evaluate the issue, we performed combined measurements of Hf-Nd isotope compositions together with major and trace element measurements for well preserved >3.72 to >3.80 Ga old tholeiitic metabasalts and gabbros from the inner western part and the southwestern unit of the Isua Supracrustal Belt, SW-Greenland. A careful evaluation of alteration based on major and trace elements reveals pristine magmatic trends, and therefore near chondritic to moderately depleted initial ɛHf values of -0.2-+2.7 and initial ɛNd values of 0.0-+3.0 indeed most likely characterize the early Archean mantle sources. These values confirm a decoupling of the Hf-Nd systematics, but are in marked contrast to more depleted signatures in nearby boninite-like metabasalts of the Garbenschiefer unit [2]. In Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf isochron space, the Isua metabasalts yield early Archean ages, in agreement with emplacement ages inferred from crosscutting relationships with tonalites. Trace element compositions of the metabasalts indicate a source overprint by subduction components. It is likely, that the source overprint may have caused partial decoupling of ɛHf-ɛNd values, due to selective addition of Nd as in modern subduction settings. In this case, the most radiogenic initial ɛNd and ɛHf isotope values characterize the most depleted mantle sources, and less radiogenic values might reflect addition of more enriched subduction components. A comparison of our data with Hf-Nd isotope data from the literature for early Archean rocks from Greenland reveals an overlap in initial Hf

  18. Hydrogeology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The geohydrology of McMullen Valley, west-central Arizona, was investigated using geologic, geophysical, and hydrologic data and a numerical model of the groundwater system. Interpretation of geologic and geophysical information indicates that the main structure of McMullen Valley is a syncline that has been normal faulted on the southeast side. Basin fill that accumulated in the structural depression during late Miocene to Pleistocene time is the main aquifer and is divided into upper and lower units on the basis of lithologic information. The upper unit is a thin layer of coarse-grained sediments and generally is not saturated. The lower unit is 3,000 to 4,000 ft thick, includes a fine-grained facies in the upper 1,000 ft, and is the main source of water. The fine-grained facies is found in the southwest half of the basin and is further divided into upper and lower parts. The lower part of the fine-grained facies has: a higher percentage of silt and clay than the upper part, contains evaporites, does not yield water to wells, and separates the aquifer into shallow and deep systems. A numerical model was used to analyze the groundwater system for both steady-state and transient conditions. The transient model was used to analyze system response to pumping stress. The transient system is one of storage depletion, and water level declines are controlled by pumping and specific yield distributions. Water level declines are also influenced by hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies. Significant water level declines may extend to aquifer boundaries in most of the basin; in one area, impermeable boundary greatly influences declines. The location of the nearby boundary was estimated through gravity data modeling. Several hydrologic components, including hydraulic properties and areal extent of the fine-grained facies , storage properties, and aquifer boundaries, need better definition in order to develop a more accurate model of the groundwater

  19. Karrat REE mineralization on Niaqornakavsak and extension on Umiamako Nuna, West Greenland: mineralogic, geochronologic, and carbon and oxygen isotope constraints on the origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Bird, D. K.; Grove, M.; Bernstein, S.; Mackay, H.; Rose, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Karrat rare earth element (REE) mineralization is located in the Niaqornakavsak (NIAQ) area of Qeqertarssuaq Island in Greenland (~72°N). A mineralized horizon occurs as a single distinct layer (35-40° dip) within an amphibolite host rock of the Qeqertarssuaq Formation: a member of the Paleoproterozoic Karrat Group sequence. Average Yttrium + REE-oxide (YREEO) concentration is ~1.0 wt. % with concentrations up to 2.59 wt. % over one meter intervals. Eight drill holes across three locations on NIAQ allow for an estimated true thickness of REE enrichment (YREEO ≥ 0.2 wt. %) of 29-38m in the east and central area, and a fault restricted thickness at the site in the west of 16m (at surface) to 28m (at depth). Two distinct metasomatic reaction zones comprise the mineralized horizon and are universal across NIAQ: the upper unit (CCA ~1.5 %YREEO) has a primary mineralogy of calcite + ankerite + fluorite (>50%), grunerite, cummingtonite, magnetite, fergusonite, bastnasite, allanite, and monazite, while the lower unit (BLC) consists of biotite (>50%), calcite, ilmenite, magnetite, allanite, fergusonite, and monazite. An extension of the Karrat REE deposit outcrops 7 km to the east on Umiamako Nuna. Hand samples from Umiamako Nuna similar to CCA (YREEO up to 2.4 wt. %) have been collected, but two exploratory drill holes revealed the majority of the REE enriched zone is comparable to the mineralogy of the incomplete reaction zone around CCA on NIAQ with concentrations of YREEO ranging from 0.5-1.0 wt. % with an estimated thickness of 15m. The mineralization consists of Ca-amphiboles, biotite, calcite, pyrite, albite, and garnet. Enrichment of REE continues to a depth of 60m from vein mineralization. In addition, a secondary occurrence at depth can be found on Umiamako Nuna tens of meters below the primary mineralized horizon, which is characterized by high modal concentrations of calcite, fluorite, and amphiboles. Carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of 145 carbonate

  20. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 1. Programme of investigation on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, Poul; Hubbard, Bryn; Bougamont, Marion; Doyle, Samuel; Young, Tun Jan; Hofstede, Coen; Nicholls, Keith; Todd, Joe; Box, Jason; Ryan, Johnny; Toberg, Nick; Walter, Jacob; Hubbard, Alun

    2015-04-01

    Marine-terminating outlet glaciers drain 90 percent of the Greenland Ice Sheet and are responsible for about half of the ice sheet's net annual mass loss, which currently raises global sea level by almost 1 mm per year. Understanding the processes that drive the fast flow of these glaciers is crucial because a growing body of evidence points to a strong, but spatially varied and often complex, response to oceanographic as well as atmospheric forcing. While the bed of glaciers elsewhere is known to strongly influence the flow of ice, no observations have ever been made at the bed of a marine-terminating glacier in Greenland. The flow of ice in numerical models of the Greenland Ice Sheet consequently rely on untested basal parameterisations, which form a likely and potentially significant source of error in the prediction of sea level rise over the coming decades and century. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE) is addressing this paucity of observational constraints by gaining access to the bed of Store Glacier, a marine-terminating outlet of the Greenland Ice Sheet which has a drainage basin of 35,000 square kilometres and terminates in Uummannaq Fjord. In 2014, the SAFIRE programme drilled four boreholes in a region where ice flows at a rate of 700 m per year and where a seismic survey revealed a bed consisting of soft sediment. (See joint abstract by Hofstede et al. for details.) The boreholes were 603-616 m deep and direct access to the bed was confirmed by a clear hydrological connectivity with a basal water system. (See joint abstract by Doyle et al. for details.) With sensors deployed englacially (temperature and tilt) and at the bed (water pressure, turbidity, electrical conductivity), the SAFIRE will inform the ratio of internal ice deformation and basal slip, vertical strain, ice temperature, and fluctuations in water pressure linked to supraglacial lake drainage as well as diurnal drainage into moulins. In 2015, we plan to

  1. Seasonal and Intra-Seasonal Variability of Surface Streams Over the West Greenland Ice Sheet from High Resolution Satellite Optical Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.

    2014-12-01

    The surface hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet plays a crucial role on surface energy and mass balance, as well as on the englacial and sub-glacial environments. The spatial distribution of these surface streams is poorly understood and their temporal variability is (to our knowledge) unknown. One of the reasons for the lack of knowledge on the temporal variability of such streams is related to the historical unavailability of satellite data that could spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of the streams. In recent years, however, multi-spectral commercial satellite data in the visible and infra-red bands have been made available to the scientific community. These newly accessible data sets are provided at spatial resolutions of the order of 1-2 meters, therefore, allowing to perform accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface streams (and small lakes and ponds that cannot be resolved with sensors such as MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study, we report results concerning the seasonal and intra-seasonal variability of surface streams over a selected area on the west Greenland ice sheet. Using a combination of ENVI® and ArcGIS® software packages applied to multispectral high resolution imagery from World View 2 and Quickbird satellites, surface streams are identified through multiple approaches (either based on unsupervised classifications, band combinations, band ratio thresholds, or digitization) and vector maps of the surface hydrology network were created. Stream networks created during one melting season (at three different stages of the season) were compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between two consecutive years for proximate dates.

  2. Seasonal and Intra-Seasonal Variability of Surface Streams over the West Greenland Ice Sheet from High Resolution Satellite Optical Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael G.; Tedesco, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The surface hydrology of the Greenland ice sheet plays a crucial role on surface energy and mass balance, as well as on the en-glacial and sub-glacial environments. The spatial distribution of these surface streams is poorly understood and their temporal variability is (to our knowledge) unknown. One of the reasons for the lack of knowledge on the temporal variability of such streams is related to the historical unavailability of satellite data that could spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of the streams. In recent years, however, multi-spectral commercial satellite data in the visible and infra-red bands have been made available to the scientific community. These newly accessible data sets are provided at spatial resolutions of the order of 1-2 meters, therefore, allowing to perform accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface streams (and small lakes and ponds that cannot be resolved with sensors such as MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study, we report results concerning the seasonal and intra-seasonal variability of surface streams over a selected area on the west Greenland ice sheet. Using ArcGIS® software applied to multispectral high resolution imagery from World View 2 and Quickbird satellites, surface streams were identified through band math, threshold classifications, and morphological operations. Raster and vector maps of the surface hydrology network were created. Stream networks created during multiple melt seasons (at several different stages of the season) were compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between consecutive years for proximate dates.

  3. Modelling Greenland Outlet Glaciers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderVeen, Cornelis; Abdalati, Waleed (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop simple yet realistic models of Greenland outlet glaciers to better understand ongoing changes and to identify possible causes for these changes. Several approaches can be taken to evaluate the interaction between climate forcing and ice dynamics, and the consequent ice-sheet response, which may involve changes in flow style. To evaluate the icesheet response to mass-balance forcing, Van der Veen (Journal of Geophysical Research, in press) makes the assumption that this response can be considered a perturbation on the reference state and may be evaluated separately from how this reference state evolves over time. Mass-balance forcing has an immediate effect on the ice sheet. Initially, the rate of thickness change as compared to the reference state equals the perturbation in snowfall or ablation. If the forcing persists, the ice sheet responds dynamically, adjusting the rate at which ice is evacuated from the interior to the margins, to achieve a new equilibrium. For large ice sheets, this dynamic adjustment may last for thousands of years, with the magnitude of change decreasing steadily over time as a new equilibrium is approached. This response can be described using kinematic wave theory. This theory, modified to pertain to Greenland drainage basins, was used to evaluate possible ice-sheet responses to perturbations in surface mass balance. The reference state is defined based on measurements along the central flowline of Petermann Glacier in north-west Greenland, and perturbations on this state considered. The advantage of this approach is that the particulars of the dynamical flow regime need not be explicitly known but are incorporated through the parameterization of the reference ice flux or longitudinal velocity profile. The results of the kinematic wave model indicate that significant rates of thickness change can occur immediately after the prescribed change in surface mass balance but adjustments in flow

  4. A review of structural patterns and melting processes in the Archean craton of West Greenland: Evidence for crustal growth at convergent plate margins as opposed to non-uniformitarian models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Ali; Wang, Lu; Appel, Peter W. U.

    2015-11-01

    The Archean craton of West Greenland consists of many fault-bounded Eoarchean to Neoarchean tectonic terranes (crustal blocks). These tectonic terranes are composed mainly of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) gneisses, granitic gneisses, metavolcanic-dominated supracrustal belts, layered anorthositic complexes, and late- to post-tectonic granites. Rock assemblages and geochemical signatures in these terranes suggest that they represent fragments of dismembered oceanic island arcs, consisting mainly of TTG plutons, tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts, boninites, picrites, and cumulate layers of ultramafic rocks, gabbros, leucogabbros and anorthosites, with minor sedimentary rocks. The structural characteristics of the terrane boundaries are consistent with the assembly of these island arcs through modern style of horizontal tectonics, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland grew at convergent plate margins. Several supracrustal belts that occur at or near the terrane boundaries are interpreted as relict accretionary prisms. The terranes display fold and thrust structures and contain numerous 10 cm to 20 m wide bifurcating, ductile shear zones that are characterized by a variety of structures including transposed and redistributed isoclinal folds. Geometrically these structures are similar to those occurring on regional scales, suggesting that the Archean craton of West Greenland can be interpreted as a continental scale accretionary complex, such as the Paleozoic Altaids. Melting of metavolcanic rocks during tectonic thickening in the arcs played an important role in the generation of TTGs. Non-uniformitarian models proposed for the origin of Archean terranes have no analogs in the geologic record and are inconsistent with structural, lithological, petrological and geochemical data collected from Archean terranes over the last four decades. The style of deformation and generation of felsic rocks on outcrop scales in the Archean craton of West

  5. Raccoon roundworm in raccoons in central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Sheldon F. Owen; John W. Edwards; W. Mark Ford; James M. Crum; Petra Bohall. Wood

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) in common raccoons (Procyon lotor) in the Allegheny Mountains of West Virginia during spring (n = 9, April-June) and fall (n = 5, August-October) 2001 and spring (n = 1) and fall (n = 4) 2002. We found no evidence of B. procyonis...

  6. Snow Core Records of Recent Deposition of Trace Metals to Central (Summit) Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the summer 2005 and 2006 field seasons at Summit (3270 m) Greenland we collected snow core samples for comprehensive geochemical characterization. From snow pits of 3-meter depth, dug in the clean-air sector, representing ~4 years of recent accumulation, detailed profiles (10 cm intervals) of: total and water soluble organic carbon, particulate organic and elemental carbon, inorganic ions, organic acids (LMWA), and comprehensive elemental and isotopic species were obtained. The elemental characterization supports our source reconciliation efforts in providing sub-seasonal data on aerosol particulate matter chemistry from which sourcing vectors can be inferred. Elemental analysis on the snow core sections was carried-out using magnetic-sector ICP-MS. A large suite of elements was quantified, including: the major/crustal elements (Al, Ca, K, Fe, Na, Mg, Si); minor crustal elements (Ba, Be, Cs, Li, Rb, Sc, Sr, Ti); light transition metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn); heavy transition metals (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb, Tl, W); oxyanion metals (As, Mo, U, V); platinum group metals (Rh, Pd, Pt); rare earths (Ce, Er, Eu, La, Nd, Sm, Y, Yb); as well as semi- and non-metals Sb, Sn, S, and P. Signal-noise was adequate to quantify all but 4 of the 52 elements studied. Chemical profiles from separate cores collected in 2005 and 2006 exhibited excellent coherence (when offset by the 45 cm of annual snow deposition) between years, indicating that the deposition archive is relatively uniform and that the sampling and analytical methods applied were robust. Clearly resolved intra- and inter-annual burial patterns were apparent for most elements, with strong covariance between many; indicating that relatively few deposition modalities are represented. Large (>30x) temporal variation in snow core concentrations were measured for Al, Ba, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, P, Rb, Sr, Ti, U, Zn and all the rare earths, while low variation (~5x) was observed for the elements As, Cd, Hg, Mo, Pt, S and Sn. The

  7. Geographic distribution of phlebotomine sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Central-West Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Paulo Silva de; Andrade, Andrey José de; Sciamarelli, Alan; Raizer, Josué; Menegatti, Jaqueline Aparecida; Hermes, Sandra Cristina Negreli Moreira; Carvalho, Maria do Socorro Laurentino de; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-06-01

    This study updates the geographic distributions of phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil and analyses the climatic factors associated with their occurrence. The data were obtained from the entomology services of the state departments of health in Central-West Brazil, scientific collections and a literature review of articles from 1962-2014. Ecological niche models were produced for sandfly species with more than 20 occurrences using the Maxent algorithm and eight climate variables. In all, 2,803 phlebotomine records for 127 species were analysed. Nyssomyia whitmani, Evandromyia lenti and Lutzomyia longipalpis were the species with the greatest number of records and were present in all the biomes in Central-West Brazil. The models, which were produced for 34 species, indicated that the Cerrado areas in the central and western regions of Central-West Brazil were climatically more suitable to sandflies. The variables with the greatest influence on the models were the temperature in the coldest months and the temperature seasonality. The results show that phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil have different geographical distribution patterns and that climate conditions in essentially the entire region favour the occurrence of at least one Leishmania vector species, highlighting the need to maintain or intensify vector control and surveillance strategies.

  8. Geographic distribution of phlebotomine sandfly species (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Central-West Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Paulo Silva; de Andrade, Andrey José; Sciamarelli, Alan; Raizer, Josué; Menegatti, Jaqueline Aparecida; Hermes, Sandra Cristina Negreli Moreira; de Carvalho, Maria do Socorro Laurentino; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    This study updates the geographic distributions of phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil and analyses the climatic factors associated with their occurrence. The data were obtained from the entomology services of the state departments of health in Central-West Brazil, scientific collections and a literature review of articles from 1962-2014. Ecological niche models were produced for sandfly species with more than 20 occurrences using the Maxent algorithm and eight climate variables. In all, 2,803 phlebotomine records for 127 species were analysed. Nyssomyia whitmani, Evandromyia lenti and Lutzomyia longipalpis were the species with the greatest number of records and were present in all the biomes in Central-West Brazil. The models, which were produced for 34 species, indicated that the Cerrado areas in the central and western regions of Central-West Brazil were climatically more suitable to sandflies. The variables with the greatest influence on the models were the temperature in the coldest months and the temperature seasonality. The results show that phlebotomine species in Central-West Brazil have different geographical distribution patterns and that climate conditions in essentially the entire region favour the occurrence of at least one Leishmania vector species, highlighting the need to maintain or intensify vector control and surveillance strategies. PMID:26018450

  9. The Subglacial Access and Fast Ice Research Experiment (SAFIRE): 2. High magnitude englacial strain detected with autonomous phase-sensitive FMCW radar on Store Glacier, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Tun Jan; Christoffersen, Poul; Nicholls, Keith; Bun Lok, Lai; Doyle, Samuel; Hubbard, Bryn; Stewart, Craig; Hofstede, Coen; Bougamont, Marion; Todd, Joseph; Brennan, Paul; Hubbard, Alun

    2016-04-01

    Fast-flowing outlet glaciers terminating in the sea drain 90% of the Greenland Ice Sheet. It is well-known that these glaciers flow rapidly due to fast basal motion, but its contributing processes and mechanisms are, however, poorly understood. In particular, there is a paucity of data to quantify the extent to which basal sliding and internal ice deformation by viscous creep contribute to the fast motion of Greenland outlet glaciers. To study these processes, we installed a network of global positioning system (GPS) receivers around an autonomous phase-sensitive radio-echo sounder (ApRES) capable of imaging internal reflectors and the glacier bed. The ApRES system, including antennas, were custom-designed to monitor and image ice sheets and ice shelves in monostatic and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) modes. Specifically, the system transmits a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) that increases linearly from 200 to 400 MHz over a period of 1 second. We installed this system 30 km up-flow of the tidewater terminus of Store Glacier, which flows into Uummannaq Fjord in West Greenland, and data were recorded every hour from 06 May to 16 July 2014 and every 4 hours from 26 July to 11 December 2014. The same site was used to instrument 600 m deep boreholes drilled to the bed as part of the SAFIRE research programme. With range and reflector distances captured at high temporal (hourly) and spatial (millimetre) resolutions, we obtained a unique, 6-month-long time series of strain through the vertical ice column at the drill site where tilt was independently recorded in a borehole. Our results show variable, but persistently high vertical strain. In the upper three-fourths of the ice column, we have calculated strain rates on the order of a few percent per year, and the strain regime curiously shifts from vertical thinning in winter to vertical thickening at the onset of summer melt. In the basal ice layer we observed high-magnitude vertical strain rates on

  10. CHARACTER AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE OF GREAT FALLS TECTONIC ZONE, EAST-CENTRAL IDAHO AND WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, J. Michael; Lopez, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The Great Falls tectonic zone, here named, is a belt of diverse northeast-trending geologic features that can be traced from the Idaho batholith in the Cordilleran miogeocline, across thrust-belt structures and basement rocks of west-central and southwestern Montana, through cratonic rocks of central Montana, and into southwestern-most Saskatchewan, Canada. Geologic mapping in east-central Idaho and west-central Montana has outlined a continuous zone of high-angle faults and shear zones. Recurrent fault movement in this zone and strong structural control over igneous intrusion suggest a fundamental tectonic feature that has influenced the tectonic development of the Idaho-Montana area from a least middle Proterozoic time to the present. Refs.

  11. Role of cabbeling in water densification in the Greenland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasajima, Y.; Johannessen, T.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of cabbeling mixing on water mass modification in the Greenland Sea were explored by hydrographic observations across the Greenland Basin in summer 2006. The neutral surface was chosen as a reference frame, and the strength of cabbeling mixing was quantified by the dianeutral velocity magnitude. Active cabbeling spots were detected with the criterion of the velocity magnitude >1 m/day, and four active cabbeling areas were identified; the west of Bear Island (SB), the Arctic Frontal Zone (AFZ), the central Greenland Sea (CG) and the western Greenland Sea (WG). The most vigorous cabbeling mixing was found at SB, where warm North Atlantic Water (NAW) mixed with cold water from the Barents Sea, inducing a maximum velocity of 7.5 m/day and a maximum density gain of 4.7×10-3 kg/m3. At AFZ and CG, the mixing took place between NAW, modified NAW and Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW), and the density gain at these fronts were 1.5×10-3 kg/m3 (AFZ) and 1.3×10-3 kg/m3 (CG). In the western Greenland Sea, the active cabbeling spots were widely separated and mixing appeared to be rather weak, with a maximum velocity of 2.5 m/day. The mixing source waters at WG were modified NAW, AIW and even denser water, and the density gain in this area was 0.4×10-3 kg/m3. The deepest mixing produced water whose density is equivalent to that of the dense water of the basin, indicating that cabbeling in the western Greenland Sea contributed directly to basin-scale water densification. The water mass modification rate was the highest at AFZ (about 8.0 Sv), suggesting that cabbeling may play an important role in water transformation in the Greenland Basin.

  12. Bathymetry of Walker Lake, West-Central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Smith, J. LaRue

    2007-01-01

    Walker Lake lies within a topographically closed basin in west-central Nevada and is the terminus of the Walker River. Much of the streamflow in the Walker River is diverted for irrigation, which has contributed to a decline in lake-surface altitude of about 150 feet and an increase in dissolved solids from 2,500 to 16,000 milligrams per liter in Walker Lake since 1882. The increase in salinity threatens the fresh-water ecosystem and survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accurately determining the bathymetry and relations between lake-surface altitude, surface area, and storage volume are part of a study to improve the water budget for Walker Lake. This report describes the updated bathymetry of Walker Lake, a comparison of results from this study and a study by Rush in 1970, and an estimate of the 1882 lake-surface altitude. Bathymetry was measured using a single-beam echosounder coupled to a differentially-corrected global positioning system. Lake depth was subtracted from the lake-surface altitude to calculate the altitude of the lake bottom. A Lidar (light detection and ranging) survey and high resolution aerial imagery were used to create digital elevation models around Walker Lake. The altitude of the lake bottom and digital elevation models were merged together to create a single map showing land-surface altitude contours delineating areas that are currently or that were submerged by Walker Lake. Surface area and storage volume for lake-surface altitudes of 3,851.5-4,120 feet were calculated with 3-D surface-analysis software. Walker Lake is oval shaped with a north-south trending long axis. On June 28, 2005, the lake-surface altitude was 3,935.6 feet, maximum depth was 86.3 feet, and the surface area was 32,190 acres. The minimum altitude of the lake bottom from discrete point depths is 3,849.3 feet near the center of Walker Lake. The lake bottom is remarkably smooth except for mounds near

  13. Formation of native iron in sediment-contaminated magma: I. A. case study of the Hanekammen Complex on Disko Island, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Ulff-Moller, F. )

    1990-01-01

    For the first time a compositional range of native iron bodies is described in a cogenetic series of sediment-contaminated volcanic rocks from the Tertiary West Greenland Basalt Province. The iron-bearing rocks occur in a high-level composite intrusion, the Hanekammen Complex. Reaction between a tholeiitic parent magma with >11% MgO and carbonaceous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich shale took place in a reservoir >3 km below the paleosurface and created magmatic layering with basaltic magma overlain by less dense andesitic magma. The contaminated rock series bears a strong imprint of assimilation but very little fractional crystallization, which implies that the two processes were not intimately coupled in the present in basalt and andesite form a general trend, defined by Co versus Ni concentrations, that reflects the degree of assimilation, the amount of immiscible sulfide liquid, and the degree of reduction (in order of decreasing importance). The zoning of single iron grains reflects the dynamics of their growth and, to some extent, subsequent homogenization and reaction with magma. Weakly zoned iron spherules in viscous andesite were formed and remained in situ, whereas iron grains in basalt settled through the layered magma and developed strong zoning. All iron types contain Co-rich domains (<1 mm in diameter); their conservation implies a residence time for the iron at magmatic temperatures on the order of a month or less before the emplacement in the subvolcanic intrusions.

  14. Pb isotopes as tracers of mining-related Pb in lichens, seaweed and mussels near a former Pb-Zn mine in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Asmund, Gert; Johansen, Poul; Elberling, Bo

    2010-05-01

    Identification of mining-related contaminants is important in order to assess the spreading of contaminants from mining as well as for site remediation purposes. This study focuses on lead (Pb) contamination in biota near the abandoned 'Black Angel Mine' in West Greenland in the period 1988-2008. Stable Pb isotope ratios and total Pb concentrations were determined in lichens, seaweed and mussels as well as in marine sediments. The results show that natural background Pb ((207)Pb/(206)Pb: 0.704-0.767) and Pb originating from the mine ore ((207)Pb/(206)Pb: 0.955) have distinct isotopic fingerprints. Total Pb in lichens, seaweed, and mussels was measured at values up to 633, 19 and 1536 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively, and is shown to be a mixture of natural Pb and ore-Pb. This enables quantification of mining-related Pb and shows that application of Pb isotope data is a valuable tool for monitoring mining pollution.

  15. Long-term response of an arctic fiord system to lead-zinc mining and submarine disposal of mine waste (Maarmorilik, West Greenland).

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Asmund, Gert; Johansen, Poul; Rigét, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Contamination by lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) was studied in seawater, sediments, seaweeds and blue mussels near the former Black Angel Pb-Zn Mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland. The mine operated during the period 1973-90 when mine waste (tailings and later waste rock) was discharged directly into the sea. Metal concentrations peaked during the mining period and Pb and Zn in seawater within the discharge area were measured up to 440 and 790 μg L⁻¹, respectively. Pb in fiord sediments, seaweeds and blue mussels just outside the discharge area were measured in concentrations up to 190, 84 and 2650 and Zn up to 300, 360 and 1190 μg g⁻¹ dry wt., respectively. Within the discharge area, seawater metal concentrations (especially Pb) decreased abruptly after mine closure. Metals concentrations in sediments and biota, however, decreased more slowly and two decades after mine closure seaweeds and blue mussels were still contaminated 12 km from the mine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Average sedimentary rock rare Earth element patterns and crustal evolution: Some observations and implications from the 3800 Ma ISUA supracrustal belt, West Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dymek, R. F.; Boak, J. L.; Gromet, L. P.

    1983-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) data is given on a set of clastic metasediments from the 3800 Ma Isua Supracrustal belt, West Greenland. Each of two units from the same sedimentary sequence has a distinctive REE pattern, but the average of these rocks bears a very strong resemblance to the REE pattern for the North American Shale Composite (NASC), and departs considerably from previous estimates of REE patterns in Archaean sediments. The possibility that the source area for the Isua sediments resembled that of the NASC is regarded as highly unlikely. However, REE patterns like that in the NASC may be produced by sedimentary recycling of material yielding patterns such as are found at Isua. The results lead to the following tentative conclusions: (1) The REE patterns for Isua Seq. B MBG indicate the existence of crustal materials with fractionated REE and negative Eu anomalies at 3800 Ma, (2) The average Seq. B REE pattern resembles that of the North American Shale Composite (NASC), (3) If the Seq. B average is truly representative of its crustal sources, then this early crust could have been extensively differentiated. In this regard, a proper understanding of the NASC pattern, and its relationship to post-Archaean crustal REE reservoirs, is essential, (4) The Isua results may represent a local effect.

  17. Deciphering the Ecology of Key Diatom Taxa to Understand Climate-Induced Changes in West Greenland Lakes over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saros, J. E.; Northington, R.; Malik, H.; Anderson, N. J.

    2014-12-01

    Paleolimnological records from southwest Greenland reveal that diatom communities have not changed in a similar way to other regions of the Arctic, and in general, do not show synchronous change across this area. There are a number of cases in which lakes in close proximity to each other show opposite community changes over the Holocene. These changes in diatom fossil profiles have been difficult to interpret due to a lack of explicit ecological information for key species. The objective of this project is to decipher the ecology of key diatom species that are abundant across these paleolimnological records. We hypothesize that climate-driven changes in nutrients and water column stability (via its effects on light availability) are key factors shaping diatom community structure in these lakes. We assessed the requirements of particular taxa for nutrients and light through comparative lake sampling and resource bioassays. A whole-lake manipulation in which water column stability was reduced through enhanced water circulation was also conducted to assess the response of key taxa to this change. We found that the relative abundances of key diatom taxa are under complex control by the interactive effects of nutrients and light. We discuss how these results will enhance interpretation of climate-induced changes in Arctic lakes in this region.

  18. Dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters from west-central Indiana contaminated with acidic mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.K.; Allen, J.M.; Lucas, S.

    1996-02-01

    A significant amount of coal mining activity in the west-central region of Indiana, has resulted in a large number of sites where surface waters are contaminated with acidic mine drainage (AMD). Contamination of drinking and irrigation water supplies is of concern mainly due to elevated levels of toxic metals. Abandoned mine sites are frequently located near occupied houses and farms in rural areas. Consequently, constituents of surface waters contaminated by AMD have the potential to be transported into sub-surface drinking water wells and irrigation water supplies. The extent of surface water contamination in west-central Indiana by AMID is not well characterized. For this reason, samples of surface waters that are contaminated with AMD were collected from a wide variety of locations in west-central Indiana and subjected to metals analysis.

  19. Interregional comparison of karst disturbance: west-central Florida and southeast Italy.

    PubMed

    North, Leslie A; van Beynen, Philip E; Parise, Mario

    2009-04-01

    The karst disturbance index (KDI) consists of 31 environmental indicators contained within the five broad categories: geomorphology, hydrology, atmosphere, biota, and cultural. The purpose of this research is to apply the KDI to two distinct karst areas, west Florida, USA, and Apulia, Italy. Through its application, the utility of the index can be validated and other important comparisons can be made, such as differences in the karst legislations implemented in each region and the effect of time exposure to human occupation to each karst terrain. Humans have intensively impacted the karst of southeast Italy for thousands of years compared to only decades in west-central Florida. However, west-central Florida's higher population density allows the region to reach disturbance levels comparable to those reached over a longer period in Apulia. Similarly, Italian karst is more diverse than the karst found in west-central Florida, creating an opportunity to test all the KDI indicators. Overall, major disturbances for southeast Italy karst include quarrying, stone clearing, and the dumping of refuse into caves, while west-central Florida suffers most from the infilling of sinkholes, soil compaction, changes in the water table, and vegetation removal. The application of the KDI allows a benchmark of disturbance to be established and later revisited to determine the changing state of human impact for a region. The highlighting of certain indicators that recorded high levels of disturbance also allows regional planners to allocate resources in a more refined manner.

  20. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bertola, Laura D; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A; Driscoll, Carlos A; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Tumenta, Pricelia N; Jirmo, Tuqa H; de Snoo, Geert R; de Iongh, Hans H; Vrieling, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted.

  1. Autosomal and mtDNA Markers Affirm the Distinctiveness of Lions in West and Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Laura D.; Tensen, Laura; van Hooft, Pim; White, Paula A.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Henschel, Philipp; Caragiulo, Anthony; Dias-Freedman, Isabela; Sogbohossou, Etotépé A.; Tumenta, Pricelia N.; Jirmo, Tuqa H.; de Snoo, Geert R.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of a species is key for understanding the taxonomy and for the design of effective management strategies for species conservation. The knowledge about the phylogenetic position of the lion (Panthera leo) in West/Central Africa is largely based on mitochondrial markers. Previous studies using mtDNA only have shown this region to hold a distinct evolutionary lineage. In addition, anthropogenic factors have led to a strong decline in West/Central African lion numbers, thus, the conservation value of these populations is particularly high. Here, we investigate whether autosomal markers are concordant with previously described phylogeographic patterns, and confirm the unique position of the West/Central African lion. Analysis of 20 microsatellites and 1,454 bp of the mitochondrial DNA in 16 lion populations representing the entire geographic range of the species found congruence in both types of markers, identifying four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2) East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies. There are no indications that genetic diversity in West/Central Africa lions is lower than in either East or Southern Africa, however, given this genetic distinction and the recent declines of lion numbers in this region, we strongly recommend prioritization of conservation projects in West/Central Africa. As the current taxonomic nomenclature does not reflect the evolutionary history of the lion, we suggest that a taxonomic revision of the lion is warranted. PMID:26466139

  2. Modelling near field regional uplift patterns in West Greenland/Disko Bay with plane-Earth finite element models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldgaard, Asger; Nielsen, Lars; Iaffaldano, Giampiero

    2017-04-01

    Relative sea level data, primarily obtained through isolation basin analysis in western Greenland and on Disko Island, indicates asynchronous rates of uplift during the Early Holocene with larger rates of uplift in southern Disko Bay compared to the northern part of the bay. Similar short-wavelength variations can be inferred from the Holocene marine limit as observations on the north and south side of Disko Island differ by as much as 60 m. While global isostatic adjustment models are needed to account for far field contributions to the relative sea level and for the calculation of accurate ocean functions, they are generally not suited for a detailed analysis of the short-wavelength uplift patterns observed close to present ice margins. This is in part due to the excessive computational cost required for sufficient resolution, and because these models generally ignore regional lateral heterogeneities in mantle and lithosphere rheology. To mitigate this problem, we perform sensitivity tests to investigate the effects of near field loading on a regional plane-Earth finite element model of the lithosphere and mantle of the Disko Bay area, where the global isostatic uplift chronology is well documented. By loading the model area through detailed regional ocean function and ice models, and by including a high resolution topography model of the area, we seek to assess the isostatic rebound generated by surface processes with wavelengths similar to those of the observed rebound signal. We also investigate possible effects of varying lithosphere and mantle rheology, which may play an important role in explaining the rebound signal. We use the abundance of relative sea level curves obtained in the region primarily through isolation basin analysis on Disko Island to constrain the parameters of the Earth model.

  3. Colonization history and clonal richness of asexual Daphnia in periglacial habitats of contrasting age in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Haileselasie, Tsegazeabe H; Mergeay, Joachim; Weider, Lawrence J; Jeppesen, Erik; De Meester, Luc

    2016-07-01

    Due to climate change, Arctic ice sheets are retreating. This leads to the formation of numerous new periglacial ponds and lakes, which are being colonized by planktonic organisms such as the water flea Daphnia. This system provides unique opportunities to test genotype colonization dynamics and the genetic assemblage of populations. Here, we studied clonal richness of the Daphnia pulex species complex in novel periglacial habitats created by glacial retreat in the Jakobshavn Isbrae area of western Greenland. Along a 10 km transect, we surveyed 73 periglacial habitats out of which 61 were colonized by Daphnia pulex. Hence, for our analysis, we used 21 ponds and 40 lakes in two clusters of habitats differing in age (estimated <50 years vs. >150 years). We tested the expectation that genetic diversity would be low in recently formed (i.e. young), small habitats, but would increase with increasing age and size. We identified a total of 42 genetically distinct clones belonging to two obligately asexual species of the D. pulex species complex: D. middendorffiana and the much more abundant D. pulicaria. While regional clonal richness was high, most clones were rare: 16 clones were restricted to a single habitat and the five most widespread clones accounted for 68% of all individuals sampled. On average, 3·2 clones (range: 1-12) coexisted in a given pond or lake. There was no relationship between clonal richness and habitat size when we controlled for habitat age. Whereas clonal richness was statistically higher in the cluster of older habitats when compared with the cluster of younger ponds and lakes, most young habitats were colonized by multiple genotypes. Our data suggest that newly formed (periglacial) ponds and lakes are colonized within decades by multiple genotypes via multiple colonization events, even in the smallest of our study systems (4 m(2) ). © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2016 British Ecological Society.

  4. Phytoplankton Productivity in an Arctic Fjord (West Greenland): Estimating Electron Requirements for Carbon Fixation and Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Hancke, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Tage; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Markager, Stiig; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification of pelagic primary production is essential for quantifying the marine carbon turnover and the energy supply to the food web. Knowing the electron requirement (Κ) for carbon (C) fixation (ΚC) and oxygen (O2) production (ΚO2), variable fluorescence has the potential to quantify primary production in microalgae, and hereby increasing spatial and temporal resolution of measurements compared to traditional methods. Here we quantify ΚC and ΚO2 through measures of Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry, C fixation and O2 production in an Arctic fjord (Godthåbsfjorden, W Greenland). Through short- (2h) and long-term (24h) experiments, rates of electron transfer (ETRPSII), C fixation and/or O2 production were quantified and compared. Absolute rates of ETR were derived by accounting for Photosystem II light absorption and spectral light composition. Two-hour incubations revealed a linear relationship between ETRPSII and gross 14C fixation (R2 = 0.81) during light-limited photosynthesis, giving a ΚC of 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± S.E.) mol é (mol C)−1. Diel net rates also demonstrated a linear relationship between ETRPSII and C fixation giving a ΚC of 11.2 ± 1.3 mol é (mol C)−1 (R2 = 0.86). For net O2 production the electron requirement was lower than for net C fixation giving 6.5 ± 0.9 mol é (mol O2)−1 (R2 = 0.94). This, however, still is an electron requirement 1.6 times higher than the theoretical minimum for O2 production [i.e. 4 mol é (mol O2)−1]. The discrepancy is explained by respiratory activity and non-photochemical electron requirements and the variability is discussed. In conclusion, the bio-optical method and derived electron requirement support conversion of ETR to units of C or O2, paving the road for improved spatial and temporal resolution of primary production estimates. PMID:26218096

  5. Phytoplankton Productivity in an Arctic Fjord (West Greenland): Estimating Electron Requirements for Carbon Fixation and Oxygen Production.

    PubMed

    Hancke, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Tage; Sejr, Mikael Kristian; Markager, Stiig; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification of pelagic primary production is essential for quantifying the marine carbon turnover and the energy supply to the food web. Knowing the electron requirement (Κ) for carbon (C) fixation (ΚC) and oxygen (O2) production (ΚO2), variable fluorescence has the potential to quantify primary production in microalgae, and hereby increasing spatial and temporal resolution of measurements compared to traditional methods. Here we quantify ΚC and ΚO2 through measures of Pulse Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometry, C fixation and O2 production in an Arctic fjord (Godthåbsfjorden, W Greenland). Through short- (2h) and long-term (24h) experiments, rates of electron transfer (ETRPSII), C fixation and/or O2 production were quantified and compared. Absolute rates of ETR were derived by accounting for Photosystem II light absorption and spectral light composition. Two-hour incubations revealed a linear relationship between ETRPSII and gross 14C fixation (R2 = 0.81) during light-limited photosynthesis, giving a ΚC of 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± S.E.) mol é (mol C)-1. Diel net rates also demonstrated a linear relationship between ETRPSII and C fixation giving a ΚC of 11.2 ± 1.3 mol é (mol C)-1 (R2 = 0.86). For net O2 production the electron requirement was lower than for net C fixation giving 6.5 ± 0.9 mol é (mol O2)-1 (R2 = 0.94). This, however, still is an electron requirement 1.6 times higher than the theoretical minimum for O2 production [i.e. 4 mol é (mol O2)-1]. The discrepancy is explained by respiratory activity and non-photochemical electron requirements and the variability is discussed. In conclusion, the bio-optical method and derived electron requirement support conversion of ETR to units of C or O2, paving the road for improved spatial and temporal resolution of primary production estimates.

  6. Ilheus Virus Isolation in the Pantanal, West-Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Kenney, Joan L.; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Campos, Zilca M. S.; Nogueira, Rita M. R.; Brault, Aaron C.; Komar, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The wetlands of the Brazilian Pantanal host large concentrations of diverse wildlife species and hematophagous arthropods, conditions that favor the circulation of zoonotic arboviruses. A recent study from the Nhecolândia sub-region of Pantanal reported serological evidence of various flaviviruses, including West Nile virus and Ilheus virus (ILHV). According to the age of seropositive horses, at least three flaviviruses, including ILHV, circulated in the Brazilian Pantanal between 2005 and 2009. To extend this study, we collected 3,234 adult mosquitoes of 16 species during 2009 and 2010 in the same sub-region. Mosquito pool homogenates were assayed for infectious virus on C6/36 and Vero cell monolayers and also tested for flaviviral RNA by a group-specific real-time RT-PCR. One pool containing 50 non-engorged female specimens of Aedes scapularis tested positive for ILHV by culture and for ILHV RNA by real-time RT-PCR, indicating a minimum infection rate of 2.5 per 1000. Full-length genomic sequence exhibited 95% identity to the only full genome sequence available for ILHV. The present data confirm the circulation of ILHV in the Brazilian Pantanal. PMID:23875051

  7. Origin and Role of Recycled Crust in Flood Basalt Magmatism: Case Study of the Central East Greenland Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Continental flood basalts (CFB) are extreme manifestations of mantle melting derived from chemically/isotopically heterogeneous mantle. Much of this heterogeneity comes from lithospheric material recycled into the convecting mantle by a range of mechanisms (e.g. subduction, delamination). The abundance and petrogenetic origins of these lithologies thus provide important constraints on the geodynamical origins of CFB magmatism, and the timescales of lithospheric recycling in the mantle. Basalt geochemistry has long been used to constrain the compositions and mean ages of recycled lithologies in the mantle. Typically, this work assumes the isotopic compositions of the basalts are the same as their mantle source(s). However, because basalts are mixtures of melts derived from different sources (having different fusibilities) generated over ranges of P and T, their isotopic compositions only indirectly represent the isotopic compositions of their mantle sources[1]. Thus, relating basalts compositions to mantle source compositions requires information about the melting process itself. To investigate the nature of lithologic source heterogeneity while accounting for the effects of melting during CFB magmatism, we utilize the REEBOX PRO forward melting model[2], which simulates adiabatic decompression melting in lithologically heterogeneous mantle. We apply the model to constrain the origins and abundance of mantle heterogeneity associated with Paleogene flood basalts erupted during the rift-to-drift transition of Pangea breakup along the Central East Greenland rifted margin of the North Atlantic igneous province. We show that these basalts were derived by melting of a hot, lithologically heterogeneous source containing depleted, subduction-modified lithospheric mantle, and <10% recycled oceanic crust. The Paleozoic mean age we calculate for this recycled crust is consistent with an origin in the region's prior subduction history, and with estimates for the mean age of

  8. Evaluation of the use of common sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) organ histology as bioindicator for element exposure in the fjord of the mining area Maarmorilik, West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Sonne, Christian; Bach, Lis; Søndergaard, Jens; Rigét, Frank F.; Dietz, Rune; Mosbech, Anders; Leifsson, Pall S.; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-08-15

    The former Black Angel lead–zinc mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland, is a historic example of how mining activity may result in a significant impact on the surrounding fjord system in terms of elevated concentrations of especially lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in seawater, sediments and surrounding biota. In order to shed light on the present contamination and possible effects in the fjord we initiated a range of studies including a pilot study on gill and liver morphology of common sculpins (Myoxocephalus scorpius) around Maarmorilik. Sculpins were caught and sampled at five different stations known to represent a gradient of Pb concentrations. Fish livers from all specimens were analyzed for relevant elements in the area: Fe, Zn, As, Cu, Se, Cd, Pb, Ag, Hg, Co and Ni. Lead, As and Hg showed significant differences among the five stations. For 20% of the sculpins, Hg concentrations were in the range of lowest observed effect dose (LOED) of 0.1–0.5 μg/g ww for toxic threshold on reproduction and subclinical endpoints. Likewise LOEDs for tissue lesions, LOEDs for biochemistry, growth, survival and reproduction were exceeded for Cd (0.42–1.8 μg/g ww) and for As (11.6 μg/g ww) in 28% and 85% of the sculpins, respectively. Similar to this, the no observed effect dose (NOED) for biochemistry was exceeded for Pb (0.32 μg/g ww) and for growth, mortality and reproduction for Zn (60–68 μg/g ww) in 33% and 24% of the sculpins, respectively. For all sculpins, females were significantly larger than males and for five of the elements (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se) females had higher concentrations. The chronic lesions observed in liver (mononuclear cell infiltrates, necrosis, vacuolar hepatocytes, portal fibrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, active melanomacrophage centers) and gills (fusion and edema of secondary lamellae, laminar telangiectasis, mononuclear cell infiltrates, blebs) were similar to those in the literature studies for both wild and laboratory exposed sculpins and

  9. Timber resource statistics for non-Federal forest land in west-central Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Donald R. Gedney; Patricia M. Bassett; Mary A. Mei

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1985-86 timber resource inventory of the non-Federal forest land in the four counties (Benton, Lane, Lincoln, and Linn) in west-central Oregon. Detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest are presented.

  10. Remnant fire disturbed montane longleaf pine forest in west central georgia

    Treesearch

    Robert Carter; Andrew J. Londo

    2006-01-01

    Fire disturbed ecosystems are characteristic of the Southeastern Coastal Plain of the United States. Less well known are fire disturbed mountainous regions of the Piedmont and Appalachian region that support longleaf pine (Pinus palustris P. Mill.) ecosystems. The Pine Mountain Range in the Piedmont of west central Georgia has remnant longleaf pine...

  11. 40 CFR 81.96 - West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false West Central Florida Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.96 Section 81.96 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.96...

  12. Association analysis of photoperiodic flowering genes in West and Central African sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Photoperiod-sensitive flowering is a key adaptive trait for sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in West and Central Africa. In this study we performed an association analysis to investigate the effect of polymorphisms within the genes putatively related to variation in flowering time on photoperiod sensitive ...

  13. Preharvest manual herbicide treatments for controlling American beech in Central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffery D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer; David A. Warner; Gary W. Miller

    2004-01-01

    Application costs and efficacy were determined for manual preharvest herbicide treatments applied to control American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) that was interfering with the establishment and development of black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) in central West Virginia. The treatments consisted of four levels of basal area...

  14. A comparison of two stem injection treatments applied to American beech in central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; Gary W. Miller; James N. Kochenderfer

    2012-01-01

    Efficacies for two herbicide stem injection treatments on American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and impacts to nontarget residual trees were evaluated in central West Virginia. The treatments consisted of hack-and-squirt injection of all beech stems ≥1.0 in. to 9.9 in. diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) with either imazapyr as Arsenal...

  15. Effects of climate variations and soil conservation on sedimentation of a west-central Oklahoma reservoir

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During the second half of the 20th century, extensive soil conservation practices were implemented on the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in West-Central Oklahoma. Sediment and flow observations were made on major tributaries in 1943-1950 (pre-conservation time period), and again in 2004-2008 (post-co...

  16. Close Relationship between West Nile Virus from Turkey and Lineage 1 Strain from Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Ergunay, Koray; Bakonyi, Tamas; Nowotny, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We sequenced West Nile viruses (WNVs) from Turkey and found close relationships to WNV lineage 1 strain ArB310/67 from the Central African Republic, distinct from other WNVs circulating in the Mediterranean Basin, eastern Europe, and the Middle East. These findings suggest independent introductions of WNV strains from Africa to the Middle East. PMID:25625703

  17. Efficacy of stem injection treatments on striped maple in central West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey D. Kochenderfer; James N. Kochenderfer

    2008-01-01

    Hack-and-squirt injection treatments were applied to individual striped maple (Acer pennsylvanicum L.) stems and to the largest stem in sprout clumps in a 25-year-old clearcut in central West Virginia to evaluate seasonal efficacy of imazapyr as Arsenal (28.7%) and glyphosate as Glypro Plus (41.0%) in water carriers. Complete control of injected...

  18. Jökulhlaup (ice-dammed lake outburst flood) impact within a valley-confined sandur subject to backwater conditions, Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Andrew J.

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines the controls on the morphology and sedimentology of a valley-confined proglacial outwash plain or 'sandur' in West Greenland subject to glacial outburst floods (jökulhlaups). Jökulhlaup flow conditions observed during a recent (1987) flood are linked to sandur sedimentology and morphological change. Backwater effects over the distal sandur resulted in a reduction of stream power despite increasing discharge. Bar units were typically large. Bar front advance of 60 m during 1987 jökulhlaup occurred prior to waning stage bar dissection by chute channels. Channel change was confined to the distal sandur, due to the greater erodibility of the finer-grained bars. A temporary zone of sediment storage prevailed at the transition between free flowing and ponded flood waters until flood powers increased during waning flood stage as backwater effects were removed. Extension of pre-existing high-relief amplitude bars within the distal sandur records sedimentation related to at least eight jökulhlaups, whilst lower-relief amplitude, proximal sandur sediments provide a composite record of the last high stage jökulhlaup flows. Backwater conditions during jökulhlaups have increased the rapidity of spatial variation of grain sizes and fluvial facies types. Complex, within-event, sediment reworking and routing is generated by the onset and break up of backwater effects. The role of local topography is therefore crucial when interpreting the sedimentary record of former proglacial channels potentially subject to jökulhlaups. This study may prove useful in identifying the presence of flood cycles within palaeo-fluvial systems in both formerly glaciated and non glaciated areas.

  19. Trends of lead and zinc in resident and transplanted Flavocetraria nivalis lichens near a former lead-zinc mine in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Johansen, Poul; Asmund, Gert; Rigét, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated spatial and temporal trends of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in resident and transplanted Flavocetraria nivalis lichens near the former Black Angel Mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland. The objectives of the study were to evaluate resident and transplanted lichens for monitoring dust contamination and investigate trends in mine-related dust contamination near the mine. The mine operated between 1973 and 1990 and lichens were regularly sampled between 1986 and 2009. When the mine operated, elevated concentrations of Pb, Zn and other elements were observed in resident lichens up to 35 km from Maarmorilik. In the period after mine closure, Pb and Zn concentrations in resident lichens decreased with 1-11% and 0-6% per year, respectively. From 1996 to 2009, lichens were transplanted into the study area from an uncontaminated site and collected the following year. After 1 year, transplanted lichens showed elevated concentrations of Pb and Zn but contained consistently less Pb and Zn compared to resident lichens (24±23% and 63±37%, respectively). During the most recent sampling in 2009, transplanted lichens still showed significantly elevated Pb concentrations (up to a factor 270) within a distance of 20 km from Maarmorilik. Zinc concentrations were only significantly elevated at sites within 5 km from the mine. Time-series regression analyses showed no significant decreases in Pb and Zn in transplanted lichens at any of the sites during the period 1996-2009. In conclusion, our study showed that resident F. nivalis lichens could not be used to evaluate the recent annual dust contamination in Maarmorilik. Lichen transplants, however, were considered adequate for assessing spatial and temporal trends in Pb and Zn contamination from recently deposited dust. The continuous dispersal of contaminated dust in Maarmorilik almost 20 years after mine closure reveals a slow recovery from mining contamination in this arctic area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All

  20. Photobiology of sea ice algae during initial spring growth in Kangerlussuaq, West Greenland: insights from imaging variable chlorophyll fluorescence of ice cores.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Ian; Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten; Sorrell, Brian K; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Borzák, Réka; Buss, Inge

    2012-06-01

    We undertook a series of measurements of photophysiological parameters of sea ice algae over 12 days of early spring growth in a West Greenland Fjord, by variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging. Imaging of the ice-water interface showed the development of ice algae in 0.3-0.4 mm wide brine channels between laminar ice crystals in the lower 4-6 mm of the ice, with a several-fold spatial variation in inferred biomass on cm scales. The maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis, F(v) /F(m), was initially low (~0.1), though this increased rapidly to ~0.5 by day 6. Day 6 also saw the onset of biomass increase, the cessation of ice growth and the time at which brine had reached <50 psu and >-2 °C. We interpret this as indicating that the establishment of stable brine channels at close to ambient salinity was required to trigger photosynthetically active populations. Maximum relative electron transport rate (rETR(max)), saturation irradiance (E(k)) and photosynthetic efficiency (α) had also stabilised by day 6 at 5-6 relative units, ~30 μmol photons m⁻² s⁻¹ and 0.4-0.5 μmol photons m⁻²s⁻¹, respectively. E(k) was consistent with under-ice irradiance, which peaked at a similar value, confirming that daytime irradiance was adequate to facilitate photosynthetic activity throughout the study period. Photosynthetic parameters showed no substantial differences with depth within the ice, nor variation between cores or brine channels suggesting that during this early phase of ice algal growth cells were unaffected by gradients of environmental conditions within the ice. Variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging offers a tool to determine how this situation may change over time and as brine channels and algal populations evolve.

  1. Recent changes in north-west Greenland climate documented by NEEM shallow ice core data and simulations, and implications for past temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Ortega, P.; Swingedouw, D.; Popp, T.; Vinther, B. M.; Oerter, H.; Sveinbjornsdottir, A. E.; Gudlaugsdottir, H.; Box, J. E.; Falourd, S.; Fettweis, X.; Gallée, H.; Garnier, E.; Jouzel, J.; Landais, A.; Minster, B.; Paradis, N.; Orsi, A.; Risi, C.; Werner, M.; White, J. W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Combined records of snow accumulation rate, δ18O and deuterium excess were produced from several shallow ice cores and snow pits at NEEM (north-west Greenland), covering the period from 1724 to 2007. They are used to investigate recent climate variability and characterize the isotope-temperature relationship. We find that NEEM records are only weakly affected by inter-annual changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation. Decadal δ18O and accumulation variability is related to North Atlantic SST, and enhanced at the beginning of the 19th century. No long-term trend is observed in the accumulation record. By contrast, NEEM δ18O shows multi-decadal increasing trends in the late 19th century and since the 1980s. The strongest annual positive δ18O anomaly values are recorded at NEEM in 1928 and 2010, while maximum accumulation occurs in 1933. The last decade is the most enriched in δ18O (warmest), while the 11-year periods with the strongest depletion (coldest) are depicted at NEEM in 1815-1825 and 1836-1846, which are also the driest 11-year periods. The NEEM accumulation and δ18O records are strongly correlated with outputs from atmospheric models, nudged to atmospheric reanalyses. Best performance is observed for ERA reanalyses. Gridded temperature reconstructions, instrumental data and model outputs at NEEM are used to estimate the multi-decadal accumulation-temperature and δ18O-temperature relationships for the strong warming period in 1979-2007. The accumulation sensitivity to temperature is estimated at 11 ± 2% °C-1 and the δ18O-temperature slope at 1.1 ± 0.2‰ °C-1, about twice larger than previously used to estimate last interglacial temperature change from the bottom part of the NEEM deep ice core.

  2. Temporal trends of mercury in Greenland ringed seal populations in a warming climate.

    PubMed

    Rigét, Frank; Dietz, Rune; Hobson, Keith A

    2012-12-01

    Temporal trends of mercury in livers of ringed seals collected from the early 1980s to 2010 from central West, Northwest and central East Greenland were studied. In this period the climate of Greenland warmed and the influences of climate indices such as ice coverage, water temperature and the Atlantic Oscillation Index on mercury concentration were evaluated using multiple regressions and Akaike's Information Criteria (AIC) to determine the most parsimonious models. Biological co-variables such as age, sex and trophic position (as determined by stable isotope analysis) of seals were also evaluated. Increasing levels of mercury in seals were found in Ittoqqortoormiit, central East Greenland, and Avanersuaq, Northwest Greenland, with an annual increase of +10.3 and +2%, respectively. Age was an important co-variable for all three regions and trophic position for two regions. The Atlantic Oscillation Index was also an important explanatory variable for all three regions and was positively associated with mercury concentrations in seals indicating the importance of global climatic processes on ringed seal populations in Greenland.

  3. Tuna Longline Fishing around West and Central Pacific Seamounts

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Seamounts have been identified as aggregating locations for pelagic biodiversity including tuna; however the topography and prevailing oceanography differ between seamounts and not all are important for tuna. Although a relatively common feature in oceanic ecosystems, little information is available that identifies those that are biologically important. Improved knowledge offers opportunities for unique management of these areas, which may advance the sustainable management of oceanic resources. In this study, we evaluate the existence of an association between seamounts and tuna longline fisheries at the ocean basin scale, identify significant seamounts for tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean, and quantify the seamount contribution to the tuna longline catch. Methodology/Principal Findings We use data collected for the Western and Central Pacific Ocean for bigeye, yellowfin, and albacore tuna at the ocean basin scale. GLMs were applied to a coupled dataset of longline fisheries catch and effort, and seamount location information. The analyses show that seamounts may be associated with an annual longline combined catch of 35 thousand tonnes, with higher catch apparent for yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tuna on 17%, 14%, and 14% of seamounts respectively. In contrast 14%, 18%, and 20% of seamounts had significantly lower catches for yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna respectively. Studying catch data in relation to seamount positions presents several challenges such as bias in location of seamounts, or lack of spatial resolution of fisheries data. Whilst we recognize these limitations the criteria used for detecting significant seamounts were conservative and the error in identification is likely to be low albeit unknown. Conclusions/Significance Seamounts throughout the study area were found to either enhance or reduce tuna catch. This indicates that management of seamounts is important Pacific-wide, but management approaches must take

  4. Tuna longline fishing around West and Central Pacific seamounts.

    PubMed

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J

    2010-12-29

    Seamounts have been identified as aggregating locations for pelagic biodiversity including tuna; however the topography and prevailing oceanography differ between seamounts and not all are important for tuna. Although a relatively common feature in oceanic ecosystems, little information is available that identifies those that are biologically important. Improved knowledge offers opportunities for unique management of these areas, which may advance the sustainable management of oceanic resources. In this study, we evaluate the existence of an association between seamounts and tuna longline fisheries at the ocean basin scale, identify significant seamounts for tuna in the western and central Pacific Ocean, and quantify the seamount contribution to the tuna longline catch. We use data collected for the Western and Central Pacific Ocean for bigeye, yellowfin, and albacore tuna at the ocean basin scale. GLMs were applied to a coupled dataset of longline fisheries catch and effort, and seamount location information. The analyses show that seamounts may be associated with an annual longline combined catch of 35 thousand tonnes, with higher catch apparent for yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tuna on 17%, 14%, and 14% of seamounts respectively. In contrast 14%, 18%, and 20% of seamounts had significantly lower catches for yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna respectively. Studying catch data in relation to seamount positions presents several challenges such as bias in location of seamounts, or lack of spatial resolution of fisheries data. Whilst we recognize these limitations the criteria used for detecting significant seamounts were conservative and the error in identification is likely to be low albeit unknown. Seamounts throughout the study area were found to either enhance or reduce tuna catch. This indicates that management of seamounts is important Pacific-wide, but management approaches must take account of local conditions. Management of tuna and biodiversity

  5. Transit traverse in Missouri, 1900-1937. Part 8, West-central Missouri, 1906-37

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staack, John G.

    1940-01-01

    This bulletin, which for convenience is to be published in eight parts, contains the results of all transit traverse* done In Missouri through 1937 by the Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior, including those heretofore published. (See page X.) Each of the parts deals with one of eight sections into which the State has been divided for this purpose and which have been designated northeastern, northwestern, southeastern, southwestern, central, east-central, south-central, and west-central Missouri. In each part descriptions of the points for which geodetic positions have been determined are listed according to the quadrangles in which the points occur. Results of transit traverse other than that done by the Geological Survey have not been included.West-central Missouri, as the term is used in this bulletin and as the subject of part 8 of the bulletin, is that section of the State lying between latitudes 38°00' and 39°30' and west of longitude 93°30'.

  6. Basement Gravity Feature in East-central Nevada and West-central Utah and its Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. A.; Tilden, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    A basement gravity map of east-central Nevada and west-central Utah, derived by removing the effects of Cenozoic deposits, reveals prominent gravity anomalies that reflect lateral density variations in pre-Cenozoic rocks throughout the region. Although some remanent artifacts may be present in the basement gravity map, in general, basement gravity features transcend Basin and Range structures, suggesting that the effects of the Cenozoic deposits were removed reasonably well. In a statewide analysis of basement gravity anomalies in Nevada, Blakely and Jachens (1991) suggest that a basement gravity low that extends across the central part of the state may reflect concealed silicic intrusions within the mid to lower crust. Within east-central Nevada and west-central Utah, this prominent NW-trending basement gravity low transects the region, and poorly correlates to exposed pre-Cenozoic rocks (Stewart and Carlson, 1978; Hintze, 1980). The western margin of the basement gravity low is surprisingly linear and trends about N30°W, a direction similar to that of the northern Nevada rift (e.g., Zoback et al., 1994), a mid- Miocene feature just to the west that may have preferentially followed a pre-existing basement structure (e.g., Ponce and Glen, 2003; 2005). Much of this basement gravity low occurs in a highly extended terrane between two structural troughs - the Butte and the Confusion synclinoriums (e.g., Hose, 1977; Gans and Miller, 1983), composed of downfolded Triassic to Permian rocks. The Butte synclinorium correlates to the western margin of the basement gravity low, whereas, the Confusion synclinorium is just east of the basement gravity low and directly correlates to a basement gravity high over the Confusion Range, Burbank Hills, and Mountain Home Range in west-central Utah (Hintze, 1980). This disconnect between the gravity anomaly polarity of the two synclinoriums may be related to underlying lithologic differences between the two areas such as the presence

  7. Upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica from array analysis of Rayleigh wave phase velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeszel, David S.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew A.; Wilson, Terry J.; Winberry, J. Paul

    2016-03-01

    The seismic velocity structure of Antarctica is important, both as a constraint on the tectonic history of the continent and for understanding solid Earth interactions with the ice sheet. We use Rayleigh wave array analysis methods applied to teleseismic data from recent temporary broadband seismograph deployments to image the upper mantle structure of central and West Antarctica. Phase velocity maps are determined using a two-plane wave tomography method and are inverted for shear velocity using a Monte Carlo approach to estimate three-dimensional velocity structure. Results illuminate the structural dichotomy between the East Antarctic Craton and West Antarctica, with West Antarctica showing thinner crust and slower upper mantle velocity. West Antarctica is characterized by a 70-100 km thick lithosphere, underlain by a low-velocity zone to depths of at least 200 km. The slowest anomalies are beneath Ross Island and the Marie Byrd Land dome and are interpreted as upper mantle thermal anomalies possibly due to mantle plumes. The central Transantarctic Mountains are marked by an uppermost mantle slow-velocity anomaly, suggesting that the topography is thermally supported. The presence of thin, higher-velocity lithosphere to depths of about 70 km beneath the West Antarctic Rift System limits estimates of the regionally averaged heat flow to less than 90 mW/m2. The Ellsworth-Whitmore block is underlain by mantle with velocities that are intermediate between those of the West Antarctic Rift System and the East Antarctic Craton. We interpret this province as Precambrian continental lithosphere that has been altered by Phanerozoic tectonic and magmatic activity.

  8. Post-Industrial Revolution changes in large-scale atmospheric pollution of the northern hemisphere by heavy metals as documented in central Greenland snow and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelone, Jean-Pierre; Hong, Sungmin; Pellone, Christian; Boutron, Claude F.

    1995-08-01

    Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu have been measured using ultraclean procedures in various sections of a 70.3-m snow/ice core covering the past 220 years (including the Industrial Revolution) drilled at Summit, central Greenland. These time series are the first reliable ones ever published for Zn, Cd, and Cu; for Pb they are the first verification of the pioneering data published more than two decades ago by C. Patterson and his coworkers [Murozumi et al., 1969]. For all four heavy metals, concentrations are found to have markedly increased up until the 1960s and 1970s before decreasing significantly during the following few decades. The timing and the amplitude of the observed changes differ significantly however from one metal to another. Comparison with concentration values obtained by analyzing ancient Holocene ice dated 7760 years B.P., that is, before humans started to impact on the atmosphere, show that no detectable increase occurred for Zn, Cd, and Cu before the Industrial Revolution. On the other hand, Pb concentrations were already one order of magnitude above natural values in late 18th century ice. Cumulative deposition of heavy metals to the whole Greenland ice cap since the Industrial Revolution ranges from 3200 t for Pb to 60 t for Cd.

  9. Response of arid ecosystems to the Holocene climate variability along west and central Mediterranean gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouadi, Sahbi; Combourieu Nebout, Nathalie; Azuara, Julien; Lebreton, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Decadal to millennial climate variability is a common feature recorded by environmental series. However interconnections between climate forcing (i.e. insolation, thermohaline circulation) and large atmospheric circulation patterns (i.e. North Atlantic Oscillation, Mediterranean Oscillation, Monsoon) still remain poorly understood considering their respective impacts on the global climate mechanisms. In the Mediterranean area, joint climatic influences from high temperate and low subtropical latitudes result in a high sensitivity of ecosystems to climate changes and especially to extreme events. Several vegetation records illustrate millennial changes in Mediterranean. Nevertheless notable discrepancies in the environmental response arise between Mediterranean edges (east vs west, north vs south). The new paleoenvironmental record from Sebkha Boujmel (33°N, southern Tunisia) covers the last 8kyr and exhibits eight humid/arid fluctuations with cyclic expansion of the desert, related to Middle and Late Holocene rapid climate changes (RCC) occurring at a centennial scale. Sebkha Boujmel record is replaced in the wider context of west Mediterranean and northern hemisphere. Asynchronies and disparity of the Mediterranean RCC occurrence documents north-south and west-east climate gradients in the west Mediterranean and pinpoint Sebkha Boujmel as the single vegetation record tracing as many climate events during the last 8kyr. Indeed the high sensitivity of arid environments triggers the prompt reaction of the southern Tunisian vegetation to Holocene RCC however tenuous. Pattern of RCC geographical occurrence in west and central Mediterranean is interpreted in the light of climate forcings involved for the Holocene centennial variability.

  10. Summary of reported agriculture and irrigation water use in west-central Arkansas counties, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, T.W.; Manning, C.A.; Stafford, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the 1991 water-use reporting through the Conservation District Offices in the following west-central Arkansas counties: Conway, Crawford, Faulkner, Franklin, Johnson, Logan, Perry, Pope, Scott, Sebastian, and Yell. The number of withdrawal registrations for west-central Arkansas counties was 307 (90 groundwater and 217 surface water). Water withdrawals reported during the registration process total 1.00 Mgal/d (0.15 Mgal/d groundwater and 0.85 Mgal/d surface water) for agriculture and 32.07 Mgal/d (5.67 Mgal/d groundwater and 26.40 Mgal/d surface water) for irrigation. The registration reports for 1991 indicate that this water was applied to 22,856 acres of land to irrigate rice, corn, sorghum, soybeans, wheat, cash grains, hay, milo, vegetables, sod, berries, grapes, and fruit trees as well as for the agricultural uses of catfish and ducks.

  11. New Perspectives on Long Run-out Rock Avalanches: A Dynamic Analysis of 20 Events in the Vaigat Strait, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, J.; Rosser, N. J.; Dunning, S.; Hardy, R. J.; Karim, K.; Szczucinski, W.; Norman, E. C.; Strzelecki, M.; Drewniak, M.

    2014-12-01

    Risk assessments of the threat posed by rock avalanches rely upon numerical modelling of potential run-out and spreading, and are contingent upon a thorough understanding of the flow dynamics inferred from deposits left by previous events. Few records exist of multiple rock avalanches with boundary conditions sufficiently consistent to develop a set of more generalised rules for behaviour across events. A unique cluster of 20 large (3 x 106 - 94 x 106 m3) rock avalanche deposits along the Vaigat Strait, West Greenland, offers a unique opportunity to model a large sample of adjacent events sourced from a stretch of coastal mountains of relatively uniform geology and structure. Our simulations of these events were performed using VolcFlow, a geophysical mass flow code developed to simulate volcanic debris avalanches. Rheological calibration of the model was performed using a well-constrained event at Paatuut (AD 2000). The best-fit simulation assumes a constant retarding stress with a collisional stress coefficient (T0 = 250 kPa, ξ = 0.01), and simulates run-out to within ±0.3% of that observed. Despite being widely used to simulate rock avalanche propagation, other models, that assume either a Coulomb frictional or a Voellmy rheology, failed to reproduce the observed event characteristics and deposit distribution at Paatuut. We applied this calibration to 19 other events, simulating rock avalanche motion across 3D terrain of varying levels of complexity. Our findings illustrate the utility and sensitivity of modelling a single rock avalanche satisfactorily as a function of rheology, alongside the validity of applying the same parameters elsewhere, even within similar boundary conditions. VolcFlow can plausibly account for the observed morphology of a series of deposits emplaced by events of different types, although its performance is sensitive to a range of topographic and geometric factors. These exercises show encouraging results in the model's ability to

  12. Simulation of the soil water balance of an undeveloped prairie in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Boetcher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to simulate the soil water balance of a densely vegetated prairie site in west-central Florida. Transient simulations of the soil water balance were performed using field-measured soil and vegetation properties. Simulated and measured soil water content generally agreed to within 0.04; however, simulated water storage and recharge were sensitive to air-entry soil-water pressure potential and depth to the water table.

  13. Lower Palaeozoic of North-Western and West-Central Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    The first compilation in English of the stratigraphy, palaeontology, sedimentology, palaeogeography, and palaeoclimatology of the Lower Palaeozoic found in this area. The fourth volume in the Lower Palaeozoic Rocks of the World Series discusses geological formations such as the lower Cambrian tribolite-bearing sequences of Morocco, those showing evidence of late Ordovician glaciation in West-Central Africa, and the Silurian-Devonian sequences of Morocco and Algeria.

  14. Generalized thickness and configuration of the top of the intermediate aquifer, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corral, Miguel A.; Wolansky, Richard M.

    1984-01-01

    Generalized map show the thickness and top of the intermediate aquifer in west-central Florida within the boundaries of the Southwest Florida Water Management District. The intermediate aquifer consists of a series of water-bearing units and confining beds between the surficial aquifer (water table) and the Floridan aquifer. This aquifer contains from one to several water-bearing units in west-central Florida. The aquifer and confining beds consist of the Tamiami and Hawthorn Formations of late and middle Miocene age and parts of the Tampa Limestone of early Miocene age. The top of the intermediate aquifer is about 100 feet above sea level in the north and slopes to about 100 feet below sea level in the south. The thickness ranges from zero in the north to more than 600 feet in the south. Despite the high mineral content of the water in some areas, the intermediate aquifer offers the best source of ground water to the coastal and southern areas of west-central Florida. (USGS)

  15. Integration of remotely-sensed geobotanical and structural methods for hydrocarbon exploration in West-Central West Virginia. Quartery report, May 1, 1996--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Progress is reported on hydrocarbon exploration in West-Central West Virginia. In this period, the following tasks were carried out: a reconnaissance soil gas geochemical survey was performed at the Volcano test site and at the Lewis County test site; a geobotanical analysis of the September imagery was carried out in order to highlight spectral anomalies that appear to be associated with the historic volcano field and the Lewis County test site; and multi-temporal spectral reflectance measurements continued.

  16. West-east lithostratigraphic cross section of Cretaceous rocks from central Utah to western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anna, Lawrence O.

    2012-01-01

    A west-east lithostratigraphic cross section of the Cretaceous rocks from central Utah to western Kansas was prepared as part of the former Western Interior Cretaceous (WIK) project, which was part of the Global Sedimentary Geology Program started in 1989. This transect is similar to that published by Dyman and others (1994) as a summary paper of the WIK project but extends further east and is more detailed. Stratigraphic control was provided by 32 geophysical logs and measured sections tied to ammonite and Inoceramus faunal zones. A variable datum was used, including the base of the Castlegate Sandstone for the western part of the section, and the fossil ammonite zone Baculites obtusus for the middle and eastern section. Lower Cretaceous units and the Frontier Formation and Mowry Shale are shown as undifferentiated units. Cretaceous strata along the transect range in thickness from more than 7,000 ft in the structural foredeep of the western overthrust belt in central Utah, to about 11,000 ft near the Colorado-Utah border as a result of considerable thickening of the Mesaverde Group, to less than 3,500 ft in the eastern Denver Basin, Kansas resulting in a condensed section. The basal Mancos Shale rises stepwise across the transect becoming progressively younger to the west as the Western Interior Seaway transgressed westward. The section illustrates large scale stratigraphic relations for most of the area covered by the seaway, from central Utah, Colorado, to west-central Kansas. These strata are predominantly continental and shoreline deposits near the Sevier thrust belt in Utah, prograding and regressive shorelines to the east with associated flooding surfaces, downlapping mudstones, and transgressive parasequences (shoreface) that correlate to condensed zones across the seaway in central Colorado and eastern Denver Basin.

  17. Geographical differences of zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Greenland.

    PubMed

    Dietz, R; Riget, F; Born, E W

    2000-01-17

    Muscle, liver, and kidney tissues from 100 polar bears (Ursus maritimus), caught in the Avanersuaq area, north-west Greenland, and Ittoqqortoormiit area, central-east Greenland, were analysed for zinc, cadmium, mercury and selenium. The zinc concentrations in muscle and liver were higher than in kidney. Mean zinc concentrations ranged from 19.7 to 76.0 micrograms/g (all data are presented as geometric means on a wet wt. basis). The presented cadmium concentrations by area and age groups were all low in muscle and in many cases below the detection limit (range: < 0.015-0.048 microgram/g). Cadmium concentrations were intermediate in liver (range: 0.120-1.98 micrograms/g) and highest in kidney tissue (range: 2.16-28.9 micrograms/g). Mercury was likewise lowest in muscle tissue (range: 0.034-0.191 microgram/g). Mercury concentration ranged quite similarly in liver and kidney tissue (liver range: 2.13-22.0 micrograms/g; kidney range: 2.87-32.0 micrograms/g). The selenium concentration increased from muscle (range: < 0.2-0.452 microgram/g) over liver (range: 1.20-9.80 micrograms/g) to kidney (range: 2.34-13.9 micrograms/g). No age accumulation was found for zinc. A weak increase was found for selenium, whereas cadmium and mercury clearly accumulated with age. An exception was mercury concentrations in muscle tissue, where no clear pattern was observed. Polar bears had significantly lower cadmium concentrations than ringed seals from the same area in all three tissues. Likewise mercury was significantly lower in the muscle tissue of polar bears than in ringed seals, whereas liver and kidney concentrations were higher. Biomagnification factors are provided for different tissues and age groups. Tissue ratios are given for different age groups and metals to enable a rough extrapolation from one tissue to another. Tissue ratios for cadmium, selenium and for mercury vary up to a factor of 6 with age. No significant differences could be detected between the elements analysed in

  18. The uppermost mantle seismic velocity and viscosity structure of central West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, J. P.; Selway, K.; Nyblade, A. A.; Brazier, R. A.; Wiens, D. A.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Aster, R. C.; Huerta, A. D.; Wilson, T.; Winberry, J. P.

    2017-08-01

    Accurately monitoring and predicting the evolution of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet via secular changes in the Earth's gravity field requires knowledge of the underlying upper mantle viscosity structure. Published seismic models show the West Antarctic lithosphere to be ∼70-100 km thick and underlain by a low velocity zone extending to at least ∼200 km. Mantle viscosity is dependent on factors including temperature, grain size, the hydrogen content of olivine, the presence of partial melt and applied stress. As seismic wave propagation is particularly sensitive to thermal variations, seismic velocity provides a means of gauging mantle temperature. In 2012, a magnitude 5.6 intraplate earthquake in Marie Byrd Land was recorded on an array of POLENET-ANET seismometers deployed across West Antarctica. We modelled the waveforms recorded by six of the seismic stations in order to determine realistic estimates of temperature and lithology for the lithospheric mantle beneath Marie Byrd Land and the central West Antarctic Rift System. Published mantle xenolith and magnetotelluric data provided constraints on grain size and hydrogen content, respectively, for viscosity modelling. Considering tectonically-plausible stresses, we estimate that the viscosity of the lithospheric mantle beneath Marie Byrd Land and the central West Antarctic Rift System ranges from ∼1020-1022 Pa s. To extend our analysis to the sublithospheric seismic low velocity zone, we used a published shear wave model. We calculated that the velocity reduction observed between the base of the lithosphere (∼4.4-4.7 km/s) and the centre of the low velocity zone (∼4.2-4.3 km/s) beneath West Antarctica could be caused by a 0.1-0.3% melt fraction or a one order of magnitude reduction in grain size. However, the grain size reduction is inconsistent with our viscosity modelling constraints, suggesting that partial melt more feasibly explains the origin of the low velocity zone. Considering plausible

  19. Distribution of knock-down resistance mutations in Anopheles gambiae molecular forms in west and west-central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Santolamazza, Federica; Calzetta, Maria; Etang, Josiane; Barrese, Elena; Dia, Ibrahima; Caccone, Adalgisa; Donnelly, Martin J; Petrarca, Vincenzo; Simard, Frederic; Pinto, Joao; della Torre, Alessandra

    2008-01-01

    Background Knock-down resistance (kdr) to DDT and pyrethroids in the major Afrotropical vector species, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, is associated with two alternative point mutations at amino acid position 1014 of the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, resulting in either a leucine-phenylalanine (L1014F), or a leucine-serine (L1014S) substitution. In An. gambiae S-form populations, the former mutation appears to be widespread in west Africa and has been recently reported from Uganda, while the latter, originally recorded in Kenya, has been recently found in Gabon, Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. In M-form populations surveyed to date, only the L1014F mutation has been found, although less widespread and at lower frequencies than in sympatric S-form populations. Methods Anopheles gambiae M- and S-form specimens from 19 sites from 11 west and west-central African countries were identified to molecular form and genotyped at the kdr locus either by Hot Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA) or allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR). Results The kdr genotype was determined for about 1,000 An. gambiae specimens. The L1014F allele was found at frequencies ranging from 6% to 100% in all S-form samples (N = 628), with the exception of two samples from Angola, where it was absent, and coexisted with the L1014S allele in samples from Cameroon, Gabon and north-western Angola. The L1014F allele was present in M-form samples (N = 354) from Benin, Nigeria, and Cameroon, where both M- and S-forms were sympatric. Conclusion The results represent the most comprehensive effort to analyse the overall distribution of the L1014F and L1014S mutations in An. gambiae molecular forms, and will serve as baseline data for resistance monitoring. The overall picture shows that the emergence and spread of kdr alleles in An. gambiae is a dynamic process and that there is marked intra- and inter-form heterogeneity in resistance allele frequencies. Further studies are needed to determine: i) the

  20. Central African Republic is part of the West-African hepatitis B virus genotype E crescent.

    PubMed

    Bekondi, Claudine; Olinger, Christophe M; Boua, Nathalie; Talarmin, Antoine; Muller, Claude P; Le Faou, Alain; Venard, Véronique

    2007-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype E predominates in a vast crescent in West-Africa spanning from Senegal to Angola. To determine whether HBV strains in the Central African Republic (CAR) belong predominately to the homogeneous West-African genotype E or whether they are more closely related to genotypes found in East Africa. Serum samples were randomly collected from 196 patients admitted with symptoms of acute or chronic hepatitis to the Central Hospital in Bangui. Thirty complete and 36 partial sequences of HBV strains were obtained. Ninety-four percent (62/66) of the strains belonged to genotype E, while genotype A1, most closely related to a strain from Tanzania and genotype D were detected in only one and three samples, respectively. One strain presented a recombination between the S and X gene of a genotype E precursor and a partial PreC/C gene of a genotype D precursor. Genotype E is predominant in CAR with little overlap with genotypes from Eastern Africa, extending the West-African HBV genotype E crescent further to the East.

  1. Time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among Greenland Inuit

    PubMed Central

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicides remain a major public health problem in Greenland. Their increase coincides with the modernization since 1950. Serious suicidal thoughts are reported by a significant proportion of participants in countrywide surveys. Objective To analyze the time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit in Greenland. Design Data included the Greenland registry of causes of death for 1970–2011 and 2 cross-sectional health surveys carried out in 1993–1994 and 2005–2010 with 1,580 and 3,102 Inuit participants, respectively. Results Suicide rates were higher among men than women while the prevalence of suicidal thoughts was higher among women. Suicide rates for men and women together increased from 1960 to 1980 and have remained around 100 per 100,000 person-years since then. The regional pattern of time trend for suicide rates varied with an early peak in the capital, a continued increase to very high rates in remote East and North Greenland and a slow increase in villages relative to towns on the West Coast. Suicidal thoughts followed the regional pattern for completed suicides. Especially for women there was a noticeable increasing trend in the villages. The relative risk for suicide was highest among those who reported suicidal thoughts, but most suicides happened outside this high-risk group. Conclusion Suicide rates and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts remain high in Greenland but different regional trends point towards an increased marginalization between towns on the central West Coast, villages and East and North Greenland. Different temporal patterns call for different regional strategies of prevention. PMID:25701279

  2. Time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among Greenland Inuit.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Larsen, Christina Viskum Lytken

    2015-01-01

    Suicides remain a major public health problem in Greenland. Their increase coincides with the modernization since 1950. Serious suicidal thoughts are reported by a significant proportion of participants in countrywide surveys. To analyze the time trend by region of suicides and suicidal thoughts among the Inuit in Greenland. Data included the Greenland registry of causes of death for 1970-2011 and 2 cross-sectional health surveys carried out in 1993-1994 and 2005-2010 with 1,580 and 3,102 Inuit participants, respectively. Suicide rates were higher among men than women while the prevalence of suicidal thoughts was higher among women. Suicide rates for men and women together increased from 1960 to 1980 and have remained around 100 per 100,000 person-years since then. The regional pattern of time trend for suicide rates varied with an early peak in the capital, a continued increase to very high rates in remote East and North Greenland and a slow increase in villages relative to towns on the West Coast. Suicidal thoughts followed the regional pattern for completed suicides. Especially for women there was a noticeable increasing trend in the villages. The relative risk for suicide was highest among those who reported suicidal thoughts, but most suicides happened outside this high-risk group. Suicide rates and the prevalence of suicidal thoughts remain high in Greenland but different regional trends point towards an increased marginalization between towns on the central West Coast, villages and East and North Greenland. Different temporal patterns call for different regional strategies of prevention.

  3. A tectonically controlled basin-fill within the Valle del Cauca, West-Central Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Rine, J.M.; Keith, J.F. Jr.; Alfonso, C.A.; Ballesteros, I.; Laverde, F.; Sacks, P.E.; Secor, D.T. Jr. ); Perez, V.E.; Bernal, I.; Cordoba, F.; Numpaque, L.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Tertiary strata of the Valle del Cauca reflect a forearc/foreland basin tectonic history spanning a period from pre-uplift of the Cordillera Central to initiation of uplift of the Cordillera Occidental. Stratigraphy of the Valle del Cauca begins with Jurassic-Cretaceous rocks of exotic and/or volcanic provenance and of oceanic origin. Unconformably overlying these are Eocene to Oligocene basal quartz-rich sandstones, shallow marine algal limestones, and fine-grained fluvial/deltaic mudstones and sandstones with coalbeds. These Eocene to Oligocene deposits represent a period of low tectonic activity. During late Oligocene to early Miocene, increased tectonic activity produced conglomeratic sediments which were transported from east to west, apparently derived from uplift of the Cordillera Central, and deposited within a fluvial to deltaic setting. East-west shortening of the Valle del Cauca basin folded the Eocene to early Miocene units, and additional uplift of the Cordillera Central during the later Miocene resulted in syn-tectonic deposition of alluvial fans. After additional fold and thrust deformation of the total Eocene-Miocene basin-fill, tectonic activity abated and Pliocene-Quaternary alluvial and lacustrine strata were deposited. Within the framework of this depositional and tectonic history of the Valle del Cauca, hydrocarbon exploration strategies can be formulated and evaluated.

  4. In-situ Measurements of Sedimentary Graphites and Sulfides in Early Archean (>3.7 Ga) Banded Iron-Formations from West Greenland: Biological and Atmospheric Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojzsis, S. J.

    2001-05-01

    might atmospheric and biological evolutionary links be evaluated by studying the carbon and sulfur isotope compositions of ancient sediments? New data reveal well-resolved non-mass-dependent Δ 33S anomalies in an early Archean [3.77-3.83 Ga] banded iron-formation and a metapelite from West Greenland [total range in Δ 33S=+1.10+/-0.07‰ to +1.23+/-0.05‰ , 2σ ] previously analyzed for carbon isotopes. Data from sulfides in a diverse collection of stromatolithic cherts, banded iron-formation and shales of Proterozoic to late Archean age [1.8-3.2 Ga] displayed only mass-dependent [Δ 33S ~0‰ ] sulfur isotope relationships within the precision of the measurements [typically +/-0.06‰ , 2σ ]. Results reveal that non-mass-dependent sulfur isotope anomalies [i.e. Δ 33S>0] are preserved in sulfide phases contained in the oldest known rocks of sedimentary origin. That these rocks contain a record of gas-phase reactions in an early atmosphere would support the interpretation that atmospheric partial pressures of oxygen were low and the effects of UV-photolysis on atmospheric sulfur from a UV-active young Sun were widespread and commonplace on the Archean Earth. This might also be reflected in the long-term [billion-year timescale] changes to the isotope composition of bioorganic carbon. Further studies warrant coupling sulfur, carbon [and nitrogen] measurements in ancient sediments to explore this relationship.

  5. Evaluation of the use of common sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) organ histology as bioindicator for element exposure in the fjord of the mining area Maarmorilik, West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Bach, Lis; Søndergaard, Jens; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Mosbech, Anders; Leifsson, Pall S; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-08-01

    The former Black Angel lead-zinc mine in Maarmorilik, West Greenland, is a historic example of how mining activity may result in a significant impact on the surrounding fjord system in terms of elevated concentrations of especially lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in seawater, sediments and surrounding biota. In order to shed light on the present contamination and possible effects in the fjord we initiated a range of studies including a pilot study on gill and liver morphology of common sculpins (Myoxocephalus scorpius) around Maarmorilik. Sculpins were caught and sampled at five different stations known to represent a gradient of Pb concentrations. Fish livers from all specimens were analyzed for relevant elements in the area: Fe, Zn, As, Cu, Se, Cd, Pb, Ag, Hg, Co and Ni. Lead, As and Hg showed significant differences among the five stations. For 20% of the sculpins, Hg concentrations were in the range of lowest observed effect dose (LOED) of 0.1-0.5 μg/g ww for toxic threshold on reproduction and subclinical endpoints. Likewise LOEDs for tissue lesions, LOEDs for biochemistry, growth, survival and reproduction were exceeded for Cd (0.42-1.8 μg/g ww) and for As (11.6 μg/g ww) in 28% and 85% of the sculpins, respectively. Similar to this, the no observed effect dose (NOED) for biochemistry was exceeded for Pb (0.32 μg/g ww) and for growth, mortality and reproduction for Zn (60-68 μg/g ww) in 33% and 24% of the sculpins, respectively. For all sculpins, females were significantly larger than males and for five of the elements (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Se) females had higher concentrations. The chronic lesions observed in liver (mononuclear cell infiltrates, necrosis, vacuolar hepatocytes, portal fibrosis, bile duct hyperplasia, active melanomacrophage centers) and gills (fusion and edema of secondary lamellae, laminar telangiectasis, mononuclear cell infiltrates, blebs) were similar to those in the literature studies for both wild and laboratory exposed sculpins and other fish

  6. Sedimentary Record and Morphological Effects of a Landslide-Generated Tsunami in a Polar Region: The 2000 AD Tsunami in Vaigat Strait, West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczucinski, W.; Rosser, N. J.; Strzelecki, M. C.; Long, A. J.; Lawrence, T.; Buchwal, A.; Chague-Goff, C.; Woodroffe, S.

    2012-12-01

    To date, the effects of tsunami erosion and deposition have mainly been reported from tropical and temperate climatic zones yet tsunamis are also frequent in polar zones, particularly in fjord settings where they can be generated by landslides. Here we report the geological effects of a landslide-triggered tsunami that occurred on 21st November 2000 in Vaigat, northern Disko Bugt in west Greenland. To characterise the typical features of this tsunami we completed twelve detailed coastal transects in a range of depositional settings: cliff coasts, narrow to moderate width coastal plains, lagoons and a coastal lake. At each setting we completed a detailed map using a laser scanner and DGPS survey. The tsunami deposits were described from closely spaced trenches and, from the lake, by a series of sediment cores . At each setting we examined the sedimentological properties of the deposits, as well as their bulk geochemistry and diatom content. Selected specimens of arctic willow from inundated and non-inundated areas were collected to assess the impact of the event in their growth ring records. Samples of sediments beneath the AD 2000 deposit were studied for 137Cs to confirm the age of the tsunami and to assess the extent of erosion. Offshore sediment samples, modern beach and soils/sediments underlying the AD 2000 tsunami deposits were sampled to determine tsunami deposit sources. The observed tsunami run-up exceeded 20 m next to the tsunami trigger - a rock avalanche at Paatuut - and up to 10 m on the opposite coast of the fjord. The inland inundation distance ranged from several tens of meters to over 300 m. The wave was recorded as far as 180 km away from the source. The tsunami inundated the coast obliquely to the shoreline in all locations studied. The tsunami frequently caused erosion of existing beach ridges whilst erosional niches were formed inland. The tsunami deposits mainly comprise gravels and very coarse sand. They are over 30 cm thick close to the

  7. Geodetic long-term studies (1991-2011) in ice dynamics and in mass balance in the Paakitsoq area (West Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, M.; Rawiel, P.; Hepperle, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ice flow velocity, deformation, elevation change and mass balance are essential properties required for modeling ice sheets and correlation with climate change. Since 1991 until 2011 now 11 campaigns had been carried out in order to study ice flow velocity, surface deformation and elevation change respectively mass balance of the inland ice in the Paakitsoq area, West Greenland. It is a long-term project with terrestrial GPS observations of stake networks in two research areas. One area is situated at the Swiss-Camp in an altitude of 1170 m, where the former position of the equilibrium line was supposed. The second research area, called ST2, is located in the flow line in an altitude of 1000 m, and situated close to the automatic weather station JAR1 of the GC-Net. The ST2 network was established in 2004. In 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008 and 2011 here now 5 campaigns have been performed. The results in elevation change very clearly show the increased lowering of the ice surface. At Swiss-Camp we started in the period 1991 until 2002 with -0.25 m/year, in 2002 - 2006 with -0.60 m/year and in 2006 - 2011 with -1.10 m/year. At ST2 in 2004 - 2006 we find a lowering of -0.34 m/year and in 2006 - 2011 of -1.31 m/year. The elevation decrease is directly correlated with altitude. In general, the recent ice thickness loss is more than three times greater than the long-term trend in former years. The elevation changes are converted into mass balance results between the measuring dates. They are compared to meteorological parameters with data from the AWS of the GC-net. Elevation changes are also derived by digital terrain models from the research areas. It is shown that systematic local height change anomalies occur in all years indicating local variations of melting, probably caused by albedo variations. From the horizontal deformation of the stake network the local horizontal strain rates were derived. In connection with the incompressibility condition of ice, the vertical strain

  8. Emsian (late Early Devonian) sponges from west-central and south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigby, J.K.; Blodgett, R.B.; Anderson, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    Relatively common specimens of the hypercalcified agelasiid sponge Hormospongia labyrinthica Rigby and Blodgett, 1983 and specimens of associated species of Hormospongia have been previously reported from Emsian and Eifelian stratigraphic units at several localities in south-central and southeastern Alaska (Rigby and Blodgett, 1983). Those sponges were first described from the type section of the Eifelian Cheeneetnuk Limestone in the McGrath A-5 quadrangle. Since then several additional specimens of Hormospongia labyrinthica have also been collected from a new locality in the Talkeetna C-6 quadrangle in southcentral Alaska (Figs. 1, 2.1), and are documented here.

  9. New Argentine Central-West Line taps rich Neuquen gas field

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.

    1982-02-01

    Argentina's Centro-Oeste (Central-West) Gas Pipeline is now a reality, carrying gas from the extensive Loma de la Lata (Hill of Tin) field in Neuquen State to cities which had been relying on bottled gas. The project is impressive, but hardly seems unique. A pipeline consisting of 697 miles of 30-in. line and 451 miles of smaller diameter gathering and distribution lines is a big project but nothing that has not been done before. Sometimes figures and statistics hide more than they reveal. A discussion is provided of project financing, logistics, pipeline outlets, treatment plants, route, construction, other lines, compressor stations, and suppliers.

  10. New Argentine Central-West line taps rich Neuquen gas field

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.

    1982-02-01

    Argentina's new Central-West gas pipeline consists of 697 miles of 30-in. line and 451 miles of smaller gathering and distribution lines that link the rich Neuquen gas field with cities to the north. A financing package drawn up by 21 banks in the US and Europe allowed Cogasco S.A. to build the line for Gas del Estado across the roadless pampas east of the Andes. Primarily an agricultural country, Argentina had to import all the equipment and materials for the project. Site work began in July, 1980 with 800 workers employed on three spreads; the line was commissioned in November, 1981, 15 months ahead of the contract schedule.

  11. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Hydrologic Conditions in West-Central Florida The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2006. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 50.23 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2005 through May 2006) was 2.82 inches below the historical cumulative average of 53.05 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2006). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water

  12. Depositional environments and paleogeography of the Upper Miocene Wassuk Group, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golia, R.T.; Stewart, John H.

    1984-01-01

    Fluvial and lacustrine deposits of the Miocene Wassuk Group, exposed in Coal Valley, west-central Nevada, are divided into five lithofacies: (1) diatomite, claystone, siltstone, and carbonaceous siltstone deposited in a lake with paludal conditions at the margin; (2) upward-coarsening sequences of sandstone deposited on a delta and fan-delta; (3) channel-form sandstone deposited on a distal braided alluvial plain; (4) clast-supported conglomerate deposited on a proxial braided alluvial plain or distal alluvial fan; and (5) matrix-supported conglomerate deposited on a distal to middle alluvial fan. Petrographic analysis records an upsection change from a predominantly andesitic to a predominantly plutonic provenance. This change, combined with the overall upward-coarsening of the Wassuk Group and the great thickness (2400 m) of the sequence, suggests active uplift and rapid subsidence during deposition of the group. Facies relationships and paleocurrent directions indicate source areas to the south, southeast and west of Coal Valley. The Miocene Wassuk Group was deposited in an intra-arc basin with penecontemporaneous volcanism and tectonic activity. Syndepositional faulting at the southern margin of Coal Valley between 13 and 11 m.y. ago suggests an early episode of northeast-southwest extension prior to the onset of east-west basin and range extension. ?? 1984.

  13. Measuring bioavailable metals using diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and transplanted seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus), blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and sea snails (Littorina saxatilis) suspended from monitoring buoys near a former lead-zinc mine in West Greenland.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens; Bach, Lis; Gustavson, Kim

    2014-01-15

    Measuring loads of bioavailable metals is important for environmental assessment near mines and other industrial sources. In this study, a setup of monitoring buoys was tested to assess loads of bioavailable metals near a former Pb-Zn mine in West Greenland using transplanted seaweed, mussels and sea snails. In addition, passive DGT samplers were installed. After a 9-day deployment period, concentrations of especially Pb, Zn and Fe in the species were all markedly elevated at the monitoring sites closest to the mine. Lead concentrations in all three species and the DGT-Pb results showed a significant linear correlation. Zinc and Fe concentrations were less correlated indicating that the mechanisms for Zn and Fe accumulation in the three species are more complex. The results show that there is still a significant load of metals from the mine and that such buoys can be an adequate method to assess present loads of bioavailable metals.

  14. Kali Gandaki gravel deposits of central West Nepal — their neotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Toran; Upreti, B. N.; Vashi, N. M.

    1980-02-01

    The terraced gravel deposits of the Baglung-Behadi region in the Kali Gandaki valley, central West Nepal, reveal geomorphic features related to neotectonism. The accumulation of thick fluvioglacial gravel deposits in lake-like basins along the then existing river course took place due to the uplift of the southern Mahabharat Range and the relative subsidence of the Midland. The deposits consist of unsorted fragments of variable size, showing considerable uniformity laterally over large areas from north to south, and with abundant angular to sub-rounded boulders of Dhaulagiri limestone and gneisses of the Main Central Crystallines. Terrace flats arranged in three successive levels on either side of Kali Gandaki show that the region has undergone at least three periods of uplift.

  15. Central and South West Services (CSWS) transmission system studies: (Rio Grande Valley FACTS studies). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Arabi, S.; Hamadanizadeh, H.

    1998-12-01

    Stability limitations impose constraints on power imports into the Rio Grande Valley, the southern region of Central Power and Light`s (CPL) system. CPL`s parent company, Central and South West Services, sought to identify viable plans for eliminating these constraints to enable power transfers via two 345-kV transmission lines. This project conducted assessment studies of the CPL system, using applications from EPRI`s Power System Analysis Package, and identified two scenarios as the most likely remedial measures required. These consisted of the addition of generating units and the use of series compensation of the two transmission lines, in conjunction with shunt compensation. While Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices were not indicated in this study phase, the researchers indicated a Thyristor Controlled Series Compensation device could be considered to address a potential subsynchronous resonance issue.

  16. Anthropogenic influence on recent bathymetric change in west-central San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2010-01-01

    Two multibeam sonar surveys of west-central San Francisco Bay, California, were conducted in 1997 and 2008. Bathymetric change analysis between the two surveys indicates a loss of 14.1 million cubic meters (-3.1 cm/yr-1) of sediment during this time period, representing an approximately three-fold acceleration of the rate that was observed from prior depth change analysis from 1947 to 1979 for all of Central Bay, using more spatially coarse National Ocean Service (NOS) soundings. The portions of the overlapping survey areas between 1997 and 2008 designated as aggregate mining lease sites lost sediment at five times the rate of the remainder of west-central San Francisco Bay. Despite covering only 28% of the analysis area, volume change within leasing areas accounted for 9.2 million cubic meters of sediment loss, while the rest of the area lost 4.9 million cubic meters of sediment. The uncertainty of this recent analysis is more tightly constrained due to more stringent controls on vertical and horizontal position via tightly coupled, inertially aided differential Global Positioning Systems (GPS) solutions for survey vessel trajectory that virtually eliminate inaccuracies from traditional tide modeling and vessel motion artifacts. Further, quantification of systematic depth measurement error can now be calculated through comparison of static surfaces (e.g., bedrock) between surveys using seafloor habitat maps based on acoustic backscatter measurements and ground-truthing with grab samples and underwater video. Sediment loss in the entire San Francisco Bay Coastal System during the last half-century,as estimated from a series of bathymetric change studies, is 240 million cubic meters, and most of this is believed to be coarse sediment (i.e., sand and gravel) from Central Bay and the San Francisco Bar, which is likely to limit the sand supply to adjacent, open-coast beaches. This hypothesis is supported by a calibrated numerical model in a related study that indicates

  17. Aponogeton pollen from the Cretaceous and Paleogene of North America and West Greenland: Implications for the origin and palaeobiogeography of the genus.

    PubMed

    Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Halbritter, Heidemarie; Grimm, Guido W

    2014-01-01

    The fossil record of Aponogeton (Aponogetonaceae) is scarce and the few reported macrofossil findings are in need of taxonomic revision. Aponogeton pollen is highly diagnostic and when studied with light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) it cannot be confused with any other pollen types. The fossil Aponogeton pollen described here represent the first reliable Cretaceous and Eocene records of this genus worldwide. Today, Aponogeton is confined to the tropics and subtropics of the Old World, but the new fossil records show that during the late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic it was thriving in North America and Greenland. The late Cretaceous pollen record provides important data for future phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies focusing on basal monocots, especially the Alismatales. The Eocene pollen morphotypes from North America and Greenland differ in morphology from each other and also from the older Late Cretaceous North American pollen morphotype, indicating evolutionary trends and diversification within the genus over that time period. The presence of Aponogeton in the fossil record of North America and Greenland calls for a reconsideration of all previous ideas about the biogeographic history of the family.

  18. Aponogeton pollen from the Cretaceous and Paleogene of North America and West Greenland: Implications for the origin and palaeobiogeography of the genus☆

    PubMed Central

    Grímsson, Friðgeir; Zetter, Reinhard; Halbritter, Heidemarie; Grimm, Guido W.

    2014-01-01

    The fossil record of Aponogeton (Aponogetonaceae) is scarce and the few reported macrofossil findings are in need of taxonomic revision. Aponogeton pollen is highly diagnostic and when studied with light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) it cannot be confused with any other pollen types. The fossil Aponogeton pollen described here represent the first reliable Cretaceous and Eocene records of this genus worldwide. Today, Aponogeton is confined to the tropics and subtropics of the Old World, but the new fossil records show that during the late Cretaceous and early Cenozoic it was thriving in North America and Greenland. The late Cretaceous pollen record provides important data for future phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies focusing on basal monocots, especially the Alismatales. The Eocene pollen morphotypes from North America and Greenland differ in morphology from each other and also from the older Late Cretaceous North American pollen morphotype, indicating evolutionary trends and diversification within the genus over that time period. The presence of Aponogeton in the fossil record of North America and Greenland calls for a reconsideration of all previous ideas about the biogeographic history of the family. PMID:24926107

  19. Melt anomalies on the Greenland Ice Sheet and large scale modes of atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Russell

    The relationships between inter annual melt variability in Greenland and large scale atmospheric circulation are explored based on an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of melt in Greenland derived from passive microwave satellite observations. The first EOF of the melt anomalies was found to be highly representative of the spatial and temporal distribution of melt anomalies accounting for over 34% of the variability and the principal component (PC) time series is 98% correlated with the annual total melt extent time series. The leading melt PC is highly correlated with key features of the large scale atmospheric circulation both in the vicinity of Greenland and regions that are well removed. Some aspects of the atmospheric pressure anomaly fields related to melt in Greenland are congruent with the summer expression of the AO/NAO including the main center of action east of Greenland, however there are features of the melt related anomaly field that are not. During peak melt years there is a decrease in the pressure gradient between the Bearing Sea and more southerly latitudes resulting in a redistribution of the central Arctic low pressure toward the Pacific side of the Arctic basin. This pattern is expressed as a 50% correlation between melt in Greenland and the phase of planetary pressure wave #1 and #2 north of 50° N. The storm tracks related to increased melt in Greenland result in increased summer storm activity to the south and west of Greenland balanced by decreased cyclonic activity to the east and north. Comparison with the NAO related storm track highlights key differences relative to the melt related atmospheric circulation that lead to increased southerly flow directly into Greenland during years with increased melt. The pattern of summer sea ice concentration anomalies linked to the melt PC is remarkably similar to the spatial pattern of recent sea ice decline. The pattern of circulation anomalies associated with increased melt in Greenland

  20. Maternal anaemia in West and Central Africa: time for urgent action.

    PubMed

    Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Bendech, Mohamed Ag; Zagré, Noel Marie; Tchibindat, Félicité

    2012-05-01

    To review the prevalence, severity and determinants of anaemia among women in West and Central Africa (WCA) and raise awareness among policy makers and programme planners in the region. Systematic descriptive review of data in the public domain of the ORC Macro MEASURE Demographic and Health Surveys, national nutrition surveys, oral and technical communications at regional meetings, studies published in scientific journals, and WHO and UNICEF databases. West and Central Africa region. Women of childbearing age. The prevalence of anaemia among pregnant and non-pregnant women is higher than 50 % and 40 %, respectively, in all countries. Within countries, this prevalence varies by living setting (rural v. urban), women's age and education. Across countries, socio-economic and climatic differences have no apparent association with the prevalence of anaemia among women. Several factors contribute either alone or jointly to the high rates of maternal anaemia in this region. These include widespread nutritional deficiencies; high incidence of infectious diseases; low access to and poor quality of health services; low literacy rates; ineffective design, implementation and evaluation of anaemia control programmes; and poverty. Addressing the multiple causes and minimizing the consequences of anaemia on maternal and child health and development in WCA require integrated multifactorial and multisectoral strategies. This also calls for unprecedented, historical and stronger political will and commitment that put adolescent girls and maternal health at the centre of the development agenda.

  1. Improving spatial nitrogen dioxide prediction using diffusion tubes: A case study in West Central Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannullo, Francesca; Lee, Duncan; Waclawski, Eugene; Leyland, Alastair H.

    2015-10-01

    It has been well documented that air pollution adversely affects health, and epidemiological pollution-health studies utilise pollution data from automatic monitors. However, these automatic monitors are small in number and hence spatially sparse, which does not allow an accurate representation of the spatial variation in pollution concentrations required for these epidemiological health studies. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) diffusion tubes are also used to measure concentrations, and due to their lower cost compared to automatic monitors are much more prevalent. However, even combining both data sets still does not provide sufficient spatial coverage of NO2 for epidemiological studies, and modelled concentrations on a regular grid from atmospheric dispersion models are also available. This paper proposes the first modelling approach to using all three sources of NO2 data to make fine scale spatial predictions for use in epidemiological health studies. We propose a geostatistical fusion model that regresses combined NO2 concentrations from both automatic monitors and diffusion tubes against modelled NO2 concentrations from an atmospheric dispersion model in order to predict fine scale NO2 concentrations across our West Central Scotland study region. Our model exhibits a 47% improvement in fine scale spatial prediction of NO2 compared to using the automatic monitors alone, and we use it to predict NO2 concentrations across West Central Scotland in 2006.

  2. West Nile Virus Antibodies in Permanent Resident and Overwintering Migrant Birds in South-Central Kansas

    PubMed Central

    Shelite, Thomas R.; Rogers, Christopher M.; Litzner, Brandon R.; Johnson, R. Roy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We conducted serological studies, using epitope-blocking ELISAs directed at West Nile virus (WNV) and flavivirus antibodies, of wild birds in south-central Kansas, the first for this state, in the winters of 2003–04 through 2005–06. Overwintering migratory species (primarily the American tree sparrow and dark-eyed junco) consistently showed significantly lower seropositivity than permanent residents (primarily the northern cardinal). The cardinal showed annual variation in seropositivity between winters. Of 35 birds that were serial sampled within a single winter, one cardinal may have seroconverted between late December and mid-February, providing a preliminary suggestion of continued enzootic transmission, chronic infection, or bird-bird transfer as overwintering mechanisms. Breeding population size of the cardinal did not change after the introduction of WNV to Kansas. Of eighteen birds that were serial sampled between winters, none seroconverted. Among overwintering migrants, the Harris' Sparrow showed the highest seropositivity, possibly related to its migration route through the central Great Plains, an area of recent high WNV activity. The finding that permanent resident birds exhibit higher seropositivity than migrant birds suggests that resident birds contribute to the initiation of annual infection cycles, although this conclusion is speculative in the absence of data on viral titers and the length of viremia. Key Words: West Nile Virus—flavivirus—birds—epitope-blocking ELISA––winter. PMID:18471059

  3. A Precambrian cratonic block in the west-central Chihuahua - The Sierra del Nido cratonic block

    SciTech Connect

    Goodell, P.C. . Dept. of Geological)

    1993-02-01

    Precambrian rocks in west-central Chihuahua have been recognized by Denison (1969) and Mauger et al. (1983), on the basis of radiometric dating. The rocks are rhyolite clasts, and an allucthonous block, respectively, however their source direction and vergence can be measured. They point back to and are on the edge of a large, uniform, negative Bouguer gravity anomaly, having values greater than 200 milligals. The isotopic geochemical character of several Tertiary felsic fields within this anomalous are has been determined, and initial strontium isotopic ratios are all greater than 0.7055. Outside the anomalous area these ratios are lower, and Basin and Range extension tectonism is more evident. It is proposed that a Precambrian cratonic block, the Sierra del Nido, is present in the crust in west-central Chihuahua. It is reasonable to propose that it was decreted from North America during a Precambrian extensional (1.1. By ) event, from somewhere along the Arizona Transition Zone-Texas Linament region. The Sierra del Nido Block is separated form the ATZ-TL by a region of disrupted craton and extended crust, the Basin and Range Province. Implications of the pressure of the Sierra del Nido Block on other regional tectonic events will be discussed.

  4. Hydrologic maps of Ogallala Aquifer, west-central Kansas, 1979-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinazola, Joseph M.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical technique, called kriging, was programmed for a computer to interpolate hydrologic data based on a network of measured values in west-central Kansas. The computer program generated estimated values at the center of each 1-mile section in the Western Kansas Groundwater Management District No. 1 and facilitated contouring of selected hydrologic data that are needed in the effective management of ground water for irrigation. The kriging technique produced various maps that illustrated hydrologic conditions in the Ogallala aquifer, the principal source of water in west-central Kansas. Maps of the aquifer, which use a 3-year average, included the 1979-81 water-table altitudes, which ranged from about 2,580 to 3,720 feet; the 1979-81 saturated thicknesses, which ranged from about 0 to 250 feet; and the percentage changes in saturated thickness from 1950 to 1979-81, which ranged from about a 40-percent increase to a 100-percent decrease. A map showing errors of estimate also was provided as a measure of reliability for the 1979-81 water-table altitudes. Errors of estimate ranged from 2 to 24 feet. (USGS)

  5. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, September 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water-level conditions, respectively. This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2010. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when groundwater levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 53.17 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2009 through September 2010) was 0.41 inches above the historical cumulative average of 52.76 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2010). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District.

  6. Ocean climate data for user community in West and Central Africa: Needs, opportunities, and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojo, S. O.

    1992-01-01

    The urgent need to improve data delivery systems needed by scientists studying ocean role in climate and climate characteristics has been manifested in recent years because of the unprecedented climatic events experienced in many parts of the world. Indeed, there has been a striking and growing realization by governments and the general public indicating that national economies and human welfare depend on climate and its variability. In West and Central Africa, for instance climatic events, which have resulted in floods and droughts, have caused a lot of concern to both governments and people of the region. In particular, the droughts have been so widespread that greater awareness and concern have become generated for the need to find solutions to the problems created by the consequences of the climatic events. Particularly in the southern border regions of the Sahara Desert as well as in the Sahel region, the drought episodes considerably reduced food production and led to series of socioeconomic problems, not only in the areas affected by the droughts, but also in the other parts of West Africa. The various climatic variabilities which have caused the climatic events are no doubt related to the ocean-atmosphere interactions. Unfortunately, not much has been done on the understanding of these interactions, particularly as they affect developing countries. Indeed, not much has been done to develop programs which will reflect the general concerns and needs for researching into the ocean-atmosphere systems and their implications on man-environmental systems in many developing countries. This is for example, true of West and Central Africa, where compared with the middle latitude countries, much less is known about the characteristics of the ocean-atmosphere systems and their significance on man-environmental systems of the area.

  7. Tracing the origin of the east-west population admixture in the Altai region (Central Asia).

    PubMed

    González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Santos, Cristina; Jordana, Xavier; Simón, Marc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Gigli, Elena; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2012-01-01

    A recent discovery of Iron Age burials (Pazyryk culture) in the Altai Mountains of Mongolia may shed light on the mode and tempo of the generation of the current genetic east-west population admixture in Central Asia. Studies on ancient mitochondrial DNA of this region suggest that the Altai Mountains played the role of a geographical barrier between West and East Eurasian lineages until the beginning of the Iron Age. After the 7th century BC, coinciding with Scythian expansion across the Eurasian steppes, a gradual influx of East Eurasian sequences in Western steppes is detected. However, the underlying events behind the genetic admixture in Altai during the Iron Age are still unresolved: 1) whether it was a result of migratory events (eastward firstly, westward secondly), or 2) whether it was a result of a local demographic expansion in a 'contact zone' between European and East Asian people. In the present work, we analyzed the mitochondrial DNA lineages in human remains from Bronze and Iron Age burials of Mongolian Altai. Here we present support to the hypothesis that the gene pool of Iron Age inhabitants of Mongolian Altai was similar to that of western Iron Age Altaians (Russia and Kazakhstan). Thus, this people not only shared the same culture (Pazyryk), but also shared the same genetic east-west population admixture. In turn, Pazyryks appear to have a similar gene pool that current Altaians. Our results further show that Iron Age Altaians displayed mitochondrial lineages already present around Altai region before the Iron Age. This would provide support for a demographic expansion of local people of Altai instead of westward or eastward migratory events, as the demographic event behind the high population genetic admixture and diversity in Central Asia.

  8. Tracing the Origin of the East-West Population Admixture in the Altai Region (Central Asia)

    PubMed Central

    González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Santos, Cristina; Jordana, Xavier; Simón, Marc; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Gigli, Elena; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2012-01-01

    A recent discovery of Iron Age burials (Pazyryk culture) in the Altai Mountains of Mongolia may shed light on the mode and tempo of the generation of the current genetic east-west population admixture in Central Asia. Studies on ancient mitochondrial DNA of this region suggest that the Altai Mountains played the role of a geographical barrier between West and East Eurasian lineages until the beginning of the Iron Age. After the 7th century BC, coinciding with Scythian expansion across the Eurasian steppes, a gradual influx of East Eurasian sequences in Western steppes is detected. However, the underlying events behind the genetic admixture in Altai during the Iron Age are still unresolved: 1) whether it was a result of migratory events (eastward firstly, westward secondly), or 2) whether it was a result of a local demographic expansion in a ‘contact zone’ between European and East Asian people. In the present work, we analyzed the mitochondrial DNA lineages in human remains from Bronze and Iron Age burials of Mongolian Altai. Here we present support to the hypothesis that the gene pool of Iron Age inhabitants of Mongolian Altai was similar to that of western Iron Age Altaians (Russia and Kazakhstan). Thus, this people not only shared the same culture (Pazyryk), but also shared the same genetic east-west population admixture. In turn, Pazyryks appear to have a similar gene pool that current Altaians. Our results further show that Iron Age Altaians displayed mitochondrial lineages already present around Altai region before the Iron Age. This would provide support for a demographic expansion of local people of Altai instead of westward or eastward migratory events, as the demographic event behind the high population genetic admixture and diversity in Central Asia. PMID:23152818

  9. Population Structure of Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa from West and Central African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cholley, Pascal; Ka, Roughyatou; Guyeux, Christophe; Thouverez, Michelle; Guessennd, Nathalie; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Frank, Thierry; Bertrand, Xavier; Hocquet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) has a non-clonal, epidemic population with a few widely distributed and frequently encountered sequence types (STs) called ‘high-risk clusters’. Clinical P. aeruginosa (clinPA) has been studied in all inhabited continents excepted in Africa, where a very few isolates have been analyzed. Here, we characterized a collection of clinPA isolates from four countries of West and Central Africa. Methodology 184 non-redundant isolates of clinPA from hospitals of Senegal, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, and Central African Republic were genotyped by MLST. We assessed their resistance level to antibiotics by agar diffusion and identified the extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) by sequencing. The population structure of the species was determined by a nucleotide-based analysis of the entire PA MLST database and further localized on the phylogenetic tree (i) the sequence types (STs) of the present collection, (ii) the STs by continents, (iii) ESBL- and MBL-producing STs from the MLST database. Principal Findings We found 80 distinct STs, of which 24 had no relationship with any known STs. ‘High-risk’ international clonal complexes (CC155, CC244, CC235) were frequently found in West and Central Africa. The five VIM-2-producing isolates belonged to CC233 and CC244. GES-1 and GES-9 enzymes were produced by one CC235 and one ST1469 isolate, respectively. We showed the spread of ‘high-risk’ international clonal complexes, often described as multidrug-resistant on other continents, with a fully susceptible phenotype. The MBL- and ESBL-producing STs were scattered throughout the phylogenetic tree and our data suggest a poor association between a continent and a specific phylogroup. Conclusions ESBL- and MBL-encoding genes are borne by both successful international clonal complexes and distinct local STs in clinPA of West and Central Africa. Furthermore, our data suggest that the spread of a ST could be

  10. Role of west Asian surface pressure in summer monsoon onset over central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arindam; Agrawal, Shubhi

    2017-07-01

    Using rain-gauge measurements and reanalysis data sets for 1948-2015, we propose a mechanism that controls the interannual variation of summer monsoon onset over central India. In May, about a month before the onset, the low level jet over the Arabian Sea is about 40% stronger and about 2.5 degrees northward during years of early onset as compared to years of late onset. A stronger and northward shifted low level jet carries about 50% more moisture in early onset years, which increases low level moist static energy over central India in the pre-monsoon season. The increase in low level moist static energy decreases the stability of the atmosphere and makes it conducive for convection. The strength and position of the low level jet are determined by surface pressure gradient between western Asia and the west-equatorial Indian Ocean. Thus, an anomalous surface pressure low over western Asia in the pre-monsoon season increases this gradient and strengthens the jet. Moreover, a stronger low level jet increases the meridional shear of zonal wind and supports the formation of an onset vortex in a stronger baroclinic atmosphere. These developments are favourable for an early onset of the monsoon over the central Indian region. Our study postulates a new physical mechanism for the interannual variation of onset over central India, the core of the Indian monsoon region and relevant to Indian agriculture, and could be tested for real-time prediction.

  11. Magnetic signature of North-East Greenland, the Morris Jesup Rise, the Yermak Plateau, the central Fram Strait: Constraints for the rift/drift history between Greenland and Svalbard since the Eocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokat, Wilfried; Lehmann, Paul; Damaske, Detlef; Bradley Nelson, J.

    2016-11-01

    A compilation of several aeromagnetic surveys across North Greenland and the Fram Strait area is presented. Across North Greenland, the data are related to the known onshore geology. The correlation between the geological structure and the large-scale magnetic anomalies is excellent. Along the North Greenland coast, the data indicate that the Late Mesozoic Kap Washington volcanics might have a larger areal extent than known from onshore geological mapping. The submarine Morris Jesup Rise is characterized by strong positive magnetic anomalies, and the anomalies across the plateau indicate the presence of distinct volcanic centers. This massive magmatism has occurred latest in conjunction with the Oligocene initial stages of plate divergence between Svalbard and North Greenland that led to the development of Fram Strait. Both plateaux, the Morris Jesup Rise and the Yermak Plateau, are interpreted to be of continental origin and, in the initial rift stage of the Eurasia Basin around 56 Ma, to have been contiguous with the Lomonosov Ridge. More toward the east in the Fram Strait interpretations of seismic and bathymetric data indicate the presence of an active segment of mid-ocean ridge, the Lena Trough. This approximately 280-km-long segment terminates in the south at the NW-SE striking Spitsbergen Fracture Zone, while in the north it bends to connect with the Gakkel Ridge. A shallow water pathway along the line of the trough might have existed between those times and 21 Ma, above the propagating rift system in the north and, further south, over extending and subsiding continental crust of the Svalbard and North-East Greenland margins. Magnetic anomaly identifications indicate that the Lena Trough has remained an ultraslow spreading system, or possibly even all of the magnetic lineations may be signals of serpentinized exhumed mantle rocks rather than of basaltic crust.

  12. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the southern Great Salt Lake Desert and summary of the hydrology of west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Joseph S.; Kruer, Stacie A.

    1981-01-01

    This report is the last of 19 hydrologic reconnaissances of the basins in western Utah. The purposes of this series of studies are (1) to analyze available hydrologic data and describe the hydrologic system, (2) to evaluate existing and potential water-resources development, and (3) to identify additional studies that might be needed. Part 1 of this report gives an estimate of recharge and discharge, an estimate of the potential for water-resources development, and a statement on the quality of water in the southern Great Salt Lake Desert part of west-central Utah. Part 2 deals with the same aspects of west-central Utah as a whole. Part 2 also summarizes the evidence of interbasin ground-water flow in west-central Utah and presents a theory for the origin of the water discharged from Fish Springs.

  13. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, September 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish-water desalination in coastal communties (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2005. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface, connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in a tightly cased well that taps a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 55.19 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2004 through September 2005) was 2.00 inches above the historical cumulative average of 53.19 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2005). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to the most recent calendar year) and are updated monthly by the SWFWMD. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the SWFWMD, is part of a semiannual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the approximate annual low and high water

  14. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, September 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public-supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish-water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000).This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2005. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface, connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 55.19 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2004 through September 2005) was 2.00 inches above the historical cumulative average of 53.19 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2005). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District.This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year

  15. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2007. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 41.21 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2006 through May 2007) was 11.63 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.84 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2007). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the

  16. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, September 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2006. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 46.06 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2005 through September 2006) was 6.91 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.97 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2006). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each

  17. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, Anita G.

    2009-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2008. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 50.63 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2007 through September 2008) was 2.26 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.89 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2008). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each

  18. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2008. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 46.95 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2007 through May 2008) was 5.83 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.78 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2008). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the

  19. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, September 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in September 2007. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the wet season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual high and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are low. The cumulative average rainfall of 39.50 inches for west-central Florida (from October 2006 through September 2007) was 13.42 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.92 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2007). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each

  20. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-central Florida, May 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2010. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when groundwater levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 55.21 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2009 through May 2010) was 2.55 inches above the historical cumulative average of 52.66 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2010). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the

  1. Potentiometric surface of the upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, May 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, Anita G.

    2011-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2011. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when groundwater levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 45.74 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2010 through May 2011) was 6.85 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.59 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2011). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September from 1975 through 2010. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to

  2. Tectonic evolution of West Junggar (NW China): implications for accretionary orogens processes in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choulet, Flavien; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan; Cluzel, Dominique; Wang, Bo; Lin, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the development and evolution of accretionary orogens is crucial for characterizing continental crust growth in time and space. In the Altaids tectonic collage of Central Asia, conflicting geodynamic models have been proposed about the Paleozoic evolution, during which juvenile continental crust has been extensively formed. This study focuses on West Junggar (NW China), a key region that has not been extensively studied yet. A multidisciplinary approach, including detrital zircon provenance study, geochemistry, field structural analysis and paleomagnetism provides new constraints on the Paleozoic evolution of West Junggar. Oceanic subduction predominates in Early Paleozoic time, as indicated by ophiolitic mélanges, fore-arc volcaniclastic turbidites and magmatic arc suites. However, the development of an olistostrome supplied by a sub-contemporaneous carbonate platform, the occurrence of continental molasse, and the chronology and geochemistry of magmatic events reveal interruptions of subduction. Discrete collisions of volcanic arcs and micro-continent are inferred from the tectonic structure of the belt, which displays allochthonous units rooted in the suture zone. Early Paleozoic magmatic and sedimentary rocks of West Junggar bear some resemblance to contemporaneous analogues in Eastern Kazakhstan, and suggest a lateral connection. During Late Paleozoic, tectonic features that develop in response to plate convergence are strongly controlled by geometry of two new subduction zones. A Carboniferous accretionary complex composed of fore-arc sedimentary rocks and ophiolitic mélanges has been identified. The occurrence of quasi-synchronous upright folds and folds with vertical axes suggests that transpression plays a significant role in the Late Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the West Junggar. Latest Carboniferous (ca. 300 Ma) alkaline plutons postdate this early phase of folding, which was synchronous with accretion of the Carboniferous complex. The

  3. From Arctic greenhouse to icehouse: the Cenozoic development of the West Greenland-Baffin Bay margin and the case for scientific drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutz, Paul; Gregersen, Ulrik; Hopper, John R.; Dybkjær, Karen; Nøhr-Hansen, Henrik; Sheldon, Emma; Huuse, Mads

    2016-04-01

    The long-term evolution of glaciated margins plays an essential role in understanding the driving forces and interactions that determine the build-up and decay of ice sheets. The Greenland continental margin towards Baffin Bay is densely covered by industry seismic data and several exploration wells have been drilled, providing a regional stratigraphic framework for the sedimentary successions. This presentation provides an overview of the major depositional units and stratigraphy of the mid-late Cenozoic (since mid-Eocene), with examples demonstrating the different processes that have formed this margin. A sedimentary succession up to 3.5 km thick, of mid-Eocene to mid-Miocene age (mega-unit D), infills the pronounced ridge-basin structures of the rifted and tectonically inverted margin. The lower part of this interval, presumably late Eocene-Oligocene in age, is interpreted as basin-floor fan deposits, while the upper section, of early-middle Miocene age, is mainly marine mudstone. The basin infilling strata are overlain by a late Miocene-Pliocene succession consisting of two mega-units (B and C), with typical thicknesses of 0.5-1 km. The units are characterised by upslope-climbing sediment waves and along-slope trending sedimentary prisms reminiscent of giant contourite drifts. The borehole data associates the prism accumulations with a deep shelf environment influenced by strong marine currents and nearby fluvial sources. On the slope and in the deep basin of Baffin Bay the late Neogene succession is strongly influenced by mass wasting correlated with erosional scars updip. The uppermost seismic mega-unit (A) is dominated by aggradational wedges and prograding fan deposits displaying depocentres >3 km thick, formed at the terminus of palaeo-ice streams. Borehole information associates this interval with deposition of primarily diamict sediments and suggests a late Pliocene onset of major shelf based glaciations on the NW Greenland margin. The southwest margin

  4. Climate Change and Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades in Greenland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    species in West Greenland. We use a multidisciplinary approach by combining observations of foraging ecology and phenology collected by satellite and...feeding in each site and the phenology of the use of the focal areas. These data are related to long-term physical and biological monitoring program...in Nuuk Fjord and on the coast of West Greenland, where long-term fishery data are collected to quantify seasonal and inter-annual variations in the

  5. Precipitation, streamflow, and base flow in west-central Texas, December 1974 through March 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    1989-01-01

    Precipitation, streamflow, and base-flow data were analyzed for December 1974 through March 1977 as a part of the Edwards-Trinity Regional Aquifer-System Analysis in west-central Texas. The period of record analyzed corresponds to the calibrating period of a digital groundwater-flow model of the aquifer system currently (1988) being developed. Precipitation at individual stations ranged from 6 to 45 in/yr. Precipitation normally (1951-80) ranged from 10 to 32 in/year from east to west in the study area. Precipitation was near normal over most of the area and above normal in the southeastern part of the study area. Streamflow ranged from less than 1 in/year in the western part of the study area to 13 in/yr in the southeastern part. Streamflow was 8 in/yr above normal in the southeast. Base flow ranged from less than 0.1 in/yr in the western part of the study area to 6 in/yr in the southeastern part. (USGS)

  6. Radiological re-survey results at 130 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ029)

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 130 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, ORNL conducted a radiological survey on this property. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May, 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by a new property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the survey was to determine if residuals from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if any radiological elements present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological survey. The radiological re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses.

  7. Selenium status in Greenland Inuit.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jens C; Deutch, Bente; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2004-09-20

    In Greenland, the human intake of selenium has always been relatively high and is closely connected to intake of the traditional food of marine origin. Analyses of historic and present day human and animal hair samples have indicated that the selenium level in the marine environment has been constant over time, while the levels in humans have declined corresponding to a decrease in intake of traditional food. The Inuit population in Greenland is in dietary transition where western-style food will increasingly dominate. As a consequence, the ample supply of selenium may not be sustained in the future. We report here the selenium status in three Greenlandic population groups, Ittoqqortoormiit and Tasiilaq on the east coast and Uummannaq on the west coast. Mean whole blood concentrations ranged from 178 microg/l in Tasiilaq men to 488 microg/l in Uummannaq men. Plasma concentrations ranged from 79 microg/l in Tasiilaq women to 113 microg/l in Uummannaq men. With increasing Se concentrations in whole blood, the plasma concentrations increased but tended to stabilise a level approximately 140 microg/l. Selenium blood levels were highly significantly correlated with long chain marine fatty acids. Dietary survey and food composition data from the west coast showed that whale skin, muktuk, is the main source of Se followed by birds, seal meat and organs, and fish. Terrestrial animals contributed only insignificantly to the selenium intake. In West Greenland, daily Se intake (235 microg/day) was estimated by dietary survey; it corresponded well with a calculated intake (220 microg/day) based on the mean blood concentration.

  8. Middle Permian brachiopods from central Peninsular Malaysia — faunal affinities between Malaysia and west Cambodia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Masatoshi; Leman, Mohd Shafeea; Shi, Guang R.

    2001-02-01

    A moderately diverse Permian brachiopod fauna is described from a new rock unit, the Bera Formation, in the Bera District, central Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia. The fauna consists of 19 taxa, including 14 genera and 17 (both identified and unidentified) typically Tethyan species. The fauna appears to be correlative on the basis of brachiopods with the Neoschwagerina-Yabeina fusulinid Zones in Indochina and South China. In particular, it has strong linkage to Member C ( Yabeina beds) of the Sisophon Limestone, west Cambodia. This is indicated by three of the Bera species — Urushtenoidea chaoi (Ching), Spyridiophora gubleri Termier and Termier, and Transennatia termierorum sp. nov., being shared with the Cambodian fauna. A possible early Capitanian (Middle Permian) age is proposed for the Bera brachiopod fauna.

  9. Flood of May 6, 2007, Willow Creek, west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Edward E.; Eash, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Major flooding occurred May 6, 2007, in the Willow Creek drainage basin in Harrison County following severe thunderstorm activity over west-central Iowa. More than 7 inches of rain were recorded for the 72-hour period ending 7 a.m., May 6, at the Logan, Iowa weather station. The peak discharge in Willow Creek at Medford Avenue near Missouri Valley, Iowa, was 17,000 cubic feet per second. The recurrence interval of the flood is 160 years, which was estimated using regional regression equations. Information about the basin, the storms, the flooding, and a profile of high-water marks measured at 10 locations along Willow Creek between the mouth at the Boyer River and State Highway 37 in Monona County, a distance of almost 33 river miles, are presented in this report.

  10. Chlorinated pesticide residues in sediments from the Arabian Sea along the central west coast of India

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Gupta, R.S.

    1987-12-01

    The problem of environmental contamination by persistent chlorinated pesticides still evokes major concern due to the presence of their residues in the environment and in human tissues. In developing countries like India organochlorine insecticides, especially DDT are extensively being used in agriculture and vector control programs. Few data are available on their levels of concentration from the seas around India. Persistent pesticides residues can be expected to accumulate in marine sediments. However, very little data on this are available along the Indian coast. An attempt has been made in the present communication to identify and quantify some of the chlorinated pesticides residues in the marine sediments collected from different region along the central west coast of India. This is a part of our ongoing project to monitor and map pollutants within the exclusive economic zone of India.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of environmental bovine mastitis pathogens in west central Iran.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Kheirabadi, K H Pirali; Nikookhah, Farzaneh

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe antimicrobial susceptibility of environmental mastitis pathogens isolated from dairy herds of Chahar Mahal province in west central Iran. Out of the 620 milk samples collected from the four districts, 180 were CMT (California mastitis test) positive that cultured and yield, 7 (3.88%) coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS), 15 (8.33%) Streptococci other than agalactiae and 17 (9.44%) E. coli. CNS resistance to penicillin was 14.28% but for streptomycin, Oxytetracycline and Colistin, were 28.57%. Non agalactiae Streptococci resistance to Oxytetracycline and Kanamycin were 20 and 13.33%, respectively. E. coli resistance to penicillin, oxytetracycline, streptomycin, erythromycin and Colistin were 88.23, 82.35, 76.47, 76.47 and 52.94%, respectively.

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 136 West Central Avenue (MJ030), Maywood, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-02-01

    As a result of the Energy and Water Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 1984, the property discussed in this report and properties in its vicinity contaminated with residues from the former Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As part of this project, DOE is conducting radiological surveys in the vicinity of the site to identify properties contaminated with residues derived from the MCW. The principal radionuclide of concern is thorium-232. The radiological survey discussed in this report is part of that effort and was conducted, at the request of DOE by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A radiological survey of the private, residential property at 136 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey, was conducted during 1987. The survey and sampling of the ground surface and subsurface were carried out on April 29, 1987.

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among recyclable waste collectors in Central-West Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Thaís Augusto; Lopes, Carmen Luci Rodrigues; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Reis, Nádia Rúbia Silva; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; de Andrade, Andreia Alves; Martins, Regina Maria Bringel

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a population of recyclable waste collectors (n = 431) was assessed using a cross-sectional survey in all 15 cooperatives in the city of Goiânia, Central-West Brazil. The HCV prevalence was 1.6% (95% confidence interval: 0.6-3.6) and a history of sexually transmitted infections was independently associated with this infection. HCV RNA (corresponding to genotype 1; subtypes 1a and 1b) was detected in five/seven anti-HCV-positive samples. Although the study population reported a high rate (47.3%) of sharps and needle accidents, HCV infection was not more frequent in recyclable waste collectors than in the general Brazilian population.

  14. Compliance with the guidelines of prescription writing in a central hospital in the West Bank.

    PubMed

    Tayem, Y I; Ibrahim, M A; Qubaja, M M; Shraim, R K; Taha, O B; Abu Shkhedem, E

    2013-09-01

    This retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out to evaluate the quality of 2208 outpatient prescriptions in a central hospital in the West Bank, Palestine. The physicians' handwriting was poorly readable or illegible in one-third of the prescriptions. The prescriber's name and signature and patient's name were mentioned in almost all orders whereas the patient's age was stated in 54.9%. The vast majority of physicians (95.5%) prescribed drugs using their trade (brand) names. Drug strength, quantity and dose/frequency were stated in 61.1%, 76% and 73.8% of prescriptions respectively. Only 33 prescriptions (1.5%) contained full directions for use for all drugs. Correlation analysis revealed that the presence of certain prescription elements was statistically significantly associated with the clinic of origin and the number of drugs prescribed. The overall poor legibility and incompleteness of the prescriptions is of concern.

  15. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the Chippewa River basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, C.A.; Krumrie, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected points on streams in the Chippewa River Basin, located in west-central Minnesota, are presented in this report The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. The points on the stream include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outlets of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  16. Physical characteristics of stream subbasins in the Pomme de Terre River Basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, D.L.; Payne, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Data describing the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected points on streams in the Pomme de Terre River Basin, located in west-central Minnesota, are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. The points on the stream include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, outfalls of sewage treatment plants, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey low-flow, high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  17. Possible new constraints on late Miocene depositional patterns in west-central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liniecki-Laporte, Margaret; Andersen, David W.

    1988-03-01

    In the San Francisco Bay area, estuarine, lacustrine, and fluvial depositional environments existed contemporaneously within the Mulholland Formation, which was deposited in the Contra Costa basin from 7.7 to 6.5 Ma. The estuarine facies is differentiated from the nonmarine facies on the bases of ostracodes and sedimentology. Presence of the estuarine facies in the Mulholland Formation demonstrates that the Contra Costa basin was at sea level, the western part of the basin being a marine embayment for about 1 m.y. Absence of fresh Sierra Nevada-derived material in the lower Mulholland Formation indicates that a topographically elevated area existed east of the Contra Costa basin, effectively deflecting the Sierran debris, which is represented by the coeval Neroly Formation found in the eastern central Coast Ranges. To the west of the Contra Costa basin, some gaps in the Coast Ranges allowed connection with the Pacific Ocean.

  18. Ground water for irrigation in the Viking Basin, west-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Viking Basin consists of six glacial outwash areas in Douglas, Ottertail, and Todd Counties, west-central Minnesota. Total area is 340 square miles (880 square kilometres). Soils are sandy and excessively well-drained. Crops grown on the outwash would benefit from supplemental irrigation. Irrigation supplies can be obtained from wells in the surface outwash aquifer in significant parts of the large outwash areas near Carlos and Parkers Prairie and the small outwash area near Clotho. Irrigation supplies are unlikely in the outwash areas near Alexandria, Urbank, and Rose City. Major use of ground water for irrigation may lower ground-water levels sufficiently to affect lake and marsh levels and streamflow out of the irrigation areas. Water from the outwash is of excellent chemical quality for irrigation.

  19. Near-surface water balance of an undeveloped upland site in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Boetcher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    A study was made to examine the near-surface water balance of a dry prairie site in west-central Florida. The water balance, which was defined on a unit area basis and for a depth of 5.5 meters, was described for the period June 1991 to October 1992. Precipitation during the 498 days of field measurements was 2,245 millimeters. Evapotranspiration, the second largest component, was 1,419 millimeters. Water yield was 808 millimeters and the change in soil water storage was 19 millimeters. Computed vertical water flux was less than 4 percent of evapotranspiration because of the small hydraulic conductivity of a clay layer that began at a depth of 5.5 meters.

  20. SeaWinds - Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The frequent coverage provided by NASA's SeaWinds instrument on the QuikScat satellite provides unprecedented capability to monitor daily and seasonal changes in the key melt zones of Greenland, which is covered with a thick ice sheet that resulted from snow accumulating over tens of thousands of years. The thickness of the snow layers reveals details about the past global climate, and comparing snow accumulation and snow melting can provide insight into climate change and global warming. In particular, the extent of summer melting of snow in Greenland is considered a sensitive indicator of global change.

    Earlier scatterometer data has suggested that Greenland has experienced significantly more melting in recent years. This figure compares the melting observed over 15 days during July 1999 in Greenland. The red areas around the central blue and white areas are the main melt zones and have lower radar back scatter because of water on the surface that saturates the surface snow. As the days warm up, the melt extent dramatically increases. Comparing this data with computer models and past scatterometer data will help scientists evaluate the inter-annual variability of the melting as a step toward understanding potential climate change.

    The world's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica act as vast storehouses of freshwater. Summer season melting releases large quantities of freshwater into the ocean, and year-to-year variations can have a significant impact on global sea level. Furthermore, long-term changes in the patterns and extent of melting on the large ice sheets reflect the effects of climate variability; thus Greenland is considered a sensitive indicator of global warming.

    Satellite microwave radars are extremely sensitive to melting and can provide the only effective means of accurately measuring the year-round picture of the extent and variability in ice sheet melting. Daily mean images were produced from QuikScat data collected over the

  1. Geophysical Framework Investigations Influencing Ground-Water Resources in East-Central Nevada and West-Central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, Janet T.; Ponce, David A.

    2007-01-01

    A geophysical investigation was undertaken as part of an effort to characterize the geologic framework influencing ground-water resources in east-central Nevada and west-central Utah. New gravity data were combined with existing aeromagnetic, drill-hole, and geologic data to help determine basin geometry, infer structural features, estimate depth to pre-Cenozoic basement rocks, and further constrain the horizontal extents of exposed and buried plutons. In addition, a three-dimensional (3D) geologic model was constructed to help illustrate the often complex geometries of individual basins and aid in assessing the connectivity of adjacent basins. In general, the thirteen major valleys within the study area have axes oriented north-south and frequently contain one or more sub-basins. These basins are often asymmetric and typically reach depths of 2 km. Analysis of gravity data helped delineate geophysical lineaments and accommodation zones. Structural complexities may further compartmentalize ground-water flow within basins and the influence of tectonics on basin sedimentation further complicates their hydrologic properties. The horizontal extent of exposed and, in particular, buried plutons was estimated over the entire study area. The location and subsurface extents of these plutons will be very important for regional water resource assessments, as these features may act as either barriers or pathways for groundwater flow. A previously identified basement gravity low strikes NW within the study area and occurs within a highly extended terrane between the Butte and Confusion synclinoria. Evidence from geophysical, geologic, and seismic reflection data suggests relatively lower density plutonic rocks may extend to moderate crustal depths and rocks of similar composition may be the source of the entire basement gravity anomaly.

  2. Flood of July 9-11, 1993, in the Raccoon River basin, west-central Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eash, D.A.; Koppensteiner, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Water-surface-elevation profiles and peak discharges for the flood of July 9-11, 1993, in the Raccoon River Basin, west-central Iowa, are presented in this report. The profiles illustrate the 1993 flood along the Raccoon, North Raccoon, South Raccoon, and Middle Raccoon Rivers and along Brushy and Storm Creeks in the west-central Iowa counties of Carroll, Dallas, Greene, Guthrie, and Polk. Water-surface-elevation profiles for the floods of June 1947, March 1979, and June 29- July 1, 1986, in the Raccoon River Basin also are included in the report for comparative purposes. The July 9-11, 1993, flood is the largest known peak discharge at gaging stations Brushy Creek near Templeton (station number 05483318) 19,000 cubic feet per second, Middle Raccoon River near Bayard (station number 05483450) 27,500 cubic feet per second, Middle Raccoon River at Panora (station number 05483600) 22,400 cubic feet per second, South Raccoon River at Redfield (station number 05484000) 44,000 cubic feet per second, and Raccoon River at Van Meter (station number 05484500) 70,100 cubic feet per second. The peak discharges were, respectively, 1.5, 1.3, 1.1,1.2, and 1.3 times larger than calculated 100-year recurrence-interval discharges. The report provides information on flood stages and discharges and floodflow frequencies for streamflow-gaging stations in the Raccoon River Basin using flood information collected through 1996. A flood history summarizes rainfall conditions and damages for floods that occurred during 1947, 1958, 1979, 1986, 1990, and 1993. Information on temporary bench marks and reference points established in the Raccoon River Basin during 1976-79 and 1995-97 also is included in the report.

  3. Isotopic Characteristics of Basalts From the Central Basin Fault, West Philippine Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Sato, H.; Machida, S.; Ishii, T.; Hirano, N.; Yumul, G.; Fujioka, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Central Basin Fault (CBF) of the West Philippine Basin (WPB) marks the location of an extinct seafloor spreading center that was disrupted by shearing and amagmatic extension. Basaltic rocks recovered from the rift by dredging and Shinkai 6500 submersible have K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages as young as 26-28 Ma and 15 Ma and probably include the final products of magmatism related to the Central Basin spreading center. The relationship between this spreading center and early arc magmatism along the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc is an important question. Nd and Pb isotopic ratios of basalts from the CBF are similar to those found in older West Philippine Basin basalts and they have the same "Indian Ocean" isotopic signature that characterizes basin basalts from throughout the Philippine Sea plate. 143Nd/144Nd varies from 0.51294 to 0.51308 and Pb isotope ratios are: 206Pb/204Pb = 18.15-18.62, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.47-15.57 and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.80-38.63. The Pb isotope ratios span a range from low values similar to normal MORB-like WPB basalts to high values typical of highly incompatible element-enriched, OIB-like basalts from the Benham Rise. However, Pb isotopic ratios are not coupled with incompatible element enrichment among the CBF basalts. Instead, there is an apparent geographic pattern, with higher 206Pb/204Pb in basalts from westernmost sites, near the junction of the Benham seamount chain with the CBF, and lower values in basalt from the easternmost site near the Palau-Kyushu ridge, a remnant of the early Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc. The decoupling of trace element and isotopic ratios may indicate that late stage magmatism involved generation and extraction of small melt volumes resulting in extreme fractionation of trace elements.

  4. Metamorphism and fluid flow related to Mesozoic thrusting in west-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.L.; Peacock, S.M.; Reynolds, S.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Petrologic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope investigations are being conducted on rocks from the Granite Wash mountains (GWM) and the Harquahala Mountains (HM), located in west-central Arizona, to constrain fluid flow paths and metamorphism during basement-involved thrusting. Regional south-vergent thrusting in west-central Arizona resulted in widespread greenschist-facies metamorphism. In the GWM, upper greenschist-facies metamorphic conditions are indicated by (1) the presence of kyanite and andalusite in aluminum-rich metavolcanic rocks, (2) the presence of calcic amphibole in metabasites, and (3) the absence of garnet in pelitic units. In the HM, higher P-T conditions are indicated by the assemblage kyanite + staurolite + garnet in metasedimentary lithologies. A complex fluid history is recorded by fluid inclusions from both ranges. Individual microfractures from quartz veins parallel to the thrust-related fabric contain either liquid-rich, vapor-rich, or three phase inclusions, representing several stages of fluid flow. A C-O-H fluid was present during thrusting based on the occurrence of three-phase inclusions in quartz veins, CO[sub 2]-bearing inclusions in kyanite crystals related to the thrusting event, and the formation of chlorite and calcite in upper plate granite of the Hercules thrust in the GWM. Homogenization temperatures of [approximately]270 C, which constrain minimum temperatures of the fluid, are common for the liquid-rich inclusions; vapor-rich and three-phase inclusions homogenize at higher temperatures. Preliminary stable isotope analyses suggest large volumes of isotopically light fluid may have flowed preferentially along thrust surfaces.

  5. Legume Diversity Patterns in West Central Africa: Influence of Species Biology on Distribution Models

    PubMed Central

    de la Estrella, Manuel; Mateo, Rubén G.; Wieringa, Jan J.; Mackinder, Barbara; Muñoz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of species richness for conservation planning. Methodology Using Maxent, SDMs based on a suite of 14 environmental predictors were generated for 185 West Central African Leguminosae species, each categorised according to one of five vegetation types: Afromontane, coastal, non-flooded forest, open formations, or riverine forest. The relative contribution of each environmental variable was compared between different vegetation types using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis followed by a post-hoc Kruskal-Wallis Paired Comparison contrast. Legume species diversity patterns were explored initially using the typical method of stacking all SDMs. Subsequently, five different ensemble models were generated by partitioning SDMs according to vegetation category. Ecological modelers worked with legume specialists to improve data integrity and integrate expert opinion in the interpretation of individual species models and potential species richness predictions for different vegetation types. Results/Conclusions Of the 14 environmental predictors used, five showed no difference in their relative contribution to the different vegetation models. Of the nine discriminating variables, the majority were related to temperature variation. The set of variables that played a major role in the Afromontane species diversity model differed significantly from the sets of variables of greatest relative important in other vegetation categories. The traditional approach of stacking all SDMs indicated overall

  6. Legume diversity patterns in West Central Africa: influence of species biology on distribution models.

    PubMed

    de la Estrella, Manuel; Mateo, Rubén G; Wieringa, Jan J; Mackinder, Barbara; Muñoz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Species Distribution Models (SDMs) are used to produce predictions of potential Leguminosae diversity in West Central Africa. Those predictions are evaluated subsequently using expert opinion. The established methodology of combining all SDMs is refined to assess species diversity within five defined vegetation types. Potential species diversity is thus predicted for each vegetation type respectively. The primary aim of the new methodology is to define, in more detail, areas of species richness for conservation planning. Using Maxent, SDMs based on a suite of 14 environmental predictors were generated for 185 West Central African Leguminosae species, each categorised according to one of five vegetation types: Afromontane, coastal, non-flooded forest, open formations, or riverine forest. The relative contribution of each environmental variable was compared between different vegetation types using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis followed by a post-hoc Kruskal-Wallis Paired Comparison contrast. Legume species diversity patterns were explored initially using the typical method of stacking all SDMs. Subsequently, five different ensemble models were generated by partitioning SDMs according to vegetation category. Ecological modelers worked with legume specialists to improve data integrity and integrate expert opinion in the interpretation of individual species models and potential species richness predictions for different vegetation types. Of the 14 environmental predictors used, five showed no difference in their relative contribution to the different vegetation models. Of the nine discriminating variables, the majority were related to temperature variation. The set of variables that played a major role in the Afromontane species diversity model differed significantly from the sets of variables of greatest relative important in other vegetation categories. The traditional approach of stacking all SDMs indicated overall centers of diversity in the region but the

  7. Evaluation of Statistical Rainfall Disaggregation Methods Using Rain-Gauge Information for West-Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Murch, Renee Rokicki; Zhang, Jing; Ross, Mark; Ganguly, Auroop R; Nachabe, Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    Rainfall disaggregation in time can be useful for the simulation of hydrologic systems and the prediction of floods and flash floods. Disaggregation of rainfall to timescales less than 1 h can be especially useful for small urbanized watershed study, and for continuous hydrologic simulations and when Hortonian or saturation-excess runoff dominates. However, the majority of rain gauges in any region record rainfall in daily time steps or, very often, hourly records have extensive missing data. Also, the convective nature of the rainfall can result in significant differences in the measured rainfall at nearby gauges. This study evaluates several statistical approaches for rainfall disaggregation which may be applicable using data from West-Central Florida, specifically from 1 h observations to 15 min records, and proposes new methodologies that have the potential to outperform existing approaches. Four approaches are examined. The first approach is an existing direct scaling method that utilizes observed 15 min rainfall at secondary rain gauges, to disaggregate observed 1 h rainfall at more numerous primary rain gauges. The second approach is an extension of an existing method for continuous rainfall disaggregation through statistical distributional assumptions. The third approach relies on artificial neural networks for the disaggregation process without sorting and the fourth approach extends the neural network methods through statistical preprocessing via new sorting and desorting schemes. The applicability and performance of these methods were evaluated using information from a fairly dense rain gauge network in West-Central Florida. Of the four methods compared, the sorted neural networks and the direct scaling method predicted peak rainfall magnitudes significantly better than the remaining techniques. The study also suggests that desorting algorithms would also be useful to randomly replace the artificial hyetograph within a rainfall period.

  8. Interannual climate variability drives regional fires in west central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Jill E.; Smith, Dan J.

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the influence of climate variability on forest fire occurrence at eight sites in west central British Columbia, Canada. Forty-six local fire years affecting a single site and 16 moderate fire years affecting two or more sites were identified (1600-1900 A.D.). Existing fire history data were incorporated to identify 17 regionally synchronous fire years (fires that affected ≥3 sites). Interannual and multidecadal relationships between fire occurrence and the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and the Pacific North American (PNA) pattern were examined, in addition to the effects of additive positive phases of ENSO and PDO. We examined multiple reconstructions of ENSO, PDO, and PNA and utilized three methodological approaches to characterize climate-fire relationships. We found that the influence of interannual climate, expressed as PDSI, increasingly synchronized the occurrence of fires when examined from local to regional scales. An association between local fires and positive antecedent moisture conditions suggests moisture-driven fine fuel development and the proximity of some sites to grasslands likely function as key determinants of local-scale fire activity. The relationships between regional fires and ENSO, PDO, and PNA suggest that large-scale patterns of climate variability exert a weak and/or inconsistent influence over fire activity in west central British Columbia between 1700 and 1900 A.D. Although inconsistent among reconstructions of climate patterns, we identified a significant relationship between regional fires and large-scale climate patterns when ENSO and PDO were both in positive phases.

  9. Drug Development and Conservation of Biodiversity in West and Central Africa: Performance of Neurochemical and Radio Receptor Assays of Plant Extracts Drug Discovery for the Central Nervous System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    7) Hui, D.; Sao-Xing, C. J. Nat. Prod. 1998, 61, 142-144. (8) Aldrich Libray of 13C and 1H FT NMR spectra 1992, 2, 326A. (9) Kadota, S .; Hui, D...Biodiversity in West and Central Africa: Performance of Neurochemical and Radio Receptor Assays of Plant Extracts Drug Discovery for the Central... s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation

  10. Age and provenance of Triassic to Cenozoic sediments of West and Central Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfeld, H. Tim; Galin, Thomson; Hall, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Sarawak is located on the northern edge of Sundaland in NW Borneo. West and Central Sarawak include parts of the Kuching and Sibu Zones. These contain remnants of several sedimentary basins with ages from Triassic to Cenozoic. New light mineral, heavy mineral and U-Pb detrital zircon ages show differences in provenance reflecting the tectonic evolution of the region. The oldest clastic sediments are Triassic (Sadong Formation and its deep marine equivalent Kuching Formation). They were sourced by a Triassic (Carnian to Norian) volcanic arc and reworked Paleoproterozoic detritus derived from Cathaysialand. The Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous Pedawan Formation is interpreted as forearc basin fill with distinctive zircon populations indicating subduction beneath present-day West Sarawak which initiated in the Late Jurassic. Subsequent subduction until the early Late Cretaceous formed the Schwaner Mountains magmatic arc. After collision of SW Borneo and other microcontinental fragments with Sundaland in the early Late Cretaceous, deep marine sedimentation (Pedawan Formation) ceased, and there was uplift forming the regional Pedawan-Kayan unconformity. Two episodes of extension followed and were responsible for basin development on land in West Sarawak from the latest Cretaceous onwards, probably in a pull-apart setting. The first episode is associated with sediments of the Kayan Group, deposited in the Latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) to Eocene, and the second episode with Upper Eocene sediments of the Ketungau Basin. Zircon ages indicate volcanic activity throughout the Early Cenozoic in NW Borneo, and inherited zircon ages indicate reworking of Triassic and Cretaceous rocks. A large deep marine basin, the Rajang Basin, was north of the Lupar Line Fault in Central Sarawak (Sibu Zone) from the Late Cretaceous to the Late Eocene. Zircons from sediments of the Rajang Basin indicate they have similar ages and provenance to contemporaneous terrestrial sediments of the Kayan

  11. Intra- and Inter-Seasonal Supra-glacial Water Variability over the West Greenland Ice Sheet as Estimated from Combining High Resolution Satellite Optical Data and a Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Tedesco, M.; Smith, L. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Yang, K.

    2015-12-01

    The supra-glacial hydrology of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role on the surface energy and mass balance budgets of the ice sheet as a whole. The surface hydrology network variability of small streams in the ablation zone of Greenland is poorly understood both spatially and temporally. Using satellites that can spatially resolve the presence and associated properties of small streams, the scientific community is now able to be provided with accurate spatial and temporal analysis of surface hydrology on the ice sheet (that could not have been resolved with other sensors such as those on board MODIS or LANDSAT). In this study we report mapped supra-glacial water networks over a region of the West GrIS (approximately 164 km2) derived from high resolution multispectral satellite imagery from the Quickbird and WorldView - 2 satellites in tandem with a 2 meter stereographic SETSM DEM (digital elevation model). The branching complexity of the identified surface streams is computed from the available DEM as well as the intra- and inter seasonal changes observed in the hydrological system. The stream networks created during the melt season (at several different stages of melting) are compared and discussed as well as the networks mapped between consecutive years for proximate dates. Also, depth and volume estimations for the surface water features identified were extracted via band math algorithms, threshold classifications, and morphological operations. Our results indicate that the higher stream orders have the largest amount of stored surface water per km but the lower stream orders, specifically 1st order with widths of ~ 2 meters, hold more stored surface water overall. We also employ and compare runoff data from the numerical model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) to the estimations found using imagery and the DEM.

  12. Greenland Blocking As a Mechanism for Recent Arctic/Mid-Latitude Weather Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overland, J. E.; Hanna, E.; Wang, M.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude blocking (HLB) located near and west of Greenland and in northeastern Siberia is a process that links Arctic processes to mid-latitude weather. HLB lies north of the jet stream and tends to bifurcate or divert the jet stream southward, rather than providing a complete block to the westerly flow. It is differentiated from mid-latitude blocking located in the central Atlantic to Europe and the western Pacific along eddy-driven jet streams. It is important to identify and understand an increase in recent HLB in early winter during the last five years relative to time series since 1948, even though this length is too short to robustly distinguish the influence of Arctic forcing from random events. In the last five early winters (December-January 2009-10 through 2013-14), two record and four other negative Arctic Oscillation atmospheric circulation index events have been observed, with positive Greenland Blocking Indices (GBI, greater 500 hPa geopotential heights) and increased geopotential thickness west of Greenland. Cold air penetrated into the southeastern United States in December 2009 and 2010 and January 2014 related to amplification in the long-wave upper-level atmospheric wind pattern. Northward air flow over Davis Strait acts as a positive feedback to maintain the Greenland air temperature anomalies. Extreme negative GBI were observed in December 2011-January 2012. Increased thickness associated with positive GBI can be a response to external (local sea ice loss, Greenland surface warming, or even equatorial teleconnections) or internal (advection and orientation of the long wave patterns) processes. A similar blocking feature is observed in Siberia/eastern Asia. A Bayesian approach to an Arctic/mid-latitude weather linkage emphasizes the nearly irresolvable uncertainty surrounding causation of recent major weather events; yet it drives scientific understanding of linkages and potential impacts on seasonal forecasting.

  13. Potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer, west-central Florida, May 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, A.G.; Blanchard, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing freshwater are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is a highly productive aquifer and supplies more than 10 times the amount of water pumped from either the surficial aquifer system or the intermediate aquifer system in most of the study area (Duerr and others, 1988). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2005. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in a tightly cased well that taps a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 67.27 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2004 through May 2005) was 14.20 inches above the historical cumulative average of 53.07 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), 2005). The above average precipitation is attributed to the active hurrican season for Florida in 2004. Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to the most recent completed calendar year) and are updated monthly by the SWFWMD. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the SWFWMD, is part of a semiannual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to

  14. Integration of Remotely-Sensed Geobotanical and Structural Methods for Hydrocarbon Exploration in West-Central West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-26

    This report covers the first of the two years covered in the DOE grant to investigate structural and geobotanical features of hydrocarbon reservoirs in western West Virginia. The reader is referred to the three previous Quarterly reports for greater detail on tasks originally described in those reports. The progress of the project will be discussed with reference to the tasks identified for the project.

  15. Lower and middle Guadalupian shelf carbonates, eastern margin of Central Basin platform, Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.F.; Chalcraft, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Lower and middle Guadalupian shelf carbonates serve as the reservoir for a nearly continuous band of oil fields extending 100 mi along the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform of west Texas. Approximately 5 billion bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic-structural traps within the Upper Permian (Gaudalupian Series) dolomites of the San Andrea and Grayburg Formations in Upton, Crane, Ector, Pecos, and Andrews Counties, Texas. The San Andrea and Grayburg Formations are cyclical shallowing-upward carbonate sequences of open shelf through sabkha facies whose depositional strike parallels the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform. Porosity and permeability of reservoir rock are governed by diagenetic processes such as dolomitization, anhydrite porosity occlusion, leaching, silicification, and authigenic clay formation. Self sediments are primarily burrowed wackestones and packstones that locally contain pelletal, skeletal, and ooid grainstones. Typical subtidal shelf sediments are capped by algal-laminated dolomite, nodular anhydritic dolomite, and bedded anhydrite. The fauna is normally sparse and dominated by foraminifera and algae. Less common faunal components include pelecypods, crinoids, sponges, Bryozoa, brachiopods, gastropods, and coral that are associated with the development of small scattered patch reefs. Lowering the sea level during the early Guadalpian initiated basinward progradation of San Andres carbonate facies with hydrocarbon reservoirs best developed in shallow self fusulinid wackestones to packstone and oolitic grainstone. Reservoir dolomites of the Grayburg formation are present east of San Andres fields with optimal reservoir properties occurring near the San Andreas outer shelf margin.

  16. Hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat, Washoe County, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, D.L.; Ponce, D.A.; Ross, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    Description of the hydrogeologic framework of Antelope Valley and Bedell Flat in west-central Nevada adds to the general knowledge of regional ground-water flow north of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. The hydrogeologic framework is defined by the rocks and deposits that transmit ground water or impede its movement and by the combined thickness of Cenozoic deposits. When data are lacking about the subsurface geology of an area, geophysical methods can be used to provide additional information. In this study, gravimetric and seismic-refraction methods were used to infer the form of structural features and to estimate the thickness of Cenozoic deposits in each of the two valleys. In Antelope Valley, the thickness of these deposits probably does not exceed about 300 feet, suggesting that ground-water storage in the basin-fill aquifer is limited. Beneath Bedell Flat is an elongated, northeast-trending structural depression in the pre-Cenozoic basement; the maximum thickness of Cenozoic deposits is about 2,500 feet beneath the south-central part of the valley. Shallow ground water in the northwest corner of Bedell Flat may be a result of decreasing depth to the pre-Cenozoic basement.

  17. Raccoon (Procyon lotor) diurnal den use within an intensively managed forest in central West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, Sheldon F.; Berl, Jacob L.; Edwards, John W.; Ford, W. Mark; Wood, Petra Bohall

    2015-01-01

    Intensive forest management may influence the availability of suitable den sites for large den-seeking species, such as Procyon lotor (Raccoon). As part of a Raccoon ecology study on an industrial forest in the Allegheny Mountains of central West Virginia, we radio-tracked 32 Raccoons to 175 diurnal den sites to determine relative use of dens that included cavity trees, rock dens, log piles, slash piles, and exposed limbs. Patterns of den use significantly differed between sexes and among seasons. Overall, we recorded 58 cavity dens in 12 tree species with 7 maternal dens found in 5 tree species. Raccoons selected larger-diameter den trees than available cavity trees and non-cavity trees. Because the abundance of suitable tree cavities is known to influence Raccoon densities and recruitment at fine spatial scales and female Raccoons in this study used tree cavities as maternal den sites, the continued harvest of large-diameter trees (i.e., those capable of developing den cavities) without replacement may impact Raccoon recruitment within intensively managed forests throughout the central Appalachians.

  18. 78 FR 41901 - Determination of Attainment for the West Central Pinal Nonattainment Area for the 2006 Fine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... 2006 Fine Particle Standard; Arizona; Determination Regarding Applicability of Clean Air Act... determine that the West Central Pinal area in Arizona has attained the 2006 24-hour fine particle (PM 2.5... 2006 24-hour NAAQS for fine particles (generally referring to particles less than or equal to 2.5...

  19. Effects of harvesting treatments on the ant community in a Mississippi River bottomland hardwood forest in west-central Mississippi

    Treesearch

    Lynne C. Thompson; David M. General; Brian Roy Lockhart

    2010-01-01

    We assessed effects that harvesting treatments had on the ant community in a Mississippi River bottomland hardwood forest in west-central MS. Ants were collected on Pittman Island using pitfall traps from July to November in 1996, 1997, and 2000. The forest received three replicated harvesting treatments in 1995, including: 1) uncut controls (check), 2) selection...

  20. Comparing Two Numerical Models in Simulating Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport at a Dual Inlet System, West-Central Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-15

    Regionally, the John’s Pass-Blind Pass system is part of the west-central Florida barrier-island chain that extends north from the mouth of Tampa Bay. The...in a high-energy setting: The mouth of the Columbia River,” Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, C09011, doi:10.1029/2012JC008105. Larson M

  1. REGIONAL EMISSIONS OF NITRIC OXIDE (NO) AND CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2) IN AGROECOSYSTEMS IN CENTRAL WEST REGION, BRAZIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Central West Region in Brazil has been the focus of intense agricultural expansion since the 1970s and, nowadays, a large area of native cerrado has been converted to agricultural use. The expansion was accompanied by intensive use of fertilizer, irrigation and management pra...

  2. Environmental characteristics and water quality of hydrologic benchmark network stations in the west-central United States, 1963-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Eddy-Miller, C. A.; Mast, M. Alisa

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the environmental characteristics and water-quality characteristics of 14 benchmark basins in the west-central United States. The information was compiled to aide in the interpretation and application of historical water-quality data collected through the Hydrologic Benchmark Network Program.

  3. REGIONAL EMISSIONS OF NITRIC OXIDE (NO) AND CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2) IN AGROECOSYSTEMS IN CENTRAL WEST REGION, BRAZIL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Central West Region in Brazil has been the focus of intense agricultural expansion since the 1970s and, nowadays, a large area of native cerrado has been converted to agricultural use. The expansion was accompanied by intensive use of fertilizer, irrigation and management pra...

  4. Seawater-like trace element signatures (REE + Y) of Eoarchaean chemical sedimentary rocks from southern West Greenland, and their corruption during high-grade metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, C. R. L.; Nutman, A. P.; Bennett, V. C.; Norman, M. D.

    2008-02-01

    Modern chemical sediments display a distinctive rare earth element + yttrium (REE + Y) pattern involving depleted LREE, positive La/La*SN, Eu/Eu*SN, and YSN anomalies (SN = shale normalised) that is related to precipitation from circumneutral to high pH waters with solution complexation of the REEs dominated by carbonate ions. This is often interpreted as reflecting precipitation from surface waters (usually marine). The oldest broadly accepted chemical sediments are c. 3,700 Ma amphibolite facies banded iron-formation (BIF) units in the Isua supracrustal belt, Greenland. Isua BIFs, including the BIF international reference material IF-G are generally considered to be seawater precipitates, and display these REE + Y patterns (Bolhar et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004). Greenland Eoarchaean BIF metamorphosed up to granulite facies from several localities in the vicinity of Akilia (island), display REE + Y patterns identical to Isua BIF, consistent with an origin by chemical sedimentation from seawater and a paucity of clastic input. Furthermore, the much-debated magnetite-bearing siliceous unit of “earliest life” rocks (sample G91/26) from Akilia has the same REE + Y pattern. This suggests that sample G91/26 is also a chemical sediment, contrary to previous assertions (Bolhar et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004), and including suggestions that the Akilia unit containing G91/26 consists entirely of silica-penetrated, metasomatised, mafic rock (Fedo and Whitehouse 2002a). Integration of our trace element data with those of Bolhar et al. (Earth Planet Sci Lett 222:43 60, 2004) demonstrates that Eoarchaean siliceous rocks in Greenland, with ages from 3.6 to 3.85 Ga, have diverse trace element signatures. There are now geographically-dispersed, widespread examples with Isua BIF-like REE + Y signatures, that are interpreted as chemically unaltered, albeit metamorphosed, chemical sediments. Other samples retain remnants of LREE depletion but

  5. The impact of calving front retreat on Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland , using a 3D thermodynamically coupled numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Kleiner, T.; Rückamp, M.; Larour, E. Y.; Humbert, A.

    2016-12-01

    Jakobshavn Isbræ is a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Since the breakup of its floating ice tongue in the late 1990's, the glacier has been thinning, accelerating and its calving front has been retreating by about 20 km. It is currently a major contributor to global sea level rise. Understanding the processes involved in and driving these changes is important to improve the predictive skills of numerical models and improve estimates of future dynamic ice discharge of the Greenland Ice Sheet. However, the limited amount of observations when the glacier underwent these strong changes does not allow us to fully understand the interplay and significance of the processes involved. Numerical modelling can be used to improve our understanding, but ice flow model studies so far suffered from lacking technical capabilities, poorly constrained input data sets and insufficient computational resources. Here, we use the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) to perform, for the first time, a high-resolution, 3D thermodynamically coupled model study of Jakobshavn Isbræ with a dynamically evolving ice front. We perform several sensitivity studies by analyzing the influence of submarine melt, calving and thermal regime on the glacier's thermodynamics to determine the processes that control the response of the glacier to climate change. We find that increased submarine melt significantly contributed to the initial speed-up of the glacier, but that today's flow regime is almost entirely controlled by it's calving front position, which agrees well with observations. The glacier's acceleration causes a substantial increase in internal and basal friction, which increases subglacial melt rates. Sustained higher submarine discharge might increase undercutting of the calving front through melt, leading to higher calving rates even in case of a glacier slow down, creating a potential positive feedback.

  6. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Sevier Lake area, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilberg, Dale E.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrologic system of the Sevier Lake area, at the terminus of the Sevier Lake drainage basin in west-central Utah, was studied during 1987-88 to determine baseline hydrologic conditions prior to anticipated development.  Sevier Lake was reestablished during 1983-87 on the normally dry playa as a result of record volumes of surface-water runoff, but the lake was receding during the study.  In June 1985, the lake reached a maximum depth of about 13 feet, with a water-surface altitude of 4,527 feet above sea level.The basin-fill aquifer includes a coarse-grained facies at higher altitudes of the alluvial slopes, and a fine-grained facies at lower altitudes around Sevier Lake.  Water levels indicate a potential for lateral groundwater movement away from the lake and toward the northwest, west, and south.Transmissivity of the coarse-grained facies, determined from one well, was 4,120 feet squared per day. Transmissivity values for the fine-grained facies ranged from 1 X 10-3 to 5 X 10-2 foot squared per day, determined from slug tests of shallow wells near the shoreline of the lake, and 5.2 feet squared per day determined from a well in the lakebed.The predominant constituents of water sampled in the Sevier Lake area are sodium, sulfate, and chloride. The concentration of dissolved solids ranges from 480 to 120,000 milligrams per liter. Smaller concentrations of dissolved solids were determined for water from wells completed in the coarse-grained facies, and larger concentrations were determined for water from wells completed in the fine-grained facies.

  7. Depositional environments and sedimentary tectonics of subsurface Cotton Valley group (upper Jurassic), west-central Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Sydboten, B.D. Jr.; Bowen, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    Study of data from 65 selected wells in a 6-county area (about 60 by 60 mi) north and west of Jackson, Mississippi, discloses that Cotton Valley strata, now within the axial trough of the Mississippi embayment, display thickness variations which demonstrate that Late Jurassic sedimentation was strongly controlled by maximum subsidence along the same trough axis. Examination of well logs, other records, and cutting sets from 38 wells has resulted in preparation of dip and strike cross sections that permit information definition of lower, middle, and upper parts of the Cotton Valley Group throughout the area evaluated. Within these lithostratigraphic diversions, lithofacies are discriminable that represent alluvial, upper delta plain, lower delta plain, and prodeltaic environments. These facies display a general variation from coarse, commonly red, oxidized sediments on the north and east, to mudrocks, locally calcareous and carbonaceous, on the southwest. Within the Cotton Valley Group examined, two persistent clastic lobes demonstrate relative environmental stability while deposits ranging in thickness from 1500 ft (northwestern corner of study area) to 4500 ft (axial depocenter on the south) accumulated. During Cotton Valley deposition, west-central Mississippi was the site of a two-toed birdfoot delta within which lignites were deposited. Major sediment supply was from the east and north; a minor source was to the northwest (Ouachita-Ozarks). Irregulatories in both rates of supply of clastics and of shelf subsidence permitted intermittent shallow, clear-water, marine incursions from the south during which thin carbonate beds were deposited, interfingering with the clastics. Thus, potential source and host rocks for hydrocarbon traps are closely associated, for thick, organic-rich, interlobate mudrocks pass laterally and vertically into fluvial sands of the delta lobes.

  8. Radiological re-survey results at 146 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ034)

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Johnson, C.A.

    1994-05-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from 1916 to 1959. During the early years of operation, MCW stored wastes and residues in low-lying areas west of the processing facilities and consequently some of the residuals containing radioactive materials migrated offsite to the surrounding area. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated for remedial action the old MCW property and several vicinity properties. Additionally, in 1984, the property at 146 West Central Ave., Maywood, New Jersey and properties in its vicinity were included as a decontamination research and development project under the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In 1987 and 1988, at the request of DOE, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological survey on this property. A report describing this survey was published in 1989. A second radiological survey by ORNL was conducted on this property in May 1993 at the request of DOE after an ad hoc radiological survey, requested by the property owner and conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), identified some contamination not previously found by ORNL. The purpose of the second ORNL survey was to determine whether radioactive materials from the old MCW were present on the property, and if so, if radioactive materials present were above guidelines. A certified civil survey was requisitioned by ORNL to determine actual property boundaries before beginning the radiological re-survey. The re-survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of a large number of soil samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of this survey demonstrated that although elevated residual thorium-232 contamination was present in a few isolated spots on the southern end of the backyard, it did not exceed DOE guidelines.

  9. Potential for water-quality degradation of interconnected aquifers in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Brendle, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Thousands of deep artesian wells were drilled into the Upper Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida prior to well-drilling regulations adopted in the 1970's. The wells were usually completed with a short length of casing through the unconsolidated sediments and were left open to multiple aquifers containing water of varying quality. These open boreholes serve as a potential source of water-quality degradation within the aquifers when vertical internal borehole flow is induced by hydraulic-head differences. Thispotential for water-quality degradation exists in west-central Florida where both the intermediate aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer exist. Measurements of caliper, temperature, gamma, fluid conductivity, and flow were obtained in 87 wells throughout west-central Florida to determine the occurrence of interaquifer borehole flow between the intermediate aquifer system and the Upper Floridan aquifer. Flow measurements were made using an impeller flowmeter, a heat-pulse flowmeter, and a video camera with an impeller flowmeter attachment. Of the 87 wells measured with the impeller flowmeter, 17 had internal flow which ranged from 10 to 300 gallons per minute. A heat-pulse flowmeter was used in 19 wells in which flow was not detected using the impeller flowmeter. Of these 19 wells, 18 had internal flow which ranged from 0.3 to 10gallons per minute. Additionally, water-quality samples were collected from specific contributing zones in wells that had internal flow. Analysis of geophysical and water-quality data indicates degradation of water quality has occurred from mineralized ground water flowing upward from the Upper Floridan aquifer into the intermediate aquifer system through both uncased boreholes and corroded black-iron well casings. In areas where there is a downward component of flow, data indicate that potable water from the intermediate aquifer system is artificially recharging the Upper Floridan aquifer through open boreholes. A geographical

  10. Potentiometric Surface of the Upper Floridan Aquifer, West-Central Florida, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ortiz, Anita G.

    2009-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by the middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer in west-central Florida generally contain highly mineralized water. The water-bearing units containing fresh water are herein referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is the principal source of water in the Southwest Florida Water Management District and is used for major public supply, domestic use, irrigation, and brackish water desalination in coastal communities (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2000). This map report shows the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer measured in May 2009. The potentiometric surface is an imaginary surface connecting points of equal altitude to which water will rise in tightly-cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system (Lohman, 1979). This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season, when ground-water levels usually are at an annual low and withdrawals for agricultural use typically are high. The cumulative average rainfall of 48.53 inches for west-central Florida (from June 2008 through May 2009) was 4.12 inches below the historical cumulative average of 52.65 inches (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 2009). Historical cumulative averages are calculated from regional rainfall summary reports (1915 to most recent complete calendar year) and are updated monthly by the Southwest Florida Water Management District. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, is part of a semi-annual series of Upper Floridan aquifer potentiometric-surface map reports for west-central Florida. Potentiometric-surface maps have been prepared for January 1964, May 1969, May 1971, May 1973, May 1974, and for each May and September since 1975. Water-level data are collected in May and September each year to show the

  11. Apatite Fission Track Constraints On The Denudational History Of The Bielsa And Millares Plutons, West-Central Pyrenees, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, E.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Munoz, J. A.; Baldwin, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    The Pyreneean orogen extends for ~ 440 km from the Bay of Biscay to the Mediterranean Sea, forming a WNW-ESE topographic barrier between France and Spain. The mountain belt, formed by the Late Cretaceous-Early Miocene oblique collision and partial subduction of the Iberian Plate beneath the European Plate. Restored and balanced cross sections show a decrease in crustal shortening from ~165 km in the central Pyrenees to ~ 50 km in the Cantabrian margin, further to the west. The variation in shortening and crustal style is due to the decrease westward in convergence and differences in inherited geometry of pre- existing extensional faults. We propose the variation must also be reflected in the denudation record, with relative timing of the main denudational events younging to the west, as well as the magnitude and rates of denudation decreasing westward. In this study we analyze AFT data collected from vertical profiles on the southern flank of the mountains in the west-central Pyrenees. The results constrain the relative timing of structures between the central and west-central Pyrenees. AFTT data from the Bielsa and Millares massifs, located in the Bielsa and Millares thrust sheets on the southern flank of the axial zone, west-central Pyrenees yield AFT ages from 30 to 20 Ma. The data, including constraints from inverse thermal modeling, indicate denudation at rates ca. 300 m/my underway in the middle Oligocene, slowing in the Miocene. Denudation is likely related to erosion following thrusting during which the granites were transported within the south-vergent Bielsa and Millares thrust sheets. The Late Oligocene-Early Miocene AFT PAZ has since been exhumed to its present elevation. In form, results are similar to those from the central Pyrenees (Fitzgerald et al., 1999) but that Oligocene denudation in the west-central Pyrenees occurred later, was slower, and of reduced magnitude when compared to extremely rapid Oligocene denudation recorded ~50 km east in the

  12. Early Pleistocene Glacial Lake Lesley, West Branch Susquehanna River valley, central Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramage, Joan M.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Sasowsky, Ira D.

    1998-02-01

    Laurentide glaciers extended into north central Pennsylvania repeatedly during at least the last 2 million years. Early Pleistocene glaciation extended farther south into central Pennsylvania than any subsequent glaciation, reaching the West Branch Susquehanna River (WBSR) valley. Early Pleistocene ice dammed the northeast-flowing West Branch Susquehanna River at Williamsport, forming Glacial Lake Lesley, a 100-km-long proglacial lake. In this paper, we present compelling evidence for the lake and its age. Maximum lake volume (˜ 100 km 3) was controlled by the elevation of the lowest drainage divide, ˜ 340 m above sea level at Dix, Pennsylvania. Stratified deposits at McElhattan and Linden are used to reconstruct depositional environments in Glacial Lake Lesley. A sedimentary section 40 m thick at McElhattan fines upward from crossbedded sand to fine, wavy to horizontally laminated clay, consistent with lake deepening and increasing distance from the sediment source with time. At Linden, isolated cobbles, interpreted as dropstones, locally deform glacio-lacustrine sediment. We use paleomagnetism as an age correlation tool in the WBSR valley to correlate contemporaneous glaciofluvial and proglacial lacustrine sediments. Reversed remanent polarity in finely-laminated lacustrine clay and silt at McElhattan ( I = 20.4°, D = 146.7°, α95 = 17.7°) and in interbedded silt and sand at Linden ( I = 55.3°, D = 175.2°, α95 = 74.6°) probably corresponds to the latter part of the Matuyama Reversed Polarity Chron, indicating an age between ˜ 770 and ˜ 970 ka. At McElhattan, a diamicton deformed the finely laminated silt and clay by loading and partial fluidization during or soon after lake drainage. As a result, the deformed clay at McElhattan lacks discrete bedding and records a different characteristic remanent magnetism from underlying, undeformed beds. This difference indicates that the characteristic remanent magnetism is detrital. An electrical resistivity

  13. Evaluating the anthropogenic impact on karst environments: Karst Disturbance Index applied to West-Central Florida and Southeast Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, L. A.; Parise, M.; van Beynen, P. E.

    2009-04-01

    Due to its high fragility, that derives from the intrinsic geological and hydrogeological characteristics, karst is extremely vulnerable to degradation and pollution. Although the carrying capacity of these natural environments is low, a variety of human activities is implemented on karst settings generating impacts at the surface and subsurface. The human-induced effects in karst can be assessed by applying a recently developed Karst Disturbance Index (KDI). The KDI consists of 31 environmental indicators contained within the five broad categories: geomorphology, hydrology, atmosphere, biota, and cultural. The purpose of this research is to apply the KDI to two distinct karst areas, West Florida, USA, and Apulia, Southeast Italy. Through its application, the utility of the index can be validated and other important comparisons can be made, such as differences in the karst legislations implemented in each region and the effect of time exposure to human occupation to each karst terrain. Humans have intensively impacted the karst of southeast Italy for thousands of years compared to only decades in west-central Florida. However, west-central Florida's higher population density allows the region to reach disturbance levels comparable to those reached over a longer period in Apulia. Similarly, Italian karst is more diverse than the karst found in west-central Florida, creating an opportunity to test all the KDI indicators. Overall, major disturbances for southeast Italy karst include quarrying, stone clearing, and the dumping of refuse into caves, while west-central Florida suffers most from the infilling of sinkholes, soil compaction, changes in the water table, and vegetation removal. The application of the KDI allows a benchmark of disturbance to be established and later revisited to determine the changing state of human impact for a region. The highlighting of certain indicators that recorded high levels of disturbance also allows regional planners to allocate

  14. Late Holocene Hydroclimate Variability of West-Central Guatemala Driven by NAO and ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stansell, N.; Feller, J. R.; Steinman, B. A.; Lachniet, M. S.; Shea, C.; Avendaño, C.

    2016-12-01

    Finely-laminated sediments from Lake San Francisco in the Huehuetenango province of west-central Guatemala provide a sub-decadal resolution record of hydroclimate variability spanning the last 5200 years. Age control is based on 7 radiocarbon samples of charcoal and lead-210 dating of surface sediments. Modern water isotope samples indicate the lake is currently an open system, and variations of δ18O values of precipitation in the region are driven largely by the amount effect. In contrast, a strong covariance of δ18O and δ13C values combined with pollen evidence in the lower part of the record suggests the lake was a seasonally closed-basin from 5200 to 3200 BP, and was sensitive to evaporation under more arid conditions. There was an overall trend of increasingly wetter conditions during the late Holocene, and a lack of covariance between δ18O and δ13C indicates that the lake transitioned to an open-basin after 3200 BP. The Medieval Climate Anomaly was the wettest period of the late Holocene, and there was a shift to lower precipitation amounts during the Little Ice Age. Present conditions are more arid than most of the last millennium, but δ18O values in the modern sediments are intermediate compared to the full late Holocene. The Lake San Francisco record provides additional evidence that the hydroclimate of Central America is sensitive to both changes in North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Drier conditions at San Francisco over the length of the record were associated with more negative phases of NAO and vice versa. During the last 1500 years, drier conditions at San Francisco were also associated with warmer sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Niño3 region, and it was wetter when SSTs were colder.

  15. Morphotectonics of the Central Sagaing fault West of Mandalay: Trace of the 1