Science.gov

Sample records for central-station nuclear cogeneration

  1. The technical and economic principles and lines of development of nuclear district heating cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu. N.; Khrilev, L. S.; Brailov, V. P.

    2008-11-01

    We consider the social and economic requirements, technical background, and possible lines for future development of nuclear district heating cogeneration for the period leading up to 2030 taking into account the way in which the structure of Russia’s fuel and energy complex is formed.

  2. Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Sherrell R; Flanagan, George F; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2009-03-01

    Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

  3. Technical feasibility and economics of retrofitting an existing nuclear power plant to cogeneration for hot water district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, J.O.; Bauman, H.F.; Jones, P.D.

    1984-04-01

    This report gives the results of a study of the hypothetical conversion of the Prairie Island Nuclear Plant of the Northern States Power Company to cogeneration operation to supply a future hot water district heating system load in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul. The conceptual design of the nuclear turbine retrofitted for cogeneration and of a hot water transmission system has been performed, and the capital investment and annual owning and operating costs have been estimated for thermal energy capacities of 600 and 1200 MW(t). Unit costs of thermal energy (in mid-1982 dollars/million Btu) have been estimated for cogenerated hot water at the plant gate and also for the most economic transmission system from Prairie Island to the Twin Cities. The economic results from the analysis of the Prairie Island plant and transmission route have been generalized for other transmission distances in other locations.

  4. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  6. Central station market development strategies for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Federal market development strategies designed to accelerate the market penetration of central station applications of photovoltaic energy system are analyzed. Since no specific goals were set for the commercialization of central station applications, strategic principles are explored which, when coupled with specific objectives for central stations, can produce a market development implementation plan. The study includes (1) background information on the National Photovoltaic Program, photovoltaic technology, and central stations; (2) a brief market assessment; (3) a discussion of the viewpoints of the electric utility industry with respect to solar energy; (4) a discussion of commercialization issues; and (5) strategy principles. It is recommended that a set of specific goals and objectives be defined for the photovoltaic central station program, and that these goals and objectives evolve into an implementation plan that identifies the appropriate federal role.

  7. Qualification testing for a central station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrester, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Qualification testing for a Central Station Photovoltaic (PV) Facility depends to a great extent on the system design, (fixed versus tracking), and the level of data acquisition/control which is incorporated into the system. The basic elements which require qualification tests include: dc power production/collection; tracker conversion systems; ac utility interface; system level control; and data acquisition/reporting. The qualification tests from the Lungo (ARCO) 1 MW Facility which were completed in January 1983 are discussed. The philosophy and many of the procedures are applicable to any central station PV facility.

  8. Central Station DHC Phase 1 feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, H.L.

    1992-03-01

    This project assisted a private real estate developer in technically assessing the feasibility of integrating a central DHC system into a proposed 72 acre area mixed-use Planned Development (Central Station) just south of the Chicago Central Business District (Loop). The technical assessment concluded that a district heating and cooling system for Central Station will be feasible, provided that a major anchor load can be connected to the system. The system conceived for the site employs a modular approach that adjusts production capacity to actual load growth. The design concept includes gas-fired boilers for heating, gas turbine driven chillers for base loading, electric motor driven chillers for peaking, steam turbines for peak power and back pressure operation, and chilled water storage. Energy will be supplied to the users in the form of steam or low temperature hot water for heating, and low temperature chilled water for cooling.

  9. Survey of cogeneration: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The consumption of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil was surveyed. The potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology was estimated. It was found that an estimated 3700 MWe could potentially be generated in Southern California using cogenerated technology. It is suggested that current technology could provide 2600 MWe and advanced technology could provide 1100 MWe. Approximately 1600 MWt is considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  10. 75 FR 5075 - Coalinga Cogeneration Company, Kern River Cogeneration Company, Mid-Set Cogeneration Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ...-612-000; ER10-611-000] Coalinga Cogeneration Company, Kern River Cogeneration Company, Mid-Set Cogeneration Company, Salinas River Cogeneration Company, Sargent Canyon Cogeneration Company, Sycamore Cogeneration Company; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

  11. Cogeneration power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.

    1978-01-01

    Cogeneration is defined as the combination of electrical generation and process heat for more efficient use of fuel. Comparisons of energy utilization in conventional electric power plants and cogeneration electric power plants are presented. Characteristics of various cogeneration systems are also presented. Systems are analyzed for use in utility systems and industrial systems. Economic and cost analysis are reviewed.

  12. Industrial cogeneration optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

  13. Management decisions for cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, R. R.; Tabors, R. D.

    1982-07-01

    Two interdependent studies which explore the underlying factors in the decision by private, private non-profit, and public sector facility owners to invest in cogeneration technology are summarized. The employ factor analysis techniques to explain the decision to invest and discriminant analysis to group the survey respondents into non-cogenerators and potential cogenerators. Data for both studies come from a survey of commercial, industrial, and institutional electric energy consumers who used more than 750 kW demand in any one month of 1981 for a selected electric utility in the Boston area. There were 129 usable responses to the survey of 32.2% of the population. The studies confirm that a number of factors other than purely economic considerations may prevent use of cogeneration technology at the present time. These factors include: uncertainty caused by regulatory action; desire for energy self sufficiency by the organization; financial flexibility; experience with electricity cogeneration or self generation; and capital budget planning methods.

  14. Central-station applications: System and subsystem research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a number of photovoltaic central power-station studies are summarized. Analysis based upon vendor quotes and construction contractor bids indicate that $50/m2 for area related costs for flat-plate arrays is achievable. Electrical design tradeoffs for multimegawatt systems are considered. The values of photovoltaic central-station plants for various regions are determined from an energy scenario effects study.

  15. Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.

  16. Cogeneration in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.

    1997-07-01

    The former Soviet Union made a major commitment to Cogeneration. The scale and nature of this commitment created a system conceptually different from Cogeneration in the west. The differences were both in scale, in political commitment, and in socio economic impact. This paper addresses some of the largest scale Cogeneration programs, the technology, and the residual impact of these programs. The integration of the Cogeneration and nuclear programs is a key focus of the paper. Soviet designed nuclear power plants were designed to produce both electricity and heat for residential and industrial uses. Energy systems used to implement this design approach are discussed. The significant dependence on these units for heat created an urgent need for continued operation during the winter. Electricity and heat are also produced in nuclear weapons production facilities, as well as power plants. The Soviets also had designed, and initiated construction of a number of nuclear power plants {open_quotes}ATETs{close_quotes} optimized for production of heat as well as electricity. These were canceled.

  17. Maximising returns from cogeneration.

    PubMed

    Walter, Craig

    2013-11-01

    In an article first published in The Australian hospital engineer, Craig Walter, manager-Emerging Markets, A.G. Coombs Pty, examines some of the key considerations for healthcare estates teams looking at installing cogeneration or trigeneration systems and technology.

  18. Integrated photovoltaic central station conceptual designs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.L.; Stoddard, L.E.

    1984-06-01

    Conceptual designs are presented for 100 MW photovoltaic central stations using fixed flat plate, one-axis tracking flat plate, two-axis tracking flat plate, and two-axis tracking high concentration collectors. Designs developed were for specific sites in the southwestern and southeastern United States, and were predicated on mid-1990 plant startup. Estimates of system performance and balance-of-system cost were developed, and cost and efficiency requirements for photovoltaic laminates (unframed modules) and concentrator collectors were derived. Results indicate that all four system types appear potentially viable in the Southwest; fixed and one-axis tracking flat plate concepts appear the best alternatives for the Southeast.

  19. Cogeneration on a southeastern dairy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.C.; Walsh, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a 5 year study on cogeneration on a dairy operation in Georgia are summarized. Details of system operation and performance are given. Discussion of practical and economic viability of a cogeneration system is provided.

  20. SUNY Contracts for Cogeneration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Laurie

    1996-01-01

    The State University of New York-Stony Brook forged a public-private partnership to fund a new plan for cogeneration, a two-step process that uses one fuel source--natural gas--to make two forms of energy. The agreement is designed to free the university from the need to make ongoing capital investment in its utility infrastructure. (MLF)

  1. SUNY Contracts for Cogeneration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Laurie

    1996-01-01

    The State University of New York-Stony Brook forged a public-private partnership to fund a new plan for cogeneration, a two-step process that uses one fuel source--natural gas--to make two forms of energy. The agreement is designed to free the university from the need to make ongoing capital investment in its utility infrastructure. (MLF)

  2. Anthracite firing design for central stations: Ignition and emissions aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Mallol, J.A.; Kukoski, A.E.; Winkin, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The most successful technology for firing pulverized anthracite coals in central station steam generators has accumulated more than 12,000 MWe of ordered capacity worldwide, over half of which is already operational. These units burn coals with less than 14% volatile matter. A recent contract is the 2,100 MWe Yangcheng Power Plant, which will fire a southeast Shanxi anthracite having only 5% volatile matter. Foster Wheeler`s technology ensures self-ignition by integrating, in a double-arch fired, water-wall furnace: (1) partial refractory coverage of the walls, (2) venting of cold primary (coal transport) air, (3) hot gas entrainment at the beginning of the jet-flame. Fuel systems applied to anthracite coals will be reviewed, including the one for the ongoing Hanfeng project in Hebei, which consists of two 660 MWe arch-fired units. Alternative means to improve ignition will also be presented. In addition, emissions from anthracites are characterized, including the effect of an over-fire air design suitable for arch-fired furnaces.

  3. Cogeneration computer model assessment: Advanced cogeneration research study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, L.

    1983-01-01

    Cogeneration computer simulation models to recommend the most desirable models or their components for use by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) in evaluating potential cogeneration projects was assessed. Existing cogeneration modeling capabilities are described, preferred models are identified, and an approach to the development of a code which will best satisfy SCE requirements is recommended. Five models (CELCAP, COGEN 2, CPA, DEUS, and OASIS) are recommended for further consideration.

  4. Fuel cell cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Wimer, J.G.; Archer, D.

    1995-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) sponsors the research and development of engineered systems which utilize domestic fuel supplies while achieving high standards of efficiency, economy, and environmental performance. Fuel cell systems are among the promising electric power generation systems that METC is currently developing. Buildings account for 36 percent of U.S. primary energy consumption. Cogeneration systems for commercial buildings represent an early market opportunity for fuel cells. Seventeen percent of all commercial buildings are office buildings, and large office buildings are projected to be one of the biggest, fastest-growing sectors in the commercial building cogeneration market. The main objective of this study is to explore the early market opportunity for fuel cells in large office buildings and determine the conditions in which they can compete with alternative systems. Some preliminary results and conclusions are presented, although the study is still in progress.

  5. System for a displaying at a remote station data generated at a central station and for powering the remote station from the central station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. C. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A system for displaying at a remote station data generated at a central station and for powering the remote station from the central station is presented. A power signal is generated at the central station and time multiplexed with the data and then transmitted to the remote station. An energy storage device at the remote station is responsive to the transmitted power signal to provide energizing power for the circuits at the remote station during the time interval data is being transmitted to the remote station. Energizing power for the circuits at the remote station is provided by the power signal itself during the time this signal is transmitted. Preferably the energy storage device is a capacitor which is charged by the power signal during the time the power is transmitted and is slightly discharged during the time the data is transmitted to energize the circuits at the remote station.

  6. Power conditioning subsystems for photovoltaic central-station power plants - Technology and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Das, R.; Bulawka, A.

    1985-01-01

    Central-Station (CS) Photovoltaic (PV) systems have the potential of economically displacing significant amounts of centrally generated electricity. However, the technical viability and, to some extent, the economic viability of central-station PV generation technology will depend upon the availability of large power conditioners that are efficient, safe, reliable, and economical. This paper is an overview of the technical and cost requirements that must be met to develop economically viable power conditioning subsystems (PCS) for central-station power plants. The paper also examines various already commercially available PCS hardware that may be suitable for use in today's central PV power stations.

  7. Bronx Zoo cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rivet, P.H.

    1988-09-01

    The New York Zoological Society commenced feasibility studies for a proposed cogeneration and district heating system for the Bronz Zoo in spring 1982. Early studies focused on evaluating the Zoo's energy loads, infrastructure, and energy delivery and financing systems. The Zoological Society and New York City joined in the decision to support the construction of a system which would serve not only the Bronx Zoo but also five nearby City-funded installations, including the adjacent New York Botanical Garden. Since the submission of that study, the project has been modified in scope, scaling back to a generating capacity designed to serve only the Bronz Zoo.

  8. Photovoltaic central station step and touch potential considerations in grounding system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engmann, G.

    1983-01-01

    The probability of hazardous step and touch potentials is an important consideration in central station grounding system design. Steam turbine generating station grounding system design is based on accepted industry practices and there is extensive in-service experience with these grounding systems. A photovoltaic (PV) central station is a relatively new concept and there is limited experience with PV station grounding systems. The operation and physical configuration of a PV central station is very different from a steam electric station. A PV station bears some similarity to a substation and the PV station step and touch potentials might be addressed as they are in substation design. However, the PV central station is a generating station and it is appropriate to examine the effect that the differences and similarities of the two types of generating stations have on step and touch potential considerations.

  9. Advanced cogeneration research study. Survey of cogeneration potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-five facilities that consumed substantial amounts of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil were surveyed by telephone in 1983. The primary objective of the survey was to estimate the potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology. An estimated 3667 MW sub e could potentially be generated using cogenerated technology. Of this total, current technology could provide 2569 MW sub p and advanced technology could provide 1098 MW sub e. Approximately 1611 MW sub t was considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  10. Central station applications planning activities and supporting studies. [application of photovoltaic technology to power generation plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, S. L.; Siegel, B.

    1980-01-01

    The application of photovoltaic technology in central station (utility) power generation plants is considered. A program of data collection and analysis designed to provide additional information about the subset of the utility market that was identified as the initial target for photovoltaic penetration, the oil-dependent utilities (especially muncipals) of the U.S. Sunbelt, is described along with a series of interviews designed to ascertain utility industry opinions about the National Photovoltaic Program as it relates to central station applications.

  11. Cogeneration improves thermal EOR efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Western, E.R. ); Nass, D.W. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports that the successful completion and operation of a cogeneration plant is a prime example of the multi-faceted use of cogeneration. Through high-efficiency operation, significant energy is saved by combining the two process of steam and electrical production. The 225-megawatt (mw) cogeneration plant provides 1,215 million lb/hr of steam for thermally enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) at the Midway-Sunset oil field in south-central California. Overall pollutant emissions as well as total electric and steam production costs have been reduced. The area's biological resources also have been protected.

  12. Advanced Cogeneration Technology Economic Optimization Study (ACTEOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanda, P.; Ansu, Y.; Manuel, E. H., Jr.; Price, W. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The advanced cogeneration technology economic optimization study (ACTEOS) was undertaken to extend the results of the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS). Cost comparisons were made between designs involving advanced cogeneration technologies and designs involving either conventional cogeneration technologies or not involving cogeneration. For the specific equipment cost and fuel price assumptions made, it was found that: (1) coal based cogeneration systems offered appreciable cost savings over the no cogeneration case, while systems using coal derived liquids offered no costs savings; and (2) the advanced cogeneration systems provided somewhat larger cost savings than the conventional systems. Among the issues considered in the study included: (1) temporal variations in steam and electric demands; (2) requirements for reliability/standby capacity; (3) availability of discrete equipment sizes; (4) regional variations in fuel and electricity prices; (5) off design system performance; and (6) separate demand and energy charges for purchased electricity.

  13. Coal fired air turbine cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Pegg, R. W.

    Fuel options and generator configurations for installation of cogenerator equipment are reviewed, noting that the use of oil or gas may be precluded by cost or legislation within the lifetime of any cogeneration equipment yet to be installed. A coal fueled air turbine cogenerator plant is described, which uses external combustion in a limestone bed at atmospheric pressure and in which air tubes are sunk to gain heat for a gas turbine. The limestone in the 26 MW unit absorbs sulfur from the coal, and can be replaced by other sorbents depending on types of coal available and stringency of local environmental regulations. Low temperature combustion reduces NOx formation and release of alkali salts and corrosion. The air heat is exhausted through a heat recovery boiler to produce process steam, then can be refed into the combustion chamber to satisfy preheat requirements. All parts of the cogenerator are designed to withstand full combustion temperature (1500 F) in the event of air flow stoppage. Costs are compared with those of a coal fired boiler and purchased power, and it is shown that the increased capital requirements for cogenerator apparatus will yield a 2.8 year payback. Detailed flow charts, diagrams and costs schedules are included.

  14. Cogeneration using a thermionic combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, G.; Lieb, D.

    A burner incorporating thermionic converters for both electricity and process heat at a manufacturing plant is described. Since thermionic converters operate at 1600-1800 K for the emitter and 800-1000 K at the collector, the cogeneration system is applicable for copper smelting, glass melting, commercial burners, steel smelting, and petroleum products manufacturing. Care must be taken to couple the heat transfer rates to the thermionic diode characteristics, with minimum air preheat temperatures necessarily above 1000 K and gas temperatures in the furnace at 1600 K. An analytical study is performed of the thermodynamics of the cogeneration cycle, and an example is provided of an application to a steel slab reheat furnace. Efficiencies of up to 90% are shown to be available for the entire cogeneration cycle if the reject heat is reused for process.

  15. Determination of hot-spot susceptibility of multistring photovoltaic modules in a central-station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Weaver, R. W.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Spencer, R.; Arnett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Part of the effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) includes a program to improve module and array reliability. A collaborative activity with industry dealing with the problem of hot-spot heating due to the shadowing of photovoltaic cells in modules and arrays containing several paralleled cell strings is described. The use of multiparallel strings in large central-station arrays introduces the likelihood of unequal current sharing and increased heating levels. Test results that relate power dissipated, current imbalance, cross-strapping frequency, and shadow configuration to hot-spot heating levels are presented. Recommendations for circuit design configurations appropriate to central-station applications that reduce the risk of hot-spot problems are offered. Guidelines are provided for developing hot-spot tests for arrays when current imbalance is a threat.

  16. Determination of hot-spot susceptibility of multistring photovoltaic modules in a central-station application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Weaver, R. W.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Spencer, R.; Arnett, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Part of the effort of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) includes a program to improve module and array reliability. A collaborative activity with industry dealing with the problem of hot-spot heating due to the shadowing of photovoltaic cells in modules and arrays containing several paralleled cell strings is described. The use of multiparallel strings in large central-station arrays introduces the likelihood of unequal current sharing and increased heating levels. Test results that relate power dissipated, current imbalance, cross-strapping frequency, and shadow configuration to hot-spot heating levels are presented. Recommendations for circuit design configurations appropriate to central-station applications that reduce the risk of hot-spot problems are offered. Guidelines are provided for developing hot-spot tests for arrays when current imbalance is a threat.

  17. Shadowing on Apollo 12 Solar Cells and Possible Movement of the ALSEP Central Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Paul A.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A fortuitous arrangement of a west-facing solar cell and a bracket on the Apollo 12 ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) has allowed us to precisely determine the relative position of the Sun near sunset relative to the Apollo 12 central station over a period of nearly 8 years. The small bracket, mounted on the central station due west of the cell, casts a shadow on the cell near sunset, decreasing the output of the cell proportional to the area of shadow covering the cell. The pattern of shadowing by the bracket gives good agreement with the known change of solar azimuth on a yearly timescale, but the pattern gradually but constantly changed from year-to-year, in a manner inconsistent with the known and changing position of the Sun.

  18. Advanced cogeneration research study: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluhm, S. A.; Moore, N.; Rosenberg, L.; Slonski, M.

    1983-01-01

    This study provides a broad based overview of selected areas relevant to the development of a comprehensive Southern California Edison (SCE) advanced cogeneration project. The areas studied are: (1) Cogeneration potential in the SCE service territory; (2) Advanced cogeneration technologies; and (3) Existing cogeneration computer models. An estimated 3700 MW sub E could potentially be generated from existing industries in the Southern California Edison service territory using cogeneration technology. Of this total, current technology could provide 2600 MW sub E and advanced technology could provide 1100 MW sub E. The manufacturing sector (SIC Codes 20-39) was found to have the highest average potential for current cogeneration technology. The mining sector (SIC Codes 10-14) was found to have the highest potential for advanced technology.

  19. Cogeneration: A Campus Option? A Cogeneration Manual for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Robert Lloyd; Goble, Wendy Coleman

    Guidelines for colleges who may want to implement cogeneration on their campuses are presented. Cogeneration has been defined as "the simultaneous production of electric power and other forms of useful energy--such as heat or process steam--from the same facility." The history of cogeneration, current and future technologies, and…

  20. Cogeneration: A Campus Option? A Cogeneration Manual for Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Robert Lloyd; Goble, Wendy Coleman

    Guidelines for colleges who may want to implement cogeneration on their campuses are presented. Cogeneration has been defined as "the simultaneous production of electric power and other forms of useful energy--such as heat or process steam--from the same facility." The history of cogeneration, current and future technologies, and…

  1. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

  2. Cogeneration for existing alfalfa processing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This study is designed to look at the application of gas-turbine generator cogeneration to a typical Nebraska alfalfa processing mill. The practicality is examined of installing a combustion turbine generator at a plant site and modifying existing facilities for generating electricity, utilizing the electricity generated, selling excess electricity to the power company and incorporating the turbine exhaust flow as a drying medium for the alfalfa. The results of this study are not conclusive but the findings are summarized.

  3. Biomass waste utilization for cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, L.D.; Janarthanan, A.K.; Parker, F.D.

    1996-12-31

    Application of biomass gasification technologies for electrical power production offers an opportunity to couple waste management with energy cogeneration. These applications call for reliable pyrolysis/gasification systems that are feedstock versatile and economically competitive, particularly at smaller biomass capacities. The Spouted Bed Gasifier (SBG) system being developed jointly by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Utilities Management Group has been designed specifically to address the niche for applications producing up to 10 MWe. This paper describes the use of the SBG system as the fuel conversion module in waste management - electrical cogeneration systems sized to fit a large institutional setting (a university), an animal production facility (cattle feed lot) and a food processing plant (sugar cane mill). The paper uses pilot plant data for wood gasification as the basis for biomass conversion performance to estimate capital cost and economic return for cogeneration in each of the settings. For institutional applications ranging from 0.15 to 5 MWe capacity, the capital investment ranges from $650,000 to $7,000,000. Payback times range from 3 to 6 years.

  4. Selection of alternative central-station technologies for the Satellite Power System (SPS) comparative assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samsa, M.

    1980-01-01

    An important effort is the Satellite Power System (SPS) comparative Assessment is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies to be compared with the SPS concept. The ground rules, criteria, and screening procedure applied in the selection of those alternative technologies are summarized. The final set of central station alternatives selected for comparison with the SPS concept includes: (1) light water reactor with improved fuel utilization, (2) conventional coal combustion with improved environmental controls, (3) open cycle gas turbine with integral low Btu gasifier, (4) terrestrial photovoltaic, (5) liquid metal fast breeder reactor, and (6) magnetic confinement fusion.

  5. Cogeneration development and market potential in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F.; Levine, M.D.; Naeb, J.; Xin, D.

    1996-05-01

    China`s energy production is largely dependent on coal. China currently ranks third in global CO{sub 2} emissions, and rapid economic expansion is expected to raise emission levels even further in the coming decades. Cogeneration provides a cost-effective way of both utilizing limited energy resources and minimizing the environmental impacts from use of fossil fuels. However, in the last 10 years state investments for cogeneration projects in China have dropped by a factor of 4. This has prompted this study. Along with this in-depth analysis of China`s cogeneration policies and investment allocation is the speculation that advanced US technology and capital can assist in the continued growth of the cogeneration industry. This study provides the most current information available on cogeneration development and market potential in China.

  6. Potential for cogeneration in Maryland. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Cogeneration is a name given to energy systems that produce both electric power and useful thermal energy such as steam. While cogeneration markets have flourished in California, Texas, and some states, those in Maryland have not. A primary reason is that the industries that have been targeted in other states--e.g., oil refining, pulp and paper, chemicals, food processing--are not major elements of Maryland's industrial base. The study estimates the potential for future cogeneration in Maryland, both large units and small packaged systems, and assesses the potential impact of cogeneration systems on Maryland's energy needs between now and 2005. The study is presented in three volumes. Because of significant differences between large- and small-scale cogeneration, the analysis of these two systems was performed separately. This volume is a summary document presenting the findings from both studies.

  7. System studies of coal fired-closed cycle MHD for central station power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zauderer, B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the closed-cycle MHD results obtained in a recent study of various advanced energy-conversion power systems. The direct coal-fired MHD topping-steam bottoming cycle was established as the current choice for central station power generation. Emphasis is placed on the background assumptions and the conclusions that can be drawn from the closed-cycle MHD analysis. It is concluded that closed-cycle MHD has efficiencies comparable to that of open-cycle MHD. Its cost will possibly be slightly higher than that of the open-cycle MHD system. Also, with reasonable fuel escalation assumptions, both systems can produce lower-cost electricity than conventional steam power plants. Suggestions for further work in closed-cycle MHD components and systems are made.

  8. System studies of coal fired-closed cycle MHD for central station power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zauderer, B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the closed-cycle MHD results obtained in a recent study of various advanced energy-conversion power systems. The direct coal-fired MHD topping-steam bottoming cycle was established as the current choice for central station power generation. Emphasis is placed on the background assumptions and the conclusions that can be drawn from the closed-cycle MHD analysis. It is concluded that closed-cycle MHD has efficiencies comparable to that of open-cycle MHD. Its cost will possibly be slightly higher than that of the open-cycle MHD system. Also, with reasonable fuel escalation assumptions, both systems can produce lower-cost electricity than conventional steam power plants. Suggestions for further work in closed-cycle MHD components and systems are made.

  9. Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, M. K.; Antoniak, Z. I.

    1992-04-01

    Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be decoupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

  10. Retrofit cogeneration system increases refrigeration capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Amberger, R.F. ); DeFrees, J.A. )

    1993-04-01

    This article describes a retrofit cogeneration systems for increasing refrigeration capacity at a milk processing plant in Queens, New York. The natural gas/ammonia cogeneration and subcooling systems reduce CO[sub 2] emissions and provide cost and energy savings. The topics of the article include the innovative aspects, computer modeling for system analysis, analysis technique, system configuration, refrigeration loads, operations and maintenance, cost effectiveness and environmental benefits.

  11. Cogeneration of water and power

    SciTech Connect

    Sephton, H.H.; Frank, K.F.

    1997-09-01

    Need of pure water in areas of limited supply has driven the development of technologies to permit recycling of available water and to generate new water supplies by purifying saline resources. These technologies include sedimentation, filtration, softening, ion exchange, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis and distillation. Some of these developments serve needs of the power industry, others evolved due to the synergistic relationship between generating water and power. Large plant seawater desalination depend on this synergism for best economy, especially in Southern California and the Middle East. Applying new processes promise to drive down the cost of desalinated water, based on recently improved thermal efficiencies and on capital cost reductions. Cogeneration with these processes provides new mutual benefits for power and water technologies.

  12. Coal gasifier cogeneration powerplant project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. I.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Industrial cogeneration and utility pr systems were analyzed and a conceptual design study was conducted to evaluate the economic feasibility of a coal gasifier power plant for NASA Lewis Research Center. Site location, plant size, and electric power demand were considered in criteria developed for screening and selecting candidates that could use a wide variety of coals, including that from Ohio. A fluidized bed gasifier concept was chosen as the baseline design and key components of the powerplant were technically assessed. No barriers to environmental acceptability are foreseen. If funded, the powerplant will not only meet the needs of the research center, but will reduce the commercial risk for utilities and industries by fully verifying and demonstrating the technology, thus accelerating commercialization.

  13. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 5: Cogeneration systems results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-05-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems is examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. The methodology and results of matching the cogeneration energy conversion systems to approximately 50 industrial processes are described. Results include fuel energy saved, levelized annual energy cost saved, return on investment, and operational factors relative to the noncogeneration base cases.

  14. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 5: Cogeneration systems results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems is examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. The methodology and results of matching the cogeneration energy conversion systems to approximately 50 industrial processes are described. Results include fuel energy saved, levelized annual energy cost saved, return on investment, and operational factors relative to the noncogeneration base cases.

  15. System studies of coal fired-closed cycle MHD for central station power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zauderer, B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the closed cycle MHD results obtained in a recent study of various advanced energy conversion (ECAS) power systems. The study was part of the first phase of this ECAS study. Since this was the first opportunity to evaluate the coal fired closed cycle MHD system, a number of iterations were required to partially optimize the system. The present paper deals with the latter part of the study in which the direct coal fired, MHD topping-steam bottoming cycle was established as the current choice for central station power generation. The emphasis of the paper is on the background assumptions and the conclusions that can be drawn from the closed cycle MHD analysis. The author concludes that closed cycle MHD has efficiencies comparable to that of open cycle MHD and that both systems are considerably more efficient than the other system studies in Phase 1 of the GE ECAS. Its cost will possibly be slightly higher than that of the open cycle MHD system. Also, with reasonable fuel escalation assumptions, both systems can produce lower cost electricity than conventional steam power plants. Suggestions for further work in closed cycle MHD components and systems is made.

  16. System studies of coal fired-closed cycle MHD for central station power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zauderer, B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the closed cycle MHD results obtained in a recent study of various advanced energy conversion (ECAS) power systems. The study was part of the first phase of this ECAS study. Since this was the first opportunity to evaluate the coal fired closed cycle MHD system, a number of iterations were required to partially optimize the system. The present paper deals with the latter part of the study in which the direct coal fired, MHD topping-steam bottoming cycle was established as the current choice for central station power generation. The emphasis of the paper is on the background assumptions and the conclusions that can be drawn from the closed cycle MHD analysis. The author concludes that closed cycle MHD has efficiencies comparable to that of open cycle MHD and that both systems are considerably more efficient than the other system studies in Phase 1 of the GE ECAS. Its cost will possibly be slightly higher than that of the open cycle MHD system. Also, with reasonable fuel escalation assumptions, both systems can produce lower cost electricity than conventional steam power plants. Suggestions for further work in closed cycle MHD components and systems is made.

  17. 78 FR 31916 - Yuma Cogeneration Associates; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Yuma Cogeneration Associates; Notice of Filing Take notice that on... Commission (Commission) implementing the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), Yuma Cogeneration Associates (Yuma Cogeneration) submitted a petition for a limited waiver of the efficiency...

  18. Cogeneration demonstration at Riegel Textile Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.; Smith, M.J.; Stone, G.A.

    1981-09-01

    Riegel Textile Corporation, headquartered in Greenville, South Carolina, operates a weaving, dyeing, and finishing plant in Ware Shoals, South Carolina, in which substantial quantities of low-pressure steam are required for process of woven and knit fabrics. Steam is also used in the manufacture of chemicals and for space heating. The cogeneration cycle of topping high-pressure steam is applicable to many industries. It must be emphasized, however, that because of the high capital cost of steam-generator replacement, economic justification may not always exist. If an incremental expansion or replacement of steam-generation equipment is planned, then the economic justification for cogeneration can be very attractive. Selling power under the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) to the local utility may also improve the cost-effectiveness of a cogeneration project in some cases, depending on the local utility rate structure. 3 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Fuel cell co-generation: the future of co-generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Does, Ton

    This paper presents the position of co-generation in a number of countries in the European Union and in more detail the situation in The Netherlands where, at this moment, about more than 30% of the electricity production is based on co-generation. The principal obstacles for the future development of co-generation has been presented. Based on the development of co-generation, which is the most economic and the most efficient way of producing electricity with the advantages for energy conservation and the environment, the fuel cell can play an important role in the change to a more decentralized power production. A future development with a household fuel cell, as an ultimate consequence for decentralized power production, has been presented as a challenge for the actors in the energy market. Based on the Dutch experience, the requirements and critical success factors for fuel cells in a household application have been discussed.

  20. Thermal tracking cogeneration -- A new or old idea? Cogeneration for multi-thermal loads

    SciTech Connect

    Geers, J.R.

    1998-04-01

    The idea of designing a cogeneration project that produces electricity based on the existing heating load is common to many cogeneration projects, but may be limiting the ultimate potential to the end user. Cogeneration which is developed as a power generator producing a small amount of steam for a host load is also common. However, the idea of designing a cogeneration facility to track multiple utility loads is not as common. Where the concept has been used, the projects have been very successful. This article has been written as a primer for professionals looking for ideas when performing analysis of a potential cogeneration project, and as a thought-provoker for end users. The authors will look at each of the possible loads, outline various technical considerations and factors, look at the factors impacting the economics, and lay out an approach that would provide assistance to those trying to analyze a cogeneration project without specialized engineering assistance. Regulatory, legal and financing issues are covered in other sources.

  1. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37... by State State name Oil/gas savings Btu/kWh Alabama 33 Arizona 802 Arkansas 1,363 California 3,502...

  2. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37... Wyoming 75 Data are based upon 1987 oil, natural gas and electricity statistics published by DOE's Energy...

  3. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37... Wyoming 75 Data are based upon 1987 oil, natural gas and electricity statistics published by DOE's Energy...

  4. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37... Wyoming 75 Data are based upon 1987 oil, natural gas and electricity statistics published by DOE's Energy...

  5. 10 CFR 503.37 - Cogeneration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cogeneration. 503.37 Section 503.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.37... Wyoming 75 Data are based upon 1987 oil, natural gas and electricity statistics published by DOE's Energy...

  6. Electricity and heat production by biomass cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčič, Simon; Marčič, Milan

    2017-07-01

    In Slovenia, approximately 2 % of electricity is generated using cogeneration systems. Industrial and district heating networks ensure the growth of such technology. Today, many existing systems are outdated, providing myriad opportunities for reconstruction. One concept for the development of households and industry envisages the construction of several small biomass units and the application of natural gas as a fuel with a relatively extensive distribution network. This concept has good development potential in Slovenia. Forests cover 56 % of the surface area in Slovenia, which has, as a result, a lot of waste wood to be turned into biomass. Biomass is an important fuel in Slovenia. Biomass is gasified in a gasifier, and the wood gas obtained is used to power the gas engine. This paper describes a biomass cogeneration system as the first of this type in Slovenia, located in Ruše.

  7. Development of Residential SOFC Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takashi; Miyachi, Itaru; Suzuki, Minoru; Higaki, Katsuki

    2011-06-01

    Since 2001 Kyocera has been developing 1kW class Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for power generation system. We have developed a cell, stack, module and system. Since 2004, Kyocera and Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. have been developed SOFC residential co-generation system. From 2007, we took part in the "Demonstrative Research on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" Project conducted by New Energy Foundation (NEF). Total 57 units of 0.7kW class SOFC cogeneration systems had been installed at residential houses. In spite of residential small power demand, the actual electric efficiency was about 40%(netAC,LHV), and high CO2 reduction performance was achieved by these systems. Hereafter, new joint development, Osaka Gas, Toyota Motors, Kyocera and Aisin Seiki, aims early commercialization of residential SOFC CHP system.

  8. Power conditioning subsystems for photovoltaic central-station power plants - State-of-the-art and advanced technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulawka, A.; Krauthamer, S.; Das, R.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the technical and near-term cost requirements that must be met to develop economically viable power conditioning subsystems (PCS) for large-scale, central photovoltaic power stations. Various commercially available PCS hardware suitable for use in today's central photovoltaic power stations are also surveyed. Federal and industrial activities in the research and development of advanced PCSs that will contribute to the attainment of fully competitive, large-scale photovoltaic power stations are reviewed. The status of the DOE central station PCS program is discussed.

  9. Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

  10. Biomass externally fired gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Eidensten, L.; Yan, J.; Svedberg, G.

    1996-07-01

    This paper is a presentation of a systematic study on externally fired gas turbine cogeneration fueled by biomass. The gas turbine is coupled in series with a biomass combustion furnace in which the gas turbine exhaust is used to support combustion. Three cogeneration systems have been simulated. They are systems without a gas turbine, with a non-top-fired gas turbine, and a top-fired gas turbine. For all systems, three types of combustion equipment have been selected: circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, grate fired steam boiler, and grate fired hot water boiler. The sizes of biomass furnaces have been chosen as 20 MW and 100 MW fuel inputs. The total efficiencies based on electricity plus process heat, electrical efficiencies, and the power-to-heat ratios for various alternatives have been calculated. For each of the cogeneration systems, part-load performance with varying biomass fuel input is presented. Systems with CFB boilers have a higher total efficiency and electrical efficiency than other systems when a top-fired gas turbine is added. However, the systems with grate fired steam boilers allow higher combustion temperature in the furnace than CFB boilers do. Therefore, a top combustor may not be needed when high temperature is already available. Only one low-grade fuel system is then needed and the gas turbine can operate with a very clean working medium.

  11. Black liquor gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, S.; Larson, E.D.; Keutz, T.G.; Berglin, N.

    1998-07-01

    The kraft process dominates pulp and paper production worldwide. Black liquor, a mixture of lignin and inorganic chemicals, is generated in this process as fiber is extracted from wood. At most kraft mills today, black liquor is burned in Tomlinson boilers to produce steam for on-site heat and power and to recover the inorganic chemicals for reuse in the process. Globally, the black liquor generation rate is about 85,000 MW{sub fuel} (or 0.5 million tonnes of dry solids per day), with nearly 50% of this in North America. The majority of presently installed Tomlinson boilers will reach the end of their useful lives during the next 5 to 20 years. As a replacement for Tomlinson-based cogeneration, black liquor-gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration promises higher electrical efficiency, with prospective environmental, safety, and capital cost benefits for kraft mills. Several companies are pursuing commercialization of black liquor gasification for gas turbine applications. This paper presents results of detailed performance modeling of gasifier/gas turbine cogeneration systems using different black liquor gasifiers modeled on proposed commercial designs.

  12. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cogeneration facility for which any of the energy input is natural gas or oil, and the installation of which... total energy input of natural gas and oil to the facility; or (B) If the useful thermal energy output is... total energy input of natural gas and oil to the facility. (ii) For any topping-cycle cogeneration...

  13. Design considerations for a cogeneration system utilizing biogas

    SciTech Connect

    Koelsch, R.K.; Walker, L.P.; Pellerin, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of biogas in a cogeneration system producing electricity and hot water on a dairy farm has gained considerable attention in recent years. This paper is a compilation of the experiences and data gained from several research and on-farm installations. From these experiences, recommendations are made for the design, installation, and operation of a cogeneration system.

  14. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities. 292.205 Section 292.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... for topping-cycle facilities—(1) Operating standard. For any topping-cycle cogeneration facility,...

  15. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities. 292.205 Section 292.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... for topping-cycle facilities—(1) Operating standard. For any topping-cycle cogeneration facility,...

  16. Cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS). Volume V. Cogeneration system results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlaugh, H.E.; Hall, E.W.; Brown, D.H.; Priestly, R.R.; Knightly, W.F.

    1980-05-01

    The most-attractive advanced conversion systems for implementation in industrial cogeneration systems for the 1985-2000 time period, which permit increased use of coal or coal-derived fuels, are identified and evaluated. The advantages of using advanced-technology systems in industrial cogeneration are quantified and assessed. Nine systems evaluated include: steam turbine, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycles, Stirling engines, closed-cycle gas turbines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics. The systems selected showed desirable cogeneration characteristics and the capability of being developed for commercialization in the 1985 to 200 year time frame. These energy-conversion systems were then heat matched and power matched to over 50 specific industrial processes selected primarily from the six major energy-consuming industrial sectors of food; paper and pulp; chemicals; petroleum refineries; stone, clay and glass; and primary metals. Several processes were also included from wood products and textiles. On each of these matches, analyses were performed to evaluate and compare the advanced technology systems on such factors as: fuel energy saved, flexibility in fuel use, capital costs, return on investment and annual energy cost saved, emissions, and applicability to a number of industries. Earlier volumes contain information on the analytical approach, industrial-process characteristics, and energy-conversion-system characteristics; this volume presents the methodology of matching the cogeneration systems, the results of the performance analysis, an economic analysis, the national savings, and results.

  17. Industrial Cogeneration Optimization Program: A summary of two studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    Two industrial cogeneration optimization programs were performed to examine the economic and energy saving impacts of adding cogeneration to site specific plants in the chemical, food, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, and textile industries. Industrial cogeneration is reviewed. The two parallel ICOP studies are described. The five industrial sectors are also described, followed by highlights of each of the site specific case studies. Steam turbine cogeneration systems fired by coal or alternative fuels are generally the most attractive in terms of economic performance and oil/gas savings potential. Of the 15 cogeneration systems selected as optimum in the ICOP studies, 11 were coal or wood fired steam turbines. By contrast, gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines, which are limited to oil or gas firing, are usually less economical.

  18. Solar voltaic generator requirements for large-scale central-station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canada, A. H.

    A solar voltaic generation (SVG) reference system is examined in terms of engineering and manufacturing requirements and solar voltaic generator characteristics. The SVG system proposed here is composed of four subsystems chosen to conform to existing sectors of the utility engineering and manufacturing industry and the emerging SVG unit supply industry. The four subsystems are: the SVG subsystem, the transmission and station structure system, the power apparatus subsystem, and the monitoring and control subsystem. The material and engineering requirements for the SVG reference system are compared with those for a typical nuclear power plant.

  19. Efficient Use of Cogeneration and Fuel Diversification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunickis, M.; Balodis, M.; Sarma, U.; Cers, A.; Linkevics, O.

    2015-12-01

    Energy policy of the European Community is implemented by setting various goals in directives and developing support mechanisms to achieve them. However, very often these policies and legislation come into contradiction with each other, for example Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources and Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency, repealing Directive 2004/8/EC on the promotion of cogeneration based on a useful heat demand. In this paper, the authors attempt to assess the potential conflicts between policy political objectives to increase the share of high-efficiency co-generation and renewable energy sources (RES), based on the example of Riga district heating system (DHS). If a new heat source using biomass is built on the right bank of Riga DHS to increase the share of RES, the society could overpay for additional heat production capacities, such as a decrease in the loading of existing generating units, thereby contributing to an inefficient use of existing capacity. As a result, the following negative consequences may arise: 1) a decrease in primary energy savings (PES) from high-efficiency cogeneration in Riga DHS, 2) an increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Baltic region, 3) the worsening security situation of electricity supply in the Latvian power system, 4) an increase in the electricity market price in the Lithuanian and Latvian price areas of Nord Pool power exchange. Within the framework of the research, calculations of PES and GHG emission volumes have been performed for the existing situation and for the situation with heat source, using biomass. The effect of construction of biomass heat source on power capacity balances and Nord Pool electricity prices has been evaluated.

  20. Benefits of advanced technology in industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    This broad study is aimed at identifying the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration for the 1985 to 2000 time period and assessing the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to using today's commercially available technology. Energy conversion systems being studied include those using steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, closed cycle gas turbines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Specific cases using today's commercially available technology are being included to serve as a baseline for assessing the advantages of advanced technology.

  1. Solar voltaic generator requirements for large-scale central-station

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.H.

    1982-09-01

    Solar Voltaic Generation (SVG) is ready to take its place alongside Coal Fired Generation (CFG) and Boiling Water Reactor Generation (BWRG) as a world strategic energy option in this century. In the U.S. National Energy Policy Plan, selection of an alternative SVG option, providing 10 Quads of prime energy electric generation, would ensure the U.S. as an oil exporting country and consume less capital and materials than the NEPP's coal-nuclear direction. The power engineering of SVG is comprised of four Subsystems, three of which are shown to be outside the photovoltaics industry but well within current utility industry engineering and manufacturing, and current utilities procurement and installation . . . requiring no turn-key contractor. Engineering and manufacturing requirements on the SVG Unit Subsystem and on the fuel (isolation) based plant availability and generation, the only concerns of the photovoltaic industry, are examined in the context of meeting this Solar Voltaic Generation-2000 goal for Energy Decency: Abundant, Affordable, Amicable in the Environment.

  2. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the Design of Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Arrays for Central Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project, focuses on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt level central station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat plate central station or other large scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost effective configurations. Design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory reserch activities are investigated. Technical issues are examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect/engineer and laboratory researcher. Topics on optimum source circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements, and array operation and maintenance are discussed.

  3. Fuel cells for chemicals and energy cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaide, Francisco; Cabot, Pere-Lluís; Brillas, Enric

    Fuel cells (FCs) are mainly applied for electricity generation. This paper presents a review of specific FCs with ability to produce useful chemicals at the same time. The chemical cogeneration processes have been classified according to the different types of fuel cells. Thus, it is shown that a flow alkaline FC (AFC) is able to produce hydrogen peroxide. In aqueous acid or neutral FCs, hydrogenations, dehydrogenations, halogenations and oxidations, together with pollution abatement solutions, are reported. Hydrogen peroxide and valuable organic chemicals can also be obtained from polymer electrolyte FCs (PEFCs). A phosphoric acid FC (PAFC) allows the selective oxidation of hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds, and the production of industrial compounds such as cresols. Molten salt FCs (similar to molten carbonate or MCFCs) can be applied to obtain acetaldehyde with high product selectivity from ethanol oxidation at the anode. Solid oxide FCs (SOFCs) are able of chemical cogeneration of valuable industrial inorganic compounds such as nitric oxide with high yields. Although the number of related papers in the literature is small, the potential economic interest of this emergent field, related to the recent commercial development of fuel cells, is demonstrated in some cases, and the corresponding results encourage the development of FCs with electrocogeneration of useful chemicals with high added value and electricity.

  4. Chemical, power firms team up in cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.

    1994-02-21

    US chemical producers are more eager than ever to free up any available capital by shedding operation that are not central to their businesses. As part of this soul searching, chemical companies are questioning whether they should continue to invest the time and tie up capital necessary to operate on-site power generation facilities. Many chemical firms have long produced their own power through the process of cogeneration--which allows for the simultaneous production of electricity and steam from the same energy source--because it provides reliable power at low cost. But in this back-to-basics environment, petrochemical producers want the benefits of self-generation without the headaches. Recognizing this, electric utilities are spinning off independent power subsidiaries. These companies can venture out of the utility's traditional service area to aggressively seek to own or operate cogeneration facilities and then supply other companies with an economical source of power. Providing such services is an attractive way for power companies to diversify their business and buoy return on investment enough to satisfy restless shareholders. Companies in the chemical and related industries pose a prime opportunity because their plants have relatively large requirements for both electricity and steam. As these two trends converge, industry consultants predict an increasing number of chemical and power companies will form mutually beneficial partnerships.

  5. Modular cogeneration in district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Aalto, P.; Gleason, T.C.J.; Skalafuris, A.J.

    1987-12-01

    The use of prepackaged cogeneration systems of modular size (100 kWe - 10 MWe) in conjunction with district heating and cooling is proposed as a way to enhance the energy conservation potential of both cogeneration and district energy systems. This report examines the technical and institutional aspects of this marriage of technologies, and develops a research agenda whose goal is to define this potential use of cogeneration more accurately and to develop the generic technology base needed to bring it to actuality. 11 refs.

  6. Regional characteristics relevant to advanced technology cogeneration development. [industrial energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    To assist DOE in establishing research and development funding priorities in the area of advanced energy conversion technoloy, researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory studied those specific factors within various regions of the country that may influence cogeneration with advanced energy conversion systems. Regional characteristics of advanced technology cogeneration possibilities are discussed, with primary emphasis given to coal derived fuels. Factors considered for the study were regional industry concentration, purchased fuel and electricity prices, environmental constraints, and other data of interest to industrial cogeneration.

  7. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Final report, September 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jerry; McWhinney, Jr., Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    This study program is part of the DOE Integrated Industry Cogeneration Program to optimize, evaluate, and demonstrate cogeneration systems, with direct participation of the industries most affected. One objective is to characterize five major energy-intensive industries with respect to their energy-use profiles. The industries are: petroleum refining and related industries, textile mill products, paper and allied products, chemicals and allied products, and food and kindred products. Another objective is to select optimum cogeneration systems for site-specific reference case plants in terms of maximum energy savings subject to given return on investment hurdle rates. Analyses were made that define the range of optimal cogeneration systems for each reference-case plant considering technology applicability, economic factors, and energy savings by type of fuel. This study also provides guidance to other parts of the program through information developed with regard to component development requirements, institutional and regulatory barriers, as well as fuel use and environmental considerations. (MCW)

  8. Energy Integrated Dairy Farm digester and cogeneration system installation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.C.; Walsh, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Georgia Tech finished in December, 1983 Phase II (system installation and startup) of its four year Energy Integrated Dairy Farm System (EIDFS) program. This paper outlines the selection and installation of the anaerobic digestion and cogeneration components of the EIDFS.

  9. Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Fowler, Thomas David; Karanikas, John Michael

    2009-12-29

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

  10. Decision making for best cogeneration power integration into a grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Asmar, Joseph; Zakhia, Nadim; Kouta, Raed; Wack, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Cogeneration systems are known to be efficient power systems for their ability to reduce pollution. Their integration into a grid requires simultaneous consideration of the economic and environmental challenges. Thus, an optimal cogeneration power are adopted to face such challenges. This work presents a novelty in selectinga suitable solution using heuristic optimization method. Its aim is to optimize the cogeneration capacity to be installed according to the economic and environmental concerns. This novelty is based on the sensitivity and data analysis method, namely, Multiple Linear Regression (MLR). This later establishes a compromise between power, economy, and pollution, which leads to find asuitable cogeneration power, and further, to be integrated into a grid. The data exploited were the results of the Genetic Algorithm (GA) multi-objective optimization. Moreover, the impact of the utility's subsidy on the selected power is shown.

  11. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  12. Optimization of Irreversible Cogeneration Systems under Alternative Performance Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaca, M.; Gumus, M.; Inan, A. T.; Yilmaz, T.

    2009-10-01

    In this study, an exergy optimization has been performed for a cogeneration plant consisting of an irreversible Carnot heat engine. In the analysis, different objective functions have been defined based on alternative performance criteria and the optimum values of the design parameters of a cogeneration cycle were determined for different criteria. In this context, the effects of irreversibilities on the exergetic performance are investigated, and the results are discussed.

  13. Riegel Textile Corporation, Ware Shoals cogeneration. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-31

    Riegel signed a cooperative cost sharing agreement with the Department of Energy to design, purchase, install, and operate a new cogeneration system in which a new turbine/generator unit exhausts steam at 225/sup 0/PSIG. The background of Riegel's previous cogeneration experience is presented; this project is described; and problems experienced in getting the boiler on-line and the turbine/generator up to speed are summarized. The project cost, operating cost, savings, and return on investment are presented. (MHR)

  14. Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

  15. Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

    1994-09-01

    To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

  16. Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Camara, E.H.

    1985-08-01

    Work at the Institute of Gas Technology on fuel cell technology for commercial application has focused on phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. The author describes the status of the three technologies, and concludes that the MCFC in particular can efficiently supply energy in industrial cogeneration applications. The four largest industrial markets are primary metals, chemicals, food, and wood products, which collectively represent a potential market of 1000 to 1500 MEe annual additions. At $700 to $900/kW, fuel cells can successfully compete with other advanced systems. An increase in research and development support would be in the best interest of industry and the nation. 1 reference, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Proceedings of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project Research Forum on the design of flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central stations

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The Flat-Plate Solar Array Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, has focused on advancing technologies relevant to the design and construction of megawatt-level central-station systems. Photovoltaic modules and arrays for flat-plate central-station or other large-scale electric power production facilities require the establishment of a technical base that resolves design issues and results in practical and cost-effective configurations. The Central Station Research Forum addressed design, qualification and maintenance issues related to central-station arrays derived from the engineering and operating experiences of early applications and parallel laboratory research activities. Technical issues were examined from the viewpoint of the utility engineer, architect-engineer and laboratory researcher. The forum included presentations on optimum source-circuit designs, module insulation design for high system voltages, array safety, structural interface design, measurements and array operation and maintenance. The Research Forum focused on current capabilities as well as design difficulties requiring additional technological thrusts and/or continued research emphasis. Session topic summaries highlighting major points during group discussions, identifying promising technical approaches or areas of future research, are presented.

  18. Cogeneration steam turbines from Siemens: New solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Kholodkov, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    The Enhanced Platform system intended for the design and manufacture of Siemens AG turbines is presented. It combines organizational and production measures allowing the production of various types of steam-turbine units with a power of up to 250 MWel from standard components. The Enhanced Platform designs feature higher efficiency, improved reliability, better flexibility, longer overhaul intervals, and lower production costs. The design features of SST-700 and SST-900 steam turbines are outlined. The SST-700 turbine is used in backpressure steam-turbine units (STU) or as a high-pressure cylinder in a two-cylinder condensing turbine with steam reheat. The design of an SST-700 single-cylinder turbine with a casing without horizontal split featuring better flexibility of the turbine unit is presented. An SST-900 turbine can be used as a combined IP and LP cylinder (IPLPC) in steam-turbine or combined-cycle power units with steam reheat. The arrangements of a turbine unit based on a combination of SST-700 and SST-900 turbines or SST-500 and SST-800 turbines are presented. Examples of this combination include, respectively, PGU-410 combinedcycle units (CCU) with a condensing turbine and PGU-420 CCUs with a cogeneration turbine. The main equipment items of a PGU-410 CCU comprise an SGT5-4000F gas-turbine unit (GTU) and STU consisting of SST-700 and SST-900RH steam turbines. The steam-turbine section of a PGU-420 cogeneration power unit has a single-shaft turbine unit with two SST-800 turbines and one SST-500 turbine giving a power output of N el. STU = 150 MW under condensing conditions.

  19. Exergy analysis and simulation of a 30MW cogeneration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Nikhil; Samsher; Kachhwaha, S. S.; Attri, Rajesh

    2013-06-01

    Cogeneration cycle is an efficient mean to recover the waste heat from the flue gases coming out of gas turbine. With the help of computer simulation, design parameters may be selected for the best performance of cogeneration cycle. In the present work a program is executed in software EES on the basis of mathematical modelling described in paper to study cogeneration cycle performance for different parameters. Results obtained are compared with the results available in literature and are found in good agreement with them. Real gas and water properties are inbuilt in the software. Results show that enthalpy of air entering the combustion chamber is higher than that of the flue gases at combustion chamber outlet. For different operative conditions, energy and exergy efficiencies follow similar trends; although, exergy efficiency values are always lower than the corresponding energy efficiency ones. From the results it is found that turbine outlet temperature (TIT) of 524°C is uniquely suited to efficient cogeneration cycle because it enables the transfer of heat from exhaust gas to the steam cycle to take place over a minimal temperature difference. This temperature range results in the maximum thermodynamic availability while operating with highest temperature and highest efficiency cogeneration cycle. Effect of cycle pressure ratio (CR), inlet air temperature (IAT) and water pressure at heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) inlet on the 30MW cogeneration cycle is also studied.

  20. An assessment of advanced technology for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of advanced fuel utilization and energy conversion technologies to enhance the outlook for the increased use of industrial cogeneration was assessed. The attributes of advanced cogeneration systems that served as the basis for the assessment included their fuel flexibility and potential for low emissions, efficiency of fuel or energy utilization, capital equipment and operating costs, and state of technological development. Over thirty advanced cogeneration systems were evaluated. These cogeneration system options were based on Rankine cycle, gas turbine engine, reciprocating engine, Stirling engine, and fuel cell energy conversion systems. The alternatives for fuel utilization included atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed combustors, gasifiers, conventional combustion systems, alternative energy sources, and waste heat recovery. Two advanced cogeneration systems with mid-term (3 to 5 year) potential were found to offer low emissions, multi-fuel capability, and a low cost of producing electricity. Both advanced cogeneration systems are based on conventional gas turbine engine/exhaust heat recovery technology; however, they incorporate advanced fuel utilization systems.

  1. Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide the textile plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the deicision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. Experience has shown that a well-defined work statement can be the key to a rapid and cost-effective design effort. Discussion is presented under the headings: Data Base Development; Matching Cogeneration System Designs; Economic Analysis; Financial Strategies; Environmental Issues; Legal and Contractual Issues; and Three-Phase Work Statements. 18 references, 36 figures, 30 tables.

  2. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, C. S.; Schwartz, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concenrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R&D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options.

  3. Evaluating Interventions in the U.S. Electricity System: Assessments of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, and Small-Scale Cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle

    to evaluate the effects of an additional wind turbine or solar panel in the U.S. electricity system. I find that the most attractive sites for renewables depend strongly on one's objective. A solar panel in Iowa displaces 20% more CO2 emissions than a panel in Arizona, though energy production from the Iowa panel is 25% less. Similarly, despite a modest wind resource, a wind turbine in West Virginia is expected to displace 7 times more health and environmental damages than a wind turbine in Oklahoma. Finally, I shift focus and explore the economics of small-scale cogeneration, which has long been recognized as a more efficient alternative to central-station power. Although the benefits of distributed cogeneration are widely cited, adoption has been slow in the U.S. Adoption could be encouraged by making cogeneration more economically attractive, either by increasing the expected returns or decreasing the risks of such investments. I present a case study of a 300-kilowatt cogeneration unit and evaluate the expected returns from: demand response, capacity markets, regulation markets, accelerated depreciation, a price on CO2 emissions, and net metering. In addition, I explore the effectiveness of feed-in tariffs at mitigating the energy-price risks to cogeneration projects.

  4. 75 FR 13534 - Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership; Supplemental Notice That Initial... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Grays Ferry Cogeneration Partnership application for...

  5. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D. R.; Drost, M. K.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following significant advantages: (1) electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25 and 40 percent lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15 and 35 percent lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

  6. Development of a thermal scheme for a cogeneration combined-cycle unit with an SVBR-100 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Dudolin, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    At present, the prospects for development of district heating that can increase the effectiveness of nuclear power stations (NPS), cut down their payback period, and improve protection of the environment against harmful emissions are being examined in the nuclear power industry of Russia. It is noted that the efficiency of nuclear cogeneration power stations (NCPS) is drastically affected by the expenses for heat networks and heat losses during transportation of a heat carrier through them, since NPSs are usually located far away from urban area boundaries as required for radiation safety of the population. The prospects for using cogeneration power units with small or medium power reactors at NPSs, including combined-cycle units and their performance indices, are described. The developed thermal scheme of a cogeneration combined-cycle unit (CCU) with an SBVR-100 nuclear reactor (NCCU) is presented. This NCCU should use a GE 6FA gasturbine unit (GTU) and a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a two-stage district heating plant. Saturated steam from the nuclear reactor is superheated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) to 560-580°C so that a separator-superheater can be excluded from the thermal cycle of the turbine unit. In addition, supplemental fuel firing in HRSG is examined. NCCU effectiveness indices are given as a function of the ambient air temperature. Results of calculations of the thermal cycle performance under condensing operating conditions indicate that the gross electric efficiency η el NCCU gr of = 48% and N el NCCU gr = 345 MW can be achieved. This efficiency is at maximum for NCCU with an SVBR-100 reactor. The conclusion is made that the cost of NCCU installed kW should be estimated, and the issue associated with NCCUs siting with reference to urban area boundaries must be solved.

  7. 76 FR 4648 - PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Filing January 19, 2011. Take notice that on January 13, 2011, PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP (PowerSmith), pursuant to section... Regulations for the topping-cycle cogeneration facility owned and operated by PowerSmith located in...

  8. Cogeneration plant serves Prague sewage works

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The new cogeneration plant at the sewage works in Prague, Czech Republic, was commissioned in June of this year. The plant is based on three gas engine modules from Deutz MWM-Gastechnik, which supply power and heat from the sewage gas. Also installed was a central plant control system (CPCS) for automation of the power plant, including long-term data storage for operation optimization. The gas engines are equipped with an individual total electronic management system (TEM) that optimizes engine operation and heat transfer. The TEM system also serves for safety monitoring of the relevant modules. Data communication between the TEM system and the CPCS is realized via a serial interface. The CPCS can thus test the availability of the individual heat generators and, depending on the condition of an individual module, switch over to another. With due consideration to environmental protection, Deutz MWM-Gastechnik guarantees NO{sub x} emissions of less than 500 mg/Nm{sup 3} (at 5% O{sub 2}) and CO emissions of less than 650 mg/Nm{sup 3}. The plant operator has also encapsulated the three gas engine modules in soundproofing enclosures in order to reduce noise emissions from 105 down to 78 dB(A).

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell cogeneration system conceptual design, program 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundberg, W. L.

    1989-07-01

    Results of a solid oxide fuel cell cogeneration system conceptual design study are presented. The baseline system, rated at 200 kWe net power and fueled by natural gas, is applied in a baseloaded electric mode at a commercial site. The system satisfies part of the site's needs for ac power and supplies exhaust heat to generate 170 C (338 F) saturated steam for site use. In evaluating cogeneration system economics, it is assumed that this steam is supplied directly to an existing steam-driven chiller. Solid oxide fuel cell cogeneration systems rated at 50, 500, and 2000 kWe are also evaluated. The 2000 kWe system is assumed to be sited in a small industrial application.

  10. Texasgulf solar cogeneration program. Mid-term topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The status of technical activities of the Texasgulf Solar Cogeneration Program at the Comanche Creek Sulfur Mine is described. The program efforts reported focus on preparation of a system specification, selection of a site-specific configuration, conceptual design, and facility performance. Trade-off studies performed to select the site-specific cogeneration facility configuration that would be the basis for the conceptual design efforts are described. Study areas included solar system size, thermal energy storage, and field piping. The conceptual design status is described for the various subsystems of the Comanche Creek cogeneration facility. The subsystems include the collector, receiver, master control, fossil energy, energy storage, superheat boiler, electric power generation, and process heat subsystems. Computer models for insolation and performance are also briefly discussed. Appended is the system specification. (LEW)

  11. Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties: Cogeneration powers up cost-competitive energy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Cities and counties build many multi-million dollar facilities, and supplying energy to run these facilities is a long-term obligation for a community. Cogeneration offers local governments an opportunity to reduce the cost of providing electricity, heating, and cooling to their buildings. Sometimes cogeneration is combined with district heating and cooling systems. This kind of cogeneration results in system efficiencies as high as 70%--about twice the efficiency of a conventional power plant that produces only electricity! The article describes cogeneration combined with district cooling in Trenton, NJ, and cogeneration on a small scale in San Jose, California.

  12. A negotiation methodology and its application to cogeneration planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.M.; Liu, C.C.; Luu, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    Power system planning has become a complex process in utilities today. This paper presents a methodology for integrated planning with multiple objectives. The methodology uses a graphical representation (Goal-Decision Network) to capture the planning knowledge. The planning process is viewed as a negotiation process that applies three negotiation operators to search for beneficial decisions in a GDN. Also, the negotiation framework is applied to the problem of planning for cogeneration interconnection. The simulation results are presented to illustrate the cogeneration planning process.

  13. Cogeneration handbook for the pulp and paper industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, E.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the pulp and paper industry. Appendices B and O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  14. Bagasse-based cogeneration projects in Kenya. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Kenda, W.; Shrivastava, V.K.

    1992-03-01

    A Definitional Mission team evaluated the prospects of the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) funding a feasibility study that would assist the Government of Kenya in developing power cogeneration plants in three Kenyan sugar factories and possibly two more that are now in the planning stage or construction. The major Kenyan sugar producing region around Kisumu, on Lake Victoria has climatic conditions that permit cane growing operations ideally suitable for cogeneration of power in sugar factories. The total potentially available capacity from the proposed rehabilitation of the three mills will be approximately 25.15 MW, or 5.7 percent of total electricity production.

  15. Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  16. Cogeneration handbook for the textile industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the textile industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  17. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the petroleum refining industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  18. Cogeneration handbook for the chemical process industries. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, A.G.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The desision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the chemical industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  19. The selection of a profile of the PGU-400T combined-cycle cogeneration unit for the TETs-25 cogeneration power plant of the mosenergo power utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhnii, A. D.; Prokhorov, M. I.

    2008-06-01

    The selection of a profile of a heat-recovery combined-cycle cogeneration plant of 400- to 420-MW capacity for the expansion of the TETs-25 Mosenergo cogeneration plant is substantiated. It is shown that the most preferable version is a two-shaft arrangement with a gas turbine installed at a zero elevation level and a steam turbine mounted on a frame foundation, with cogeneration equipment located in the basement.

  20. Acrylic acid and electric power cogeneration in an SOFC reactor.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baofeng; Wang, Jibo; Chu, Wenling; Yang, Weishen; Lin, Liwu

    2009-04-21

    A highly efficient catalyst, MoV(0.3)Te(0.17)Nb(0.12)O, used for acrylic acid (AA) production from propane, was used as an anodic catalyst in an SOFC reactor, from which AA and electric power were cogenerated at 400-450 degrees C.

  1. 18 CFR 292.205 - Criteria for qualifying cogeneration facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... standard. (i) For any topping-cycle cogeneration facility for which any of the energy input is natural gas... section be no less than 42.5 percent of the total energy input of natural gas and oil to the facility; or... facility, be no less than 45 percent of the total energy input of natural gas and oil to the facility. (ii...

  2. Technical assessment of an oil-fired residential cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The definition of cogeneration, within the context of this project, is the simultaneous production of electricity and heat energy from a single machine. This report will present the results of an engineering analysis of the efficiency and energy-conservation potential associated with a unique residential oil-fired cogeneration system that provides both heat and electric power. The system operates whenever a thermostat signals a call for heat in the home, just as a conventional heating system. However, this system has the added benefit of cogenerating electricity whenever it is running to provide space heating comfort. The system is designed to burn No. 2 heating oil, which is consumed in an 11-horsepower, two cylinder, 56.75-cubic-inch, 1850-RPM diesel engine. This unit is the only pre-production prototype residential No. 2 oil-fired cogeneration system known to exist in the world. As such, it is considered a landmark development in the field of oil-heat technology.

  3. 78 FR 43198 - Watson Cogeneration Company; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Watson Cogeneration Company; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 12... 36 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) Regulations, 18 CFR 36.1, Watson... (SCE) to continue providing the existing physical interconnection to the Watson facility; (2)...

  4. The Results of Feasibility Study of Co-generation NPP With Innovative VK-300 Simplified Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yury N.

    2006-07-01

    The co-generation nuclear power plant (CNPP) producing electricity and district heating heat is planned to be constructed in Archangelsk Region of Russia. Following the 'Letter of Intent' signed by Governor of Archangelsk region and by Minister of the Russian Federation for atomic energy the feasibility study of the Project has been done. The NPP will be based on the four co-generation nuclear power units with the Russian VK-300 SBWR. The innovative passive VK-300 reactor facility has been designed on the basis of well-established nuclear technologies, proven major components, the operating experience of the prototype VK-50 reactor in RIAR, Dimitrovgrad, and the experience in designing such reactors as SBWR (GE) and SWR-1000 (Siemens). The CNPP's total power is planned to be 1000 MW(e) and district-heating heat production capacity 1600 Gcal/h. A detailed description of the results of the feasibility study is presented in the report. The results of the feasibility study have shown that the Archangelsk CGNP is feasible in terms of engineering, economics and production. (authors)

  5. Analysis of long-time operation of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsch, Marek; Čaja, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Micro-cogeneration is cogeneration with small performance, with maximal electric power up to 50 kWe. On the present, there are available small micro-cogeneration units with small electric performance, about 1 kWe, which are usable also in single family houses or flats. These micro-cogeneration units operate on principle of conventional combustion engine, Stirling engine, steam engine or fuel cell. Micro-cogeneration units with fuel cells are new progressive developing type of units for single family houses. Fuel cell is electrochemical device which by oxidation-reduction reaction turn directly chemical energy of fuel to electric power, secondary products are pure water and thermal energy. The aim of paper is measuring and evaluation of operation parameters of micro-cogeneration unit with fuel cell which uses natural gas as a fuel.

  6. Optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration in the district heating system cooperating with thermal storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Gładysz, Paweł

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents the results of optimizing the coefficient of the share of cogeneration expressed by an empirical formula dedicated to designers, which will allow to determine the optimal value of the share of cogeneration in contemporary cogeneration systems with the thermal storages feeding the district heating systems. This formula bases on the algorithm of the choice of the optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems with the thermal storage, taking into account additional benefits concerning the promotion of high-efficiency cogeneration and the decrease of the cost of CO2 emission thanks to cogeneration. The approach presented in this paper may be applicable both in combined heat and power (CHP) plants with back-pressure turbines and extraction-condensing turbines.

  7. Innovative hybrid gas/electric chiller cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, G.

    2000-04-01

    January Progress--A kick-off meeting was held in San Diego with Alturdyne on January 21st. The proposed hybrid gas/electric chiller/cogenerator design concept was discussed in detail. The requirements and functionality of the key component, a variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator was presented. Variations of the proposed design were also discussed based on their technical feasibility, cost and market potential. The discussion is documented in a Trip Report. February Progress--After significant GRI/Alturdyne discussion regarding alternative product design concepts, the team made a decision to continue with the proposed product design, a hybrid chiller capable of also providing emergency power. The primary benefits are: (a) the flexibility and operating cost savings associated with the product's dual fuel capability and (b) the emergency power feature. A variable speed, constant frequency motor/generator would significantly increase the cost of the product while providing marginal benefit. (The variable speed, constant frequency motor generator is estimated to cost $25,000 versus $4,000 for a constant speed version). In addition, the interconnection requirements to the electric grid would significantly limit market penetration of the product. We will proceed with a motor/generator design capable of serving as the electric prime mover for the compressor as well as the generator for emergency power needs. This component design is being discussed with two motor manufacturers. The first generation motor/generator will not be a variable speed, constant frequency design. The variable speed, constant frequency capability can be an advancement that is included at a later time. The induction motor/synchronous generator starts as a wound rotor motor with a brushless exciter and control electronics to switch between induction mode and synchronous mode. The exciter is a three-phase exciter with three phase rotating diode assembly. In the induction motor mode, the

  8. Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    of tools that enables a developer or installer to size the solar cogeneration system based on the roof layout and to do the full design and...EW-201248) Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations June 2014 This report was prepared under contract to the...2014 ESTCP COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT Solar Cogeneration of Electricity and Hot Water at DoD Installations W912HQ-12-C-0053 EW-201248Ratson

  9. Feasibility Study of Coal Gasification/Fuel Cell/Cogeneration Economic and Financing Assessment,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    I p "" r FEASIBILITY STUDY OF COAL GASIFICATION FUEL CELL COGENERATION ECONOMIC AND FINANCING ASSESSMENT Lfl Lfl ’-..,.a REPORT CLIN 0004-0005...GASIFICATION FUEL CELL COGENERATION ECONOMIC AND FINANCING ASSESSMENT REPORT CLIN 0004-0005 PREPARED FOR :...: DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AND GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY...Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT 6 PERIOD COVERED FEASIBILITY STUDY OF COAL GASIFICATION! Economic/Financing FUEL CELL/COGENERATION, ECONOMIC AND Analysis

  10. Potential and policy issues of industrial cogeneration in the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    A partial solution to the problems created by the high cost of imported energy affecting the economic well-being of the Dominican Republic is outlined. The introduction of cogeneration into the industrial sector could save a significant amount of imported fuel. COENER, a domestic government program, provides for private-sector cogeneration which, if implemented, could provide as much as 10% of the country's installed electrical-generating capacity. Results of an Agency for International Development study, reported here, indicate that the industries most likely to benefit from the cogeneration scheme and the institutional and regulatory barriers that must be overcome if a cogeneration program is to be successful.

  11. Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    1993-12-01

    What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.

  12. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 1: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.; Sagerman, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications were compared to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler. Also included in the comparisons and evaluations are results extrapolated to the national level.

  13. The Mulberry Cogeneration Facility: Design features and operating success

    SciTech Connect

    Jasper, W.M.; Wierschem, R.A.; Gray, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Mulberry Cogeneration Facility is in successful, reliable, and profitable service, with the complex requirements of zero discharge, extensive water treatment, process steam supply, and inlet chillers having been reduced to routine, automated operation. What was initially visualized by the developer as a straightforward combined cycle plant became much more than that as the various requirements for environmental and regulatory compliance became necessities, along with the desire to maximize output and revenues in response to growing power demands. A delicate balance exists between a financially successful cogeneration project and the Owners` obligation to the community and the environment. As competitive pressures grow and expectations of investors, insurers, operators, and the public increase, still more creativity will be required to provide a safe, reliable, cost-effective plant on ever shorter schedules.

  14. Cogeneration upgrades. The time is ripe in California

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, S.R.; Bitting, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    With a life of 20 to 30 years or more, energy facilities represent a significant investment. Therefore, keeping facilities up-to-date is a sound capital investment, extending the life of the plant and increasing its economic efficiency. The following is an overview of several retrofit projects with which International Power Technology has recently been involved. Included is a discussion of the technical as well as economic logic behind each decision to retrofit. Most of the projects discussed here have a payback period of one to two years. International Power Technology (IPT), an energy service company in Redwood City, California, has over 500000 hours of plant operating experience, and is well acquainted with the benefits and challenges of cogeneration. IPT offers a broad range of services to parties interested in cogeneration, independent power, and thermal energy production. These activities can be tailored to the specific needs of a facility or plant owner, and include retrofit services.

  15. Operating experience with a flexible cogeneration plant in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wadman, B.

    1997-01-01

    Much has been written about the interesting gas turbine cogeneration Project in Fort Lupton, Colorado, U.S.A., as created and developed by the Thermo Cogeneration Partnership under the leadership of Paul Steinway, project general manager. The plant is based on five 40 MW-class gas turbine generator modules supplied by Stewart & Stevenson, who is also responsible for operation and maintenance of the plant through its operating arm, Stewart & Stevenson Operations, Inc. The plant, first placed into service in mid-1994 after only 18 months of construction, is of particular interest because it has to function with a wide degree of flexibility in load management, and it also uses one of the latest-design aeroderivative gas turbines, namely the GE LM6000. This article describes the plant design, equipment and operating experience thus far. 6 figs.

  16. Combined-cycle cogeneration to power oil refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Broeker, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    A cogeneration plant now under construction at an oil refinery in Martinez, California, is an example of how the energy industry has been responding to the fundamental economic and technological challenges it has been facing over the past ten years. The industry is re-examining cogeneration as one way of meeting the requirements of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act. The new plant is located at Tosco Corporation's Avon Oil Refinery, 45 miles northeast of San Francisco. It was designed by Foster Wheeler to supply process steam for the refinery as well as for a water-treatment installation that will benefit the Contra Costa Water District. Electric power produced will be used primarily by the refinery, with the balance purchased by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

  17. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

  18. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1990-07-01

    The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. This quarter, work was centered on design, fabrication, and testing of the combustor, cleanup, fuel specifications, and hot end simulation rig. 2 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Assessment of Training Needs for Cogeneration Technology in Schuylkill County. Project Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Passmore, David L.

    This paper reports an assessment of the education and training program needs stimulated by investment in cogeneration technology in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. (Cogeneration technology would convert raw culm, a byproduct of anthracite coal mining, into a fuel source for steam power generation.) After plant tours and interviews with plant…

  20. Prospects for constructing cogeneration stations equipped with back-pressure steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovskii, A. A.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Stepanov, M. Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The possibilities of using back-pressure cogeneration turbines developed on the basis of serially produced ones are considered together with the thermal process circuits in which such turbines are applied. Design versions and advantages of cogeneration stations in which the proposed process circuits are implemented are described.

  1. Potential for cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.; Gurfield, R. M.; Moretti, V. C.; Slonski, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    Information collected during an industrial survey of 12 selected plants was organized into four categories: technical, economic, environmental, and institutional. The technical aspects of industrial cogeneration are examined on a site-specific basis. The site-specific economics, environmental constraints, and institutional barriers that impact industrial cogeneration will be further investigated.

  2. 77 FR 13593 - PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP; Notice of Request for Waiver Take... Act of 1978 (PURPA), as amended, 18 CFR 292.205(c), PowerSmith Cogeneration Project, LP (PowerSmith... operated by PowerSmith located in Oklahoma. PowerSmith makes such a request because of a delay in...

  3. Feasibility of a small central cogenerated energy facility: Energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. N.

    1982-10-01

    The thermal economic feasibility of a small cogenerated energy facility designed to serve several industries in the Stockyards area was investigated. Cogeneration options included two dual fuel diesels and two gas turbines, all with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired boiler cases, also low sulphur coal and municipal refuse. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The fired boiler cogeneration systems employed back pressure steam turbines. The refuse fired cases utilized electrical capacities, 8500 to 52,400 lbm/hr and 0 to 9.9 MW (e), respectively. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which was displaced was sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act). The facility was operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users.

  4. Thermoeconomic analysis: A criterion for the selection of cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luz-Silveira, J.; Balestieri, J.A.P.; Santos, A.H.M.; Almeida, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    The economical viability of three cogeneration schemes as supplying alternatives for a hypothetical industrial process has been studied. A cost appropriation method based on Valero`s studies (1986) has been used. This method enables the determination of exergetic flows, the Second Law efficiency of equipment and the monetary costs of the products acquired by the industrial process (steam and electrical energy). The criterion adopted for the selection is the global cost of the supplied products to the industrial process as regarding in Brazilian conditions.

  5. The T-125/150-12.8 cogeneration steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Gol'dberg, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Bilan, V. N.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Polyaeva, E. N.; Shekhter, M. V.; Shibaev, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    The article presents the design, the economic indicators, and the main solutions on the thermal process circuit and layout of the T-125/150-12.8 turbine, a new design version of the T-100-12.8 turbine, which is one of the best known, unique and widely used cogeneration turbines in Russia and abroad. The project of the new turbine is supposed to be used both for renovating and upgrading already installed turbines of the T-100 family and for supplying it as a full set for replacing obsolete equipment or constructing new one.

  6. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Analytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The use of various advanced energy conversion systems were compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. The ground rules established by NASA and assumptions made by the General Electric Company in performing this cogeneration technology alternatives study are presented. The analytical methodology employed is described in detail and is illustrated with numerical examples together with a description of the computer program used in calculating over 7000 energy conversion system-industrial process applications. For Vol. 1, see 80N24797.

  7. Benefices environnementaux de la cogeneration d'energie en milieu hospitalier et cas de l'Hopital de Moncton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, Diakalia

    .06 MW cogeneration plant, to be run on natural gas, to meet about 30% of the facility's current demand for electricity and heat. In order to anticipate the environmental consequences of this CHP project, an environmental impact assessment (EIA) was conducted, according to the principles that apply in New Brunswick (Regulation 87-83 on EIA). A literature review was conducted and a matrix approach (matrix of impacts) was used to identify and assess the anticipated environmental impacts. The study showed that multiple stakeholders in the healthcare sector can reap benefits of CHP deployment. Facility owners can reduce energy costs and increase power reliability to enhance operations' continuity, during normal and extraordinary times (e.g., natural disasters). For instance, when hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck the United States in 2005, hospitals running with CHP were able to provide secure electricity supplies for emergency facilities and shelters. CHP also has environmental benefits related to its distinctively high efficiency. But its deployment in the healthcare sector also provides challenges, mainly due to the fact that power production is not a core activity for an hospital. These challenges can be overcome, however, as shown by numerous success stories in hospitals worldwide; specialised resources are available to help hospitals switch to CHP. This study underlines some of the steps a hospital can take toward this aim. EIA of The Moncton Hospital CHP project suggests that, globally, the environmental impacts of CHP are reduced compared to the traditional production of electricity and heat separately. Cogeneration utilizes fewer resources (fuel) and therefore releases fewer GHG and other pollutants. However, quantifying the emissions avoided is challenging. Also, the environmental benefits of CHP may be less obvious when compared to a centralised nuclear or hydraulic power production, which emits less GHG than power plants operating on coal or fuel oil. The study

  8. Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Burns, R. K.; Easley, A. J.

    1982-03-01

    A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

  9. Performance and operational economics estimates for a coal gasification combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Burns, R. K.; Easley, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A performance and operational economics analysis is presented for an integrated-gasifier, combined-cycle (IGCC) system to meet the steam and baseload electrical requirements. The effect of time variations in steam and electrial requirements is included. The amount and timing of electricity purchases from sales to the electric utility are determined. The resulting expenses for purchased electricity and revenues from electricity sales are estimated by using an assumed utility rate structure model. Cogeneration results for a range of potential IGCC cogeneration system sizes are compared with the fuel consumption and costs of natural gas and electricity to meet requirements without cogeneration. The results indicate that an IGCC cogeneration system could save about 10 percent of the total fuel energy presently required to supply steam and electrical requirements without cogeneration. Also for the assumed future fuel and electricity prices, an annual operating cost savings of 21 percent to 26 percent could be achieved with such a cogeneration system. An analysis of the effects of electricity price, fuel price, and system availability indicates that the IGCC cogeneration system has a good potential for economical operation over a wide range in these assumptions.

  10. CELCAP: A Computer Model for Cogeneration System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A description of the CELCAP cogeneration analysis program is presented. A detailed description of the methodology used by the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory in developing the CELCAP code and the procedures for analyzing cogeneration systems for a given user are given. The four engines modeled in CELCAP are: gas turbine with exhaust heat boiler, diesel engine with waste heat boiler, single automatic-extraction steam turbine, and back-pressure steam turbine. Both the design point and part-load performances are taken into account in the engine models. The load model describes how the hourly electric and steam demand of the user is represented by 24 hourly profiles. The economic model describes how the annual and life-cycle operating costs that include the costs of fuel, purchased electricity, and operation and maintenance of engines and boilers are calculated. The CELCAP code structure and principal functions of the code are described to how the various components of the code are related to each other. Three examples of the application of the CELCAP code are given to illustrate the versatility of the code. The examples shown represent cases of system selection, system modification, and system optimization.

  11. Modern fluidized bed combustion in Ostrava-Karvina cogeneration plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mazac, V.; Novacek, A.; Volny, J.

    1995-12-01

    The contemporary situation of our environment claims the sensitive approach to solving effective conversion of energy. Limited supplies of noble fuels and their prices evoke the need to use new combustion technologies of accessible fuels in given region without negative ecological influences. Energoproject participates in the preparation of the two projects in Ostrava-Karvin{acute a} black coal field in Czech Republic. The most effective usage of fuel energy is the combined of electricity and heat. If this physical principle is supported by a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) one obtains a high electricity/heat ratio integrated steam-gas cycle on the basis of solid fuel. Cogeneration plant Toebovice is the dominant source (600 MW{sub th}) of Ostrava district heating system (1100 MW{sub th}). The high utilization of the installed output and utilization of the clean, compact and efficient of the PFBC technology is the principal but not the single reason for the selection of the Toebovice power plant as the first cogeneration plant for installation of the PFBC in Czech Republic. The boiler will burn black coal from the neighboring coal basin.

  12. Thermal regenerative design of a fuel cell cogeneration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jenn-Jiang

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present work is to design and fabricate a thermal management system (TMS) that commands a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) based cogeneration system to generate the electricity and hot water efficiently. Parametric studies include the external load (PL) and the regenerative temperature (TR). A thermostat valve is employed to optimize the stack operation temperature, while a thermal regenerative unit (TRU) containing a planar heat exchanger is used to recover the heat dissipated by the stack. First, the dynamics of thermal and electrical characteristics such as voltage, current, power, coolant temperature, coolant flow rate, and hydrogen flow rate are measured to check the reliability of the TMS. Then, the effectiveness of the planar heat exchanger is determined to verify the cooling ability of the TRU. Moreover, the transient system efficiencies, including electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency, and overall efficiency are determined. Furthermore, the effect of the regenerative temperature on the time-averaged system efficiencies is examined under different external loads. Finally, an empirical correlation for time-averaged overall efficiency is proposed for helping in design of the PEMFC cogeneration system.

  13. Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project, Centennial Park

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Clay; Mandon, Jim; DeGiulio, Thomas; Baker, Ryan

    2014-04-29

    The Waste-to-Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park has allowed methane from the closed Centennial landfill to export excess power into the the local utility’s electric grid for resale. This project is part of a greater brownfield reclamation project to the benefit of the residents of Munster and the general public. Installation of a gas-to-electric generator and waste-heat conversion unit take methane byproduct and convert it into electricity at the rate of about 103,500 Mwh/year for resale to the local utility. The sale of the electricity will be used to reduce operating budgets by covering the expenses for streetlights and utility bills. The benefits of such a project are not simply financial. Munster’s Waste-to Energy Cogeneration Project at Centennial Park will reduce the community’s carbon footprint in an amount equivalent to removing 1,100 cars from our roads, conserving enough electricity to power 720 homes, planting 1,200 acres of trees, or recycling 2,000 tons of waste instead of sending it to a landfill.

  14. Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-31

    This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

  15. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information in the area of advanced energy conversion systems for industrial congeneration applications in the 1985-2000 time period was studied. Six current and thirty-one advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance-of-plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a framework for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. Various cogeneration strategies were analyzed and both topping and bottoming (using industrial by-product heat) applications were included. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Typically fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on-site furnaces and utility electricity. With the variety of industrial requirements, each advanced technology had attractive applications. Overall, fuel cells indicated the greatest fuel energy savings and emission reductions. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual cost savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal-derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on-site gasification systems.

  16. A 1000-cell SOFC reactor for domestic cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alston, T.; Kendall, K.; Palin, M.; Prica, M.; Windibank, P.

    A cogeneration system was built using 1000 cells with the intention of supplying 30 kW of hot water and 500 W of power. The basis of the cogenerator was the small tubular SOFC design. 8Y zirconia was mixed into a plastic paste and extruded to form thin-walled tubes. The process produced a zirconia material with high strength and good electrical properties. After drying and firing to full density, electrodes were coated onto the inner and outer surfaces of the electrolyte, then sintered. Current collecting wires were wound around the tubular cells and the tubes were assembled into a reactor. Either hydrogen or a premix of natural gas and air was fed through the tubes and ignited by a hot wire. The ignition shock did not damage the cells in any way. Cycling was achieved within minutes. A steel heat exchanger/recuperator was used to feed hot air to the cell stack. The electrical output was measured via a potentiostat.

  17. Exergy analysis for a gas turbine cogeneration system

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.D.; Pang, H.S.; Kim, S.M.; Kwak, H.Y.

    1996-10-01

    A general exergy balance equation that is applicable to any component of thermal systems has been formulated in this study. One of distinct features of this formulation is that the exergy involved in the component of any thermal system can be decomposed into exergy flows, entropy production flows, and the appropriate exergy rate terms such as fuel and available work. The exergy analysis based on this equation permits one to predict the thermal efficiency of the system, the exergy destruction in each component as well as the mass flow rate, the composition, and the temperature of the exhaust gases. The authors have examined the performance of a 1,000 kW gas turbine cogeneration system when it is operated at part and full-load conditions through this analysis. They have also tested the effect of the inlet air temperature and the relative humidity of the inlet air on the performance of the system. The predicted values of the performances for the system have been compared with the actual performance data provided by the gas turbine manufacturer. It has been found that the measured data of net power and the properties of exhaust gases are in good agreement with calculation ones, differing by less than 3%. The exergy balance equation may be utilized in the exergoeconomic analysis to estimate the production costs depending on various input costs in a gas turbine cogeneration system.

  18. The performance of residential micro-cogeneration coupled with thermal and electrical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, John

    Over 80% of residential secondary energy consumption in Canada and Ontario is used for space and water heating. The peak electricity demands resulting from residential energy consumption increase the reliance on fossil-fuel generation stations. Distributed energy resources can help to decrease the reliance on central generation stations. Presently, distributed energy resources such as solar photovoltaic, wind and bio-mass generation are subsidized in Ontario. Micro-cogeneration is an emerging technology that can be implemented as a distributed energy resource within residential or commercial buildings. Micro-cogeneration has the potential to reduce a building's energy consumption by simultaneously generating thermal and electrical power on-site. The coupling of a micro-cogeneration device with electrical storage can improve the system's ability to reduce peak electricity demands. The performance potential of micro-cogeneration devices has yet to be fully realized. This research addresses the performance of a residential micro-cogeneration device and it's ability to meet peak occupant electrical loads when coupled with electrical storage. An integrated building energy model was developed of a residential micro-cogeneration system: the house, the micro-cogeneration device, all balance of plant and space heating components, a thermal storage device, an electrical storage device, as well as the occupant electrical and hot water demands. This model simulated the performance of a micro-cogeneration device coupled to an electrical storage system within a Canadian household. A customized controller was created in ESP-r to examine the impact of various system control strategies. The economic performance of the system was assessed from the perspective of a local energy distribution company and an end-user under hypothetical electricity export purchase price scenarios. It was found that with certain control strategies the micro-cogeneration system was able to improve the

  19. Industrial cogeneration case study No. 3: Mead Corporation Paper Mill, Kingsport, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The design, operation, performance, economics and energy efficiency of the 25,000 kW co-generating power plant at the Mead Co. paper mill in Kingsport, TN are described, and compared with the efficiency of producing only process heat at the plant while importing electric power from a local utility. It was established that on-site co-generation consumed 2/3 of the energy that would have been required for on-site process heat generation plus purchased off-site-generated electric power and that co-generation resulted in more than $2.8 million saved during the period from 1975 through 1978. (LCL)

  20. Manual for locating large energy users for cogeneration and other energy actions

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, J.; Paddock, R.; Rao, D.

    1980-03-01

    This manual includes instructions on how Boiler Registry data files and Atmospheric Emissions data files can be used for the compilation of lists of major energy users in any given state. It also discusses the authors' experience in North Carolina in compiling such lists from these data sources and includes examples of the types of lists they have compiled for determining the potential for cogeneration of electricity and process heat in North Carolina. A method for extrapolating the results of this cogeneration study to obtain a preliminary estimate of the cogeneration potential in several industrial sectors in other states is included.

  1. Solar cogeneration: Cimarron River station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The site-specific conceptual design progress is described for a solar central receiver cogeneration facility at a Kansas utility. The process is described which led to the selection of the preferred solar cogeneration facility. The status of the conceptual design is presented. The evaluation of system performance is described. A test program is described that is to determine the magnitude of impact that local environmental factors have on collector system performance and to measure the direct normal insolation at the cogeneration facility site. The system specification is appended. (LEW)

  2. Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

    2004-10-06

    The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal

  3. Relative potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications. Issue study

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, C.S.; Schwartz, D.L.

    1984-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to assess the relative economic potentials of concentrating and two-axis tracking flat-plate photovoltaic arrays for central-station applications in the mid-1990's. Specific objectives of this study are to provide information on concentrator photovoltaic collector probabilistic price and efficiency levels to illustrate critical areas of R and D for concentrator cells and collectors, and to compare concentrator and flat-plate PV price and efficiency alternatives for several locations, based on their implied costs of energy. To deal with the uncertainties surrounding research and development activities in general, a probabilistic assessment of commercially achievable concentrator photovoltaic collector efficiencies and prices (at the factory loading dock) is performed. The results of this projection of concentrator photovoltaic technology are then compared with a previous flat-plate module price analysis (performed early in 1983). To focus this analysis on specific collector alternatives and their implied energy costs for different locations, similar two-axis tracking designs are assumed for both concentrator and flat-plate options. The results of this study provide the first comprehensive assessment of PV concentrator collector manufacturing costs in combination with those of flat-plate modules, both projected to their commercial potentials in the mid-1990's.

  4. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration Lead Project strategy plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    The strategy for developing the HTGR system and introducing it into the energy marketplace is based on using the most developed technology path to establish a HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) Lead Project. Given the status of the HTGR-SC/C technology, a Lead Plant could be completed and operational by the mid 1990s. While there is remaining design and technology development that must be accomplished to fulfill technical and licensing requirements for a Lead Project commitment, the major barriers to the realization a HTGR-SC/C Lead Project are institutional in nature, e.g. Project organization and management, vendor/supplier development, cost/risk sharing between the public and private sector, and Project financing. These problems are further exacerbated by the overall pervading issues of economic and regulatory instability that presently confront the utility and nuclear industries. This document addresses the major institutional issues associated with the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project and provides a starting point for discussions between prospective Lead Project participants toward the realization of such a Project.

  5. Decentralised optimisation of cogeneration in virtual power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard; Erge, Thomas; Wittwer, Christof

    2010-04-15

    Within several projects we investigated grid structures and management strategies for active grids with high penetration of renewable energy resources and distributed generation (RES and DG). Those ''smart grids'' should be designed and managed by model based methods, which are elaborated within these projects. Cogeneration plants (CHP) can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions by locally producing heat and electricity. The integration of thermal storage devices is suitable to get more flexibility for the cogeneration operation. If several power plants are bound to centrally managed clusters, it is called ''virtual power plant''. To operate smart grids optimally, new optimisation and model reduction techniques are necessary to get rid with the complexity. There is a great potential for the optimised management of CHPs, which is not yet used. Due to the fact that electrical and thermal demands do not occur simultaneously, a thermally driven CHP cannot supply electrical peak loads when needed. With the usage of thermal storage systems it is possible to decouple electric and thermal production. We developed an optimisation method based on mixed integer linear programming (MILP) for the management of local heat supply systems with CHPs, heating boilers and thermal storages. The algorithm allows the production of thermal and electric energy with a maximal benefit. In addition to fuel and maintenance costs it is assumed that the produced electricity of the CHP is sold at dynamic prices. This developed optimisation algorithm was used for an existing local heat system with 5 CHP units of the same type. An analysis of the potential showed that about 10% increase in benefit is possible compared to a typical thermally driven CHP system under current German boundary conditions. The quality of the optimisation result depends on an accurate prognosis of the thermal load which is realised with an empiric formula fitted with measured data by a multiple regression method. The key

  6. Advanced technology cogeneration system conceptual design study: Closed cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, E. A. T.; Daudet, H. C.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a three task study performed for the Department of Energy under the direction of the NASA Lewis Research Center are documented. The thermal and electrical energy requirements of three specific industrial plants were surveyed and cost records for the energies consumed were compiled. Preliminary coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed heated closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration system designs were developed for each industrial plant. Preliminary cost and return-on-equity values were calculated and the results compared. The best of the three sites was selected for more detailed design and evaluation of both closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems during Task II. Task III involved characterizing the industrial sector electrical and thermal loads for the 48 contiguous states, applying a family of closed cycle gas turbine and steam turbine cogeneration systems to these loads, and conducting a market penetration analysis of the closed cycle gas turbine cogeneration system.

  7. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 4: Heat Sources, balance of plant and auxiliary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information established for heat sources balance of plant items, thermal energy storage, and heat pumps are presented. Design case descriptions are given along with projected performance values. Capital cost estimates for representative cogeneration plants are also presented.

  8. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  9. Comparison of Integrated Gasifier-Combined Cycle and AFB-steam turbine systems for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.; Abbott, J. M.; Burns, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    In the cogeneration technology alternatives study (CTAS) a number of advanced coal fired systems were examined and systems using a integrated coal gasifier IGCC or a fluid bed combustor AFB were found to yield attractive cogeneration results in industrial cogeneration applications. A range of site requirements and cogeneration sizing strategies using ground rules based on CTAS were used in comparing an IGCC and an AFB. The effect of time variations in site requirements and the sensitivity to fuel and electricity price assumptions are examined. The economic alternatives of industrial or utility ownership are also considered. The results indicate that the IGCC system has potentially higher fuel and emission savings and could be an attractive option for utility ownership. The AFB steam turbine system has a potentially higher return on investment and could be attractive assuming industrial ownership.

  10. Micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine for heating and their real operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čierny, Jaroslav; Patsch, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This article was deal with micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine. We watched problematic of real working Stirling engine. The article also contain hookup of unit constructed at University of Zilina.

  11. Cogeneration of electricity using wood waste as a replacement for fossil fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The experiences of a wood products company in their efforts to work out a cogeneration system using wood wastes are reviewed. Negotiations with the public utility and result of equipment search are described. (MHR)

  12. Feasibility of cogenerated district heating and cooling for North Loop project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-03-01

    A thermal-economic analysis was performed in order to determine feasibility of cogeneration with central heating and cooling for Chicago's North Loop Development Project. Heating, cooling and electrical loads were predicted by using energy data according to use and floor area, representative of downtown Chicago. The central facility proposed would supply cogenerated heating for a part of the development's demand and about one half of the cooling demand by means of combined conventional and cogeneration equipment together on the 4-pipe distribution system. Electricity would also be distributed and used to substantially displace purchases. Additional options are also discussed and, if economical, could make implementation more attractive. Four alternatives involving gas turbines and diesels were selected for study and are reported. Energy savings extend over the assumed 25 years of the project and are indexed to inflation and fuel-cost escalation. It would appear that cogeneration could assist economic development of the North Loop Project.

  13. Industrial Cogeneration--What it is, How it Works, Its Potential.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-29

    plant . Therefore, where industrial cogenerated electricity replaces central power- plant generated electricity, fewer emissions should be pro- duced...States Utilities Company plant located in the center of a petrochem - ical complex near Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Since 1929 the plant has produced steam and...utility emissions . Furthermore, since many existing utility plants burn oil, cogeneration might also lead to greater oil use than would otherwise be the

  14. Case study of McCormick place cogeneration project

    SciTech Connect

    Overstreet, E.L.

    1994-12-31

    In the authors business of providing district energy services, competition is the key to his being able to have a positive impact on the environment, business stability, and economic activity. In the district energy industry, the competitive options are for property owners to continue to self generate energy to meet their needs, purchase energy from a company that utilizes electricity during off-peak hours to produce chilled water or take advantage of a total solution of purchasing tri-generation energy from Trigen-Peoples District Energy Company. Tri-generation is an innovative technology which involves the simultaneous production of steam, chilled water, and electricity. The McCormick Place cogeneration project calls for producing steam and chilled water (co-) for use by the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority (MPEA). The plant will produce electricity (tri-) to run the production equipment.

  15. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 4: Energy conversion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed-cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum-based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. The advanced and commercially available cogeneration energy conversion systems studied in CTAS are fined together with their performance, capital costs, and the research and developments required to bring them to this level of performance.

  16. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 4: Energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. H.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-04-01

    Industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed-cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum-based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. The advanced and commercially available cogeneration energy conversion systems studied in CTAS are fined together with their performance, capital costs, and the research and developments required to bring them to this level of performance.

  17. System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

  18. Project considerations and design of systems for wheeling cogenerated power

    SciTech Connect

    Tessmer, R.G. Jr.; Boyle, J.R.; Fish, J.H. III; Martin, W.A.

    1994-08-01

    Wheeling electric power, the transmission of electricity not owned by an electric utility over its transmission lines, is a term not generally recognized outside the electric utility industry. Investigation of the term`s origin is intriguing. For centuries, wheel has been used to describe an entire machine, not just individual wheels within a machine. Thus we have waterwheel, spinning wheel, potter`s wheel and, for an automobile, wheels. Wheel as a verb connotes transmission or modification of forces and motion in machinery. With the advent of an understanding of electricity, use of the word wheel was extended to be transmission of electric power as well as mechanical power. Today, use of the term wheeling electric power is restricted to utility transmission of power that it doesn`t own. Cogeneration refers to simultaneous production of electric and thermal power from an energy source. This is more efficient than separate production of electricity and thermal power and, in many instances, less expensive.

  19. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  20. Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crego, D. F.; Eller, V. L.; Stephenson, J. W.

    1982-02-01

    An existing 727 TPD incinerator burning mixed municipal refuse was deemed to be a feasible candidate for a cogeneration energy retrofit. It is indicated that equipment and construction of the retrofit will cost $17.6 million or $24,200/rated tonne in 1980 dollars; air pollution control equipment will cost 10.4 million or $14,300/tonne. Furnace temperature and gas samplings along with pilot air pollution control equipment tests were conducted. Refuse was characterized on both wet and dry seasons. Final design is based upon burning 155,000 TPY of refuse from which can be generated, sufficient steam and electricity for inhouse use and an additional amount of 64 million kWh for sale.

  1. A simulation model for Carson Ice Co-Generation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, N.K.W.; Elmasri, M.; Brownell, G.

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a software system to simulate the performance of the Carson Ice Co-gen Facility operated by the Carson Energy Group. This 100 MW plant consists of a cogeneration combined cycle and a simple cycle unit powered by LM6000 gas turbine generators. Features of the system include inlet heating/absorption chilling for the gas turbines, supplementary firing capability, and a broad range of steam turbine extractions and admissions. The software enables the operator to model complex operating scenarios. It predicts technical and economic performance under a wide range of conditions, taking into account various equipment constraints and operation preferences. For any set of user-specified operating inputs, the corresponding heat and mass balance diagrams as well as economic figures may be viewed virtually instantaneously. Interactive plots of plant heat rate, incremental heat rate, operating income, and other parameters reveal issues and trade-offs involved in performance and economic optimization.

  2. Thermal analysis of solar biomass hybrid co-generation plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushika, N. D.; Mishra, Anuradha; Chakravarty, M. N.

    2005-12-01

    This article describes a co-generation plant based on the biogas being produced from the waste of distillery plant and highlights the possible configuration in which the plant can be hybridized with auxiliary solar energy source having the advantage of using financial incentives in several countries. In hybridization, the solar heat is used for heating the boiler feed water. The solar heat-generating unit consists of line focus parabolic trough collector, heat transportation system and heat delivery unit such as heat exchanger. The simulation model of heat and mass transfer processes in the solar field as well as the balance of the system is developed to investigate the technological feasibility of the concept in terms of plant yield and matching of subsystems.

  3. Cogeneration technology alternatives study. Volume 6: Computer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The potential technical capabilities of energy conversion systems in the 1985 - 2000 time period were defined with emphasis on systems using coal, coal-derived fuels or alternate fuels. Industrial process data developed for the large energy consuming industries serve as a framework for the cogeneration applications. Ground rules for the study were established and other necessary equipment (balance-of-plant) was defined. This combination of technical information, energy conversion system data ground rules, industrial process information and balance-of-plant characteristics was analyzed to evaluate energy consumption, capital and operating costs and emissions. Data in the form of computer printouts developed for 3000 energy conversion system-industrial process combinations are presented.

  4. 1992 National census for district heating, cooling and cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    District energy systems are a major part of the energy use and delivery infrastructure of the United States. With nearly 6,000 operating systems currently in place, district energy represents approximately 800 billion BTU per hour of installed thermal production capacity, and provides over 1.1 quadrillion BTU of energy annually -- about 1.3% of all energy used in the US each year. Delivered through more that 20,000 miles of pipe, this energy is used to heat and cool almost 12 billion square feet of enclosed space in buildings that serve a diverse range of office, education, health care, military, industrial and residential needs. This Census is intended to provide a better understanding of the character and extent of district heating, cooling and cogeneration in the United States. It defines a district energy system as: Any system that provides thermal energy (steam, hot water, or chilled water) for space heating, space cooling, or process uses from a central plant, and that distributes the energy to two or more buildings through a network of pipes. If electricity is produced, the system is a cogenerating facility. The Census was conducted through surveys administered to the memberships of eleven national associations and agencies that collectively represent the great majority of the nation`s district energy system operators. Responses received from these surveys account for about 11% of all district systems in the United States. Data in this report is organized and presented within six user sectors selected to illustrate the significance of district energy in institutional, community and utility settings. Projections estimate the full extent of district energy systems in each sector.

  5. Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

    2004-04-30

    This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

  6. Feasibility study for retrofitting biogas cogeneration systems to district heating in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mo; Park, Hwa-Choon

    2015-08-01

    A feasibility study was performed to assess the technical and economic merits of retrofitting biogas-based cogeneration systems to district heating networks. Three district heating plants were selected as candidates for accommodating heat recovery from nearby waste treatment stations, where a massive amount of biogas can be produced on a regular basis. The scenario involves constructing cogeneration systems in each waste treatment station and producing electricity and heat. The amounts of biogas production for each station are estimated based on the monthly treatment capacities surveyed over the most recent years. Heat produced by the cogeneration system is first consumed on site by the waste treatment system to keep the operating temperature at a proper level. If surplus heat is available, it will be transported to the nearest district heating plant. The year-round operation of the cogeneration system was simulated to estimate the electricity and heat production. We considered cost associated with the installation of the cogeneration system and piping as initial investments. Profits from selling electricity and recovering heat are counted as income, while costs associated with buying biogas are expenses. Simple payback periods of 2-10 years were projected under the current economic conditions of South Korea. We found that most of the proposed scenarios can contribute to both energy savings and environmental protection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Development of the first demonstration CFB boiler for gas and steam cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M; Luo, Z.; Li, X.; Wang, Q.; Shi, Z.; Ni, M.; Cen, K.

    1997-12-31

    To solve the shortage of gas and steam supply in the small towns of the country, a new gas steam cogeneration system has been developed. On the basis of the fundamental research on the system, a demonstration gas steam cogeneration system has been designed. As the phase 1 of the project, a 75t/h demonstration CFB boiler for gas steam cogeneration has been erected and operated at Yangzhong Thermal Power Plant of China. This paper introduces the first 75t/h demonstration CFB boiler for gas steam cogeneration. Due to the need of gas steam cogeneration process, the boiler has the features of high temperature cyclone separation, high solid recycle ratio, staged combustion and an external heat exchanger adjusting bed temperature and heat load. The operation results show that the boiler has wide fuel adaptability and the heating value of the coal changes from 14MJ/Kg to 25MJ/Kg. The heat load changes from 85t/h to 28t/h while steam parameter is maintained at the normal conditions. The combustion efficiency of the boiler attain 98%. The boiler design and operation experiences may be a guide to the design and operation of larger CFB units in the future.

  8. Avoided costs associated with cogeneration: a case study of Con Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, R.; Davitian, H.; Martorella, J.

    1980-08-01

    The potential impact of cogeneration in office and apartment buildings in New York City on the Consolidated Edison Company (Con Ed) has been investigated using a method of utility cost and fuel use analysis developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This method computes a utility's long run marginal costs and long run marginal fuel consumption associated with load modifications due to the introduction of on-site energy producing technologies. The principal findings of this study show that Con Ed's long run average cost is more likely to go down than up due to cogeneration in office and apartment building; the utility's avoided costs (i.e., its long run marginal savings) associated with the gross power output of the cogeneration systems are 10.5 cents/KWh for the office building and 6.4 cents/KWh for the apartment buildings; the utility's marginal savings include a component for avoided capacity costs; and there are net savings in the use of oil due to cogeneration (assuming the building used oil for its boilers before it switched and diesel fuel in its cogenerators afterwards).

  9. Feasibility of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility, energy management memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. W.

    1982-09-01

    The thermal-economic feasibility was studied of a medium-size central cogenerated energy facility designed to serve five varied industries. Generation options included one dual-fuel diesel and one gas turbine, both with waste heat boilers, and five fired boilers. Fuels included natural gas, and for the fired-boiler cases, also low-sulphur coal and municipal refuse. The fired-boiler cogeneration systems employed back-pressure steam turbines. For coal and refuse, the option of steam only without cogeneration was also assessed. The refuse-fired cases utilized modular incinerators. The options provided for a wide range of steam and electrical capacities. Deficient steam was assumed generated independently in existing equipment. Excess electrical power over that which could be displaced was assumed sold to Commonwealth Edison Company under PURPA (Public Utility Regulator Policies Act). The facility was assumed operated by a mutually owned corporation formed by the cogenerated power users. The economic analysis was predicted on currently applicable energy-investment tax credits and accelerated depreciation for a January 1985 startup date. Based on 100% equity financing, the results indicated that the best alternative was the modular-incinerator cogeneration system.

  10. Efficiency Assessment of Support Mechanisms for Wood-Fired Cogeneration Development in Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, Anna; Siirde, Andres

    2010-01-01

    There are various support mechanisms for wood-fired cogeneration plants, which include both support for cogeneration development and stimulation for increasing consumption of renewable energy sources. The efficiency of these mechanisms is analysed in the paper. Overview of cogeneration development in Estonia is given with the focus on wood-fired cogeneration. Legislation acts and amendments, related to cogeneration support schemes, were described. For evaluating the efficiency of support mechanisms an indicator - fuel cost factor was defined. This indicator includes the costs related to the chosen fuel influence on the final electricity generation costs without any support mechanisms. The wood fuel cost factors were compared with the fuel cost factors for peat and oil shale. For calculating the fuel cost factors, various data sources were used. The fuel prices data were based on the average cost of fuels in Estonia for the period from 2000 till 2008. The data about operating and maintenance costs, related to the fuel type in the case of comparing wood fuel and oil shale fuel were taken from the CHP Balti and Eesti reports. The data about operating and maintenance costs used for peat and wood fuel comparison were taken from the Tallinn Elektrijaam reports. As a result, the diagrams were built for comparing wood and its competitive fuels. The decision boundary lines were constructed on the diagram for the situation, when no support was provided for wood fuels and for the situations, when various support mechanisms were provided during the last 12 years.

  11. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  12. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Industrial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Gerlaugh, H. E.; Priestley, R. R.

    1980-04-01

    Cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers is examined in terms of cost savings. The use of various advanced energy conversion systems are examined and compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the target energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules specified by NASA for determining performance and cost. Data and narrative descriptions of the industrial processes are given.

  13. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerlaugh, H. E.; Hall, E. W.; Brown, D. H.; Priestley, R. R.; Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Large savings can be made in industry by cogenerating electric power and process heat in single energy conversion systems rather than separately in utility plants and in process boilers. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed-cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum-based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. An attempt was made to use consistent assumptions and a consistent set of ground rules for determining performance and cost in individual plants and on a national level. It was found that: (1) atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed steam turbine systems were the most attractive of the direct coal-fired systems; and (2) open-cycle gas turbines with heat recovery steam generators and combined-cycles with NO(x) emission reduction and moderately increased firing temperatures were the most attractive of the coal-derived liquid-fired systems.

  14. Bio-mass utilization in high pressure cogeneration boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinya, Sandeep; Maria Ambrose Raj, Y.; Sreeram, K.; Divakar Shetty A., S.

    2017-07-01

    Coal is widely used all over the world in almost all power plants. The dependence on coal has increased enormously as the demand for electricity has reached its peak. Coal being a non-renewable source is depleting fast. We being the engineers, it's our duty to conserve the natural resources and optimize the coal consumption. In this project, we have tried to optimize the bio-mass utilization in high pressure cogeneration boiler. The project was carried in Seshasayee Paper and Boards Limited, erode related to Boiler No:10 operating at steam pressure of 105 kscg and temperature of 510°C. Available bio-mass fuels in and around the mill premises are bagasse, bagasse pith, cane trash and chipper dust. In this project, we have found out the coal equivalent replacement by the above bio-mass fuel(s) to facilitate deciding on the optimized quantity of coal that can be replaced by biomass without modifying the existing design of the plant. The dominant fuel (coal) which could be displaced with the substitute biomass fuel had been individually (biomass) analyzed.

  15. Biogas as a fuel source for SOFC co-generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Membrez, Yves; Bucheli, Olivier

    This study reports on the combination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generators fueled with biogas as renewable energy source, recoverable from wastes but at present underexploited. From a mobilisable near-future potential in the European Union (EU-15) of 17 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe), under 15% appears to be converted today into useful heat and power (2 Mtoe). SOFCs could improve and promote the exploitation of biogas on manifold generation sites as small combined heat and power (5-50 kW el), especially for farm and sewage installations, raising the electrical conversion efficiency on such reduced and variable power level. Larger module packs of the high temperature ceramic converter would also be capable of operating on contaminated fuel of low heating value (less than 40% that of natural gas) which can emanate from landfill sites (MW-size). Landfill gas delivers 80% of current world biogas production. This document compiles and estimates biogas data on actual production and future potential and presents the thermodynamics of the biogas reforming and electrochemical conversion processes. A case study is reported of the energy balance of a small SOFC co-generator operated with agricultural biogas, the largest potential source.

  16. Supercritical biodiesel production and power cogeneration: technical and economic feasibilities.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, A; Anitescu, G; Rice, P A; Tavlarides, L L

    2010-03-01

    An integrated supercritical fluid technology with power cogeneration to produce biodiesel fuels, with no need for the costly separations involved with the conventional technology, is proposed, documented for technical and economic feasibility, and preliminarily designed. The core of the integrated system consists of the transesterification of various triglyceride sources (e.g., vegetable oils and animal fats) with supercritical methanol/ethanol. Part of the reaction products can be combusted by a diesel power generator integrated in the system which, in turn, provides the power needed to pressurize the system and the heat of the exhaust gases necessary in the transesterification step. The latter energy demand can also be satisfied by a fired heater, especially for higher plant capacities. Different versions of this system can be implemented based on the main target of the technology: biodiesel production or diesel engine applications, including power generation. The process options considered for biodiesel fuel production estimate break-even processing costs of biodiesel as low as $0.26/gal ($0.07/L) with a diesel power generator and $0.35/gal ($0.09/L) with a fired heater for a plant capacity of 15,000 gal/day (56,775 L/day). Both are significantly lower than the current processing costs of approximately $0.51/gal ($0.13/L) of biodiesel produced by conventional catalytic methods. A retail cost of biodiesel produced by the proposed method is likely to be competitive with the prices of diesel fuels.

  17. Development of micro-cogeneration system with porous catalyst microcombustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ieda, N.; Ihara, T.

    2015-10-01

    A self-standing micro-cogeneration system was developed by coupling a microcombustor, thermoelectric (TE) modules, and an air supply device. The microcombustor has a porous monolithic Pt catalyst layer, and a combustion efficiency of 90% was achieved. A microblower is used to supply air to the combustor, and it is driven by electricity from the Bi-Te TE modules through a dc-dc converter. We investigated the optimal point where the output became maximal and the system was self-standing. At the optimal point, the input fuel enthalpy was 13.2 W, and 440 mW of electricity was generated from the TE modules. The microblower consumed 280 mW, and the net generated electricity was 160 mW. Therefore, the final thermal efficiency was 1.21%. The net thermal efficiency of the developed system was the same magnitude as that of TeeDee01 (COX Co. Ltd.), the world’s smallest model plane engine (0.163 cc), even though the magnitude of the output power was less than 1/20 in comparison.

  18. CO2 mitigation in coal gasification cogeneration systems with integration of the shift reaction, CO2 absorption and methanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jin

    2004-08-01

    Cogeneration of electricity and liquid fuel can achieve higher efficiencies than electricity generation alone in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), and cogeneration systems are also expected to mitigate CO2 emissions. A proposed methanol-electricity cogeneration system was analyzed in this paper using exergy method to evaluate the specified system. A simple cogeneration scheme and a complicated scheme including the shift reaction and CO2 removal were compared. The results show that the complicated scheme consumes more energy, but has a higher methanol synthesis ratio with partial capture of CO2. In those methanol and electricity cogeneration systems, the CO2 mitigation is not merely an additional process that consumes energy and reduces the overall efficiency, but is integrated into the methanol production.

  19. Energy and cost saving results for advanced technology systems from the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerman, G. D.; Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the organization and methodology of the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study is presented. The objectives of the study were to identify the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the future and to assess the advantages of advanced technology systems compared to those systems commercially available today. Advanced systems studied include steam turbines, open and closed cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics. Steam turbines, open cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, and diesel engines were also analyzed in versions typical of today's commercially available technology to provide a base against which to measure the advanced systems. Cogeneration applications in the major energy consuming manufacturing industries were considered. Results of the study in terms of plant level energy savings, annual energy cost savings and economic attractiveness are presented for the various energy conversion systems considered.

  20. Carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration and energy projects: A technically, environmentally, and economically feasible option

    SciTech Connect

    Rushing, S.A.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the topics of carbon dioxide recovery from cogeneration projects and related industrial usage of carbon dioxide will be covered from North American and international perspectives. The CO{sub 2} recovery discussion will largely focus on one particular technology, namely the application of proprietary monoethanolamine (MEA) solvents, which have a very satisfactory record of performance in the cogeneration and power production industries. The US Federal Energy Act, the impetus behind the development of such projects, will be discussed along with its impacts on the feasibility of U.S. projects. This subject would be reviewed for other developed countries and developing economies as well. Moreover, capital and operating costs and requirements will be summarized for such plants, plus existing CO{sub 2} recovery (from cogeneration) projects will be identified.

  1. Potential for cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. S.; Edelson, E.; Kashani, A. K.; Slonski, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The nontechnical issues of industrial cogeneration for 12 California firms were analyzed under three categories of institutional settings: (1) industrial ownership without firm sales of power; (2) industrial ownership with firm sales of power; and (3) utility or third party ownership. Institutional issues were analyzed from the independent viewpoints of the primary parties of interest: the industrial firms, the electric utilities and the California Public utilities Commission. Air quality regulations and the agencies responsible for their promulgation were examined, and a life cycle costing model was used to evaluate the economic merits of representative conceptual cogeneration systems at these sites. Specific recommendations were made for mitigating measures and regulatory action relevant to industrial cogeneration in California.

  2. Three-phase cogenerator and transformer models for distribution system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.H.; Chen, M.S.; Inoue, T. . Energy Systems Research Center); Kotas, P.; Chebli, E.A. )

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents detailed three-phase cogenerator and transformer models for analyzing a large-scale distribution system. The cogenerator model presented here is significant in that it will represent the inherent generator phase imbalance due to distribution system imbalance. The cogenerators can be synchronous or induction and can be on either primary or secondary system. The transformer models consider the copper and core losses, the winding connection, the phase shifting between primary and secondary windings, and the off-nominal tapping. An individual phase, as opposed to a balanced three-phase, representation was employed. This approach is oriented toward applications in distribution system operational analysis rather than planning analysis. This difference should be properly emphasized. The misuse of the planning oriented method to analyze the operational behavior of the system will distort the explanation of the calculated results and lead to incorrect conclusions.

  3. HTGR-process steam/cogeneration and HTGR-steam cycle program. Semiannual report, October 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Progress in the design of an 1170-MW(t) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Nuclear Steam Supply (NSS) is described. This NSS can integrate favorably into present petrochemical and primary metal process industries, heavy oil recovery operations, and future shale oil recovery and synfuel processes. The economics appear especially attractive in comparison with alternative coal-fired steam generation. Cost estimates for central station power-generating 2240- and 3360-MW(t) HTGR-Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) plants are updated. The 2240-MW(t) HTGR-SC is treated to a probabilistic risk evaluation. Compared with the earlier 3000-MW(t) design, the results predict a slightly increased risk of core heatup, owing to the result of eliminating the capability of the boiler feed pump to operate at atmospheric backpressure. The differences in risk, however, are within the calculational uncertainties. Preliminary results of the ranking of safety enhancement features for the 1170-MW(t) HTGR indicate that the following modifications offer the most promise: (1) capability for main loop rundown, (2) natural circulation core auxiliary cooling, and (3) PCRV blowdown capability through the helium purification system to minimize activity release during some core heatups.

  4. Utility reduces fuel cost with heat recovery, industrial byproduct fuel, cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    A 50-MW North Dakota power plant is refurbished to recover major waste-heat sources. Use of agricultural byproduct fuel and cogeneration also helps to cut future costs. The plant is saving on fuel costs by burning 150-200 tons/day of sunflower seed hulls from a local processing plant. The hulls are pulverized and mixed with the primary fuel, North Dakota lignite. At the same time, the processing plant that supplies the sunflower hulls buys steam from the power plant, thus giving the utility some of the economic benefits of cogeneration.

  5. Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  6. Process integration methodology for natural gas-fueled heat pumps and cogeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Alan P.

    1988-11-01

    A process integration methodology was developed for analyzing industrial processes, identifying those that will benefit from natural gas fueled heat pumps and cogeneration system as well as novel, process-specific opportunities for further equipment improvements, including performance targets. The development included the writing of software to assist in implementing the methodology and application of the procedures in studies using both literature data and plant operating data. These highlighted potential applications for gas fueled heat pumps in ethylene processes and liquor distilling plants, and slightly less attractive opportunities in a number of other plants. Many of the processes studied showed excellent potentials for cogeneration applications.

  7. Design and construction of a Ringbom-Stirling cogeneration unit

    SciTech Connect

    Capata, R.; Dong, W.; Lucchetti, A.; Lucentini, M.; Masci, A.; Naso, V.

    1998-07-01

    A research team at University of Rome La Sapienza designed and developed a new Stirling Ringbom engine, named ULS-RSE 1, with the aim to make it simple and cheap, to accelerate the pre-commercialization process and facilitate the diffusion of Stirling technology. The engine is a by 2.5 kW mechanical power and about 9 kW thermal power unit, since it can operate as cogeneration unit. The heat source is a multi-fuel furnace of 14 kW thermal power with a combustion efficiency of 75%. In order to reduce its weight, the compressor device (power piston, cross-head, rod and cylinder) is made of Ergal, an aluminum alloy. The seal of the piston is a charged PTFE (bronze or graphite); the characteristics of this material are the long life and the high working performance (260 C, 600 bar and 10 m/s of mean piston speed). The hot section has no crank mechanism. The stainless steel displacer has a seal guide of Peek, preventing the effects of high working temperatures (about 1000 K). Two dampers are located at the top, in order to regulate the displacer piston stroke. The displacer free piston runs into a sort of stainless steel container, cylinder shaped. The corrugated nickel foil heat exchangers are located in the space between the hot section wall and the container. The regenerator, unusually long 12 cm, consists of a stainless steel foil matrix (thickness of 0.05 mm). To improve the thermal exchange in the hot and cold working spaces, external fins are also provided, respectively longitudinal and horizontal ones. The realization of a test bench is in progress.

  8. Exergetic, thermal, and externalities analyses of a cogeneration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, M.B.; Curtiss, P.; Blanton, P.H.; McBrayer, T.B.

    2006-02-15

    A thermodynamic study of an 88.4 MW cogeneration plant located in the United States is presented in this paper. The feedstock for this actual plant is culm, the waste left from anthracite coal mining. Before combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers, the usable carbon within the culm is separated from the indigenous rock. The rock and ash waste from the combustion process fill adjacent land previously scared by strip mining. Trees and grass are planted in these areas as part of a land reclamation program. Analyses based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics using actual operating data are first presented to acquaint the reader with the plant's components and operation. Using emission and other relevant environmental data from the plant, all externalities study is outlined that estimates the plant's effect on the local population. The results show that the plant's cycle performs with a coefficient of utilization of 29% and all approximate exergetic efficiency of 34.5%. In order to increase these values, recommended improvements to the plant are noted. In addition, the externality costs associated with the estimated SO{sub 2} and NOx discharge from the culm fed plant are lower (85-95%) than those associated with a similarly sized coal fed plant. The plant's cycle efficiencies are lower than those associated with more modern technologies; such as all integrated gas turbine combined cycle. However, given the abundant, inexpensive supply of feedstock located adjacent to the plant and the environmental benefit of removing culm banks, the plant's existing operation is unique from an economical and environmental viewpoint.

  9. Sophisticated new/retrofit cogeneration plant boosts profits

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieger, B.

    1985-03-01

    Conversion of a coal-capable boiler that produced 200-psig saturated steam for process to a high-pressure unit, the addition of a new coal-fired steam generator, and the installation of two turbine/generators at its Park 500 reconstituted-leaf (tobacco) plant in Chester, Va, have enabled Philip Morris USA to reduce the facility's operating costs while improving availability. The first process line at the plant, and the 120,000-lb/hr (at 200 psig, saturated), oil-fired packaged boiler serving it, were installed in 1974. Purpose: To reprocess into a usable product the stems and other parts of the tobacco leaf that must be removed before cigarette manufacture. The reconstituted-leaf process essentially makes a sheet of pure tobacco ''paper'' using a method similar to that of the kraft process. Reconstituted leaf is mixed with natural leaf in the manufacture of smoking materials. Though it accounts for only a small amount of the tobacco in a typical cigarette, the reprocessed product is an important economic factor, because of the high cost of natural leaf. About the time a second process line and the 200,000-lb/hr coal-fired boiler for it were installed in 1978, oil prices jumped dramatically and the relatively simple, oil/gas-fired, low-pressure industrial steam system-an industry standard since the 1950s-became an economic liability. Thus, when planning for a third process line was initiated in 1979, coal firing and cogeneration were foremost in the minds of engineers.

  10. Compare total costs of cogeneration-system alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Coffin, B.D.

    1984-10-01

    Today's emphasis on industrial cogeneration calls for a method of reasonably estimating costs of the many system alternatives. The approach differs from utility cost-estimating, mainly because steam capacity and power-generation capability are separate design objectives. Either the industrial powerplant meets the process-steam demand and then generates whatever power that creates, or else it meets the electric-power demand and generates the required steam. Choice of approach depends on the steam and electric-power requirements of the facility. Ideally, they balance exactly. In practice, most steam requirements will not generate enough electric power to meet the plant load. Conversely, the steam flow can rarely generate more electric power than the plant needs. Variations in steam conditions and turbine-exhaust pressure lead to many ways of matching the loads. More important, regulated buyback of excess electric power by public utilities now eases the problem of load balancing. Still, a profile of steam and electricpower consumption is necessary to begin. Daily, weekly, monthly, and seasonal variations are all important. During initial evaluation of the balance, use an average of 25 lb of steam/kWh as the steam rate of a small steam turbine. It is a conservative number, and the actual value will probably be lower--meaning more electric power for the steam flow-but it will give a rough idea of how close the two demands will match. In this paper, capital costs are separated into costs for the boiler island and costs for the turbine island. Absolute accuracy is to within + or - 25%, not of appropriation quality but good enough to compare different plant designs. In fact, the relative accuracy is closer to + or - 10%.

  11. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  12. Cogeneration : A Regulatory Guide to Leasing, Permitting, and Licensing in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.

    SciTech Connect

    Deshaye, Joyce; Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1992-12-01

    This guidebook focuses on cogeneration development. It is one of a series of four guidebooks recently prepared to introduce the energy developer to the federal, state and local agencies that regulate energy facilities in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington (the Bonneville Power Administration Service Territory). It was prepared specifically to help cogeneration developers obtain the permits, licenses and approvals necessary to construct and operate a cogeneration facility. The regulations, agencies and policies described herein are subject to change. Changes are likely to occur whenever energy or a project becomes a political issue, a state legislature meets, a preexisting popular or valuable land use is thought threatened, elected and appointed officials change, and new directions are imposed on states and local governments by the federal government. Accordingly, cogeneration developers should verify and continuously monitor the status of laws and rules that might affect their plans. Developers are cautioned that the regulations described herein may only be a starting point on the road to obtaining all the necessary permits.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis and optimization of fuel cell based Combined Cycle Cogeneration plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odukoya, Adedoyin

    Power plants operating in combined cycle cogeneration configuration are becoming increasingly popular because of high energy conversion efficiency and reduced pollutant and green-house gas emissions. On the other hand, fuel cell technology continues to be of global interest because it can operate with very low to 0% green-house gas emission depending on the fuel. The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of co-firing of natural gas with synthetic gas generated from coal gasification on the thermodynamic performance of an air blown coal gasification Combined Cycle Cogeneration unit with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement. The effects of the operating temperature of the SOFC and the pressure ratio and turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine on the net work output and efficiency of the power cycles on the cogeneration unit are simulated. Simulations are also conducted on the thermal and cogeneration efficiencies of the individual power cycle as well as the overall plants respectively. The optimal pressure ratio, temperature of operation of the SOFC and, gas turbine inlet temperature was determined using a sequential quadratic program solver base on the Quasi-Newton algorithm.

  14. 77 FR 2717 - Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cherokee County Cogeneration Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced...

  15. Fuel price changes and the adoption of cogeneration in the U.K. and Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Bonilla, David

    2007-08-15

    Whenever industrial plants consume power and heat, there is a need to consider energy efficiency investment in a cogeneration plant. The author tests an empirical model employing application of cross-sectional time series to analyze the economic incentives influencing the adoption of energy-saving technology in the U.K. and Dutch manufacturing sectors. (author)

  16. What's needed next to refine the EU directive on cogeneration regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Verbruggen, Aviel

    2007-03-15

    Efforts to develop a more precise definition and measurement of cogenerated electricity than those contained in the European Union's 2004 Directive have made real progress, but additional improvements are needed to yield a better-founded, more transparent methodology. The author offers suggestions on how to complete this important job. (author)

  17. Cogenerating a Competency-based HRM Degree: A Model and Some Lessons from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Elden, Max

    2001-01-01

    A competency-based degree program in human resource management was co-generated by six groups of stakeholders who synthesized competency models using group decision support software. The program focuses on core human resource processes, general business management, strategic decision making and problem solving, change management, and personal…

  18. Preliminary evaluation of the industrial cogeneration potential in five San Francisco Bay Area counties. Consultant report

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, C. Jr.; Rodden, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates of the industrial cogeneration potential in five San Francisco Bay Area counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, Santa Clara, San Mateo, and San Francisco are developed. The estimates are developed using survey techniques including mailed questionaires and on-site visits. The following technical and economic feasibility criteria were used in screening potential industrial cogenerators; a heat demand rate criterion of 15,000 pounds of steam per hour and annual heat load factor of 0.60, which was determined by an after-tax return on investment requirement of 16%. Using these screening criteria, a survey was conducted at 75 industrial sites in the five county area, questionaires were received for 34 projects, and site visits were performed at 12 facilities. Based upon the above economic criteria there were 584 MW of viable cogeneration potential identified, about three quarters of which were found in oil refineries, chemical plants, or paper, plastic, or wallboard firms. The total industrial cogeneration capacity estimated for the five county area was 1334 MW. Extrapolating from this sample, this estimate involves a number of approximations and assumptions, and does not consider industrial growth in future years.

  19. Effectiveness of a Micro Gas Turbine Cogeneration System using in a Residential Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Teru; Yamada, Masahiro

    For energy conservation and CO2 reduction, cogeneration systems may be useful. This paper shows the effectiveness of the cogeneration system, used in a residential area and designed to supply heat by hot water pipelines. The cogeneration system consists of a micro gas turbine (MGT) generator and a boiler. Entire heat load is supplied by the MGT or boiler, while an electric load may be supplied by an electric power company. Optimal diameter of the hot water pipeline becomes large when the load density becomes low. Total heat supply loss is less then 10% for moderate temperature region. However, it exceeds 20% for a sparse load in the cold region. The MGT should generates heat just required by the load for the primary energy or cost minimum operation. In the moderate temperature region, primary energy reduction ratio is positive in almost all cases, while it becomes negative in the cold region. On the other hand, CO2 emission almost always decreases in some extent. In the warm or moderate temperature region, MGT cogeneration systems are effective for energy conservation. They are also effective for CO2 reduction in almost all cases.

  20. Applied Performance Research of a Cogeneration Arrangement with Proposed Efficiency Well-Balance Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naing, Soe; Yamada, Takanobu; Nakanishi, Kimio

    According to the third conference of parties (COP3), Japan has set a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 6% by the year 2010. Cogeneration system is a recently potent method which its environmental benefits, through the highly efficient utilization of fuel that is related to reduction emissions. The particular purpose of this paper is to support the selection of cogeneration technologies by acquiring the optimal useful thermal energy and electrical power from system with well-efficiency balance method and fuel saving approaching method. When a micro gas turbine (MGT) is operated under ambient condition, the discharged hot gases from the MGT may be expanded at its exhaust stage and cooled by an exhaust heat exchanger which composes with a single stage absorption heat exchanger. The performance and annual total fuel saving amount of cogeneration plant will be investigated and compared with separated production of heat and power system. Eventually, this cogeneration plant will be reduced the fuel consumption rate in operation that will be also reduced the emissions and fuel cost when the system will gain highly efficiency of thermal energy and electrical power.

  1. Long-Term Nuclear Industry Outlook - 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Reichmuth, Barbara A.; Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.

    2004-09-30

    The nuclear industry has become increasingly efficient and global in nature, but may now be poised at a crossroads between graceful decline and profound growth as a viable provider of electrical energy. Predicted population and energy-demand growth, an increased interest in global climate change, the desire to reduce the international dependence on oil as an energy source, the potential for hydrogen co-generation using nuclear power reactors, and the improved performance in the nuclear power industry have raised the prospect of a “nuclear renaissance” in which nuclear power would play an increasingly more important role in both domestic and international energy market. This report provides an assessment of the role nuclear-generated power will plan in the global energy future and explores the impact of that role on export controls.

  2. District heating/cogeneration application studies for the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Impact of a district heating/cogeneration system on annual average SO2 air quality in the twin cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnitz, M. A.; Kornegay, F. C.; McLain, H. A.; Murphy, B. D.; Raridon, R. J.; Shlatter, E. C.

    1981-03-01

    Annual average SO2 concentrations in air at ground level were determined for a base year (1976) and for a future year (1987) with and without a 2600-MW(t) district heating system. Without district heating, the SO2 concentrations in the area are predicted to increase with time because of anticipated increased substitution of oil for curtailed natural gas. Implementation of the district heating/cogeneration system is predicted to mitigate this increase of SO2 concentrations significantly. Although the total emissions will be slightly higher with district heating/cogeneration because of the substitution of coal for natural gas and oil, use of tall stacks at the cogeneration plants will permit greater dispersion of the SO2 emissions. Considerable overall energy savings, particularly in the form of natural gas and oil, will be realized with a district heating/cogeneration system.

  3. Influence of biomass cofiring on the optimal coefficient of the cogeneration share in a district heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziębik, Andrzej; Gładysz, Paweł

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents a modified algorithm for choosing the optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems taking into account additional benefits concerning the promotion of highefficiency cogeneration and biomass cofiring. The optimal coefficient of the share of cogeneration depends first of all on the share of the heat required for preparing the hot tap water. The final result of investigations is an empirical equation describing the influence of the ratio of the heat flux for the production of hot tap water to the maximum flux for space heating and ventilation, as well as the share of chemical energy of biomass in the fuel mixture on the optimal value of the share of cogeneration in district heating systems. The approach presented in the paper may be applied both in back-pressure combined heat and power (CHP) plants and in extraction-condensing CHP plants.

  4. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 2: Residual-fired nocogeneration process boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Computer generated data on the performance of the cogeneration energy conversion system are presented. Performance parameters included fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics, and emissions of residual fired process boilers.

  5. Starting the water treatment system of the 410-MW combined-cycle plant at the Krasnodar cogeneration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, A. A.; Zhadan, A. V.; Gromov, S. L.; Tropina, D. V.; Arkhipova, O. V.

    2012-07-01

    The process diagram of a water treatment plant constructed on the basis of integrated membrane technologies with the use of two-stage reverse osmosis for the PGU-410 power unit at the Krasnodar cogeneration station is presented.

  6. Environmental assessment on industrial cogeneration demonstration plant at the Riegel Textile Mill site, Ware Shoals, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The paper examines the potential environmental, health and safety, and socioeconomic impacts of the proposed industrial cogeneration demonstration plant at the Riegel Textile Corporation's mill in Ware Shoals, South Carolina. The proposal involves installing and demonstrating cogeneration of process steam and electricity by topping process steam. Section I discusses the need and purpose for the proposal. Section II discusses alternatives including the proposed action. Alternatives including the proposed cogeneration system discussed are no action; replacement of one existing boiler, omitting cogeneration; system alternatives (cogeneration bottoming cycles, alternative cogeneration topping cycles. Section III provides past and present data on those aspects of the local environment which could be affected by the proposed actions. Items discussed are topography and climatology, geology and oils; air quality; water resources and quality; ecological resources; land use plans and policies; socioeconomic setting; health and safety; utilities and services; energy resources; cultural resources and aesthetics and details on these items are presented in Section IV. A summary of impacts associated with, impact of alternatives to, and mitigating measures to the proposed action are also presented in Section IV. Discussions on unavoidable adverse environmental effects; irreversible and irretrievable commitment of resources; relationship of land use plans, policies, and controls; and relationship between short-term use of environment and maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity conclude Section IV. (MCW)

  7. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-03-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  8. Development of advanced concepts for DIR-MCFC cogeneration applications in the European Market

    SciTech Connect

    Kortbeek, P.J.; Ottervanger, R.G.; Dicks, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Early 1996 a three year (1996 - 1998) joint European project was launched under the name {open_quote}Advanced DIR-MCFC Development{close_quote}, aiming at the development of Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) systems for cogeneration applications for the European market. In this project participate: Brandstofcel Nederland BV (BCN), British Gas pic (BG), Gaz de France (GDF), Netherlands Energy Research foundation (ECN), Stork, Royal Schelde and Sydkraft AB. The European Fuel Cell User Group (EFCUG) supports the project as an advisory board. Whereas the US and Japanese programmes are aimed at large-scale demonstrations of the MCFC technology, this project focusses on the development of concepts and technology, required for MCFC systems that will be competative on the cogeneration market. The project partners provide the essential expertise: from end-user, system engineering, stack development up to fundamental material research.

  9. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 2: Comparison and evaluation of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CTAS compared and evaluated various advanced energy conversion systems that can use coal or coal-derived fuels for industrial cogeneration applications. The principal aim of the study was to provide information needed by DOE to establish research and development (R&D) funding priorities for advanced-technology systems that could significantly advance the use of coal or coal-derived fuels in industrial cogeneration. Steam turbines, diesel engines, open-cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, closed-cycle gas turbines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and thermionics were studied with technology advancements appropriate for the 1985-2000 time period. The various advanced systems were compared and evaluated for a wide diversity of representative industrial plants on the basis of fuel energy savings, annual energy cost savings, emissions savings, and rate of return on investment (ROI) as compared with purchasing electricity from a utility and providing process heat with an on-site boiler.

  10. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  11. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility industrial process heat, category A. Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, P.; Brzeczek, M.; Seilestad, H.; Silverman, C.; Yenetchi, G.

    1981-07-01

    The conceptual design of a central receiver solar cogeneration facility at a California oil field is described. The process of selecting the final cogeneration system configuration is described and the various system level and subsystem level tradeoff studies are presented, including the system configuration study, technology options, and system sizing. The facility is described, and the functional aspects, requirements operational characteristics, and performance are discussed. Capital and operating costs, safety, environmental, regulatory issues and potential limiting considerations for the design are included. Each subsystem is described in detail including a discussion of the functional requirements, design, operating characteristics performance estimates and a top level cost estimate. An economic assessment is performed to determine the near-term economic viability of the project and to examine the impact of variations in major economic parameters such as capital and operating and maintenance costs on economic viability. Two measures of economic viability used are levelized energy cost and net present value.

  12. Electric co-generation units equipped with wood gasifier and Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolini, C.M.; Caresana, F.; Pelagalli, L.

    1998-07-01

    The disposal of industrial waste such as oil sludges, waste plastic, lubricant oils, paper and wood poses serious problems due to the ever increasing amount of material to be disposed of and to the difficulty in finding new dumping sites. The interest in energy recovery technologies is accordingly on the increase. In particular, large amounts of waste wood are simply burned or thrown away causing considerable environmental damage. In this context the co-generation technique represents one of the possible solutions for efficient energy conversion. The present paper proposes the employment of a Stirling engine as prime mover in a co-generation set equipped with a wood gasifier. A Stirling engine prototype previously developed in a joint project with Mase Generators, an Italian manufacturer of fixed and portable electrogenerators, is illustrated and its design is described.

  13. Savings analysis of a 1 MW cogeneration system at a Texas mental health facility

    SciTech Connect

    Athar, A.; Turner, W.D.; Caton, J.A.; McClean, G.

    1995-12-31

    Cogeneration is defined as the generation of electric power and coincident recovery of useful thermal energy from a single prime mover using a single fuel. The 1 MW gas turbine cogeneration system at Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation (TDMHMR), Austin, came on line in March, 1992 and is a unique application of federal and state funds. This system has been analyzed for its present performance and loads using hourly measured data. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A and M University has been collecting hourly data for natural gas use and the electrical energy produced by the engine since August, 1992. Waste heat recovered by the Waste Heat Recovery Boiler (WHRB) is also monitored. This paper describes the present system, analyzes the system using hourly monitored data, calculates energy and dollar savings, compares the measured results with the estimated savings, and discusses some of the problems encountered during the first year of operation.

  14. The Optimization of a Cogeneration System for Commercial Buildings by the Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takahiko; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    The cogeneration system provides electricity as well as heating and cooling, which consequently leads to a complexity of the design and operation of the system. It requires, therefore, the optimization of parameters such as the number of machines and the capacity of equipment. Generally, the problem can be expressed as a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem, and a lot of efforts would be required to solve it. In this paper, we present a different approach to the optimization of cogeneration systems, which facilitates to find a quasi-optimum solution. The particle swarm optimization combined with a simulation of the system is applied to the minimization of the primary energy consumption and of the system cost. The results present the optimum system constitutions for medium- and large-sized buildings. The result of the system cost minimization under a constraint of the energy saving rate is also discussed.

  15. An assessment of the industrial cogeneration market for parabolic dish systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The value analysis technique used is straightforward. Maximum allowable life-cycle system cost for the cogeneration system is determined as the sum of the present value of fuels displaced plus the present value of revenues from exported power. Each conventional fuel displaced is described by a unit cost in the first year, a uniform annual consumption rate, and a uniform annual escalation rate for unit cost. Exported energy flows are treated the same as displaced energy.

  16. Initial Feasibility Report on Decentralized Small Cogeneration for Navy Shore Bases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    34 which presents information on a variety of engines (large and small) that can be adapted to cogeneration.7 The Gas Research Institute is soon to publish...Sliwinski, D. Leverenz, L. Windingland, A. R. Mech, "Fixed Facilities Energy Consumption Investigation - Data Analysis, Construction Engineering Research ...Manual," U.S. Arny Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, CERL-IR-E-127, February 1978. 11. R. K. Messock, "Industrial Energy Conservation

  17. Energy and cost savings results for advanced technology systems from the Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study /CTAS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerman, G. D.; Barna, G. J.; Burns, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS), a program undertaken to identify the most attractive advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the 1985-2000 time period, is described, and preliminary results are presented. Two cogeneration options are included in the analysis: a topping application, in which fuel is input to the energy conversion system which generates electricity and waste heat from the conversion system is used to provide heat to the process, and a bottoming application, in which fuel is burned to provide high temperature process heat and waste heat from the process is used as thermal input to the energy conversion system which generates energy. Steam turbines, open and closed cycle gas turbines, combined cycles, diesel engines, Stirling engines, phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells and thermionics are examined. Expected plant level energy savings, annual energy cost savings, and other results of the economic analysis are given, and the sensitivity of these results to the assumptions concerning fuel prices, price of purchased electricity and the potential effects of regional energy use characteristics is discussed.

  18. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS) Volume 5: Analytical approach and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data and information in the area of advanced energy conversion systems for industrial cogeneration applications in the 1985 to 2000 time period are provided. Six current and thirty-six advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance of plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a framework for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. Various cogeneration strategies were analyzed and both topping and bottoming (using industrial by-product heat) applications were included. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Typically fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on site furnaces and utility electricity. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual cost savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on site gasification systems.

  19. Partners assume risks, lower finance costs of delayed coker-cogeneration project in Chile

    SciTech Connect

    Alveal, E.D.; Karpenski, M.J.

    1997-03-31

    Foster Wheeler Power Systems Inc., and its partners--Petrox SA Refineria de Petroleo and Empresa Nacional de Petroleo (ENAP), the Chilean national oil company--closed on the financing of Petropower Energia Limitada, a $237 million financed combination delayed coker-cogeneration facility. The facility is now under construction adjacent to Petrox`s 84,000 b/d Talcahuano refinery, near Concepcion. In addition to the low interest rate of 7.36%--only 170 basis points over the 10 year US Treasury yield--the project was rated investment-grade by Standard and Poor`s. The Petropower project also has the distinction of having the longest term--18 years--for any project financing in Latin America. The project is unique in other ways: it is the Republic of Chile`s first public/private partnership and also the first project to combine petroleum coking technology with cogeneration technology in a single project financing. The paper discusses risk assumption, the Petropower project, organization, delayed coker facility, hydrotreater unit, cogeneration facility, environmental assessment, Chile`s changing market, and project benefit.

  20. Acidogenic fermentation of food waste for volatile fatty acid production with co-generation of biohydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Shikha; Sarkar, Omprakash; Swamy, Y V; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-04-01

    Fermentation experiments were designed to elucidate the functional role of the redox microenvironment on volatile fatty acid (VFA, short chain carboxylic acid) production and co-generation of biohydrogen (H2). Higher VFA productivity was observed at pH 10 operation (6.3g/l) followed by pH 9, pH 6, pH 5, pH 7, pH 8 and pH 11 (3.5 g/l). High degree of acidification, good system buffering capacity along with co-generation of higher H2 production from food waste was also noticed at alkaline condition. Experiments illustrated the role of initial pH on carboxylic acids synthesis. Alkaline redox conditions assist solubilization of carbohydrates, protein and fats and also suppress the growth of methanogens. Among the carboxylic acids, acetate fraction was higher at alkaline condition than corresponding neutral or acidic operations. Integrated process of VFA production from waste with co-generation of H2 can be considered as a green and sustainable platform for value-addition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration at the Anheuser-Busch Los Angeles brewery

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, R.M.; Corea, V.A.; Sorensen, J.C.; Duncan, J.M.; Rudawitz, L.; Verdes, R.

    1980-02-01

    The results of a feasibility study undertaken in support of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) goal to develop fuel cell power plants for industrial cogeneration are described. Use of a single 4.5 MW fuel cell power plant like that manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and currently being constructed on the Consolidated Edison of New York System was examined. The technical feasibility of using such a plant in a cogeneration mode at the Anheuser-Busch, Los Angeles brewery was affirmed by the study. Break-even capital costs for UTC supplied equipment were calculated for various conditions. Based upon the assumption that UTC supplied equipment could be provided for the $350 to $400/kW projected for first generation fuel cells, the economic feasibility of fuel cell cogeneration was demonstrated for nearly all assumed conditions. The most economical case was found to be a municipal utility owned, base loaded power plant where economic credit is taken for reduced environmental emissions. Acceptable fuels were evaluated for their availability, and the fuels identified for use were natural gas with propane as a backup. Phosphoric acid is the selected electrolyte. The Demonstration Program Plan is described. (WHK)

  2. The empirical validation of a model for simulating the thermal and electrical performance of fuel cell micro-cogeneration devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil-Morrison, Ian

    Fuel cell micro-cogeneration is a nascent technology that can potentially reduce the energy consumption and environmental impact associated with serving building electrical and thermal demands. Accurately assessing these potential benefits and optimizing the integration of micro-cogeneration within buildings requires simulation methods that enable the integrated modelling of fuel cell micro-cogeneration devices with the thermal and electrical performance of the host building and other plant components. Such a model has recently been developed and implemented into a number of building simulation programs as part of an International Energy Agency research project. To date, the model has been calibrated (tuned) for one particular prototype 2.8 kWAC solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro-cogeneration device. The current paper examines the validity of this model by contrasting simulation predictions to measurements from the 2.8 kWAC prototype device. Good agreement was found in the predictions of DC power production, the rate of fuel consumption, and energy conversion efficiencies. Although there was greater deviation between simulation predictions and measurements in the predictions of useful thermal output, acceptable agreement was found within the uncertainty of the model and the measurements. It is concluded that the form of the mathematical model can accurately represents the performance of SOFC micro-cogeneration devices and that detailed performance assessments can now be performed with the calibrated model to examine the applicability of the 2.8 kWAC prototype device for supplying building electrical and thermal energy requirements.

  3. Thermodynamic evaluation of the possibility to increase cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a heat pump operating with steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenin, V. M.; Datsenko, V. V.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Kosoi, A. S.; Sinkevich, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    Cogeneration turbines operate in different operation modes that considerably differ as to the working process conditions. In summer time, when heat demand is minimal, almost all steam flow passes through all turbine stages and enters into the condenser (condensing mode of operation). When heat supply is needed, the steam bleed-offs are used. The several last stages of the turbine (low-pressure part—LPP) have a control diaphragm at the inlet. When the heat supply is large, the diaphragm is maximally closed, and the entire steam flow, with an exception for a minimal ventilation flow is delivered to the steam bleed-offs (cogeneration mode). LPP flow path is designed for the optimal operation in the condensing mode. While running in cogeneration mode, the LPP operating conditions are far from optimal. Depending on the ventilation steam flow rate and outlet pressure, the LPP power can drop to zero or even become negative (ventilation mode). It is proposed to control an outlet steam pressure by using the heat pump that operates with steam. The heat pump energy consumption can be compensated and even exceeded by optimizing the steam expansion process in LPP. In this respect, operating conditions of cogeneration turbine LPPs during the cold season are analyzed. A brief description of a heat pump operating with steam is made. The possibility of increasing cogeneration turbine efficiency by using a steam heat pump is shown.

  4. Efficient ways for setting up the operation of nuclear power stations in power systems in the base load mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Shkret, A. F.; Burdenkova, E. Yu.; Garievskii, M. V.

    2011-05-01

    The results obtained from studies of efficient ways and methods for organizing the operation of developing nuclear power stations in the base load mode are presented. We also show comparative efficiency of different scenarios for unloading condensing thermal power stations, cogeneration stations, combined-cycle power plants, nuclear power stations, and using off-peak electric energy for electricity-intensive loads: pumped-hydroelectric storage, electric-powered heat supply, and electrolysis of water for producing hydrogen and oxygen.

  5. Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Vasenda, S.K.; Hassler, C.C.

    1992-06-01

    Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.

  6. Methodological specifics of the study of micro HPP based on internal combustion engines with air cooling and cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchinnikov, P. A.; Tomilov, V. G.; Sinelnikov, D. S.

    2017-01-01

    The article considers some aspects of the research methodology of micro heat power plants based on internal combustion engines with air cooling and cogeneration based on energy balance equations and the laws of heat transfer. The research is conducted for such a setup based on the Hitachi internal combustion engine with 2.4 kW capacity. It has shown the efficiency of cogeneration use in the form of useful heat flow from air, cooling the cylinder head, with its further heating by utilizing the heat of flue gases in an additional plate heat exchanger. It has been shown that the cogeneration can save fuel costs 3-10 times compared with heat guns, depending on the duration of the setup use.

  7. Preliminary design studies on a nuclear seawater desalination system

    SciTech Connect

    Wibisono, A. F.; Jung, Y. H.; Choi, J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, J. I.; Jeong, Y. H.; No, H. C.

    2012-07-01

    Seawater desalination is one of the most promising technologies to provide fresh water especially in the arid region. The most used technology in seawater desalination are thermal desalination (MSF and MED) and membrane desalination (RO). Some developments have been done in the area of coupling the desalination plant with a nuclear reactor to reduce the cost of energy required in thermal desalination. The coupling a nuclear reactor to a desalination plant can be done either by using the co-generation or by using dedicated heat from a nuclear system. The comparison of the co-generation nuclear reactor with desalination plant, dedicated nuclear heat system, and fossil fueled system will be discussed in this paper using economical assessment with IAEA DEEP software. A newly designed nuclear system dedicated for the seawater desalination will also be suggested by KAIST (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology) research team and described in detail within this paper. The suggested reactor system is using gas cooled type reactor and in this preliminary study the scope of design will be limited to comparison of two cases in different operating temperature ranges. (authors)

  8. Advanced cogeneration and absorption chillers potential for service to Navy bases. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.; Butcher, T.A.; Leigh, R.W.; McDonald, R.J.; Pierce, B.L.

    1996-04-01

    The US military uses millions of Btu`s of thermal energy to heat, cool and deliver process thermal energy to buildings on military bases, much of which is transmitted through a pipeline system incorporating thousands of miles of pipe. Much of this pipeline system is in disrepair and is nearing the end of its useful life, and the boilers which supply it are old and often inefficient. In 1993, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) proposed to SERDP a three-year effort to develop advanced systems of coupled diesel cogenerators and absorption chillers which would be particularly useful in providing a continuation of the services now provided by increasingly antiquated district systems. In mid-February, 1995, BNL learned that all subsequent funding for our program had been canceled. BNL staff continued to develop the Program Plan and to adhere to the requirements of the Execution Plan, but began to look for ways in which the work could be made relevant to Navy and DoD energy needs even without the extensive development plan formerly envisioned. The entire program was therefore re-oriented to look for ways in which small scale cogeneration and absorption chilling technologies, available through procurement rather than development, could provide some solutions to the problem of deteriorated district heating systems. The result is, we believe, a striking new approach to the provision of building services on military bases: in many cases, serious study should be made of the possibility that the old district heating system should be removed or abandoned, and small-scale cogenerators and absorption chillers should be installed in each building. In the remainder of this Summary, we develop the rationale behind this concept and summarize our findings concerning the conditions under which this course of action would be advisable and the economic benefits which will accrue if it is followed. The details are developed in the succeeding sections of the report.

  9. The Design and Commissioning of a Micro-cogeneration Testing Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Evan

    The simultaneous production of heat and electricity onsite to serve residential loads can potentially yield a reduction in operating costs, primary energy use and related emissions over traditional technologies which meet these loads separately. Proper sizing and operation of units along with their required buffering and auxiliary systems are critical to the realization of both economical and environmental performance objectives. Further research is required to develop strategies to integrate micro-cogeneration technologies into Canadian residences as issues related to device type, capacity, design of balance of plant components, and controls remain largely unresolved. Building performance simulation is a highly flexible, and time-efficient method to systematically explore and evaluate different design options; however, the validity of the conclusions resulting from simulation based studies are dependent on the accuracy and reliability of the models employed. In order to support ongoing research relating to micro-cogeneration technologies through simulation based activities, a facility capable of subjecting units to controlled electrical and thermal loading was designed and commissioned to collect performance data suitable for device-specific model calibration. The facility can also be configured to provide realistic thermal and electrical loading to complete micro-cogeneration systems including thermal storage and auxiliary heating to evaluate the performance of complete systems. It provides a platform to experimentally investigate appropriate configurations to integrate units into residences through variations in the balance of plant components and control strategies. This thesis describes the design of the facility including its hardware, instrumentation, data acquisition and controls systems. Also described are experiments that were conducted during the commissioning phase to assess system level performance, to identify and correct hardware integration issues

  10. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-01

    At the end of the First Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 322, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,643 MW. Of these totals, 215 projects, capable of producing 640 MW, are operational. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 110 contracts with a potential of 1,467 MW. In total, 114 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,508 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 35 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 425 MW to 467 MW, and 11 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 94 MW to 114 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 5 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 32, with a generating capability of 848 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 18 wind farm projects, totaling 490 MW. There were 101 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 6 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 64 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 148 MW, as well as 75 projects under active discussion for 316 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 187 MW, that Pg and E was planning to construct.

  11. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Fourth Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    At the end of 1983, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 305, with a total estimated nominal capacity of 2,389 MW. Of these totals, 202 projects, capable of producing 566 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects had signed 101 contracts with a potential of 1,408 MW. In total, 106 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with projects capable of producing 1,479 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 29 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 402 MW to 444 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 84 MW to 89 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. There were 7 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 28, with a generating capability of 618 MW. Also, discussions were being conducted with 14 wind farm projects, totaling 365 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 59 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 146 MW, as well as 72 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there were 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of December 31, 1983.

  12. Planning, construction and testing of a cogeneration system for swimming pool and space heating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balding, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    In the first four months of operation the cogeneration system for Alta Loma High School not only proved to be a reliable workhorse but managed to maintain a 70% efficiency in the use of natural gas, the engine fuel. In the first 1400 hours of operation 90,000 kilowatt hours of electricity were generated and nearly 5 million Btu's of heat put into the school's swimming pools and heating system. In July 1982 the engine was installed and tested for heat and electrical output. In September the engine was started for the school year and has been working on a daily basis since then. The information gained in 2000 hours of use indicates that cogeneration is far more than just practical; it is a necessity. The basic plan to cut the cost of energy in half, by using both heat and electricity from the same source, has worked in an impressive way. The system for Alta Loma was designed to meet the heating needs of two swimming pools during the coldest part of the winter, with covers in use at night. Cogeneration is most practical when all the heat can be used all the time. For this reason the Alta Loma plant was also designed to provide heat for P.E. showers and space heating needs, when the pools do not need all the available heat. It was determined that an engine driving a 75 kilowatt generator would best suit the heating need for the pools. Since all the electricity was to be used in campus, or sent into the Edison grid, the size of the unit was based primarily on heating needs.

  13. Industrial cogeneration case study No. 2: American Cyanamid Chemical Company, Bound Brook, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Within a project for evaluating the economics of cogeneration for industrial plants with an electrical capacity of 10,000 to 30,000 kW, the American Cyanamid plant at Bound Brook, NJ was selected for study. Built between 1915 and 1920 this power plant was converted in the 1960's from coal-fueling to oil and natural gas. Information is presented on the plant site, fuel usage, generation costs, comparative cost of purchasable electric power, equipment used, performance, and reliability and capital and maintenance costs. (LCL)

  14. Borax spends $30M for cogeneration system. [US Borax and Chemical Corp

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1982-09-20

    A $30 million natural-gas-fired turbine power plant will provide all the electricity and steam needed at the US Borax and Chemical Corp. plant in Los Angeles. The cogeneration facility will come on line in 1984, and will pay for itself in about five years. The plant will use only half the 46 megawatts produced, the 22 megawatt surplus being sold to Southern California Edison Co. on a 20-year contract at a price pegged to the utility's avoided costs. Natural gas consumption at the plant will remain about the same. (DCK)

  15. 250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.

  16. Cogeneration and beyond: The need and opportunity for high efficiency, renewable community energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, T.C.J.

    1992-06-01

    The justification, strategies, and technology options for implementing advanced district heating and cooling systems in the United States are presented. The need for such systems is discussed in terms of global warming, ozone depletion, and the need for a sustainable energy policy. Strategies for implementation are presented in the context of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act and proposed new institutional arrangements. Technology opportunities are highlighted in the areas of advanced block-scale cogeneration, CFC-free chiller technologies, and renewable sources of heating and cooling that are particularly applicable to district systems.

  17. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission. Second Quarter 1984

    SciTech Connect

    1984-01-01

    At the end of the Second Quarter of 1984, the number of signed contracts and letter agreements for cogeneration and small power production projects was 334, with total estimated nominal capacity of 2,876 MW. Of these totals, 232 projects, capable of producing 678 MW, are operational (Table A). A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided as Figure A. Developers of cogeneration projects had signed 80 contracts with a potential of 1,161 MW. Thirty-three contracts had been signed for solid waste/biomass projects for a total of 298 MW. In total, 118 contracts and letter agreements had been signed with cogeneration, solid waste, and biomass projects capable of producing 1,545 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 46 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 688 MW to 770 MW, and 13 solid waste or biomass projects with a potential of 119 MW to 139 MW. One contract had been signed for a geothermal project, capable of producing 80 MW. Two geothermal projects were under active discussion for a total of 2 MW. There were 8 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 37 MW, as well as 4 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract numbered 34, with a generating capability of 1,042 MW, Also, discussions were being conducted with 23 wind farm projects, totaling 597 MW. There were 100 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of 1 MW, as well as 7 other small wind projects under active discussion. There were 71 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 151 MW, as well as 76 projects under active discussion for 505 MW. In addition, there were 18 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 193 MW, that PG and E was planning to construct. Table B displays the above information. Appendix A displays in tabular form the status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1984.

  18. Final environmental impact statement, Coyote Springs Cogeneration Project, Morrow County, Oregon - appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Portland General Electric Company (PGE) has submitted an Application for Site Certification (ASC) to the Oregon Department of Energy for development of the Coyote Springs cogeneration power plant in the Port of Morrow, Oregon. This document includes the appendixes for the Environmental Impact Statement. Appendix topics include the following: A-Wildlife and vegetation surveys; B-EMF Supplement; C-Biological Assessment; D-Oregon DOE proposed order, in the matter of the Application for Site Certificate of Portland General Electric Company; E-Ecological Monitoring Program; F-Air contaminant Discharge permit; G-National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Storm Water Discharge Permit; H-Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plan.

  19. Central-station solar hydrogen power plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.

    2005-04-01

    Solar power towers can be used to make hydrogen on a large scale. Electrolyzers could be used to convert solar electricity produced by the power tower to hydrogen, but this process is relatively inefficient. Rather, efficiency can be much improved if solar heat is directly converted to hydrogen via a thermochemical process. In the research summarized here, the marriage of a high-temperature ({approx}1000 C) power tower with a sulfuric acid/hybrid thermochemical cycle was studied. The concept combines a solar power tower, a solid-particle receiver, a particle thermal energy storage system, and a hybrid-sulfuric-acid cycle. The cycle is 'hybrid' because it produces hydrogen with a combination of thermal input and an electrolyzer. This solar thermochemical plant is predicted to produce hydrogen at a much lower cost than a solar-electrolyzer plant of similar size. To date, only small lab-scale tests have been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of a few of the subsystems and a key immediate issue is demonstration of flow stability within the solid-particle receiver. The paper describes the systems analysis that led to the favorable economic conclusions and discusses the future development path.

  20. Electrochemical gas-electricity cogeneration through direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yongmin; Cai, Weizi; Xiao, Jie; Tang, Yubao; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Meilin

    2015-03-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), with yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as electrolyte, composite of strontium-doped lanthanum manganate (LSM) and YSZ as cathode, and cermet of silver and gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) as anode, are prepared and tested with 5wt% Fe-loaded activated carbon as fuel and ambient air as oxidant. It is found that electricity and CO gas can be cogenerated in the direct carbon SOFCs through the electrochemical oxidation of CO and the Boudouard reaction. The gas-electricity cogeneration performances are investigated by taking the operating time of the DC-SOFCs as a measure of rate decrease of the Boudouard reaction. Three single cells and a two-cell-stack are tested and characterized in terms of electrical power output, CO production rate, electrical conversion efficiency, and overall conversion efficiency. It turns out that a rapid rate of the Boudouard reaction is necessary for getting high electrical power and CO production. Taking the emitted CO as part of the power output, an overall efficiency of 76.5% for the single cell, and of 72.5% for the stack, is obtained.

  1. Temperature effect on electrochemical promotion of syngas cogeneration in direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ta-Jen; Huang, Meng-Chin

    Syngas cogeneration in direct-methane solid oxide fuel cells with Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anodes was studied with temperature varying from 700 to 900 °C. A phenomenon of electrochemical promotion of bulk lattice-oxygen extraction from the YSZ electrolyte was observed. With increasing temperature, this promotion effect increases while both the rate enhancement ratios of CO and CO 2 formations decrease. The activation energy of CO and CO 2 formation under close circuit is lower than that under open circuit. The activation energy for the lattice-oxygen extraction from the YSZ bulk is higher than that for the oxygen transport through the YSZ bulk. The process of lattice-oxygen extraction from YSZ is rate determining in direct-methane oxidation under the condition of either close circuit or open circuit. The dependence of CO formation rate on the oxygen supply rate is stronger than that of CO 2 formation rate. Electrochemical promotion of bulk lattice-oxygen extraction enhances syngas cogeneration.

  2. Evaluation results and use of software tools for a cogeneration plant comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, W.C.; Sopocy, D.M.; Roche, R.V.

    1998-07-01

    Today's concerns for the environment and the necessity to address the extremely competitive business situation demand that existing and new industrial plants are analyzed to optimize the supply of electricity, process steam and other forms of energy. This paper presents a review of four plant designs for steam and electricity supply. The plants are: 1. Rankine cycle--natural gas fired boiler, 2. Rankine cycle--petroleum coke fired circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB) 3. Cogeneration cycle--natural gas fired combustion turbine, and 4. Combined cycle--natural gas fired combustion turbine. Petroleum coke, refereed to as pet coke or coke, is a refining waste product which can be used as a boiler fuel. It is usually high in carbon and sulfur content and typically indexed to and priced below coal. Plant operating performance and financial results are compared. Note these four designs are based on one set of project site, project and economic parameters and the results could vary significantly for another project with different parameters. The intent of this comparison is to illustrate calculation methodology and the use of cogeneration cycles, not to suggest a preference for fuels or technology.

  3. Vacuum evaporation treatment of digestate: full exploitation of cogeneration heat to process the whole digestate production.

    PubMed

    Guercini, S; Castelli, G; Rumor, C

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum evaporation represents an interesting and innovative solution for managing animal waste surpluses in areas with high livestock density. To reduce operational costs, a key factor is the availability of an inexpensive source of heat, such as that coming from an anaerobic digestion (AD) plant. The aim of this study was to test vacuum evaporation for the treatment of cattle slurry digestate focusing on heat exploitation. Tests were performed with a pilot plant fed with the digestate from a full-scale AD plant. The results were used to evaluate if and how cogeneration heat can support both the AD plant and the subsequent evaporation of the whole daily digestate production in a full-scale plant. The concentrate obtained (12% total solids) represents 40-50% of the influent. The heat requirement is 0.44 kWh/kg condensate. Heat power availability exceeding the needs of the digestor ranges from 325 (in winter) to 585 kW (in summer) versus the 382 kW required for processing the whole digestate production. To by-pass fluctuations, we propose to use the heat coming from the cogenerator directly in the evaporator, tempering the digestor with the latent heat of distillation vapor.

  4. JV 38-APPLICATION OF COFIRING AND COGENERATION FOR SOUTH DAKOTA SOYBEAN PROCESSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-11-01

    Cogeneration of heat and electricity is being considered by the South Dakota Soybean Processors for its facility in Volga, South Dakota, and a new facility to be located in Brewster, Minnesota. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed a feasibility study, with 40% funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy's Jointly Sponsored Research Program to determine the potential application of firing biomass fuels combined with coal and comparative economics of natural gas-fired turbines. Various biomass fuels are available at each location. The most promising options based on availability are as follows. The economic impact of firing 25% biomass with coal can increase return on investment by 0.5 to 1.5 years when compared to firing natural gas. The results of the comparative economics suggest that a fluidized-bed cogeneration system will have the best economic performance. Installation for the Brewster site is recommended based on natural gas prices not dropping below a $4.00/MMBtu annual average delivered cost. Installation at the Volga site is only recommended if natural gas prices substantially increase to $5.00/MMBtu on average. A 1- to 2-year time frame will be needed for permitting and equipment procurement.

  5. Performance and economic enhancement of cogeneration gas turbines through compressor inlet air cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delucia, M.; Bronconi, R.; Carnevale, E.

    1994-04-01

    Gas turbine air cooling systems serve to raise performance to peak power levels during the hot months when high atmospheric temperatures cause reductions in net power output. This work describes the technical and economic advantages of providing a compressor inlet air cooling system to increase the gas turbine's power rating and reduce its heat rate. The pros and cons of state-of-the-art cooling technologies, i.e., absorption and compression refrigeration, with and without thermal energy storage, were examined in order to select the most suitable cooling solution. Heavy-duty gas turbine cogeneration systems with and without absorption units were modeled, as well as various industrial sectors, i.e., paper and pulp, pharmaceuticals, food processing, textiles, tanning, and building materials. The ambient temperature variations were modeled so the effects of climate could be accounted for in the simulation. The results validated the advantages of gas turbine cogeneration with absorption air cooling as compared to other systems without air cooling.

  6. Economic analysis of coal-fired cogeneration plants for Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.S.; Griffin, F.P.

    1990-10-01

    The Defense Appropriations Act of 1986 requires the Department of Defense to use an additional 1,600,000 tons/year of coal at their US facilities by 1995 and also states that the most economical fuel should be used at each facility. In a previous study of Air Force heating plants burning gas or oil, Oak Ridge National Laboratory found that only a small fraction of this target 1,600,000 tons/year could be achieved by converting the plants where coal is economically viable. To identify projects that would use greater amounts of coal, the economic benefits of installing coal-fired cogeneration plants at 7 candidate Air Force bases were examined in this study. A life-cycle cost analysis was performed that included two types of financing (Air Force and private) and three levels of energy escalation for a total of six economic scenarios. Hill, McGuire, and Plattsburgh Air Force Bases were identified as the facilities with the best potential for coal-fired cogeneration, but the actual cost savings will depend strongly on how the projects are financed and to a lesser extent on future energy escalation rates. 10 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

  7. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myat, Aung; Thu, Kyaw; Kim, Young-Deuk; Choon, Ng Kim

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  8. Renewable Fuel Utilization in a Cogeneration Arrangement with Hydrate Storage Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naing, Soe; Yamada, Takanobu; Nakanishi, Kimio

    According to the third conference of parties (COP3), Japan has set a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 6% by the year 2010. Many believe that the bulk utilization of fossil fuel influences to the damaging environmental effect. The objective of this paper is to propose an effective method for this goad which is possible to clarify a noticeable utilization of renewable fuel in a micro gas turbine cogeneration system in cold region. Moreover, analysis of renewable fuel, biogas production indicates that production amount becomes largest in hot season, while the total heat energy demand is lowest on during three years. Biogas storage is also adapted for the delay between peak energy supply and demand. Biogas hydrate formation is examined by resource from laboratory experiments and simulation of integration into an existing cogeneration arrangement. The proposed system can be successfully supported the use and reuse of renewable fuel for providing to substantial emission and clean development mechanism for reducing greenhouse gas emission.

  9. Development of a system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of a cogeneration steam turbine unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Novoselov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Generalized results from the work on developing elements of a comprehensive system for monitoring technical state of the equipment of cogeneration turbines are presented. The parameters of the electrohydraulic turbine control system are considered together with a number of problems concerned with assessing the state of condensers and delivery water heaters.

  10. Experience gained from operation of the reverse-osmosis plant at the Novosibirsk TETs-2 cogeneration station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramova, I. A.; Chernov, S. A.; Maikov, V. M.; Doineko, O. A.; Ustinov, B. V.; Vil'Ms, E. V.

    2008-05-01

    We present the main indicators characterizing the performance of the demineralizing plant comprising reverse-osmosis and ion-exchange equipment that produces makeup water for the boilers at the Novosibirsk TETs-2 cogeneration station for three years of plant operation.

  11. CSP cogeneration of electricity and desalinated water at the Pentakomo field facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanicolas, C. N.; Bonanos, A. M.; Georgiou, M. C.; Guillen, E.; Jarraud, N.; Marakkos, C.; Montenon, A.; Stiliaris, E.; Tsioli, E.; Tzamtzis, G.; Votyakov, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    The Cyprus Institute's Pentakomo Field Facility (PFF) is a major infrastructure for research, development and testing of technologies relating to concentrated solar power (CSP) and solar seawater desalination. It is located at the south coast of Cyprus near the sea and its environmental conditions are fully monitored. It provides a test facility specializing in the development of CSP systems suitable for island and coastal environments with particular emphasis on small units (<25 MWth) endowed with substantial storage, suitable for use in isolation or distributed in small power grids. The first major experiment to take place at the PFF concerns the development of a pilot/experimental facility for the co-generation of electricity and desalinated seawater from CSP. Specifically, the experimental plant consists of a heliostat-central receiver system for solar harvesting, thermal energy storage in molten salts followed by a Rankine cycle for electricity production and a multiple-effect distillation (MED) unit for desalination.

  12. An overview of the value of parabolic dish solar thermal systems in industrial cogeneration applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The essential elements of the cogeneration system configuration to be captured were the displacement of thermal energy by collection and use of the Brayton exhaust stream, and the sale back to the utility of any electricity production in excess of on-site requirements. In contrast to simply dumping these energy flows, their use or sale obviously serves, by itself, to increase gross value of the solar thermal energy system. Net allowable cost of the parabolic dish modules may or may not be increased, however. A consideration is that the waste heat capture and delivery subsystems are not free. This study does not address the incremental cost of adding waste heat capture, transport, and conversion (to steam, if necessary). It does compute a value for the thermal energy thereby displaced. This value can serve as a first-round input to any detailed economic evaluation of waste heat recovery.

  13. Thermionic-cogeneration-burner assessment study. Second quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The performance analysis work continued with the completion of the programming of the mathematical model and with the start of a series of parametric analyses. Initial studies predict that approximately 25 to 30% of the heat contained in the flue gas can be passed through the thermionic converters (TEC) and then be converted at 12 to 15% efficiency into electrical power. This results in up to 17 kWe per 1 million Btu/h burner firing rate. This is a 4 to 10 percent energy saving over power produced at the utility. The thermal burner design and construction have been completed, as well as initial testing on the furnace and preheat systems. The following industries are still considered viable options for use of the thermionic cogeneration burner: chlor-alkali, alumina-aluminum, copper refining, steel and gray iron, industries using resistance heating, electrolytic industries and electrochemical industries. Information gathered on these industries is presented.

  14. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  15. Cogeneration system using digester gas for Macon-Bibb county water and sewerage authority

    SciTech Connect

    Priester, D.C.

    1984-05-01

    With rise in energy cost, there is renewed focus on alternate energy sources, and especially sources that previously were not feasible to utilize, but were readily available. One of these is methane gas generated in biomass conversion in wastewater treatment plant anaerobic digestion process. The gas generated has been historically wasted and only used where it has been convenient. Now it is economically feasible to engineer systems to make the best use of the gas. The combination of cogeneration and digester gas utilization is particularly attractive for medium to large wastewater treatment plants. This paper describes the system designed for the Poplar Street Water Pollution Control Plant of the Macon-Bibb County Water and Sewerage Authority. The system consists of gas collection, cleaning and drying systems, storage vessel, and a utilization system of gas turbine generators.

  16. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor steam cycle/cogeneration application study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-12-01

    The evaluation of the HTGR-SC/C technology, the evaluation of potential HTGR-SC/C markets, the assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-SC/C plants, and the evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-SC/C technology through the completion of the lead Project are presented. Further, the value of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project in the support of advanced applications such as the HTGR-R is also addressed. The HTGR-SC/C is considered as a Lead project candidate in two configurations: a 2240-MW(t) baseload electric plant and an 1170-MW(t) cogeneration plant that provides electricity and process steam.

  17. 1170 MW/sub t/ HTGR steamer cogeneration plant: design and cost study

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    A conceptual design and cost study is presented for intermediate size high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) for industrial energy applications performed by United Engineers and Constructors Inc., (UE and C) and The General Atomic Company (GAC). The study is part of a program at ORNL and has the objective to provide support in the evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of a single unit 1170 MW/sub t/ HTGR steam cycle cogeneration plant (referred to as the Steamer plant) for the production of industrial process energy. Inherent in the achievement of this objective, it was essential to perform a number of basic tasks such as the development of plant concept, capital cost estimate, project schedule and annual operation and maintenance (O and M) cost.

  18. Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Results are reported of a conceptual design study of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a Hawaii raw sugar factory. Background information on the site, the existing facility, and the project organization is given. Then the results are presented o the work to select the site specific configuration, including the working fluid, receiver concept, heliostat field site, and the determination of the solar facility size and of the role of thermal storage. The system selected would use water-steam as its working fluid in a twin-cavity receiver collecting sunlight from 41,420 m/sup 2/ of heliostat mirrors. The lates version of the system specification is appended, as are descriptions of work to measure site insolation and a site insolation mathematical model and interface data for the local utility. (LEW)

  19. Solar Cogeneration Facility: Cimarron River Station, Central Telephone and Utilities-Western Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A site-specific conceptual design and evaluation of a solar central receiver system integrated with an existing cogeneration facility are described. The system generates electricity and delivers a portion of that electricity and process steam to a natural gas processing plant. Early in the project, tradeoff studies were performed to establish key system characteristics. As a result of these studies the use of energy storage was eliminated, the size of the solar facility was established at 37.13 MW (sub t), and other site-specific features were selected. The conceptual design addressed critical components and system interfaces. The result is a hybrid solar/fossil central receiver facility which utilizes a collector system of Department of Energy second generation heliostats.

  20. Kakira Sugar Works (1985) Limited, Kakira biomass cogeneration: Volume 2 -- Final report, attachments. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    This report, conducted by John H. Payne, Inc., was funded by the US Trade and Development Agency. The study concerns the technical and financial feasibility of the Kakira Sugar Works Limited to increase its capacity to 5,000 TCD and to sell its surplus power to the Uganda Electricity Board. This is Volume 2, the Attachments, and it includes the following: (1) Layout Drawings; (2) Factory Steam Balance; (3) Evaporator and Juice Heater Arrangements; (4) Historical Production Data and Assumptions for Study; (5) Model Production Schedule; (6) Weather Data; (7) Solids Balance and Steam/Vapor Requirements for Pan Floor Boiling; (8) Boiler Efficiency and Steam Production; (9) Turbo Machinery Water Rate Calculations; (10) List of US Equipment Suppliers; (11) Capital Cost Estimate-Cogeneration; and (12) Capital Cost Estimate -- Mill Expansion.

  1. The Surplus-Electric-Power Trade of the Cogeneration by PPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Takuya; Akisawa, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Takahiko; Kashiwagi, Takao

    The report modeled an electricity interchange trade by a PPS (Power Producer and Supplier) and a cogeneration, and evaluated the interchange trade using the numerical example. The PPS and the CGS user behave economically themselves in the model. It is new that not an electric power company but PPS trades the surplus electric power. From the numerical example, the effect of electricity price and gas prices is different between commercial sector and industrial sector when maximizing the PPS profits. An electricity interchange gives profits to three groups (the PPS, the CGS user, and the unspecified general user) who participate in trades. However, it was shown that the PPS cannot gain only few portions of the whole interchange profits although the PPS determines the purchase price for the CGS user.

  2. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    In the Third Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 240 to 258, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,547 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 416 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of operational facilities under contract with PG and E is provided. Of the 258 signed contracts and committed projects, 83 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 779 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 38 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 797 MW to 848 MW, and 19 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 152 MW to 159 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as 3 solar projects under active discussion for 31 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 21, with a generating capability of 528 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind farm projects, totaling 257 to 262 MW. There are 94 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 8 other small wind projects under active discussion. There are 50 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 112 MW, as well as 67 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 31 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 185 MW, that PG and E is planning to construct.

  3. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Second Quarter 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    In the Second Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 223 to 240, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,449 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 361 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. A map indicating the location of currently operating facilities is provided as Figure A. Of the 240 signed contracts and committed projects, 75 were cogeneration, solid waste, or biomass projects with a potential of 740 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 32 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 858 MW to 921 MW, and 10 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 113 MW to 121 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 19, with a generating capability of 471 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 12 wind farm projects, totaling 273 to 278 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 10 other projects under active discussion. There are 47 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 110 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 175 MW. In addition, there are 30 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of June 30, 1983.

  4. York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

  5. North Plant co-generation project for South Davis County Sewer Improvement District

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.S.

    1993-12-31

    In the summer of 1988, the South Davis County Sewer Improvement District (SDCSID) learned of a grant/loan program being administered by the Utah State Department of Energy(DOE) for projects that demonstrate new and innovative ways of conserving energy or utilizing renewable energy sources. The SDCSID applied for and received from the DOE both a grant and a no-interest loan to finance half of the cost of a co-generation project at the North Wastewater Treatment Plant. This co-generation project utilizes methane gas, a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process, to generate both electricity and heat that is used at the plant. The SDCSID calculated that at the current anaerobic gas production rate, a 140 KW engine generator could be run almost 24 hours a day. Approximately 75% of the current electrical needs at the North Plant are supplied by the 140 KW engine generator. Also, all of the heat necessary to raise the temperature of the incoming sludge to 95{degrees}F, and to heat four large buildings is supplied from the heat recovery system of the engine. The system utilizes an induction type generator to supply electricity, which is somewhat simpler to design and less expensive to install than a synchronous type system. An induction system utilizes the Electrical Utility`s incoming power to excite the generator to correct the phase so that is can be used by the loads in the plant. In addition, the SDCSID installed a second identical engine generator as a back-up and to peak shave. Plant effluent is used to cool the engines instead of air-cooling through radiators.

  6. Cogeneration Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    The cost components making up TC .j(y) provide the information needed by the Navy and potential outside investors to decide upon the economic viability of an...could be written for each party in a cooperative venture. Return on Investment is a common measure of judging economic viability of candidate investments

  7. District heating/cogeneration application studies for Minneapolis-St. Paul area. Modifications of the existing units at the High Bridge Power Plant to cogeneration for hot water district heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englesson, G. A.; Casapis, M. C.; Pavlenco, G. F.; Menaker, B.; Lee, N. H.; Denesdi, L.; Williamson, D. E.

    1980-10-01

    This evaluation required examinations of the equipment, the operating reports, and the technical manuals and drawings. The evaluation also included discussions with the plant staff and with the major vendors of the operating equipment. Units 3, 5, and 6 were recommended for conversion to cogeneration unit 3 to be converted to back pressure operation and units 5 and 6 to be converted to condensing tail operation. Unit 4 was not recommended for conversion.

  8. Micro-Cogeneration Incl. The Conversion of Chemical Energy of Biomass to Electric Energy and the Low Potential Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huzvar, Jozef; Kapjor, Andrej

    2011-06-01

    This article deals with combined production of heat and electricity for small premises, such as households, where energy consumption is around few kilowatts. This proposal of micro co-generation unit uses as a heat source an automatic burner for combustion of wood pellets. Construction of an equipment for the heat transport can be designed using different basic ways of heat transfer. Electricity is produced by the two-stroke steam engine and the generator.

  9. A major cogeneration system goes in at JFK International Airport. Low-visibility privatization in a high-impact environment

    SciTech Connect

    Leibler, J.; Luxton, R.; Ostberg, P.

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growing energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.

  10. Design, parametrization, and pole placement of stabilizing output feedback compensators via injective cogenerator quotient signal modules

    PubMed Central

    Blumthaler, Ingrid; Oberst, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Control design belongs to the most important and difficult tasks of control engineering and has therefore been treated by many prominent researchers and in many textbooks, the systems being generally described by their transfer matrices or by Rosenbrock equations and more recently also as behaviors. Our approach to controller design uses, in addition to the ideas of our predecessors on coprime factorizations of transfer matrices and on the parametrization of stabilizing compensators, a new mathematical technique which enables simpler design and also new theorems in spite of the many outstanding results of the literature: (1) We use an injective cogenerator signal module F over the polynomial algebra D=F[s] (F an infinite field), a saturated multiplicatively closed set T of stable polynomials and its quotient ring DT of stable rational functions. This enables the simultaneous treatment of continuous and discrete systems and of all notions of stability, called T-stability. We investigate stabilizing control design by output feedback of input/output (IO) behaviors and study the full feedback IO behavior, especially its autonomous part and not only its transfer matrix. (2) The new technique is characterized by the permanent application of the injective cogenerator quotient signal module DTFT and of quotient behaviors BT of DF-behaviors B. (3) For the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection, model matching, and decoupling and not necessarily proper plants we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of proper stabilizing compensators with proper and stable closed loop behaviors, parametrize all such compensators as IO behaviors and not only their transfer matrices and give new algorithms for their construction. Moreover we solve the problem of pole placement or spectral assignability for the complete feedback behavior. The properness of the full feedback behavior ensures the absence of impulsive solutions in the continuous case, and that of

  11. Design, parametrization, and pole placement of stabilizing output feedback compensators via injective cogenerator quotient signal modules.

    PubMed

    Blumthaler, Ingrid; Oberst, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Control design belongs to the most important and difficult tasks of control engineering and has therefore been treated by many prominent researchers and in many textbooks, the systems being generally described by their transfer matrices or by Rosenbrock equations and more recently also as behaviors. Our approach to controller design uses, in addition to the ideas of our predecessors on coprime factorizations of transfer matrices and on the parametrization of stabilizing compensators, a new mathematical technique which enables simpler design and also new theorems in spite of the many outstanding results of the literature: (1) We use an injective cogenerator signal module ℱ over the polynomial algebra [Formula: see text] (F an infinite field), a saturated multiplicatively closed set T of stable polynomials and its quotient ring [Formula: see text] of stable rational functions. This enables the simultaneous treatment of continuous and discrete systems and of all notions of stability, called T-stability. We investigate stabilizing control design by output feedback of input/output (IO) behaviors and study the full feedback IO behavior, especially its autonomous part and not only its transfer matrix. (2) The new technique is characterized by the permanent application of the injective cogenerator quotient signal module [Formula: see text] and of quotient behaviors [Formula: see text] of [Formula: see text]-behaviors B. (3) For the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection, model matching, and decoupling and not necessarily proper plants we derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of proper stabilizing compensators with proper and stable closed loop behaviors, parametrize all such compensators as IO behaviors and not only their transfer matrices and give new algorithms for their construction. Moreover we solve the problem of pole placement or spectral assignability for the complete feedback behavior. The properness of the full feedback behavior

  12. Cogenerating and pre-annihilating dark matter by a new gauge interaction in a unified model

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2016-05-31

    Grand unified theories based on large groups (with rank ≥6) are a natural context for dark matter models. They contain Standard-Model-singlet fermions that could be dark matter candidates, and can contain new non-abelian interactions whose sphalerons convert baryons, leptons, and dark matter into each other, “cogenerating' a dark matter asymmetry comparable to the baryon asymmetry. In this paper it is shown that the same non-abelian interactions can “pre-annihilate' the symmetric component of heavy dark matter particles χ, which then decay late into light stable dark matter particles ζ that inherit their asymmetry. We derive cosmological constraints on the parameters of such models. The mass of χ must be <3000 TeV and their decays must happen when 2×10{sup −7}

  13. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system: Hot End Simulation Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Galica, M.A.

    1994-02-01

    This Hot End Simulation Rig (HESR) was an integral part of the overall Solar/METC program chartered to prove the technical, economic, an environmental feasibility of a coal-fueled gas turbine, for cogeneration applications. The program was to culminate in a test of a Solar Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal slurry fuel throughput the engine design operating range. This particular activity was designed to verify the performance of the Centaur Type H engine hot section materials in a coal-fired environment varying the amounts of alkali, ash, and sulfur in the coal to assess the material corrosion. Success in the program was dependent upon the satisfactory resolution of several key issues. Included was the control of hot end corrosion and erosion, necessary to ensure adequate operating life. The Hot End Simulation Rig addressed this important issue by exposing currently used hot section turbine alloys, alternate alloys, and commercially available advanced protective coating systems to a representative coal-fueled environment at turbine inlet temperatures typical of Solar`s Centaur Type H. Turbine hot end components which would experience material degradation include the transition duct from the combustor outlet to the turbine inlet, the shroud, nozzles, and blades. A ceramic candle filter vessel was included in the system as the particulate removal device for the HESR. In addition to turbine material testing, the candle material was exposed and evaluated. Long-term testing was intended to sufficiently characterize the performance of these materials for the turbine.

  14. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 3: Energy conversion system characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Six current and thirty-six advanced energy conversion systems were defined and combined with appropriate balance of plant equipment. Twenty-six industrial processes were selected from among the high energy consuming industries to serve as a frame work for the study. Each conversion system was analyzed as a cogenerator with each industrial plant. Fuel consumption, costs, and environmental intrusion were evaluated and compared to corresponding traditional values. The advanced energy conversion technologies indicated reduced fuel consumption, costs, and emissions. Fuel energy savings of 10 to 25 percent were predicted compared to traditional on site furnaces and utility electricity. With the variety of industrial requirements, each advanced technology had attractive applications. Fuel cells indicated the greatest fuel energy savings and emission reductions. Gas turbines and combined cycles indicated high overall annual savings. Steam turbines and gas turbines produced high estimated returns. In some applications, diesels were most efficient. The advanced technologies used coal derived fuels, or coal with advanced fluid bed combustion or on site gasifications. Data and information for both current and advanced energy conversion technology are presented. Schematic and physical descriptions, performance data, equipment cost estimates, and predicted emissions are included. Technical developments which are needed to achieve commercialization in the 1985-2000 period are identified.

  15. Efficient, Low Cost Dish Concentrator for a CPV Based Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayet, Haim; Kost, Ori; Moran, Rani; Lozovsky, Ilan

    2011-12-01

    Zenith Solar Ltd has developed efficient electricity and heat co-generation system based on segmented-parabolic dish of total aperture area of 11 m2 and water cooled dense array module combined of triple junction cells. Conventional parabolic dishes are inherently inefficient in the sense that the radiant flux distribution is non uniform causing inefficient generation by the PV array. Secondary optics improves uniformity but introduces additional complexity and losses to the system. Zenith's dish is assembled of 1200 flat mirrors of approximately 100 cm2 each. Every mirror facet has a unique shape such that the geometrical projection from each mirror on the focal plane is essentially the same. When perfectly aligned, the projected radiation from all mirrors overlaps uniformly on the PV surface. The low cost construction of the dish utilizes plastic mount supported by a precise metal frame. The precision of the metal frame affects the overall optical efficiency of the mirror and hence the efficiency of the system. State of the art dish of 11 m2 active aperture results in output of 2.25 kWp (900 W/m2) electrical and 5 kWp thermal power from one dish system representing 21% electrical and 50% thermal conversion efficiency adding to 71% overall system efficiency.

  16. Design and development of a thermoelectric cogeneration device integrated in autonomous gas heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codecasa, Matteo P.; Fanciulli, Carlo; Gaddi, Roberto; Passaretti, Francesca

    2012-06-01

    An autonomous heat-radiating gas heater for commercial outdoor environments has been selected as a test case for implementing cogeneration in autonomous gas heaters and stoves, permitting its installation and operation without the need of a connection to the electrical network. A thermoelectric generator (TEG) was selected for this purpose[1], designed for converting an amount of the produced heat into electrical power for auxiliary (ventilation, battery recharge) or ancillary functions (high efficiency LED illumination). The design approach, the layout and structure of the TEG are discussed, as well as the constraints for its integration in the existing gas heater. Design features and main components are examined: hot side heat collector for capturing heat from the flame; thermoelectric module (TEGM) technology and model selection; natural convection heat radiator at cold side; analysis and optimization of the thermal chain; TEG's assembly and its design as a whole. A prototype has been built and tested, its functional behavior has been modeled through multi-physics numerical simulation[2] to allow for further optimization and extrapolation of the results towards larger and/or more complex designs. A patent application has been issued jointly by the authors, covering the design hereinafter described.

  17. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  18. Balanced noise control design: A case study for co-generation power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Hertil, Salem

    2002-11-01

    Power generation plant generally requires noise mitigation treatment to achieve the specified noise regulations. In this paper, a case study of the noise control design for a cogeneration power plant was presented. Major noise sources included two GE gas combustion turbines, two generators, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), one steam turbine and generator, one 12-cell cooling tower, and other accessory equipment. The acoustic modeling software Cadna/A was used to predict the noise contributions from sources. During the acoustic modeling, alternative noise mitigation measures underwent two specific investigations before they were chosen as a noise solution recommendation. The first was to determine the technical feasibility of attenuating the source equipment. The second was to perform a cost benefit analysis, necessary to find the most cost-effective solution. For example, several acoustic wall and roof assemblies were entered into the acoustic model and the acoustic performance of the ventilation system was varied until we were able to arrive at the most economical acoustic solution. This is the premise on which so called balanced design is based.

  19. Alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells for cogeneration of electricity and valuable chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z. F.; Chen, R.; An, L.; Li, Y. S.

    2017-10-01

    Alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AAEMFCs) have received ever-increasing attentions due to the enhanced electrochemical kinetics and the absence of precious metal electrocatalysts, and thus great progress has been made in recent years. The alkaline anion exchange membrane based direct alcohol fuel cells, one type of alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cells utilizing liquid alcohols as fuel that can be obtained from renewable biomass feedstocks, is another attractive point due to its ability to provide electricity with cogeneration of valuable chemicals. Significant development has been made to improve the selectivity towards high added-value chemicals and power output in the past few years. This review article provides a general description of this emerging technology, including fuel-cell setup and potential reaction routes, summarizes the products, performance, and system designs, as well as introduces the application of this concept in the removal of heavy-metal ions from the industrial wastewater. In addition, the remaining challenges and perspectives are also highlighted.

  20. Highly Selective Oxidation of Carbohydrates in an Efficient Electrochemical Energy Converter: Cogenerating Organic Electrosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holade, Yaovi; Servat, Karine; Napporn, Teko W; Morais, Cláudia; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc; Kokoh, Kouakou B

    2016-02-08

    The selective electrochemical conversion of highly functionalized organic molecules into electricity, heat, and added-value chemicals for fine chemistry requires the development of highly selective, durable, and low-cost catalysts. Here, we propose an approach to make catalysts that can convert carbohydrates into chemicals selectively and produce electrical power and recoverable heat. A 100% Faradaic yield was achieved for the selective oxidation of the anomeric carbon of glucose and its related carbohydrates (C1-position) without any function protection. Furthermore, the direct glucose fuel cell (DGFC) enables an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V in 0.5 m NaOH to be reached, a record. The optimized DGFC delivers an outstanding output power Pmax =2 mW cm(-2) with the selective conversion of 0.3 m glucose, which is of great interest for cogeneration. The purified reaction product will serve as a raw material in various industries, which thereby reduces the cost of the whole sustainable process.

  1. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. In this particular application, the fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. The displacement of oil and coal resulting from the Bergen County Utilities Authority application was determined. A demonstration program based on the selected configuration was prepared to describe the scope of work, organization, schedules, and costs from preliminary design through actual tests and operation. The potential market for nationwide application of the concept was projected, along with the equivalent oil displacement resulting from estimated commercial application.

  2. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G.; Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K.

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock & Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  3. Benefits of compressor inlet air cooling for gas turbine cogeneration plants

    SciTech Connect

    De Lucia, M.; Lanfranchi, C.; Boggio, V.

    1996-07-01

    Compressor inlet air cooling is an effective method for enhancing the performance of gas turbine plants. This paper presents a comparative analysis of different solutions for cooling the compressor inlet air for the LM6000 gas turbine in a cogeneration plant operated in base load. Absorption and evaporative cooling systems are considered and their performance and economic benefits compared for the dry low-NO{sub x} LM6000 version. Reference is made to two sites in Northern and Southern Italy, whose climate data series for modeling the variations in ambient temperature during the single day were used to account for the effects of climate in the simulation. The results confirmed the advantages of inlet air cooling systems. In particular, evaporative cooling proved to be cost effective, though capable of supplying only moderate cooling, while absorption systems have a higher cost but are also more versatile and powerful in base-load operation. An integration of the two systems proved to be able to give both maximum performance enhancement and net economic benefit.

  4. Statistical Evaluation of Voltage Variation of Power Distribution System with Clustered Home-Cogeneration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Minagata, Atsushi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    This paper discusses the influence of mass installation of a home co-generation system (H-CGS) using a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) on the voltage profile of power distribution system in residential area. The influence of H-CGS is compared with that of photovoltaic power generation systems (PV systems). The operation pattern of H-CGS is assumed based on the electricity and hot-water demand observed in 10 households for a year. The main results are as follows. With the clustered H-CGS, the voltage of each bus is higher by about 1-3% compared with the conventional system without any distributed generators. Because H-CGS tends to increase the output during the early evening, H-CGS contributes to recover the voltage drop during the early evening, resulting in smaller voltage variation of distribution system throughout a day. Because of small rated power output about 1kW, the influence on voltage profile by the clustered H-CGS is smaller than that by the clustered PV systems. The highest voltage during the day time is not so high as compared with the distribution system with the clustered PV systems, even if the reverse power flow from H-CGS is allowed.

  5. A Study on Power Flow Congestion Relief in Cooperation with Customer-side Cogeneration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Ken; Yanase, Kazunori; Sugihara, Hideharu; Tsuji, Kiichiro

    Dispersed generation technologies (e.g. Gas-engines) have greatly advanced in recent years. Gas engines are often operated as the main component of a cogeneration system (CGS). By using exhaust heat, the total efficiency of CGSs can reach from 70% to 80%, and as a result, it is also useful for reductions of CO2 emission. Therefore CGSs have been given preferential treatment by the Japanese government and their installation and use is expected to become widespread in the future. As a demand response program, the authors proposed a method whereby CGSs at the customer-side are used for congestion relief in transmission networks. In the proposed method, the optimal configuration of energy systems including CGSs at the customer-side is determined. As well, the optimal operation of the electric utility's generators is also determined taking into account the CGS operation patterns. This paper evaluates both costs to the electric utility and the customers' cost for congestion relief in transmission networks. Further, we evaluate the influence on CO2 emission and primary energy consumption from the view point of a unified energy system with CGSs providing input on a flexible operation pattern.

  6. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-07-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  7. Materials performance in the atmospheric fluidized-bed cogeneration air heater experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Podolski, W.; Wang, D.Y.; Teats, F.G. ); Gerritsen, W.; Stewart, A.; Robinson, K. )

    1991-02-01

    The Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Cogeneration Air Heater Experiment (ACAHE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) was initiated to assess the performance of various heat-exchanger materials to be used in fluidized-bed combustion air heater systems. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through subcontracts with Babcock Wilcox, Foster Wheeler, and ABB Combustion Engineering Systems, prepared specifications and hardware for the ACAHE tests. Argonne National Laboratory contracted with Rockwell International to conduct tests in the DOE atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion facility. This report presents an overview of the project, a description of the facility and the test hardware, the test operating conditions, a summary of the operation, and the results of analyzing specimens from several uncooled and cooled probes exposed in the facility. Extensive microstructural analyses of the base alloys, claddings, coatings, and weldments were performed on specimens exposed in several probes for different lengths of time. Alloy penetration data were determined for several of the materials as a function of specimen orientation and the exposure location in the combustor. Finally, the data were compared with earlier laboratory test data, and the long-term performance of candidate materials for air-heater applications was assessed.

  8. Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

  9. Experimental study on cement clinker co-generation in pulverized coal combustion boilers of power plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenlong; Luo, Zhongyang; Shi, Zhenglun; Cen, Kefa

    2006-06-01

    The idea to co-generate cement clinker in pulverized coal combustion (PCC) boilers of power plants is introduced and discussed. An experimental study and theoretical analysis showed this idea to be feasible and promising. By adding quick lime as well as other mineralizers to the coal and grinding the mixture before combustion, sulfoaluminate cement clinker with a high content of silicate (SCCHS) could be generated. The main mineral phases in SCCHS are 2CaO x SiO2 (dicalcium-silicate), 3CaO x 3Al2O3 x CaSO4 (calcium-sulfoaluminate) and 2CaO x A12O3 SiO2 (gehlenite). Performance tests showed that the SCCHS met the requirements for utilization in common construction. Based on this idea, zero solid waste generation from PCC would be realized. Furthermore, thermal power production and cement production could be combined, and this would have a significant effect on both environmental protection and natural resource saving.

  10. A 400-kWe high-efficiency steam turbine for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    An advanced state-of-the-art steam turbine-generator developed to serve as the power conversion subsystem for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories' Solar Total-Energy Project (STEP) is described. The turbine-generator, which is designed to provide 400-kW of net electrical power, represents the largest turbine-generator built specifically for commercial solar-powered cogeneration. The controls for the turbine-generator incorporate a multiple, partial-arc entry to provide efficient off-design performance, as well as an extraction control scheme to permit extraction flow regulation while maintaining 110-spsig pressure. Normal turbine operation is achieved while synchronized to a local utility and in a stand-alone mode. In both cases, the turbine-generator features automatic load control as well as remote start-up and shutdown capability. Tests totaling 200 hours were conducted to confirm the integrity of the turbine's mechanical structure and control function. Performance tests resulted in a measured inlet throttle flow of 8,450 pounds per hour, which was near design conditions.

  11. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-06-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's fourth quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002.

  12. Feasibility study: fuel cell cogeneration in a water pollution control facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of a cogeneration fuel cell power plant operating in a large water pollution control facility. The fuel cell power plant would use methane-rich digester gas from the water pollution control facility as a fuel feedstock to provide electrical and thermal energy. Several design configurations were evaluated. These configurations were comprised of combinations of options for locating the fuel cell power plant at the site, electrically connecting it with the water pollution control facility, using the rejected power plant heat, supplying fuel to the power plant, and for ownership and operation. A configuration was selected which met institutional/regulatory constraints and provided a net cost savings to the industry and the electric utility. This volume of the report contains the appendices: (A) abbreviations and definitions, glossary; (B) 4.5 MWe utility demonstrator power plant study information; (C) rejected heat utilization; (D) availability; (E) conceptual design specifications; (F) details of the economic analysis; (G) detailed description of the selected configuration; and (H) fuel cell power plant penetration analysis. (WHK)

  13. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification, SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP designs emphasize on recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from coal clean operations and will assess blends of the culm and coal or petroleum coke as feedstocks. The project is being carried out in three phases. Phase I involves definition of concept and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II consists of an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III involves updating the original EECP design, based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 BPD coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania.

  14. Ionic-liquid pretreatment of cassava residues for the cogeneration of fermentative hydrogen and methane.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jiabei; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Li; Cen, Kefa

    2017-03-01

    An ionic liquid of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) was used to effectively pretreat cassava residues for the efficient enzymatical hydrolysis and cogeneration of fermentative hydrogen and methane. The reducing sugar yield of enzymolysed cassava residues with NMMO pretreatment improved from 36 to 42g/100g cassava residues. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the formation of deep grooves (∼4μm wide) and numerous pores in the cassava residues pretreated with NMMO. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the crystallinity coefficient of NMMO-pretreated cassava residues decreased from 40 to 34. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that crystal cellulose I was partially transformed to amorphous cellulose II in the NMMO-pretreated cassava residues. This transformation resulted in a reduced crystallinity index from 0.85 to 0.77. Hydrogen yield from the enzymolysed cassava residues pretreated with NMMO increased from 92.3 to 126mL/gTVS, and the sequential methane yield correspondingly increased from 79.4 to 101.6mL/g TVS.

  15. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-01-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

  16. A technical analysis for cogeneration systems with potential applications in twelve California industrial plants. [energy saving heat-electricity utility systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, V. C.; Davis, H. S.; Slonski, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    In a study sponsored by the State of California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, 12 industrial plants in five utility districts were surveyed to assess the potential applications of the cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry. Thermodynamic calculations were made for each plant in determining the energy required to meet the existing electrical and steam demands. The present systems were then compared to conceptual cogeneration systems specified for each plant. Overall energy savings were determined for the cogeneration applications. Steam and gas turbine topping cycle systems were considered as well as bottoming cycle systems. Types of industries studied were: pulp and paper, timber, cement, petroleum refining, enhanced oil recovery, foods processing, steel and glass

  17. A technical analysis for cogeneration systems with potential applications in twelve California industrial plants. [energy saving heat-electricity utility systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, V. C.; Davis, H. S.; Slonski, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    In a study sponsored by the State of California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, 12 industrial plants in five utility districts were surveyed to assess the potential applications of the cogeneration of heat and electricity in California industry. Thermodynamic calculations were made for each plant in determining the energy required to meet the existing electrical and steam demands. The present systems were then compared to conceptual cogeneration systems specified for each plant. Overall energy savings were determined for the cogeneration applications. Steam and gas turbine topping cycle systems were considered as well as bottoming cycle systems. Types of industries studied were: pulp and paper, timber, cement, petroleum refining, enhanced oil recovery, foods processing, steel and glass

  18. Development of a Novel Home Cogeneration System using a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell which Enabled Air Conditioning by Its Low-TemperatureWaste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Honda, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Ryuichiro; Nishikawa, Toshimichi; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Tomohiro

    Micro-scale distributed power generation system, which means a micro-cogeneration system in almost cases, has been paid a great attention from a standpoint of saving fossil fuels' consumption and preventing global warming. Especially, polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is considered the most promising power generation system for small scale commercial use and residential use. In the PEFC cogeneration system, small amount of waste heat at low temperature from a cell stack is almost used to produce hot water. Therefore, in the paper, we proposed a new heat utilization method of the waste heat for air conditioning. In the proposed home cogeneration system, absorption refrigerator is introduced in order to produce chilled water. Thermal performances of the proposed system have been analyzed by a computer simulation which was developed for the prediction both of power generation characteristics of PEFC and absorption refrigerator's behavior.

  19. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described.

  20. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  1. Modern technologies for rendering information support to cogeneration steam turbine units in their design and operation stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezgin, V. I.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Chubarov, A. A.; Brezgin, D. V.

    2013-08-01

    Application of modern information technologies in different stages of the lifecycle of cogeneration turbines is considered as one of possible ways for improving their competitiveness. Specific features relating to rendering information support for steam turbine units during the periods of their design and operation, which are the main stages of their life cycle, are presented. Three-dimension modeling, adaptive, and parametric design technologies are applied in the equipment design stages. Information support technologies developed by the authors are applied during the operation stage. Information is integrated by using a product lifecycle management (PLM) system.

  2. 3M: Hutchinson Plant Focuses on Heat Recovery and Cogeneration during Plan-Wide Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-01

    3M performed a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment at its Hutchinson, Minnesota, plant to identify energy- and cost-saving opportunities. Assessment staff developed four separate implementation packages that represented various combinations of energy-efficiency projects involving chiller consolidation, air compressor cooling improvements, a steam turbine used for cogeneration, and a heat recovery boiler for two of the plant's thermal oxidizers. Staff estimated that the plant could save 6 million kWh/yr in electricity and more than 200,000 MMBtu/yr in natural gas and fuel oil, and avoid energy costs of more than $1 million during the first year.

  3. Performance diagnostics software for gas turbines in pipeline and cogeneration applications. Final report, July 1985-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, P.

    1989-12-01

    The development experience for the PEGASYS and COGENT software is presented. The PEGASYS software is applicable to two-shaft gas turbines in simple, regenerative and combined cycle systems. The COGENT software is applicable to cogeneration systems. The test results show that the software is able to define the deviations between measured and expected power and thermal efficiency. Further, the software is able to identify the components causing the performance losses. The results show that axial compressor fouling is a major cause of performance losses and that the performance can be recovered by washing. A description of an on-line version of PEGASYS is described.

  4. 3M: Hutchinson Plant Focuses on Heat Recovery and Cogeneration During Plant-Wide Energy-Efficiency Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-06-01

    3M performed a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment at its Hutchinson, Minnesota, plant to identify energy- and cost-saving opportunities. Assessment staff developed four separate implementation packages that represented various combinations of energy-efficiency projects involving chiller consolidation, air compressor cooling improvements, a steam turbine used for cogeneration, and a heat recovery boiler for two of the plant's thermal oxidizers. Staff estimated that the plant could save 6 million kWh/yr in electricity and more than 200,000 MMBtu/yr in natural gas and fuel oil, and avoid energy costs of more than$1 million during the first year.

  5. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-07-01

    Waste Processors Management Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a cooperative agreement with the USDOE to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US that produces ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP will emphasize on reclaiming and gasifying low-cost coal waste and/or its mixture as the primary feedstocks. The project consists of three phases. Phase I objectives include conceptual development, technical assessment, feasibility design and economic evaluation of a Greenfield commercial co-production plant and a site specific demonstration EECP to be located adjacent to the existing WMPI Gilberton Power Station. There is very little foreseen design differences between the Greenfield commercial coproduction plant versus the EECP plant other than: The greenfield commercial plant will be a stand alone FT/power co-production plant, potentially larger in capacity to take full advantage of economy of scale, and to be located in either western Pennsylvania, West Virginia or Ohio, using bituminous coal waste (gob) and Pennsylvania No.8 coal or other comparable coal as the feedstock; The EECP plant, on the other hand, will be a nominal 5000 bpd plant, fully integrated into the Gilbertson Power Company's Cogeneration Plant to take advantage of the existing infrastructure to reduce cost and minimize project risk. The Gilberton EECP plant will be designed to use eastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal waste and/or its mixture as feedstock.

  6. Thermodynamic optimization of a solar system for cogeneration of water heating/purification and absorption cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovsapian, Zohrob O.

    This dissertation presents a contribution to understanding the behavior of solar powered air conditioning and refrigeration systems with a view to determining the manner in which refrigeration rate; mass flows, heat transfer areas, and internal architecture are related. A cogeneration system consisting of a solar concentrator, a cavity-type receiver, a gas burner, and a thermal storage reservoir is devised to simultaneously produce water heating/purification and cooling (absorption refrigerator system). A simplified mathematical model, which combines fundamental and empirical correlations, and principles of classical thermodynamics, mass and heat transfer, is developed. An experimental setup was built to adjust and validate the numerical results obtained with the mathematical model. The proposed model is then utilized to simulate numerically the system transient and steady state response under different operating and design conditions. A system global optimization for maximum performance (or minimum exergy destruction) in the search for minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum system second law efficiency is performed with low computational time. Appropriate dimensionless groups are identified and the results presented in normalized charts for general application. The numerical results show that the three way maximized system second law efficiency, etaII,max,max,max, occurs when three system characteristic mass flow rates are optimally selected in general terms as dimensionless heat capacity rates, i.e., (Psisps , Psiwxwx, PsiHs)opt ≅ (1.43, 0.17, 0.19). The minimum pull-down and pull-up times, and maximum second law efficiencies found with respect to the optimized operating parameters are sharp and, therefore important to be considered in actual design. As a result, the model is expected to be a useful tool for simulation, design, and optimization of solar energy systems in the context of distributed power generation.

  7. Development of a cogenerating thermophotovoltaic powered combination hot water heater/hydronic boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Kushch, A.S.; Skinner, S.M.; Brennan, R.; Sarmiento, P.A.

    1997-03-01

    A cogenerating thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device for hot water, hydronic space heating, and electric power generation was developed, designed, fabricated, and tested under a Department of Energy contracted program. The device utilizes a cylindrical ytterbia superemissive ceramic fiber burner (SCFB) and is designed for a nominal capacity of 80 kBtu/hr. The burner is fired with premixed natural gas and air. Narrow band emission from the SCFB is converted to electricity by single crystal silicon (Si) photovoltaic (PV) arrays arranged concentrically around the burner. A three-way mixing valve is used to direct heated water to either the portable water storage tank, radiant baseboard heaters, or both. As part of this program, QGI developed a microprocessor-based control system to address the safety issues, as well as photovoltaic power management. Flame sensing is accomplished via the photovoltaics, a technology borrowed from QGI{close_quote}s Quantum Control{trademark} safety shut-off system. Device testing demonstrated a nominal photovoltaic power output of 200 W. Power consumed during steady state operation was 33 W, with power drawn from the combustion air blower, hydronic system pump, three-way switching valve, and the control system, resulting in a net power surplus of 142 W. Power drawn during the ignition sequence was 55 W, and a battery recharge time of 1 minute 30 seconds was recorded. System efficiency was measured and found to be more than 83{percent}. Pollutant emissions at determined operating conditions were below the South Coast Air Quality Management District{close_quote}s (California) limit of 40 ng/J for NOx, and carbon monoxide emissions were measured at less than 50 dppm. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Development of a cogenerating thermophotovoltaic powered combination hot water heater/hydronic boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushch, Aleksandr S.; Skinner, Steven M.; Brennan, Richard; Sarmiento, Pedro A.

    1997-03-01

    A cogenerating thermophotovoltaic (TPV) device for hot water, hydronic space heating, and electric power generation was developed, designed, fabricated, and tested under a Department of Energy contracted program. The device utilizes a cylindrical ytterbia superemissive ceramic fiber burner (SCFB) and is designed for a nominal capacity of 80 kBtu/hr. The burner is fired with premixed natural gas and air. Narrow band emission from the SCFB is converted to electricity by single crystal silicon (Si) photovoltaic (PV) arrays arranged concentrically around the burner. A three-way mixing valve is used to direct heated water to either the portable water storage tank, radiant baseboard heaters, or both. As part of this program, QGI developed a microprocessor-based control system to address the safety issues, as well as photovoltaic power management. Flame sensing is accomplished via the photovoltaics, a technology borrowed from QGI's Quantum Control™ safety shut-off system. Device testing demonstrated a nominal photovoltaic power output of 200 W. Power consumed during steady state operation was 33 W, with power drawn from the combustion air blower, hydronic system pump, three-way switching valve, and the control system, resulting in a net power surplus of 142 W. Power drawn during the ignition sequence was 55 W, and a battery recharge time of 1 minute 30 seconds was recorded. System efficiency was measured and found to be more than 83%. Pollutant emissions at determined operating conditions were below the South Coast Air Quality Management District's (California) limit of 40 ng/J for NOx, and carbon monoxide emissions were measured at less than 50 dppm.

  9. Novel solar cogeneration trough system based on stretched microstructured mylar film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejmadi, Vic; Shin, Meimei; Kress, Bernard; Giliberto, Alfredo

    2011-05-01

    Hybrid CSP / CPV (Concentrating Solar Power / Concentration Photovoltaic) systems provide a good alternative to traditional CPV systems or CSP trough architectures. Such systems are often described as solar cogeneration systems. Trough systems use mainly the IR portion of the spectrum in order to heat up a pipe in which water is circulating. CPV systems use only the visible portion of the spectrum to produce the photo-voltaic conversion. Due to the achromatic nature of traditional thermal trough CSP systems, it is very unlikely that a CPV system can be integrated with a CSP system, even a low concentration CPV system (LCPV). We propose a novel technique to implement a low concentration CSP/LCPV system which relies on commercially available solar trough concentrators / trackers that use reflective stretched Mylar membranes. However, here the Mylar is embossed with microstructures that act only on the visible portion of the spectrum, leaving the infrared part of the solar spectrum unperturbed. This architecture has many advantages, such as: the existing Mylar-based thermal trough architecture is left unperturbed for optimal thermal conversion, with linear strips of PV cells located a few inches away from the central water pipe; the infrared radiation is focused on the central pipe, away from the PV cells, which remain relatively cool compared to conventional LCPV designs (only visible light (the PV convertible part of the solar spectrum) is diffracted onto the PV cell strips); and the Mylar sheets can be embossed by conventional roll-to-roll processes, with a one-dimensional symmetric micro-structured pattern. We show how the positive master elements are designed and fabricated over a small area (using traditional IC wafer fabrication techniques), and how the Mylar sheets are embossed by a recombined negative nickel shim. We also show that such a system can efficiently filter the visible spectrum and divert it onto the linear strips of PV cells, while leaving the

  10. Co-generating synthetic parts toward a self-replicating system

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Jun; Haas, Wilhelm; Jackson, Kirsten; ...

    2017-03-23

    To build replicating systems with new functions, the engineering of existing biological machineries requires a sensible strategy. Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements (PURE) system consists of the desired components for transcription, translation, aminoacylation and energy regeneration. PURE, might be the basis for a radically alterable, lifelike system after optimization. Here, we regenerated 54 E. coli ribosomal (r-) proteins individually from DNA templates in the PURE system. We show that using stable isotope labeling with amino acids, mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics could detect 26 of the 33 50S and 20 of the 21 30S subunit r-proteins when co-expressed in batchmore » format PURE system. By optimizing DNA template concentrations and adapting a miniaturized Fluid Array Device with optimized feeding solution, we were able to cogenerate and detect at least 29 of the 33 50S and all of the 21 30S subunit r-proteins in one pot. The boost on yield of a single r-protein in co-expression pool varied from ~1.5 to 5-fold compared to the batch mode, with up to ~ 2.4 µM yield for a single r-protein. Reconstituted ribosomes under physiological condition from PURE system synthesized 30S r-proteins and native 16S rRNA showed ~13% activity of native 70S ribosomes, which increased to 21% when supplemented with GroEL/ES. As a result, this work also points to what is still needed to obtain self-replicating synthetic ribosomes in-situ in the PURE system.« less

  11. The performance optimization of a gas turbine cogeneration/heat pump facility with thermal storage

    SciTech Connect

    Spakovsky, M.R. von; Curti, V.; Batato, M.

    1995-01-01

    With the push for greater energy conservation, the need for heating and/or power production is being filled by cogeneration facilities. Thus, the search for the best performance at the least cost for such multipurpose plants is made much more difficult by the fact that such facilities must meet differing goals or demands. Such a facility exists at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and has been studied in order to find the optimum modes of operation as a function of time for variations in both the heating and electrical demands this facility must meet. The results of this study are presented here. The plant itself provides heat and electricity for both the EPFL and the University of Lausanne and is projected to supply electricity to the exterior utility grid provided it can be shown to be economically viable. The plant`s primary components include two gas turbines, a heat recovery system, two heat pumps, a set of heat storage tanks, and both medium and low-temperature district heating networks. In order to find the optimum mode of operation, a mixed-integer linear programming approach was used, which balances the competing costs of operation and minimizes these costs subject to the operational constraints placed on the system. The effects of both the cost of the fuel and the costs of electricity sold and bought on the best performance of the system are evaluated. In addition, the important features of the modeling process are discussed, in particular the heat storage tanks, which complicate the optimization of the series of steady-state models used to model the overall quasi-steady-state behavior of the system.

  12. York County Energy Partners cogeneration project: A case study in public participation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamill, P.; Caperton, C.

    1996-12-31

    In the summer of 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) modified an existing cooperative agreement to allow for the location of the York County Energy Partners (YCEP) Cogeneration Facility, 250-MW coal-fired plant, adjacent to the P.H. Glatfelter paper mill in Spring Grove, Pennsylvania. The plant would demonstrate utility scale atmospheric fluidized-bed technology, supplying steam for the paper making process and electricity to be sold commercially. Under the National Environmental Policy Act, DOE`s cost share was considered a major federal action with the potential to significantly affect the environment, and thus an environmental impact statement (EIS) was required. In August 19895, DOE`s Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy signed a Record of Decision (ROD) to provide funding. In spite of this approval, and a State-approved air permit, pressure by sophisticated citizens groups contributed to the denial of key permits. In September 1995, YCEP and Met-Ed announced their joint intention to restructure the Power Purchase Agreement to allow for development of a natural gas fired facility. In January 1996, YCEP dropped the project altogether. This paper focuses on citizen actions used to influence the NEPA process conducted for the Spring Grove site, and traces the role of government and citizen groups throughout the sequence of events in order to draw conclusions about the effective role of each party. The paper describes the methods used by citizen organizations to work the system. Major citizen groups were interviewed by the authors to gain insight into their perceptions of events at Spring Grove and their own influence on the final outcome.

  13. HTGR nuclear heat source component design and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Peinado, C.O.; Wunderlich, R.G.; Simon, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) nuclear heat source components have been under design and development since the mid-1950's. Two power plants have been designed, constructed, and operated: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. Recently, development has focused on the primary system components for a 2240-MW(t) steam cycle HTGR capable of generating about 900 MW(e) electric power or alternately producing high-grade steam and cogenerating electric power. These components include the steam generators, core auxiliary heat exchangers, primary and auxiliary circulators, reactor internals, and thermal barrier system. A discussion of the design and operating experience of these components is included.

  14. Rising critical emission of air pollutants from renewable biomass based cogeneration from the sugar industry in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, S. K.; Ohara, T.; Beig, G.; Kurokawa, J.; Nagashima, T.

    2015-09-01

    In the recent past, the emerging India economy is highly dependent on conventional as well as renewable energy to deal with energy security. Keeping the potential of biomass and its plentiful availability, the Indian government has been encouraging various industrial sectors to generate their own energy from it. The Indian sugar industry has adopted and made impressive growth in bagasse (a renewable biomass, i.e. left after sugercane is crushed) based cogeneration power to fulfil their energy need, as well as to export a big chunk of energy to grid power. Like fossil fuel, bagasse combustion also generates various critical pollutants. This article provides the first ever estimation, current status and overview of magnitude of air pollutant emissions from rapidly growing bagasse based cogeneration technology in Indian sugar mills. The estimated emission from the world’s second largest sugar industry in India for particulate matter, NOX, SO2, CO and CO2 is estimated to be 444 ± 225 Gg yr-1, 188 ± 95 Gg yr-1, 43 ± 22 Gg yr-1, 463 ± 240 Gg yr-1 and 47.4 ± 9 Tg yr-1, respectively in 2014. The studies also analyze and identify potential hot spot regions across the country and explore the possible further potential growth for this sector. This first ever estimation not only improves the existing national emission inventory, but is also useful in chemical transport modeling studies, as well as for policy makers.

  15. Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, Tatsuo

    1996-12-31

    Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

  16. A new market risk model for cogeneration project financing---combined heat and power development without a power purchase agreement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Timothy A.

    Federal legislative changes in 2006 no longer entitle cogeneration project financings by law to receive the benefit of a power purchase agreement underwritten by an investment-grade investor-owned utility. Consequently, this research explored the need for a new market-risk model for future cogeneration and combined heat and power (CHP) project financing. CHP project investment represents a potentially enormous energy efficiency benefit through its application by reducing fossil fuel use up to 55% when compared to traditional energy generation, and concurrently eliminates constituent air emissions up to 50%, including global warming gases. As a supplemental approach to a comprehensive technical analysis, a quantitative multivariate modeling was also used to test the statistical validity and reliability of host facility energy demand and CHP supply ratios in predicting the economic performance of CHP project financing. The resulting analytical models, although not statistically reliable at this time, suggest a radically simplified CHP design method for future profitable CHP investments using four easily attainable energy ratios. This design method shows that financially successful CHP adoption occurs when the average system heat-to-power-ratio supply is less than or equal to the average host-convertible-energy-ratio, and when the average nominally-rated capacity is less than average host facility-load-factor demands. New CHP investments can play a role in solving the world-wide problem of accommodating growing energy demand while preserving our precious and irreplaceable air quality for future generations.

  17. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission Third Quarter - September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    1982-09-01

    In the Third Quarter of 1982, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 148 to 173, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 922 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 168 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. Of the 173 signed contracts and committed projects, 61 were cogeneration and solid waste projects with a potential of 643 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 28 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 968 MW to 1,049 MW, and 10 solid waste projects with a potential of 90 MW to 95 MW. Wind projects under contract number 84, with a generating capability of 85 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 17 wind projects, totaling 83 MW. There are 23 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 95 MW, as well as 63 projects under active discussion for 169 MW. In addition, there are 25 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 278 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Five contracts have been signed with projects, using other types of electric power generation, capable of producing 100 MW.

  18. Experimental Performance of a Solar Thermoelectric Cogenerator Comprising Thermoelectric Modules and Parabolic Trough Concentrator without Evacuated Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, L.; Kang, Y. P.; Li, C.; Tanemura, S.; Wan, C. L.; Iwamoto, Y.; Shen, Y.; Lin, H.

    2015-06-01

    A prototype practical solar-thermoelectric cogenerator composed of (1) a primary component of a pile of solar-selective absorber (SSA) slab, thermoelectric (TE) modules, and a depressed water flow tube (multichannel cooling heat sink, MCS), and (2) a parabolic trough concentrator with aperture area of 2m × 2m and east-west focal axis was constructed. Its cogeneration performance under the best climatic and solar insolation conditions in Guangzhou, China was tested. For simplicity, the evacuated glass tube to cover the primary component was eliminated from the system. Six Bi2Te3 TE modules were arranged in series, directly bonded to the rear surface of the solar absorber slab. The hot-side temperature of the TE module reached up to 152°C. The experimentally obtained instantaneous results for the solar to electrical conversion efficiency, heat exchange coefficient of the MCS, and overall system efficiency under the best environmental and solar insolation conditions were about 1.14%, 56.1%, and 49.5%, respectively. To justify these values, an equivalent thermal network diagram based on a single-temperature-node heat transfer model representing the respective system components was used to analyze the thermal transfer and losses of the system. Finally, electrical power of 18° W was generated, with 2 L/min of hot water at 37°C being produced and stored in the insulated container.

  19. Thermal-economic analysis of organic Rankine combined cycle cogeneration. ITT Energy management report TR-82-3

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This study presents an evaluation of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) as combined with topping cycles incorporating gas turbines or diesel engines, and with subsequent waste heat utilization. The potential benefit of the proposed organic-Rankine-combined-cycle cogeneration of useful heat and electricity is more flexibility in meeting demands for the two products, by varying the mode of operation of the system. A thermal-economic analysis is developed and illustrated with cost and performance data for commercially available equipment, and with general economic parameters reflecting current regulations and market conditions. The performance of the ORC and of the entire combined cycle is described. Equations are presented for evaluating the various thermodynamic and economic parameters, and the resultant cash flows. Criteria are developed in order to assess whether or not the addition of an ORC to a cogeneration system without ORC is viable based on rate of return on incremental investment. Examples are given to illustrate how the method may be applied, namely to serve proposed commercial energy facilities for the North Loop Project and for Illinois Center, in Chicago. While results indicate that the proposed system is potentially viable, it is not viable under conditions prevailing in Chicago for the selected case studies.

  20. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  1. Nuclear ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  2. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  3. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-04

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  4. Nuclear data for nuclear transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Hideo

    2009-05-01

    Current status on nuclear data for the study of nuclear transmutation of radioactive wastes is reviewed, mainly focusing on neutron capture reactions. It is stressed that the highest-precision frontier research in nuclear data measurements should be a key to satisfy the target accuracies on the nuclear data requested for realizing the nuclear transmutation.

  5. Local government guide to the emerging technologies of cogeneration and photovoltaics. Energy technology report of the energy task force of the urban consortium

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    An overview of cogeneration and photovoltaics systems is presented to provide local government managers a basic understanding of the technologies. Issues and considerations associated with applications are presented. Discussions cover installation and maintenance requirements, equipment availability, costs, and risks/benefits. Data describing demonstration sites and contacts for further information are provided. (MCW)

  6. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Rich

    2003-12-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting

  7. High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1996-01-01

    As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

  8. CO2 emission free co-generation of energy and ethylene in hydrocarbon SOFC reactors with a dehydrogenation anode.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Lin, Jie-Yuan; Xu, Shihong; Luo, Jing-Li; Chuang, Karl T; Sanger, Alan R; Krzywicki, Andrzej

    2011-11-21

    A dehydrogenation anode is reported for hydrocarbon proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A Cu-Cr(2)O(3) nanocomposite is obtained from CuCrO(2) nanoparticles as an inexpensive, efficient, carbon deposition and sintering tolerant anode catalyst. A SOFC reactor is fabricated using a Cu-Cr(2)O(3) composite as a dehydrogenation anode and a doped barium cerate as a proton conducting electrolyte. The protonic membrane SOFC reactor can selectively convert ethane to valuable ethylene, and electricity is simultaneously generated in the electrochemical oxidative dehydrogenation process. While there are no CO(2) emissions, traces of CO are present in the anode exhaust when the SOFC reactor is operated at over 700 °C. A mechanism is proposed for ethane electro-catalytic dehydrogenation over the Cu-Cr(2)O(3) catalyst. The SOFC reactor also has good stability for co-generation of electricity and ethylene at 700 °C.

  9. Power Hardware-in-the-loop Simulation of a Gas Engine Cogeneration System for Developing a Power Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Miao; Horie, Satoshi; Miura, Yushi; Ise, Tosifumi; Sato, Yuki; Momose, Toshinari; Dufour, Christian

    This research focuses on the development scheme of a power converter in a gas engine cogeneration system using a power hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A matrix converter is adopted to substitute a conventional ac/dc/ac converter and transfers three phase electricity to single phase electricity directly. To inevstigate the interaction between gas engine-generator unit and the proposed matrix converter, a power hardware-in-the-loop simulation is carried out, in which a piece of real matrix converter is installed in the simulation loop and interfaces with the numerical model of gas engine-generator unit. Numerical models of gas engine and generator are presented and verified by experiment. The configuration of the power hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described and results are also presented, through which the practical application of matrix converter is well demonstrated.

  10. Cogeneration and Small Power Production Quarterly Report to the California Public Utilities Commission First Quarter - March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-03-01

    In the First Quarter of 1983, the number of signed contracts and committed projects rose from 204 to 224, with a total estimated nominal capacity of these projects of 1,246 MW. Of this nominal capacity, about 259 MW is operational, and the balance is under contract for development. Of the 224 signed contracts and committed projects, 70 were cogeneration and solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 687 MW. PG and E also had under active discussion 30 cogeneration projects that could generate a total of 744 MW to 821 MW, and 12 solid waste/biomass projects with a potential of 118 MW to 126 MW. Two contracts have been signed with geothermal projects, capable of producing 83 MW. There are 6 solar projects with signed contracts and a potential of 36 MW, as well as another solar project under active discussion for 30 MW. Wind farm projects under contract number 17, with a generating capability of 330 MW. Also, discussions are being conducted with 9 wind farm projects, totaling 184 to 189 MW. There are 89 wind projects of 100 kW or less with signed contracts and a potential of almost 1 MW, as well as 9 other projects under active discussion. There are 38 hydroelectric projects with signed contracts and a potential of 103 MW, as well as 65 projects under active discussion for 183 MW. In addition, there are 29 hydroelectric projects, with a nominal capacity of 291 MW, that PG and E is constructing or planning to construct. Table A displays the above information. In tabular form, in Appendix A, are status reports of the projects as of March 31, 1983.

  11. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  12. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  13. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  14. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Science Education » Science Topics » Nuclear Medicine SCIENCE EDUCATION SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ... Related Documents: Nuclear Medicine Fact Sheet.pdf SCIENCE EDUCATION Science Topics Resource Links for General Public Resource ...

  15. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  16. Nuclear Winter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Anne

    1984-01-01

    "Nuclear Winter" was recently coined to describe the climatic and biological effects of a nuclear war. These effects are discussed based on models, simulations, scenarios, and projections. Effects on human populations are also considered. (JN)

  17. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  18. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  19. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  20. Evaluation of thermal energy storage for the proposed Twin Cities District Heating system. [using cogeneration heat production and aquifiers for heat storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of incorporating thermal energy storage components into the proposed Twin Cities District heating project was evaluated. The technical status of the project is reviewed and conceptual designs of district heating systems with and without thermal energy storage were compared in terms of estimated capital requirements, fuel consumption, delivered energy cost, and environmental aspects. The thermal energy storage system is based on cogeneration and the storage of heat in aquifers.

  1. A Make/Buy Decision Analysis and Its Computer Program for Optimization of Cogeneration Plant Operation at Naval Submarine Base, New London, Connecticut.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    the total thermal energy to be converted into the predetermined electrical power, W + W 3 4 F + W while meeting the steam load demand at any given time...A MAKE/ BUY DECISION ANALYSIS AND ITS COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR OPTIM--ETC(U) UNCLASSIFIED CEL-TN-1596mniIIIIEEEEIIEIIII EEIIIIIIIIIIIE EIIIIIEEEEEIII...LEVELS ~TN no. N- 1596 A MAKE/ BUY DECISION ANALYSIS AND ITS COMPUTER PROGRAM title: FOR OPTIMIZATION OF COGENERATION PLANT OPERATION AT NAVAL SUBMARINE

  2. Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Schneider, Andre; Horowitz, Charles; Berry, Don; Briggs, Christian

    2014-03-01

    For decades it has been theorized that just below nuclear saturation density matter undergoes a series of phase transitions. These phases, which are expected to exist in core-collapse supernovae and neutron stars, involve a range of exotic nuclear shapes collectively known as nuclear pasta. Recently, Jose Pons and collaborators suggested that ``the maximum period of isolated X-ray pulsars may be the first observational evidence for an amorphous inner crust, ..., possibly owing to the existence of a nuclear pasta phase.'' In this talk we present results of semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta and discuss how each phase might contribute to neutron star crust properties.

  3. Nuclear orientation and nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present generation of on-line nuclear orientation facilities promises to revolutionize the gathering of nuclear structure information, especially for the hitherto poorly known and understood nuclei far from stability. Following a brief review of the technological developments that have facilitated these experiments, the nuclear spectroscopic information that can be obtained is summarized. Applications to understanding nuclear structure are reviewed, and challenges for future studies are discussed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Guidelines to assist rural electric cooperatives to fulfill the requirements of Sections 201 and 210 of PURPA for cogeneration and small power production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    These guidelines were designed to assist National Rural Electric Cooperative Association staff and consultants involved in the implementation of Sections 201 and 210 of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The guidelines were structured to meet anticipated use as: a self-contained legal, technical and economic reference manual helpful in dealing with small power producers and cogenerators; a roadmap through some of the less obvious obstacles encountered by utilities interacting with small power producers and cogenerators; a starting point for those utilities who have not yet formulated specific policies and procedures, nor developed rates for purchasing power from small power producers and cogenerators; a discussion vehicle to highlight key issues and increase understanding in workshop presentations to rural electric cooperatives; and an evolutionary tool which can be updated to reflect changes in the law as they occur. The chapters in these Guidelines contain both summary information, such as compliance checklists, and detailed information, such as cost rate calculations, on regulatory requirements, operational considerations, and rate considerations. The appendices contain more specific material, e.g. rural electric cooperative sample policy statements. (LCL)

  5. DC Linked Hybrid Generation System with an Energy Storage Device including a Photo-Voltaic Generation and a Gas Engine Cogeneration for Residential Houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lung, Chienru; Miyake, Shota; Kakigano, Hiroaki; Miura, Yushi; Ise, Toshifumi; Momose, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Hideki

    For the past few years, a hybrid generation system including solar panel and gas cogeneration is being used for residential houses. Solar panels can generate electronic power at daytime; meanwhile, it cannot generate electronic power at night time. But the power consumption of residential houses usually peaks in the evening. The gas engine cogeneration system can generate electronic power without such a restriction, and it also can generate heat power to warm up house or to produce hot water. In this paper, we propose the solar panel and gas engine co-generation hybrid system with an energy storage device that is combined by dc bus. If a black out occurs, the system still can supply electronic power for special house loads. We propose the control scheme for the system which are related with the charging level of the energy storage device, the voltage of the utility grid which can be applied both grid connected and stand alone operation. Finally, we carried out some experiments to demonstrate the system operation and calculation for loss estimation.

  6. Nuclear networking.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  7. The market viability of nuclear hydrogen technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Botterud, A.; Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M. C.; Yildiz, B.

    2007-04-06

    significantly different results in regards to the relative profitability of the different technologies and configurations. This is the case both with a deterministic and a stochastic analysis, as shown in the tables below. The flexibility in output products clearly adds substantial value to the HPE-ALWR and HTE-HTGR plants. In fact, under the GBM assumption for prices, the HTE-HTGR plant becomes more profitable than the SI-HTGR configuration, although SI-HTGR has a much lower levelized cost. For the HTE-HTGR plant it is also profitable to invest in additional electric turbine capacity (Case b) in order to fully utilize the heat from the nuclear reactor for electricity production when this is more profitable than producing hydrogen. The technologies are all at the research and development stage, so there are significant uncertainties regarding the technology cost and performance assumptions used in this analysis. As the technologies advance, the designers need to refine the cost and performance evaluation to provide a more reliable set of input for a more rigorous analysis. In addition, the durability of the catalytic activity of the materials at the hydrogen plant during repetitive price cycling is of prime importance concerning the flexibility of switching from hydrogen to electricity production. However, given the potential significant economic benefit that can be brought from cogeneration with the flexibility to quickly react to market signals, DOE should consider R&D efforts towards developing durable materials and processes that can enable this type of operation. Our future work will focus on analyzing a range of hydrogen production technologies associated with an extension of the financial analysis framework presented here. We are planning to address a variety of additional risks and options, such as the value of modular expansion in addition to the co-generation capability (i.e., a modular increase in the hydrogen production capacity of a plant in a given market with

  8. Nuclear Halos

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Erich

    2010-07-27

    We show that extreme nuclear halos are caused only by pairs of s-wave neutrons (or single s-wave neutrons) and that such states occur much more frequently in the periodic table than previously believed. Besides lingering long near zero neutron separation energy such extreme halos have very remarkable properties: they can contribute significantly to the nuclear density at more than twice the normal nuclear radius and their spreading width can be very narrow. The properties of these states are primarily determined by the ''thickness'' of the nuclear surface in the mean-free nuclear potential and thus their importance increases greatly as we approach the neutron drip line. We discuss what such extreme halos are, where they occur, what their properties are and some of their impact on nuclear observations.

  9. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  10. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  11. Nuclear Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  12. Nuclear Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E G

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  13. Terrestrial central station array life-cycle analysis support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Plant elements evaluated included designs for module, panel and array structures, as well as balance-of-plant systems. Installation and maintenance procedures and the impact of site environment were also evaluated. In terms of the cost of energy produced, the horizontal array configuration was found to be less expensive than the tandem array at latitudes less than 40 deg. Both of these configurations are less expensive than the rack design. However, the costs of energy for all three configurations are within approximately ?10 percent of each other. For flat plate panels, the seasonally adjusted and tracking array configurations are not economically attractive when compared to the three other designs. Balance-of-plant costs are approximately equal to (goal) module costs. The array structures and foundations are the most expensive items in the balance-of-plant costs.

  14. Hot-spot heating in central-station arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Hot spot tests performed on the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) verificaton array show that current imbalance occurs, resulting in significant hot spot heating. One cause of current imbalance is differences in the average shunt resistances of parallel cell strings due to cell shunt resistance variations. In depth hot spot tests are performed on the verification array with bypass diodes. The tests had several objectives: (1) a comparison of hot spot temperatures achieved under field conditions with those obtained with the present laboratory hot spot test using similar modules; (2) an assessment of current imbalance versus cross tie frequency; and (3) an assessment of different shadow patterns and shadow densities. Instrumented modules are used to vary the number of cross ties and to measure the test-cell current and back-bias voltage. The widths, lengths, and densities of the shadows are varied to maximize the back bias voltage at maximum power current. An infrared camera is used to indicate the existence of hot spots and estimate temperature increases in conjunction with thermocouples. The results of these hot spot tests indicate a sensitivity of back bias heating to the shadow size (amount of cell coverage) and density.

  15. Is central station generation becoming a white elephant

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, J.S.

    1985-03-21

    Cost increases encourage the development of alternative sources of energy, and some of the alternatives currently under development lend themselves to moving the generation location back to load centers. In addition, some alternative sources have short lead times and minimal environmental impact, and are being subsidized through income tax policy. Alternative sources of energy have the potential for beginning to affect the usefulness of electric-generating plants and their high-voltage transmission networks before the end of this century. If this comes about, the electric utility industry may find its position similar to that of the telephone industry - with obsolete facilities not fully depreciated. The scenario discussed here would not come about all at once and may not come about at all. But it is the authors opinion that the chances are greater than fifty-fifty that it or something similar will affect the usefulness of bulk power supply systems sometime during the lifetime of generating units installed during the past ten years.

  16. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-05-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems (ECS) are compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented for coal fired process boilers. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented.

  17. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Rich

    2001-03-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

  18. Methodology for the optimal design of an integrated first and second generation ethanol production plant combined with power cogeneration.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Rami; Gomez, Adrien; Saint-Antonin, Valérie; Schweitzer, Jean-Marc; Maréchal, François

    2016-08-01

    The application of methodologies for the optimal design of integrated processes has seen increased interest in literature. This article builds on previous works and applies a systematic methodology to an integrated first and second generation ethanol production plant with power cogeneration. The methodology breaks into process simulation, heat integration, thermo-economic evaluation, exergy efficiency vs. capital costs, multi-variable, evolutionary optimization, and process selection via profitability maximization. Optimization generated Pareto solutions with exergy efficiency ranging between 39.2% and 44.4% and capital costs from 210M$ to 390M$. The Net Present Value was positive for only two scenarios and for low efficiency, low hydrolysis points. The minimum cellulosic ethanol selling price was sought to obtain a maximum NPV of zero for high efficiency, high hydrolysis alternatives. The obtained optimal configuration presented maximum exergy efficiency, hydrolyzed bagasse fraction, capital costs and ethanol production rate, and minimum cooling water consumption and power production rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Proposal and Evaluation of a Gas Engine and Gas Turbine Hybrid Cogeneration System in which Cascaded Heat is Highly Utilized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    A high efficiency cogeneration system (CGS) is proposed for utilizing high temperature exhaust gas (HTEG) from a gas engine (GE). In the proposed system, for making use of heat energy of HTEG, H2O turbine (HTb) is incorporated and steam produced by utilizing HTEG is used as working fluid of HTb. HTb exhaust gas is also utilized for increasing power output and for satisfying heat demand in the proposed system. Both of the thermodynamic characteristics of the proposed system and a gas engine CGS (GE-CGS) constructed by using the original GE are estimated. Energy saving characteristics and CO2 reduction effects of the proposed CGS and the GE-CGS are also investigated. It was estimated that the net generated power of the proposed CGS has been increasd 25.5% and net power generation efficiency 6.7%, compared with the the original GE-CGS. It was also shown that the proposed CGS could save 27.0% of energy comsumption and reduce 1137 t-CO2/y, 1.41 times larger than those of GE-CGS, when a case syudy was set and investigated. Improvements of performance by increasing turbine inlet temperature were also investigated.

  20. Experimental observation of the behaviour of cogenerated dusty plasma using a bipolar pulsed direct current power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Sanjib; Bose, M.; Pramanik, J.; Mukherjee, S.

    2013-02-15

    We have experimentally observed the behaviour of cogenerated dusts in unmagnetized plasma produced using a bipolar pulsed dc power supply. In this experiment, the dust particles have been generated through sputtering of graphite cathode and were stratified between two electrodes. This stratification of dust clouds has obtained at a typical range of plasma parameters, namely, 650 V (peak-to-peak) with 0.2 mbar pressure. In above condition, we detected the Taylor-like instability at the interface of two dusty clouds with different densities. A very less dust density (void like) region inside the lesser dust density portion is also noted. Again, it has been observed that a self excited dust density wave propagates towards the higher density dust fluid inside the system as well as a stationary band structure of thin multiple layers of dust particles when we apply a higher voltage (750 V peak-to-peak). The wavelength, phase velocity, and frequency of the excited wave have also been estimated.

  1. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  2. Proposal of a novel multifunctional energy system for cogeneration of coke, hydrogen, and power - article no. 052001

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, H.G.; Sun, S.; Han, W.; Gao, L.

    2009-09-15

    This paper proposes a novel multifunctional energy system (MES), which cogenerates coke, hydrogen, and power, through the use of coal and coke oven gas (COG). In this system, a new type of coke oven, firing coal instead of COG as heating resource for coking, is adopted. The COG rich in H{sub 2} is sent to a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 80% of hydrogen first, and then the PSA purge gas is fed to a combined cycle as fuel. The new system combines the chemical processes and power generation system, along with the integration of chemical conversion and thermal energy utilization. In this manner, both the chemical energy of fuel and thermal energy can be used more effectively. With the same inputs of fuel and the same output of coking heat, the new system can produce about 65% more hydrogen than that of individual systems. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the new system is about 70%, and the exergy efficiency is about 66%. Compared with individual systems, the primary energy saving ratio can reach as high as 12.5%. Based on the graphical exergy analyses, we disclose that the integration of synthetic utilization of COG and coal plays a significant role in decreasing the exergy destruction of the MES system. The promising results obtained may lead to a clean coal technology that will utilize COG and coal more efficiently and economically.

  3. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT-DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-07-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002.

  4. A two-level approach to large mixed-integer programs with application to cogeneration in energy-efficient buildings

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Fu; Leyffer, Sven; Munson, Todd

    2016-04-12

    We study a two-stage mixed-integer linear program (MILP) with more than 1 million binary variables in the second stage. We develop a two-level approach by constructing a semi-coarse model that coarsens with respect to variables and a coarse model that coarsens with respect to both variables and constraints. We coarsen binary variables by selecting a small number of prespecified on/off profiles. We aggregate constraints by partitioning them into groups and taking convex combination over each group. With an appropriate choice of coarsened profiles, the semi-coarse model is guaranteed to find a feasible solution of the original problem and hence providesmore » an upper bound on the optimal solution. We show that solving a sequence of coarse models converges to the same upper bound with proven finite steps. This is achieved by adding violated constraints to coarse models until all constraints in the semi-coarse model are satisfied. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in cogeneration for buildings. Here, the coarsened models allow us to obtain good approximate solutions at a fraction of the time required by solving the original problem. Extensive numerical experiments show that the two-level approach scales to large problems that are beyond the capacity of state-of-the-art commercial MILP solvers.« less

  5. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 2: Residual-fired nocogeneration process boiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  6. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Various advanced energy conversion systems (ECS) are compared with each other and with current technology systems for their savings in fuel energy, costs, and emissions in individual plants and on a national level. About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidates which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on-site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuel consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented for coal fired process boilers. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented.

  7. Cogeneration Technology Alternatives Study (CTAS). Volume 6: Computer data. Part 1: Coal-fired nocogeneration process boiler, section A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    About fifty industrial processes from the largest energy consuming sectors were used as a basis for matching a similar number of energy conversion systems that are considered as candidate which can be made available by the 1985 to 2000 time period. The sectors considered included food, textiles, lumber, paper, chemicals, petroleum, glass, and primary metals. The energy conversion systems included steam and gas turbines, diesels, thermionics, stirling, closed cycle and steam injected gas turbines, and fuel cells. Fuels considered were coal, both coal and petroleum based residual and distillate liquid fuels, and low Btu gas obtained through the on site gasification of coal. Computer generated reports of the fuels consumption and savings, capital costs, economics and emissions of the cogeneration energy conversion systems (ECS's) heat and power matched to the individual industrial processes are presented. National fuel and emissions savings are also reported for each ECS assuming it alone is implemented. Two nocogeneration base cases are included: coal fired and residual fired process boilers.

  8. A two-level approach to large mixed-integer programs with application to cogeneration in energy-efficient buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Fu; Leyffer, Sven; Munson, Todd

    2016-04-12

    We study a two-stage mixed-integer linear program (MILP) with more than 1 million binary variables in the second stage. We develop a two-level approach by constructing a semi-coarse model that coarsens with respect to variables and a coarse model that coarsens with respect to both variables and constraints. We coarsen binary variables by selecting a small number of prespecified on/off profiles. We aggregate constraints by partitioning them into groups and taking convex combination over each group. With an appropriate choice of coarsened profiles, the semi-coarse model is guaranteed to find a feasible solution of the original problem and hence provides an upper bound on the optimal solution. We show that solving a sequence of coarse models converges to the same upper bound with proven finite steps. This is achieved by adding violated constraints to coarse models until all constraints in the semi-coarse model are satisfied. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in cogeneration for buildings. Here, the coarsened models allow us to obtain good approximate solutions at a fraction of the time required by solving the original problem. Extensive numerical experiments show that the two-level approach scales to large problems that are beyond the capacity of state-of-the-art commercial MILP solvers.

  9. From the first nuclear power plant to fourth-generation nuclear power installations [on the 60th anniversary of the World's First nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachkov, V. I.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kukharchuk, O. F.; Orlov, Yu. I.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    Successful commissioning in the 1954 of the World's First nuclear power plant constructed at the Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) in Obninsk signaled a turn from military programs to peaceful utilization of atomic energy. Up to the decommissioning of this plant, the AM reactor served as one of the main reactor bases on which neutron-physical investigations and investigations in solid state physics were carried out, fuel rods and electricity generating channels were tested, and isotope products were bred. The plant served as a center for training Soviet and foreign specialists on nuclear power plants, the personnel of the Lenin nuclear-powered icebreaker, and others. The IPPE development history is linked with the names of I.V. Kurchatov, A.I. Leipunskii, D.I. Blokhintsev, A.P. Aleksandrov, and E.P. Slavskii. More than 120 projects of various nuclear power installations were developed under the scientific leadership of the IPPE for submarine, terrestrial, and space applications, including two water-cooled power units at the Beloyarsk NPP in Ural, the Bilibino nuclear cogeneration station in Chukotka, crawler-mounted transportable TES-3 power station, the BN-350 reactor in Kazakhstan, and the BN-600 power unit at the Beloyarsk NPP. Owing to efforts taken on implementing the program for developing fast-neutron reactors, Russia occupied leading positions around the world in this field. All this time, IPPE specialists worked on elaborating the principles of energy supertechnologies of the 21st century. New large experimental installations have been put in operation, including the nuclear-laser setup B, the EGP-15 accelerator, the large physical setup BFS, the high-pressure setup SVD-2; scientific, engineering, and technological schools have been established in the field of high- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics, electrostatic accelerators of multicharge ions, plasma processes in thermionic converters and nuclear-pumped lasers, physics of compact

  10. Nuclear safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buden, D.

    1991-01-01

    Topics dealing with nuclear safety are addressed which include the following: general safety requirements; safety design requirements; terrestrial safety; SP-100 Flight System key safety requirements; potential mission accidents and hazards; key safety features; ground operations; launch operations; flight operations; disposal; safety concerns; licensing; the nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application (NERVA) design philosophy; the NERVA flight safety program; and the NERVA safety plan.

  11. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  12. Nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) processes plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. This fact sheet responds to your September 6, 1991, request, that we describe the methods and facilities for DOE's plutonium processing. Plutonium, which is used to make nuclear weapons, does not exist in nature and has to be produced. However, DOE no longer produces plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. Instead, DOE processes and recycles the plutonium from retired nuclear weapons and the plutonium that remains as scrap or residue from plutonium processing. This paper reports that DOE recovers plutonium through two basic processes-aqueous and pyrochemical-at four processing sites-Rocky Flats, Savannah River, Hanford, and Los Alamos. However, because of environmental and safety concerns and reductions in nuclear weapons, DOE has closed or may close most of the processing facilities. Only Los Alamos' processing facilities are currently operating.

  13. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  14. Nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Halley-Stott, Richard P; Pasque, Vincent; Gurdon, J B

    2013-06-01

    There is currently particular interest in the field of nuclear reprogramming, a process by which the identity of specialised cells may be changed, typically to an embryonic-like state. Reprogramming procedures provide insight into many mechanisms of fundamental cell biology and have several promising applications, most notably in healthcare through the development of human disease models and patient-specific tissue-replacement therapies. Here, we introduce the field of nuclear reprogramming and briefly discuss six of the procedures by which reprogramming may be experimentally performed: nuclear transfer to eggs or oocytes, cell fusion, extract treatment, direct reprogramming to pluripotency and transdifferentiation.

  15. (Nuclear theory). [Research in nuclear physics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion. (LSP)

  16. Nuclear battlefields

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, W.M.; Fieldhouse, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides complete data on the nuclear operations and research facilities in the U.S.A., the U.S.S.R., France, China and the U.K. It describes detailed estimates on the U.S.S.R.'s nuclear stockpile for over 500 locations. It shows how non-nuclear countries cooperate with the world-wide war machine. And it maps the U.S. nuclear facilities from Little America, WY, and Charleston, SC, to the battleships patroling the world's oceans and subs stalking under the sea. The data were gathered from unclassified sources through the Freedom of Information Act, from data supplied to military installations, and from weapons source books. It provides guidance for policymakers, government and corporate officials.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  18. Nuclear Disarmament.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  19. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  20. Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Morgan C.

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  1. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  2. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  3. Development of a Novel Efficient Solid-Oxide Hybrid for Co-generation of Hydrogen and Electricity Using Nearby Resources for Local Application

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Greg, G.; Virkar, Anil, V.; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Thangamani, Nithyanantham; Anderson, Harlan, U.; Brow, Richard, K.

    2009-06-30

    Developing safe, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient hydrogen-electricity co-generation systems is an important step in the quest for national energy security and minimized reliance on foreign oil. This project aimed to, through materials research, develop a cost-effective advanced technology cogenerating hydrogen and electricity directly from distributed natural gas and/or coal-derived fuels. This advanced technology was built upon a novel hybrid module composed of solid-oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs) and solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), both of which were in planar, anode-supported designs. A SOFEC is an electrochemical device, in which an oxidizable fuel and steam are fed to the anode and cathode, respectively. Steam on the cathode is split into oxygen ions that are transported through an oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte (i.e. YSZ) to oxidize the anode fuel. The dissociated hydrogen and residual steam are exhausted from the SOFEC cathode and then separated by condensation of the steam to produce pure hydrogen. The rationale was that in such an approach fuel provides a chemical potential replacing the external power conventionally used to drive electrolysis cells (i.e. solid oxide electrolysis cells). A SOFC is similar to the SOFEC by replacing cathode steam with air for power generation. To fulfill the cogeneration objective, a hybrid module comprising reversible SOFEC stacks and SOFC stacks was designed that planar SOFECs and SOFCs were manifolded in such a way that the anodes of both the SOFCs and the SOFECs were fed the same fuel, (i.e. natural gas or coal-derived fuel). Hydrogen was produced by SOFECs and electricity was generated by SOFCs within the same hybrid system. A stand-alone 5 kW system comprising three SOFEC-SOFC hybrid modules and three dedicated SOFC stacks, balance-of-plant components (including a tailgas-fired steam generator and tailgas-fired process heaters), and electronic controls was designed, though an overall

  4. Nuclear telemedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, R. T.; Szasz, I. J.

    1990-06-01

    Diagnostic nuclear medicine patient images have been transniitted for 8 years from a regional conununity hospital to a university teaching hospital 700 kiloinetres away employing slow scan TV and telephone. Transruission and interpretation were done at the end of each working day or as circumstances required in cases of emergencies. Referring physicians received the nuclear medicine procedure report at the end of the completion day or within few minutes of completion in case of emergency procedures. To date more than 25 patient studies have been transmitted for interpretation. Blinded reinterpretation of the original hard copy data of 350 patient studies resulted in 100 agreement with the interpretation of transmitted data. This technique provides high quality diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine services in remote hospitals where the services of an on-site nuclear physician is not available. 2. HISTORY Eight years ago when the nuclear medicine physician at Trail Regional Hospital left the Trail area and an other could not be recruited we examined the feasibility of image transmission by phone for interpretation since closing the department would have imposed unacceptable physical and financial hardship and medical constraints on the patient population the nearest nuclear medicine facility was at some 8 hours drive away. In hospital patients would have to be treated either based purely on physical findings or flown to Vancouver at considerable cost to the health care system (estimated cost $1500.

  5. Nuclear risk

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, M.

    1989-01-01

    The title of our session, Nuclear Risk Versus Other Power Options, is provocative. It is also a title with different meanings to different people. To the utility chief executive officer, nuclear power is a high-risk financial undertaking because of political and economic barriers to cost recovery. To the utility dispatcher, it is a high-risk future power source since plant completion and start-up dates can be delayed for very long times due to uncertain legal and political issues. To the environmentalist, concerned about global effects such as greenhouse and acid rain, nuclear power is a relatively low risk energy source. To the financial people, nuclear power is a cash cow turned sour because of uncertainties as to what new plants will cost and whether they will even be allowed to operate. The statistics on risk are known and the results of probability risk assessment calculations of risks are known. The challenge is not to make nuclear power safer, it is already one of the safest, if not the safest, source of power currently available. The challenge is to find a way to communicate this to the public.

  6. Nuclear scales

    SciTech Connect

    Friar, J.L.

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

  7. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2010-08-15

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) was declared by the 62nd General Assembly of the United Nations and was also endorsed by UNESCO. Investigations in the realms of particle and nuclear physicsmake a large contribution in the development of our ideas of the properties of the Universe. The present article discusses some problems of the evolution of the Universe, nucleosyntheses, and cosmochronology from the point of view of nuclear and particle physics. Processes occurring in the Universe are compared with the mechanisms of the production and decay of nuclei, as well as with the mechanisms of their interaction at high energies. Examples that demonstrate the potential of nuclearphysics methods for studying cosmic objects and the properties of the Universe are given. The results that come from investigations into nuclear reactions induced by beams of radioactive nuclei and which make it possible to take a fresh look at the nucleosynthesis scenario in the range at light nuclei are presented.

  8. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses how, as part of the Department of Energy's implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE's failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million for the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  9. Analysis of operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Cogeneration Facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.A.; Carroll, D.M.; McMordie, K.L.; Brown, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Shankle, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwestern Division commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to determine the most cost-effective approach to the operation of the cogeneration facility in the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI). Nineteen alternative scenarios were analyzed by PNL on a life-cycle cost basis to determine whether to continue operating the cogeneration facility or convert the plant to emergency-generator status. This report provides the results of the analysis performed by PNL for the 19 alternative scenarios. A narrative description of each scenario is provided, including information on the prime mover, electrical generating efficiency, thermal recovery efficiency, operational labor, and backup energy strategy. Descriptions of the energy and energy cost analysis, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, emissions and related costs, and implementation costs are also provided for each alternative. A summary table presents the operational cost of each scenario and presents the result of the life-cycle cost analysis.

  10. Nuclear Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossión, Rubén

    2010-09-01

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction). Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  11. Nuclear Models

    SciTech Connect

    Fossion, Ruben

    2010-09-10

    The atomic nucleus is a typical example of a many-body problem. On the one hand, the number of nucleons (protons and neutrons) that constitute the nucleus is too large to allow for exact calculations. On the other hand, the number of constituent particles is too small for the individual nuclear excitation states to be explained by statistical methods. Another problem, particular for the atomic nucleus, is that the nucleon-nucleon (n-n) interaction is not one of the fundamental forces of Nature, and is hard to put in a single closed equation. The nucleon-nucleon interaction also behaves differently between two free nucleons (bare interaction) and between two nucleons in the nuclear medium (dressed interaction).Because of the above reasons, specific nuclear many-body models have been devised of which each one sheds light on some selected aspects of nuclear structure. Only combining the viewpoints of different models, a global insight of the atomic nucleus can be gained. In this chapter, we revise the the Nuclear Shell Model as an example of the microscopic approach, and the Collective Model as an example of the geometric approach. Finally, we study the statistical properties of nuclear spectra, basing on symmetry principles, to find out whether there is quantum chaos in the atomic nucleus. All three major approaches have been rewarded with the Nobel Prize of Physics. In the text, we will stress how each approach introduces its own series of approximations to reduce the prohibitingly large number of degrees of freedom of the full many-body problem to a smaller manageable number of effective degrees of freedom.

  12. Nuclear pursuits

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This table lists quantities of warheads (in stockpile, peak number per year, total number built, number of known test explosions), weapon development milestones (developers of the atomic bomb and hydrogen bomb, date of first operational ICBM, first nuclear-powered naval SSN in service, first MIRVed missile deployed), and testing milestones (first fission test, type of boosted fission weapon, multistage thermonuclear test, number of months from fission bomb to multistage thermonuclear bomb, etc.), and nuclear infrastructure (assembly plants, plutonium production reactors, uranium enrichment plants, etc.). Countries included in the tally are the United States, Soviet Union, Britain, France, and China.

  13. The calibration of a model for simulating the thermal and electrical performance of a 2.8 kW AC solid-oxide fuel cell micro-cogeneration device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beausoleil-Morrison, Ian; Lombardi, Kathleen

    The concurrent production of heat and electricity within residential buildings using solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) micro-cogeneration devices has the potential to reduce primary energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and air pollutants. A realistic assessment of this emerging technology requires the accurate simulation of the thermal and electrical production of SOFC micro-cogeneration devices concurrent with the simulation of the building, its occupants, and coupled plant components. The calibration of such a model using empirical data gathered from experiments conducted with a 2.8 kW AC SOFC micro-cogeneration device is demonstrated. The experimental configuration, types of instrumentation employed, and the operating scenarios examined are treated. The propagation of measurement uncertainty into the derived quantities that are necessary for model calibration are demonstrated by focusing upon the SOFC micro-cogeneration system's gas-to-water heat exchanger. The calibration coefficients necessary to accurately simulate the thermal and electrical performance of this prototype device are presented and the types of analyses enabled to study the potential of the technology are demonstrated.

  14. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  15. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  16. Nuclear Terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2001-01-01

    As pointed out by several speakers, the level of violence and destruction in terrorist attacks has increased significantly during the past decade. Fortunately, few have involved weapons of mass destruction, and none have achieved mass casualties. The Aum Shinrikyo release of lethal nerve agent, sarin, in the Tokyo subway on March 20, 1995 clearly broke new ground by crossing the threshold in attempting mass casualties with chemical weapons. However, of all weapons of mass destruction, nuclear weapons still represent the most frightening threat to humankind. Nuclear weapons possess an enormous destructive force. The immediacy and scale of destruction are unmatched. In addition to destruction, terrorism also aims to create fear among the public and governments. Here also, nuclear weapons are unmatched. The public's fear of nuclear weapons or, for that matter, of all radioactivity is intense. To some extent, this fear arises from a sense of unlimited vulnerability. That is, radioactivity is seen as unbounded in three dimensions - distance, it is viewed as having unlimited reach; quantity, it is viewed as having deadly consequences in the smallest doses (the public is often told - incorrectly, of course - that one atom of plutonium will kill); and time, if it does not kill you immediately, then it will cause cancer decades hence.

  17. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  18. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  19. Nuclear Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, Harrisburg. Bureau of Curriculum Services.

    This document is a report on a course in nuclear science for the high school curriculum. The course is designed to provide a basic but comprehensive understanding of the atom in the light of modern knowledge, and to show how people attempt to harness the tremendous energy liberated through fission and fusion reactions. The course crosses what are…

  20. Nuclear orbiting

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, D.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear orbiting following collisions between sd and p shell nuclei is discussed. The dependence of this process on the real and imaginary parts of the nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed, as well as the evolution of the dinucleus toward a fully equilibrated fused system. 26 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  2. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    The technical principles and practices of the civil nuclear industry are described with particular reference to fission and its products, natural and artificial radioactivity elements principally concerned and their relationships, main types of reactor, safety issues, the fuel cycle, waste management, issues related to weapon proliferation, environmental considerations and possible future developments.

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-09-01

    A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

  4. EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Rich

    2003-06-01

    Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. Phase I Task 6 activities of Preliminary Site Analysis were documented and reported as a separate Topical Report on February 2003. Most of the other technical activities were on hold pending on DOE's announcement of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) awards. WMPI was awarded one of the CCPI projects in late January 2003 to engineer, construct and operate a first-of-kind gasification/liquefaction facility in the U.S. as a continued effort for the current WMPI EECP engineering feasibility study. Since then, project technical activities were focused on: (1

  5. 400-MWe consolidated nuclear steam system (CNSS). 1255 MWt CNSS design/cost update

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-07-01

    Since 1976 Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) has been extensively involved in the development of a medium-sized (1255 MWt/400 MWe) reactor. Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and through a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL), B and W investigated the feasibility of the concept for utility power generation and cogenerated process heat. The potential benefits of the design, called the Consolidated Nuclear Steam System (CNSS), were also identified. This study provides an update of the CNSS design and cost reflecting current regulatory requirements and operating reactor experience. The study was funded by DOE through ORNL and was performed by B and W and UE and C.

  6. Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Streek, Penny Vande; Carretta, Robert; Weiland, Frederick L.

    1994-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following epitomes of progress in nuclear medicine. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and clinical importance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, and scholars to stay abreast of progress in medicine, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The epitomes included here were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Nuclear Medicine of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under the direction of Dr Lyons and the panel. PMID:7529452

  7. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  8. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  9. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  10. Nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives.

  11. Nuclear photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-01

    With the planned new γ-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 1013 γ/s and a band width of ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-3, a new era of γ beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HIγS facility at Duke University (USA) with 108 γ/s and ΔEγ/Eγ≈3ṡ10-2. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for γ beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused γ beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the γ beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for γ beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for γ beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the γ-beam facility, the γ-beam optics and γ detectors. We can trade γ intensity for band width, going down to ΔEγ/Eγ≈10-6 and address individual nuclear levels. The term "nuclear photonics" stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with γ-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, γ beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to μm resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of applications. We find many new applications in biomedicine, green energy, radioactive waste management or homeland security. Also more brilliant secondary beams of neutrons and positrons can be produced.

  12. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  13. Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market

    SciTech Connect

    Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel; Carre, Franck

    2007-07-01

    Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated

  14. Use of biogas for cogeneration of heat and electricity for local application: performance evaluation of an engine power generator and a sludge thermal dryer.

    PubMed

    Lobato, L C S; Chernicharo, C A L; Pujatti, F J P; Martins, O M; Melo, G C B; Recio, A A R

    2013-01-01

    A small unit of cogeneration of energy and heat was tested at the Centre for Research and Training on Sanitation UFMG/COPASA - CePTS, located at the Arrudas Sewage Treatment Plant, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The unit consisted of an engine power generator adapted to run on biogas, a thermal dryer prototype and other peripherals (compressor, biogas storage tank, air blower, etc.). The heat from engine power generator exhaust gases was directed towards the thermal dryer prototype to dry the sludge and disinfect it. The results showed that the experimental apparatus is self-sufficient in electricity, even producing a surplus, available for other uses. The tests of drying and disinfection of sludge lasted 7 h, leading to an increase in solids content from 4 to 8% (50% reduction in sludge volume). Although the drying of sludge was not possible (only thickening was achieved), the disinfection process proved very effective, enabling the complete inactivation of helminth eggs.

  15. Energy integrated dairy farm system in Georgia: Technical manual, Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm, Social Circle, Georgia. [Cogeneration using biogas; heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.L. Jr.; Ross, C.C.; Lamade, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    This manual describes a project sponsored to optimize energy generation and utilization in the agricultural or food processing industry. The particular project involves the Mathis/P and M Dairy Farm located in Social Circle, Georgia (about 60 miles east of Atlanta). The farm is designed for a 550 milking cow herd and produces certified raw milk for sale to a processing plant located in Atlanta. The project converted the Mathis/P and and M Dairy into an energy integrated dairy farm system (EIDFS) in which the interaction of the subsystems and components are modified such that the energy resources of the farm are optimized. This manual is a description of the system, subsystems and components composing the Mathis EIDFS and is primarily intended for farmers, extension agents, and equipment manufacturers who might be involved in future EIDFS projects. Cogeneration using biogas from manures and heat recovery from the refrigeration machinery were among the options chosen.

  16. Feasibility Study on the Use of a Solar Thermoelectric Cogenerator Comprising a Thermoelectric Module and Evacuated Tubular Collector with Parabolic Trough Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, L.; Zhang, M.; Tanemura, S.; Tanaka, T.; Kang, Y. P.; Xu, G.

    2012-06-01

    We have designed a new solar thermoelectric cogeneration system consisting of an evacuated tubular solar collector (ETSC) with a parabolic trough concentrator (PTC) and thermoelectric modules (TEMs) to supply both thermal energy and electricity. The main design concepts are (1) the hot side of the TEM is bonded to the solar selective absorber installed in an evacuated glass tube, (2) the cold side of the TEM is also bonded to the heat sink, and (3) the outer circulated water is heated by residual solar energy after TEM generation. We present an example solar thermal simulation based on energy balance and heat transfer as used in solar engineering to predict the electrical conversion efficiency and solar thermal conversion efficiency for different values of parameters such as the solar insolation, concentration ratio, and TEM ZT values.

  17. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  18. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  19. The Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Explains problems enforcing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) of 1968. Provides factual charts and details concerning the production of nuclear energy and arms, the processing and disposal of waste products, and outlines the nuclear fuel cycle. Discusses safeguards, the risk of nuclear terrorism, and ways to deal with these problems. (NL)

  20. The Nuclear Power/Nuclear Weapons Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Sam; Totten, Martha Wescoat

    1985-01-01

    Once they have nuclear power, most countries will divert nuclear materials from commercial to military programs. In excerpts from the book "Facing the Danger" (by Totten, S. and M. W., Crossing Press, 1984), five anti-nuclear activists explain how and why they have been addressing the nuclear connection. (RM)

  1. High-efficiency cogeneration boiler bagasse-ash geochemistry and mineralogical change effects on the potential reuse in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, cements, mortars, and concretes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm W; Despland, Laure M; Lake, Neal J; Yee, Lachlan H; Anstoetz, Manuela; Arif, Elisabeth; Parr, Jeffery F; Doumit, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse ash re-utilisation has been advocated as a silica-rich feed for zeolites, pozzolans in cements and concretes, and geopolymers. However, many papers report variable success with the incorporation of such materials in these products as the ash can be inconsistent in nature. Therefore, understanding what variables affect the ash quality in real mills and understanding the processes to characterise ashes is critical in predicting successful ash waste utilisation. This paper investigated sugarcane bagasse ash from three sugar mills (Northern NSW, Australia) where two are used for the co-generation of electricity. Data shows that the burn temperatures of the bagasse in the high-efficiency co-generation boilers are much higher than those reported at the temperature measuring points. Silica polymorph transitions indicate the high burn temperatures of ≈1550 °C, produces ash dominated α -quartz rather than expected α-cristobilite and amorphous silica; although α-cristobilite, and amorphous silica are present. Furthermore, burn temperatures must be ≤1700 °C, because of the absence of lechatelierite where silica fusing and globulisation dominates. Consequently, silica-mineralogy changes deactivate the bagasse ash by reducing silica solubility, thus making bagasse ash utilisation in synthetic zeolites, geopolymers, or a pozzolanic material in mortars and concretes more difficult. For the ashes investigated, use as a filler material in cements and concrete has the greatest potential. Reported mill boiler temperatures discrepancies and the physical characteristics of the ash, highlight the importance of accurate temperature monitoring at the combustion seat if bagasse ash quality is to be prioritised to ensure a usable final ash product.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  3. Nuclear energy.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Karl; Jagers, Peter; Kullander, Sven

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow's energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more materials efficient and environmental friendly, but also need more development and research. The roadmap for development of fourth generation fission and fusion reactors, therefore, asks for attention and research in these fields must be strengthened.

  4. Nuclear security

    SciTech Connect

    Dingell, J.D.

    1991-02-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, located in Livermore, California, generates and controls large numbers of classified documents associated with the research and testing of nuclear weapons. Concern has been raised about the potential for espionage at the laboratory and the national security implications of classified documents being stolen. This paper determines the extent of missing classified documents at the laboratory and assesses the adequacy of accountability over classified documents in the laboratory's custody. Audit coverage was limited to the approximately 600,000 secret documents in the laboratory's custody. The adequacy of DOE's oversight of the laboratory's secret document control program was also assessed.

  5. Nuclear dualism.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Kathleen M

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear dualism is a characteristic feature of the ciliated protozoa. Tetrahymena have two different nuclei in each cell. The larger, polyploid, somatic macronucleus (MAC) is the site of transcriptional activity in the vegetatively growing cell. The smaller, diploid micronucleus (MIC) is transcriptionally inactive in vegetative cells, but is transcriptionally active in mating cells and responsible for the genetic continuity during sexual reproduction. Although the MICs and MACs develop from mitotic products of a common progenitor and reside in a common cytoplasm, they are different from one another in almost every respect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy cogeneration handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Polimeros, G.

    1981-01-01

    Design criteria for central plants that facilitate energy conversion, utilization, and conservation, an evaluation of project alternatives and an examination of systems and their functions to achieve optimum overall design in the generation of heating, cooling, and electricity are presented.

  7. Coal gasification cogeneration process

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, J.H.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a process for the coproduction of a combustible first gas stream usable as an energy source, a sulfur-dioxide-containing second gas stream usable as a source for oxidant in the gasification of coal and a sulfur-dioxide-containing third gas stream usable as a feedstock for the production of sulfuric acid. It comprises: reacting coal in a coal gasification zone in the presence of an oxidant under partial coal-gasifying conditions to produce carbonaceous char and a crude gas stream; separating sulfur-containing compounds from the crude gas stream in a sulfur recovery zone to produce a combustible first gas stream and elemental sulfur; reacting the carbonaceous char and gypsum in a reaction zone in proportions such that the non-gypsum portion of the carbonaceous char and gypsum mixture contains sufficient reducing potential to reduce sulfur in the gypsum to gaseous compounds of sulfur in a +4 or lower oxidation state under reducing conditions to produce first a sulfur-dioxide-containing second gas stream which contains weaker SO{sub 2} produced in an early stage of the reaction zone and removed from the reaction zone, and then a sulfur-dioxide-containing third gas stream which contains concentrated SO{sub 2} recovered from a later stage of the reaction zone.

  8. Applications of nuclear physics

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2017-01-10

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applicationsmore » of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Lastly, each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.« less

  9. Applications of nuclear physics.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A C

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  10. Applications of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.

    2017-02-01

    Today the applications of nuclear physics span a very broad range of topics and fields. This review discusses a number of aspects of these applications, including selected topics and concepts in nuclear reactor physics, nuclear fusion, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear-geophysics, and nuclear medicine. The review begins with a historic summary of the early years in applied nuclear physics, with an emphasis on the huge developments that took place around the time of World War II, and that underlie the physics involved in designs of nuclear explosions, controlled nuclear energy, and nuclear fusion. The review then moves to focus on modern applications of these concepts, including the basic concepts and diagnostics developed for the forensics of nuclear explosions, the nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility, nuclear reactor safeguards, and the detection of nuclear material production and trafficking. The review also summarizes recent developments in nuclear geophysics and nuclear medicine. The nuclear geophysics areas discussed include geo-chronology, nuclear logging for industry, the Oklo reactor, and geo-neutrinos. The section on nuclear medicine summarizes the critical advances in nuclear imaging, including PET and SPECT imaging, targeted radionuclide therapy, and the nuclear physics of medical isotope production. Each subfield discussed requires a review article unto itself, which is not the intention of the current review; rather, the current review is intended for readers who wish to get a broad understanding of applied nuclear physics.

  11. Nuclear "waffles"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.

    2014-11-01

    Background: The dense neutron-rich matter found in supernovae and inside neutron stars is expected to form complex nonuniform phases, often referred to as nuclear pasta. The pasta shapes depend on density, temperature and proton fraction and determine many transport properties in supernovae and neutron star crusts. Purpose: To characterize the topology and compute two observables, the radial distribution function (RDF) g (r ) and the structure factor S (q ) , for systems with proton fractions Yp=0.10 ,0.20 ,0.30 , and 0.40 at about one-third of nuclear saturation density, n =0.050 fm-3 , and temperatures near k T =1 MeV . Methods: We use two recently developed hybrid CPU/GPU codes to perform large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with 51 200 and 409 600 nucleons. From the output of the MD simulations we obtain the two desired observables. Results: We compute and discuss the differences in topology and observables for each simulation. We observe that the two lowest proton fraction systems simulated, Yp=0.10 and 0.20 , equilibrate quickly and form liquidlike structures. Meanwhile, the two higher proton fraction systems, Yp=0.30 and 0.40 , take a longer time to equilibrate and organize themselves in solidlike periodic structures. Furthermore, the Yp=0.40 system is made up of slabs, lasagna phase, interconnected by defects while the Yp=0.30 systems consist of a stack of perforated plates, the nuclear waffle phase. Conclusions: The periodic configurations observed in our MD simulations for proton fractions Yp≥0.30 have important consequences for the structure factors S (q ) of protons and neutrons, which relate to many transport properties of supernovae and neutron star crust. A detailed study of the waffle phase and how its structure depends on temperature, size of the simulation, and the screening length showed that finite-size effects appear to be under control and, also, that the plates in the waffle phase merge at temperatures slightly above 1.0 MeV and

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  13. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  14. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  16. Nuclear exoticism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  17. Nuclear exoticism

    SciTech Connect

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-15

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  18. Thin film battery/fuel cell power generation system. Topical report covering Task 5: the design, cost and benefit of an industrial cogeneration system, using a high-temperature solid-oxide-electrolyte (HTSOE) fuel-cell generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-25

    A literature search and review of the studies analyzing the relationship between thermal and electrical energy demand for various industries and applications resulted in several applications affording reasonable correlation to the thermal and electrical output of the HTSOE fuel cell. One of the best matches was in the aluminum industry, specifically, the Reynolds Aluminum Production Complex near Corpus Christi, Texas. Therefore, a preliminary design of three variations of a cogeneration system for this plant was effected. The designs were not optimized, nor were alternate methods of providing energy compared with the HTSOE cogeneration systems. The designs were developed to the extent necessary to determine technical practicality and economic viability, when compared with alternate conventional fuel (gas and electric) prices in the year 1990.

  19. Nuclear Education Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Metta L.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the controversial issue of nuclear education in public schools. Highlights include resolutions passed by the National Congress of Parent Teacher Associations, what nuclear education is, distinction between nuclear education and education in the nuclear age, educational materials, a review of teaching materials, nuclear literacy, and…

  20. Nuclear Education Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Metta L.

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the controversial issue of nuclear education in public schools. Highlights include resolutions passed by the National Congress of Parent Teacher Associations, what nuclear education is, distinction between nuclear education and education in the nuclear age, educational materials, a review of teaching materials, nuclear literacy, and…

  1. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  2. Nuclear war: Opposing viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Szumski, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents opposing viewpoints on nuclear war. Topics discussed include: how nuclear would begin; would humanity survive; would civil defense work; will an arms agreement work; and can space weapons reduce the risk of nuclear war.

  3. Nuclear Quadrupole Moments and Nuclear Shell Structure

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Townes, C. H.; Foley, H. M.; Low, W.

    1950-06-23

    Describes a simple model, based on nuclear shell considerations, which leads to the proper behavior of known nuclear quadrupole moments, although predictions of the magnitudes of some quadrupole moments are seriously in error.

  4. Nuclear thermal/nuclear electric hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, B. D.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of the nuclear thermal and nuclear electric hybrid. The specifications are described along with its mission performance. Next, the technical status, development requirements, and some cost estimates are provided.

  5. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, Brian D.

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  6. Nuclear South Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    inseparable from the history of nuclear developments in both India and Pakistan. The timing of India’s tests was determined by the pronuclear stance of the...Rawalpindi, 2001), 17-18. 53 3Robert Boardman, The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear Exports and World Politics (New...disasters of nuclear arms race. 61 BIBLIOGRAPHY Books Boardman, Robert. The Politics of Fading Dreams: Britain and the Nuclear Export Business, Nuclear

  7. Hollow nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Gao-Chan

    2016-01-01

    It is generally considered that an atomic nucleus is always compact. Based on the isospin-dependent Boltzmann nuclear transport model, here I show that large block nuclear matter or excited nuclear matter may both be hollow. The size of the inner bubble in these matter is affected by the charge number of nuclear matter. The existence of hollow nuclear matter may have many implications in nuclear or atomic physics or astrophysics as well as some practical applications.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  9. Nuclear Proliferation: A Global Nuclear Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    thinking about nuclear weapons as a “ Wild Card ” in this case. Finally, just as North Korea is using nuclear weapons as a “bargaining chip,” we...definite disadvantage for non-nuclear nations not to have a nuclear” Wild Card ”. So some misguided Japanese politicians are attracted to the “ Wild Card ” advantage

  10. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  11. General Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Biopsies - Overview Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) Alzheimer's Disease X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  12. Focused technology: Nuclear propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    Five viewgraphs are presented that outline the objectives and elements of the Nuclear Propulsion Program, mission considerations, propulsion technologies, and the logic flow path for nuclear propulsion development.

  13. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kristensen, Hans M.

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  14. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  15. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  16. Nuclear Power in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun

    2012-02-01

    In response to the Fukushima accident, China is strengthening its nuclear safety at reactors in operation, under construction and in preparation, including efforts to improve nuclear safety regulations and guidelines based on lessons learned from the accident. Although China is one of the major contributors in the global nuclear expansion, China's nuclear power industry is relatively young. Its nuclear safety regulators are less experienced compared to those in other major nuclear power countries. To realize China's resolute commitment to rapid growth of safe nuclear energy, detailed analyses of its nuclear safety regulatory system are required. This talk explains China's nuclear energy program and policy at first. It also explores China's governmental activities and future nuclear development after Fukushima accidents. At last, an overview of China's nuclear safety regulations and practices are provided. Issues and challenges are also identified for police makers, regulators, and industry professionals.

  17. Substantiation of the cogeneration turbine unit selection for reconstruction of power units with a T-250/300-23.5 turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valamin, A. E.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Shibaev, T. L.; Gol'dberg, A. A.; Sakhnin, Yu. A.; Stepanov, M. Yu.; Bilan, V. N.; Kadkina, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    The selection of a cogeneration steam turbine unit (STU) for the reconstruction of power units with a T-250/300-23.5 turbine is substantiated by the example of power unit no. 9 at the cogeneration power station no. 22 (TETs-22) of Mosenergo Company. Series T-250 steam turbines have been developed for combined heat and power generation. A total of 31 turbines were manufactured. By the end of 2015, the total operation time of prototype power units with the T-250/300-23.5 turbine exceeded 290000 hours. Considering the expiry of the service life, the decision was made that the reconstruction of the power unit at st. no. 9 of TETs-22 should be the first priority. The main issues that arose in developing this project—the customer's requirements and the request for the reconstruction, the view on certain problems of Ural Turbine Works (UTZ) as the manufacturer of the main power unit equipment, and the opinions of other project parties—are examined. The decisions were made with account taken of the experience in operation of all Series T-250 turbines and the results of long-term discussions of pressing problems at scientific and technical councils, meetings, and negotiations. For the new power unit, the following parameters have been set: a live steam pressure of 23.5 MPa and live steam/reheat temperature of 565/565°C. Considering that the boiler equipment will be upgraded, the live steam flow is increased up to 1030 t/h. The reconstruction activities involving the replacement of the existing turbine with a new one will yield a service life of 250000 hours for turbine parts exposed to a temperature of 450°C or higher and 200000 hours for pipeline components. Hence, the decision has been made to reuse the arrangement of the existing turbine: a four-cylinder turbine unit comprising a high-pressure cylinder (HPC), two intermediate pressure cylinders (IPC-1 & 2), and a low-pressure cylinder (LPC). The flow path in the new turbine will have active blading in LPC and IPC-1

  18. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  19. Terrorists and Nuclear Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, David

    1975-01-01

    This essay explores the ways terrorist groups may gain possession of nuclear materials; the way in which they may use nuclear weapons and other nuclear technologies to their benefit; and various courses of action designed to minimize the possibilities of terrorists utilizing nuclear technology to their benefit and society's detriment. (BT)

  20. Nuclear medicine annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1984-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed in this work: nuclear physicians role in planning for and handling radiation accidents; the role of nuclear medicine in evaluating the hypertensive patient; studies of the heart with radionuclides; role of radionuclide imaging in the patient undergoing chemotherapy; hematologic nuclear medicine; the role of nuclear medicine in sports related injuries; radionuclide evaluation of hepatic function with emphasis on cholestatis.

  1. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarewicz, Witold

    1997-12-31

    Current developments in nuclear structure at the `limits` are discussed. The studies of nuclear behavior at extreme conditions provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction and nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales. In this talk frontiers of nuclear structure are briefly reviewed from a theoretical perspective, mainly concentrating on medium-mass and heavy nuclei.

  2. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  3. Nuclear energy and security

    SciTech Connect

    BLEJWAS,THOMAS E.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; EAGAN,ROBERT J.; BAKER,ARNOLD B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity.

  4. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  5. Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation

    DOE PAGES

    Pozzi, Sara A.; Hamel, Michael C.; Polack, J. Kyle; ...

    2016-11-13

    The detection and characterization of special nuclear materials is a high priority area for applications in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation. We are developing new instruments based on organic scintillators to detect and characterize the emissions from special nuclear materials. This paper describes some of the gaps and challenges in nuclear safeguards and proposed approaches.

  6. The New Nuclear Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Leonard S.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the issue of nuclear proliferation, noting that the countries with nuclear capability now include Israel, South Africa, India, and Pakistan. Describes the role and problems of the United States in halting nuclearization. Supplies charts, maps, and information concerning the state of nuclear capability in each country. (NL)

  7. [Chilean nuclear policy].

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, E

    1996-06-01

    This official document is statement of the President of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Dr. Eduardo Bobadilla, about the nuclear policy of the Chilean State, Thanks to the international policy adopted by presidents Aylwin (1990-1994) and his successor Frei Ruiz Tagle (1994-), a nuclear development plan, protected by the Chilean entrance to the nuclear weapons non proliferation treaty and Tlatelolco Denuclearization treaty, has started. Chile will be able to develop without interference, an autonomous nuclear electrical system and other pacific uses of nuclear energy. Chile also supports a new international treaty to ban nuclear weapon tests.

  8. The nuclear freeze controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, K.B.; Gray, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear arms control. Topics considered include the background and rationale behind the nuclear freeze proposal, nuclear deterrence, national defense, arms races, arms buildup, warfare, the moral aspects of nuclear deterrence, treaty verification, the federal budget, the economy, a historical perspective on Soviet policy toward the freeze, the other side of the Soviet peace offensive, and making sense of the nuclear freeze debate.

  9. Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

  10. Novel-structured electrospun TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers for high efficient photocatalytic cogeneration of clean water and energy from dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siew Siang; Bai, Hongwei; Liu, Zhaoyang; Sun, Darren Delai

    2013-08-01

    It is still a challenge to photocatalytically cogenerate clean water and energy from dye wastewater owing to the relatively low photocatalytic efficiency of photocatalysts. In this study, novel-structured TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers were successfully fabricated via facile electrospinning. For the first time, the TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers demonstrated multifunctional ability for concurrent photocatalytic organic degradation and H2 generation from dye wastewater. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers was ascribed to its excellent synergy of physicochemical properties: 1) mesoporosity and large specific surface area for efficient substrate adsorption, mass transfer and light harvesting; 2) red-shift of the absorbance spectra for enhanced light utilization; 3) long nanofibrous structure for efficient charge transfer and ease of recovery, 4) TiO2/CuO heterojunctions which enhance the separation of electrons and holes and 5) presence of CuO which serve as co-catalyst for the H2 production. The TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers also exhibited rapid settleability by gravity and uncompromised reusability. Thus, the as-synthesized TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers represent a promising candidate for highly efficient concurrent photocatalytic organic degradation and clean energy production from dye wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Co-generation of electricity and syngas on proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cell with a perovskite layer as a precursor of a highly efficient reforming catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tingting; Zhu, Ankang; Guo, Youmin; Wang, Chunchang; Huang, Shouguo; Chen, Huili; Yang, Guangming; Wang, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell (layered H+-SOFC) is prepared by introducing a La2NiO4perovskite oxide with a Ruddlesden-Popper structure as a catalyst layer onto a conventional NiO + BaZr0.4Ce0.4Y0.2O3-δ (NiO + BZCY4) anode for in situ CO2 dry reforming of methane. The roles of the La2NiO4 catalyst layer on the reforming activity, coking tolerance, electrocatalytic activity and operational stability of the anodes are systematically studied. The La2NiO4 catalyst layer exhibits greater catalytic performance than the NiO + BZCY4 anode during the CO2 dry reforming of methane. An outstanding coking resistance capability is also demonstrated. The layered H+-SOFC consumes H2 produced in situ at the anode and delivers a much higher power output than the conventional cell with the NiO + BZCY4 anode. The improved coking resistance of the layered H+-SOFC results in a steady output voltage of ∼0.6 V under a constant current density of 200 mA cm-2. In summary, the H+-SOFC with La2NiO4 perovskite oxide is a potential energy conversion device for CO2 conversion and utilization with co-generation of electricity and syngas.

  12. 75 FR 3497 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ..., ``Hybrid Hearing Procedures for Expansion of Spent Fuel Storage Capacity at Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Entergy Nuclear Indian Point 2, LLC, Entergy Nuclear...

  13. Quantum nuclear pasta and nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, F. J.; Horowitz, C. J.; Schuetrumpf, B.

    2017-05-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries, collectively referred to as "nuclear pasta," are expected to appear naturally in dense nuclear matter found in the crusts of neutron stars and supernovae environments. The pasta geometries depend on the average baryon density, proton fraction, and temperature and are critically important in the determination of many transport properties of matter in supernovae and the crusts of neutron stars. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals, we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0.03 ≤ρ ≤0.10 fm-3 , proton fractions 0.05 ≤Yp≤0.40 , and zero temperature. The full quantum simulations, in particular, allow us to thoroughly investigate the role and impact of the nuclear symmetry energy on pasta configurations. We use the Sky3D code that solves the Skyrme Hartree-Fock equations on a three-dimensional Cartesian grid. For the nuclear interaction we use the state-of-the-art UNEDF1 parametrization, which was introduced to study largely deformed nuclei, hence is suitable for studies of the nuclear pasta. Density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy is simulated by tuning two purely isovector observables that are insensitive to the current available experimental data. We find that a minimum total number of nucleons A =2000 is necessary to prevent the results from containing spurious shell effects and to minimize finite size effects. We find that a variety of nuclear pasta geometries are present in the neutron star crust, and the result strongly depends on the nuclear symmetry energy. The impact of the nuclear symmetry energy is less pronounced as the proton fractions increase. Quantum nuclear pasta calculations at T =0 MeV are shown to get easily trapped in metastable states, and possible remedies to avoid metastable solutions are discussed.

  14. Impacts of Large-scale Penetration of Non-industrial Cogeneration Systems on CO2 Emission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahito; Nishio, Ken-Ichiro

    This paper presents a quantitative evaluation of CO2 emission from grid power systems and heat source systems including CHP (combined heat and power) in residential and commercial buildings in Japan. We estimated changes in CO2 emission from the utility grid and from CHP using an optimal generation planning model. Through quantitative simulation runs, the authors obtained the following results. First, introduction of CHP at a certain degree brings an increase of CO2 emission until 2020 regardless of the pace of nuclear power development. Second, because CHP will defer highly-efficient AGCC (advanced gas combined cycle generation) due to suppressed demand growth of utilities in the daytime when most of commercial CHP systems operate. CHP can reduce CO2 emission only if generating efficiency of CHP will be improved up to 50% or higher.

  15. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, John C.

    2016-05-22

    One interdisciplinary field devoted to achieving the end-state of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through reuse and/or permanent disposal. The reuse option aims to make use of the remaining energy content in UNF and reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive materials that require permanent disposal. The planned approach in the U.S., as well as in many other countries worldwide, is direct permanent disposal in a deep geologic repository. Used nuclear fuel is fuel that has been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to the point where it is no longer capable of sustaining operational objectives. The vast majority (by mass) of UNF is from electricity generation in commercial nuclear power reactors. Furthermore, the other main source of UNF in the U.S. is the Department of Energy’s (DOE) and other federal agencies’ operation of reactors in support of federal government missions, such as materials production, nuclear propulsion, research, testing, and training. Upon discharge from a reactor, UNF emits considerable heat from radioactive decay. Some period of active on-site cooling (e.g., 2 or more years) is typically required to facilitate efficient packaging and transportation to a disposition facility. Hence, the field of UNF disposition broadly includes storage, transportation and ultimate disposition. See also: Nuclear Fission (content/nuclear-fission/458400), Nuclear Fuels (/content/nuclear-fuels/458600), Nuclear Fuel Cycle (/content/nuclear-fuel-cycle/458500), Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing (/content/nuclear-fuels-reprocessing/458700), Nuclear Power (/content/nuclear-power/459600), Nuclear Reactor (/content/nuclear-reactor/460100), Radiation (/content/radiation/566300), and Radioactive Waste Management (/content/radioactive-waste-management/568900).

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, John C.

    2016-05-22

    One interdisciplinary field devoted to achieving the end-state of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through reuse and/or permanent disposal. The reuse option aims to make use of the remaining energy content in UNF and reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive materials that require permanent disposal. The planned approach in the U.S., as well as in many other countries worldwide, is direct permanent disposal in a deep geologic repository. Used nuclear fuel is fuel that has been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to the point where it is no longer capable of sustaining operational objectives. The vast majority (by mass) of UNFmore » is from electricity generation in commercial nuclear power reactors. Furthermore, the other main source of UNF in the U.S. is the Department of Energy’s (DOE) and other federal agencies’ operation of reactors in support of federal government missions, such as materials production, nuclear propulsion, research, testing, and training. Upon discharge from a reactor, UNF emits considerable heat from radioactive decay. Some period of active on-site cooling (e.g., 2 or more years) is typically required to facilitate efficient packaging and transportation to a disposition facility. Hence, the field of UNF disposition broadly includes storage, transportation and ultimate disposition. See also: Nuclear Fission (content/nuclear-fission/458400), Nuclear Fuels (/content/nuclear-fuels/458600), Nuclear Fuel Cycle (/content/nuclear-fuel-cycle/458500), Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing (/content/nuclear-fuels-reprocessing/458700), Nuclear Power (/content/nuclear-power/459600), Nuclear Reactor (/content/nuclear-reactor/460100), Radiation (/content/radiation/566300), and Radioactive Waste Management (/content/radioactive-waste-management/568900).« less

  18. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, James M.; Scherer, Carolynn P.

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  19. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  20. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's history with nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) technology goes back to the earliest days of the Agency. The Manned Lunar Rover Vehicle and the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications p...